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Sample records for lung clearance models

  1. Comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, K.C.

    1984-10-01

    An in-vitro dissolution study was conducted on two respirable oxidized depleted uranium samples. The dissolution rates generated from this study were then utilized in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group lung clearance model and a lung clearance model proposed by Cuddihy. Predictions from both models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that would be cleared to blood from the pulmonary region following an inhalation exposure were compared. It was found that the predictions made by both models differed considerably. The difference between the predictions was attributed to the differences in the way each model perceives the clearance from the pulmonary region. 33 references, 11 figures, 9 tables.

  2. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R; Avram, Michael J; Coppeta, Jonathan R; Wishnok, John S; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior.

  3. An advanced stochastic model for mucociliary particle clearance in cystic fibrosis lungs

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background A mathematical model describing mucociliary clearance in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and its development with progressing course of the disease was developed. The approach should support the prediction of the disease state on the basis of measured bronchial clearance efficiencies. Methods The approach is based on the assumption of a steady-state steady-flow mucus transport through the tracheobronchial tree which enables the determination of airway generation-specific mucus velocities by using a measured tracheal mucus velocity and a realistic morphometric dataset of the human lung. Architecture of the tracheobronchial tree was approximated by a stochastic model, reflecting the intra-subject variability of geometric parameters within a given lung generation. Results As predicted by the appropriately validated mathematical approach, mucociliary clearance efficiency in CF patients is partly significantly decreased with respect to healthy controls. 24-h retention of patients with mild CF (FEV1 >70% of predicted) is reduced by 10% compared to healthy subjects, whilst 24-h retention of patients with moderate to severe CF (FEV1 <70% of predicted) differs by 25% from that of the healthy controls. These discrepancies are further enhanced with continuation of the clearance process. Conclusions The theoretical results lead to the conclusion that CF patients have a higher risk of inhaled particle accumulation and related particle overload in specific lung compartments than healthy subjects. PMID:22295167

  4. A biomathematical model of particle clearance and retention in the lungs of coal miners. II. Evaluation of variability and uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Kuempel, E D; Tran, C L; Smith, R J; Bailer, A J

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the sources of variability and uncertainty in a previously developed human lung dosimetry model. That three-compartment model describes the retention and clearance kinetics of respirable particles in the gas-exchange region of the lungs. It was calibrated using exposure histories and lung dust burden data in U.S. coal miners. A multivariate parameter estimation and optimization method was developed for fitting the dosimetry model to these human data. Models with various assumptions about overloading of alveolar clearance and interstitialization (sequestration) of particles were evaluated. Variability in the estimated clearance rate coefficients was assessed empirically by fitting the model to groups' and to each miner's data. Distributions of lung and lymph node particle burdens were computed at working lifetime exposures, using the variability in the estimated individual clearance rate coefficients. These findings confirm those of the earlier analysis; i.e., the best-fitting exposure-dose model to these data has substantial interstitialization/sequestration of particles and no dose-dependent decline in alveolar clearance. Among miners with different characteristics for smoking, disease, and race, the group median estimated alveolar clearance rate coefficients varied by a factor of approximately 4. Adjustment for these group differences provided some improvement in the dosimetry model fit to all miners (up to 25% reduction in MSE), although unexplained interindividual differences made up the largest source of variability. The predicted mean lung and lymph node particle burdens at age 75 after exposure to respirable coal mine dust at 2 mg/m(2) for a 45-year working lifetime were 12 g (5th and 95th percentiles, 3.0-26 g) and 1.9 g (0.26-5.3), respectively. This study provides quantitative information on variability in particle retention and clearance kinetics in humans. It is useful for risk assessment by providing

  5. Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Mitran, Sorin

    2013-01-01

    The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale. PMID:23729842

  6. Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitran, Sorin

    2013-07-01

    The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale.

  7. Effects of lung volume on clearance of solutes from the air spaces of lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, B.T.; James, H.L.; McLarty, J.W.

    1988-03-01

    Several investigators have shown that the clearance rate of aerosolized 99mTc-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA, mol wt = 492, radius = 0.6 nm) from the air spaces of the lungs of humans and experimental animals increases with lung volume. To further investigate this phenomenon we performed a compartmental analysis of the 2-h clearance of DTPA from the lungs of anesthetized sheep using a new method to more accurately correct for the effects of DTPA recirculation. This analysis showed that the DTPA clearance in eight sheep ventilated with zero end-expired pressure was best described by a one-compartment model with a clearance rate of 0.42 +/- 0.15%/min. Ventilating eight sheep with an end-expired pressure of 10 cmH/sub 2/O throughout the study increased the end-expired volume 0.4 +/- 0.1 liter BTPS and created a clearance curve that was best described by a two-compartment model. In these sheep 56 +/- 16% of the DTPA cleared from the lungs at a rate of 7.9 +/- 2.9%/min. The remainder cleared at a rate similar to that measured in the sheep ventilated with zero end-expired pressure (0.35 +/- 0.18%/min). Additional control and lung inflation experiments were performed using /sup 99m/Tc-labeled human serum albumin (mol wt = 66,000, radius = 3.6 nm). In six control sheep ventilated with zero end-expired pressure the albumin clearance was best described by a one-compartment model with a clearance rate of 0.06 +/- 0.02%/min. The clearance rate in six sheep with increased lung volume was slightly larger (0.09 +/- 0.02, P less than 0.05) but was well described by a one-compartment model.

  8. ESR measurement of radical clearance in lung of whole mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, K.; Utsumi, H.; Hamada, A. )

    1991-06-14

    Clearance of the nitroxide radicals, hydroxy-TEMPO and carboxy-PROxYL, in whole-mouse lung was directly measured by in vivo ESR. After injecting a nitroxide radical, distribution of the nitroxide radical all over the lung was confirmed by ESR imaging. The ESR signal of hydroxy-TEMPO was reduced in the lung and the clearance obeyed first-order kinetics, whereas the signal of carboxy-PROxYL remained constant. Comparison of the clearance rates of live and dead mice indicated the presence of 2 different clearance systems in the lung: loss of its paramagnetism in the lung, and transfer from alveolar to the blood circulation system.

  9. Radioaerosol lung clearance in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, M.P.; Baughman, R.P.; Hughes, J.; Fernandez-Ulloa, M.

    1985-05-01

    Pulmonary radioaerosol clearance rate of /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriamine pentacetate (DTPA) in 14 patients with untreated sarcoidosis was compared with /sup 67/Ga lung scan and increased lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Nine healthy nonsmoking subjects had a mean DTPA clearance rate of 1.18%/min (range, 0.54 to 1.60%/min). Eight of 14 patients with sarcoidosis had clearance rates greater than 1.60%/min. Of those 8 patients with abnormal DTPA clearance, 4 had positive gallium scans, 4 had more than 17% lymphocytes in the BAL fluid, and 3 had both tests positive. To study the cause of abnormal DTPA clearance, 23 subjects (including 3 normal controls, all 14 patients with sarcoidosis, and 6 patients with localized disease on chest roentgenogram) underwent both DTPA clearance studies and BAL for quantitation of the amount of albumin in lung fluid. There was a positive correlation between the rate of DTPA clearance and the albumin concentration in lung fluid (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01).

  10. The effect of complement depletion on lung clearance of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gross, G N; Rehm, S R; Pierce, A K

    1978-08-01

    We have investigated the effect of hypocomplementemia on early pulmonary clearance of four species of bacteria. The experiments were performed in an inbred animal model to minimize immunologic variability. Complement was depleted by cobra venom factor, and activity in serum was monitored with a phagocytic assay. Bacterial specific antibodies were examined by an indirect radioimmunoassay, and animals with high levels of activity were excluded from anaysis. 4 h after aerosolization with Streptococcus pneumoniae, complement-depleted animals had cleared only 75% of the initial number of organisms, whereas saline-treated controls cleared 91% (P less than 0.01). Aerosolization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was followed at 4 h by a twofold greater growth of organisms in the complement-depleted animals (446% of original deposition) as compared to the saline-treated controls (211% of original deposition) (P less than 0.02). Clearance of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus were similar in complement-depleted animals and saline-treated controls. These experiments suggest that hypocomplementemia predisposes to bacterial pneumonia and may explain the high incidence of pulmonary infections in patients having impaired complement activity. Our results further indicate that varying defense mechanisms may be involved with clearing the lung of differing bacterial species. PMID:27534

  11. Smoking produced mucus and clearance of particulates in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, T.D.; Poland, T.M.

    1992-12-31

    Some studies of miners have shown a lesser relative lung-cancer risk for smokers than for nonsmokers. For example, experiments by Cross and associates with dogs have shown an apparent protective effect of cigarette smoke against radon-daughter and dust exposure. One reason for these changes may be the thickened mucus layer in the tracheobronchial region of smokers. Physiological changes in the lung due to smoking may decrease the effects of radioactive particles in cancers in the bronchial region by apparently promoting faster clearance, in that region, of radioactive particles and by decreasing the radiation dose through reduced penetration to the sensitive basal epithelial cells. Because of the short half-life of radon daughters, even if there is possible tobacco-related delay of particle clearance from the alveolar region it cannot affect radon clearance. Therefore, the possible mitigating effect of tobacco on radon-produced cancer appears to be limited to the tracheobronchial region. It would be of value to a number of occupations if the same changes in the lungs due to smoking could be produced in exposed workers in the absence of cigarette-smoking. Beta-carotene and vitamin A, which affect maintenance and secretion of the mucosal lining, appear to thicken mucus, thereby providing protection against radon-induced lung cancers that is similar to smoking-related changes in the lung.

  12. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  13. Lung clearance index in the assessment of airways disease.

    PubMed

    Horsley, Alex

    2009-06-01

    In the last few years there has been a growing interest in lung clearance index (LCI), a measure of lung physiology derived from multiple breath washout tests. This resurgence of interest was initially driven by the recognition that such assessments were capable of detecting early airways disease in children, and are more sensitive and easier to perform in this population than conventional lung function tests [Aurora P, Kozlowska W, Stocks J. Gas mixing efficiency from birth to adulthood measured by multiple-breath washout. Respir Physiol Neurobiol, 2005;148(1-2):125-39]. With an appreciation of the importance of earlier identification of airways dysfunction, and prevention of irreversible structural airway changes, methods of following airways disease in these "silent years" are especially important. LCI has now been reported in studies involving all age groups, from infants to adults [Lum S, Gustafsson P, Ljungberg H, Hulskamp G, Bush A, Carr SB, et al. Early detection of cystic fibrosis lung disease: multiple-breath washout versus raised volume tests. Thorax, 2007;62(4):341-7; Horsley AR, Gustafsson PM, Macleod K, Saunders CJ, Greening AP, Porteous D, et al. Lung clearance index is a sensitive, repeatable and practical measure of airways disease in adults with cystic fibrosis. Thorax, 2008;63:135-40], and has a narrow range of normal over this wide age range, making it especially suitable for long-term follow-up studies. In cystic fibrosis (CF) particularly, there is a pressing need for sensitive and repeatable clinical endpoints for therapeutic interventions [Rosenfeld M. An overview of endpoints for cystic fibrosis clinical trials: one size does not fit all. Proc Am Thorac Soc, 2007;4(4):299-301], and LCI has been proposed as an outcome measure in future CF gene therapy studies [Davies JC, Cunningham S, Alton EW, Innes JA. Lung clearance index in CF: a sensitive marker of lung disease severity. Thorax, 2008;63(2):96-7]. This review will consider how LCI is

  14. A study of uranium lung clearance at a uranium processing plant.

    PubMed

    Barber, J M; Forrest, R D

    1995-05-01

    A study has been made of the retention of uranium in the lungs of persons exposed chronically to low levels of uranium aerosols at the Y-12 Plant. A new characterization of the workplace aerosols shows an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 8 microns to be representative of the uranium oxides handled at the Y-12 Plant. The usual ICRP respiratory-system model is employed in conjunction with bioassay data from worker exposures to deduce a new set of parameters to describe lung clearance of these aerosols. This new assessment leads to good agreement between in vivo estimates of uranium lung burdens. PMID:7730062

  15. Importance of bacterial replication and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Camberlein, Emilie; Cohen, Jonathan M; José, Ricardo; Hyams, Catherine J; Callard, Robin; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Edwards, Lindsey A; Marshall, Helina; van Rooijen, Nico; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Brown, Jeremy S

    2015-03-01

    Although the importance of alveolar macrophages for host immunity during early Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection is well established, the contribution and relative importance of other innate immunity mechanisms and of bacterial factors are less clear. We have used a murine model of S. pneumoniae early lung infection with wild-type, unencapsulated, and para-amino benzoic acid auxotroph mutant TIGR4 strains to assess the effects of inoculum size, bacterial replication, capsule, and alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent clearance mechanisms on bacterial persistence within the lungs. Alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent (calculated indirectly) clearance half-lives and bacterial replication doubling times were estimated using a mathematical model. In this model, after infection with a high-dose inoculum of encapsulated S. pneumoniae, alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms were dominant, with a clearance half-life of 24 min compared to 135 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance. In addition, after a high-dose inoculum, successful lung infection required rapid bacterial replication, with an estimated S. pneumoniae doubling time of 16 min. The capsule had wide effects on early lung clearance mechanisms, with reduced half-lives of 14 min for alveolar macrophage-independent and 31 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance of unencapsulated bacteria. In contrast, with a lower-dose inoculum, the bacterial doubling time increased to 56 min and the S. pneumoniae alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance half-life improved to 42 min and was largely unaffected by the capsule. These data demonstrate the large effects of bacterial factors (inoculum size, the capsule, and rapid replication) and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with S. pneumoniae. PMID:25583525

  16. Importance of bacterial replication and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Camberlein, Emilie; Cohen, Jonathan M; José, Ricardo; Hyams, Catherine J; Callard, Robin; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Edwards, Lindsey A; Marshall, Helina; van Rooijen, Nico; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Brown, Jeremy S

    2015-03-01

    Although the importance of alveolar macrophages for host immunity during early Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection is well established, the contribution and relative importance of other innate immunity mechanisms and of bacterial factors are less clear. We have used a murine model of S. pneumoniae early lung infection with wild-type, unencapsulated, and para-amino benzoic acid auxotroph mutant TIGR4 strains to assess the effects of inoculum size, bacterial replication, capsule, and alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent clearance mechanisms on bacterial persistence within the lungs. Alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent (calculated indirectly) clearance half-lives and bacterial replication doubling times were estimated using a mathematical model. In this model, after infection with a high-dose inoculum of encapsulated S. pneumoniae, alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms were dominant, with a clearance half-life of 24 min compared to 135 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance. In addition, after a high-dose inoculum, successful lung infection required rapid bacterial replication, with an estimated S. pneumoniae doubling time of 16 min. The capsule had wide effects on early lung clearance mechanisms, with reduced half-lives of 14 min for alveolar macrophage-independent and 31 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance of unencapsulated bacteria. In contrast, with a lower-dose inoculum, the bacterial doubling time increased to 56 min and the S. pneumoniae alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance half-life improved to 42 min and was largely unaffected by the capsule. These data demonstrate the large effects of bacterial factors (inoculum size, the capsule, and rapid replication) and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with S. pneumoniae.

  17. Possible risks to human lungs from magnetometric dust clearance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, T. D.

    1981-03-01

    Cohen, Arai and Brain did a magnetization study on smokers and nonsmokers from which they conclude that the dust clearance ability of the cigarette smoker's lungs is markedly impaired. Their conclusion may be incorrect because they overlooked that during the magnetization phase of their experiment, iron oxide clusters were preferentially formed in smoker's bronchi because of their high mucus content and consequent low resistance to redistribution of particles. Prudence dictates avoidance of the Cohen, Arai, Brain type study until health hazards related to this work are investigated.

  18. Quantitation of deposition, clearance and routes of elimination of 3 um insoluble particles in the sheep lung

    SciTech Connect

    Langenback, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    This study is the first to completely determine the number of particles deposited in the lung, the number of particles cleared over a period of a hundred days and the pathways by which the particles exit the lungs. The study uses long lived radioactively (/sup 57/Co) tagged 3 um insoluble polystyrene particles to follow clearance in a sheep animal model. Particle clearance was characterized by 4 phases. Periodic sacrifice and autopsy showed no particle accumulation in regional lymph nodes draining the lung and no particle accumulation in the liver, spleen or kidneys. Urine and blood samples throughout clearance were devoid of particles, but fecal excretion of particles matched lung elimination of particles and mirrored clearance closely. Thus the avenues of long-term clearance of a 3 um polystrene particle has been established from the alveolar portion of the lung: virtually all particles cleared in 101 days were removed by transport from the alveoli to the mucociliary escalator, either as free particles and/or associated with macrophages and subsequently swallowed and excreted. Particles remaining in the lungs after 101 days continued to be cleared from the lungs via the mucociliary escalator with a t/sub 1/2/ = 38 days. This suggests that particles leave a sequestered state, re-enter the airways and are cleared.

  19. Vaccination by aerosols: modulation of clearance mechanisms in the lung.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; Lubitz, W

    1997-02-01

    Inhalation and deposition within the the airways are the initial steps before pathogens of the respiratory tract are able to adhere and colonize their host. Once the microorganisms are deposited in the lung lining fluids they do not remain at the location where they first came in contact with the mucous membranes. It is long known that lung clearance mechanisms translocate all deposited particles. At least, most of them are swallowed and cleared via the gastrointestinal tract. Aerosol vaccination with inactivated or (recombinant) live bacteria has been shown to be an efficient way to induce local protection against lung diseases. It can be assumed that the local concentration of the vaccine and the deposition pattern of the vaccine within the lung limit the strength of a local or systemic immune response. The local concentration of airborne bacterial antigen necessary to initiate a mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract is known for a very few microorganisms. Bacterial survival, infectivity, deposition, and persistence characteristics have to be defined when aerosols are included in vaccination experiments.

  20. Inhaled adrenergics and anticholinergics in obstructive lung disease: do they enhance mucociliary clearance?

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Ruben D

    2007-09-01

    Pulmonary mucociliary clearance is an essential defense mechanism against bacteria and particulate matter. Mucociliary dysfunction is an important feature of obstructive lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. This dysfunction in airway clearance is associated with accelerated loss of lung function in patients with obstructive lung disease. The involvement of the cholinergic and adrenergic neural pathways in the pathophysiology of mucus hypersecretion suggests the potential therapeutic role of bronchodilators as mucoactive agents. Although anticholinergics and adrenergic agonist bronchodilators have been routinely used, alone or in combination, to enhance mucociliary clearance in patients with obstructive lung disease, the existing evidence does not consistently show clinical effectiveness.

  1. Integrating acute lung injury and regulation of alveolar fluid clearance.

    PubMed

    Guidot, David M; Folkesson, Hans G; Jain, Lucky; Sznajder, Jacob I; Pittet, Jean-François; Matthay, Michael A

    2006-09-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema and flooding of the alveolar air spaces with proteinaceous fluid. ARDS develops in response to inflammatory stresses including sepsis, trauma, and severe pneumonia, and despite aggressive critical care management, it still has a mortality of 30-50%. At the time of its original description in 1967, relatively little was known about the specific mechanisms by which the alveolar epithelium regulated lung fluid balance. Over the last 20 years, substantial advances in our understanding of the alveolar epithelium have provided major new insights into how molecular and cellular mechanisms regulate the active transport of solutes and fluid across the alveolar epithelium under both normal and pathological conditions. Beginning with the elucidation of active sodium transport as a major driving force for the transport of water from the air space to the interstitium, elegant work by multiple investigators has revealed a complex and integrated network of membrane channels and pumps that coordinately regulates sodium, chloride, and water flux in both a cell- and condition-specific manner. At the Experimental Biology Meeting in San Francisco on April 4, 2006, a symposium was held to discuss some of the most recent advances. Although there is still much to learn about the mechanisms that impair normal alveolar fluid clearance under pathological conditions, the compelling experimental findings presented in this symposium raise the prospect that we are now poised to test and develop therapeutic strategies to improve outcome in patients with acute lung injury. PMID:16698856

  2. Fibroblast Activation Protein (FAP) Accelerates Collagen Degradation and Clearance from Lungs in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Qiang; Li, Hui-Hua; Ra, Hyun-Jeong; Majumdar, Sonali; Gulick, Dexter L; Jerome, Jacob A; Madsen, Daniel H; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Speicher, David W; Bachovchin, William W; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Puré, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a disease characterized by progressive, unrelenting lung scarring, with death from respiratory failure within 2-4 years unless lung transplantation is performed. New effective therapies are clearly needed. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a cell surface-associated serine protease up-regulated in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in wound healing and cancer. We postulate that FAP is not only a marker of disease but influences the development of pulmonary fibrosis after lung injury. In two different models of pulmonary fibrosis, intratracheal bleomycin instillation and thoracic irradiation, we find increased mortality and increased lung fibrosis in FAP-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Lung extracellular matrix analysis reveals accumulation of intermediate-sized collagen fragments in FAP-deficient mouse lungs, consistent within vitrostudies showing that FAP mediates ordered proteolytic processing of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-derived collagen cleavage products. FAP-mediated collagen processing leads to increased collagen internalization without altering expression of the endocytic collagen receptor, Endo180. Pharmacologic FAP inhibition decreases collagen internalization as expected. Conversely, restoration of FAP expression in the lungs of FAP-deficient mice decreases lung hydroxyproline content after intratracheal bleomycin to levels comparable with that of wild-type controls. Our findings indicate that FAP participates directly, in concert with MMPs, in collagen catabolism and clearance and is an important factor in resolving scar after injury and restoring lung homeostasis. Our study identifies FAP as a novel endogenous regulator of fibrosis and is the first to show FAP's protective effects in the lung.

  3. Lung clearance and retention of toner, utilizing a tracer technique, during chronic inhalation exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Bellmann, B; Muhle, H; Creutzenberg, O; Dasenbrock, C; Kilpper, R; MacKenzie, J C; Morrow, P; Mermelstein, R

    1991-08-01

    Male and female F-344 rats were exposed to 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for up to 24 months to a special test toner at 0, 1, 4, and 16 mg/m3, TiO2 at 5 mg/m3, or SiO2 at 1 mg/m3 by the inhalation route. 59Fe-labeled iron oxide and 85Sr-labeled polystyrene particles were periodically inhaled by the nose-only route and used to measure alveolar clearance rates during the course of the study. This method was used to describe a maximum functionally tolerated dose (MFTD). Pulmonary retention of toner and control materials (TiO2 and SiO2) was measured after 3, 9, 15, 21, and 24 months of exposure. The quantity of all three materials retained in the lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes increased with exposure duration and level. The final pulmonary burdens of toner at the three exposure levels were 0.22, 1.73, and 15.6 mg/lung, respectively. Alveolar clearance of both tracers was substantially impaired at the toner high-exposure level, and moderately slowed at the toner middle-exposure level. The excessive quantity of toner retained and the substantially retarded clearance in the toner high-exposure group are indicative of "lung overloading." Alveolar clearance of 85Sr-polystyrene particles was slightly slowed in the TiO2-exposed group and substantially impaired in the SiO2-exposed group. The alveolar clearance of the unexposed rats decreased about 30% during the study, a change ascribed to aging. For a general description of the toxicokinetics of the various dusts, a semiempirical kinetic model was developed, which could generally be useful for the extrapolation of lung retention of insoluble particles from a subchronic to a chronic inhalation study. Both the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the MFTD were exceeded at the toner high-exposure level during the study in rats.

  4. Air pollution particles diminish bacterial clearance in the primed lungs of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sigaud, Samuel; Goldsmith, Carroll-Ann W.; Zhou Hongwei; Yang Zhiping; Fedulov, Alexey; Imrich, Amy; Kobzik, Lester

    2007-08-15

    Epidemiological studies reveal increased incidence of lung infection when air pollution particle levels are increased. We postulate that one risk factor for bacterial pneumonia, prior viral infection, can prime the lung for greater deleterious effects of particles via the interferon-gamma (IFN-{gamma}) characteristic of successful host anti-viral responses. To test this postulate, we developed a mouse model in which mice were treated with {gamma}-interferon aerosol, followed by exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) collected from urban air. The mice were then infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and the effect of these treatments on the lung's innate immune response was evaluated. The combination of IFN-{gamma} priming and CAPs exposure enhanced lung inflammation, manifest as increased polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) recruitment to the lung, and elevated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs. Combined priming and CAPs exposure resulted in impaired pulmonary bacterial clearance, as well as increased oxidant production and diminished bacterial uptake by alveolar macrophages (AMs) and PMNs. The data suggest that priming and CAPs exposure lead to an inflamed alveolar milieu where oxidant stress causes loss of antibacterial functions in AMs and recruited PMNs. The model reported here will allow further analysis of priming and CAPs exposure on lung sensitivity to infection.

  5. Lung clearance in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy or spinal muscular atrophy with and without CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure).

    PubMed

    Klefbeck, B; Svartengren, K; Camner, P; Philipson, K; Svartengren, M; Sejersen, T; Mattsson, E

    2001-09-01

    Bronchiolar clearance was studied in 7 boys in the age range of 8 to 17 years, 6 with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and 1 with spinal muscular atrophy type II (SMA-II). These boys had healthy lungs but a severely reduced muscular strength (wheelchair dependent). In 6 of the boys, clearance was studied twice, at one occasion as a control and at the other occasion following treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A control group of healthy adults was used. In the clearance examinations, 6-microm Teflon particles, labeled with III In was inhaled extremely slowly, 0.05 L/s. This gives a deposition mainly in the bronchioles. Lung retention was measured after 0,24,48, and 72 hours. A model for deposition of particles in the adult lung was scaled down to represent the children in this study. Deposition in various airway generations was calculated to be similar in children and adults. Also the measured retentions were similar in the boys and the adults. In the clearance experiments during CPAP treatment, there was a significantly lower retention after 72 hours (but not after 24 and 48 hours) than in the control experiments. Theresults indicate that a severe reduction of muscular strength, and thereby a reduction of mechanical movement of the lung, does not affect clearance from large and small airways. However, some effect of clearance from small airways cannot be excluded due to the short measuring period. The small but significant effect of the CPAP treatment might have potential clinical importance and suggest that bronchiolar clearance can be affected by some form of mechanical force. PMID:11558965

  6. Retention and clearance of stainless steel shieldgas welding fumes in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, P L; Tuomisaari, M; Lakomaa, E L; Kalliomäki, K; Kivelä, R

    1983-09-01

    The use of metal inert gas (MIG) stainless steel (SS) welding techniques is rapidly increasing. The possible health hazards of MIG/SS welding fumes are not known; more attention has been paid to manual metal arc (MMA) welding. In this study, 52 male Wistar rats were exposed to MIG/SS welding fumes generated by an automatic welding device for "nose only" exposure. For the retention study, the duration of exposure was one hour per workday for 1,2,3, and 4 weeks. For the clearance study, the duration was 4 weeks, and the follow-up period was 106 days. The retention and clearance of the alloyed metals of SS (chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni] and iron were studied in the rats' lungs, and the results were compared with the corresponding results of MMA/SS welding. The multielement chemical analysis was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA); the concentration of exogeneous iron (Feex) was determined by a magnetic measuring method. Feex and Cr were retained in the ratio expected; Mn, Ni and total Fe were retained slower than expected. The total Fe did not clear at all even though Feex cleared with the half-time of 50 d which corresponded well with that of pure magnetite. The accumulation of Cr in the lungs was very high: it cleared with the half-time of 240 d. The clearance patterns of Mn and Ni were very similar. They followed a double exponential model with half-times of 2 d and 125 d for Mn, and 3 d and 85 d for Ni. The results indicated that even though the retention patterns for MMA and MIG welding fumes were very similar, the clearances differed very much.

  7. Lung clearance index for monitoring early lung disease in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Pittschieler, Klaus; Ahrens, Frank; Baden, Winfried; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Gleiber, Wolfgang; Griese, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Köhnlein, Thomas; Reckling, Ludmilla; Rietschel, Ernst; Staab, Doris; Gappa, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and a PI-ZZ genotype are at high risk to develop severe emphysema during adulthood. However, little is known about early stages of emphysema and disease manifestation in other PI-types. Spirometry is commonly used for monitoring although early manifestation of emphysema is suspected within the peripheral airways that are not accessible by forced expiratory manoeuvres. We hypothesized that the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath nitrogen-washout (N2-washout) is useful to bridge this diagnostic gap. Patients from age 4 years onward and different PI-types performed N2-washout and spirometry. Results were compared to controls. 193 patients (4-79 years, 75% PI-ZZ) and 33 controls (8-60 years) were included. Mean (SD) LCI in patients was 9.1 (3.1) and 6.3 (0.6) in controls (p ≤ 0.001). 47% of adult patients with other than PI-ZZ genotypes and 39% of all patients with normal spirometry had abnormal LCIs. The LCI measured by N2-washout discriminates between patients with AATD and controls, reflects AATD related lung disease in all stages and appears to identify early peripheral lung changes in younger age than spirometry. We conclude that a normal spirometry does not exclude presence of AATD related lung disease even in genotypes other than PI-ZZ. PMID:27296827

  8. Clearance of Tc-99m DTPA aerosol from coal miners' lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Susskind, H.; Brill, A.B.; Harold, W.H.

    1985-07-01

    Alterations in regional epithelial permeability were assessed in 22 retired West Virginia coal miners' lungs by measuring the clearance of inhaled 0.5-..mu..m Tc-99m DTPA aerosol. Activity was measured in both lungs and in regions of interest placed over the lung periphery in the apical, middle, and basal portions of each lung. Clearance rates (T/sub 1/2/) for 5 nonsmokers, 8 ex-smokers, and 9 smokers were significantly faster than for comparable subjects measured elsewhere, who were not coal miners. Regional apex-to-base distributions of DTPA were measured as a function of clearance time and compared with regional ventilation and perfusion. Regional, as well as overall lung clearance curves of 8 smokers and 4 ex-smokers had two components, with overall T/sub 1/2/ of <7 min for the faster one. No correlations were found between T/sub 1/2/ and DLCO or with P(A-a)O/sub 2/. The results of our study suggest that measurement of DTPA clearance is a potentially useful noninvasive technique to assess lung injury in miners exposed to coal dust. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Clearance of man made mineral fibres from the lungs of sheep

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, A.; Perrault, G.; Yamato, H.; Masse, S.; Begin, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the clearance rate, the related pathology, and the chemical and morphological changes of three man made mineral fibres (MMMFs) in the sheep model of pneumoconiosis. METHODS: Fibrous particles were extracted from lung parenchyma and analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). RESULTS: The concentration of MMMF11, MMMF21, refractory ceramic fibre (RCF-1), and crocidolite asbestos fibres decreased with time according to a slow and a fast kinetic component. There was a statistical difference in the four regression lines as a function of time and the type of fibres (p < 0.001). The diameter of MMMFs decreased during the course of the time, whereas the crocidolite fibres did not seem to show any change. There was a statistical difference in the four regression lines as a function of time (p = 0.037) and type of fibres (p < 0.001). Ferruginous bodies were counted in the 40 sheep for which the latency period was 2 years. No typical ferruginous bodies were found in the groups exposed to MMMFs. The geometric mean concentration of asbestos bodies in the group exposed to crocidolite was 2421 bodies/g lung tissue (95% CI 385 to 15260). CONCLUSIONS: The number of initially retained fibres decreased with time according to a slow and a fast kinetic component. MMMF11 and MMMF21 have similar clearance, faster than RCF-1 and crocidolite. The geometric mean diameter and length of MMMF decreased with time, but crocidolite did not. After 2 years in the sheep tracheal lobe, ferruginous bodies were not found in all three MMMF groups but were substantial in the crocidolite group. Clearance is thought to proceed through dissolution and macrophage translocation.   PMID:10658548

  10. Protein clearance from the air spaces and lungs of unanesthetized sheep over 144 h

    SciTech Connect

    Berthiaume, Y.; Albertine, K.H.; Grady, M.; Fick, G.; Matthay, M.A. )

    1989-11-01

    We studied the rate, the routes, and the mechanisms for protein clearance from the air spaces and lungs of 20 unanesthetized sheep over 144 h. We instilled 100 ml of autologous serum labeled with 125I-albumin into one lung. At the end of 24, 48, 96, or 144 h, the lungs were removed and the residual native protein and 125I-albumin in the air spaces were determined by bronchoalveolar lavage. Also the fraction of the instilled 125I-albumin remaining in the rest of the lung was measured in the lung homogenate. Clearance of the 125I-albumin from the lung into the plasma, lymph, thyroid, urine, and feces was also determined. The removal of both the 125I-albumin and the native protein from the air spaces was slow, following a monoexponential decline. The removal rate of the 125I-albumin from the air spaces was slightly but significantly faster (1.6%/h) than the clearance rate of the native protein (0.9%/h). Clearance of the 125I-albumin from the lung also followed a slow monoexponential decline at a rate of 1.4%/h. At all time periods, 75% of the 125I-albumin remaining in the lung was located in the air spaces, thus indicating that the pulmonary epithelium is the principal barrier to protein clearance from the normal lung. Macrophages appeared to play a minor role in alveolar protein clearance because the quantity of 125I-albumin present in the phagocytic cells in the air spaces was less than 1% of the instilled 125I-albumin at all time periods. However, macrophages may play some role in protein clearance after 48 h because we visualized phagolysosomes in macrophages, and there was an increase in free iodine in lung lavage, urine, thyroid, and feces after 48 h. However, gel electrophoretic studies showed that most of the 125I-albumin was cleared from the lung as an intact molecule, although only 24.7 +/- 4.7% of the 125I-albumin was cleared by the lymphatics.

  11. Exercise increases the lung clearance of inhaled Tc-99m DTPA

    SciTech Connect

    Meignan, M.; Rosso, J.; Cinotti, L.; Galle, P.

    1985-05-01

    It has been suggested that blood flow have little effect on the lung clearance of Tc-99m DTPA which depends on the alveolar distension. However an increase of pulmonary blood flow, induces a recruitment of new vascular areas which can enhance this clearance. To assess this hypothesis the pulmonary apical and basal clearances of a sumicronic aerosol of Tc-99m DTPA were studied at rest and at exercise in seven non smoking volunteers in upright posture. As a matter of fact exercising upright is known to increase primarily the apical blood flow. After inhalation the subjects were seated on a bicycle their back against a gamma camera which was linked to a computer. The lung radioactivity was registered successively during a resting and an exercising period. At rest there was a gradient of clearance from the apex to the base of the lung, the apical clearance being significantly higher. At exercise (50 Watts, 60 c. min /sup -1/, 7 min.) this regional gradient was enhanced by a large and significant increase of the apical clearances (0.0340 min /sup -1/ +-0.0063 SD versus 0.00183 min /sup -1/ +- 0.074 SD at rest, n = 7, p < 0.01). By contrast the changes of the basal clearances were slight and unsignificant (0.0146 min /sup -1/ +- 0.0062 SD versus 0.0140 min /sup -1/ +- 0.0082 SD). Since exercise induces little distension of the apical alveoli but drastically enhances the apical blood flow, the observed increase of the apical lung clearance could be primarily attributed to the recruitment of new capillaries induced by exercise in the apices. This led to an increase of the surface area permeability product.

  12. Exercise increases the lung clearance of inhaled technetium-99m DTPA

    SciTech Connect

    Meignan, M.; Rosso, J.; Leveau, J.; Katz, A.; Cinotti, L.; Madelaine, G.; Galle, P.

    1986-02-01

    The regional lung clearance of a deposited aerosol of (/sup 99m/Tc) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was successively computed at rest and at exercise in seven nonsmoking volunteers in upright posture. The subjects were seated on a bicycle with their backs against a gamma camera. At rest there was a gradient of clearance from the apex to the base of the lung, the apical clearance being significantly higher. At exercise this regional gradient was enhanced by a large and significant increase of the apical clearances (3.40 +/- 0.63% min-1 s.d. compared with 1.82 +/- 0.75% min-1 s.d. at rest, n = 7, p less than 0.01). By contrast the changes of the basal clearances were slight and unsignificant (1.46 +/- 0.71% min-1 s.d. compared with 1.40 +/- 0.82% min-1 s.d.). This increase of the apical lung clearance could be attributed primarily to the increase of apical blood flow induced by exercise and to the subsequent increase of the permeability surface area product.

  13. Pulmonary clearance of radiotracers after positive end-expiratory pressure or acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Barrowcliffe, M.P.; Zanelli, G.D.; Jones, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    In anesthetized rabbits we measured clearance from lung to blood of eight aerosolized technetium-99m-labeled compounds: diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA); cytochrome c; myoglobin; a myoglobin polymer; albumin; and anionic, cationic, and neutral dextrans of equivalent molecular size. We investigated the effect of applying positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and, on a subsequent occasion, of injecting oleic acid intravenously to produce acute lung injury on the pulmonary clearance rate. Base-line clearance rates were monoexponential and varied with the molecular weights of the radiotracers. For each tracer the rate of clearance was increased a similar degree by either PEEP or oleic acid. However, with PEEP, clearance remained monoexponential, whereas after oleic acid, smaller molecular-weight radiotracers had multiexponential clearance curves. This suggests that after oleic acid the alveolar epithelium breaks down in a nonuniform fashion. We conclude that differentiation of the effect of PEEP from that of severe lung injury caused by oleic acid is not readily accomplished by either increasing the size of the tracer molecule or by varying the molecular charge.

  14. Effect of exercise on redistribution and clearance of inhaled particles from hamster lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, T.D.; Tryka, A.F.; Brain, J.D. )

    1990-03-01

    Does exercise alter the redistribution and clearance of particles from the lungs Sedentary hamsters and hamsters that were exercise trained by voluntary wheel running for the previous 5 wk were exposed to a 198Au-labeled aerosol for 25 min. Six trained and 6 sedentary animals were killed within 5 min after the exposure (day 0); the same number were killed 5 days later. The trained hamsters ran ad libitum during those 5 days. The lungs of all animals were excised, dried at total lung capacity, sliced into 1-mm-thick sections, and dissected into pieces that were counted for radioactivity and weighed. On day 0, trained hamsters had 80% more particles per milligram of lung than sedentary hamsters, although both were exposed under identical conditions of restraint. After five days, exercising hamsters cleared 38% of the particles present at day 0, whereas sedentary animals removed only 15%. Significant clearance was observed from the middle lung regions of sedentary hamsters and from all lung regions in exercising hamsters. We conclude that exercise can enhance the redistribution and clearance of particles from the lungs; the mechanisms responsible are as yet unclear.

  15. A model of metabolism and clearance of organic compounds from the respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect

    Gerde, P.; Dahl, A.R.

    1994-11-01

    In cases where inhalants induce toxicity in the airway epithelium, the mechanism of absorption is an important determinant of target dose. Absorption of organic solutes in the lungs occurs mainly by two consecutive mechanisms; molecular diffusion drives the chemicals into the tissues, and blood perfusion of the tissues removes the chemicals into the systemic circulation. Solutes having lipophilicities ranging from equally soluble in lipids and water to moderately more lipid-soluble are limited by the perfusion during clearance from the lungs. The perfusion-limited solute enters the blood circulation from all regions of the lungs within minutes and is distributed to other organs via the systemic circulation. In contrast, clearance of highly lipophilic toxicants, such as benzo(a)pyrene, from the lungs is diffusion-limited. The limiting process refers to the slowest transport mechanism of either perfusion or diffusion. Because of the short distance from the surface of the alveolar region to the capillary network, diffusion-limited clearance of highly lipophilic solutes occurs within minutes. In the thicker epithelium of the conducting airways, however, clearance may take hours. The purpose of the current modeling effort was to encompass both mechanisms of clearance in a single model in order to explore the influence of toxicant lipophilicity and local metabolism on the dosimetry at the airway portal-of-entry.

  16. Lung-clearance mechanisms following inhalation of acid sulfates

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, R.K.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Silbaugh, S.A.; Carpenter, R.L.; Rowatt, J.D.; Hill, J.O.

    1982-08-01

    These studies have indicated that acute exposures (1-6 hrs) to sulfuric acid at levels of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/m/sup 3/ can produce impairments in mucous clearance. The impairments can last for up to a week following a 1 hr exposure. These effects and studies by others suggest that high sulfate levels in polluted conditions may be one factor in observed increases of hospital visits for respiratory problems. Long term exposures to elevated levels of sulfates resulting in decreases of clearance could also be an initiating factor in producing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These studies have also shown that it is the larger size fraction (0.6 to 1.0 ..mu..m) of sulfuric acid mist in the urban aerosol which is predominantly responsible for at least the acute effects.

  17. A preliminary study of the effect of guaiphenesin on mucociliary clearance from the human lung

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, M. L.; Pavia, D.; McNicol, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Thomson, M. L., Pavia, D., and McNicol, M. W. (1973).Thorax, 28, 742-747. A preliminary study of the effect of guaiphenesin on mucociliary clearance from the human lung. The effect of guaiphenesin (administered as Robitussin1) on mucociliary clearance has been assessed in 15 subjects from the rate of removal from the lung of previously inhaled radioactive tracer particles. The guaiphenesin was compared with a positive control preparation consisting of the guaiphenesin vehicle only in two double-blind crossover trials. The first trial examined eight aged `healthy' volunteer subjects and the second trial examined seven chronic bronchitic patients. Sequential gamma counts were made from the whole lung by scintillation counters for 6 hours after inhalation and the chest was also scanned rectilinearly. In the first 5 hours after inhalation the mean rate of removal of particles and therefore of secretions was faster after guaiphenesin than after the control preparation. This difference was not statistically significant in the healthy volunteers but achieved significance (P <0·05) in the chronic bronchitic patients. Lung scans after inhaling the tracer aerosol indicated that on average the initial penetration of the particles into the lung was similar in the guaiphenesin and control runs. The faster clearance after guaiphenesin was unlikely to be due to bulk movements of mucus caused by coughing since the mean frequency of coughing during the experiment was somewhat less after the drug. PMID:4595814

  18. Alterations in lung clearance mechanisms due to single and repeated nitrogen dioxide exposures in the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmuth, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance was assessed following single, two-hour exposures to either 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, or 10.0 ppm NO/sub 2/, or 14 daily two hour exposures to 0.3, 1.0, 3.0 ppm NO/sub 2/. No significant changes in the mean residence time of tracer particles in the tracheobronchial region were produced under any exposure condition, indicating no effect upon mucociliary clearance. Macrophage functional properties were examined in vitro at select times following single, two hour in vivo exposures to 1.0 and 10.0 ppm NO/sub 2/. Macrophage number and viability were not affected; however, significant dose-related differences in phagocytosis and mobility were observed. These changes were associated with altered in vivo alveolar clearance patterns. Additional studies examined the effects of in vitro exposure to nitrite and hydrogen ion, two known NO/sub 2/ reaction products in the lung, on macrophage phagocytosis. While hydrogen ion had no effect at the levels used, nitrate was shown to enhance phagocytosis. These results demonstrate that alveolar clearance and macrophage function are altered by short-term NO/sub 2/ exposure at realistic, environmental levels. These data also provide insight into the mechanisms of NO/sub 2/-induced alteration in lung clearance pathways.

  19. Pulmonary deposition and clearance of glass fiber in rat lungs after long-term inhalation.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, I; Oyabu, T; Ishimatsu, S; Hori, H; Higashi, T; Yamato, H

    1994-01-01

    In this study Wistar male rats were exposed to glass fiber obtained by the disintegration of a binderless glass fiber filter, for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 12 months. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of the fiber, determined with an Andersen sampler, was 2.6 microns. The count median diameter and length of the fibers measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were 0.51 and 5.5 microns, respectively. The daily average exposure fiber concentration was 2.2 +/- 0.6 mg/m3. Some rats were sacrificed 24 hr after removal from the exposure chamber following the 12 months' exposure. Others were sacrificed 12 months after the end of exposure. The wet organ weights were recorded at the time of death and the silicon content of the lungs was determined by absorption spectrophotometry. After 12 months' exposure, the amount of glass fiber retained in the rat lungs was 1.49 mg, and after 12 months' clearance it was 0.61 mg. The biological half-life in a single exponential model was to be 8.7 months, much longer than the predicted value of 1.5 months obtained in a previous experiment in which rats were exposed for 4 weeks to the same glass fiber. PMID:7882935

  20. Xenogeneic lung transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Study of lung xenografts has proven useful to understand the remaining barriers to successful transplantation of other organ xenografts. In this chapter, the history and current status of lung xenotransplantation will be briefly reviewed and two different experimental models, the ex vivo porcine-to-human lung perfusion and the in vivo xenogeneic lung transplantation, will be presented. We will focus on the technical details of these lung xenograft models in sufficient detail, list the needed materials and mention analysis techniques to allow others to adopt them with minimal learning curve. PMID:22565996

  1. The effects of selected air pollutants on clearance of titanic oxide particles from the lungs of rats.

    PubMed

    Ferin, J; Leach, L J

    1975-09-01

    A procedure utilizing the lung clearance kinetics of titanic oxide (TiO2) particles was used to determine the effects of inhaled sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NO x) on particle clearance. The procedure is reproducible and mainly tests clearance mechanisms involving alveolar macrophages and the mucociliary transport system at the alveolobronchial clearance pathway. At low SO2 or NOx exposures enhanced particle clearance was observed. Lung clearance was depressed at 15 and 24 ppm of NO2 after 22 exposures as well as at 20 ppm of SO2 after 11 exposures, and also at 1 ppm of SO2 after 25 exposures. Dose-response curves for the SO2 and NOx exposures showed differences explainable by the routes by which these gases reach the alveolar macrophages.

  2. Mechanisms of complement-mediated clearance of bacteria from the murine lung.

    PubMed

    Heidbrink, P J; Toews, G B; Gross, G N; Pierce, A K

    1982-05-01

    Complement factors enhance host defense against bacterial challenges by attracting phagocytic cells to the site of the inoculum and by opsonizing bacteria for phagocytic ingestion. The relative contribution of these 2 mechanisms to in vivo clearance of bacteria from the lung has not been described. Hypocomplementemic and normal animals were challenged with various bacteria. Clearance of bacteria was studied by quantitative lung culture. Phagocytic response was determined by bronchoalveolar lavage. Staphylococci were cleared by macrophages without regard to the complement status of the host. Hypocomplementemic animals cleared pneumococci less efficiently than did control animals. This defect correlated with decreased neutrophil recruitment. Pseudomonas was not cleared in hypocomplementemic animals, but there was no difference in the number or type of phagocytes. This implies that an opsonic rather thn a chemotactic defect was responsible. These data suggest that the mechanism of complement-mediated defense against bacterial challenge varies with the type of pathogen present.

  3. Effect of Ethanol on the Clearance of Airborne Pneumococci and the Rate of Pneumococcal Transformations in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach-Rubin, Fran; Ottolenghi-Nightingale, Elena

    1971-01-01

    The rate of clearance of pneumococci from the lungs of mice infected by aerosols was found to vary inversely with the virulence of the pneumococci. Treatment of of the mice with ethanol delayed the clearance and increased the rate of pneumococcal transformations in vivo. PMID:16558037

  4. Pulmonary and thoracic macrophage subpopulations and clearance of particles from the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, B E

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary macrophages consist of several subpopulations that can be defined by their anatomical locations as well as by other criteria. In addition to the well-known alveolar macrophages that reside on the alveolar surface, pulmonary macrophages also occur in the conducting airways, in various pulmonary interstitial regions, and, in some mammalian species, in the lung's intravascular compartment. Other thoracic macrophages of relevance to pulmonary defense and some lung disease processes are the pleural macrophages resident in the pleural space and macrophages present in regional lymph nodes that receive lymphatic drainage from the lung. Of the above subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, the alveolar macrophages have received the most experimental attention in the context of the pulmonary clearance and retention of deposited particles. Accordingly, less information is currently available regarding the roles other pulmonary and thoracic populations of macrophages may play in the removal of particles from the lower respiratory tract and associated tissue compartments. This report provides an overview of the various subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, as defined by their anatomical locations. The known and postulated roles of macrophages in the pulmonary clearance and retention of particles are reviewed, with particular emphasis on macrophage-associated processes involved in the pulmonary clearance of relatively insoluble particles. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. FIGURE 19. A FIGURE 19. B FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. PMID:1396454

  5. Clearance of polonium-210-enriched cigarette smoke from the rat trachea and lung

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.; Harley, N.H.; Tso, T.C.

    1985-06-30

    The distribution and clearance of alpha radioactivity in the lungs of rats were measured after inhalation of smoke from cigarettes highly enriched in /sup 210/Po. Female Fischer rats were exposed daily for 6 months to smoke from cigarettes with 500 times the normal content of /sup 210/Po. Control rats were exposed to standard cigarette smoke. Animals were serially withdrawn and killed. After necropsy the trachea, major bronchi, larynx, and nasopharynx were examined for surface alpha activity by an etched track technique utilizing cellulose nitrate detectors. Areas of accumulated activity were seen on samples of larynx from rats exposed to the /sup 210/Po-enriched cigarettes. No other local accumulations were seen on the airways. The lower lungs were analyzed radiochemically for /sup 210/Po. Both radiochemical analysis and track measurements showed highly elevated activity concentrations in rats exposed to the /sup 210/Po-enriched cigarettes. Following withdrawal from smoking, both short- and long-term clearance components were seen. The parameters which fit the postexposure data for clearance of the lung burden cannot fit the buildup during the exposure period.

  6. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived pyocyanin and 1-hydroxyphenazine on pulmonary mucociliary clearance monitored scintigraphically in the baboon model.

    PubMed

    Dormehl, I; Ras, G; Taylor, G; Hugo, N

    1991-01-01

    The effect of products of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa on mucociliary lung clearance has been monitored in vivo in the baboon model by scintigraphy. Clearance was found to be inhibited by both 1-hydroxyphenazine and pyocyanin, and a dose-effect was illustrated by the former. This confirms previous in vitro results as well as results from work on guinea-pigs, and holds good prospects for the use of the baboon model under anesthesia in such investigations.

  7. A model of clearance rate regulation in mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fréchette, Marcel

    2012-10-01

    Clearance rate regulation has been modelled as an instantaneous response to food availability, independent of the internal state of the animals. This view is incompatible with latent effects during ontogeny and phenotypic flexibility in clearance rate. Internal-state regulation of clearance rate is required to account for these patterns. Here I develop a model of internal-state based regulation of clearance rate. External factors such as suspended sediments are included in the model. To assess the relative merits of instantaneous regulation and internal-state regulation, I modelled blue mussel clearance rate and growth using a DEB model. In the usual standard feeding module, feeding is governed by a Holling's Type II response to food concentration. In the internal-state feeding module, gill ciliary activity and thus clearance rate are driven by internal reserve level. Factors such as suspended sediments were not included in the simulations. The two feeding modules were compared on the basis of their ability to capture the impact of latent effects, of environmental heterogeneity in food abundance and of physiological flexibility on clearance rate and individual growth. The Holling feeding module was unable to capture the effect of any of these sources of variability. In contrast, the internal-state feeding module did so without any modification or ad hoc calibration. Latent effects, however, appeared transient. With simple annual variability in temperature and food concentration, the relationship between clearance rate and food availability predicted by the internal-state feeding module was quite similar to that observed in Norwegian fjords. I conclude that in contrast with the usual Holling feeding module, internal-state regulation of clearance rate is consistent with well-documented growth and clearance rate patterns.

  8. Enhanced clearance of silica from mouse lung after instillation of a leukocyte chemotactic factor.

    PubMed

    Adamson, I Y; Prieditis, H; Bowden, D H

    1994-01-01

    It has been suggested that increased recruitment of phagocytes and subsequent clearance of particles may follow instillation of a leukocyte chemoattractant to lungs containing silica. The present study quantitated serially the silica content in alveolar spaces, in lung tissue and in hilar lymph nodes of mice that received 2 mg silica only, compared to a group that also received 100 micrograms intratracheal chemotactic factor N-formyl-L-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) at 2 and 3 weeks after silica. These mice showed a supplemental increase in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, and an increase in silica was measured in lavaged cells and fluid soon after FMLP injection. At all times to 16 weeks, the silica content of lung tissue was significantly lower in mice that also received FMLP, and in this group, pulmonary fibrosis was much reduced, as shown morphologically and biochemically. In addition, there was reduced translocation of silica to lymph nodes in FMLP-treated mice. The results indicate that induction of a controlled inflammatory response in the alveoli at a time when particles are present in the pulmonary interstitium can accelerate clearance by increasing phagocyte traffic to the alveoli. The subsequent reduction in particle content of the lung is associated with a lower level of pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. Macrophage-epithelial paracrine crosstalk inhibits lung edema clearance during influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Peteranderl, Christin; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Lecuona, Emilia; Vadász, István; Morty, Rory E.; Schmoldt, Carole; Bespalowa, Julia; Pleschka, Stephan; Mayer, Konstantin; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Fink, Ludger; Lohmeyer, Juergen; Seeger, Werner; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Mutlu, Gökhan M.; Budinger, G.R. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) can cause lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is characterized by accumulation of excessive fluid (edema) in the alveolar airspaces and leads to hypoxemia and death if not corrected. Clearance of excess edema fluid is driven mostly by the alveolar epithelial Na,K-ATPase and is crucial for survival of patients with ARDS. We therefore investigated whether IAV infection alters Na,K-ATPase expression and function in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and the ability of the lung to clear edema. IAV infection reduced Na,K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of human and murine AECs and in distal lung epithelium of infected mice. Moreover, induced Na,K-ATPase improved alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) in IAV-infected mice. We identified a paracrine cell communication network between infected and noninfected AECs and alveolar macrophages that leads to decreased alveolar epithelial Na,K-ATPase function and plasma membrane abundance and inhibition of AFC. We determined that the IAV-induced reduction of Na,K-ATPase is mediated by a host signaling pathway that involves epithelial type I IFN and an IFN-dependent elevation of macrophage TNF-related apoptosis–inducing ligand (TRAIL). Our data reveal that interruption of this cellular crosstalk improves edema resolution, which is of biologic and clinical importance to patients with IAV-induced lung injury. PMID:26999599

  10. Phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition reduces innate immunity and improves isoniazid clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lungs of infected mice.

    PubMed

    Koo, Mi-Sun; Manca, Claudia; Yang, Guibin; O'Brien, Paul; Sung, Nackmoon; Tsenova, Liana; Subbian, Selvakumar; Fallows, Dorothy; Muller, George; Ehrt, Sabine; Kaplan, Gilla

    2011-02-25

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is one of the leading infectious disease causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Though current antibiotic regimens can cure the disease, treatment requires at least six months of drug therapy. One reason for the long duration of therapy is that the currently available TB drugs were selected for their ability to kill replicating organisms and are less effective against subpopulations of non-replicating persistent bacilli. Evidence from in vitro models of Mtb growth and mouse infection studies suggests that host immunity may provide some of the environmental cues that drive Mtb towards non-replicating persistence. We hypothesized that selective modulation of the host immune response to modify the environmental pressure on the bacilli may result in better bacterial clearance during TB treatment. For this proof of principal study, we compared bacillary clearance from the lungs of Mtb-infected mice treated with the anti-TB drug isoniazid (INH) in the presence and absence of an immunomodulatory phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor (PDE4i), CC-3052. The effects of CC-3052 on host global gene expression, induction of cytokines, and T cell activation in the lungs of infected mice were evaluated. We show that CC-3052 modulates the innate immune response without causing generalized immune suppression. Immune modulation combined with INH treatment improved bacillary clearance and resulted in smaller granulomas and less lung pathology, compared to treatment with INH alone. This novel strategy of combining anti-TB drugs with an immune modulating molecule, if applied appropriately to patients, may shorten the duration of TB treatment and improve clinical outcome.

  11. Dynamic modelling and experimental study of cantilever beam with clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Jin, W.; Han, L.; He, Z.

    2012-05-01

    Clearances occur in almost all mechanical systems, typically such as the clearance between slide plate of gun barrel and guide. Therefore, to study the clearances of mechanisms can be very important to increase the working performance and lifetime of mechanisms. In this paper, rigid dynamic modelling of cantilever with clearance was done according to the subject investigated. In the rigid dynamic modelling, clearance is equivalent to the spring-dashpot model, the impact of beam and boundary face was also taken into consideration. In ADAMS software, the dynamic simulation was carried out according to the model above. The software simulated the movement of cantilever with clearance under external excitation. Research found: When the clearance is larger, the force of impact will become larger. In order to study how the stiffness of the cantilever's supporting part influences natural frequency of the system, A Euler beam which is restricted by a draught spring and a torsion spring at its end was raised. Through numerical calculation, the relationship between natural frequency and stiffness was found. When the value of the stiffness is close to the limit value, the corresponding boundary condition is illustrated. An ADAMS experiment was carried out to check the theory and the simulation.

  12. Duration of action of hypertonic saline on mucociliary clearance in the normal lung.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W D; Wu, J; Fuller, F; Balcazar, J R; Zeman, K L; Duckworth, H; Donn, K H; O'Riordan, T G; Boucher, R C; Donaldson, S H

    2015-06-15

    Inhalation of hypertonic saline (HS) acutely enhances mucociliary clearance (MC) in both health and disease. In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), repeated use of HS causes a sustained improvement in MC as well as clinical benefit. The pharmacodynamic duration of activity on MC may be an important determinant of its therapeutic potential in other airways diseases. Before moving toward testing the clinical benefits of HS for non-CF indications, we sought to assess the duration of pharmacodynamic effects of HS in healthy subjects by performing radiotracer clearance studies at baseline, 30-min post-HS administration, and 4-h post-HS administration. Indeed, acceleration of MC was observed when measured 30 min after HS inhalation. This acceleration was most pronounced in the first 30 min after inhaling the radiotracer in the central lung region (mean Ave30Clr = 15.5 vs. 8.6% for 30-min post-HS treatment vs. mean baseline, respectively, P < 0.005), suggesting that acute HS effects were greatest in the larger bronchial airways. In contrast, when MC was measured 4 h after HS administration, all indices of central lung region MC were slower than at baseline: Ave30Clr = 5.9% vs. 8.6% (P = 0.10); Ave90Clr = 12.4% vs. 16.8% (P < 0.05); clearance through 3 h = 29.4 vs. 43.7% (P < 0.002); and clearance through 6 h = 39.4 vs. 50.2% (P < 0.02). This apparent slowing of MC in healthy subjects 4-h post-HS administration may reflect depletion of airway mucus following acute HS administration.

  13. Use of Technetium (99mTc) as a Bacterial Label in Lung Clearance Studies

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Waldemar G.; Kennedy, Marina G.; Bonte, Frederick J.

    1973-01-01

    The suitability of technetium (99mTc), a gamma emitter, for labeling of Diplococcus pneumoniae in studies of lung bacterial clearance was examined. A killed bacterial slurry with high specific activity was obtained with a ferric ascorbate reducing system. Approximately 5.5% of radioactive counts dissociated from labeled bacteria in 6 h. Rats were exposed to a uniformly mixed aerosol of untagged, viable pneumococci and killed, 99mTc-tagged pneumococci. The aerodynamic behavior of labeled and unlabeled pneumococci was similar. Viable bacterial counts and radioactive counts were determined in lung homogenates at intervals following exposure, and rates of bacterial killing and disappearance of radioactive counts were plotted. Radioactive counts did not increase in the liver during the period of observation, suggesting that the decrease in lung radioactivity represents mucociliary clearance and not release of isotope to the systemic circulation. The use of 99mTc for bacterial labeling provides advantages of technical simplicity and personnel safety compared to the use of beta-emitting isotopes. PMID:4144653

  14. Enhancement of Clearance of Bacteria from Murine Lungs by Immunization with Detoxified Lipooligosaccharide from Moraxella catarrhalis Conjugated to Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Chen, Jing; Battey, James F.; Gu, Xin-Xing

    2000-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis strain 25238 detoxified lipooligosaccharide (dLOS)-protein conjugates induced a significant rise of bactericidal anti-LOS antibodies in animals. This study reports the effect of active or passive immunization with the conjugates or their antiserum on pulmonary clearance of M. catarrhalis in an aerosol challenge mouse model. Mice were injected subcutaneously with dLOS-tetanus toxoid (dLOS-TT), dLOS–high-molecular-weight proteins (dLOS-HMP) from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), or nonconjugated materials in Ribi adjuvant and then challenged with M. catarrhalis strain 25238 or O35E or NTHi strain 12. Immunization with dLOS-TT or dLOS-HMP generated a significant rise of serum anti-LOS immunoglobulin G and 68% and 35 to 41% reductions of bacteria in lungs compared with the control (P < 0.01) following challenge with homologous strain 25238 and heterologous strain O35E, respectively. Serum anti-LOS antibody levels correlated with its bactericidal titers against M. catarrhalis and bacterial CFU in lungs. Additionally, immunization with dLOS-HMP generated a 54% reduction of NTHi strain 12 compared with the control (P < 0.01). Passive immunization with a rabbit antiserum against dLOS-TT conferred a significant reduction of strain 25238 CFU in lungs in a dose- and time-dependent pattern compared with preimmune serum-treated mice. Kinetic examination of lung tissue sections demonstrated that antiserum-treated mice initiated and offset inflammatory responses more rapidly than preimmune serum-treated mice. These data indicate that LOS antibodies (whether active or passive) play a major role in the enhancement of pulmonary clearance of different test strains of M. catarrhalis in mice. In addition, dLOS-HMP is a potential candidate for a bivalent vaccine against M. catarrhalis and NTHi infections. PMID:10948114

  15. The role of CD1d-restricted NKT cells in the clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the lung is dependent on the host genetic background.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Patrick; Sigounas, Vaia Yioula; Thompson, Jenna L; van Rooijen, Nico; Poynter, Matthew E; Wargo, Matthew J; Boyson, Jonathan E

    2015-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important human opportunistic pathogen, accounting for a significant fraction of hospital-acquired lung infections. CD1d-restricted NKT cells comprise an unusual innate-like T cell subset that plays important roles in both bacterial and viral infections. Previous reports have differed in their conclusions regarding the role of NKT cells in clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lung. Since there is significant strain-dependent variation in NKT cell number and function among different inbred strains of mice, we investigated whether the role of NKT cells was dependent on the host genetic background. We found that NKT cells did indeed play a critical role in the clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lungs of BALB/c mice but that they played no discernible role in clearance from the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. We found that the strain-dependent role of NKT cells was associated with significant strain-dependent differences in cytokine production by lung NKT cells and that impaired clearance of P. aeruginosa in BALB/c CD1d(-/-) mice was associated with an increase in neutrophil influx to the lung and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines after infection. Finally, we found that the role of alveolar macrophages was also dependent on the genetic background. These data provide further support for a model in which the unusually high level of variability in NKT cell number and function among different genetic backgrounds may be an important contributor to infectious-disease susceptibility and pathology. PMID:25870224

  16. Structure and function of the mucus clearance system of the lung.

    PubMed

    Button, Brenda M; Button, Brian

    2013-08-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), a defect in ion transport results in thick and dehydrated airway mucus, which is difficult to clear, making such patients prone to chronic inflammation and bacterial infections. Physiotherapy using a variety of airway clearance techniques (ACTs) represents a key treatment regime by helping clear the airways of thickened, adhered, mucus and, thus, reducing the impact of lung infections and improving lung function. This article aims to bridge the gap between our understanding of the physiological effects of mechanical stresses elicited by ACTs on airway epithelia and the reported effectiveness of ACTs in CF patients. In the first part of this review, the effects of mechanical stress on airway epithelia are discussed in relation to changes in ion transport and stimulation in airway surface layer hydration. The second half is devoted to detailing the most commonly used ACTs to stimulate the removal of mucus from the airways of patients with CF. PMID:23751214

  17. Structure and Function of the Mucus Clearance System of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brenda M.; Button, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), a defect in ion transport results in thick and dehydrated airway mucus, which is difficult to clear, making such patients prone to chronic inflammation and bacterial infections. Physiotherapy using a variety of airway clearance techniques (ACTs) represents a key treatment regime by helping clear the airways of thickened, adhered, mucus and, thus, reducing the impact of lung infections and improving lung function. This article aims to bridge the gap between our understanding of the physiological effects of mechanical stresses elicited by ACTs on airway epithelia and the reported effectiveness of ACTs in CF patients. In the first part of this review, the effects of mechanical stress on airway epithelia are discussed in relation to changes in ion transport and stimulation in airway surface layer hydration. The second half is devoted to detailing the most commonly used ACTs to stimulate the removal of mucus from the airways of patients with CF. PMID:23751214

  18. The Interplay of Lung Surfactant Proteins and Lipids Assimilates the Macrophage Clearance of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Christian A.; Schaefer, Ulrich F.; Herrmann, Jennifer; Kirch, Julian; Cañadas, Olga; Echaide, Mercedes; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Casals, Cristina; Müller, Rolf; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2012-01-01

    The peripheral lungs are a potential entrance portal for nanoparticles into the human body due to their large surface area. The fact that nanoparticles can be deposited in the alveolar region of the lungs is of interest for pulmonary drug delivery strategies and is of equal importance for toxicological considerations. Therefore, a detailed understanding of nanoparticle interaction with the structures of this largest and most sensitive part of the lungs is important for both nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. Astonishingly, there is still little known about the bio-nano interactions that occur after nanoparticle deposition in the alveoli. In this study, we compared the effects of surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) on the clearance of magnetite nanoparticles (mNP) with either more hydrophilic (starch) or hydrophobic (phosphatidylcholine) surface modification by an alveolar macrophage (AM) cell line (MH-S) using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Both proteins enhanced the AM uptake of mNP compared with pristine nanoparticles; for the hydrophilic ST-mNP, this effect was strongest with SP-D, whereas for the hydrophobic PL-mNP it was most pronounced with SP-A. Using gel electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering methods, we were able to demonstrate that the observed cellular effects were related to protein adsorption and to protein-mediated interference with the colloidal stability. Next, we investigated the influence of various surfactant lipids on nanoparticle uptake by AM because lipids are the major surfactant component. Synthetic surfactant lipid and isolated native surfactant preparations significantly modulated the effects exerted by SP-A and SP-D, respectively, resulting in comparable levels of macrophage interaction for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanoparticles. Our findings suggest that because of the interplay of both surfactant lipids and proteins, the AM clearance of nanoparticles is essentially the same, regardless of different

  19. Effect of SO/sub 2/ on the clearance of Listeria monocytogenes from the lungs of emphysematous hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Trimpe, K.L.; Weiss, H.; Zwilling, B.S.

    1986-10-01

    The effect of sulfur dioxide on the clearance of Listeria monocytogenes from normal and emphysematous hamsters was assessed by measuring the number of colony forming units recovered from whole lung homogenates. Continuous exposure to SO/sub 2/ after intratracheal instillation of Listeria significantly altered the clearance of viable bacteria from the lungs of emphysematous but not normal hamsters. Pre-exposure of hamsters to SO/sub 2/ for 2 weeks prior to respiratory infection had similar effects. The emphysematous hamsters exposed to SO/sub 2/ had a lower average number of Listeria in the lungs after the first week of infection than control groups. This effect appears to result from the combined influence of the SO/sub 2/, the Listeria infection, and the emphysematous condition within the lungs.

  20. Influence of clearance model on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Gao, B.; Yang, L.; Du, W. Q.

    2016-05-01

    Computing models are always simplified to save the computing resources and time. Particularly, the clearance that between impeller and pump casing is always ignored. But the completer model is, the more precise result of numerical simulation is in theory. This paper study the influence of clearance model on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump. We present such influence via comparing performance, flow characteristic and pressure pulsation of two cases that the one of two cases is the model pump with clearance and the other is not. And the results show that the head decreases and power increases so that efficiency decreases after computing with front and back cavities. Then no-leakage model would improve absolute velocity magnitude in order to reach the rated flow rate. Finally, more disturbance induced by front cavity flow and wear-ring flow would change the pressure pulsation of impeller and volute. The performance of clearance flow is important for the whole pump in performance, flow characteristic, pressure pulsation and other respects.

  1. Effect of bronchopulmonary lavage on lung retention and clearance of particulate material in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Ellender, M; Hodgson, A; Wood, K L; Moody, J C

    1992-01-01

    Hamsters were exposed to an aerosol of fused aluminosilicate particles (FAP) labeled with 57Co. Three groups of animals were given bronchopulmonary lavage, beginning at either 1 week, 1 month, or 6 months after exposure. Each treated group was lavaged eight times over a period of 25 days. Each lavage involved 10 saline washes of the lungs. For each group, about 60-70% of the body content of 57Co at the start of lavage treatment was removed; nearly half of this was recovered in the first two lavages. A positive correlation was demonstrated between the macrophage content and 57Co activity of the washings. The subsequent fractional clearance rate of 57Co from lavaged animals was not significantly different from that in a group of untreated control animals. PMID:1396460

  2. Effect of bronchopulmonary lavage on lung retention and clearance of particulate material in hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Ellender, M.; Hodgson, A.; Wood, K.L.; Moody, J.C. )

    1992-07-01

    Hamsters were exposed to an aerosol of fused aluminosilicate particles (FAP) labeled with [sup 57]CO. Three groups of animals were given bronchopulmonary lavage, beginning at either 1 week, 1 month, or 6 months after exposure. Each treated group was lavaged eight times over a period of 25 days. Each lavage involved 10 saline washes of the lungs. For each group, about 60-70% of the body content of [sup 57]CO at the start of lavage treatment was removed; nearly half of this was recovered in the first two lavages. A positive correlation was demonstrated between the macrophage content and [sup 57]Co activity of the washings. The subsequent fractional clearance rate of [sup 57]Co from lavaged animals was not significantly different from that in a group of untreated control animals. 30 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. 11. MODEL 200 CRANE, GENERAL ARRANGEMENT & CLEARANCES. Colby Steel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. MODEL 200 CRANE, GENERAL ARRANGEMENT & CLEARANCES. Colby Steel & Engineering Company, Vancouver B.C., Seattle, New York. Two elevations and cab plan. No architect noted, drawn by "Gould." Sheet A2, No. 6365. Scale not given. August 10, 1942. "Proposal no. 318." blueline print - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Crane, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  4. Model 200 crane, general arrangement & clearances. Colby Steel & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Model 200 crane, general arrangement & clearances. Colby Steel & Engineering Company, Vancouver B.C., Seattle, New York. Two elevations and cab plan. No architect noted, drawn by Gould. Sheet A2, no 6365. Scaled not given. August 10, 1942. Proposal no. 318. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Crane, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  5. Pseudomonas infection and mucociliary and absorptive clearance in the cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Weiner, Daniel J; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Muthukrishnan, Ashok; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Lacy, Ryan T; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2016-05-01

    Airway surface liquid hyperabsorption and mucus accumulation are key elements of cystic fibrosis lung disease that can be assessed in vivo using functional imaging methods. In this study we evaluated experimental factors affecting measurements of mucociliary clearance (MCC) and small-molecule absorption (ABS) and patient factors associated with abnormal absorption and mucus clearance.Our imaging technique utilises two radiopharmaceutical probes delivered by inhalation. Measurement repeatability was assessed in 10 adult cystic fibrosis subjects. Experimental factors were assessed in 29 adult and paediatric cystic fibrosis subjects (51 scans). Patient factors were assessed in a subgroup with optimal aerosol deposition (37 scans; 24 subjects). Paediatric subjects (n=9) underwent initial and 2-year follow-up scans. Control subjects from a previously reported study are included for comparison.High rates of central aerosol deposition influenced measurements of ABS and, to a lesser extent, MCC. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis was only detectable in subjects with previous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Cystic fibrosis subjects without P. aeruginosa had similar MCC to control subjects. Cystic fibrosis subjects had consistently higher ABS rates.We conclude that the primary experimental factor affecting MCC/ABS measurements is central deposition percentage. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis is associated with P. aeruginosa infection. ABS is consistently increased in cystic fibrosis.

  6. Pneumocystis pneumonia increases the clearance rate of inhaled /sup 99m/Tc DTPA from lung to blood

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.K.; Higenbottam, T.W.

    1985-10-01

    Despite no radiographic change, a patient with Pneumocystis pneumonia showed increased clearance of inhaled /sup 99m/Tc DTPA from lung to blood. Gas transfer for carbon monoxide was also reduced, but improved with treatment. This was paralleled by serial increase in the t1/2 LB.

  7. Influence of particle size on persistence and clearance of aerosolized silver nanoparticles in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Donald S; Patchin, Esther S; Silva, Rona M; Uyeminami, Dale L; Sharmah, Arjun; Guo, Ting; Das, Gautom K; Brown, Jared M; Shannahan, Jonathan; Gordon, Terry; Chen, Lung Chi; Pinkerton, Kent E; Van Winkle, Laura S

    2015-04-01

    The growing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in consumer products raises concerns about potential health effects. This study investigated the persistence and clearance of 2 different size AgNPs (20 and 110 nm) delivered to rats by single nose-only aerosol exposures (6 h) of 7.2 and 5.4 mg/m(3), respectively. Rat lung tissue was assessed for silver accumulations using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), autometallography, and enhanced dark field microscopy. Involvement of tissue macrophages was assessed by scoring of silver staining in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Silver was abundant in most macrophages at 1 day post-exposure. The group exposed to 20 nm AgNP had the greatest number of silver positive BALF macrophages at 56 days post-exposure. While there was a significant decrease in the amount of silver in lung tissue at 56 days post-exposure compared with 1 day following exposure, at least 33% of the initial delivered dose was still present for both AgNPs. Regardless of particle size, silver was predominantly localized within the terminal bronchial/alveolar duct junction region of the lung associated with extracellular matrix and within epithelial cells. Inhalation of both 20 and 110 nm AgNPs resulted in a persistence of silver in the lung at 56 days post-exposure and local deposition as well as accumulation of silver at the terminal bronchiole alveolar duct junction. Further the smaller particles, 20 nm AgNP, produced a greater silver burden in BALF macrophages as well as greater persistence of silver positive macrophages at later timepoints (21 and 56 days). PMID:25577195

  8. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. ); Oberdorster, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Influence of Particle Size on Persistence and Clearance of Aerosolized Silver Nanoparticles in the Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald S.; Patchin, Esther S.; Silva, Rona M.; Uyeminami, Dale L.; Sharmah, Arjun; Guo, Ting; Das, Gautom K.; Brown, Jared M.; Shannahan, Jonathan; Gordon, Terry; Chen, Lung Chi; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in consumer products raises concerns about potential health effects. This study investigated the persistence and clearance of 2 different size AgNPs (20 and 110 nm) delivered to rats by single nose-only aerosol exposures (6 h) of 7.2 and 5.4 mg/m3, respectively. Rat lung tissue was assessed for silver accumulations using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), autometallography, and enhanced dark field microscopy. Involvement of tissue macrophages was assessed by scoring of silver staining in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Silver was abundant in most macrophages at 1 day post-exposure. The group exposed to 20 nm AgNP had the greatest number of silver positive BALF macrophages at 56 days post-exposure. While there was a significant decrease in the amount of silver in lung tissue at 56 days post-exposure compared with 1 day following exposure, at least 33% of the initial delivered dose was still present for both AgNPs. Regardless of particle size, silver was predominantly localized within the terminal bronchial/alveolar duct junction region of the lung associated with extracellular matrix and within epithelial cells. Inhalation of both 20 and 110 nm AgNPs resulted in a persistence of silver in the lung at 56 days post-exposure and local deposition as well as accumulation of silver at the terminal bronchiole alveolar duct junction. Further the smaller particles, 20 nm AgNP, produced a greater silver burden in BALF macrophages as well as greater persistence of silver positive macrophages at later timepoints (21 and 56 days). PMID:25577195

  10. Factors affecting the response of lung clearance systems to acid aerosols: role of exposure concentration, exposure time, and relative acidity.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, R B

    1989-02-01

    The ability of the lungs to clear deposited material is essential for maintenance of lung homeostasis. Acid aerosols have been shown to alter the efficiency of this process. This paper assesses the role of acid aerosol exposure concentration (C), exposure time (T), and relative acidity in producing changes in clearance from both the tracheobronchial tree and respiratory region of the lungs of rabbits. The response was found to be due to total exposure, i.e., some combination form of C x T, and was also related to relative acidity.

  11. Clearance of Free Silica in Rat Lungs by Spraying with Chinese Herbal Kombucha

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Nai-fang; Luo, Chang-hui; Wu, Jun-cai; Zheng, Yan-yan; Gan, Yong-jin; Ling, Jian-an; Liang, Heng-qiu; Liang, Dan-yu; Xie, Jing; Chen, Xiao-qin; Li, Xian-jun; Pan, Rui-hui; Chen, Zuo-Xing; Jiang, Sheng-jun

    2013-01-01

    The effects of spraying with kombucha and Chinese herbal kombucha were compared with treatments with tetrandrine in a rat silicosis model. Silica dust (50 mg) was injected into the lungs of rats, which were then treated with one of the experimental treatments for a month. The rats were then killed and the effects of the treatments were evaluated by examining the extent and severity of the histopathological lesions in the animals' lungs, measuring their organ coefficients and lung collagen contents, determining the dry and wet weights of their lungs, and measuring the free silica content of the dried lungs. In addition, lavage was performed on whole lungs taken from selected rats, and the numbers and types of cells in the lavage fluid were counted. The most effective treatment in terms of the ability to reduce lung collagen content and minimize the formation of pulmonary histopathological lesions was tetrandrine treatment, followed by Chinese herbal kombucha and non-Chinese herbal kombucha. However, the lavage fluid cell counts indicated that tetrandrine treatment had severe adverse effects on macrophage viability. This effect was much less pronounced for the kombucha and Chinese herbal kombucha treatments. Moreover, the free silica levels in the lungs of animals treated with Chinese herbal kombucha were significantly lower than those for any other silica-exposed group. These preliminary results indicate that spraying with Chinese herbal kombucha preparations can effectively promote the discharge of silica dust from lung tissues. Chinese herbal kombucha inhalation may thus be a useful new treatment for silicosis and other pneumoconiosis diseases. PMID:24023583

  12. Mucociliary Clearance Defects in a Murine In Vitro Model of Pneumococcal Airway Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fliegauf, Manfred; Sonnen, Andreas F.-P.; Kremer, Bernhard; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Mucociliary airway clearance is an innate defense mechanism that protects the lung from harmful effects of inhaled pathogens. In order to escape mechanical clearance, airway pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are thought to inactivate mucociliary clearance by mechanisms such as slowing of ciliary beating and lytic damage of epithelial cells. Pore-forming toxins like pneumolysin, may be instrumental in these processes. In a murine in vitro airway infection model using tracheal epithelial cells grown in air-liquid interface cultures, we investigated the functional consequences on the ciliated respiratory epithelium when the first contact with pneumococci is established. High-speed video microscopy and live-cell imaging showed that the apical infection with both wildtype and pneumolysin-deficient pneumococci caused insufficient fluid flow along the epithelial surface and loss of efficient clearance, whereas ciliary beat frequency remained within the normal range. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy demonstrated that pneumococci caused specific morphologic aberrations of two key elements in the F-actin cytoskeleton: the junctional F-actin at the apical cortex of the lateral cell borders and the apical F-actin, localized within the planes of the apical cell sides at the ciliary bases. The lesions affected the columnar shape of the polarized respiratory epithelial cells. In addition, the planar architecture of the entire ciliated respiratory epithelium was irregularly distorted. Our observations indicate that the mechanical supports essential for both effective cilia strokes and stability of the epithelial barrier were weakened. We provide a new model, where - in pneumococcal infection - persistent ciliary beating generates turbulent fluid flow at non-planar distorted epithelial surface areas, which enables pneumococci to resist mechanical cilia-mediated clearance. PMID:23527286

  13. Mucociliary clearance defects in a murine in vitro model of pneumococcal airway infection.

    PubMed

    Fliegauf, Manfred; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Kremer, Bernhard; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Mucociliary airway clearance is an innate defense mechanism that protects the lung from harmful effects of inhaled pathogens. In order to escape mechanical clearance, airway pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are thought to inactivate mucociliary clearance by mechanisms such as slowing of ciliary beating and lytic damage of epithelial cells. Pore-forming toxins like pneumolysin, may be instrumental in these processes. In a murine in vitro airway infection model using tracheal epithelial cells grown in air-liquid interface cultures, we investigated the functional consequences on the ciliated respiratory epithelium when the first contact with pneumococci is established. High-speed video microscopy and live-cell imaging showed that the apical infection with both wildtype and pneumolysin-deficient pneumococci caused insufficient fluid flow along the epithelial surface and loss of efficient clearance, whereas ciliary beat frequency remained within the normal range. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy demonstrated that pneumococci caused specific morphologic aberrations of two key elements in the F-actin cytoskeleton: the junctional F-actin at the apical cortex of the lateral cell borders and the apical F-actin, localized within the planes of the apical cell sides at the ciliary bases. The lesions affected the columnar shape of the polarized respiratory epithelial cells. In addition, the planar architecture of the entire ciliated respiratory epithelium was irregularly distorted. Our observations indicate that the mechanical supports essential for both effective cilia strokes and stability of the epithelial barrier were weakened. We provide a new model, where--in pneumococcal infection--persistent ciliary beating generates turbulent fluid flow at non-planar distorted epithelial surface areas, which enables pneumococci to resist mechanical cilia-mediated clearance. PMID:23527286

  14. Feasibility and variability of measuring the Lung Clearance Index in a multi-center setting.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Ellemunter, Helmut; Eder, Johannes; Mellies, Uwe; Grosse-Onnebrink, Jörg; Tümmler, Burkhard; Staab, Doris; Jobst, Andrea; Griese, Matthias; Ripper, Jan; Rietschel, Ernst; Zeidler, Susanne; Ahrens, Frank; Gappa, Monika

    2012-07-01

    The Lung Clearance Index (LCI) is superior to spirometry in detecting early lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) and correlates with structural lung changes seen on CT scans. The LCI has the potential to become a novel outcome parameter for clinical and research purposes. However longitudinal studies are required to further prove its prognostic value. Multi-center design is likely to facilitate realization of such studies. Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess multi-center feasibility and inter-center variability of LCI measurements in healthy children and adolescents. Comparative measurements were performed in unselected patients with CF to confirm previous single-center results. LCI measurements were performed in eight centers using the EasyOne Pro, MBW Module (ndd Medical Technologies, Zurich, Switzerland). The overall success rate for LCI measurements was 75.5%, leaving 102/151 measurements in healthy volunteers and 139/183 measurements in patients with CF for final analysis. Age ranged between 4 and 24 years. Mean LCI (range of means among centers) was 6.3 (6.0-6.5) in healthy volunteers and thus normal. Inter-center variability of center means was 2.9%, ANOVA including Schffé procedure demonstrated no significant inter-center differences (P > 0.05). Mean LCI (range of means among centers) was 8.2 (7.4-8.9) in CF and thus abnormal. Our study demonstrates good multi-center feasibility and low inter-center variability of the LCI in healthy volunteers when measured with the EasyOne Pro MBW module. Our data confirm published LCI data in CF. However, central coordination, quality control, regular training, and supervision during the entire study appear essential for successfully performing multi-center trials.

  15. Antagonism of miR-328 Increases the Antimicrobial Function of Macrophages and Neutrophils and Rapid Clearance of Non-typeable Haemophilus Influenzae (NTHi) from Infected Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Hock L.; Kaiko, Gerard E.; Plank, Maximilian; Li, JingJing; Maltby, Steven; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Jarnicki, Andrew; Yang, Ming; Mattes, Joerg; Hansbro, Philip M.; Foster, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacterial infections of the lung are life threatening and underpin chronic lung diseases. Current treatments are often ineffective potentially due to increasing antibiotic resistance and impairment of innate immunity by disease processes and steroid therapy. Manipulation miRNA directly regulating anti-microbial machinery of the innate immune system may boost host defence responses. Here we demonstrate that miR-328 is a key element of the host response to pulmonary infection with non-typeable haemophilus influenzae and pharmacological inhibition in mouse and human macrophages augments phagocytosis, the production of reactive oxygen species, and microbicidal activity. Moreover, inhibition of miR-328 in respiratory models of infection, steroid-induced immunosuppression, and smoke-induced emphysema enhances bacterial clearance. Thus, miRNA pathways can be targeted in the lung to enhance host defence against a clinically relevant microbial infection and offer a potential new anti-microbial approach for the treatment of respiratory diseases. PMID:25894560

  16. Rate-Based Model Predictive Control of Turbofan Engine Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    An innovative model predictive control strategy is developed for control of nonlinear aircraft propulsion systems and sub-systems. At the heart of the controller is a rate-based linear parameter-varying model that propagates the state derivatives across the prediction horizon, extending prediction fidelity to transient regimes where conventional models begin to lose validity. The new control law is applied to a demanding active clearance control application, where the objectives are to tightly regulate blade tip clearances and also anticipate and avoid detrimental blade-shroud rub occurrences by optimally maintaining a predefined minimum clearance. Simulation results verify that the rate-based controller is capable of satisfying the objectives during realistic flight scenarios where both a conventional Jacobian-based model predictive control law and an unconstrained linear-quadratic optimal controller are incapable of doing so. The controller is evaluated using a variety of different actuators, illustrating the efficacy and versatility of the control approach. It is concluded that the new strategy has promise for this and other nonlinear aerospace applications that place high importance on the attainment of control objectives during transient regimes.

  17. An integrated approach to model hepatic drug clearance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lichuan; Pang, K Sandy

    2006-11-01

    It has been well accepted that hepatic drug extraction depends on the blood flow, vascular binding, transmembrane barriers, transporters, enzymes and cosubstrate and their zonal heterogeneity. Models of hepatic drug clearances have been appraised with respect to their utility in predicting drug removal by the liver. Among these models, the "well-stirred" model is the simplest since it assumes venous equilibration, with drug emerging from the outflow being in equilibrium with drug within the liver, and the concentration is the same throughout. The "parallel tube" and dispersion models, and distributed model of Goresky and co-workers have been used to account for the observed sinusoidal concentration gradient from the inlet and outlet. Departure from these models exists to include heterogeneity in flow, enzymes, and transporters. This article utilized the physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) liver model and its extension that include heterogeneity in enzymes and transporters to illustrate how in vitro uptake and metabolic data from zonal hepatocytes on transport and enzymes may be used to predict the kinetics of removal in the intact liver; binding data were also necessary. In doing so, an integrative platform was provided to examine determinants of hepatic drug clearance. We used enalapril and digoxin as examples, and described a simple liver PBPK model that included transmembrane transport and metabolism occurring behind the membrane, and a zonal model in which the PBPK model was expanded three sets of sub-compartments that are arranged sequentially to represent zones 1, 2, and 3 along the flow path. The latter model readily accommodated the heterogeneous distribution of hepatic enzymes and transporters. Transport and metabolic data, piecewise information that served as initial estimates, allowed for the unknown efflux and other intrinsic clearances to be estimated. The simple or zonal PBPK model provides predictive views on the hepatic removal of drugs and

  18. Lung clearance index: normal values, repeatability, and reproducibility in healthy children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Eder, Johannes; Ellemunter, Helmut; Gappa, Monika

    2009-12-01

    There is increasing interest in using the Multiple Breath Washout technique and the lung clearance index (LCI) for detecting early pulmonary changes, for example, in cystic fibrosis lung disease. However, there are still limited data regarding equipment specific reference ranges, repeatability and reproducibility. The aim of this prospective study was to assess within-test repeatability, short term reproducibility and long term reproducibility, and to establish normal values for the LCI in healthy children and adolescents using the sidestream ultrasonic flow sensor (EasyOne Pro, MBW Module, ndd Medical Technologies, Switzerland). Fourty-four volunteers (5.3-20.3 years) were recruited for the 1st test. Twenty-two out of 44 were measured on a 2nd test occasion after an interval of 1 hr (2nd test). Thirty-four out of 44 agreed to come back for a follow up test 6-15 months later (3rd test). Mean LCI (SD) was 6.2 (0.4), 6.3 (0.4), and 6.0 (0.4) at the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd test. The upper limit of normal was 7.0 for all subjects. Within-test repeatability was 5.1%. Short-term reproducibility (1st test vs. 2nd test) was 4.2% with a mean difference of -0.13 (95% CI -0.350; 0.087). Long-term reproducibility (1st test vs. 3rd test) was 5.1%, with a mean difference of 0.017 (95% CI -0.016; 0.348). With this low variability of the LCI for both, within and between tests, our study demonstrates reliability and robustness of equipment, protocol and analysis and the reliability of the MBW technique in general. The present data will help to interpret the effect of therapeutic interventions and interpretation of longitudinal data in patients with pulmonary diseases.

  19. Lung clearance index in cystic fibrosis subjects treated for pulmonary exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Sonneveld, Nicole; Stanojevic, Sanja; Amin, Reshma; Aurora, Paul; Davies, Jane; Elborn, J Stuart; Horsley, Alex; Latzin, Philipp; O'Neill, Katherine; Robinson, Paul; Scrase, Emma; Selvadurai, Hiran; Subbarao, Padmaja; Welsh, Liam; Yammine, Sophie; Ratjen, Felix

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary exacerbations are important clinical events for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Studies assessing the ability of the lung clearance index (LCI) to detect treatment response for pulmonary exacerbations have yielded heterogeneous results. Here, we conduct a retrospective analysis of pooled LCI data to assess treatment with intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations and to understand factors explaining the heterogeneous response.A systematic literature search was performed to identify prospective observational studies. Factors predicting the relative change in LCI and spirometry were evaluated while adjusting for within-study clustering.Six previously reported studies and one unpublished study, which included 176 pulmonary exacerbations in both paediatric and adult patients, were included. Overall, LCI significantly decreased by 0.40 units (95% CI -0.60- -0.19, p=0.004) or 2.5% following treatment. The relative change in LCI was significantly correlated with the relative change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), but results were discordant in 42.5% of subjects (80 out of 188). Higher (worse) baseline LCI was associated with a greater improvement in LCI (slope: -0.9%, 95% CI -1.0- -0.4%).LCI response to therapy for pulmonary exacerbations is heterogeneous in CF patients; the overall effect size is small and results are often discordant with FEV1.

  20. Influence of respiratory dead space on lung clearance index in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Roland P; Pillow, J Jane; Thamrin, Cindy; Frey, Urs; Schulzke, Sven M

    2016-03-01

    Lung clearance index (LCI), a marker of ventilation inhomogeneity derived from multiple breath washout (MBW), is used for clinical monitoring and as a key outcome of clinical trials in infants and children with cystic fibrosis. Utility of LCI is controversial in preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) who tend to have high dead space to tidal volume ratio (VD/VT). We investigated the effect of VD/VT on LCI in a cohort of preterm infants with and without BPD and term healthy controls. We analyzed MBW data from 455 infants at a mean (SD) of 43.4 (3.5) w postmenstrual age. VD was estimated from the molar mass signal of an ultrasonic flowmeter (VD,MM). LCI was associated with VD,MM/VT (r(2)=0.13, p<0.001) but was not associated with BPD. Adjusting for VD,MM/VT did not reveal an association between LCI and BPD. We conclude that VD,MM/VT is a relevant factor when interpreting LCI in this population but the effect size of this association is moderate. PMID:26742626

  1. High-frequency chest compression system to aid in clearance of mucus from the lung.

    PubMed

    Hansen, L G; Warwick, W J

    1990-01-01

    The authors developed a high-frequency chest compression (HFCC) device to aid in mucous clearance for patients with obstructive lung disease. The device, designed for self-therapy, consists of a large-volume variable-frequency air-pulse delivery system and a nonstretchable inflatable vest worn by the patient. Pressure pulses are controlled by the patient and applied during expiration. Pulse frequency is tunable from 5 to 25 Hz. Maximum vest pressure is 39 mmHg (5.2 kPa), with patient-controlled vest inflation and deflation time constants of 0.5 s. Vest pressure increases from 28 mmHg (3.7 kPa) at 5 Hz to 39 mmHg (5.2 kPa) at 25 Hz. Preliminary clinical trials have shown the HFCC device to be more effective than standard chest physical therapy. The HFCC device yielded a mean volume of cleared mucus of 3.3 cc per session, compared with 1.8 cc for a conventional therapy session.

  2. Pharmacotherapy of impaired mucociliary clearance in non-CF pediatric lung disease. A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, Ruben; de Jongste, Johan C; Merkus, Peter J F M

    2007-11-01

    Mucoactive agents are used to treat a variety of lung diseases involving impaired mucociliary clearance or mucus hypersecretion. The mucoactive agents studied most frequently are N-acetylcysteine (NAC), recombinant human DNase (rhDNase), and hypertonic saline. Studies on the efficacy of these have been mainly conducted in adults, and in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The exact role of mucoactive agents in children with non-CF lung disease is not well established. We present an overview of the current literature reporting clinical outcome measures of treatment with NAC, rhDNase, and hypertonic saline in children. PMID:17902149

  3. Pharmacotherapy of impaired mucociliary clearance in non-CF pediatric lung disease. A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, Ruben; de Jongste, Johan C; Merkus, Peter J F M

    2007-11-01

    Mucoactive agents are used to treat a variety of lung diseases involving impaired mucociliary clearance or mucus hypersecretion. The mucoactive agents studied most frequently are N-acetylcysteine (NAC), recombinant human DNase (rhDNase), and hypertonic saline. Studies on the efficacy of these have been mainly conducted in adults, and in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The exact role of mucoactive agents in children with non-CF lung disease is not well established. We present an overview of the current literature reporting clinical outcome measures of treatment with NAC, rhDNase, and hypertonic saline in children.

  4. Imaging Lung Clearance of Radiolabeled Tumor Cells to Study Mice with Normal, Activated or Depleted Natural Killer (NK) Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, P.V.; Bennett, M.; Constantinescu, A.; Arora, V.; Viguet, M.; Antich, P.; Parkey, R.W.; Mathews, D.; Mason, R.P.; Oz, O.K.

    2003-08-26

    Lung clearance of 51CR and 125I iododeoxyuridine (IUDR) labeled cancer cells assess NK cell activity. It is desirable to develop noninvasive imaging technique to assess NK activity in mice. We labeled target YAC-1 tumor cells with 125I, 111In, 99mTc, or 67Ga and injected I.V. into three groups of BALB/c mice. Animals were treated with medium (group I), 300mg/kg cyclophosmamide (CY) to kill NK cell (group II), or anti-LY49C/1) (ab')2 mAb to augment NK function (group III). Lungs were removed 15 min or 2 h later for tissue counting. Control and treated mice were imaged every 5 min with a scintillating camera for 1 h after 15 min of infusion of the 111In labeled cells. Lung clearance increased after 15 min (lodging: 60-80%) and (2 h retention: 3-7%). Similar results were obtained with all the isotopes studied. Images distinguished the control and treated mice for lung activity. Cells labeled with 111In, 99mTc or 67Ga are cleared similar to those labeled with 51Cr or 125I. NK cell destruction of tumor cells may be assessed by noninvasive imaging method either by SPECT (99mTc, 111In, 67Ga) or by PET (68Ga)

  5. Lung clearance and disposition of /sup 63/Ni in F344/N rats after intratracheal instillation of nickel sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Benson, J.M.; Hobbs, C.H.

    1987-06-01

    Epidemiology studies have indicated increased incidences of respiratory tract and renal cancer in nickel refinery workers. Since the most likely route of exposure to nickel in the workplace is via the respiratory tract, the objectives of the experiments described here were to determine the retention pattern of Ni in the lungs, identify the target organs for Ni absorbed from the respiratory tract, and determine rates for excretion of Ni. Male and female F344 rats were given 17, 190, or 1800 nmoles Ni (as a nickel sulfate solution) in saline, containing trace amounts of /sup 63/Ni, by intratracheal instillation. Urine and feces were collected, and rats were necropsied at predetermined times up to 96 hr after instillation. At all times, lungs, trachea, larynx, kidney, and urinary bladder contained the highest concentrations of Ni as determined by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Urine was the major route for excretion of Ni, accounting for 50% of the dose after instillation of 17 or 190 nmoles Ni, and 80% of the dose after instillation of 1800 nmoles Ni. The half-time for urinary excretion of Ni increased from 4.6 hr at the highest dose to 23 hr at the lowest dose used. Fecal excretion accounted for 30% (17- and 190-nmole doses) or 13% (1800 nmoles) of the initial dose. Of the Ni remaining in the body at the end of 96 hr, over 50% was in the lungs. The long-term half-time for clearance of Ni from the lungs ranged from 21 hr at the highest dose to 36 hr at the lowest dose instilled. As the amount of instilled Ni decreased, the fraction of the instilled Ni associated with the long-term clearance component increased (from 24% at the highest dose to 40% at the lowest dose). Results suggest that, over the range of doses studied, both pulmonary clearance of Ni and routes for excretion of Ni were dependent on the instilled dose.

  6. Lung inflammation in coal miners assessed by uptake of 67Ga-citrate and clearance of inhaled 99mTc-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Susskind, H.; Rom, W.N. )

    1992-07-01

    The authors compared the diffuse lung uptake of 67Ga-citrate, an index of inflammatory lung activity, with the lung clearance of inhaled 99mTc-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) aerosol, an index of pulmonary epithelial permeability, in a group of 19 West Virginia coal miners whose pulmonary status was compatible with coal worker's pneumoconiosis. 99mTc-DTPA clearance alone and 67Ga-citrate uptake alone were measured in nine and five additional subjects, respectively. The objective of this study was to determine if increased 99mTc-DTPA lung clearance was caused by inflammation at the lung epithelial surfaces. Subjects inhaled approximately 150 microCi (approximately 5.6 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA aerosol, and quantitative gamma camera images of the lungs were acquired at 1-min increments for 25 min. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected to include (1) both lungs; (2) each individual lung; and (3) the upper, middle, and lower thirds of each lung. 99mTc-DTPA clearance was determined from the slopes of the respective time-activity plots for the different ROI. Each subject was intravenously administered 50 miCroCk (1.9 MBq)/kg 67Ga-citrate 48 to 72 h before imaging the body between neck and pelvis. The extent of 67Ga-citrate lung uptake was expressed as the gallium index (GI). Mean radioaerosol clearance half-time (T1/2) for the six nonsmoking coal miners (60.6 +/- 16.0 min) was significantly shorter (p less than 0.001) than for the nonsmoking control group (123.8 +/- 28.7 min). T1/2 for the 12 smoking miners (18.4 +/- 10.2 min) was shorter than for the smoking control group (33.1 +/- 17.8 min), but the difference did not attain statistical significance.

  7. Pulmonary clearance of three aerosolized solutes in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Huchon, G.J.; Montgomery, A.B.; Lipavsky, A.; Hoeffel, J.M.; Murray, J.F.

    1988-03-01

    We studied the effects of oleic acid (OA) on pulmonary clearance of three aerosolized radioactive solutes: /sup 99m/Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA), /sup 67/Ga-desferoxamine (/sup 67/Ga-DFOM), and /sup 111/In-transferrin (/sup 111/In-TF). Either 0.09 ml/kg OA or an equivalent volume of 0.9% NaCl (controls) was administered intravenously to 48 anesthetized, paralyzed dogs. Each animal received one aerosolized solute either 60 min after (protocol A) or 30 min before (protocol B) the infusion of OA or NaCl. In protocol A clearances of all three solutes were similar in OA and control animals. In contrast, in protocol B clearances of all three solutes increased significantly during OA infusion; during the next 60 min clearances of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA and /sup 67/Ga-DFOM returned to control values but 111In-TF remained increased. We conclude that 1) in OA-induced permeability edema pulmonary clearance of aerosolized solutes is increased when the aerosol is delivered 30 min before but not 60 min after injury, and 2) increased clearance persists only for large molecules, presumably because smaller molecules cross injured epithelium quickly and completely. These phenomena are best explained by a nonhomogeneous distribution of OA-induced injury.

  8. An Evaluation of the Venous Equilibrium Model for Hepatic Clearance using Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Livers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The venous equilibrium model is widely used to describe hepatic clearance (CLH) of chemicals metabolized by the liver. If chemical delivery to the tissue does not limit CLH, this model predicts that CLH will approximately equal the product of intrinsic metabolic clearance and a t...

  9. A Reduced Model for Prediction of Thermal and Rotational Effects on Turbine Tip Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kypuros, Javier A.; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a dynamic model that was developed to predict changes in turbine tip clearance the radial distance between the end of a turbine blade and the abradable tip seal. The clearance is estimated by using a first principles approach to model the thermal and mechanical effects of engine operating conditions on the turbine sub-components. These effects are summed to determine the resulting clearance. The model is demonstrated via a ground idle to maximum power transient and a lapse-rate takeoff transient. Results show the model demonstrates the expected pinch point behavior. The paper concludes by identifying knowledge gaps and suggesting additional research to improve the model.

  10. siRNA delivery targeting to the lung via agglutination-induced accumulation and clearance of cationic tetraamino fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Kosuke; Okamoto, Koji; Doi, Kent; Harano, Koji; Noiri, Eisei; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2014-05-01

    The efficient treatment of lung diseases requires lung-selective delivery of agents to the lung. However, lung-selective delivery is difficult because the accumulation of micrometer-sized carriers in the lung often induces inflammation and embolization-related toxicity. Here we demonstrate a lung-selective delivery system of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by controlling the size of carrier vehicle in blood vessels. The carrier is made of tetra(piperazino)fullerene epoxide (TPFE), a water-soluble cationic tetraamino fullerene. TPFE and siRNA form sub-micrometer-sized complexes in buffered solution and these complexes agglutinate further with plasma proteins in the bloodstream to form micrometer-sized particles. The agglutinate rapidly clogs the lung capillaries, releases the siRNA into lung cells to silence expression of target genes, and is then cleared rapidly from the lung after siRNA delivery. We applied our delivery system to an animal model of sepsis, indicating the potential of TPFE-based siRNA delivery for clinical applications.

  11. Establishment and use of surgical rat models for assessment of organ specific in vivo clearance.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Bill

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of clearance plays a key role in the development of new drug entities, especially in the development of improved analogues for treatment of chronic conditions. Improved pharmacokinetic properties can be used to increase dosing interval and thereby improve patient compliance. This will lead to improved treatment outcome or decreased risk of treatment failure when treating chronic conditions. Therefore, animal models for assessment of organ-specific clearance are of great value in preclinical drug development. These models can be used to obtain insights into the relative importance of a clearance organ and thereby guide drug design of new analogues in early drug discovery. The current PhD project was undertaken to explore surgical in vivo models, which could be used in the assessment of the relative importance of major clearance organs. It was the aim of the PhD project to establish and validate both a nephrectomy model and a hepatectomy model as tools to investigate relative importance of renal and hepatic clearance. Furthermore, the project aim was to investigate renal clearance of rFVIIa and rhGH using a nephrectomy model in rats. The thesis is composed of a short theoretical background, a literature review, two papers based on experimental work as well as experimental work not included in the papers. Chapter one is an introduction with the specific aims and hypotheses. The chapters from two to five contain theoretical background of the clearance concept, anatomical and physiological description of clearance organs and a brief overview of potential clearance models including in vivo models. Chapters six through nine highlight the experimental work with the results obtained during the PhD project. Lastly, the chapters from ten to twelve contain a general discussion, conclusion and perspectives of the current thesis. Paper I "Nephrectomized and hepatectomized animal models as tools in preclinical pharmacokinetics" provides a literature review of animal

  12. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  13. GERMINATION, VIABILITY AND CLEARANCE OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM IN THE LUNGS OF INFANT RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fungus Stachybotrys chartarum has been associated with many adverse health effects including the condition known as idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage in infants. In order to gain some insight into possible mechanisms, viable conidia of S. chartarum were instilled into the lung...

  14. Modelling of Outer and Inner Film Oil Pressure for Floating Ring Bearing Clearance in Turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Shi, Zhanqun; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    Floating ring bearing is widely used in turbochargers to undertake the extreme condition of high rotating speed and high operating temperature. It is also the most concerned by the designers and users alike due to its high failure rate and high maintenance cost. Any little clearance change may result in oil leakage, which in turn cause blue smoke or black smoke according to leakage types. However, there is no condition monitoring of this bearing because it is almost impossible to measure the clearance especially the inner clearance, in which the inner oil film directly bears the high speed rotation. In stead of measuring clearance directly, this paper has proposed a method that uses film pressure as a measure to monitor the bearing clearance and its variation. A non-linear mathematical model is developed by using Reynolds equations with non-linear oil film pressure. A full description of the outer and inner film is provided along both axial and radial directions. A numerical simulation is immediately carried out. Variable clearance changes are investigated using the mathematical model. Results show the relationship between clearance and film pressure.

  15. Adaptation of an amphibian mucociliary clearance model to evaluate early effects of tobacco smoke exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, J Gustavo; O'Brien, Darryl W; Tai, Shusheng; Ding, Jie; Lim, Leonard; King, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    Rationale Inhaled side-stream tobacco smoke brings in all of its harmful components impairing mechanisms that protect the airways and lungs. Chronic respiratory health consequences are a complex multi-step silent process. By the time clinical manifestations require medical attention, several structural and functional changes have already occurred. The respiratory system has to undergo an iterative process of injury, healing and remodeling with every exposure. Methods To have a better understanding of the initial changes that take place when first exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, we have developed an exposure model, using the frog palate that closely represents the features of obstructive airways where ciliary dysfunction and mucus hypersecretion occur. Results Mucus transport was significantly reduced, even after exposure to the smoke of one cigarette (p < 0.05) and even further with 4-cigarettes exposure (p < 0.001). Morphometric and ultrastructural studies by SEM show extensive areas of tissue disruption. Gelatinase zymography shows activation of MMP9 in mucus from palates exposed to tobacco smoke. Conclusions The clearance of mucus on the frog palate is significantly reduced after exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. Cilia and the extracellular matrix are anatomically disrupted. Tobacco smoke triggers an increased activity of matrix metalloproteinases associated with a substantial defoliation of ciliated epithelium. These studies enhance the knowledge of the changes in the mucociliary apparatus that occur initially after exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, with the goal of understanding how these changes relate to the genesis of chronic airway pathologies in humans. PMID:15357881

  16. Lung models: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Musante, C J; Segal, R A; Schroeter, J D; Hwang, D; Dolovich, M A; Burton, R; Spencer, R M; Fleming, J S

    2000-06-01

    The most widely used particle dosimetry models are those proposed by the National Council on Radiation Protection, International Commission for Radiological Protection, and the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (the RIVM model). Those models have inherent problems that may be regarded as serious drawbacks: for example, they are not physiologically realistic. They ignore the presence and commensurate effects of naturally occurring structural elements of lungs (eg, cartilaginous rings, carinal ridges), which have been demonstrated to affect the motion of inhaled air. Most importantly, the surface structures have been shown to influence the trajectories of inhaled particles transported by air streams. Thus, the model presented herein by Martonen et al may be perhaps the most appropriate for human lung dosimetry. In its present form, the model's major "strengths" are that it could be used for diverse purposes in medical research and practice, including: to target the delivery of drugs for diseases of the respiratory tract (eg, cystic fibrosis, asthma, bronchogenic carcinoma); to selectively deposit drugs for systemic distribution (eg, insulin); to design clinical studies; to interpret scintigraphy data from human subject exposures; to determine laboratory conditions for animal testing (ie, extrapolation modeling); and to aid in aerosolized drug delivery to children (pediatric medicine). Based on our research, we have found very good agreement between the predictions of our model and the experimental data of Heyder et al, and therefore advocate its use in the clinical arena. In closing, we would note that for the simulations reported herein the data entered into our computer program were the actual conditions of the Heyder et al experiments. However, the deposition model is more versatile and can simulate many aerosol therapy scenarios. For example, the core model has many computer subroutines that can be enlisted to simulate the

  17. Dissolution and clearance of titanium tritide particles in the lungs of F344/Crl rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Snipes, M.B.; Wang, Yansheng

    1995-12-01

    Metal tritides are compounds in which the radioactive isotope tritium, following adsorption onto the metal, forms a stable chemical compound with the metal. When particles of tritiated metals become airborne, they can be inhaled by workers. Because the particles may be retained in the lung for extended periods, the resulting dose will be greater than doses following exposure to tritium gas or tritium oxide (HTO). Particles of triated metals may be dispersed into the air during routine handling, disruption of contaminated metals, or as a result of spontaneous radioactive decay processes. Unlike metal hydrides and deuterides, tritides are radioactive, and the decay of the tritium atoms affects the metal. Because helium is a product of the decay, helium bubbles form within the metal tritide matrix. The pressure from these bubbles leads to respirable particles breaking off from the tritide surface. Our results show that a substantial amount of titanium tritide remains in the rat lung 10 d after intratracheal instillation, confirming results previously obtain in an in vitro dissolution study.

  18. Phosphodiesterase-4 Inhibition Alters Gene Expression and Improves Isoniazid – Mediated Clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Rabbit Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; O'Brien, Paul; Yang, Guibin; Koo, Mi-Sun; Peixoto, Blas; Fallows, Dorothy; Dartois, Veronique; Muller, George; Kaplan, Gilla

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) treatment is hampered by the long duration of antibiotic therapy required to achieve cure. This indolent response has been partly attributed to the ability of subpopulations of less metabolically active Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to withstand killing by current anti-TB drugs. We have used immune modulation with a phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor, CC-3052, that reduces tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production by increasing intracellular cAMP in macrophages, to examine the crosstalk between host and pathogen in rabbits with pulmonary TB during treatment with isoniazid (INH). Based on DNA microarray, changes in host gene expression during CC-3052 treatment of Mtb infected rabbits support a link between PDE4 inhibition and specific down-regulation of the innate immune response. The overall pattern of host gene expression in the lungs of infected rabbits treated with CC-3052, compared to untreated rabbits, was similar to that described in vitro in resting Mtb infected macrophages, suggesting suboptimal macrophage activation. These alterations in host immunity were associated with corresponding down-regulation of a number of Mtb genes that have been associated with a metabolic shift towards dormancy. Moreover, treatment with CC-3052 and INH resulted in reduced expression of those genes associated with the bacterial response to INH. Importantly, CC-3052 treatment of infected rabbits was associated with reduced ability of Mtb to withstand INH killing, shown by improved bacillary clearance, from the lungs of co-treated animals compared to rabbits treated with INH alone. The results of our study suggest that changes in Mtb gene expression, in response to changes in the host immune response, can alter the responsiveness of the bacteria to antimicrobial agents. These findings provide a basis for exploring the potential use of adjunctive immune modulation with PDE4 inhibitors to enhance the efficacy of existing anti-TB treatment. PMID:21949656

  19. Maximal mid-expiratory flow is a surrogate marker of lung clearance index for assessment of adults with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-jie; Yuan, Jing-jing; Gao, Yong-hua; Li, Hui-min; Zheng, Jin-ping; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the comparative diagnostic value of lung clearance index (LCI) and maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF) in bronchiectasis. We compared the diagnostic performance, correlation and concordance with clinical variables, and changes of LCI and MMEF% predicted during bronchiectasis exacerbations (BEs). Patients with stable bronchiectasis underwent history inquiry, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), multiple-breath nitrogen wash-out test, spirometry and sputum culture. Patients who experienced BEs underwent these measurements during onset of BEs and 1 week following antibiotics therapy. Sensitivity analyses were performed in mild, moderate and severe bronchiectasis. We recruited 110 bronchiectasis patients between March 2014 and September 2015. LCI demonstrated similar diagnostic value with MMEF% predicted in discriminating moderate-to-severe from mild bronchiectasis. LCI negatively correlated with MMEF% predicted. Both parameters had similar concordance in reflecting clinical characteristics of bronchiectasis and correlated significantly with forced expiratory flow in one second, age, HRCT score, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, cystic bronchiectasis, ventilation heterogeneity and bilateral bronchiectasis. In exacerbation cohort (n = 22), changes in LCI and MMEF% predicted were equally minimal during BEs and following antibiotics therapy. In sensitivity analyses, both parameters had similar diagnostic value and correlation with clinical variables. MMEF% predicted is a surrogate of LCI for assessing bronchiectasis severity. PMID:27339787

  20. Improved Temperature Dynamic Model of Turbine Subcomponents for Facilitation of Generalized Tip Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kypuros, Javier A.; Colson, Rodrigo; Munoz, Afredo

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes efforts conducted to improve dynamic temperature estimations of a turbine tip clearance system to facilitate design of a generalized tip clearance controller. This work builds upon research previously conducted and presented in and focuses primarily on improving dynamic temperature estimations of the primary components affecting tip clearance (i.e. the rotor, blades, and casing/shroud). The temperature profiles estimated by the previous model iteration, specifically for the rotor and blades, were found to be inaccurate and, more importantly, insufficient to facilitate controller design. Some assumptions made to facilitate the previous results were not valid, and thus improvements are presented here to better match the physical reality. As will be shown, the improved temperature sub- models, match a commercially validated model and are sufficiently simplified to aid in controller design.

  1. Respiratory tract clearance model for dosimetry and bioassay of inhaled radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.R.; Birchall, A. ); Cuddihy, R.G. ); James, A.C. ); Roy, M. . Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire)

    1990-07-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Respiratory Tract Models is developing a model to describe the retention and clearance of deposited radionuclides for dose-intake calculations and interpretation of bioassay data. Clearance from each region is treated as competition between mechanical transport, which moves particles to the gastro-intestinal tract and lymph nodes, and the translocation of material to blood. It is assumed that mechanical transport rates are the same for all materials, and that rates of translocation to blood are the same in all regions. Time-dependent clearance is represented by combinations of compartments. Representative values of parameters to describe mechanical transport from the human respiratory tract have been estimated, and guidance is given on the determination of translocation rates. It is emphasized that the current version of the model described here is still provisional. 30 refs.

  2. A parameters optimization method for planar joint clearance model and its application for dynamics simulation of reciprocating compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai-yang, Zhao; Min-qiang, Xu; Jin-dong, Wang; Yong-bo, Li

    2015-05-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of dynamics response simulation for mechanism with joint clearance, a parameter optimization method for planar joint clearance contact force model was presented in this paper, and the optimized parameters were applied to the dynamics response simulation for mechanism with oversized joint clearance fault. By studying the effect of increased clearance on the parameters of joint clearance contact force model, the relation of model parameters between different clearances was concluded. Then the dynamic equation of a two-stage reciprocating compressor with four joint clearances was developed using Lagrange method, and a multi-body dynamic model built in ADAMS software was used to solve this equation. To obtain a simulated dynamic response much closer to that of experimental tests, the parameters of joint clearance model, instead of using the designed values, were optimized by genetic algorithms approach. Finally, the optimized parameters were applied to simulate the dynamics response of model with oversized joint clearance fault according to the concluded parameter relation. The dynamics response of experimental test verified the effectiveness of this application.

  3. Does the Clearance of Inhaled (99m)Tc-Sestamibi Correlate with Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 Expression in the Human Lung?

    PubMed

    Mohan, Hosahalli K; Routledge, Thomas; Cane, Paul; Livieratos, Lefteris; Ballinger, James R; Peters, Adrien M

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To examine the relation between the lung elimination rate of inhaled technetium 99m ((99m)Tc)-sestamibi and immunohistochemical expression of bronchopulmonary multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and assess the repeatability of the inhaled (99m)Tc-sestamibi clearance technique. Materials and Methods (99m)Tc-sestamibi is a known substrate for P-gp and MRP1, which are established cellular drug efflux transporters. The elimination rate of (99m)Tc-sestamibi from the lungs after inhalation as an aerosol has been hypothesized to be regulated by expression of these transporters. Institutional ethics committee approval was received for this prospective study. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The clearance of inhaled (99m)Tc-sestamibi from the lungs of 13 patients due to undergo surgery for primary lung cancer (five of 13) or spontaneous pneumothorax (eight of 13) was estimated after dynamic imaging of the lungs during a period of 40 minutes. The time taken to clear 50% of inhaled sestamibi (T1/2) was compared with a semiquantitative immunohistochemical assessment (grade 0-3) of MRP1 and P-gp expression in the lung by using parametric and nonparametric tests. The study was repeated in five participants to assess the repeatability of the technique by using a Bland Altman analysis method. Results MRP1 expression was seen in 12 of 13 patients, while P-gp expression was seen in only two. The mean (99m)Tc-sestamibi elimination rate was faster in patients (n = 6) with low levels of MRP1 expression (grade 0-1) and mean T1/2 of 105 minutes ± 20 (standard deviation), compared with those with higher levels of MRP1 expression (grade 2-3, n = 7) and mean T1/2 of 149 minutes ± 28 (P = .008). Bland-Altman analysis revealed excellent agreement between test and retest values. Conclusion Inhaled (99m)Tc-sestamibi clearance study is a repeatable technique demonstrating significant correlation with MRP1 expression in

  4. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Enhances Bacterial Clearance and Limits Lung Consolidation in Murine Pneumonia Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Anne Jan; Achouiti, Achmed; van der Ende, Arie; Soussan, Aicha Ait; Florquin, Sandrine; de Vos, Alex; Zeerleder, Sacha S; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen in pneumonia associated with severe lung damage. Tissue injury causes release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which may perpetuate inflammation. DNA has been implicated as a DAMP that activates inflammation through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of TLR9 in MRSA pneumonia. Wild-type (Wt) and TLR9 knockout (tlr9−/−) mice were infected intranasally with MRSA USA300 (BK 11540) (5E7 CFU) and euthanized at 6, 24, 48 or 72 h for analyses. MRSA pneumonia was associated with profound release of cell-free host DNA in the airways, as reflected by increases in nucleosome and DNA levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), accompanied by transient detection of pathogen DNA in MRSA-free BALF supernatants. In BALF, as compared with Wt mice, tlr9−/− mice showed reduced tumor necrosis factor α and IL-6 levels at 6 h and reduced bacterial clearance at 6 and 24 h postinfection. Furthermore, tlr9−/− mice exhibited a greater influx of neutrophils in BALF and increased lung consolidation at 24 and 48 h. This study demonstrates the release of host- and pathogen-derived TLR9 ligands (DNA) into the alveolar space after infection with MRSA via the airways and suggests that TLR9 has proinflammatory effects during MRSA pneumonia associated with enhanced bacterial clearance and limitation of lung consolidation. PMID:27508882

  5. Differences in amyloid-β clearance across mouse and human blood-brain barrier models: kinetic analysis and mechanistic modeling.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; Abuasal, Bilal S; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Oliver; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a characteristic hallmark of amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in the brain. This accumulation of Aβ has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Indeed, preclinical studies that used mice to investigate Aβ clearance showed that efflux across blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain degradation mediate efficient Aβ clearance. However, the contribution of each process to Aβ clearance remains unclear. Moreover, it is still uncertain how species differences between mouse and human could affect Aβ clearance. Here, a modified form of the brain efflux index method was used to estimate the contribution of BBB and brain degradation to Aβ clearance from the brain of wild type mice. We estimated that 62% of intracerebrally injected (125)I-Aβ40 is cleared across BBB while 38% is cleared by brain degradation. Furthermore, in vitro and in silico studies were performed to compare Aβ clearance between mouse and human BBB models. Kinetic studies for Aβ40 disposition in bEnd3 and hCMEC/D3 cells, representative in vitro mouse and human BBB models, respectively, demonstrated 30-fold higher rate of (125)I-Aβ40 uptake and 15-fold higher rate of degradation by bEnd3 compared to hCMEC/D3 cells. Expression studies showed both cells to express different levels of P-glycoprotein and RAGE, while LRP1 levels were comparable. Finally, we established a mechanistic model, which could successfully predict cellular levels of (125)I-Aβ40 and the rate of each process. Established mechanistic model suggested significantly higher rates of Aβ uptake and degradation in bEnd3 cells as rationale for the observed differences in (125)I-Aβ40 disposition between mouse and human BBB models. In conclusion, current study demonstrates the important role of BBB in the clearance of Aβ from the brain. Moreover, it provides insight into the differences between mouse and human BBB with regards to Aβ clearance and offer, for the first time, a mathematical model that describes

  6. Differences in amyloid-β clearance across mouse and human blood-brain barrier models: Kinetic analysis and mechanistic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Qosa, Hisham; Abuasal, Bilal S.; Romero, Ignacio A.; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Oliver; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has a characteristic hallmark of amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in the brain. This accumulation of Aβ has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Indeed, preclinical studies that used mice to investigate Aβ clearance showed that efflux across blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain degradation mediate efficient Aβ clearance. However, the contribution of each process to Aβ clearance remains unclear. Moreover, it is still uncertain how species differences between mouse and human could affect Aβ clearance. Here, a modified form of the brain efflux index method was used to estimate the contribution of BBB and brain degradation to Aβ clearance from the brain of wild type mice. We estimated that 62% of intracerebrally injected 125I-Aβ40 is cleared across BBB while 38% is cleared by brain degradation. Furthermore, in vitro and in silico studies were performed to compare Aβ clearance between mouse and human BBB models. Kinetic studies for Aβ40 disposition in bEnd3 and hCMEC/D3 cells, representative in vitro mouse and human BBB models, respectively, demonstrated 30-fold higher rate of 125I-Aβ40 uptake and 15-fold higher rate of degradation by bEnd3 compared to hCMEC/D3 cells. Expression studies showed both cells to express different levels of P-glycoprotein and RAGE, while LRP1 levels were comparable. Finally, we established a mechanistic model, which could successfully predict cellular levels of 125I-Aβ40 and the rate of each process. Established mechanistic model suggested significantly higher rates of Aβ uptake and degradation in bEnd3 cells as rationale for the observed differences in 125I-Aβ40 disposition between mouse and human BBB models. In conclusion, current study demonstrates the important role of BBB in the clearance of Aβ from the brain. Moreover, it provides insight into the differences between mouse and human BBB with regards to Aβ clearance and offer, for the first time, a mathematical model that describes A

  7. Differences in amyloid-β clearance across mouse and human blood-brain barrier models: kinetic analysis and mechanistic modeling.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; Abuasal, Bilal S; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Oliver; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a characteristic hallmark of amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in the brain. This accumulation of Aβ has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Indeed, preclinical studies that used mice to investigate Aβ clearance showed that efflux across blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain degradation mediate efficient Aβ clearance. However, the contribution of each process to Aβ clearance remains unclear. Moreover, it is still uncertain how species differences between mouse and human could affect Aβ clearance. Here, a modified form of the brain efflux index method was used to estimate the contribution of BBB and brain degradation to Aβ clearance from the brain of wild type mice. We estimated that 62% of intracerebrally injected (125)I-Aβ40 is cleared across BBB while 38% is cleared by brain degradation. Furthermore, in vitro and in silico studies were performed to compare Aβ clearance between mouse and human BBB models. Kinetic studies for Aβ40 disposition in bEnd3 and hCMEC/D3 cells, representative in vitro mouse and human BBB models, respectively, demonstrated 30-fold higher rate of (125)I-Aβ40 uptake and 15-fold higher rate of degradation by bEnd3 compared to hCMEC/D3 cells. Expression studies showed both cells to express different levels of P-glycoprotein and RAGE, while LRP1 levels were comparable. Finally, we established a mechanistic model, which could successfully predict cellular levels of (125)I-Aβ40 and the rate of each process. Established mechanistic model suggested significantly higher rates of Aβ uptake and degradation in bEnd3 cells as rationale for the observed differences in (125)I-Aβ40 disposition between mouse and human BBB models. In conclusion, current study demonstrates the important role of BBB in the clearance of Aβ from the brain. Moreover, it provides insight into the differences between mouse and human BBB with regards to Aβ clearance and offer, for the first time, a mathematical model that describes

  8. Predicting lung dosimetry of inhaled particleborne benzo[a]pyrene using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jerry; Franzen, Allison; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Lumpkin, Michael; Crowell, Susan; Meredith, Clive; Loccisano, Anne; Gentry, Robinan; Clewell, Harvey

    2016-09-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a by-product of incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and plant/wood products, including tobacco. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BaP for the rat was extended to simulate inhalation exposures to BaP in rats and humans including particle deposition and dissolution of absorbed BaP and renal elimination of 3-hydroxy benzo[a]pyrene (3-OH BaP) in humans. The clearance of particle-associated BaP from lung based on existing data in rats and dogs suggest that the process is bi-phasic. An initial rapid clearance was represented by BaP released from particles followed by a slower first-order clearance that follows particle kinetics. Parameter values for BaP-particle dissociation were estimated using inhalation data from isolated/ventilated/perfused rat lungs and optimized in the extended inhalation model using available rat data. Simulations of acute inhalation exposures in rats identified specific data needs including systemic elimination of BaP metabolites, diffusion-limited transfer rates of BaP from lung tissue to blood and the quantitative role of macrophage-mediated and ciliated clearance mechanisms. The updated BaP model provides very good prediction of the urinary 3-OH BaP concentrations and the relative difference between measured 3-OH BaP in nonsmokers versus smokers. This PBPK model for inhaled BaP is a preliminary tool for quantifying lung BaP dosimetry in rat and humans and was used to prioritize data needs that would provide significant model refinement and robust internal dosimetry capabilities.

  9. Predicting lung dosimetry of inhaled particleborne benzo[a]pyrene using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jerry; Franzen, Allison; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Lumpkin, Michael; Crowell, Susan; Meredith, Clive; Loccisano, Anne; Gentry, Robinan; Clewell, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a by-product of incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and plant/wood products, including tobacco. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BaP for the rat was extended to simulate inhalation exposures to BaP in rats and humans including particle deposition and dissolution of absorbed BaP and renal elimination of 3-hydroxy benzo[a]pyrene (3-OH BaP) in humans. The clearance of particle-associated BaP from lung based on existing data in rats and dogs suggest that the process is bi-phasic. An initial rapid clearance was represented by BaP released from particles followed by a slower first-order clearance that follows particle kinetics. Parameter values for BaP-particle dissociation were estimated using inhalation data from isolated/ventilated/perfused rat lungs and optimized in the extended inhalation model using available rat data. Simulations of acute inhalation exposures in rats identified specific data needs including systemic elimination of BaP metabolites, diffusion-limited transfer rates of BaP from lung tissue to blood and the quantitative role of macrophage-mediated and ciliated clearance mechanisms. The updated BaP model provides very good prediction of the urinary 3-OH BaP concentrations and the relative difference between measured 3-OH BaP in nonsmokers versus smokers. This PBPK model for inhaled BaP is a preliminary tool for quantifying lung BaP dosimetry in rat and humans and was used to prioritize data needs that would provide significant model refinement and robust internal dosimetry capabilities. PMID:27569524

  10. Predicting lung dosimetry of inhaled particleborne benzo[a]pyrene using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jerry; Franzen, Allison; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Lumpkin, Michael; Crowell, Susan; Meredith, Clive; Loccisano, Anne; Gentry, Robinan; Clewell, Harvey

    2016-09-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a by-product of incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and plant/wood products, including tobacco. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BaP for the rat was extended to simulate inhalation exposures to BaP in rats and humans including particle deposition and dissolution of absorbed BaP and renal elimination of 3-hydroxy benzo[a]pyrene (3-OH BaP) in humans. The clearance of particle-associated BaP from lung based on existing data in rats and dogs suggest that the process is bi-phasic. An initial rapid clearance was represented by BaP released from particles followed by a slower first-order clearance that follows particle kinetics. Parameter values for BaP-particle dissociation were estimated using inhalation data from isolated/ventilated/perfused rat lungs and optimized in the extended inhalation model using available rat data. Simulations of acute inhalation exposures in rats identified specific data needs including systemic elimination of BaP metabolites, diffusion-limited transfer rates of BaP from lung tissue to blood and the quantitative role of macrophage-mediated and ciliated clearance mechanisms. The updated BaP model provides very good prediction of the urinary 3-OH BaP concentrations and the relative difference between measured 3-OH BaP in nonsmokers versus smokers. This PBPK model for inhaled BaP is a preliminary tool for quantifying lung BaP dosimetry in rat and humans and was used to prioritize data needs that would provide significant model refinement and robust internal dosimetry capabilities. PMID:27569524

  11. Predicting the Toxicokinetics of Trifluralin in Rainbow Trout Using Clearance-Volume Pharmacokinetic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv R. ); Hayton, William L.; David J.Smith, William H.Gingerich, Maria G.Barker

    1999-10-13

    Trifluralin (TF) is a lipophilic, pre-emergent herbicide widely used in agriculture and known to bioconcentrate in fish. We have characterized the accumulation of TF in rainbow trout under a variety of experimental conditions. Our approach has been to use static water exposure systems and intra-vascular dosing in combination with clearance-volume pharmacokinetic (CV-PK) models to obtain quantitative estimates of uptake clearance, apparent volume of distribution and elimination due to xenobiotic metabolism. This paper will briefly discuss pertinent physicochemical data for TF and review the toxicokinetics of TF in rainbow trout. Emphasis will be placed on physiological interpretations of TF model parameters and practical aspects of modeling TF toxicokinetics with CV-PK models.

  12. Model of ciliary clearance and the role of mucus rheology.

    PubMed

    Norton, Michael M; Robinson, Risa J; Weinstein, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that the transportability of mucus by cilial mats is dependent on the rheological properties of the mucus. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid that exhibits a plethora of phenomena such as stress relaxation, tensile stresses, shear thinning, and yielding behavior. These observations motivate the analysis in this paper that considers the first two attributes in order to construct a transport model. The model developed here assumes that the mucus is transported as a rigid body, the metachronal wave exhibits symplectic behavior, that the mucus is thin compared to the metachronal wavelength, and that the effects of individual cilia can be lumped together to impart an average strain to the mucus during contact. This strain invokes a stress in the mucus, whose non-Newtonian rheology creates tensile forces that persist into unsheared regions and allow the unsupported mucus to move as a rigid body whereas a Newtonian fluid would retrograde. This work focuses primarily on the Doi-Edwards model but results are generalized to the Jeffrey's and Maxwell fluids as well. The model predicts that there exists an optimal mucus rheology that maximizes the shear stress imparted to the mucus by the cilia for a given cilia motion. We propose that this is the rheology that the body strives for in order to minimize energy consumption. Predicted optimal rheologies are consistent with results from previous experimental studies when reasonable model parameters are chosen.

  13. Model of ciliary clearance and the role of mucus rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Michael M.; Robinson, Risa J.; Weinstein, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that the transportability of mucus by cilial mats is dependent on the rheological properties of the mucus. Mucus is a non-Newtonian fluid that exhibits a plethora of phenomena such as stress relaxation, tensile stresses, shear thinning, and yielding behavior. These observations motivate the analysis in this paper that considers the first two attributes in order to construct a transport model. The model developed here assumes that the mucus is transported as a rigid body, the metachronal wave exhibits symplectic behavior, that the mucus is thin compared to the metachronal wavelength, and that the effects of individual cilia can be lumped together to impart an average strain to the mucus during contact. This strain invokes a stress in the mucus, whose non-Newtonian rheology creates tensile forces that persist into unsheared regions and allow the unsupported mucus to move as a rigid body whereas a Newtonian fluid would retrograde. This work focuses primarily on the Doi-Edwards model but results are generalized to the Jeffrey's fluid as well. The model predicts that there exists an optimal mucus rheology that maximizes the shear stress imparted to the mucus by the cilia for a given cilia motion. We propose that this is the rheology that the body strives for in order to minimize energy consumption. Predicted optimal rheologies are consistent with results from previous experimental studies when reasonable model parameters are chosen.

  14. Hepatitis B viral clearance studies using duck virus model.

    PubMed

    Long, Z; Sun, C S; White, E M; Horowitz, B; Sito, A F

    1993-01-01

    We have shown data to suggest that the in vivo duck hepatitis B virus system represents an excellent animal model system for the study of hepatitis B virus. Because of the similarity of DHBV to human HBV (including comparable results in virus inactivation studies), the high level of sensitivity of the DHBV assay, and the rapidity, ease, and relative low cost of obtaining results, we propose that the in vivo DHBV titration system be used as a model for human HBV in process validation studies. Data generated in such validation studies have, in fact, been submitted by a number of blood products manufacturers to the U.S. F.D.A. in support of IND applications.

  15. A Physiologically-Motivated Compartment-Based Model of the Effect of Inhaled Hypertonic Saline on Mucociliary Clearance and Liquid Transport in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Markovetz, Matthew R.; Corcoran, Timothy E.; Locke, Landon W.; Myerburg, Michael M.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Parker, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by liquid hyperabsorption, airway surface dehydration, and impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC). Herein, we present a compartment-based mathematical model of the airway that extends the resolution of functional imaging data. Methods Using functional imaging data to inform our model, we developed a system of mechanism-motivated ordinary differential equations to describe the mucociliary clearance and absorption of aerosolized radiolabeled particle and small molecules probes from human subjects with and without CF. We also utilized a novel imaging metric in vitro to gauge the fraction of airway epithelial cells that have functional ciliary activity. Results This model, and its incorporated kinetic rate parameters, captures the MCC and liquid dynamics of the hyperabsorptive state in CF airways and the mitigation of that state by hypertonic saline treatment. Conclusions We postulate, based on the model structure and its ability to capture clinical patient data, that patients with CF have regions of airway with diminished MCC function that can be recruited with hypertonic saline treatment. In so doing, this model structure not only makes a case for durable osmotic agents used in lung-region specific treatments, but also may provide a possible clinical endpoint, the fraction of functional ciliated airway. PMID:25383714

  16. Hydrogen sulfide decreases β-adrenergic agonist-stimulated lung liquid clearance by inhibiting ENaC-mediated transepithelial sodium absorption

    PubMed Central

    Agné, Alisa M.; Baldin, Jan-Peter; Benjamin, Audra R.; Orogo-Wenn, Maria C.; Wichmann, Lukas; Olson, Kenneth R.; Walters, Dafydd V.

    2015-01-01

    In pulmonary epithelia, β-adrenergic agonists regulate the membrane abundance of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and, thereby, control the rate of transepithelial electrolyte absorption. This is a crucial regulatory mechanism for lung liquid clearance at birth and thereafter. This study investigated the influence of the gaseous signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on β-adrenergic agonist-regulated pulmonary sodium and liquid absorption. Application of the H2S-liberating molecule Na2S (50 μM) to the alveolar compartment of rat lungs in situ decreased baseline liquid absorption and abrogated the stimulation of liquid absorption by the β-adrenergic agonist terbutaline. There was no additional effect of Na2S over that of the ENaC inhibitor amiloride. In electrophysiological Ussing chamber experiments with native lung epithelia (Xenopus laevis), Na2S inhibited the stimulation of amiloride-sensitive current by terbutaline. β-adrenergic agonists generally increase ENaC abundance by cAMP formation and activation of PKA. Activation of this pathway by forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine increased amiloride-sensitive currents in H441 pulmonary epithelial cells. This effect was inhibited by Na2S in a dose-dependent manner (5–50 μM). Na2S had no effect on cellular ATP concentration, cAMP formation, and activation of PKA. By contrast, Na2S prevented the cAMP-induced increase in ENaC activity in the apical membrane of H441 cells. H441 cells expressed the H2S-generating enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase, cystathionine-γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase, and they produced H2S amounts within the employed concentration range. These data demonstrate that H2S prevents the stimulation of ENaC by cAMP/PKA and, thereby, inhibits the proabsorptive effect of β-adrenergic agonists on lung liquid clearance. PMID:25632025

  17. Hydrogen sulfide decreases β-adrenergic agonist-stimulated lung liquid clearance by inhibiting ENaC-mediated transepithelial sodium absorption.

    PubMed

    Agné, Alisa M; Baldin, Jan-Peter; Benjamin, Audra R; Orogo-Wenn, Maria C; Wichmann, Lukas; Olson, Kenneth R; Walters, Dafydd V; Althaus, Mike

    2015-04-01

    In pulmonary epithelia, β-adrenergic agonists regulate the membrane abundance of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and, thereby, control the rate of transepithelial electrolyte absorption. This is a crucial regulatory mechanism for lung liquid clearance at birth and thereafter. This study investigated the influence of the gaseous signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on β-adrenergic agonist-regulated pulmonary sodium and liquid absorption. Application of the H2S-liberating molecule Na2S (50 μM) to the alveolar compartment of rat lungs in situ decreased baseline liquid absorption and abrogated the stimulation of liquid absorption by the β-adrenergic agonist terbutaline. There was no additional effect of Na2S over that of the ENaC inhibitor amiloride. In electrophysiological Ussing chamber experiments with native lung epithelia (Xenopus laevis), Na2S inhibited the stimulation of amiloride-sensitive current by terbutaline. β-adrenergic agonists generally increase ENaC abundance by cAMP formation and activation of PKA. Activation of this pathway by forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine increased amiloride-sensitive currents in H441 pulmonary epithelial cells. This effect was inhibited by Na2S in a dose-dependent manner (5-50 μM). Na2S had no effect on cellular ATP concentration, cAMP formation, and activation of PKA. By contrast, Na2S prevented the cAMP-induced increase in ENaC activity in the apical membrane of H441 cells. H441 cells expressed the H2S-generating enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase, cystathionine-γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase, and they produced H2S amounts within the employed concentration range. These data demonstrate that H2S prevents the stimulation of ENaC by cAMP/PKA and, thereby, inhibits the proabsorptive effect of β-adrenergic agonists on lung liquid clearance.

  18. Clearance rate and BP-ANN model in paraquat poisoned patients treated with hemoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lufeng; Hong, Guangliang; Ma, Jianshe; Wang, Xianqin; Lin, Guanyang; Zhang, Xiuhua; Lu, Zhongqiu

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of hemoperfusion (HP) on the clearance rate of paraquat (PQ) and develop a clearance model, 41 PQ-poisoned patients who acquired acute PQ intoxication received HP treatment. PQ concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). According to initial PQ concentration, study subjects were divided into two groups: Low-PQ group (0.05-1.0 μg/mL) and High-PQ group (1.0-10 μg/mL). After initial HP treatment, PQ concentrations decreased in both groups. However, in the High-PQ group, PQ levels remained in excess of 0.05 μg/mL and increased when the second HP treatment was initiated. Based on the PQ concentrations before and after HP treatment, the mean clearance rate of PQ calculated was 73 ± 15%. We also established a backpropagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) model, which set PQ concentrations before HP treatment as input data and after HP treatment as output data. When it is used to predict PQ concentration after HP treatment, high prediction accuracy (R = 0.9977) can be obtained in this model. In conclusion, HP is an effective way to clear PQ from the blood, and the PQ concentration after HP treatment can be predicted by BP-ANN model. PMID:25695058

  19. Reduced erythrocyte susceptibility and increased host clearance of young parasites slows Plasmodium growth in a murine model of severe malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, David S.; Cromer, Deborah; Best, Shannon E.; James, Kylie R.; Sebina, Ismail; Haque, Ashraful; Davenport, Miles P.

    2015-05-01

    The best correlate of malaria severity in human Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection is the total parasite load. Pf-infected humans could control parasite loads by two mechanisms, either decreasing parasite multiplication, or increasing parasite clearance. However, few studies have directly measured these two mechanisms in vivo. Here, we have directly quantified host clearance of parasites during Plasmodium infection in mice. We transferred labelled red blood cells (RBCs) from Plasmodium infected donors into uninfected and infected recipients, and tracked the fate of donor parasites by frequent blood sampling. We then applied age-based mathematical models to characterise parasite clearance in the recipient mice. Our analyses revealed an increased clearance of parasites in infected animals, particularly parasites of a younger developmental stage. However, the major decrease in parasite multiplication in infected mice was not mediated by increased clearance alone, but was accompanied by a significant reduction in the susceptibility of RBCs to parasitisation.

  20. Aerosol-derived lung morphometry: comparisons with a lung model and lung function indexes.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, J D; Heyder, J; O'Donnell, C R; Brain, J D

    1991-10-01

    This study evaluated the ability of aerosol-derived lung morphometry to noninvasively probe airway and acinar dimensions. Effective air-space diameters (EAD) were calculated from the time-dependent gravitational losses of 1-microns particles from inhaled aerosol boluses during breath holding. In 17 males [33 +/- 7 (SD) yr] the relationship between EAD and volumetric penetration of the bolus into the lungs (Vp) could be expressed by the linear power-law function, log (EAD) alpha beta log (Vp). Our EAD values were consistent with Weibel's symmetric lung model A for small airways and more distal air spaces. As lung volume increased from 57 to 87% of total lung capacity (TLC), EAD at Vp of 160 and 550 cm3 increased 70 and 41%, respectively. At 57% TLC, log (EAD) at 160 cm3 was significantly correlated with airway resistance (r = -0.57, P less than 0.0204) but not with forced expired flow between 25 and 75% of vital capacity. Log (EAD) at 400 cm3 was correlated with deposition of 1-micron particles (r = -0.73, P less than 0.0009). We conclude that aerosol-derived lung morphometry is a responsive noninvasive probe of peripheral air-space diameters. PMID:1757343

  1. A mechanism of airway injury in an epithelial model of mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Darryl W; Morris, Melanie I; Ding, Jie; Zayas, J Gustavo; Tai, Shusheng; King, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    We studied the action of sodium metabisulphite on mucociliary transport in a frog palate epithelial injury model, hypothesizing that it may be useful for the study of mechanisms of airway injury. Sodium metabisulphite (MB) releases SO2 on contact with water. SO2 is a pollutant in automobile fumes and may play a role in the exacerbation of airway disease symptoms. We first investigated its effect on mucociliary clearance. MB 10-1 M, increased mucociliary clearance time (MCT) by 254.5 ± 57.3% of control values, (p < 0.001, n = 7). MB 10-4 and 10-2 M did not interfere with mucus clearance time compared to control values. In MB-treated frog palates, MCT did not return to control values after one hour (control, 97.3 ± 6.3% vs. MB, 140.9 ± 46.3%, p < 0.001, n = 7). Scanning EM images of epithelial tissue were morphometrically analyzed and showed a 25 ± 12% loss of ciliated cells in MB palates compared to controls with an intact ciliary blanket. Intact cells or groups of ciliated cells were found in scanning EM micrographs of mucus from MB-treated palates. This was associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9) activity in epithelial tissue and mucus. We suggest that the loss of ciliated cells as a result of MMP-9 activation prevented full recovery of MCT after MB 10-1 M. The mechanism of action may be on epithelial cell-cell or cell-matrix attachments leading to cell loss and a disruption of MCT. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this is an inflammatory mediated response or the result of a direct action on epithelial cells and what role this mechanism may play in the progression to chronic airway diseases with impaired mucociliary clearance. PMID:15357883

  2. CISNET lung models: Comparison of model assumptions and model structures

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Pamela M.; Hazelton, William; Kimmel, Marek; Clarke, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Sophisticated modeling techniques can be powerful tools to help us understand the effects of cancer control interventions on population trends in cancer incidence and mortality. Readers of journal articles are however rarely supplied with modeling details. Six modeling groups collaborated as part of the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET) to investigate the contribution of US tobacco control efforts towards reducing lung cancer deaths over the period 1975 to 2000. The models included in this monograph were developed independently and use distinct, complementary approaches towards modeling the natural history of lung cancer. The models used the same data for inputs and agreed on the design of the analysis and the outcome measures. This article highlights aspects of the models that are most relevant to similarities of or differences between the results. Structured comparisons can increase the transparency of these complex models. PMID:22882887

  3. Reduced bacterial colony count of anaerobic bacteria is associated with a worsening in lung clearance index and inflammation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Katherine; Bradley, Judy M; Johnston, Elinor; McGrath, Stephanie; McIlreavey, Leanne; Rowan, Stephen; Reid, Alastair; Bradbury, Ian; Einarsson, Gisli; Elborn, J Stuart; Tunney, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria have been identified in abundance in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. The impact their presence and abundance has on lung function and inflammation is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the colony count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, lung clearance index (LCI), spirometry and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in patients with CF. Sputum and blood were collected from CF patients at a single cross-sectional visit when clinically stable. Community composition and bacterial colony counts were analysed using extended aerobic and anaerobic culture. Patients completed spirometry and a multiple breath washout (MBW) test to obtain LCI. An inverse correlation between colony count of aerobic bacteria (n = 41, r = -0.35; p = 0.02), anaerobic bacteria (n = 41, r = -0.44, p = 0.004) and LCI was observed. There was an inverse correlation between colony count of anaerobic bacteria and CRP (n = 25, r = -0.44, p = 0.03) only. The results of this study demonstrate that a lower colony count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria correlated with a worse LCI. A lower colony count of anaerobic bacteria also correlated with higher CRP levels. These results indicate that lower abundance of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria may reflect microbiota disruption and disease progression in the CF lung.

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  5. Diverse Data Sets Can Yield Reliable Information through Mechanistic Modeling: Salicylic Acid Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, G. M.; Bassingthwaighte, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    This is a practical example of a powerful research strategy: putting together data from studies covering a diversity of conditions can yield a scientifically sound grasp of the phenomenon when the individual observations failed to provide definitive understanding. The rationale is that defining a realistic, quantitative, explanatory hypothesis for the whole set of studies, brings about a “consilience” of the often competing hypotheses considered for individual data sets. An internally consistent conjecture linking multiple data sets simultaneously provides stronger evidence on the characteristics of a system than does analysis of individual data sets limited to narrow ranges of conditions. Our example examines three very different data sets on the clearance of salicylic acid from humans: a high concentration set from aspirin overdoses; a set with medium concentrations from a research study on the influences of the route of administration and of sex on the clearance kinetics, and a set on low dose aspirin for cardiovascular health. Three models were tested: (1) a first order reaction, (2) a Michaelis-Menten (M-M) approach, and (3) an enzyme kinetic model with forward and backward reactions. The reaction rates found from model 1 were distinctly different for the three data sets, having no commonality. The M-M model 2 fitted each of the three data sets but gave a reliable estimates of the Michaelis constant only for the medium level data (Km = 24±5.4 mg/L); analyzing the three data sets together with model 2 gave Km = 18±2.6 mg/L. (Estimating parameters using larger numbers of data points in an optimization increases the degrees of freedom, constraining the range of the estimates). Using the enzyme kinetic model (3) increased the number of free parameters but nevertheless improved the goodness of fit to the combined data sets, giving tighter constraints, and a lower estimated Km = 14.6±2.9 mg/L, demonstrating that fitting diverse data sets with a single model

  6. Complement facilitates macrophage phagocytosis of inhaled iron particles but has little effect in mediating silica-induced lung inflammatory and clearance responses

    SciTech Connect

    Warheit, D.B.; Carakostas, M.C.; Bamberger, J.R.; Hartsky, M.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The present studies were undertaken to investigate the role of complement in mediating pulmonary inflammation and/or phagocytosis as a function of particle clearance in rats exposed to silica or carbonyl iron (CI) particles. Both particle types were shown to be weak activators of serum complement in vitro. In these studies, normal and complement-depressed (CVFD-treated) rats were exposed to aerosols of Ci or silica particles for 6 hr at 100 mg/m{sup 3}. Following exposure, alveolar fluids and cells from sham and dust-exposed animals were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at several time periods postexposure and measured for a variety of biochemical and cellular indices. In addition, pulmonary macrophages were cultured and studied for morphology and phagocytosis. The authors results showed that CI exposure did not produce cellular or biochemical indices of pulmonary inflammation, either in normal or complement-depleted rats. However, fewer phagocytic macrophages were recovered from the lungs of CVF-treated, CI-exposed rats than from normal exposed animals. In contrast, silica inhalation produced a sustained PMN inflammatory response in the lungs of exposed rats, measured up through 1 month postexposure, along with significant increases in BAL fluid levels of LDH, protein, and alkaline phosphatase and deficits in pulmonary macrophage phagocytic functions.

  7. Hypo-Elastic Model for Lung Parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    A simple elastic isotropic constitutive model for the spongy tissue in lung is derived from the theory of hypoelasticity. The model is shown to exhibit a pressure dependent behavior that has been interpreted by some as indicating extensional anisotropy. In contrast, we show that this behavior arises natural from an analysis of isotropic hypoelastic invariants, and is a likely result of non-linearity, not anisotropy. The response of the model is determined analytically for several boundary value problems used for material characterization. These responses give insight into both the material behavior as well as admissible bounds on parameters. The model is characterized against published experimental data for dog lung. Future work includes non-elastic model behavior.

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans Infection in Mice Lacking Type I Interferon Signaling Leads to Increased Fungal Clearance and IL-4-Dependent Mucin Production in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ko; Yamamoto, Hideki; Nomura, Toshiki; Matsumoto, Ikumi; Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Zong, Tong; Kanno, Emi; Uno, Kazuko; Ishii, Keiko; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are secreted by many cell types upon stimulation via pattern recognition receptors and bind to IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR), which is composed of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2. Although type I IFNs are well known as anti-viral cytokines, limited information is available on their role during fungal infection. In the present study, we addressed this issue by examining the effect of IFNAR1 defects on the host defense response to Cryptococcus neoformans. In IFNAR1KO mice, the number of live colonies was lower and the host immune response mediated not only by Th1 but also by Th2 and Th17-related cytokines was more accelerated in the infected lungs than in WT mice. In addition, mucin production by bronchoepithelial cells and expression of MUC5AC, a major core protein of mucin in the lungs, were significantly higher in IFNAR1KO mice than in WT mice. This increase in mucin and MUC5AC production was significantly inhibited by treatment with neutralizing anti-IL-4 mAb. In contrast, administration of recombinant IFN-αA/D significantly suppressed the production of IL-4, but not of IFN-γ and IL-17A, in the lungs of WT mice after cryptococcal infection. These results indicate that defects of IFNAR1 led to improved clearance of infection with C. neoformans and enhanced synthesis of IFN-γ and the IL-4-dependent production of mucin. They also suggest that type I IFNs may be involved in the negative regulation of early host defense to this infection. PMID:26384031

  9. Comprehensive Antigen Screening Identifies Moraxella catarrhalis Proteins That Induce Protection in a Mouse Pulmonary Clearance Model

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegh, Suzanne J. C.; Niebisch, Axel; Hanner, Markus; Selak, Sanja; Schüler, Wolfgang; Morfeldt, Eva; Hellberg, Christel; Nagy, Eszter; Lundberg, Urban; Hays, John P.; Meinke, Andreas; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is one of the three most common causative bacterial pathogens of otitis media, however no effective vaccine against M. catarrhalis has been developed so far. To identify M. catarrhalis vaccine candidate antigens, we used carefully selected sera from children with otitis media and healthy individuals to screen small-fragment genomic libraries that are expressed to display frame-selected peptides on a bacterial cell surface. This ANTIGENome technology led to the identification of 214 antigens, 23 of which were selected by in vitro or in vivo studies for additional characterization. Eight of the 23 candidates were tested in a Moraxella mouse pulmonary clearance model, and 3 of these antigens induced significantly faster bacterial clearance compared to adjuvant or to the previously characterized antigen OmpCD. The most significant protection data were obtained with the antigen MCR_1416 (Msp22), which was further investigated for its biological function by in vitro studies suggesting that Msp22 is a heme binding protein. This study comprises one of the most exhaustive studies to identify potential vaccine candidate antigens against the bacterial pathogen M. catarrhalis. PMID:23671716

  10. Effect of mouse strain as a background for Alzheimer’s disease models on the clearance of amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    Qosa, Hisham; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Novel animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are relentlessly being developed and existing ones are being fine-tuned; however, these models face multiple challenges associated with the complexity of the disease where most of these models do not reproduce the full phenotypical disease spectrum. Moreover, different AD models express different phenotypes that could affect their validity to recapitulate disease pathogenesis and/or response to a drug. One of the most important and understudied differences between AD models is differences in the phenotypic characteristics of the background species. Here, we used the brain clearance index (BCI) method to investigate the effect of strain differences on the clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) from the brains of four mouse strains. These mouse strains, namely C57BL/6, FVB/N, BALB/c and SJL/J, are widely used as a background for the development of AD mouse models. Findings showed that while Aβ clearance across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was comparable between the 4 strains, levels of LRP1, an Aβ clearance protein, was significantly lower in SJL/J mice compared to other mouse strains. Furthermore, these mouse strains showed a significantly different response to rifampicin treatment with regard to Aβ clearance and effect on brain level of its clearance-related proteins. Our results provide for the first time an evidence for strain differences that could affect ability of AD mouse models to recapitulate response to a drug, and opens a new research avenue that requires further investigation to successfully develop mouse models that could simulate clinically important phenotypic characteristics of AD. PMID:27478623

  11. Lung Deposition and Clearance of Inhaled Vanadium Pentoxide in Chronically Exposed F344 Rats and B6C3F1 Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, Jeffrey A.; Lee, Kyeonghee M.; Mellinger, Kathleen H.; Bates, Derrick J.; Burka, Leo T.; Roycroft, Joseph H.

    2004-01-01

    Female F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) at concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1, or 2 mg/m{sup 3} (rats) and 0, 1, 2, or 4 mg/m{sup 3} (mice) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week (for up to 18 months), by whole-body inhalation. Lung weights and lung burdens of vanadium were determined for exposed animals after 1, 5, and 12 days and after 1, 2, 6, 12, and 18 months of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} exposure. Blood vanadium concentrations were determined at 1, 2, 6, 12, and 18 months for all animals including controls. A model that assumed a first-order deposition rate and a first-order elimination rate for vanadium was employed to fit the lung burden data. Comparisons between exposed groups indicated a progressive increase in lung weight with exposure concentration and time on exposure for both species. The vanadium lung burdens appeared to reach steady state in the lowest exposure groups (0.5 and 1 mg/m{sup 3} for rats and mice, respectively) but showed a decline in the higher exposure groups. This deposition pattern was similar between rats and mice but the maximum lung burdens were observed at different times (1 or 2 months in mice vs. 6 months in rats). The vanadium deposition rate decreased faster in mice, while the elimination half-lives of vanadium lung burdens were about six- to nine-fold shorter in mice than in rats at 1 and 2 mg/m{sup 3}. Thus, the retention of vanadium in the lungs at 18 months was lower in mice ({approx}2% retained) compared with rats (13-15% retained) at the common exposure concentrations of 1 and 2 mg/m{sup 3}. The lung burden data were approximately proportional to the exposure concentration in both species, likely due to concomitant decreases in deposition and elimination to a similar extent with increasing exposure. The area under the lung burden versus time curves and the area under the blood concentration (control-normalized) versus time curves were also proportional to exposure concentration. The progression of

  12. Effects of Chinese medicinal herbs on a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Z; Johansen, H K; Moser, C; Høiby, N

    1996-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of two kinds of Chinese medicinal herbs, Isatis tinctoria L (ITL) and Daphne giraldii Nitsche (DGN), on a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF). Compared to the control group, both drugs were able to reduce the incidence of lung abscess (p < 0.05) and to decrease the severity of the macroscopic pathology in lungs (p < 0.05). In the great majority of the rats, the herbs altered the inflammatory response in the lungs from an acute type inflammation, dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), to a chronic type inflammation, dominated by mononuclear leukocytes (MN). DGN also improved the clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lungs (p < 0.03) compared with the control group. There were no significant differences between the control group and the two herbal groups with regard to serum IgG and IgA anti-P. aeruginosa sonicate antibodies. However, the IgM concentration in the ITL group was significantly lower than in the control group (p < 0.03). These results suggest that the two medicinal herbs might be helpful to CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection, DGN being the most favorable. PMID:8703440

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells enhance autophagy and increase β-amyloid clearance in Alzheimer disease models.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin Young; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Ha Na; Oh, Se Hee; Bae, Jae-Sung; Ha, Hee-Jin; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2014-01-01

    Current evidence suggests a central role for autophagy in Alzheimer disease (AD), and dysfunction in the autophagic system may lead to amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation. Using in vitro and in vivo AD models, the present study investigated whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could enhance autophagy and thus exert a neuroprotective effect through modulation of Aβ clearance In Aβ-treated neuronal cells, MSCs increased cellular viability and enhanced LC3-II expression compared with cells treated with Aβ only. Immunofluorescence revealed that MSC coculture in Aβ-treated neuronal cells increased the number of LC3-II-positive autophagosomes that were colocalized with a lysosomal marker. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that most autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in Aβ-treated cells were not fused with lysosomes, whereas a large portion of autophagosomes were conjoined with lysosomes in MSCs cocultured with Aβ-treated neuronal cells. Furthermore, MSC coculture markedly increased Aβ immunoreactivity colocalized within lysosomes and decreased intracellular Aβ levels compared with Aβ-treated cells. In Aβ-treated animals, MSC administration significantly increased autophagosome induction, final maturation of late AVs, and fusion with lysosomes. Moreover, MSC administration significantly reduced the level of Aβ in the hippocampus, which was elevated in Aβ-treated mice, concomitant with increased survival of hippocampal neurons. Finally, MSC coculture upregulated BECN1/Beclin 1 expression in AD models. These results suggest that MSCs significantly enhance autolysosome formation and clearance of Aβ in AD models, which may lead to increased neuronal survival against Aβ toxicity. Modulation of the autophagy pathway to repair the damaged AD brain using MSCs would have a significant impact on future strategies for AD treatment.

  14. Biomechanical interpretation of a free-breathing lung motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tianyu; White, Benjamin; Moore, Kevin L.; Lamb, James; Yang, Deshan; Lu, Wei; Mutic, Sasa; Low, Daniel A.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a biomechanical model for free-breathing motion and compare it to a published heuristic five-dimensional (5D) free-breathing lung motion model. An ab initio biomechanical model was developed to describe the motion of lung tissue during free breathing by analyzing the stress-strain relationship inside lung tissue. The first-order approximation of the biomechanical model was equivalent to a heuristic 5D free-breathing lung motion model proposed by Low et al in 2005 (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 63 921-9), in which the motion was broken down to a linear expansion component and a hysteresis component. To test the biomechanical model, parameters that characterize expansion, hysteresis and angles between the two motion components were reported independently and compared between two models. The biomechanical model agreed well with the heuristic model within 5.5% in the left lungs and 1.5% in the right lungs for patients without lung cancer. The biomechanical model predicted that a histogram of angles between the two motion components should have two peaks at 39.8° and 140.2° in the left lungs and 37.1° and 142.9° in the right lungs. The data from the 5D model verified the existence of those peaks at 41.2° and 148.2° in the left lungs and 40.1° and 140° in the right lungs for patients without lung cancer. Similar results were also observed for the patients with lung cancer, but with greater discrepancies. The maximum-likelihood estimation of hysteresis magnitude was reported to be 2.6 mm for the lung cancer patients. The first-order approximation of the biomechanical model fit the heuristic 5D model very well. The biomechanical model provided new insights into breathing motion with specific focus on motion trajectory hysteresis.

  15. Lung dosimetry and risk assessment of nanoparticles: Evaluating and extending current models in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Kuempel, E.D.; Tran, C.L.; Castranova, V.; Bailer, A.J.

    2006-09-15

    Risk assessment of occupational exposure to nanomaterials is needed. Human data are limited, but quantitative data are available from rodent studies. To use these data in risk assessment, a scientifically reasonable approach for extrapolating the rodent data to humans is required. One approach is allometric adjustment for species differences in the relationship between airborne exposure and internal dose. Another approach is lung dosimetry modeling, which provides a biologically-based, mechanistic method to extrapolate doses from animals to humans. However, current mass-based lung dosimetry models may not fully account for differences in the clearance and translocation of nanoparticles. In this article, key steps in quantitative risk assessment are illustrated, using dose-response data in rats chronically exposed to either fine or ultrafine titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), carbon black (CB), or diesel exhaust particulate (DEP). The rat-based estimates of the working lifetime airborne concentrations associated with 0.1% excess risk of lung cancer are approximately 0.07 to 0.3 mg/m{sup 3} for ultrafine TiO{sub 2}, CB, or DEP, and 0.7 to 1.3 mg/m{sup 3} for fine TiO{sub 2}. Comparison of observed versus model-predicted lung burdens in rats shows that the dosimetry models predict reasonably well the retained mass lung burdens of fine or ultrafine poorly soluble particles in rats exposed by chronic inhalation. Additional model validation is needed for nanoparticles of varying characteristics, as well as extension of these models to include particle translocation to organs beyond the lungs. Such analyses would provide improved prediction of nanoparticle dose for risk assessment.

  16. Towards improved models for predicting bioconcentration of well-metabolized compounds by rainbow trout using measured rates of in vitro intrinsic clearance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consensus models were developed to predict the bioconcentration of well-metabolized chemicals by rainbow trout. The models employ intrinsic clearance data from in vitro studies with liver S9 fractions or isolated hepatocytes to estimate a liver clearance rate which is extrapolat...

  17. Rationalizing underprediction of drug clearance from enzyme and transporter kinetic data: from in vitro tools to mechanistic modeling.

    PubMed

    Galetin, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, there has been an increase in the number and quality of available in vitro tools for the assessment of clearance. Complexity of data analysis and modelling of corresponding in vitro data has increased in an analogous manner, in particular for the simultaneous characterization of transporter and metabolism kinetics, together with intracellular binding and passive diffusion. In the current chapter, the impact of different factors on the in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of clearance will be addressed in a stepwise manner, from the selection of the most adequate in vitro system and experimental design/condition to the corresponding modelling of data generated. The application of static or physiologically based pharmacokinetic models in the prediction of clearance will be discussed, highlighting limitations and current challenges of some of the approaches. Particular focus will be on the ability of in vitro and in silico predictive tools to overcome the trend of clearance underprediction. Improvements made as a result of inclusion of extrahepatic metabolism and consideration of transporter-metabolism interplay across different organs will be discussed.

  18. The Effect of Pendelluft and Dead Space on Nitrogen Clearance: Mathematical and Experimental Models and their Application to the Study of the Distribution of Ventilation*

    PubMed Central

    Safonoff, Ivan; Emmanuel, George E.

    1967-01-01

    Reinspired mixed dead space gas and Pendelluft may be considered to be part of a single process of interalveolar gas transfer. The effect of interalveolar gas transfer on nitrogen clearance from a two chamber lung model can be described by a single set of equations which hold for synchronous, and series ventilation. Interalveolar gas transfer may theoretically be either bidirectional or unidirectional. Bidirectional transfer results in an underestimation of the effective ventilation and volume of the well-ventilated compartment when nitrogen washout is analyzed by available methods. The volume of the poorly ventilated compartment is overestimated and its effective ventilation is usually overestimated but may be correctly or underestimated as distribution becomes more uneven. Unidirectional transfer has the same qualitative effect except that the ventilation of the poorly ventilated space is always overestimated. The distortions produced by both types of gas transfer become less marked as ventilation becomes more uneven. Nitrogen washout data from a model consisting of two rubber balloons connected with a Y tube agree well with the mathematical predictions. Application of the theory to data obtained from patients with advanced chronic obstructive lung disease suggests that estimates of the functional residual capacity and of the volume and ventilation of the poorly ventilated spaces are not greatly affected by interalveolar gas transfer when nitrogen washout is analyzed by usual methods. PMID:6061743

  19. Dynamic modeling of lung tumor motion during respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakou, E.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2011-05-01

    A dynamic finite element model of the lung that incorporates a simplified geometry with realistic lung material properties has been developed. Observations of lung motion from respiratory-gated computed tomography were used to provide a database against which the predictions of the model are assessed. Data from six patients presenting with lung tumors were processed to give sagittal sections of the lung containing the tumor as a function of the breathing phase. Statistical shape modeling was used to outline the diaphragm, the tumor volume and the thoracic wall at each breathing phase. The motion of the tumor in the superior-inferior direction was plotted against the diaphragm displacement. The finite element model employed a simplified geometry in which the lung material fills a rectangular volume enabling two-dimensional coordinates to be used. The diaphragm is represented as a piston, driving the motion. Plots of lung displacement against diaphragm displacement form hysteresis loops that are a sensitive indicator of the characteristics of the motion. The key parameters of lung material that determine the motion are the density and elastic properties of lung material and the airway permeability. The model predictions of the hysteresis behavior agreed well with observation only when lung material is modeled as viscoelastic. The key material parameters are suggested for use as prognostic indicators of the progression of disease and of changes arising from the response of the lung to radiation treatment.

  20. Increased peripheral lipid clearance in an animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fergani, Anissa; Oudart, Hugues; Gonzalez De Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Fricker, Bastien; René, Frédérique; Hocquette, Jean-François; Meininger, Vincent; Dupuis, Luc; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult motor neuron disease causing motor neuron degeneration, muscle atrophy, paralysis and death. Despite this degenerative process, a stable hypermetabolic state has been observed in a large subset of patients. Mice expressing a mutant form of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (mSOD1 mice) constitute an animal model of ALS that, as patients, exhibits unexpectedly increased energy expenditure. Counterbalancing for this increase with a high fat diet extends lifespan and prevents motor neuron loss. Here we investigated whether lipid metabolism is defective in this animal model. Hepatic lipid metabolism was roughly normal while gastro-instestinal absorption of lipids as well as peripheral clearance of triglycerides-rich lipoproteins were markedly increased, leading to decreased postprandial lipidemia. This defect was corrected by the high fat regimen that typically induces neuroprotection in these animals. Altogether, our findings show that energy metabolism in mSOD1 mice shifts towards an increase in the peripheral use of lipids. This metabolic shift probably accounts for the protective effect of dietary lipids in this model. PMID:17438338

  1. Increased peripheral lipid clearance in an animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fergani, Anissa; Oudart, Hugues; Gonzalez De Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Fricker, Bastien; René, Frédérique; Hocquette, Jean-François; Meininger, Vincent; Dupuis, Luc; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe

    2007-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult motor neuron disease, causing motor neuron degeneration, muscle atrophy, paralysis, and death. Despite this degenerative process, a stable hypermetabolic state has been observed in a large subset of patients. Mice expressing a mutant form of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (mSOD1 mice) constitute an animal model of ALS that, like patients, exhibits unexpectedly increased energy expenditure. Counterbalancing for this increase with a high-fat diet extends lifespan and prevents motor neuron loss. Here, we investigated whether lipid metabolism is defective in this animal model. Hepatic lipid metabolism was roughly normal, whereas gastrointestinal absorption of lipids as well as peripheral clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins were markedly increased, leading to decreased postprandial lipidemia. This defect was corrected by the high-fat regimen that typically induces neuroprotection in these animals. Together, our findings show that energy metabolism in mSOD1 mice shifts toward an increase in the peripheral use of lipids. This metabolic shift probably accounts for the protective effect of dietary lipids in this model.

  2. Depletion of M. tuberculosis GlmU from Infected Murine Lungs Effects the Clearance of the Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Vijay; Upadhayay, Sandeep; Suryadevara, Priyanka; Samla, Ganesh; Singh, Archana; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    M. tuberculosis N-acetyl-glucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmUMtb) is a bi-functional enzyme engaged in the synthesis of two metabolic intermediates N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate (GlcNAc-1-P) and UDP-GlcNAc, catalyzed by the C- and N-terminal domains respectively. UDP-GlcNAc is a key metabolite essential for the synthesis of peptidoglycan, disaccharide linker, arabinogalactan and mycothiols. While glmUMtb was predicted to be an essential gene, till date the role of GlmUMtb in modulating the in vitro growth of Mtb or its role in survival of pathogen ex vivo / in vivo have not been deciphered. Here we present the results of a comprehensive study dissecting the role of GlmUMtb in arbitrating the survival of the pathogen both in vitro and in vivo. We find that absence of GlmUMtb leads to extensive perturbation of bacterial morphology and substantial reduction in cell wall thickness under normoxic as well as hypoxic conditions. Complementation studies show that the acetyl- and uridyl- transferase activities of GlmUMtb are independently essential for bacterial survival in vitro, and GlmUMtb is also found to be essential for mycobacterial survival in THP-1 cells as well as in guinea pigs. Depletion of GlmUMtb from infected murine lungs, four weeks post infection, led to significant reduction in the bacillary load. The administration of Oxa33, a novel oxazolidine derivative that specifically inhibits GlmUMtb, to infected mice resulted in significant decrease in the bacillary load. Thus our study establishes GlmUMtb as a strong candidate for intervention measures against established tuberculosis infections. PMID:26489015

  3. Real-time imaging of glutamate clearance reveals normal striatal uptake in Huntington disease mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Matthew P.; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Woodard, Cameron L.; Kang, Rujun; Murphy, Timothy H.; Raymond, Lynn A.

    2016-01-01

    It has become well accepted that Huntington disease (HD) is associated with impaired glutamate uptake, resulting in a prolonged time-course of extracellular glutamate that contributes to excitotoxicity. However, the data supporting this view come largely from work in synaptosomes, which may overrepresent nerve-terminal uptake over astrocytic uptake. Here, we quantify real-time glutamate dynamics in HD mouse models by high-speed imaging of an intensity-based glutamate-sensing fluorescent reporter (iGluSnFR) and electrophysiological recordings of synaptically activated transporter currents in astrocytes. These techniques reveal a disconnect between the results obtained in synaptosomes and those in situ. Exogenous glutamate uptake is impaired in synaptosomes, whereas real-time measures of glutamate clearance in the HD striatum are normal or even accelerated, particularly in the aggressive R6/2 model. Our results highlight the importance of quantifying glutamate dynamics under endogenous release conditions, and suggest that the widely cited uptake impairment in HD does not contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:27052848

  4. Real-time imaging of glutamate clearance reveals normal striatal uptake in Huntington disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew P; Vanni, Matthieu P; Woodard, Cameron L; Kang, Rujun; Murphy, Timothy H; Raymond, Lynn A

    2016-01-01

    It has become well accepted that Huntington disease (HD) is associated with impaired glutamate uptake, resulting in a prolonged time-course of extracellular glutamate that contributes to excitotoxicity. However, the data supporting this view come largely from work in synaptosomes, which may overrepresent nerve-terminal uptake over astrocytic uptake. Here, we quantify real-time glutamate dynamics in HD mouse models by high-speed imaging of an intensity-based glutamate-sensing fluorescent reporter (iGluSnFR) and electrophysiological recordings of synaptically activated transporter currents in astrocytes. These techniques reveal a disconnect between the results obtained in synaptosomes and those in situ. Exogenous glutamate uptake is impaired in synaptosomes, whereas real-time measures of glutamate clearance in the HD striatum are normal or even accelerated, particularly in the aggressive R6/2 model. Our results highlight the importance of quantifying glutamate dynamics under endogenous release conditions, and suggest that the widely cited uptake impairment in HD does not contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:27052848

  5. Discrete-Layer Piezoelectric Plate and Shell Models for Active Tip-Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyliger, P. R.; Ramirez, G.; Pei, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop computational tools for the analysis of active-sensory composite structures with added or embedded piezoelectric layers. The targeted application for this class of smart composite laminates and the analytical development is the accomplishment of active tip-clearance control in turbomachinery components. Two distinct theories and analytical models were developed and explored under this contract: (1) a discrete-layer plate theory and corresponding computational models, and (2) a three dimensional general discrete-layer element generated in curvilinear coordinates for modeling laminated composite piezoelectric shells. Both models were developed from the complete electromechanical constitutive relations of piezoelectric materials, and incorporate both displacements and potentials as state variables. This report describes the development and results of these models. The discrete-layer theories imply that the displacement field and electrostatic potential through-the-thickness of the laminate are described over an individual layer rather than as a smeared function over the thickness of the entire plate or shell thickness. This is especially crucial for composites with embedded piezoelectric layers, as the actuating and sensing elements within these layers are poorly represented by effective or smeared properties. Linear Lagrange interpolation polynomials were used to describe the through-thickness laminate behavior. Both analytic and finite element approximations were used in the plane or surface of the structure. In this context, theoretical developments are presented for the discrete-layer plate theory, the discrete-layer shell theory, and the formulation of an exact solution for simply-supported piezoelectric plates. Finally, evaluations and results from a number of separate examples are presented for the static and dynamic analysis of the plate geometry. Comparisons between the different approaches are provided when

  6. A mathematical model of lung parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Karakaplan, A D; Bieniek, M P; Skalak, R

    1980-05-01

    The geometry of the proposed model of the parenchyma of a mammalian lung reproduces a cluster of alveoli arranged around a lowest-level air duct. The alveolar walls are assumed to be nonlinear elastic membranes, whose properties are described in terms of a strain energy function which reflects the hardening character of the stress-strain curve. The effect of the surfactant is included in terms of a variable (area-dependent) surface tension. Analyses of various mechanical processes in the parenchyma are performed with the aid of the finite element method, with the geometric and physical nonlinearities of the problem taken into account. PMID:6893348

  7. Irreversible Electroporation in a Swine Lung Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Damian E.; Aswad, Bassam; Ng, Thomas

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety and tissue effects of IRE in a swine lung model. Methods: This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. Nine anesthetized domestic swine underwent 15 percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE) lesion creations (6 with bipolar and 3 with 3-4 monopolar electrodes) under fluoroscopic guidance and with pancuronium neuromuscular blockade and EKG gating. IRE electrodes were placed into the central and middle third of the right mid and lower lobes in all animals. Postprocedure PA and lateral chest radiographs were obtained to evaluate for pneumothorax. Three animals were sacrificed at 2 weeks and six at 4 weeks. Animals underwent high-resolution CT scanning and PA and lateral radiographs 1 h before sacrifice. The treated lungs were removed en bloc, perfused with formalin, and sectioned. Gross pathologic and microscopic changes after standard hematoxylin and eosin staining were analyzed within the areas of IRE lesion creation. Results: No significant adverse events were identified. CT showed focal areas of spiculated high density ranging in greatest diameter from 1.1-2.2 cm. On gross inspection of the sectioned lung, focal areas of tan discoloration and increased density were palpated in the areas of IRE. Histological analysis revealed focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage with fibrosis and inflammatory infiltration that respected the boundaries of the interlobular septae. No pathological difference could be discerned between the 2- and 4-week time points. The bronchioles and blood vessels within the areas of IRE were intact and did not show signs of tissue injury. Conclusion: IRE creates focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage without creating damage to the bronchioles or blood vessels. Short-term safety in a swine model appears to be satisfactory.

  8. 4D model generator of the human lung, "Lung4Cer".

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Hiroko; Koc, Salim; Tetsumoto, Satoshi; Koumo, Satoshi; Hirata, Haruhiko; Kijima, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a free software applications which generates 4D (= 3D + time) lung models for the purpose of studying lung anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology. The coinage of 4C is originated from Japanese words, Catachi (= shape, structure) and Calacli (= machine, function). Lung4Cer makes 4D finite element models from the trachea to alveoli, which allow airflow simulation by means of computational fluid dynamics. Visualization of the generated models is expected to use a popular free software application, ParaView. There are several versions of Lung4Cer from basic lung morphology to advanced airflow computations simulating various clinical pulmonary function tests (PFT4Cer). All versions are designed so as to be operated on a common PC. Users can select model types and the element number according to their purposes and available computer resources.

  9. Clearance Deficiency and Cell Death Pathways: A Model for the Pathogenesis of SLE

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Aparna; Herrmann, Martin; Muñoz, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of cell death pathways, including apoptosis and the neutrophil specific kind of death called NETosis, can represent a potential source of autoantigens. Defects in the clearance of apoptotic cells may be responsible for the initiation of systemic autoimmunity in several chronic inflammatory diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Autoantigens are released mainly from secondary necrotic cells because of a defective clearance of apoptotic cells or an inefficient degradation of DNA-containing neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These modified autoantigens are presented by follicular dendritic cells to autoreactive B cells in germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs. This results in the loss of self-tolerance and production of autoantibodies, a unifying feature of SLE. Immune complexes (IC) are formed from autoantibodies bound to uncleared cellular debris in blood or tissues. Clearance of IC by blood phagocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells leads to proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In particular, plasmacytoid dendritic cells produce high amounts of interferon-α upon IC uptake, thereby contributing to the interferon signature of patients with SLE. The clearance of antinuclear IC via Fc-gamma receptors is considered a central event in amplifying inflammatory immune responses in SLE. Along with this, the accumulation of cell remnants represents an initiating event of the etiology, while the subsequent generation of autoantibodies against nuclear antigens (including NETs) results in the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue damage in patients with SLE. Here, we discuss the implications of defective clearance of apoptotic cells and NETs in the development of clinical manifestations in SLE. PMID:26904025

  10. Matrix Metalloproteinase-8 Augments Bacterial Clearance in a Juvenile Sepsis Model

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Sarah J; Varisco, Brian M; Sandquist, Mary; Daly, Meghan N; Klingbeil, Lindsey; Kuethe, Joshua W; Midura, Emily F; Harmon, Kelli; Opoka, Amy; Lahni, Patrick; Piraino, Giovanna; Hake, Paul; Zingarelli, Basilia; Mortensen, Joel E; Wynn, James L; Wong, Hector R

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP8) improves survival in an adult murine sepsis model. Because developmental age influences the host inflammatory response, we hypothesized that developmental age influences the role of MMP8 in sepsis. First, we compared sepsis survival between wild-type (WT, C57BL/6) and MMP8 null juvenile-aged mice (12–14 d) after intraperitoneal injection of a standardized cecal slurry. Second, peritoneal lavages collected 6 h and 18 h after cecal slurry injection were analyzed for bacterial burden, leukocyte subsets and inflammatory cytokines. Third, juvenile WT mice were pretreated with an MMP8 inhibitor prior to cecal slurry injection; analysis of their bacterial burden was compared with vehicle-injected animals. Fourth, the phagocytic capacity of WT and MMP8 null peritoneal macrophages was compared. Finally, peritoneal neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were compared using immunofluorescent imaging and quantitative image analysis. We found that juvenile MMP8 null mice had greater mortality and higher bacterial burden than WT mice. Leukocyte counts and cytokine concentrations in the peritoneal fluid were increased in the MMP8 null mice relative to the wild-type mice. Peritoneal macrophages from MMP8 null mice had reduced phagocytic capacity compared to WT macrophages. There was no quantitative difference in NET formation, but fewer bacteria were adherent to NETs from MMP8 null animals. In conclusion, in contrast to septic adult mice, genetic ablation of MMP8 increased mortality following bacterial peritonitis in juvenile mice. This increase in mortality was associated with reduced bacterial clearance and reduced NET efficiency. We conclude that developmental age influences the role of MMP8 in sepsis. PMID:27506554

  11. Transgenic models for the study of lung biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Y S

    1994-04-01

    Transgenic models provide a means of understanding the molecular mechanisms for the temporal, spatial, and stimulus-responsive regulation of gene expression in vivo and importantly the pathophysiological consequences of the altered expression of a normal or mutated gene. To facilitate the application of transgenic models in lung research, this review describes several practical considerations in generation of transgenic mice. The potential of transgenic models in lung research is also illustrated by depicting the current models in lung research including those for understanding lung gene regulation, tumorigenesis, mutation detection, antioxidant defense, emphysema, fibrosis, and hypertension. The impact of important new development of producing transgenic mice carrying large fragments of DNA contained in yeast artificial chromosomes to achieve proper control of transgene expression and gene targeting technology is also discussed. It is anticipated that transgenic models will provide invaluable information in future lung research.

  12. Chronic Liver Disease Impairs Bacterial Clearance in a Human Model of Induced Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Ashare, Alix; Stanford, Clark; Hancock, Patricia; Stark, Donna; Lilli, Kathleen; Birrer, Emily; Nymon, Amanda; Doerschug, Kevin C.; Hunninghake, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis often causes impaired hepatic function. Patients with liver disease have an increased risk of bacteremia. This is thought to be secondary to impaired reticuloendothelial system function. However, this has not been demonstrated clinically. Since transient bacteremia occurs following toothbrushing, we hypothesized that subjects with cirrhosis would have impaired bacterial clearance following toothbrushing compared with subjects with pulmonary disease and healthy controls. After baseline blood was drawn, the subjects underwent a dental examination to determine plaque index and gingival index. Following toothbrushing, blood was drawn at 30 seconds, 5 minutes, and 15 minutes. Bacteremia was measured using quantitative real-time PCR with primers that amplify all known bacteria. We found greater than 75% incidence of bacteremia following toothbrushing. While control and pulmonary subjects were able to clear this bacteremia, subjects with cirrhosis had prolonged bacteremia. Baseline and peak bacterial load correlated with plaque index, suggesting that dental hygiene predicts the degree of bacteremia. However, only the severity of cirrhosis was predictive of bacterial clearance at 15 minutes, suggesting that liver function is important in clearing bacteremia. In this study, we demonstrate clinically that cirrhosis results in impaired bacterial clearance. This suggests that cirrhotic patients may be more susceptible to sepsis because of ineffective bacterial clearance. PMID:20443893

  13. Arctigenin effectively ameliorates memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease model mice targeting both β-amyloid production and clearance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Jianming; Jiang, Wei; Yao, Xin-gang; Chen, Jing; Chen, Lili; Li, Chenjing; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) chiefly characterizes a progressively neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, and eventually leads to irreversible loss of intellectual abilities. The β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration is believed to be the main pathological mechanism of AD, and Aβ production inhibition or its clearance promotion is one of the promising therapeutic strategies for anti-AD research. Here, we report that the natural product arctigenin from Arctium lappa (L.) can both inhibit Aβ production by suppressing β-site amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 expression and promote Aβ clearance by enhancing autophagy through AKT/mTOR signaling inhibition and AMPK/Raptor pathway activation as investigated in cells and APP/PS1 transgenic AD model mice. Moreover, the results showing that treatment of arctigenin in mice highly decreased Aβ formation and senile plaques and efficiently ameliorated AD mouse memory impairment strongly highlight the potential of arctigenin in anti-AD drug discovery.

  14. Arctigenin effectively ameliorates memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease model mice targeting both β-amyloid production and clearance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Jianming; Jiang, Wei; Yao, Xin-gang; Chen, Jing; Chen, Lili; Li, Chenjing; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) chiefly characterizes a progressively neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, and eventually leads to irreversible loss of intellectual abilities. The β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration is believed to be the main pathological mechanism of AD, and Aβ production inhibition or its clearance promotion is one of the promising therapeutic strategies for anti-AD research. Here, we report that the natural product arctigenin from Arctium lappa (L.) can both inhibit Aβ production by suppressing β-site amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 expression and promote Aβ clearance by enhancing autophagy through AKT/mTOR signaling inhibition and AMPK/Raptor pathway activation as investigated in cells and APP/PS1 transgenic AD model mice. Moreover, the results showing that treatment of arctigenin in mice highly decreased Aβ formation and senile plaques and efficiently ameliorated AD mouse memory impairment strongly highlight the potential of arctigenin in anti-AD drug discovery. PMID:23926267

  15. Practical use of advanced mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Meuwissen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    To date a variety of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) mouse models have been developed that mimic human lung cancer. Chemically induced or spontaneous lung cancer in susceptible inbred strains has been widely used, but the more recent genetically engineered somatic mouse models recapitulate much better the genotype-phenotype correlations found in human lung cancer. Additionally, improved orthotopic transplantation of primary human cancer tissue fragments or cells into lungs of immune-compromised mice can be valuable tools for preclinical research such as antitumor drug tests. Here we give a short overview of most somatic mouse models for lung cancer that are currently in use. We accompany each different model with a description of its practical use and application for all major lung tumor types, as well as the intratracheal injection or direct injection of fresh or freeze-thawed tumor cells or tumor cell lines into lung parenchyma of recipient mice. All here presented somatic mouse models are based on the ability to (in) activate specific alleles at a time, and in a tissue-specific cell type, of choice. This spatial-temporal controlled induction of genetic lesions allows the selective introduction of main genetic lesions in an adult mouse lung as found in human lung cancer. The resulting conditional somatic mouse models can be used as versatile powerful tools in basic lung cancer research and preclinical translational studies alike. These distinctively advanced lung cancer models permit us to investigate initiation (cell of origin) and progression of lung cancer, along with response and resistance to drug therapy. Cre/lox or FLP/frt recombinase-mediated methods are now well-used techniques to develop tissue-restricted lung cancer in mice with tumor-suppressor gene and/or oncogene (in)activation. Intranasal or intratracheal administration of engineered adenovirus-Cre or lentivirus-Cre has been optimized for introducing Cre

  16. Temsirolimus promotes autophagic clearance of amyloid-β and provides protective effects in cellular and animal models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Tan, Meng-Shan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Cao, Lei; Zhang, Qiao-Quan; Shi, Jian-Quan; Gao, Li; Qin, Hao; Zhang, Ying-Dong; Tan, Lan

    2014-03-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) within brain is a major pathogenic hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Emerging evidence suggests that autophagy, an important intracellular catabolic process, is involved in Aβ clearance. Here, we investigated whether temsirolimus, a newly developed compound approved by Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency for renal cell carcinoma treatment, would promote autophagic clearance of Aβ and thus provide protective effects in cellular and animal models of AD. HEK293 cells expressing the Swedish mutant of APP695 (HEK293-APP695) were treated with vehicle or 100nM temsirolimus for 24h in the presence or absence of 3-methyladenine (5mM) or Atg5-siRNA, and intracellular Aβ levels as well as autophagy biomarkers were measured. Meanwhile, APP/PS1 mice received intraperitoneal injection of temsirolimus (20mg/kg) every 2 days for 60 days, and brain Aβ burden, autophagy biomarkers, cellular apoptosis in hippocampus, and spatial cognitive functions were assessed. Our results showed that temsirolimus enhanced Aβ clearance in HEK293-APP695 cells and in brain of APP/PS1 mice in an autophagy-dependent manner. Meanwhile, temsirolimus attenuated cellular apoptosis in hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice, which was accompanied by an improvement in spatial learning and memory abilities. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidence that temsirolimus promotes autophagic Aβ clearance and exerts protective effects in cellular and animal models of AD, suggesting that temsirolimus administration may represent a new therapeutic strategy for AD treatment. Meanwhile, these findings emphasize the notion that many therapeutic agents possess pleiotropic actions aside from their main applications. PMID:24602800

  17. Implications of the ICRP Task Group's proposed lung model for internal dose assessments in the mineral sands industry

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.C. ); Birchall, A. )

    1990-09-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Respiratory Tract Models for Radiological Projection is proposing a model to describe the deposition, clearance, retention and dosimetry of inhaled radionuclides for dose-intake calculations and interpretation of bioassay data. The deposition model takes into account new data on the regional deposition of aerosol particles in human lung and the inhalability of large particles. The clearance model treats clearance as competition between mechanical transport, which moves particles to the gastro-intestinal tract and lymph nodes, and the translocation of material to blood. This provides a realistic estimate of the amount of a given material (such as mineral sand) that is absorbed systemically, and its variation with aerosol size. The proposed dosimetry model takes into account the relative sensitivities of the various tissue components of the respiratory tract. A new treatment of dose received by epithelia in the tracheo-bronchiolar and extrathoracic regions is proposed. This paper outlines the novel features of the task group model, and then examines the impact that adoption of the model may have on the assessment of doses from occupational exposures to mineral sands and thoron progeny. 39 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Computer modeling of lung cancer diagnosis-to-treatment process

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Feng; Lee, Hyo Kyung; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U.; Yu, Xinhua; Faris, Nick

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an example of a rigorous, quantitative method for quality improvement in lung cancer care-delivery. Computer process modeling methods are introduced for lung cancer diagnosis, staging and treatment selection process. Two types of process modeling techniques, discrete event simulation (DES) and analytical models, are briefly reviewed. Recent developments in DES are outlined and the necessary data and procedures to develop a DES model for lung cancer diagnosis, leading up to surgical treatment process are summarized. The analytical models include both Markov chain model and closed formulas. The Markov chain models with its application in healthcare are introduced and the approach to derive a lung cancer diagnosis process model is presented. Similarly, the procedure to derive closed formulas evaluating the diagnosis process performance is outlined. Finally, the pros and cons of these methods are discussed. PMID:26380181

  19. Rapid in vivo measurement of β-amyloid reveals biphasic clearance kinetics in an Alzheimer’s mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo; Restivo, Jessica L.; Davis, Todd A.; Hettinger, Jane C.; Wallace, Clare E.; Young, Katherine L.; Hayne, Margaret R.; Bu, Guojun; Li, Chen-zhong

    2016-01-01

    Findings from genetic, animal model, and human studies support the observation that accumulation of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain plays a central role in the pathogenic cascade of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Human studies suggest that one key factor leading to accumulation is a defect in brain Aβ clearance. We have developed a novel microimmunoelectrode (MIE) to study the kinetics of Aβ clearance using an electrochemical approach. This is the first study using MIEs in vivo to measure rapid changes in Aβ levels in the brains of living mice. Extracellular, interstitial fluid (ISF) Aβ levels were measured in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice. Baseline levels of Aβ40 in the ISF are relatively stable and begin to decline within minutes of blocking Aβ production with a γ-secretase inhibitor. Pretreatment with a P-glycoprotein inhibitor, which blocks blood–brain barrier transport of Aβ, resulted in significant prolongation of Aβ40 half-life, but only in the latter phase of Aβ clearance from the ISF. PMID:27069115

  20. Finite element modeling of blast lung injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Melissa M; Dang, Xinglai; Adkins, Mark; Powell, Brian; Chan, Philemon

    2015-04-01

    A detailed 3D finite element model (FEM) of the sheep thorax was developed to predict heterogeneous and volumetric lung injury due to blast. A shared node mesh of the sheep thorax was constructed from a computed tomography (CT) scan of a sheep cadaver, and while most material properties were taken from literature, an elastic-plastic material model was used for the ribs based on three-point bending experiments performed on sheep rib specimens. Anesthetized sheep were blasted in an enclosure, and blast overpressure data were collected using the blast test device (BTD), while surface lung injury was quantified during necropsy. Matching blasts were simulated using the sheep thorax FEM. Surface lung injury in the FEM was matched to pathology reports by setting a threshold value of the scalar output termed the strain product (maximum value of the dot product of strain and strain-rate vectors over all simulation time) in the surface elements. Volumetric lung injury was quantified by applying the threshold value to all elements in the model lungs, and a correlation was found between predicted volumetric injury and measured postblast lung weights. All predictions are made for the left and right lungs separately. This work represents a significant step toward the prediction of localized and heterogeneous blast lung injury, as well as volumetric injury, which was not recorded during field testing for sheep.

  1. A Lung Segmental Model of Chronic Pseudomonas Infection in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Collie, David; Govan, John; Wright, Steven; Thornton, Elisabeth; Tennant, Peter; Smith, Sionagh; Doherty, Catherine; McLachlan, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major contributor to morbidity, mortality and premature death in cystic fibrosis. A new paradigm for managing such infections is needed, as are relevant and translatable animal models to identify and test concepts. We sought to improve on limitations associated with existing models of infection in small animals through developing a lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep. Methodology/Principal Findings Using local lung instillation of P. aeruginosa suspended in agar beads we were able to demonstrate that such infection led to the development of a suppurative, necrotising and pyogranulomatous pneumonia centred on the instilled beads. No overt evidence of organ or systemic compromise was apparent in any animal during the course of infection. Infection persisted in the lungs of individual animals for as long as 66 days after initial instillation. Quantitative microbiology applied to bronchoalveolar lavage fluid derived from infected segments proved an insensitive index of the presence of significant infection in lung tissue (>104 cfu/g). Conclusions/Significance The agar bead model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in sheep is a relevant platform to investigate both the pathobiology of such infections as well as novel approaches to their diagnosis and therapy. Particular ethical benefits relate to the model in terms of refining existing approaches by compromising a smaller proportion of the lung with infection and facilitating longitudinal assessment by bronchoscopy, and also potentially reducing animal numbers through facilitating within-animal comparisons of differential therapeutic approaches. PMID:23874438

  2. LLPi: Liverpool Lung Project Risk Prediction Model for Lung Cancer Incidence.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Michael W; Chen, Ying; Raji, Olaide Y; Duffy, Stephen W; Field, John K

    2015-06-01

    Identification of high-risk individuals will facilitate early diagnosis, reduce overall costs, and also improve the current poor survival from lung cancer. The Liverpool Lung Project prospective cohort of 8,760 participants ages 45 to 79 years, recruited between 1998 and 2008, was followed annually through the hospital episode statistics until January 31, 2013. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify risk predictors of lung cancer incidence. C-statistic was used to assess the discriminatory accuracy of the models. Models were internally validated using the bootstrap method. During mean follow-up of 8.7 years, 237 participants developed lung cancer. Age [hazard ratio (HR), 1.04; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-1.06], male gender (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10-1.98), smoking duration (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.03-1.05), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.79-3.30), prior diagnosis of malignant tumor (HR, 2.84; 95% CI, 2.08-3.89), and early onset of family history of lung cancer (HR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.04-2.72) were associated with the incidence of lung cancer. The LLPi risk model had a good calibration (goodness-of-fit χ(2) 7.58, P = 0.371). The apparent C-statistic was 0.852 (95% CI, 0.831-0.873) and the optimism-corrected bootstrap resampling C-statistic was 0.849 (95% CI, 0.829-0.873). The LLPi risk model may assist in identifying individuals at high risk of developing lung cancer in population-based screening programs.

  3. Modelling Virus and Antibody Dynamics during Dengue Virus Infection Suggests a Role for Antibody in Virus Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, Hannah E; Dorigatti, Ilaria; Simmons, Cameron P; Ferguson, Neil M

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an infection of increasing global importance, yet uncertainty remains regarding critical aspects of its virology, immunology and epidemiology. One unanswered question is how infection is controlled and cleared during a dengue infection. Antibody is thought to play a role, but little past work has examined the kinetics of both virus and antibody during natural infections. We present data on multiple virus and antibody titres measurements recorded sequentially during infection from 53 Vietnamese dengue patients. We fit mechanistic mathematical models of the dynamics of viral replication and the host immune response to these data. These models fit the data well. The model with antibody removing virus fits the data best, but with a role suggested for ADCC or other infected cell clearance mechanisms. Our analysis therefore shows that the observed viral and antibody kinetics are consistent with antibody playing a key role in controlling viral replication. This work gives quantitative insight into the relationship between antibody levels and the efficiency of viral clearance. It will inform the future development of mechanistic models of how vaccines and antivirals might modify the course of natural dengue infection. PMID:27213681

  4. Clearance of the mutant androgen receptor in motoneuronal models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy☆

    PubMed Central

    Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Giorgetti, Elisa; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cristofani, Riccardo; Carra, Serena; Poletti, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion of a tandem CAG repeat in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene that results in an abnormally long polyglutamine tract (polyQ) in the AR protein. As a result, the mutant AR (ARpolyQ) misfolds, forming cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates in the affected neurons. Neurotoxicity only appears to be associated with the formation of nuclear aggregates. Thus, improved ARpolyQ cytoplasmic clearance, which indirectly decreases ARpolyQ nuclear accumulation, has beneficial effects on affected motoneurons. In addition, increased ARpolyQ clearance contributes to maintenance of motoneuron proteostasis and viability, preventing the blockage of the proteasome and autophagy pathways that might play a role in the neuropathy in SBMA. The expression of heat shock protein B8 (HspB8), a member of the small heat shock protein family, is highly induced in surviving motoneurons of patients affected by motoneuron diseases, where it seems to participate in the stress response aimed at cell protection. We report here that HspB8 facilitates the autophagic removal of misfolded aggregating species of ARpolyQ. In addition, though HspB8 does not influence p62 and LC3 (two key autophagic molecules) expression, it does prevent p62 bodies formation, and restores the normal autophagic flux in these cells. Interestingly, trehalose, a well-known autophagy stimulator, induces HspB8 expression, suggesting that HspB8 might act as one of the molecular mediators of the proautophagic activity of trehalose. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that treatments aimed at restoring a normal autophagic flux that result in the more efficient clearance of mutant ARpolyQ might produce beneficial effects in SBMA patients. PMID:23810450

  5. Clearance of the mutant androgen receptor in motoneuronal models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Giorgetti, Elisa; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cristofani, Riccardo; Carra, Serena; Poletti, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion of a tandem CAG repeat in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene that results in an abnormally long polyglutamine tract (polyQ) in the AR protein. As a result, the mutant AR (ARpolyQ) misfolds, forming cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates in the affected neurons. Neurotoxicity only appears to be associated with the formation of nuclear aggregates. Thus, improved ARpolyQ cytoplasmic clearance, which indirectly decreases ARpolyQ nuclear accumulation, has beneficial effects on affected motoneurons. In addition, increased ARpolyQ clearance contributes to maintenance of motoneuron proteostasis and viability, preventing the blockage of the proteasome and autophagy pathways that might play a role in the neuropathy in SBMA. The expression of heat shock protein B8 (HspB8), a member of the small heat shock protein family, is highly induced in surviving motoneurons of patients affected by motoneuron diseases, where it seems to participate in the stress response aimed at cell protection. We report here that HspB8 facilitates the autophagic removal of misfolded aggregating species of ARpolyQ. In addition, though HspB8 does not influence p62 and LC3 (two key autophagic molecules) expression, it does prevent p62 bodies formation, and restores the normal autophagic flux in these cells. Interestingly, trehalose, a well-known autophagy stimulator, induces HspB8 expression, suggesting that HspB8 might act as one of the molecular mediators of the proautophagic activity of trehalose. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that treatments aimed at restoring a normal autophagic flux that result in the more efficient clearance of mutant ARpolyQ might produce beneficial effects in SBMA patients.

  6. Animal models of beryllium-induced lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, G.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Hahn, F.F.

    1996-10-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is conducting research to improve the understanding of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and beryllium-induced lung cancer. Initial animal studies examined beagle dogs that inhaled BeO calcined at either 500 or 1000{degrees}C. At similar lung burdens, the 500{degrees}C BeO induced more severe and extensive granulomatous pneumonia, lymphocytic infiltration into the lung, and positive Be-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses in vitro than the 1000{degrees}C BeO. However, the progressive nature of human CBD was not duplicated. More recently, Strains A/J and C3H/HeJ mice were exposed to Be metal by inhalation. This produced a marked granulomatous pneumonia, diffuse infiltrates, and multifocal aggregates of interstitial lymphocytes with a pronounced T helper component and pulmonary in situ lymphocyte proliferation. With respect to lung cancer, at a mean lung burden as low as 17 pg Be/g lung, inhaled Be metal induced benign and/or malignant lung tumors in over 50% of male and female F344 rats surviving {ge}1 year on study. Substantial tumor multiplicity was found, but K-ras and p53 gene mutations were virtually absent. In mice, however, a lung burden of approximately 60 {mu}g ({approximately}300 {mu}g Be/g lung) caused only a slight increase in crude lung tumor incidence and multiplicity over controls in strain A/J mice and no elevated incidence in strain C3H mice. Taken together, this research program constitutes a coordinated effort to understand beryllium-induced lung disease in experimental animal models. 47 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. On a PCA-based lung motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Jia, Xun; Zhao, Tianyu; Liu, Weifeng; Wuenschel, Sara; Lamb, James; Yang, Deshan; Low, Daniel A.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-09-01

    Respiration-induced organ motion is one of the major uncertainties in lung cancer radiotherapy and is crucial to be able to accurately model the lung motion. Most work so far has focused on the study of the motion of a single point (usually the tumor center of mass), and much less work has been done to model the motion of the entire lung. Inspired by the work of Zhang et al (2007 Med. Phys. 34 4772-81), we believe that the spatiotemporal relationship of the entire lung motion can be accurately modeled based on principle component analysis (PCA) and then a sparse subset of the entire lung, such as an implanted marker, can be used to drive the motion of the entire lung (including the tumor). The goal of this work is twofold. First, we aim to understand the underlying reason why PCA is effective for modeling lung motion and find the optimal number of PCA coefficients for accurate lung motion modeling. We attempt to address the above important problems both in a theoretical framework and in the context of real clinical data. Second, we propose a new method to derive the entire lung motion using a single internal marker based on the PCA model. The main results of this work are as follows. We derived an important property which reveals the implicit regularization imposed by the PCA model. We then studied the model using two mathematical respiratory phantoms and 11 clinical 4DCT scans for eight lung cancer patients. For the mathematical phantoms with cosine and an even power (2n) of cosine motion, we proved that 2 and 2n PCA coefficients and eigenvectors will completely represent the lung motion, respectively. Moreover, for the cosine phantom, we derived the equivalence conditions for the PCA motion model and the physiological 5D lung motion model (Low et al 2005 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 63 921-9). For the clinical 4DCT data, we demonstrated the modeling power and generalization performance of the PCA model. The average 3D modeling error using PCA was within 1

  8. Effect of cocaine on striatal dopamine clearance in a rat model of developmental stress and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Womersley, Jacqueline S; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Stein, Dan J; Gerhardt, Greg A; Russell, Vivienne A

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and developmental stress are considered risk factors for the development of drug abuse. Though the physiological mechanisms underlying this risk are not yet clear, ADHD, developmental stress and drug abuse are known to share underlying disturbances in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Thus, we hypothesized that clearance of cocaine-induced elevations in striatal dopamine would be prolonged in a rat model of ADHD and that this would be further increased by exposure to developmental stress. In the current study, male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), a well-validated model of ADHD, and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were exposed to either standard rearing (nMS) or a maternal separation (MS) paradigm involving removal of the pups from the dam for 180 min/day over 13 days. This produced a 2 × 2 factorial design (SHR/WKY × nMS/MS) with 5-6 rats/group. Striatal clearance of exogenously applied dopamine was measured via in vivo chronoamperometry, and the difference in dopamine uptake parameters before and after cocaine administration was compared between experimental groups. Cocaine, a potent dopamine transporter inhibitor, reliably increased the clearance time of dopamine though no difference in this parameter was found between SHR and WKY strains. However, developmental stress elevated the cocaine-induced increase in time to clear 50% of exogenously applied dopamine (T50) in SHR but had no effect in WKY rats. These findings suggest that a strain × environment interaction prolongs elevated levels of dopamine thereby potentially increasing the rewarding properties of this drug in SHR.

  9. Effect of cocaine on striatal dopamine clearance in a rat model of developmental stress and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Womersley, Jacqueline S; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Stein, Dan J; Gerhardt, Greg A; Russell, Vivienne A

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and developmental stress are considered risk factors for the development of drug abuse. Though the physiological mechanisms underlying this risk are not yet clear, ADHD, developmental stress and drug abuse are known to share underlying disturbances in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Thus, we hypothesized that clearance of cocaine-induced elevations in striatal dopamine would be prolonged in a rat model of ADHD and that this would be further increased by exposure to developmental stress. In the current study, male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), a well-validated model of ADHD, and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were exposed to either standard rearing (nMS) or a maternal separation (MS) paradigm involving removal of the pups from the dam for 180 min/day over 13 days. This produced a 2 × 2 factorial design (SHR/WKY × nMS/MS) with 5-6 rats/group. Striatal clearance of exogenously applied dopamine was measured via in vivo chronoamperometry, and the difference in dopamine uptake parameters before and after cocaine administration was compared between experimental groups. Cocaine, a potent dopamine transporter inhibitor, reliably increased the clearance time of dopamine though no difference in this parameter was found between SHR and WKY strains. However, developmental stress elevated the cocaine-induced increase in time to clear 50% of exogenously applied dopamine (T50) in SHR but had no effect in WKY rats. These findings suggest that a strain × environment interaction prolongs elevated levels of dopamine thereby potentially increasing the rewarding properties of this drug in SHR. PMID:26394534

  10. Mooney-Rivlin biomechanical modeling of lung with Inhomogeneous material.

    PubMed

    Nasehi Tehrani, J; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the Mooney-Rivlin material with hyperelastic strain energy was proposed for biomechanical modeling of the lung. We modeled the lung as an inhomogeneous Mooney-Rivlin material with uncoupled deviatoric and volumetric behavior. The proposed method was evaluated on the lungs of eight lung cancer patients. For each patient, the lung was segmented from the 4D-CT images and tetrahedral volume mesh of the lung in phase 50% was created by using the adaptive mesh generation toolkit. The demons deformable registration algorithm was used to extract the displacement vector fields (DVFs). The Jacobian of the deformation gradient was calculated from DVFs, and the lung strain energy function was optimized to improve the tumor center of mass (TCM) motion simulation accuracy between respiratory phase 50% and 0%. The average TCM motion simulation error for the proposed strategy is 1.95 mm for eight patients. We observed 13% improvement in the TCM position prediction compared with the homogeneous Mooney-Rivlin modeling. PMID:26738123

  11. Lung lobe modeling and segmentation with individualized surface meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaffert, Thomas; Barschdorf, Hans; von Berg, Jens; Dries, Sebastian; Franz, Astrid; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian; Renisch, Steffen; Wiemker, Rafael

    2008-03-01

    An automated segmentation of lung lobes in thoracic CT images is of interest for various diagnostic purposes like the quantification of emphysema or the localization of tumors within the lung. Although the separating lung fissures are visible in modern multi-slice CT-scanners, their contrast in the CT-image often does not separate the lobes completely. This makes it impossible to build a reliable segmentation algorithm without additional information. Our approach uses general anatomical knowledge represented in a geometrical mesh model to construct a robust lobe segmentation, which even gives reasonable estimates of lobe volumes if fissures are not visible at all. The paper describes the generation of the lung model mesh including lobes by an average volume model, its adaptation to individual patient data using a special fissure feature image, and a performance evaluation over a test data set showing an average segmentation accuracy of 1 to 3 mm.

  12. Small molecule LX2343 ameliorates cognitive deficits in AD model mice by targeting both amyloid β production and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiao-dan; Sun, Guang-long; Zhou, Ting-ting; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yuan; Rukachaisirikul, Vatcharin; Hu, Li-hong; Shen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Streptozotocin (STZ) is widely used to induce oxidative damage and to impair glucose metabolism, apoptosis, and tau/Aβ pathology, eventually leading to cognitive deficits in both in vitro and in vivo models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we constructed a cell-based platform using STZ to induce stress conditions mimicking the complicated pathologies of AD in vitro, and evaluated the anti-amyloid effects of a small molecule, N-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-[5-chloro-2-methoxy(phenylsulfonyl)anilino]acetamide (LX2343) in the amelioration of cognitive deficits in AD model mice. Methods: Cell-based assays for screening anti-amyloid compounds were established by assessing Aβ accumulation in HEK293-APPsw and CHO-APP cells, and Aβ clearance in primary astrocytes and SH-SY5Y cells after the cells were treated with STZ in the presence of the test compounds. Autophagic flux was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. APP/PS1 transgenic mice were administered LX2343 (10 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 100 d. After LX2343 administration, cognitive ability of the mice was evaluated using Morris water maze test, and senile plaques in the brains were detected using Thioflavine S staining. ELISA assay was used to evaluate Aβ and sAPPβ levels, while Western blot analysis was used to measure the signaling proteins in both cell and animal brains. Results: LX2343 (5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently decreased Aβ accumulation in HEK293-APPsw and CHO-APP cells, and promoted Aβ clearance in SH-SY5Y cells and primary astrocytes. The anti-amyloid effects of LX2343 were attributed to suppressing JNK-mediated APPThr668 phosphorylation, thus inhibiting APP cleavage on one hand, and inhibiting BACE1 enzymatic activity with an IC50 value of 11.43±0.36 μmol/L, on the other hand. Furthermore, LX2343 acted as a non-ATP competitive PI3K inhibitor to negatively regulate AKT/mTOR signaling, thus promoting autophagy, and increasing Aβ clearance. Administration of LX2343 in APP

  13. Indocyanine green clearance varies as a function of N-acetylcysteine treatment in a murine model of acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Milesi-Hallé, Alessandra; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Brown, Aliza; McCullough, Sandra S; Letzig, Lynda; Hinson, Jack A; James, Laura P

    2011-02-01

    Standard assays to assess acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in animal models include determination of ALT (alanine aminotransferase) levels and examination of histopathology of liver sections. However, these assays do not reflect the functional capacity of the injured liver. To examine a functional marker of liver injury, the pharmacokinetics of indocyanine green (ICG) were examined in mice treated with APAP, saline, or APAP followed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment.Male B6C3F1 mice were administered APAP (200 mg/kg IP) or saline. Two additional groups of mice received APAP followed by NAC at 1 or 4 h after APAP. At 24 h, mice were injected with ICG (10 mg/kg IV) and serial blood samples (0, 2, 10, 30, 50 and 75 min) were obtained for determination of serum ICG concentrations and ALT. Mouse livers were removed for measurement of APAP protein adducts and examination of histopathology. Toxicity (ALT values and histology) was significantly increased above saline treated mice in the APAP and APAP/NAC 4 h mice. Mice treated with APAP/NAC 1 h had complete protection from toxicity. APAP protein adducts were increased in all APAP treated groups and were highest in the APAP/NAC 1 h group. Pharmacokinetic analysis of ICG demonstrated that the total body clearance (Cl(T)) of ICG was significantly decreased and the mean residence time (MRT) was significantly increased in the APAP mice compared to the saline mice. Mice treated with NAC at 1 h had Cl(T) and MRT values similar to those of saline treated mice. Conversely, mice that received NAC at 4 h had a similar ICG pharmacokinetic profile to that of the APAP only mice. Prompt treatment with NAC prevented loss of functional activity while late treatment with NAC offered no improvement in ICG clearance at 24 h. ICG clearance in mice with APAP toxicity can be utilized in future studies testing the effects of novel treatments for APAP toxicity.

  14. Indocyanine Green Clearance Varies as a Function of N-Acetylcysteine Treatment in a Murine Model of Acetaminophen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Milesi-Hallé, Alessandra; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M.; Brown, Aliza; McCullough, Sandra S.; Letzig, Lynda; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-01-01

    Standard assays to assess acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in animal models include determination of ALT (alanine aminotransferase) levels and examination of histopathology of liver sections. However, these assays do not reflect the functional capacity of the injured liver. To examine a functional marker of liver injury, the pharmacokinetics of indocyanine green (ICG) were examined in mice treated with APAP, saline, or APAP followed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Male B6C3F1 mice were administered APAP (200 mg/kg IP) or saline. Two additional groups of mice received APAP followed by NAC at 1 or 4 h after APAP. At 24 h, mice were injected with ICG (10 mg/kg IV) and serial blood samples (0, 2, 10, 30, 50 and 75 min) were obtained for determination of serum ICG concentrations and ALT. Mouse livers were removed for measurement of APAP protein adducts and examination of histopathology. Toxicity (ALT values and histology) was significantly increased above saline treated mice in the APAP and APAP/NAC 4 h mice. Mice treated with APAP/NAC 1 h had complete protection from toxicity. APAP protein adducts were increased in all APAP treated groups and were highest in the APAP/NAC 1 h group. Pharmacokinetic analysis of ICG demonstrated that the total body clearance (ClT) of ICG was significantly decreased and the mean residence time (MRT) was significantly increased in the APAP mice compared to the saline mice. Mice treated with NAC at 1 h had ClT and MRT values similar to those of saline treated mice. Conversely, mice that received NAC at 4 h had a similar ICG pharmacokinetic profile to that of the APAP only mice. Prompt treatment with NAC prevented loss of functional activity while late treatment with NAC offered no improvement in ICG clearance at 24 h. ICG clearance in mice with APAP toxicity can be utilized in future studies testing the effects of novel treatments for APAP toxicity. PMID:21145883

  15. Radioactivity and lung cancer-mathematical models of radionuclide deposition in the human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The human respiratory tract is regarded as pathway for radionuclides and other hazardous airborne materials to enter the body. Radioactive particles inhaled and deposited in the lungs cause an irradiation of bronchial/alveolar tissues. At the worst, this results in a malignant cellular transformation and, as a consequence of that, the development of lung cancer. In general, naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., 222Rn, 40K) are attached to so-called carrier aerosols. The aerodynamic diameters of such radioactively labeled particles generally vary between several nanometers (ultrafine particles) and few micrometers, whereby highest particle fractions adopt sizes around 100 nm. Theoretical simulations of radioactive particle deposition in the human lungs were based on a stochastic lung geometry and a particle transport/deposition model using the random-walk algorithm. Further a polydisperse carrier aerosol (diameter: 1 nm–10 µm, ρ ≈ 1 g cm−3) with irregularly shaped particles and the effect of breathing characteristics and certain respiratory parameters on the transport of radioactive particles to bronchial/alveolar tissues were considered. As clearly shown by the results of deposition modeling, distribution patterns of radiation doses mainly depend on the size of the carrier aerosol. Ultrafine (< 10 nm) and large (> 2 µm) aerosol particles are preferentially deposited in the extrathoracic and upper bronchial region, whereas aerosol particles with intermediate size (10 nm–2 µm) may penetrate to deeper lung regions, causing an enhanced damage of the alveolar tissue by the attached radionuclides. PMID:22263097

  16. Application of a New Dynamic Model to Predict the In Vitro Intrinsic Clearance of Tolbutamide Using Rat Microsomes Encapsulated in a Fab Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Zheng, Yuanting; Xing, Junfen; Yang, Huiying; Chen, Hanmei; Xiang, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Jing; Tong, Shanshan; Zhu, Bin; Cai, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Currently used in vitro models for estimating liver metabolism do not take into account the physiologic structure and blood circulation process of liver tissue. The Bio-PK metabolic system was established as an alternative approach to determine the in vitro intrinsic clearance of the model drug tolbutamide. The system contained a peristaltic pump, recirculating pipeline, reaction chamber, and rat liver microsomes (RLMs) encapsulated in pluronic F127-acrylamide-bisacrylamide (FAB) hydrogel. The metabolism of tolbutamide at initial concentrations of 100, 150, and 200 μM was measured in both the FAB hydrogel and the circular medium. The data from the FAB hydrogel and the circular medium were fitted to a mathematical model to obtain the predicted intrinsic clearance of tolbutamide after different periods of preincubation. The in vitro clearance value for tolbutamide was incorporated into Simcyp software and used to predict both the in vivo clearance value and the dynamic process of elimination. The predicted in vivo clearance of tolbutamide was 0.107, 0.087, and 0.095 L/h/kg for i.v. injection and 0.113, 0.095, and 0.107 L/h/kg for oral administration. Compared with the reported in vivo clearance of 0.09 L/h/kg (i.v.) and 0.10 L/h/kg (oral), all the predicted values differed by less than twofold. Thus, the Bio-PK metabolic system is a reliable and general in vitro model, characterized by three-dimensional structured RLM and circulation and perfusion processes for predicting the in vivo intrinsic clearance of low-extraction compounds, making the system more analogous with the rat in terms of both morphology and physiology.

  17. A spatial model of fluid recycling in the airways of the lung.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Katie; Crampin, Edmund; Sneyd, James

    2015-10-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF) is a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, and results in viscous mucus and impaired mucociliary clearance leading to chronic recurring pulmonary infections. Although extensive experimental research has been conducted over the last few decades, CF lung pathophysiology remains controversial. There are two competing explanations for the observed depletion of periciliary liquid (PCL) in CF lungs. The low volume hypothesis assumes fluid hyperabsorption through surface epithelia due to an over-active epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), and the low secretion hypothesis assumes inspissated mucins secreted from glands due to lack of serous fluid secreted from gland acini. We present a spatial mathematical model that reflects in vivo fluid recycling via submucosal gland (SMG) secretion, and absorption through surface epithelia. We then test the model in CF conditions by increasing ENaC open probability and decreasing SMG flux while simultaneously reducing CFTR open probability. Increasing ENaC activity only results in increased fluid absorption across surface epithelia, as seen in in vitro experiments. However, combining potential CF mechanisms results in markedly less fluid absorbed while providing the largest reduction in PCL volume, suggesting that a compromise in gland fluid secretion dominates over increased ENaC activity to decrease the amount of fluid transported transcellularly in CF lungs in vivo. Model results also indicate that a spatial model is necessary for an accurate calculation of total fluid transport, as the effects of spatial gradients can be severe, particularly in close proximity to the SMGs.

  18. A spatial model of fluid recycling in the airways of the lung.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Katie; Crampin, Edmund; Sneyd, James

    2015-10-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF) is a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, and results in viscous mucus and impaired mucociliary clearance leading to chronic recurring pulmonary infections. Although extensive experimental research has been conducted over the last few decades, CF lung pathophysiology remains controversial. There are two competing explanations for the observed depletion of periciliary liquid (PCL) in CF lungs. The low volume hypothesis assumes fluid hyperabsorption through surface epithelia due to an over-active epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), and the low secretion hypothesis assumes inspissated mucins secreted from glands due to lack of serous fluid secreted from gland acini. We present a spatial mathematical model that reflects in vivo fluid recycling via submucosal gland (SMG) secretion, and absorption through surface epithelia. We then test the model in CF conditions by increasing ENaC open probability and decreasing SMG flux while simultaneously reducing CFTR open probability. Increasing ENaC activity only results in increased fluid absorption across surface epithelia, as seen in in vitro experiments. However, combining potential CF mechanisms results in markedly less fluid absorbed while providing the largest reduction in PCL volume, suggesting that a compromise in gland fluid secretion dominates over increased ENaC activity to decrease the amount of fluid transported transcellularly in CF lungs in vivo. Model results also indicate that a spatial model is necessary for an accurate calculation of total fluid transport, as the effects of spatial gradients can be severe, particularly in close proximity to the SMGs. PMID:26169010

  19. Lung deposition and clearance of microparticle and nanoparticle C60 fullerene aggregates in B6C3F1 mice and Wistar Han rats following nose-only inhalation for 13 weeks.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Brian C; Walker, Nigel J; Roycroft, Joseph H; Germolec, Dori R; Baker, Gregory L; Clark, Mark L; Hayden, Barry K; DeFord, Henry; Dill, Jeffrey A; Gupta, Amit; Stout, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    C60 fullerenes (C60) are spherical structures consisting of 60 carbon atoms that are generated via combustion from both natural and anthropogenic sources. C60 are also synthesized intentionally for industrial applications. Individual C60 structures have an approximate diameter of 1nm; however, C60 readily forms aggregates and typically exist as larger particles that range from nanometers to micrometers in diameter. In this report, lung and extrapulmonary tissue deposition and lung clearance of C60 nanoparticles (nano-C60, 50nm) and microparticles (micro-C60, 1μm) were examined in Wistar Han rats and B6C3F1/N mice after nose-only inhalation for 90 days. Exposure concentrations were 0.5 and 2mg/m(3) (nano-C60) and 2, 15, and 30mg/m(3) (micro-C60). For both C60 particle sizes, the C60 lung burden increased proportionally to exposure concentration. The C60 lung burden was greater in both species at all time points following exposure to nano-C60 particle exposure compared to micro-C60 exposure at the common exposure concentration 2mg/m(3). The calculated C60 particle lung retention half-times were similar for both nano-C60 and micro-C60 exposure at 2mg/m(3) in male mice (15-16 days). In contrast, in male rats, the half-time of C60 particles following nano-C60 exposure (61 days) was roughly twice as long as the half-time following micro-C60 exposure (27 days) at the same exposure concentration (2mg/m(3)) and was similar to the clearance following micro-C60 exposure at higher exposure concentrations (15 and 30mg/m(3)). C60 was detected in bronchial lymph nodes but the burden was not quantified due to the high variability in the data. C60 concentrations were below the experimental limit of quantitation (ELOQ) in liver, spleen, blood, brain and kidney tissues. These tissue burden data provide information for comparison between nanometer and micrometer sized C60 particle exposure and will aid in the interpretation of toxicity data. PMID:26612504

  20. Lung deposition and clearance of microparticle and nanoparticle C60 fullerene aggregates in B6C3F1 mice and Wistar Han rats following nose-only inhalation for 13 weeks.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Brian C; Walker, Nigel J; Roycroft, Joseph H; Germolec, Dori R; Baker, Gregory L; Clark, Mark L; Hayden, Barry K; DeFord, Henry; Dill, Jeffrey A; Gupta, Amit; Stout, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    C60 fullerenes (C60) are spherical structures consisting of 60 carbon atoms that are generated via combustion from both natural and anthropogenic sources. C60 are also synthesized intentionally for industrial applications. Individual C60 structures have an approximate diameter of 1nm; however, C60 readily forms aggregates and typically exist as larger particles that range from nanometers to micrometers in diameter. In this report, lung and extrapulmonary tissue deposition and lung clearance of C60 nanoparticles (nano-C60, 50nm) and microparticles (micro-C60, 1μm) were examined in Wistar Han rats and B6C3F1/N mice after nose-only inhalation for 90 days. Exposure concentrations were 0.5 and 2mg/m(3) (nano-C60) and 2, 15, and 30mg/m(3) (micro-C60). For both C60 particle sizes, the C60 lung burden increased proportionally to exposure concentration. The C60 lung burden was greater in both species at all time points following exposure to nano-C60 particle exposure compared to micro-C60 exposure at the common exposure concentration 2mg/m(3). The calculated C60 particle lung retention half-times were similar for both nano-C60 and micro-C60 exposure at 2mg/m(3) in male mice (15-16 days). In contrast, in male rats, the half-time of C60 particles following nano-C60 exposure (61 days) was roughly twice as long as the half-time following micro-C60 exposure (27 days) at the same exposure concentration (2mg/m(3)) and was similar to the clearance following micro-C60 exposure at higher exposure concentrations (15 and 30mg/m(3)). C60 was detected in bronchial lymph nodes but the burden was not quantified due to the high variability in the data. C60 concentrations were below the experimental limit of quantitation (ELOQ) in liver, spleen, blood, brain and kidney tissues. These tissue burden data provide information for comparison between nanometer and micrometer sized C60 particle exposure and will aid in the interpretation of toxicity data.

  1. Optimal clearance of Sporothrix schenckii requires an intact Th17 response in a mouse model of systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Gonçalves, Amanda Costa; Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Maia, Danielle Cardoso Geraldo; Placeres, Marisa Campos Polesi; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of Th17 cells, along with many other Th cell subsets in the recent years, has expanded the Th1/Th2 paradigm that had persisted since its proposition by Mosmann in 1986. Defined by the characteristic expression of the transcription factor retinoic-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) and production of IL-17A (IL-17), Th17 cells are powerful inducers of tissue inflammation with a recognized role against extracellular bacteria and fungi. Despite this, the interest in their study came from the pivotal role they play in the development and maintenance of major chronic inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease, hence they have been the target of promising new anti-Th17 therapies. Accordingly, the identification of opportunistic pathogens whose clearance relies on the Th17 response is of huge prophylactic importance. As shown here for the first time, this applies to Sporothrix schenckii, a thermo-dimorphic fungus and the causative agent of sporotrichosis. Our results show that both Th17 and Th1/Th17 mixed cells are developed during the S. schenckii systemic mice infection, which also leads to augmented production of IL-17 and IL-22. Also, by using an antibody-mediated IL-23 depletion model, we further demonstrate that optimal fungal clearance, but not survival, depends on an intact Th17 response.

  2. In vitro evaluation of hepatic and extra-hepatic metabolism of coumarins using rat subcellular fractions: correlation of in vitro clearance with in vivo data.

    PubMed

    Behera, Dayanidhi; Damre, Anagha; Varghese, Alice; Addepalli, Veeranjaneyulu

    2008-01-01

    7-Ethoxycoumarin (7-EC) and 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC) were chosen as model compounds to study hepatic and extra-hepatic metabolism in rat tissue subcellular (microsomal and S9) fractions and to scale the observed in vitro clearance to in vivo plasma clearance. 7-EC and 7-HC showed significant metabolic degradation in liver subcellular fractions as compared to subcellular fractions obtained from intestine, kidney, lung and brain. The total in vitro metabolic clearance for 7-EC and 7-HC was determined by adding the individual in vitro organ clearance values obtained in hepatic and extra-hepatic microsomes or S9 fractions. The predicted in vivo clearance for 7-HC was 63.6 and 81.6 ml/min/kg by in vitro scaling from microsomes and S9 fractions, respectively. For 7-EC, the values were 78.5 and 76.8 ml/min/kg, respectively. The predicted clearance was found to be reasonably accurate with slight over- and underprediction. Interestingly, the relative contribution of hepatic and extra-hepatic metabolism to the total clearance of 7-EC and 7-HC was remarkably high, ranging from 62-77% and 22-38%, respectively, of the total metabolic clearance. It is concluded that the model of multi-organ subcellular fractions is a useful in vitro tool for the prediction of in vivo metabolic clearance, as it can provide information about the relative contribution of extra-hepatic and hepatic metabolism to total metabolic clearance. PMID:19326776

  3. In vitro evaluation of hepatic and extra-hepatic metabolism of coumarins using rat subcellular fractions: correlation of in vitro clearance with in vivo data.

    PubMed

    Behera, Dayanidhi; Damre, Anagha; Varghese, Alice; Addepalli, Veeranjaneyulu

    2008-01-01

    7-Ethoxycoumarin (7-EC) and 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC) were chosen as model compounds to study hepatic and extra-hepatic metabolism in rat tissue subcellular (microsomal and S9) fractions and to scale the observed in vitro clearance to in vivo plasma clearance. 7-EC and 7-HC showed significant metabolic degradation in liver subcellular fractions as compared to subcellular fractions obtained from intestine, kidney, lung and brain. The total in vitro metabolic clearance for 7-EC and 7-HC was determined by adding the individual in vitro organ clearance values obtained in hepatic and extra-hepatic microsomes or S9 fractions. The predicted in vivo clearance for 7-HC was 63.6 and 81.6 ml/min/kg by in vitro scaling from microsomes and S9 fractions, respectively. For 7-EC, the values were 78.5 and 76.8 ml/min/kg, respectively. The predicted clearance was found to be reasonably accurate with slight over- and underprediction. Interestingly, the relative contribution of hepatic and extra-hepatic metabolism to the total clearance of 7-EC and 7-HC was remarkably high, ranging from 62-77% and 22-38%, respectively, of the total metabolic clearance. It is concluded that the model of multi-organ subcellular fractions is a useful in vitro tool for the prediction of in vivo metabolic clearance, as it can provide information about the relative contribution of extra-hepatic and hepatic metabolism to total metabolic clearance.

  4. Models to teach lung sonopathology and ultrasound-guided thoracentesis.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, Jacek A

    2014-12-01

    Lung sonography allows rapid diagnosis of lung emergencies such as pulmonary edema, hemothorax or pneumothorax. The ability to timely diagnose an intraoperative pneumothorax is an important skill for the anesthesiologist. However, lung ultrasound exams require an interpretation of not only real images but also complex acoustic artifacts such as A-lines and B-lines. Therefore, appropriate training to gain proficiency is important. Simulated environment using ultrasound phantom models allows controlled, supervised learning. We have developed hybrid models that combine dry or wet polyurethane foams, porcine rib cages and human hand simulating a rib cage. These models simulate fairly accurately pulmonary sonopathology and allow supervised teaching of lung sonography with the immediate feedback. In-vitro models can also facilitate learning of procedural skills, improving transducer and needle positioning and movement, rapid recognition of thoracic anatomy and hand - eye coordination skills. We described a new model to teach an ultrasound guided thoracentesis. This model consists of the experimenter's hand placed on top of the water-filled container with a wet foam. Metacarpal bones of the human hand simulate a rib cage and a wet foam simulates a diseased lung immersed in the pleural fluid. Positive fluid flow offers users feedback when a simulated pleural effusion is accurately assessed. PMID:26672739

  5. Modeling of the Nitric Oxide Transport in the Human Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Karamaoun, Cyril; Van Muylem, Alain; Haut, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    In the human lungs, nitric oxide (NO) acts as a bronchodilatator, by relaxing the bronchial smooth muscles and is closely linked to the inflammatory status of the lungs, owing to its antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air has been shown to be higher for asthmatic patients than for healthy patients. Multiple models have been developed in order to characterize the NO dynamics in the lungs, owing to their complex structure. Indeed, direct measurements in the lungs are difficult and, therefore, these models are valuable tools to interpret experimental data. In this work, a new model of the NO transport in the human lungs is proposed. It belongs to the family of the morphological models and is based on the morphometric model of Weibel (1963). When compared to models published previously, its main new features are the layered representation of the wall of the airways and the possibility to simulate the influence of bronchoconstriction (BC) and of the presence of mucus on the NO transport in lungs. The model is based on a geometrical description of the lungs, at rest and during a respiratory cycle, coupled with transport equations, written in the layers composing an airway wall and in the lumen of the airways. First, it is checked that the model is able to reproduce experimental information available in the literature. Second, the model is used to discuss some features of the NO transport in healthy and unhealthy lungs. The simulation results are analyzed, especially when BC has occurred in the lungs. For instance, it is shown that BC can have a significant influence on the NO transport in the tissues composing an airway wall. It is also shown that the relation between BC and the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air is complex. Indeed, BC might lead to an increase or to a decrease of this molar fraction, depending on the extent of the BC and on the possible presence of mucus. This should be confirmed experimentally and might

  6. Genetically manipulated mouse models of lung disease: potential and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Alexander J. S.; Owen, Caroline A.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2012-01-01

    Gene targeting in mice (transgenic and knockout) has provided investigators with an unparalleled armamentarium in recent decades to dissect the cellular and molecular basis of critical pathophysiological states. Fruitful information has been derived from studies using these genetically engineered mice with significant impact on our understanding, not only of specific biological processes spanning cell proliferation to cell death, but also of critical molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of human disease. This review will focus on the use of gene-targeted mice to study various models of lung disease including airways diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, pneumonia, and acute lung injury. We will attempt to review the current technological approaches of generating gene-targeted mice and the enormous dataset derived from these studies, providing a template for lung investigators. PMID:22198907

  7. A microfluidic model to study fluid dynamics of mucus plug rupture in small lung airways

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, John; Filoche, Marcel; White, Joshua; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid dynamics of mucus plug rupture is important to understand mucus clearance in lung airways and potential effects of mucus plug rupture on epithelial cells at lung airway walls. We established a microfluidic model to study mucus plug rupture in a collapsed airway of the 12th generation. Mucus plugs were simulated using Carbopol 940 (C940) gels at concentrations of 0.15%, 0.2%, 0.25%, and 0.3%, which have non-Newtonian properties close to healthy and diseased lung mucus. The airway was modeled with a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic channel. Plug motion was driven by pressurized air. Global strain rates and shear stress were defined to quantitatively describe plug deformation and rupture. Results show that a plug needs to overcome yield stress before deformation and rupture. The plug takes relatively long time to yield at the high Bingham number. Plug length shortening is the more significant deformation than shearing at gel concentration higher than 0.15%. Although strain rates increase dramatically at rupture, the transient shear stress drops due to the shear-thinning effect of the C940 gels. Dimensionless time-averaged shear stress, Txy, linearly increases from 3.7 to 5.6 times the Bingham number as the Bingham number varies from 0.018 to 0.1. The dimensionless time-averaged shear rate simply equals to Txy/2. In dimension, shear stress magnitude is about one order lower than the pressure drop, and one order higher than yield stress. Mucus with high yield stress leads to high shear stress, and therefore would be more likely to cause epithelial cell damage. Crackling sounds produced with plug rupture might be more detectable for gels with higher concentration. PMID:26392827

  8. Alterations of lung microbiota in a mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Poroyko, Valeriy; Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Afonyushkin, Taras; Ulanov, Alexander; Semenyuk, Ekaterina; Latif, Omar; Tesic, Vera; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2015-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome are common responses to a variety of infectious and noninfectious insults. We used a mouse model of ALI induced by intratracheal administration of sterile bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to investigate the changes in innate lung microbiota and study microbial community reaction to lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction induced by endotoxin insult. One group of C57BL/6J mice received LPS via intratracheal injection (n = 6), and another received sterile water (n = 7). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed at 72 h after treatment. Bacterial DNA was extracted and used for qPCR and 16S rRNA gene-tag (V3-V4) sequencing (Illumina). The bacterial load in BAL from ALI mice was increased fivefold (P = 0.03). The community complexity remained unchanged (Simpson index, P = 0.7); the Shannon diversity index indicated the increase of community evenness in response to ALI (P = 0.07). Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) test (P = 0.005) revealed a significant difference between microbiota of control and ALI groups. Bacteria from families Xanthomonadaceae and Brucellaceae increased their abundance in the ALI group as determined by Metastats test (P < 0.02). In concordance with the 16s-tag data, Stenotrohomonas maltophilia (Xanthomonadaceae) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (Brucellaceae) were isolated from lungs of mice from both groups. Metabolic profiling of BAL detected the presence of bacterial substrates suitable for both isolates. Additionally, microbiota from LPS-treated mice intensified IL-6-induced lung inflammation in naive mice. We conclude that the morbid transformation of ALI microbiota was attributed to the set of inborn opportunistic pathogens thriving in the environment of inflamed lung, rather than the external infectious agents.

  9. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  10. Pulmonary clearance and phagocytic cell response to normal pharyngeal flora.

    PubMed

    Onofrio, J M; Shulkin, A N; Heidbrink, P J; Toews, G B; Pierce, A K

    1981-02-01

    Because human lungs are repetitively inoculated with the normal bacterial flora of the pharynx, we determined the pulmonary clearance of representative species after aerosol inoculation of a murine model, and characterized the phagocytic cell response by bronchoalveolar lavage. Viable bacteria remaining in the lungs at 1, 2, and 4 h were: Streptococcus sanguis, 24%, 8%, and 1%; Streptococcus salivarius, 49%, 24%, and 5%; Neisseria catarrhalis, 69%, 49%, and 22%. Clearance of Streptococcus sanguis was associated with a twofold increase in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.05); Streptococcus salivarius evoked a doubling of alveolar macrophages and a 20-fold rise in granulocytes (p less than 0.05); the response to Neisseria catarrhalis was a 400-fold increase in granulocytes (p less than 0.05). Thus, normal pharyngeal organisms are cleared rapidly from the lung by a dual phagocytic cell system. It is speculated that bacteria-phagocyte interaction allows the possibility of lung injury from proteolytic enzymes released from either set of phagocytes.

  11. A model of blast overpressure injury to the lung.

    PubMed

    Stuhmiller, J H; Ho, K H; Vander Vorst, M J; Dodd, K T; Fitzpatrick, T; Mayorga, M

    1996-02-01

    Despite decades of animal experiments, data on blast injury to the lung cover only a limited number of circumstances and are in a fragmented form. This paper develops a mathematical model of the chest wall dynamics and the subsequent generation of strong pressure waves within the lung, which have been hypothesized as the mediator of injury. The model has been compared to an extensive database of observed pathologies from animal tests. The incidence of injury and lethality is found to follow a log-normal correlation with the computed total energy in these waves and, when the energy is normalized by the lung volume, the lethality correlation applies to all large animal species. Small animals also correlate with the normalized energy, but at a different value, and it is speculated that structural differences, other than lung volume, may be involved. This relatively simple model allows the potential for blast injury to the lung to be determined from measured or computed pressure traces without additional animal testing. Improved occupational exposure criteria should follow from this methodology. PMID:8849816

  12. A simplified experimental model for clearance of some pathogenic bacteria using common bacterivorous ciliated spp. in Tigris river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Talib Hassan; Saleh, Dhuha Saad

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria-specific uptake rates of three different protozoan taxa on a pure and mixed bacterial community was studied by means of a simplified and functionally reproducible experimental model. The bacterial species Shigella flexneri, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi were isolated and classified from stool samples of patients suffering from diarrhea. Paramecium caudatum, Tetrahymena pyriformis and Halteria grandinella, free living ciliate Protozoans, were isolated and identified from Tigris river water. Pure and mixed ( E. coli + S. typhi), ( E. coli + Sh. flexneri) bacterial cultures were used with each ciliate genera to evaluate the following: predator duplication rate, prey reduction rate, clearance rate and net grazing rate. We used selective lactose fermentation phenomena of enteric bacteria on MacConkey medium for the quantification of bacteria cultural characteristics. The final bacteria concentration was reduced by growing protozoa of 98-99.9 % compared to protozoa-free controls. It showed that Tetrahymena pyriformis had the highest duplication rate (4.13 time/day) in both types of cultures (pure and mixed), followed by Paramecium caudatum and Halteria grandinella, respectively. Paramecium caudatum had the highest rate of ingestion in both types of cultures (26 × 103 bacteria/organism/hr) and yielded the longest time required for 90 % bacterial reduction in a pure suspension of S. typhi (166 h). Clearance rates of pathogenic bacteria by ciliates ranged between 106 nanoliter/organism/h by P. caudatum to S. typhi and 1.92 nanoliter/organism/h seen in T. pyriformis in ( E. coli + S. typhi) mixed culture. We used aquatic experimental microcosms under controlled conditions to explore bacteria-dependent ciliate growth and examined whether these ciliates could discriminate between equally sized bacterial preys in a mixture.

  13. Use of a Microsoft Excel based add-in program to calculate plasma sinistrin clearance by a two-compartment model analysis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Sarah M L; Sturgess, Christopher P; Dunning, Mark D; Neiger, Reto

    2015-06-01

    Assessment of renal function by means of plasma clearance of a suitable marker has become standard procedure for estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Sinistrin, a polyfructan solely cleared by the kidney, is often used for this purpose. Pharmacokinetic modeling using adequate software is necessary to calculate disappearance rate and half-life of sinistrin. The purpose of this study was to describe the use of a Microsoft excel based add-in program to calculate plasma sinistrin clearance, as well as additional pharmacokinetic parameters such as transfer rates (k), half-life (t1/2) and volume of distribution (Vss) for sinistrin in dogs with varying degrees of renal function.

  14. Web-access to a Lung Deposition Model for radiation protection and physiological modeling.

    PubMed

    Ward, Richard C; Eckerman, Keith F; Ahmad, Lin S

    2003-01-01

    A C++ implementation of the ICRP Lung Deposition Model was validated and made accessible by creating a web interface using Perl. Considerable understanding of this lung deposition model was obtained and a small number of errors identified in the code during this process. Documentation was developed using MathML and scalable vector graphics (SVG). PMID:15455931

  15. Modeling of weak blast wave propagation in the lung.

    PubMed

    D'yachenko, A I; Manyuhina, O V

    2006-01-01

    Blast injuries of the lung are the most life-threatening after an explosion. The choice of physical parameters responsible for trauma is important to understand its mechanism. We developed a one-dimensional linear model of an elastic wave propagation in foam-like pulmonary parenchyma to identify the possible cause of edema due to the impact load. The model demonstrates different injury localizations for free and rigid boundary conditions. The following parameters were considered: strain, velocity, pressure in the medium and stresses in structural elements, energy dissipation, parameter of viscous criterion. Maximum underpressure is the most suitable wave parameter to be the criterion for edema formation in a rabbit lung. We supposed that observed scattering of experimental data on edema severity is induced by the physiological variety of rabbit lungs. The criterion and the model explain this scattering. The model outlines the demands for experimental data to make an unambiguous choice of physical parameters responsible for lung trauma due to impact load.

  16. RECONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY MODELS FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Reconstruction of Human Lung Morphology Models from Magnetic Resonance Images
    T. B. Martonen (Experimental Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709) and K. K. Isaacs (School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514)

  17. Mathematical model of the human lungs during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheryakov, R. V.

    2012-08-01

    Modeling of the human lungs during phonation is considered. The main relationships during physiological phonation process and air passage through vocal folds are established. Results of investigation are presented for statements of various types corresponding to different intonation patterns of the statement.

  18. Modeling Nanoparticle Transport and Distribution in Lung Vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Zheng, Junda

    2013-11-01

    The nanoparticle targeted delivery in vascular system involves interplay of transport, hydrodynamic force, and multivalent interactions with targeted biosurfaces. To estimate the percentage of NPs delivered to the targeted region, properties of the vascular environment must be considered, i.e., the vascular geometry and flow conditions. This paper describes a computational model for NP transport and distribution in a complex lung vasculature through combined NP Brownian dynamics and computational fluid dynamics approaches. MRI sliced lung vasculature images are transferred into vascular geometry, discretized into tetrahedral meshes, and used in blood velocity calculation and particle deposition simulation. A non-uniform NP distribution is observed on the vascular surface, with a high NP concentration in the bifurcation region. The simulation results show that NPs with different size have different distribution pattern in lung vasculature. This study provides a tool to predict NP distribution in a complex vascular network.

  19. A poroelastic model coupled to a fluid network with applications in lung modelling.

    PubMed

    Berger, Lorenz; Bordas, Rafel; Burrowes, Kelly; Grau, Vicente; Tavener, Simon; Kay, David

    2016-01-01

    We develop a lung ventilation model based on a continuum poroelastic representation of lung parenchyma that is strongly coupled to a pipe network representation of the airway tree. The continuous system of equations is discretized using a low-order stabilised finite element method. The framework is applied to a realistic lung anatomical model derived from computed tomography data and an artificially generated airway tree to model the conducting airway region. Numerical simulations produce physiologically realistic solutions and demonstrate the effect of airway constriction and reduced tissue elasticity on ventilation, tissue stress and alveolar pressure distribution. The key advantage of the model is the ability to provide insight into the mutual dependence between ventilation and deformation. This is essential when studying lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. Thus the model can be used to form a better understanding of integrated lung mechanics in both the healthy and diseased states. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Metabolism of nanomaterials in vivo: blood circulation and organ clearance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; He, Xiao; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Yuliang; Feng, Weiyue

    2013-03-19

    Before researchers apply nanomaterials (NMs) in biomedicine, they need to understand the blood circulation and clearance profile of these materials in vivo. These qualities determine the balance between nanomaterial-induced activity and unwanted toxicity. NMs have heterogeneous characteristics: they combine the bulk properties of solids with the mobility of molecules, and their highly active contact interfaces exhibit diverse functionalities. Any new and unexpected circulation features and clearance patterns are of great concern in toxicological studies and pharmaceutical screens. A number of studies have reported that NMs can enter the bloodstream directly during their application or indirectly via inhalation, ingestion, and dermal exposure. Due to the small size of NMs, the blood can then transport them throughout the circulation and to many organs where they can be stored. In this Account, we discuss the blood circulation and organ clearance patterns of NMs in the lung, liver, and kidney. The circulation of NMs in bloodstream is critical for delivery of inhalable NMs to extrapulmonary organs, the delivery of injectable NMs, the dynamics of tissue redistribution, and the overall targeting of drug carriers to specific cells and organs. The lung, liver, and kidney are the major distribution sites and target organs for NMs exposure, and the clearance patterns of NMs in these organs are critical for understanding the in vivo fate of NMs. Current studies suggest that multiple factors control the circulation and organ clearance of NMs. The size, shape, surface charge, surface functional groups, and aspect ratio of NMs as well as tissue microstructures strongly influence the circulation of NMs in bloodstream, their site-specific extravasation, and their clearance profiles within organs. Therefore structure design and surface modification can improve biocompatibility, regulate the in vivo metabolism, and reduce the toxicity of NMs. The biophysicochemical interactions

  1. An experimental model for the study of the opsonic activity of fibronectin in the clearance of intravascular complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, K. W.; Almond, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Scott, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental model is described which provides direct evidence of endocytosis of complexes of a charged colloid (dextran sulphate or DS) and of plasma fibronectin (FN) by reticulo-endothelial (RE) cells. This supports previous suggestions that plasma FN acts as a non-immunologically mediated opsonin which effects the clearance of various kinds of circulating colloids and particles by RE cells. DS of molecular weight 500 000 forms FN-containing complexes in rat plasma in vitro and lowers plasma FN levels acutely and in a dose-related fashion when given parenterally to rats. The plasma changes are accompanied by deposition of DS (shown histochemically as metachromatic material) and of FN (shown by specific immunofluorescence) in an identical distribution within RE cells in rat liver and spleen. The protein and polysaccharide components of the complex are disposed of by RE cells at markedly different rates. The model thus also offers a means of studying the dynamics of catabolism of plasma FN by this 'scavenger' pathway. Possible further extensions of the model for other purposes are also discussed. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6201183

  2. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  3. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Ullrich, Robert L.; Petrache, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u 56Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u 28Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy 56Fe or 28Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  4. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions.

  5. Lung flooding enables efficient lung sonography and tumour imaging in human ex vivo and porcine in vivo lung cancer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sonography has become the imaging technique of choice for guiding intraoperative interventions in abdominal surgery. Due to artefacts from residual air content, however, videothoracoscopic and open intraoperative ultrasound-guided thermoablation of lung malignancies are impossible. Lung flooding is a new method that allows complete ultrasound imaging of lungs and their tumours. Methods Fourteen resected tumourous human lung lobes were examined transpleurally with B-mode ultrasound before (in atelectasis) and after lung flooding with isotonic saline solution. In two swine, the left lung was filled with 15 ml/kg isotonic saline solution through the left side of a double-lumen tube. Lung tumours were simulated by transthoracic ultrasound-guided injection of 5 ml of purified bovine serum albumin in glutaraldehyde, centrally into the left lower lung lobe. The rate of tumour detection, the severity of disability caused by residual gas, and sonomorphology of the lungs and tumours were assessed. Results The ex vivo tumour detection rate was 100% in flooded human lung lobes and 43% (6/14) in atelectatic lungs. In all cases of atelectasis, sonographic tumour imaging was impaired by residual gas. Tumours and atelectatic tissue were isoechoic. In 28% of flooded lungs, a little residual gas was observed that did not impair sonographic tumour imaging. In contrast to tumours, flooded lung tissue was hyperechoic, homogeneous, and of fine-grained structure. Because of the bronchial wall three-laminar structure, sonographic differentiation of vessels and bronchi was possible. In all cases, malignant tumours in the flooded lung appeared well-demarcated from the lung parenchyma. Adenocarcinoma, squamous, and large cell carcinomas were hypoechoic. Bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma was slightly hyperechoic. Transpleural sonography identifies endobronchial tumour growth and bronchial wall destruction. With transthoracic sonography, the flooded animal lung can be completely

  6. Modeling soil magnetic susceptibility and frequency-dependent susceptibility to aid landmine clearance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannam, Jacqueline A.; Dearing, John A.

    2006-05-01

    Information on the electromagnetic properties of soils and their effects on metal detectors is increasingly necessary for effective demining due to limited detector efficacy in highly magnetic soils and the difficulty of detecting minimummetal mines. Magnetic measurements of soils, such as magnetic susceptibility and frequency dependent susceptibility can aid the detection of problem soils, but are not part of standard soil analyses. Consequently, little information about soil magnetism exists within the soil, environmental science and environmental geophysics communities. Lack of empirical data may be compensated through the estimation of soil magnetic characteristics by predictive modeling approaches. Initial modeling of soil types in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) was attempted by expert and analogue approaches, using only coarse scale soil type information, which resulted in the production of national soil maps for low field and frequency-dependent susceptibility. Validation of the maps was achieved by comparison of empirical magnetic data from soil samples in the National Bosnian soil archive in Sarajevo. Discrepancies between the model and empirical data are explained in part by the differences in soil parent material within each soil type, which controls the amount of Fe released into the soil system available for in situ conversion to magnetic Fe oxides. The integration of soil information (type and parent material), expert knowledge and empirical data refines the predictive modeling of soil magnetic characteristics in temperate-Mediterranean environments such as BiH. Further spatial separation of soil types in the landscape can be achieved by digital terrain modeling. Preliminary fine-scale, landscape-soil modeling indicates improved spatial resolution of soil types compared with the original coarsely-mapped soil units, and the potential to synthesize local scale soil magnetic maps.

  7. NAD+ salvage pathway proteins suppress proteotoxicity in yeast models of neurodegeneration by promoting the clearance of misfolded/oligomerized proteins.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Alejandro; Liu, Jingjing; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-05-01

    Increased levels of nicotinamide/nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT) act as a powerful suppressor of Wallerian degeneration and ataxin- and tau-induced neurodegeneration in flies and mice. However, the nature of the suppression mechanism/s remains controversial. Here, we show that in yeast models of proteinopathies, overexpression of the NMNAT yeast homologs, NMA1 and NMA2, suppresses polyglutamine (PolyQ) and α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicities. Unexpectedly, overexpression of other genes in the salvage pathway for NAD(+) biosynthesis, including QNS1, NPT1 and PNC1 also protected against proteotoxicity. Our data revealed that in all cases, this mechanism involves extensive clearance of the non-native protein. Importantly, we demonstrate that suppression by NMA1 does not require the presence of a functional salvage pathway for NAD(+) biosynthesis, SIR2 or an active mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Our results imply the existence of histone deacetylase- and OXPHOS-independent crosstalk between the proteins in the salvage pathway for NAD(+) biosynthesis and the proteasome that can be manipulated to achieve cellular protection against proteotoxic stress.

  8. The transient but not resident (TBNR) microbiome: a Yin Yang model for lung immune system.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Pardis; Salimian, Jafar; Ahmadi, Ali; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2015-01-01

    The concept of microbial content of the lung is still controversial. What make this more complicated are controversial results obtaining from different methodologies about lung microbiome and the definition of "lung sterility". Lungs may have very low bacteria but are not completely germ-free. Bacteria are constantly entering from the upper respiratory tract, but are then quickly being cleared. We can find bacterial DNA in the lungs, but it is much harder to ask about living bacteria. Here, we propose that if there is any trafficking of the microorganisms in the lung, it should be a "Transient But Not Resident (TBNR)" model. So, we speculate a "Yin Yang model" for the lung immune system and TBNR. Despite beneficial roles of microbiome on the development of lung immune system, any disruption and alteration in the microbiota composition of upper and lower airways may trigger or lead to several diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and mustard lung disease. PMID:26307905

  9. Analytical modelling of regional radiotherapy dose response of lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Stroian, Gabriela; Kopek, Neil; AlBahhar, Mahmood; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of the dose-response of radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is necessary for optimization of radiotherapy (RT) treatment plans involving thoracic cavity irradiation. This study models the time-dependent relationship between local radiation dose and post-treatment lung tissue damage measured by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Fifty-eight follow-up diagnostic CT scans from 21 non-small-cell lung cancer patients were examined. The extent of RILD was segmented on the follow-up CT images based on the increase of physical density relative to the pre-treatment CT image. The segmented RILD was locally correlated with dose distribution calculated by analytical anisotropic algorithm and the Monte Carlo method to generate the corresponding dose-response curves. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was fit to the dose-response curves at six post-RT time periods, and temporal change in the LKB parameters was recorded. In this study, we observed significant correlation between the probability of lung tissue damage and the local dose for 96% of the follow-up studies. Dose-injury correlation at the first three months after RT was significantly different from later follow-up periods in terms of steepness and threshold dose as estimated from the LKB model. Dependence of dose response on superior-inferior tumour position was also observed. The time-dependent analytical modelling of RILD might provide better understanding of the long-term behaviour of the disease and could potentially be applied to improve inverse treatment planning optimization.

  10. Bevacizumab clearance through the iridocorneal angle following intravitreal injection in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Gal-Or, Orly; Dotan, Assaf; Dachbash, Mor; Tal, Kfir; Nisgav, Yael; Weinberger, Dov; Ehrlich, Rita; Livnat, Tami

    2016-04-01

    Antivascular endothelial growth factor (Anti-VEGF) agents have been widely used for a variety of ocular disorders. The etiology of sustained ocular hypertension following intravitreal administration of anti-VEGF agents is yet to be unraveled. Our study investigates and characterizes the presence of intravitreally injected bevacizumab in the aqueous outflow channels of a rat model. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) was induced by diode laser photocoagulation to the right eye of twelve Brown Norway rats. Bevacizumab (25 mg/ml) was injected intravitreally after 3 days. Immediately after bevacizumab injection, and 3, 6, 24 and 48 h later, animals were euthanized for immunofluorescence staining. Donkey anti-human IgG labeled with Alexa Fluor(®) 488 was used for bevacizumab immunoreactivity detection. Anti-CD31 antibody was used as a marker for Schlemm's canal endothelial cells. Untreated eyes were used as negative controls. The intensity of the immunostaining was analyzed qualitatively. Bevacizumab immunoreactivity was found in the aqueous outflow channels including the trabecular meshwork and Schlemm's canal immediately after injection, and declined incrementally within the following hours. Forty-eight hours after the injection, no bevacizumab staining was detected in the aqueous outflow channel structures. Our manuscript demonstrates the presence of bevacizumab in the trabecular meshwork and Schlemm's canal structures after intravitreal injection in a CNV induced rat model. Bevacizumab molecules passed through the aqueous outflow channels within 48 h after intravitreal bevacizumab injection. PMID:26923799

  11. Bayesian analysis of a disability model for lung cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Armero, C; Cabras, S; Castellanos, M E; Perra, S; Quirós, A; Oruezábal, M J; Sánchez-Rubio, J

    2016-02-01

    Bayesian reasoning, survival analysis and multi-state models are used to assess survival times for Stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the evolution of the disease over time. Bayesian estimation is done using minimum informative priors for the Weibull regression survival model, leading to an automatic inferential procedure. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods have been used for approximating posterior distributions and the Bayesian information criterion has been considered for covariate selection. In particular, the posterior distribution of the transition probabilities, resulting from the multi-state model, constitutes a very interesting tool which could be useful to help oncologists and patients make efficient and effective decisions.

  12. A Simulation Model of Periarterial Clearance of Amyloid-β from the Brain.

    PubMed

    Diem, Alexandra K; Tan, Mingyi; Bressloff, Neil W; Hawkes, Cheryl; Morris, Alan W J; Weller, Roy O; Carare, Roxana O

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain indicates failure of elimination of Aβ from the brain with age and Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is a variety of mechanisms for elimination of Aβ from the brain. They include the action of microglia and enzymes together with receptor-mediated absorption of Aβ into the blood and periarterial lymphatic drainage of Aβ. Although the brain possesses no conventional lymphatics, experimental studies have shown that fluid and solutes, such as Aβ, are eliminated from the brain along 100 nm wide basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries. This lymphatic drainage pathway is reflected in the deposition of Aβ in the walls of human arteries with age and AD as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Initially, Aβ diffuses through the extracellular spaces of gray matter in the brain and then enters basement membranes in capillaries and arteries to flow out of the brain. Although diffusion through the extracellular spaces of the brain has been well characterized, the exact mechanism whereby perivascular elimination of Aβ occurs has not been resolved. Here we use a computational model to describe the process of periarterial drainage in the context of diffusion in the brain, demonstrating that periarterial drainage along basement membranes is very rapid compared with diffusion. Our results are a validation of experimental data and are significant in the context of failure of periarterial drainage as a mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of AD as well as complications associated with its immunotherapy.

  13. A Simulation Model of Periarterial Clearance of Amyloid-β from the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Diem, Alexandra K.; Tan, Mingyi; Bressloff, Neil W.; Hawkes, Cheryl; Morris, Alan W. J.; Weller, Roy O.; Carare, Roxana O.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain indicates failure of elimination of Aβ from the brain with age and Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is a variety of mechanisms for elimination of Aβ from the brain. They include the action of microglia and enzymes together with receptor-mediated absorption of Aβ into the blood and periarterial lymphatic drainage of Aβ. Although the brain possesses no conventional lymphatics, experimental studies have shown that fluid and solutes, such as Aβ, are eliminated from the brain along 100 nm wide basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries. This lymphatic drainage pathway is reflected in the deposition of Aβ in the walls of human arteries with age and AD as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Initially, Aβ diffuses through the extracellular spaces of gray matter in the brain and then enters basement membranes in capillaries and arteries to flow out of the brain. Although diffusion through the extracellular spaces of the brain has been well characterized, the exact mechanism whereby perivascular elimination of Aβ occurs has not been resolved. Here we use a computational model to describe the process of periarterial drainage in the context of diffusion in the brain, demonstrating that periarterial drainage along basement membranes is very rapid compared with diffusion. Our results are a validation of experimental data and are significant in the context of failure of periarterial drainage as a mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of AD as well as complications associated with its immunotherapy. PMID:26903861

  14. Altered hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans in the isolated perfused mouse liver model.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R T; Horst, M N; Garner, R E; Hudson, J; Jenkins, P R; Richardson, A L

    1990-09-01

    The adherence of Candida albicans was studied in situ by using the perfused mouse liver model. After exhaustive washing, 10(6) C. albicans were infused into mouse livers. At the time of recovery, 62 +/- 5% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans were recovered from the liver and 14 +/- 3% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 76 +/- 4%. This indicates that 86 +/- 3% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 24 +/- 4% was killed within the liver. Chemical pretreatment of C. albicans with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, 2% beta-mercaptoethanol, 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 10% Triton X-100, or 3 M potassium chloride or enzyme pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin, beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, pronase, trypsin, papain, or lipase did not alter adherence of C. albicans to hepatic tissue. By contrast, pepsin pretreatment significantly decreased hepatic trapping. Simultaneous perfusion with either 100 mg of C. albicans glycoprotein per liter or 100 mg of C. albicans mannan per liter also decreased trapping. Furthermore, both substances eluted previously trapped C. albicans from hepatic tissue. Chemical pretreatment with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, or 3 M KCI or enzymatic pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, subtilisin, alpha-chymotrypsin, or papain increased killing of C. albicans three- to fivefold within hepatic tissue. The data suggest that mannose-containing structures on the surface of C. albicans, for example. mannans or glucomannoproteins, mediate adherence of C. albicans within the liver. Indirectly, chemical and enzymatic pretreatment renders C. albicans more susceptible to hepatic killing.

  15. Oleocanthal enhances amyloid-β clearance from the brains of TgSwDI mice and in vitro across a human blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; Batarseh, Yazan S; Mohyeldin, Mohamed M; El Sayed, Khalid A; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2015-11-18

    Numerous clinical and preclinical studies have suggested several health promoting effects for the dietary consumption of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) that could protect and decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, recent studies have linked this protective effect to oleocanthal, a phenolic secoiridoid component of EVOO. This protective effect of oleocanthal against AD has been related to its ability to prevent amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau aggregation in vitro, and enhance Aβ clearance from the brains of wild type mice in vivo; however, its effect in a mouse model of AD is not known. In the current study, we investigated the effect of oleocanthal on pathological hallmarks of AD in TgSwDI, an animal model of AD. Mice treatment for 4 weeks with oleocanthal significantly decreased amyloid load in the hippocampal parenchyma and microvessels. This reduction was associated with enhanced cerebral clearance of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Further mechanistic studies demonstrated oleocanthal to increase the expression of important amyloid clearance proteins at the BBB including P-glycoprotein and LRP1, and to activate the ApoE-dependent amyloid clearance pathway in the mice brains. The anti-inflammatory effect of oleocanthal in the brains of these mice was also obvious where it was able to reduce astrocytes activation and IL-1β levels. Finally, we could recapitulate the observed protective effect of oleocanthal in an in vitro human-based model, which could argue against species difference in response to oleocanthal. In conclusion, findings from in vivo and in vitro studies provide further support for the protective effect of oleocanthal against the progression of AD. PMID:26348065

  16. Oleocanthal Enhances Amyloid-β Clearance from the Brains of TgSwDI Mice and in Vitro across a Human Blood-Brain Barrier Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Numerous clinical and preclinical studies have suggested several health promoting effects for the dietary consumption of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) that could protect and decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Moreover, recent studies have linked this protective effect to oleocanthal, a phenolic secoiridoid component of EVOO. This protective effect of oleocanthal against AD has been related to its ability to prevent amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau aggregation in vitro, and enhance Aβ clearance from the brains of wild type mice in vivo; however, its effect in a mouse model of AD is not known. In the current study, we investigated the effect of oleocanthal on pathological hallmarks of AD in TgSwDI, an animal model of AD. Mice treatment for 4 weeks with oleocanthal significantly decreased amyloid load in the hippocampal parenchyma and microvessels. This reduction was associated with enhanced cerebral clearance of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Further mechanistic studies demonstrated oleocanthal to increase the expression of important amyloid clearance proteins at the BBB including P-glycoprotein and LRP1, and to activate the ApoE-dependent amyloid clearance pathway in the mice brains. The anti-inflammatory effect of oleocanthal in the brains of these mice was also obvious where it was able to reduce astrocytes activation and IL-1β levels. Finally, we could recapitulate the observed protective effect of oleocanthal in an in vitro human-based model, which could argue against species difference in response to oleocanthal. In conclusion, findings from in vivo and in vitro studies provide further support for the protective effect of oleocanthal against the progression of AD. PMID:26348065

  17. Kinetics of deposition and clearance of inhaled mineral dusts during chronic exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, J H; Johnston, A M; Jones, A D; Bolton, R E; Addison, J

    1985-01-01

    New inhalation studies have been carried out with rats exposed to UICC (Union International Contre le Cancer) amosite asbestos, with the main aim of further elucidating the factors the influence the accumulation of dust in the lung during prolonged chronic exposure. The results show that, for exposure times beyond a few weeks, the lung burden rises linearly and does not level off as predicted by simple models based on ideas taken from the 1966 report of the Task Group on Lung Dynamics. Furthermore, the lung burden is found to scale directly in proportion to the exposure concentration in a way that seems to contradict the overload hypothesis stated earlier. Nevertheless, the general pattern exhibited by our results for asbestos is markedly similar to that found elsewhere for rats inhaling diesel fume, leading to the suggestion that it is general (and not specific to fibrous dust); and the hypothesis that, whereas overload of clearance can take place at high lung burdens after exposure has ceased, it is cancelled by the sustained stimulus to clearance mechanisms provided by the continuous challenge of chronic exposure. The linearity of the increase in lung burden is explained in terms of a kinetic model involving sequestration of some inhaled material to parts of the lung where it is difficult to clear. The particular sequestration model favoured is one where, the longer a particle remains in the lung without being cleared, the more likely it will be sequestrated (and therefore less likely cleared). It is believed that such ideas may eventually be useful in forming exposure-dose relations for epidemiology. PMID:2864076

  18. Lung regeneration by fetal lung tissue implantation in a mouse pulmonary emphysema model.

    PubMed

    Uyama, Koh; Sakiyama, Shoji; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kenzaki, Koichiro; Toba, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Yukikiyo; Okumura, Kazumasa; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Kondo, Kazuya; Tangoku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are high. However, no radical therapy has been developed to date. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether fetal mouse lung tissue can grow and differentiate in the emphysematous lung. Fetal lung tissue from green fluorescent protein C57BL/6 mice at 16 days' gestation was used as donor material. Twelve-month-old pallid mice were used as recipients. Donor lungs were cut into small pieces and implanted into the recipient left lung by performing thoracotomy under anesthesia. The recipient mice were sacrificed at day 7, 14, and 28 after implantation and used for histological examination. Well-developed spontaneous pulmonary emphysema was seen in 12-month-old pallid mice. Smooth and continuous connection between implanted fetal lung tissue and recipient lung was recognized. Air space expansion and donor tissue differentiation were observed over time. We could clearly distinguish the border zones between injected tissue and native tissue by the green fluorescence of grafts. Fetal mouse lung fragments survived and differentiated in the emphysematous lung of pallid mice. Implantation of fetal lung tissue in pallid mice might lead to further lung regeneration research from the perspective of respiratory and exercise function. J. Med. Invest. 63: 182-186, August, 2016. PMID:27644555

  19. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis. PMID:22640851

  20. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis.

  1. A canine model of beryllium-induced granulomatous lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, P.J.; Finch, G.L.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Harmsen, A.G.; Hahn, F.F.; Hoover, M.D.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Bice, D.E. )

    1989-08-01

    Groups of beagle dogs were exposed by inhalation to attain either low or high initial lung burdens (ILB) of BeO calcined at 500 degrees or 1000 degrees C. Dogs were killed at 8, 32, 64, 180, and 365 days after exposure for evaluation of beryllium tissue burdens and histopathologic examination. Histologic lesions were characterized by perivascular and peribronchiolar infiltrates of lymphocytes and macrophages 8 days after exposure. These lesions progressed to distinct microgranulomas accompanied by patchy granulomatous pneumonia. Lesions were more severe in dogs exposed to 500 degrees C BeO. Additional dogs were sampled by bronchoalveolar lavage at 3, 6, 7, 11, 15, 18, and 22 months after exposure for characterization of lung cytology and lung immune responses. Lymphocyte percentages and numbers were increased in lavage samples 3 months after exposure in dogs with both the high and low ILB of 500 degrees C. Values for both parameters decreased rapidly thereafter. Dogs with either low or high ILB of 1000 degrees C-treated BeO displayed negligible to low and variable changes in both lymphocyte percentages and numbers. In vitro lymphocyte stimulation by beryllium was increased 180 and 210 days after exposure in dogs with the high ILB 500 degrees C BeO only. A marked degree of individual variation in both histologic lesions and lymphocyte responses among dogs was noted. Less soluble 1000 degrees C-treated BeO was retained in the lung longer than the more soluble 500 degrees C-treated material that was cleared almost entirely by 1 year after exposure. Because these changes are similar to those reported in humans with chronic beryllium disease, these data suggest that the beagle represents a good model to study histologic and immunologic aspects of this disease syndrome.

  2. Image-based modeling of lung structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art in image-based modeling allows derivation of patient-specific models of the lung, lobes, airways, and pulmonary vascular trees. The application of traditional engineering analyses of fluid and structural mechanics to image-based subject-specific models has the potential to provide new insight into structure-function relationships in the individual via functional interpretation that complements imaging and experimental studies. Three major issues that are encountered in studies of air flow through the bronchial airways are the representation of airway geometry, the imposition of physiological boundary conditions, and the treatment of turbulence. Here we review some efforts to resolve each of these issues, with particular focus on image-based models that have been developed to simulate air flow from the mouth to the terminal bronchiole, and subjected to physiologically meaningful boundary conditions via image registration and soft tissue mechanics models. PMID:21105146

  3. Protective efficacy of Mycobacterium indicus pranii against tuberculosis and underlying local lung immune responses in guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankan; Ahmad, F J; Ahmad, Faiz; Gupta, U D; Natarajan, M; Katoch, V M; Bhaskar, Sangeeta

    2012-09-21

    Tuberculosis kills two million people each year. As the current vaccine BCG fails to prevent adult cases of TB, an improved vaccine and/or vaccination strategy is urgently needed to combat TB. Previously we reported the higher protective efficacy of Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP), formerly known as Mycobacterium w (M.w) as compared to BCG in murine model of TB. In this study we further evaluated the protective efficacy of MIP in guinea pig model of TB. Modulation of post infection immune response was analyzed in the lungs of MIP immunized and control groups. We found reduced bacterial loads, improved pathology and organized granulomatous response at different post infection time points in the MIP-immunized group as compared to the BCG-immunized group. Combined results suggest that MIP-immunization results in heightened protective Th1 response as compared to BCG group, early after infection with M.tb and a balanced Th1 versus immunosuppressive response at late chronic stage of infection. The study demonstrates the higher antigen presenting cells function both inside the granuloma as well as in the single cell suspension of the lung in the MIP-immunized group. We further demonstrate that live MIP is safe to use in vivo as we observed quick clearance of MIP from the body and no untoward reaction was found. Aerosol route of immunization provided higher protection. Further this study provides evidence that MIP-immunization gives significantly better long term protection as compared to BCG against TB.

  4. Wear analysis of revolute joints with clearance in multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, ZhengFeng; Zhao, Yang; Wang, XingGui

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the prediction of wear for revolute joint with clearance in multibody systems is investigated using a computational methodology. The contact model in clearance joint is established using a new hybrid nonlinear contact force model and the friction effect is considered by using a modified Coulomb friction model. The dynamics model of multibody system with clearance is established using dynamic segmentation modeling method and the computational process for wear analysis of clearance joint in multibody systems is presented. The main computational process for wear analysis of clearance joint includes two steps, which are dynamics analysis and wear analysis. The dynamics simulation of multibody system with revolute clearance joint is carried out and the contact forces are drawn and used to calculate the wear amount of revolute clearance joint based on the Archard's wear model. Finally, a four-bar multibody mechanical system with revolute clearance joint is used as numerical example application to perform the simulation and show the dynamics responses and wear characteristics of multibody systems with revolute clearance joint. The main results of this work indicate that the contact between the joint elements is wider and more frequent in some specific regions and the wear phenomenon is not regular around the joint surface, which causes the clearance size increase non-regularly after clearance joint wear. This work presents an effective method to predict wear of revolute joint with clearance in multibody systems.

  5. Effect of oral N-acetylcysteine on mucus clearance.

    PubMed

    Millar, A B; Pavia, D; Agnew, J E; Lopez-Vidriero, M T; Lauque, D; Clarke, S W

    1985-07-01

    Oral N-acetylcysteine has been advocated as a mucolytic agent for use in chronic bronchitis. We have investigated the effects of regular use of this drug at a dose of 200 mg thrice daily for 4 weeks in nine patients with chronic bronchitis on lung function, lung mucociliary clearance and sputum viscosity in a controlled, double-blind, crossover study. No significant differences were found in lung function, mucociliary clearance curves or sputum viscosity following treatment with N-acetylcysteine compared to control or placebo measurements.

  6. Modeling Granulomas in Response to Infection in the Lung.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenrui; Schlesinger, Larry S; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a large role in the innate immune response of the lung. However, when these highly immune-regulatory cells are unable to eradicate pathogens, the adaptive immune system, which includes activated macrophages and lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is called upon to control the pathogens. This collection of immune cells surrounds, isolates and quarantines the pathogen, forming a small tissue structure called a granuloma for intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In the present work we develop a mathematical model of the dynamics of a granuloma by a system of partial differential equations. The 'strength' of the adaptive immune response to infection in the lung is represented by a parameter α, the flux rate by which T cells and M1 macrophages that immigrated from the lymph nodes enter into the granuloma through its boundary. The parameter α is negatively correlated with the 'switching time', namely, the time it takes for the number of M1 type macrophages to surpass the number of infected, M2 type alveolar macrophages. Simulations of the model show that as α increases the radius of the granuloma and bacterial load in the granuloma both decrease. The model is used to determine the efficacy of potential host-directed therapies in terms of the parameter α, suggesting that, with fixed dosing level, an infected individual with a stronger immune response will receive greater benefits in terms of reducing the bacterial load. PMID:26986986

  7. Modeling Granulomas in Response to Infection in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenrui; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a large role in the innate immune response of the lung. However, when these highly immune-regulatory cells are unable to eradicate pathogens, the adaptive immune system, which includes activated macrophages and lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is called upon to control the pathogens. This collection of immune cells surrounds, isolates and quarantines the pathogen, forming a small tissue structure called a granuloma for intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In the present work we develop a mathematical model of the dynamics of a granuloma by a system of partial differential equations. The ‘strength’ of the adaptive immune response to infection in the lung is represented by a parameter α, the flux rate by which T cells and M1 macrophages that immigrated from the lymph nodes enter into the granuloma through its boundary. The parameter α is negatively correlated with the ‘switching time’, namely, the time it takes for the number of M1 type macrophages to surpass the number of infected, M2 type alveolar macrophages. Simulations of the model show that as α increases the radius of the granuloma and bacterial load in the granuloma both decrease. The model is used to determine the efficacy of potential host-directed therapies in terms of the parameter α, suggesting that, with fixed dosing level, an infected individual with a stronger immune response will receive greater benefits in terms of reducing the bacterial load. PMID:26986986

  8. Pulmonary Toxicity, Distribution, and Clearance of Intratracheally Instilled Silicon Nanowires in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jenny R.; Mercer, Robert R.; Chapman, Rebecca S.; Cohen, Guy M.; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James F.; Castranova, Vincent; Antonini, James M.; Leonard, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (Si NWs) are being manufactured for use as sensors and transistors for circuit applications. The goal was to assess pulmonary toxicity and fate of Si NW using an in vivo experimental model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with 10, 25, 50, 100, or 250 μg of Si NW (~20–30 nm diameter; ~2–15 μm length). Lung damage and the pulmonary distribution and clearance of Si NW were assessed at 1, 3, 7, 28, and 91 days after-treatment. Si NW treatment resulted in dose-dependent increases in lung injury and inflammation that resolved over time. At day 91 after treatment with the highest doses, lung collagen was increased. Approximately 70% of deposited Si NW was cleared by 28 days with most of the Si NW localized exclusively in macrophages. In conclusion, Si NW induced transient lung toxicity which may be associated with an early rapid particle clearance; however, persistence of Si NW over time related to dose or wire length may lead to increased collagen deposition in the lung. PMID:26640479

  9. Hemodialysis clearance of theophylline.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, R L; Green, L; Kohli, R

    1982-01-01

    The serum hemodialysis clearance of theophylline was determined in 4 patients compared to systemic serum clearance off dialysis in 3 patients. The serum extraction ratio values obtained were compared to those of urea. Hemodialysis clearance of theophylline averaged 84.3 +/- 11.6 ml/min (mean +/- SD), and extraction ratios obtained were found to be a fairly consistent fraction of the urea extraction ratio (0.72 +/- 0.08). Hemodialysis clearance increased total body clearance (ClTB) off dialysis by 130%, 387%, and 176% in the patients who had their theophylline serum clearance estimated off dialysis. Difference in reported hemodialysis clearance are probably related to the type of dialyser used. Studies utilizing hollow fiber systems (the present study) consistently yielded higher theophylline dialysis clearance values than those using coil systems (84.3% to 88.1 ml/min versus 32 to 39.4 ml/min). Patients receiving theophylline on hemodialysis should be closely monitored for bronchospasm during and after the hemodialysis procedure. Measurement of serum concentrations should be employed to facilitate dosage increases during hemodialysis.

  10. 24 CFR 3285.305 - Clearance under homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clearance under homes. 3285.305... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Foundations § 3285.305 Clearance under homes. A minimum clearance of 12 inches must be maintained between the lowest member of the main...

  11. 24 CFR 3285.305 - Clearance under homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clearance under homes. 3285.305... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Foundations § 3285.305 Clearance under homes. A minimum clearance of 12 inches must be maintained between the lowest member of the main...

  12. Biological parameters for lung cancer in mathematical models of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jacob, P; Jacob, V

    2003-01-01

    Applications of the two-step model of carcinogenesis with clonal expansion (TSCE) to lung cancer data are reviewed, including those on atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. British doctors, Colorado Plateau miners and Chinese tin miners. Different sets of identifiable model parameters are used in the literature. The parameter set which could be determined with the lowest uncertainty consists of the net proliferation rate gamma of intermediate cells, the hazard h55 at an intermediate age and the hazard h(infinity) at an asymptotically large age. Also, the values of these three parameters obtained in the various studies are more consistent than other identifiable combinations of the biological parameters. Based on representative results for these three parameters, implications for the biological parameters in the TSCE model are derived. PMID:14579892

  13. Experimental evolution of sprays in a lung model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results of an experiment conceived to observe the evolution of sprays inside the lungs. We have built a model that covers the first 6 generations (from the trachea to segmental bronchi of 5th generation). This setup is placed on a wind tunnel, and the flow inside the model is induced by a vacuum pump that emulates the breathing process using a valve. We inject a previously determined distribution of particles (water droplets), whose average diameter can be modified. Then, we measure the droplet distribution in different branches and compare how the droplet distribution is modified at each generation. The parameters that control the behavior are the average diameter of the original distribution, the airflow rate inside the model and the frequency of the breathing cycle.

  14. Improving the channeler ant model for lung CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerello, Piergiorgio; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Fiorina, Elisa; Oppedisano, Chiara; Peroni, Cristiana; Arteche Diaz, Raul; Bellotti, Roberto; Bosco, Paolo; Camarlinghi, Niccolo; Massafra, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    The Channeler Ant Model (CAM) is an algorithm based on virtual ant colonies, conceived for the segmentation of complex structures with different shapes and intensity in a 3D environment. It exploits the natural capabilities of virtual ant colonies to modify the environment and communicate with each other by pheromone deposition. When applied to lung CTs, the CAM can be turned into a Computer Aided Detection (CAD) method for the identification of pulmonary nodules and the support to radiologists in the identification of early-stage pathological objects. The CAM has been validated with the segmentation of 3D artificial objects and it has already been successfully applied to the lung nodules detection in Computed Tomography images within the ANODE09 challenge. The model improvements for the segmentation of nodules attached to the pleura and to the vessel tree are discussed, as well as a method to enhance the detection of low-intensity nodules. The results on five datasets annotated with different criteria show that the analytical modules (i.e. up to the filtering stage) provide a sensitivity in the 80 - 90% range with a number of FP/scan of the order of 20. The classification module, although not yet optimised, keeps the sensitivity in the 70 - 85% range at about 10 FP/scan, in spite of the fact that the annotation criteria for the training and the validation samples are different.

  15. Regional lung perfusion estimated by electrical impedance tomography in a piglet model of lung collapse.

    PubMed

    Borges, João Batista; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Bohm, Stephan H; Tusman, Gerardo; Melo, Alexandre; Maripuu, Enn; Sandström, Mattias; Park, Marcelo; Costa, Eduardo L V; Hedenstierna, Göran; Amato, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of the regional match between alveolar ventilation and perfusion in critically ill patients requires simultaneous measurements of both parameters. Ideally, assessment of lung perfusion should be performed in real-time with an imaging technology that provides, through fast acquisition of sequential images, information about the regional dynamics or regional kinetics of an appropriate tracer. We present a novel electrical impedance tomography (EIT)-based method that quantitatively estimates regional lung perfusion based on first-pass kinetics of a bolus of hypertonic saline contrast. Pulmonary blood flow was measured in six piglets during control and unilateral or bilateral lung collapse conditions. The first-pass kinetics method showed good agreement with the estimates obtained by single-photon-emission computerized tomography (SPECT). The mean difference (SPECT minus EIT) between fractional blood flow to lung areas suffering atelectasis was -0.6%, with a SD of 2.9%. This method outperformed the estimates of lung perfusion based on impedance pulsatility. In conclusion, we describe a novel method based on EIT for estimating regional lung perfusion at the bedside. In both healthy and injured lung conditions, the distribution of pulmonary blood flow as assessed by EIT agreed well with the one obtained by SPECT. The method proposed in this study has the potential to contribute to a better understanding of the behavior of regional perfusion under different lung and therapeutic conditions.

  16. Accelerated autoantibody clearance by intravenous immunoglobulin therapy: studies in experimental models to determine the magnitude and time course of the effect.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, W K; Teeling, J L; Hack, C E

    2001-11-15

    Recently, it has been postulated that the beneficial effect of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) in antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders is based on accelerated catabolism of autoantibodies. In the current study, in vivo experiments were performed with mice in which autoantibody production was mimicked by continuous infusion of monoclonal antibodies. In this model, a single dose of IVIG reduced the plasma concentrations of the infused immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) by approximately 40% after 3 days, whereas the concentration of an IgA mAb was not affected. To extrapolate these findings to humans, a computational model for IgG clearance was established that accurately predicted the time course and magnitude of the decrease in IgG plasma levels observed in mice. Adapted for humans, this model predicted a gradually occurring decrease in autoantibody levels after IVIG administration (2 g/kg), with a maximum reduction of approximately 25% after 3 to 4 weeks and a continued decrease of several months. In conclusion, a single high dose of IVIG induces a relatively small but long-lasting reduction of autoantibody levels by accelerated IgG clearance. This mechanism has clinical relevance in the sense that it can fully explain, as the sole mechanism, the gradual decrease in autoantibody levels observed in several patient studies. However, in some clinical studies, larger or more rapid effects have been observed that cannot be explained by accelerated clearance. Hence, IVIG can also reduce autoantibody levels through mechanisms such as down-regulation of antibody production or neutralization by anti-idiotypic antibodies.

  17. Mean lung pressure during adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation: an experimental study using a lung model.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Takahiro; Nagano, Osamu; Shiba, Naoki; Yumoto, Tetsuya; Sato, Keiji; Terado, Michihisa; Ugawa, Toyomu; Ichiba, Shingo; Ujike, Yoshihito

    2014-12-01

    In adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), stroke volume (SV) and mean lung pressure (PLung) are important for lung protection. We measured the airway pressure at the Y-piece and the lung pressure during HFOV using a lung model and HFOV ventilators for adults (R100 and 3100B). The lung model was made of a 20-liter, airtight rigid plastic container (adiabatic compliance: 19.3 ml/cmH2O) with or without a resistor (20 cmH2O/l/sec). The ventilator settings were as follows: mean airway pressure (MAP), 30 cmH2O; frequency, 5-15 Hz (every 1 Hz); airway pressure amplitude (AMP), maximum;and % of inspiratory time (IT), 50% for R100, 33% or 50% for 3100B. The measurements were also performed with an AMP of 2/3 or 1/3 maximum at 5, 10 and 15 Hz. The PLung and the measured MAP were not consistently identical to the setting MAP in either ventilator, and decreasing IT decreased the PLung in 3100B. In conclusion, we must pay attention to the possible discrepancy between the PLung and the setting MAP during adult HFOV. PMID:25519026

  18. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M; Mansy, Hansen A; Sandler, Richard H; Royston, Thomas J

    2014-09-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This "subject-specific" model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment. PMID:25190415

  19. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M.; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This “subject-specific” model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment. PMID:25190415

  20. RECONSTRUCTION OF A HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY MODEL FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE A description of lung morphological structure is necessary for modeling the deposition and fate of inhaled therapeutic aerosols. A morphological model of the lung boundary was generated from magnetic resonance (MR) images with the goal of creating a framework for anato...

  1. COMPUTER RECONSTRUCTION OF A HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY MODEL FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE (MR) IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory


    A mathematical description of the morphological structure of the lung is necessary for modeling and analysis of the deposition of inhaled aerosols. A morphological model of the lung boundary was generated from magnetic resonance (MR) images, with the goal of creating a frame...

  2. PEGylation of paclitaxel largely improves its safety and anti-tumor efficacy following pulmonary delivery in a mouse model of lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tian; Loira-Pastoriza, Cristina; Patil, Harshad P; Ucakar, Bernard; Muccioli, Giulio G; Bosquillon, Cynthia; Vanbever, Rita

    2016-10-10

    Pulmonary delivery offers an attractive route of administration for chemotherapeutic agents, with the advantages of high drug concentrations locally and low side effects systemically. However, fast clearance mechanisms result in short residence time of small molecule drugs in the lungs. Moreover, the local toxicity induced by antineoplastic drugs is considered a major obstacle for the clinical application of inhaled chemotherapy. In this study, we explored the utility of 6kDa and 20kDa polyethylene glycol-paclitaxel (PEG-PTX) conjugates to retain paclitaxel within the lungs, achieve its sustained release locally, and thereby, improve its efficacy and reduce its pulmonary toxicity. The conjugates increased the maximum tolerated dose of paclitaxel by up to 100-fold following intratracheal instillation in healthy mice. PEG-PTX conjugates induced lung inflammation. However, the inflammation was lower than that induced by an equivalent dose of the free drug and it was reversible. Conjugation of paclitaxel to both PEG sizes significantly enhanced its anti-tumor efficacy following intratracheal instillation of a single dose in a Lewis lung carcinoma model in mice. PEG-PTX 20k showed equivalent efficacy as PEG-PTX 6k delivered at a 2.5-fold higher dose, suggesting that the molecular weight of the conjugate plays a role in anti-cancer activity. PEG-PTX 20k conjugate presented a prolonged residency and a sustained paclitaxel release within the lungs. This study showed that PEGylation of paclitaxel offers a potential delivery system for inhalation with improved anti-cancer efficacy, prolonged exposure of lung-resident tumors to the antineoplastic drug and reduced local toxicity. PMID:27515664

  3. Apoptotic Cell Clearance in Development.

    PubMed

    Shklover, Jeny; Levy-Adam, Flonia; Kurant, Estee

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death and its specific form apoptosis play an important role during development of multicellular organisms. They are crucial for morphogenesis and organ sculpting as well as for adjusting cell number in different systems. Removal of apoptotic cells is the last critical step of apoptosis. Apoptotic cells are properly and efficiently recognized and eliminated through phagocytosis, which is performed by professional and nonprofessional phagocytes. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells or apoptotic cell clearance is a dynamic multistep process, involving interactions between phagocytic receptors and ligands on apoptotic cells, which are highly conserved in evolution. However, this process is extremely redundant in mammals, containing multiple factors playing similar roles in the process. Using model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, zebrafish, and mouse permits addressing fundamental questions in developmental cell clearance by a comprehensive approach including powerful genetics and cell biological tools enriched by live imaging. Recent studies in model organisms have enhanced significantly our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of apoptotic cell clearance during development. Here, we review the current knowledge and illuminate the great potential of the research performed in genetic models, which opens new directions in developmental biology.

  4. Directional Multi-scale Modeling of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) Lung Images for Diffuse Lung Disease Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Kiet T.; Sowmya, Arcot

    A directional multi-scale modeling scheme based on wavelet and contourlet transforms is employed to describe HRCT lung image textures for classifying four diffuse lung disease patterns: normal, emphysema, ground glass opacity (GGO) and honey-combing. Generalized Gaussian density parameters are used to represent the detail sub-band features obtained by wavelet and contourlet transforms. In addition, support vector machines (SVMs) with excellent performance in a variety of pattern classification problems are used as classifier. The method is tested on a collection of 89 slices from 38 patients, each slice of size 512x512, 16 bits/pixel in DICOM format. The dataset contains 70,000 ROIs of those slices marked by experienced radiologists. We employ this technique at different wavelet and contourlet transform scales for diffuse lung disease classification. The technique presented here has best overall sensitivity 93.40% and specificity 98.40%.

  5. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TruÅ£ǎ-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-01

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival. To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  6. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Truta-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-07

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival.To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  7. A novel model of rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease in SKG mice.

    PubMed

    Keith, Rebecca C; Powers, Jennifer L; Redente, Elizabeth F; Sergew, Amen; Martin, Richard J; Gizinski, Alison; Holers, V Michael; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Riches, David W H

    2012-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) is associated with increased mortality in up to 10% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Lung exposure to cigarette smoke has been implicated in disease development. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the development of RA-ILD, in part due to the lack of an appropriate mouse model. The objectives of this study were (i) to test the suitability of SKG mice as a model of cellular and fibrotic interstitial pneumonia in the setting of autoimmune arthritis, and (ii) to determine the role of lung injury in the development of arthritis in SKG mice. Lung tissues were evaluated in arthritic SKG mice by quantifying cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage, static compliance, collagen levels, and infiltrating cell phenotypes by flow cytometry and histology. Lung injury was induced by exposure to cigarette smoke or bleomycin. Arthritic SKG mice developed a patchy cellular and fibrotic interstitial pneumonia associated with reduced static compliance, increased collagen levels, and accumulation of inflammatory cells. Infiltrating cells comprised CD4+ T cells, B cells, macrophages, and neutrophils. Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke or initiation of lung injury with bleomycin did not cause arthritis. The pattern of lung disease suggests that arthritic SKG mice represent an authentic model of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia in RA-ILD patients. The lack of arthritis development after cigarette smoke or lung injury suggests that a model where breaches in immunologic tolerance are induced by lung inflammation and injury alone may be overly simplistic.

  8. Aerosol Medications for Treatment of Mucus Clearance Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2015-06-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion and secretion retention can result from inflammation, irritation, stimulation, or mucus-producing tumors. Secretion clearance can be furthered hampered by ciliary dysfunction and by weakness or restrictive lung disease, leading to an ineffective cough. There are a number of different mucoactive medications that have been used to reduce hypersecretion, make secretions easier to transport, or increase the efficiency of cough or mucus clearance. In this paper, I review the pathophysiology of secretory hyper-responsiveness and mucus hypersecretion and discuss the different aerosol medications that can be used to augment secretion clearance. PMID:26070577

  9. Aerosol Medications for Treatment of Mucus Clearance Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2015-06-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion and secretion retention can result from inflammation, irritation, stimulation, or mucus-producing tumors. Secretion clearance can be furthered hampered by ciliary dysfunction and by weakness or restrictive lung disease, leading to an ineffective cough. There are a number of different mucoactive medications that have been used to reduce hypersecretion, make secretions easier to transport, or increase the efficiency of cough or mucus clearance. In this paper, I review the pathophysiology of secretory hyper-responsiveness and mucus hypersecretion and discuss the different aerosol medications that can be used to augment secretion clearance.

  10. Pili play an important role in enhancing the bacterial clearance from the middle ear in a mouse model of acute otitis media with Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Toshiaki; Hirano, Takashi; Kodama, Satoru; Mitsui, Marcelo Takahiro; Ahmed, Kamruddin; Nishizono, Akira; Suzuki, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a Gram-negative aerobic diplococcus that is currently the third most frequent cause of bacterial acute otitis media (AOM) in children. In this study, we developed an experimental murine AOM model by inoculating M. catarrhalis in the middle ear bulla and studied the local response to this inoculation, and modulation of its course by the pili of M. catarrhalis. The pili-positive and pili-negative M. catarrhalis showed differences in bacterial clearance and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the middle ear. Pili-negative M. catarrhalis induced a more delayed and prolonged immune response in the middle ear than that of pili-positive M. catarrhalis. TLR2, -4, -5 and -9 mRNA expression was upregulated in neutrophils that infiltrated the middle ear cavity during AOM caused by both pili-positive and pili-negative bacteria. TLR5 mRNA expression and TLR5 protein in the neutrophils were induced more robustly by pili-positive M. catarrhalis. This immune response is likely to be related to neutrophil function such as toll-like 5-dependent phagocytosis. Our results show that mice may provide a useful AOM model for studying the role of M. catarrhalis. Furthermore, we show that pili play an important role in enhancing M. catarrhalis clearance from the middle ear that is probably mediated through neutrophil-dependent TLR5 signaling.

  11. Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discusses active control of turbine tip clearance from a control systems perspective. It is a subset of charts that were presented at the 2003 meeting of the International Society of Air Breathing Engines which was held August 31 through September 5 in Cleveland, Ohio. The associated reference paper is cited at the end of the presentation. The presentation describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, it is believed that the technologies developed as part of this research will benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first part of the presentation discusses the concept of tip clearance, problems associated with it, and the benefits of controlling it. It lays out a framework for implementing tip clearance controls that enables the implementation to progress from purely analytical to hardware-in-the-loop to fully experimental. And it briefly discusses how the technologies developed will be married to the previously described ACC Test Rig for hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations. The final portion of the presentation, describes one of the key technologies in some detail by presenting equations and results for a functional dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena. As shown, the model exhibits many of the clearance dynamics found in commercial gas turbine engines. However, initial attempts to validate the model identified limitations that are being addressed to make the model more realistic.

  12. Pulmonary function and clearance after prolonged sulfuric acid aerosol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, P.J. ); Gerrity, T.R.; DeWitt, P.; Folinsbee, L.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The authors studied pulmonary function and clearance responses after a 4 H exposure to 75-100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid aerosol (SAA). Healthy subjects, who exercised for 30 min/H at ventilation of about 25 L/min, were exposed once to clean air and once to SAA. Oral hygiene and acidic juice gargle were used to minimize oral ammonia. Lung function tests, including spirometry, plethysmography, and partial flow-volume (PEFV) curves were performed before and after exposure. Clearance of 99m-Technetium labeled iron oxide was assessed after each exposure. The first moment of fractional tracheobronchial retention (M1TBR), after correcting for 24 H retention and normalizing to time zero, was used as an index of clearance. There were no significant changes in lung volumes, airways resistance, or maximum expiratory flows after SAA exposure. Flow at 40% of total lung capacity on PEFV curves decreased 17% (NS) after SAA exposure. Tracheobronchial clearance was accelerated after a single exposure to SAA; M1TBR decreased from 73 {plus minus} 5 min (air) to 69 {plus minus} 5 min (SAA). These results suggest that acute prolonged exposure to low levels of SAA has minimal effects on lung mechanics in healthy subjects but does produce a modest acceleration of particle clearance.

  13. Lung Macrophages “Digest” Carbon Nanotubes Using a Superoxide/Peroxynitrite Oxidative Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to short-lived neutrophils, macrophages display persistent presence in the lung of animals after pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes. While effective in the clearance of bacterial pathogens and injured host cells, the ability of macrophages to “digest” carbonaceous nanoparticles has not been documented. Here, we used chemical, biochemical, and cell and animal models and demonstrated oxidative biodegradation of oxidatively functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes via superoxide/NO* → peroxynitrite-driven oxidative pathways of activated macrophages facilitating clearance of nanoparticles from the lung. PMID:24871084

  14. Human Lung Cancer Cells Grown in an Ex Vivo 3D Lung Model Produce Matrix Metalloproteinases Not Produced in 2D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Dhruva K.; Sakamoto, Jason H.; Thrall, Michael J.; Baird, Brandi N.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Ferrari, Mauro; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the growth of human lung cancer cells in an ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) lung model and 2D culture to determine which better mimics lung cancer growth in patients. A549 cells were grown in an ex vivo 3D lung model and in 2D culture for 15 days. We measured the size and formation of tumor nodules and counted the cells after 15 days. We also stained the tissue/cells for Ki-67, and Caspase-3. We measured matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels in the conditioned media and in blood plasma from patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung. Organized tumor nodules with intact vascular space formed in the ex vivo 3D lung model but not in 2D culture. Proliferation and apoptosis were greater in the ex vivo 3D lung model compared to the 2D culture. After 15 days, there were significantly more cells in the 2D culture than the 3D model. MMP-1, MMP-9, and MMP-10 production were significantly greater in the ex vivo 3D lung model. There was no production of MMP-9 in the 2D culture. The patient samples contained MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-10. The human lung cancer cells grown on ex vivo 3D model form perfusable nodules that grow over time. It also produced MMPs that were not produced in 2D culture but seen in human lung cancer patients. The ex vivo 3D lung model may more closely mimic the biology of human lung cancer development than the 2D culture. PMID:23028922

  15. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-21

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation. PMID:26531324

  16. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  17. A simple, closed-form, mathematical model for gas exchange in microchannel artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Potkay, Joseph A

    2013-06-01

    Microfabrication techniques are attractive for constructing artificial lungs due to the ability to create features similar in size to those in the natural lung. However, a simple and intuitive mathematical model capable of accurately predicting the gas exchange performance of microchannel artificial lungs does not currently exist. Such a model is critical to understanding and optimizing these devices. Here, we describe a simple, closed-form mathematical model for gas exchange in microchannel artificial lungs and qualify it through application to experimental data from several research groups. We utilize lumped parameters and several assumptions to obtain a closed-form set of equations that describe gas exchange. This work is intended to augment computational models by providing a more intuitive, albeit potentially less accurate, understanding of the operation and trade-offs inherent in microchannel artificial lung devices.

  18. Toward the modeling of mucus draining from the human lung: role of the geometry of the airway tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauroy, Benjamin; Fausser, Christian; Pelca, Dominique; Merckx, Jacques; Flaud, Patrice

    2011-10-01

    Mucociliary clearance and cough are the two main natural mucus draining methods in the bronchial tree. If they are affected by a pathology, they can become insufficient or even ineffective, then therapeutic draining of mucus plays a critical role to keep mucus levels in the lungs acceptable. The manipulations of physical therapists are known to be very efficient clinically but they are mostly empirical since the biophysical mechanisms involved in these manipulations have never been studied. We develop in this work a model of mucus clearance in idealized rigid human bronchial trees and focus our study on the interaction between (1) tree geometry, (2) mucus physical properties and (3) amplitude of flow rate in the tree. The mucus is considered as a Bingham fluid (gel-like) which is moved upward in the tree thanks to its viscous interaction with air flow. Our studies point out the important roles played both by the geometry and by the physical properties of mucus (yield stress and viscosity). More particularly, the yield stress has to be overcome to make mucus flow. Air flow rate and yield stress determine the maximal possible mucus thickness in each branch of the tree at equilibrium. This forms a specific distribution of mucus in the tree whose characteristics are strongly related to the multi-scaled structure of the tree. The behavior of any mucus distribution is then dependent on this distribution. Finally, our results indicate that increasing air flow rates ought to be more efficient to drain mucus out of the bronchial tree while minimizing patient discomfort.

  19. Bone Marrow–Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Bacterial Clearance and Preserve Bioprosthetic Integrity in a Model of Mesh Infection

    PubMed Central

    Criman, Erik T.; Kurata, Wendy E.; Matsumoto, Karen W.; Aubin, Harry T.; Campbell, Carmen E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The reported incidence of mesh infection in contaminated operative fields is as high as 30% regardless of the material used. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to possess favorable immunomodulatory properties and improve tissue incorporation when seeded onto bioprosthetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether seeding noncrosslinked bovine pericardium (Veritas Collagen Matrix) with allogeneic bone marrow–derived MSCs improves infection resistance in vivo after inoculation with Escherichia coli (E. coli). Methods: Rat bone marrow–derived MSCs at passage 3 were seeded onto bovine pericardium and cultured for 7 days before implantation. Additional rats (n = 24) were implanted subcutaneously with MSC-seeded or unseeded mesh and inoculated with 7 × 105 colony-forming units of E. coli or saline before wound closure (group 1, unseeded mesh/saline; group 2, unseeded mesh/E. coli; group 3, MSC-seeded mesh/E. coli; 8 rats per group). Meshes were explanted at 4 weeks and underwent microbiologic and histologic analyses. Results: MSC-seeded meshes inoculated with E. coli demonstrated superior bacterial clearance and preservation of mesh integrity compared with E. coli–inoculated unseeded meshes (87.5% versus 0% clearance; p = 0.001). Complete mesh degradation concurrent with abscess formation was observed in 100% of rats in the unseeded/E. coli group, which is in contrast to 12.5% of rats in the MSC-seeded/E. coli group. Histologic evaluation determined that remodeling characteristics of E. coli–inoculated MSC-seeded meshes were similar to those of uninfected meshes 4 weeks after implantation. Conclusions: Augmenting a bioprosthetic material with stem cells seems to markedly enhance resistance to bacterial infection in vivo and preserve mesh integrity. PMID:27482490

  20. Effects of sodium methyldithiocarbamate on selected parameters of innate immunity and clearance of bacteria in a mouse model of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei; Pruett, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Sodium methyldithiocarbamate (SMD), the third most widely used conventional pesticide in the United States, has been reported to inhibit several parameters associated with inflammation and to decrease resistance to infection. In a previous study, survival time was markedly decreased when mice were treated orally with SMD shortly before challenge with a high dose of Escherichia coli (E. coli) that was lethal to most of the control mice. In the present study, we evaluated selected parameters of the innate immune system using a lower challenge dose of E. coli, to determine which (if any) of these parameters reflected continued changes through 24 h. Main methods Bacterial clearance from the peritoneal cavity, production of chemokines and cytokines, and body temperature were measured. Key findings All these parameters were reduced by SMD up to 12 h after bacterial challenge, but the concentration of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was increased. Even so, mice in the control and SMD-treated groups cleared most bacteria by 24 h. Other parameters (cytokine concentrations and body temperature) were also normal or near normal by 24 h. The same dosage of SMD administered intranasally also did not significantly decrease survival. Hypothermia from 16 to 28 h correlated with lethal outcome, but SMD significantly increased hypothermia only at 2 and 4 h after challenge. Significance In spite of substantial early inhibition by SMD of parameters known to be important for resistance to infection, bacterial clearance and survival were not altered, suggesting immunological reserve and/or rapid recovery after transient effects of SMD. PMID:26281915

  1. Assessing model uncertainty using hexavalent chromium and lung cancer mortality as an example [Abstract 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: The National Research Council recommended quantitative evaluation of uncertainty in effect estimates for risk assessment. This analysis considers uncertainty across model forms and model parameterizations with hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and lung cancer mortality a...

  2. Modeling the lung: Design and development of tissue engineered macro- and micro-physiologic lung models for research use.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Joan E; Niles, Jean A; Vega, Stephanie P; Argueta, Lissenya B; Eastaway, Adriene; Cortiella, Joaquin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract specific cell populations, or tissue engineered in vitro grown human lung, have the potential to be used as research tools to mimic physiology, toxicology, pathology, as well as infectious diseases responses of cells or tissues. Studies related to respiratory tract pathogenesis or drug toxicity testing in the past made use of basic systems where single cell populations were exposed to test agents followed by evaluations of simple cellular responses. Although these simple single-cell-type systems provided good basic information related to cellular responses, much more can be learned from cells grown in fabricated microenvironments which mimic in vivo conditions in specialized microfabricated chambers or by human tissue engineered three-dimensional (3D) models which allow for more natural interactions between cells. Recent advances in microengineering technology, microfluidics, and tissue engineering have provided a new approach to the development of 2D and 3D cell culture models which enable production of more robust human in vitro respiratory tract models. Complex models containing multiple cell phenotypes also provide a more reasonable approximation of what occurs in vivo without the confounding elements in the dynamic in vivo environment. The goal of engineering good 3D human models is the formation of physiologically functional respiratory tissue surrogates which can be used as pathogenesis models or in the case of 2D screening systems for drug therapy evaluation as well as human toxicity testing. We hope that this manuscript will serve as a guide for development of future respiratory tract model systems as well as a review of conventional models.

  3. Modeling the nuclear magnetic resonance behavior of lung: from electrical engineering to critical care medicine.

    PubMed

    Cutillo, A G; Ailion, D C

    1999-01-01

    The present article reviews the basic principles of a new approach to the characterization of pulmonary disease. This approach is based on the unique nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of the lung and combines experimental measurements (using specially developed NMR techniques) with theoretical simulations. The NMR signal from inflated lungs decays very rapidly compared with the signal from completely collapsed (airless) lungs. This phenomenon is due to the presence of internal magnetic field inhomogeneity produced by the alveolar air-tissue interface (because air and water have different magnetic susceptibilities). The air-tissue interface effects can be detected and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques using temporally symmetric and asymmetric spin-echo sequences. Theoretical models developed to explain the internal (tissue-induced) magnetic field inhomogeneity in aerated lungs predict the NMR lung behavior as a function of various technical and physiological factors (e.g., the level of lung inflation) and simulate the effects of various lung disorders (in particular, pulmonary edema) on this behavior. Good agreement has been observed between the predictions obtained from the mathematical models and the results of experimental NMR measurements in normal and diseased lungs. Our theoretical and experimental data have important pathophysiological and clinical implications, especially with respect to the characterization of acute lung disease (e.g., pulmonary edema) and the management of critically ill patients.

  4. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C{sub 1} continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  5. Chapter 6: Lung cancer in never smokers: epidemiology and risk prediction models.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, William J; Meza, Rafael; Jeon, Jihyoun; Moolgavkar, Suresh H

    2012-07-01

    In this chapter we review the epidemiology of lung cancer incidence and mortality among never smokers/nonsmokers and describe the never smoker lung cancer risk models used by the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Network (CISNET) modelers. Our review focuses on those influences likely to have measurable population impact on never smoker risk, such as secondhand smoke, even though the individual-level impact may be small. Occupational exposures may also contribute importantly to the population attributable risk of lung cancer. We examine the following risk factors in this chapter: age, environmental tobacco smoke, cooking fumes, ionizing radiation including radon gas, inherited genetic susceptibility, selected occupational exposures, preexisting lung disease, and oncogenic viruses. We also compare the prevalence of never smokers between the three CISNET smoking scenarios and present the corresponding lung cancer mortality estimates among never smokers as predicted by a typical CISNET model.

  6. A comprehensive dynamic model of double-row spherical roller bearing—Model development and case studies on surface defects, preloads, and radial clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, M.; Xiao, J.

    2008-02-01

    Bearing excitation is one of the most important mechanical sources for vibration and noise generation in machine systems of a broad range of industries. Although extensively investigated, accurately predicting the vibration/acoustic behavior of bearings remains a challenging task because of its complicated nonlinear behaviors. While some ground work has been laid out on single-row deep-grooved ball (DGB) bearing, comprehensive modeling effort on spherical roller bearing (SRB) has yet to be carried out. This is mainly due to the facts that SRB system carries one more extra degree of freedom (DOF) on the moving race (could be either inner or outer race) and in general has more rolling elements compared with DGB. In this study, a comprehensive SRB excitation source model is developed. In addition to the vertical and horizontal displacements considered in previous investigations, the impacts of axial displacement/load are addressed by introducing the DOF in the axial shaft direction. Hence, instead of being treated as pre-assumed constants, the roller-inner/outer race contact angles are formulated as functions of the axial displacement of the moving race to reflect their dependence on the axial movement. The approach presented in this paper accounts for the point contacts between rollers and inner/outer races, as well as line contacts when the loads on individual rollers exceed the limit for point contact. A detailed contact-damping model reflecting the influences of the surface profiles and the speeds of the both contacting elements is developed and applied in the SRB model. Waviness of all the contact surfaces (including inner race, outer race, and rollers) is included and compared in this analysis. Extensive case studies are carried out to reveal the impacts of surface waviness, radial clearance, surface defects, and loading conditions on the force and displacement responses of the SRB system. System design guidelines are recommended based on the simulation results

  7. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS OF LUNG AIRWAY STRUCTURES USING DATA-DRIVEN SURFACE MODELING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Knowledge of human lung morphology is a subject critical to many areas of medicine. The visualization of lung structures naturally lends itself to computer graphics modeling due to the large number of airways involved and the complexities of the branching systems...

  8. Dry Lung as a Physical Model in Studies of Aerosol Deposition.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Victor N; Kanev, Igor L

    2015-10-01

    A new physical model was developed to evaluate the deposition of micro- and nanoaerosol particles (NAPs) into the lungs as a function of size and charges. The model was manufactured of a dry, inflated swine lung produced by Nasco company (Fort Atkinson, WI). The dry lung was cut into two lobes and a conductive tube was glued into the bronchial tube. The upper 1-2-mm-thick layer of the lung lobe was removed with a razor blade to expose the alveoli. The lobe was further enclosed into a plastic bag and placed within a metalized plastic box. The probability of aerosol deposition was calculated by comparing the size distribution of NAPs passed through the lung with that of control, where aerosol passed through a box bypassing the lung. Using this new lung model, it was demonstrated that charged NAPs are deposited inside the lung substantially more efficiently than neutral ones. It was also demonstrated that deposition of neutral NAPs well fits prediction of the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry (MPPD) model developed by the Applied Research Associates, Inc. (ARA).

  9. Lung Protective Ventilation (ARDSNet) versus APRV: Ventilatory Management in a Combined Model of Acute Lung and Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Stephen W.; Leonard, Kenji L.; Falls, Randall K.; Mageau, Ronald P.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Hollowell, Joseph P.; Trainor, Wayne E.; Kanaan, Hilal A.; Hickner, Robert C.; Sawyer, Robert G.; Poulin, Nathaniel R.; Waibel, Brett H.; Toschlog, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Concomitant lung/brain traumatic injury, results in significant morbidity and mortality. Lung protective ventilation (ARDSNet) has become the standard for managing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); however, the resulting permissive hypercapnea may compound traumatic brain injury (TBI). Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) offers an alternative strategy for management of this patient population. APRV was hypothesized to retard the progression of acute lung/brain injury to a greater degree than ARDSNet in a swine model. Methods Yorkshire swine were randomized to ARDSNet, APRV, or sham. Ventilatory settings and pulmonary parameters, vitals, blood gases, quantitative histopathology, and cerebral microdialysis were compared between groups using chi-square, Fisher’s exact, Student’s t-test, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and mixed effects repeated measures modeling. Results 22 swine (17 male, 5 female), weighing 25±6.0kg, were randomized to APRV (n=9), ARDSNet (n=12), or sham (n=1). PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) ratio dropped significantly while intracranial pressure increased significantly for all three groups immediately following lung and brain injury. Over time, peak inspiratory pressure, mean airway pressure, and P/F ratio significantly increased, while total respiratory rate significantly decreased within the APRV group compared to the ARDSNet group. Histopathology did not show significant differences between groups in overall brain or lung tissue injury; however, cerebral microdialysis trends suggested increased ischemia within the APRV group compared to ARDSNet over time. Conclusion Previous studies have not evaluated the effects of APRV in this population. While our macroscopic parameters and histopathology did not observe a significant difference between groups, microdialysis data suggest a trend toward increased cerebral ischemia associated with APRV over time. Additional and future studies should focus on extending the time interval for observation to

  10. The Implantable Pediatric Artificial Lung: Interim Report on the Development of an End-Stage Lung Failure Model

    PubMed Central

    Alghanem, Fares; Davis, Ryan P.; Bryner, Benjamin S.; Hoffman, Hayley R.; Trahanas, John; Cornell, Marie; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Bartlett, Robert H.; Hirschl, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    An implantable pediatric artificial lung (PAL) may serve as a bridge to lung transplantation for children with end-stage lung failure (ESLF); however, an animal model of pediatric lung failure is needed to evaluate a PAL’s efficacy before it can enter clinical trials. The objective of this study was to assess ligation of the right pulmonary artery (rPA) as a model for pediatric ESLF. Seven 20-30kg lambs underwent rPA ligation and were recovered and monitored for up to 4 days. Intraoperatively, rPA ligation significantly increased physiologic deadspace fraction (Vd/Vt: baseline=48.6±5.7%, rPA ligation=60.1±5.2%, p=0.012), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPPA: baseline=17.4±2.2mmHg, rPA ligation=28.5±5.2mmHg, p<0.001), and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2: baseline=40.4±9.3mmHg, rPA ligation=57.3±12.7mmHg, p=0.026). Of the 7 lambs, 3 were unable to be weaned from mechanical ventilation post-operatively, 3 were successfully weaned but suffered cardiorespiratory failure within 4 days, and 1 survived all 4 days. All 4 animals that were successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation had persistent pulmonary hypertension (mPPA=28.6±2.2mmHg) and remained tachypneic (respiratory rate=63±21min−1). Three of the 4 recovered lambs required supplemental oxygen. We conclude that rPA ligation creates the physiologic derangements commonly seen in pediatric end-stage lung failure and may be suitable for testing and implanting a PAL. PMID:25905495

  11. The Effects of Smoking on the Developing Lung: Insights from a Biologic Model for Lung Development, Homeostasis, and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Asotra, Kamlesh; Torday, John S.

    2010-01-01

    There is extensive epidemiologic and experimental evidence from both animal and human studies that demonstrates detrimental long-term pulmonary outcomes in the offspring of mothers who smoke during pregnancy. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not understood. Therefore, it is not surprising that that there is no effective intervention to prevent the damaging effects of perinatal smoke exposure. Using a biologic model of lung development, homeostasis, and repair, we have determined that in utero nicotine exposure disrupts specific molecular paracrine communications between epithelium and interstitium that are driven by parathyroid hormone-related protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, resulting in transdifferentiation of lung lipofibroblasts to myofibroblasts, i.e., the conversion of the lipofibroblast phenotype to a cell type that is not conducive to alveolar homeostasis, and is the cellular hallmark of chronic lung disease, including asthma. Furthermore, we have shown that by molecularly targeting PPARγ expression, nicotine-induced lung injury can not only be significantly averted, it can also be reverted. The concept outlined by us differs from the traditional paradigm of teratogenic and toxicological effects of tobacco smoke that has been proposed in the past. We have argued that since nicotine alters the normal homeostatic epithelial-mesenchymal paracrine signaling in the developing alveolus, rather than causing totally disruptive structural changes, it offers a unique opportunity to prevent, halt, and/or reverse this process through targeted molecular manipulations. PMID:19641967

  12. Mediators and mucociliary clearance in asthma.

    PubMed

    Pavia, D; Lopez-Vidriero, M T; Clarke, S W

    1987-01-01

    Lung mucociliary clearance is significantly reduced in asthmatic patients compared to healthy controls even during clinical remission. Further retardation in mucous clearance occurs during sleep per se and this may be a contributing factor to nocturnal asthma. Chemical mediators of anaphylaxis appear to have various and, sometimes opposing effects on the two essential components for mucociliary clearance, namely cilia and mucus. Some mediators such as leukotrienes C4 and D4 are potent secretagogues and histamine increases the water flux into the lumen of the airways from the mucosa. Slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) reduces mucus transport whereas histamine enhances it. Ciliostimulation has been reported following allergen challenge and this contrasts with the cilioinhibitory effect of asthmatics' sputa. It appears however, that the net effect of the various chemicals of anaphylaxis is one of impairment of mucus clearance. Some pharmacological agents, used for the relief of bronchospasm and control of asthma, also stimulate mucociliary transport, a desirable additional effect. PMID:3311245

  13. Cigarette smoke induced changes in rat pulmonary clearance of 99mTcDTPA. A comparison of particulate and gas phases.

    PubMed

    Minty, B D; Royston, D

    1985-12-01

    The rat model was developed to study the effects of cigarette smoke on pulmonary clearance of 99mTcDTPA. The method developed was sufficiently noninvasive to allow frequent repeat measurements to be made with a high degree of reproducibility. Animals exposed twice daily to 90 puffs of dilute whole cigarette smoke for 7 days showed an increase in 99mTcDTPA clearance from the lung which returned to normal within 3 wk of stopping exposure. Filtration of the smoke to remove all the particulate matter abolished the changes.

  14. Prediction of hepatic microsomal intrinsic clearance and human clearance values for drugs.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Katarina; Agababa, Danica

    2009-10-01

    Twenty-nine drugs of different structures were used in theoretical QSAR analysis of human hepatic microsomal intrinsic clearance (in vitro T(1/2) and in vitro CL'(int)) and whole body clearance (CL(blood)). The examined compounds demonstrated a wide range of scaled intrinsic clearance values. Constitutional, geometrical, physico-chemical and electronic descriptors were computed for the examined structures by use of the Marvin Sketch 5.1.3_2, the Chem3D Ultra 7.0.0 and the Dragon 5.4 program. Partial least squares regression (PLSR), has been applied for selection of the most relevant molecular descriptors and development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model for human hepatic microsomal intrinsic clearance (in vitro T(1/2)). Optimal QSAR models with nine and ten variables, R(2)>0.808 and cross-validation parameter q(pre)(2)>0.623, were selected and compared. Since the microsomal in vitro T(1/2) data can be used for calculation of in vitro CL'(int) and in vivo CL(blood), the developed QSAR model will enable one to analyze the kinetics of cytochrome P450-mediated reactions in term of intrinsic clearance and whole body clearance. A comparison is made between predictions produced from the QSAR analysis and experimental data, and there appears to be generally satisfactory correlations with the literature values for intrinsic clearance data. PMID:19713138

  15. Response and resistance to NF-κB inhibitors in mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Meylan, Etienne; Oliver, Trudy G.; Feldser, David M.; Winslow, Monte M.; Bronson, Roderick; Jacks, Tyler

    2011-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is a frequently diagnosed cancer type and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. We recently demonstrated in an autochthonous mouse model of this disease that genetic inhibition of the NF-κB pathway affects both the initiation and maintenance of lung cancer, identifying this pathway as a promising therapeutic target. In this study, we tested the efficacy of small molecule NF-κB inhibitors in mouse models of lung cancer. In murine lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with high NF-κB activity, the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib efficiently reduced nuclear p65, repressed NF-κB target genes and rapidly induced apoptosis. Bortezomib also induced lung tumor regression in vivo and prolonged the survival of tumor bearing KrasLSL-G12D/wt;p53flox/flox mice. In contrast, KrasG12D/wt lung tumors, which have low levels of nuclear NF-κB, do not respond to Bortezomib, suggesting that nuclear NF-κB may be a biomarker to predict treatment response to drugs of this class. Following repeated treatment, initially sensitive lung tumors became resistant to Bortezomib. A second NF-κB inhibitor, Bay-117082, showed similar therapeutic efficacy and acquired-resistance in mice. Our results using preclinical mouse models support the NF-κB pathway as a potential therapeutic target for a defined subset of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:21874163

  16. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 < Ca < 0.05. This effect diminished by decrease in airways diameter. This approach will help elucidate surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  17. Airway clearance therapy: finding the evidence.

    PubMed

    Volsko, Teresa A

    2013-10-01

    Disease processes can impair ciliary function, alter secretion production and mucus rheology, and interfere with the cough reflex. Airway clearance therapy has been a cornerstone of therapy aimed at minimizing the devastating effects of airway obstruction, infection, and inflammation due to mucus stasis on the conducting airways and lung parenchyma. Although challenges to performing clinical studies evaluating the effectiveness of airway clearance therapeutic modalities exist, resources are available in the literature. In addition to device evaluations and original clinical research, the expert opinion, systematic reviews, and evidence-based practice guidelines can be found. These tools can be used to develop protocols and pathways to guide our practice. Monitoring and reporting patient, process, and financial outcomes are essential steps germane to the implementation of evidence-based care.

  18. Long-term clearance from small airways decreases with age.

    PubMed

    Svartengren, M; Falk, R; Philipson, K

    2005-10-01

    The prevalence of respiratory symptoms increases with age. Age has been found to be negatively associated with large airway clearance. The small airways region is considered important for development of airway disease. Clearance after the first 24 h was studied in 46 healthy subjects with a wide age distribution, (mean 42, range 19-81 yrs). All subjects inhaled monodisperse 6 microm Teflon particles labelled with 111In, with an extremely slow inhalation flow (0.05 L.s-1). The particles were mainly deposited in the small conducting airways. Lung retention was measured at 0 and 24 h, and at 7, 14 and 21 days after inhalation. Significant relationships were found for the individual 24 h "large" airway clearance in per cent of initial lung deposition with age, forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity. Age was negatively associated with "small" airway clearance after 24 h as estimated at 2, 7, 14 and 21 days. Using stepwise linear regression only age remained significantly associated to clearance. In conclusion, small airway clearance over 21 days was found to decrease with age. This might be one factor associated with the high prevalence of respiratory symptoms associated among the elderly.

  19. Toxicity assessment of aggregated/agglomerated cerium oxide nanoparticles in an in vitro 3D airway model: the influence of mucociliary clearance.

    PubMed

    Frieke Kuper, C; Gröllers-Mulderij, Mariska; Maarschalkerweerd, Thérèse; Meulendijks, Nicole M M; Reus, Astrid; van Acker, Frédérique; Zondervan-van den Beuken, Esther K; Wouters, Mariëlle E L; Bijlsma, Sabina; Kooter, Ingeborg M

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the toxicity of aggregated nanoparticles of cerium oxide (CeO2) using an in vitro 3D human bronchial epithelial model that included a mucociliary apparatus (MucilAir™). CeO2 was dispersed in saline and applied to the apical surface of the model. CeO2 did not induce distinct effects in the model, whereas it did in BEAS-2B and A549 cell cultures. The absence of effects of CeO2 was not because of the model's insensitivity. Nanoparticles of zinc oxide (ZnO) elicited positive responses in the toxicological assays. Respiratory mucus (0.1% and 1%) added to dispersions increased aggregation/agglomeration to such an extent that most CeO2 sedimented within a few minutes. Also, the mucociliary apparatus of the model removed CeO2 from the central part of the apical surface to the borders. This 'clearance' may have prevented the majority of CeO2 from reaching the epithelial cells. Chemical analysis of cerium in the basal tissue culture medium showed only minimal translocation of cerium across the 3D barrier. In conclusion, mucociliary defence appeared to prevent CeO2 reaching the respiratory epithelial cells in this 3D in vitro model. This model and approach can be used to study compounds of specific toxicological concern in airway defence mechanisms in vitro. PMID:25448805

  20. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume.

    PubMed

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J

    2016-01-01

    In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of lung

  1. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume

    PubMed Central

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of

  2. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume.

    PubMed

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J

    2016-01-01

    In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of lung

  3. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; Bundschuh, Ralph; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and -testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future. PMID:27501455

  4. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; Bundschuh, Ralph; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and –testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future. PMID:27501455

  5. Numerical modeling of Po-218 deposition in a physiologically realistic lung bifurcation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mously-Soroujy, Khalid Ahmad

    Experimental data for lung bifurcations reveals complex geometries and distinct asymmetrical characteristic, which affects the localized distribution of particles deposited in the lung. This study is based on recently published numerical results for a symmetric physiological realistic bifurcation geometry Heistracher and Hofmann (1995) which has been extended here to the case of a asymmetric geometry. The asymmetric PRB model was used to study the flow field and the deposition of ultrafine particles for inspiratory and expiratory conditions. In the present study, we investigated the effect of different flow rates, representing human activity and deposition of different ultrafine particles representing radon daughter (Po-218), in the PRB model. Numerical results were compared with the limited available experimental and numerical data. The fluid dynamic computer program FIDAP was used for this purpose.

  6. Relations between fractional-order model parameters and lung pathology in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Clara M; De Keyser, Robin

    2009-04-01

    In this study, changes in respiratory mechanics from healthy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosed patients are observed from identified fractional-order (FO) model parameters. The noninvasive forced oscillation technique is employed for lung function testing. Parameters on tissue damping and elastance are analyzed with respect to lung pathology and additional indexes developed from the identified model. The observations show that the proposed model may be used to detect changes in respiratory mechanics and offers a clear-cut separation between the healthy and COPD subject groups. Our conclusion is that an FO model is able to capture changes in viscoelasticity of the soft tissue in lungs with disease. Apart from this, nonlinear effects present in the measured signals were observed and analyzed via signal processing techniques and led to supporting evidence in relation to the expected phenomena from lung pathology in healthy and COPD patients.

  7. The Audible Human Project: Modeling Sound Transmission in the Lungs and Torso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zoujun

    Auscultation has been used qualitatively by physicians for hundreds of years to aid in the monitoring and diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable changes in lung sound production and transmission. Numerous acoustic measurements have revealed the differences of breath sounds and transmitted sounds in the lung under normal and pathological conditions. Compared to the extensive cataloging of lung sound measurements, the mechanism of sound transmission in the pulmonary system and how it changes with alterations of lung structural and material properties has received less attention. A better understanding of sound transmission and how it is altered by injury and disease might improve interpretation of lung sound measurements, including new lung imaging modalities that are based on an array measurement of the acoustic field on the torso surface via contact sensors or are based on a 3-dimensional measurement of the acoustic field throughout the lungs and torso using magnetic resonance elastography. A long-term goal of the Audible Human Project (AHP ) is to develop a computational acoustic model that would accurately simulate generation, transmission and noninvasive measurement of sound and vibration within the pulmonary system and torso caused by both internal (e.g. respiratory function) and external (e.g. palpation) sources. The goals of this dissertation research, fitting within the scope of the AHP, are to develop specific improved theoretical understandings, computational algorithms and experimental methods aimed at transmission and measurement. The research objectives undertaken in this dissertation are as follows. (1) Improve theoretical modeling and experimental identification of viscoelasticity in soft biological tissues. (2) Develop a poroviscoelastic model for lung tissue vibroacoustics. (3) Improve lung airway acoustics modeling and its

  8. Lung fibrosis: drug screening and disease biomarker identification with a lung slice culture model and subtracted cDNA Library.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Lok, Ka Yee; Yu, Changhe; Li, Zhuo

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and irreversible disorder with no appropriate cure. A practical and effective experimental model that recapitulates the disease will greatly benefit the research community and, ultimately, patients. In this study, we tested the lung slice culture (LSC) system for its potential use in drug screening and disease biomarker identification. Fibrosis was induced by treating rat lung slices with 1ng/ml TGF-β1 and 2.5μM CdCl2, quantified by measuring the content of hydroxyproline, and confirmed by detecting the expression of collagen type III alpha 1 (Col3α1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) genes. The anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone, spironolactone and eplerenone were assessed by their capability to reduce hydroxyproline content. A subtractive hybridisation technique was used to create two cDNA libraries (subtracted and unsubtracted) from lung slices. The housekeeping gene glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was employed to assess the subtraction efficiency of the subtracted cDNA library. Clones from the two libraries were sequenced and the genes were identified by performing a BLAST search on the NCBI GenBank database. Furthermore, the relevance of the genes to fibrosis formation was verified. The results presented here show that fibrosis was effectively induced in cultured lung slices, which exhibited significantly elevated levels of hydroxyproline and Col3α1/CTGF gene expression. Several inhibitors have demonstrated their anti-fibrotic effects by significantly reducing hydroxyproline content. The subtracted cDNA library, which was enriched for differentially expressed genes, was used to successfully identify genes associated with fibrosis. Collectively, the results indicate that our LSC system is an effective model for the screening of drug candidates and for disease biomarker identification.

  9. The Implantable Pediatric Artificial Lung: Interim Report on the Development of an End-Stage Lung Failure Model.

    PubMed

    Alghanem, Fares; Davis, Ryan P; Bryner, Benjamin S; Hoffman, Hayley R; Trahanas, John; Cornell, Marie S; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Bartlett, Robert H; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2015-01-01

    An implantable pediatric artificial lung (PAL) may serve as a bridge to lung transplantation for children with end-stage lung failure (ESLF); however, an animal model of pediatric lung failure is needed to evaluate the efficacy of PAL before it can enter clinical trials. The objective of this study was to assess ligation of the right pulmonary artery (rPA) as a model for pediatric ESLF. Seven lambs weighing 20-30 kg underwent rPA ligation and were recovered and monitored for up to 4 days. Intraoperatively, rPA ligation significantly increased physiologic dead space fraction (Vd/Vt; baseline = 48.6 ± 5.7%, rPA ligation = 60.1 ± 5.2%, p = 0.012), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPPA; baseline = 17.4 ± 2.2 mm Hg, rPA ligation = 28.5 ± 5.2 mm Hg, p < 0.001), and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (baseline = 40.4 ± 9.3 mm Hg, rPA ligation = 57.3 ± 12.7 mm Hg, p = 0.026). Of the seven lambs, three were unable to be weaned from mechanical ventilation postoperatively, three were successfully weaned but suffered cardiorespiratory failure within 4 days, and one survived all 4 days. All four animals that were successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation had persistent pulmonary hypertension (mPPA = 28.6 ± 2.2 mm Hg) and remained tachypneic (respiratory rate = 63 ± 21 min). Three of the four recovered lambs required supplemental oxygen. We conclude that rPA ligation creates the physiologic derangements commonly seen in pediatric ESLF and may be suitable for testing and implanting a PAL.

  10. Conditions for NIR fluorescence-guided tumor resectioning in preclinical lung cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minji; Quan, Yuhua; Choi, Byeong Hyun; Choi, Yeonho; Kim, Hyun Koo; Kim, Beop-Min

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary nodule could be identified by intraoperative fluorescence imaging system from systemic injection of indocyanine green (ICG) which achieves enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effects. This study was performed to evaluate optimal injection time of ICG for detecting cancer during surgery in rabbit lung cancer model. VX2 carcinoma cell was injected in rabbit lung under fluoroscopic computed tomography-guidance. Solitary lung cancer was confirmed on positron emitting tomography with CT (PET/CT) 2 weeks after inoculation. ICG was administered intravenously and fluorescent intensity of lung tumor was measured using the custom-built intraoperative color and fluorescence merged imaging system (ICFIS) for 15 hours. Solitary lung cancer was resected through thoracoscopic version of ICFIS. ICG was observed in all animals. Because Lung has fast blood pulmonary circulation, Fluorescent signal showed maximum intensity earlier than previous studies in other organs. Fluorescent intensity showed maximum intensity within 6-9 hours in rabbit lung cancer. Overall, Fluorescent intensity decreased with increasing time, however, all tumors were detectable using fluorescent images until 12 hours. In conclusion, while there had been studies in other organs showed that optimal injection time was at least 24 hours before operation, this study showed shorter optimal injection time at lung cancer. Since fluorescent signal showed the maximum intensity within 6-9 hours, cancer resection could be performed during this time. This data informed us that optimal injection time of ICG should be evaluated in each different solid organ tumor for fluorescent image guided surgery.

  11. Suppressive oligonucleotides inhibit inflammation in a murine model of mechanical ventilator induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Scheiermann, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) is commonly used to improve blood oxygenation in critically ill patients and for general anesthesia. Yet the cyclic mechanical stress induced at even moderate ventilation volume settings [tidal volume (Vt) <10 mL/kg] can injure the lungs and induce an inflammatory response. This work explores the effect of treatment with suppressive oligonucleotides (Sup ODN) in a mouse model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Methods Balb/cJ mice were mechanically ventilated for 4 h using clinically relevant Vt and a positive end-expiratory pressure of 3 cmH2O under 2–3% isoflurane anesthesia. Lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected to assess lung inflammation and lung function was monitored using a FlexiVent®. Results MV induced significant pulmonary inflammation characterized by the influx and activation of CD11c+/F4/80+ macrophages and CD11b+/Ly6G+ polymorphonuclear cells into the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The concurrent administration of Sup ODN attenuated pulmonary inflammation as evidenced by reduced cellular influx and production of inflammatory cytokines. Oligonucleotide treatment did not worsen lung function as measured by static compliance or resistance. Conclusions Treatment with Sup ODN reduces the lung injury induced by MV in mice. PMID:27746995

  12. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  13. The injured lung: clinical issues and experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Jugg, B. J. A.; Smith, A. J.; Rudall, S. J.; Rice, P.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of military and civilian populations to inhaled toxic chemicals can take place as a result of deliberate release (warfare, terrorism) or following accidental releases from industrial concerns or transported chemicals. Exposure to inhaled toxic chemicals can result in an acute lung injury, and in severe cases acute respiratory distress syndrome, for which there is currently no specific medical therapy, treatment remaining largely supportive. This treatment often requires intensive care facilities that may become overwhelmed in mass casualty events and may be of limited benefit in severe cases. There remains, therefore, a need for evidence-based treatment to inform both military and civilian medical response teams on the most appropriate treatment for chemically induced lung injury. This article reviews data used to derive potential clinical management strategies for chemically induced lung injury. PMID:21149368

  14. Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) interactions with model lung surfactant lipids and an SP-B fragment.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Jackman, Donna; Booth, Valerie

    2011-06-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is the most abundant protein component of lung surfactant, a complex mixture of proteins and lipids. SP-A performs host defense activities and modulates the biophysical properties of surfactant in concerted action with surfactant protein B (SP-B). Current models of lung surfactant mechanism generally assume SP-A functions in its octadecameric form. However, one of the findings of this study is that when SP-A is bound to detergent and lipid micelles that mimic lung surfactant phospholipids, it exists predominantly as smaller oligomers, in sharp contrast to the much larger forms observed when alone in water. These investigations were carried out in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylphosphocholine (DPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (LMPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (LMPG), and mixed LMPC + LMPG micelles, using solution and diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have also probed SP-A's interaction with Mini-B, a biologically active synthetic fragment of SP-B, in the presence of micelles. Despite variations in Mini-B's own interactions with micelles of different compositions, SP-A is found to interact with Mini-B in all micelle systems and perhaps to undergo a further structural rearrangement upon interacting with Mini-B. The degree of SP-A-Mini-B interaction appears to be dependent on the type of lipid headgroup and is likely mediated through the micelles, rather than direct binding.

  15. Study of blade clearance effects on centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshide, R. K.; Nielson, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    A program of analysis, design, fabrication, and testing has been conducted to develop and experimentally verify analytical models to predict the effects of impeller blade clearance on centrifugal pumps. The effect of tip clearance on pump efficiency, and the relationship between the head coefficient and torque loss with tip clearance was established. Analysis were performed to determine the cost variation in design, manufacture, and test that would occur between unshrouded and shrouded impellers. An impeller, representative of typical rocket engine impellers, was modified by removing its front shroud to permit variation of its blade clearances. It was tested in water with special instrumentation to provide measurements of blade surface pressures during operation. Pump performance data were obtained from tests at various impeller tip clearances. Blade pressure data were obtained at the nominal tip clearance. Comparisons of predicted and measured data are given.

  16. Haemophilus influenzae LicB contributes to lung damage in an aged mice co-infection model.

    PubMed

    Bondy, Jessica; Osharovich, Sofya; Storm, Julie; Durning, Graham; McAuliffe, Timothy; Fan, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylcholine (ChoP) decoration of lipopolysaccharides is an important virulence strategy adopted by Haemophilus influenzae to establish a niche on the mucosal surface and to promote adherence to the host cells. The incorporation of ChoP on the LPS surface involves the lic1 operon, which consists of the licA, licB, licC, and licD genes. Among which, licB is a choline transporter gene required for acquisition of choline from environmental sources. In this study, we investigated the pathogenesis of the licB gene in an aged mice infection model. Due to immediate clearance of H. influenzae upon infection in mice, we employed influenza A virus and H. influenzae co-infection model. Our data showed that in the co-infection model, the secondary bacterial infection with a very low H. influenzae concentration of 100 colony forming unit is lethal to the aged mice. Although we did not observe any differences in weight loss between parent and licB mutant strains during the course of infection, a significant reduction of lung tissue damage was observed in the licB mutant infected aged mice. These results suggest that the licB gene is a virulence factor during H. influenzae infection in the lung in aged mice, possibly due to the increased binding to the host cell receptor via ChoP expression on the bacterial surface. In addition, when aged mice and mature mice were compared in the challenge experiments, we did not observe any protective immunity in the co-infection model suggesting the detrimental effects of the secondary bacterial infection on the aged mice in contrast to obvious immune-protections observed in the mature mice. The results of our experiments also implied that the co-infection model with influenza A virus and H. influenzae may be employed as a model system to study H. influenzae pathogenesis in vivo in aged mice.

  17. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M.; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host–pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:25699030

  18. Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapy for Acute Lung Injury in Preclinical Animal Models: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Lauralyn A.; Moher, David; Fergusson, Dean A.; Sullivan, Katrina J.; Mei, Shirley H. J.; Lalu, Manoj; Marshall, John; Mcleod, Malcolm; Griffin, Gilly; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Turgeon, Alexis; Avey, Marc T.; Rudnicki, Michael A.; Jazi, Mazen; Fishman, Jason; Stewart, Duncan J.

    2016-01-01

    The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating clinical condition that is associated with a 30–40% risk of death, and significant long term morbidity for those who survive. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have emerged as a potential novel treatment as in pre-clinical models they have been shown to modulate inflammation (a major pathophysiological hallmark of ARDS) while enhancing bacterial clearance and reducing organ injury and death. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS and Web of Science was performed to identify pre-clinical studies that examined the efficacy MSCs as compared to diseased controls for the treatment of Acute Lung Injury (ALI) (the pre-clinical correlate of human ARDS) on mortality, a clinically relevant outcome. We assessed study quality and pooled results using random effect meta-analysis. A total of 54 publications met our inclusion criteria of which 17 (21 experiments) reported mortality and were included in the meta-analysis. Treatment with MSCs, as compared to controls, significantly decreased the overall odds of death in animals with ALI (Odds Ratio 0.24, 95% Confidence Interval 0.18–0.34, I2 8%). Efficacy was maintained across different types of animal models and means of ALI induction; MSC origin, source, route of administration and preparation; and the clinical relevance of the model (timing of MSC administration, administration of fluids and or antibiotics). Reporting of standard MSC characterization for experiments that used human MSCs and risks of bias was generally poor, and although not statistically significant, a funnel plot analysis for overall mortality suggested the presence of publication bias. The results from our meta-analysis support that MSCs substantially reduce the odds of death in animal models of ALI but important reporting elements were sub optimal and limit the strength of our conclusions. PMID:26821255

  19. Toward in vivo lung's tissue incompressibility characterization for tumor motion modeling in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Samani, Abbas

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: A novel technique is proposed to characterize lung tissue incompressibility variation during respiration. Estimating lung tissue incompressibility parameter variations resulting from air content variation throughout respiration is critical for computer assisted tumor motion tracking. Continuous tumor motion is a major challenge in lung cancer radiotherapy, especially with external beam radiotherapy. If not accounted for, this motion may lead to areas of radiation overdosage for normal tissue. Given the unavailability of imaging modality that can be used effectively for real-time lung tumor tracking, computer assisted approach based on tissue deformation estimation can be a good alternative. This approach involves lung biomechanical model where its fidelity depends on input tissue properties. This investigation shows that considering variable tissue incompressibility parameter is very important for predicting tumor motion accurately, hence improving the lung radiotherapy outcome. Methods: First, an in silico lung phantom study was conducted to demonstrate the importance of employing variable Poisson's ratio for tumor motion predication. After it was established that modeling this variability is critical for accurate tumor motion prediction, an optimization based technique was developed to estimate lung tissue Poisson's ratio as a function of respiration cycle time. In this technique, the Poisson's ratio and lung pressure value were varied systematically until optimal values were obtained, leading to maximum similarity between acquired and simulated 4D CT lung images. This technique was applied in an ex vivo porcine lung study where simulated images were constructed using the end exhale CT image and deformation fields obtained from the lung's FE modeling of each respiration time increment. To model the tissue, linear elastic and Marlow hyperelastic material models in conjunction with variable Poisson's ratio were used. Results: The phantom study showed that

  20. Parabolic quantitative structure-activity relationships and photodynamic therapy: application of a three-compartment model with clearance to the in vivo quantitative structure-activity relationships of a congeneric series of pyropheophorbide derivatives used as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Potter, W R; Henderson, B W; Bellnier, D A; Pandey, R K; Vaughan, L A; Weishaupt, K R; Dougherty, T J

    1999-11-01

    An open three-compartment pharmacokinetic model was applied to the in vivo quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) data of a homologous series of pyropheophorbide photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). The physical model was a lipid compartment sandwiched between two identical aqueous compartments. The first compartment was assumed to clear irreversibly at a rate K0. The measured octanol-water partition coefficients, P(i) (where i is the number of carbons in the alkyl chain) and the clearance rate K0 determined the clearance kinetics of the drugs. Solving the coupled differential equations of the three-compartment model produced clearance kinetics for each of the sensitizers in each of the compartments. The third compartment was found to contain the target of PDT. This series of compounds is quite lipophilic. Therefore these drugs are found mainly in the second compartment. The drug level in the third compartment represents a small fraction of the tissue level and is thus not accessible to direct measurement by extraction. The second compartment of the model accurately predicted the clearance from the serum of mice of the hexyl ether of pyropheophorbide a, one member of this series of compounds. The diffusion and clearance rate constants were those found by fitting the pharmacokinetics of the third compartment to the QSAR data. This result validated the magnitude and mechanistic significance of the rate constants used to model the QSAR data. The PDT response to dose theory was applied to the kinetic behavior of the target compartment drug concentration. This produced a pharmacokinetic-based function connecting PDT response to dose as a function of time postinjection. This mechanistic dose-response function was fitted to published, single time point QSAR data for the pheophorbides. As a result, the PDT target threshold dose together with the predicted QSAR as a function of time postinjection was found.

  1. Role of GADD45a in murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Biji; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Sammani, Saad; Epshtein, Yulia; Sharma, Rajesh; Smith, Brett D; Mitra, Sumegha; Desai, Ankit A; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Garcia, Joe G N; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2015-12-15

    We previously reported protective effects of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 45 alpha) in murine ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) via effects on Akt-mediated endothelial cell signaling. In the present study we investigated the role of GADD45a in separate murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Initial studies of wild-type mice subjected to single-dose thoracic radiation (10 Gy) confirmed a significant increase in lung GADD45a expression within 24 h and persistent at 6 wk. Mice deficient in GADD45a (GADD45a(-/-)) demonstrated increased susceptibility to radiation-induced lung injury (RILI, 10 Gy) evidenced by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid total cell counts, protein and albumin levels, and levels of inflammatory cytokines compared with RILI-challenged wild-type animals at 2 and 4 wk. Furthermore, GADD45a(-/-) mice had decreased total and phosphorylated lung Akt levels both at baseline and 6 wk after RILI challenge relative to wild-type mice while increased RILI susceptibility was observed in both Akt(+/-) mice and mice treated with an Akt inhibitor beginning 1 wk prior to irradiation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active Akt1 transgene reversed RILI-susceptibility in GADD45a(-/-) mice. In separate studies, lung fibrotic changes 2 wk after treatment with bleomycin (0.25 U/kg IT) was significantly increased in GADD45a(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice assessed by lung collagen content and histology. These data implicate GADD45a as an important modulator of lung inflammatory responses across different injury models and highlight GADD45a-mediated signaling as a novel target in inflammatory lung injury clinically.

  2. Early recognition of lung cancer by integrin targeted imaging in K-ras mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ermolayev, Vladimir; Mohajerani, Pouyan; Ale, Angelique; Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; Aichler, Michaela; Kayser, Gian; Walch, Axel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-09-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer is characterized by slow progression and high heterogeneity of tumors. Integrins play an important role in lung cancer development and metastasis and were suggested as a tumor marker; however their role in anticancer therapy remains controversial. In this work, we demonstrate the potential of integrin-targeted imaging to recognize early lesions in transgenic mouse model of lung cancer based on spontaneous introduction of mutated human gene bearing K-ras mutation. We conducted ex vivo and fluorescence molecular tomography-X-ray computed tomography (FMT-XCT) in vivo imaging and analysis for specific targeting of early lung lesions and tumors in rodent preclinical model for lung cancer. The lesions and tumors were characterized by histology, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry using a panel of cancer markers. Ex vivo, the integrin-targeted fluorescent signal significantly differed between wild type lung tissue and K-ras pulmonary lesions (PL) at all ages studied. The panel of immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated that PL, which only partially show cancer cell features were detected by αvβ3-integrin targeted imaging. Human patient material analysis confirmed the specificity of target localization in different lung cancer types. Most importantly, small tumors in the lungs of 4-week-old animals could be noninvasively detected in vivo on the fluorescence channel of FMT-XCT. Our findings demonstrated αvβ3-integrin targeted fluorescent imaging to specifically detect premalignant pleural lesions in K-ras mice. Integrin targeted imaging may find application areas in preclinical research and clinical practice, such as early lung cancer diagnostics, intraoperative assistance or therapy monitoring.

  3. A Highly Efficient Gene Expression Programming (GEP) Model for Auxiliary Diagnosis of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hongzong; Liu, Shihai; Li, Xianchao; Gao, Caihong; Cui, Lianhua; Li, Chuan; Yang, Xue; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is an important and common cancer that constitutes a major public health problem, but early detection of small cell lung cancer can significantly improve the survival rate of cancer patients. A number of serum biomarkers have been used in the diagnosis of lung cancers; however, they exhibit low sensitivity and specificity. Methods We used biochemical methods to measure blood levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), Na+, Cl-, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in 145 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients and 155 non-small cell lung cancer and 155 normal controls. A gene expression programming (GEP) model and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves incorporating these biomarkers was developed for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. Results After appropriate modification of the parameters, the GEP model was initially set up based on a training set of 115 SCLC patients and 125 normal controls for GEP model generation. Then the GEP was applied to the remaining 60 subjects (the test set) for model validation. GEP successfully discriminated 281 out of 300 cases, showing a correct classification rate for lung cancer patients of 93.75% (225/240) and 93.33% (56/60) for the training and test sets, respectively. Another GEP model incorporating four biomarkers, including CEA, NSE, LDH, and CRP, exhibited slightly lower detection sensitivity than the GEP model, including six biomarkers. We repeat the models on artificial neural network (ANN), and our results showed that the accuracy of GEP models were higher than that in ANN. GEP model incorporating six serum biomarkers performed by NSCLC patients and normal controls showed low accuracy than SCLC patients and was enough to prove that the GEP model is suitable for the SCLC patients. Conclusion We have developed a GEP model with high sensitivity and specificity for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. This GEP model has the potential for the wide use

  4. Model-based risk assessment for motion effects in 3D radiotherapy of lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, René; Ehrhardt, Jan; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Although 4D CT imaging becomes available in an increasing number of radiotherapy facilities, 3D imaging and planning is still standard in current clinical practice. In particular for lung tumors, respiratory motion is a known source of uncertainty and should be accounted for during radiotherapy planning - which is difficult by using only a 3D planning CT. In this contribution, we propose applying a statistical lung motion model to predict patients' motion patterns and to estimate dosimetric motion effects in lung tumor radiotherapy if only 3D images are available. Being generated based on 4D CT images of patients with unimpaired lung motion, the model tends to overestimate lung tumor motion. It therefore promises conservative risk assessment regarding tumor dose coverage. This is exemplarily evaluated using treatment plans of lung tumor patients with different tumor motion patterns and for two treatment modalities (conventional 3D conformal radiotherapy and step-&- shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy). For the test cases, 4D CT images are available. Thus, also a standard registration-based 4D dose calculation is performed, which serves as reference to judge plausibility of the modelbased 4D dose calculation. It will be shown that, if combined with an additional simple patient-specific breathing surrogate measurement (here: spirometry), the model-based dose calculation provides reasonable risk assessment of respiratory motion effects.

  5. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  6. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk. PMID:27345200

  7. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  8. Effect of adrenergic stimulation on clearance from small ciliated airways in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Svartengren, K; Philipson, K; Svartengren, M; Camner, P

    1998-01-01

    Mucociliary transport is an important clearance mechanism of larger airways, but in the smallest ciliated airways (bronchioles) it may be less effective. The present study aimed at investigating whether clearance from the bronchioles in subjects with healthy airways was stimulated by an adrenergic agonist (terbutaline sulphate). Tracheobronchial clearance was studied twice in 10 healthy subjects after inhalation of 6-micron (aerodynamic diameter) monodisperse Teflon particles labeled with 111In. At one exposure, oral treatment with terbutaline sulphate, known to stimulate clearance in large airways, began immediately after inhalation of the particles. The other exposure was a control measurement. The particles were inhaled at an extremely slow flow, 0.05 L/s, which gave deposition mainly in the small ciliated airways (bronchioles). Lung retention was measured at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h. Clearance was significant every 24 h for both exposures (p < .05, two-tailed paired t-test), with similar fractions of retained particles at all time points. During treatment with terbutaline sulphate, the subjects' pulse rates tended to be higher, but clearance rates did not increase. We found, as expected, no significant correlation between lung retention and lung function in either exposure. This study shows that an adrenergic agonist does not significantly influence overall clearance from the bronchiolar region in healthy subjects. This suggests that mucociliary transport does not significantly contribute to clearance from the smallest ciliated airways. Other mechanisms may be more important for the transportation of mucus from these airways. PMID:9555573

  9. The MGH-HMS Lung Cancer Policy Model: Tobacco Control versus Screening

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Pamela M.; Kong, Chung Yin; Johnson, Bruce E.; Weinstein, Milton C.; Weeks, Jane C.; Tramontano, Angela C.; Cipriano, Lauren E.; Bouzan, Colleen; Gazelle, G. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background The natural history model underlying the MGH Lung Cancer Policy Model (LCPM) does not include the two-stage clonal expansion model employed in other CISNET lung models. We used the LCPM to predict numbers of U.S. lung cancer deaths for ages 30–84 between 1975 and 2000 under 4 scenarios as part of the comparative modeling analysis described in this monograph. Methods The LCPM is a comprehensive microsimulation model of lung cancer development, progression, detection, treatment, and survival. Individual-level patient histories are aggregated to estimate cohort or population-level outcomes. Lung cancer states are defined according to underlying disease variables, test results, and clinical events. By simulating detailed clinical procedures, the LCPM can predict benefits and harms attributable to a variety of patient management practices, including annual screening programs. Results Under the scenario of observed smoking patterns, predicted numbers of deaths from the calibrated LCPM were within 2% of observed over all years (1975–2000). The LCPM estimated that historical tobacco control policies achieved 28.6% (25.2% in men, 30.5% in women) of the potential reduction in U.S. lung cancer deaths had smoking had been eliminated entirely. The hypothetical adoption in 1975 of annual helical CT screening of all persons aged 55–74 with at least 30 pack-years of cigarette exposure to historical tobacco control would have yielded a proportion realized of 39.0% (42.0% in men, 33.3% in women). Conclusions The adoption of annual screening would have prevented less than half as many lung cancer deaths as the elimination of cigarette smoking. PMID:22882882

  10. HOSVD-Based 3D Active Appearance Model: Segmentation of Lung Fields in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhu; Kang, Wanjun; Hu, Haihui; Wang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    An Active Appearance Model (AAM) is a computer vision model which can be used to effectively segment lung fields in CT images. However, the fitting result is often inadequate when the lungs are affected by high-density pathologies. To overcome this problem, we propose a Higher-order Singular Value Decomposition (HOSVD)-based Three-dimensional (3D) AAM. An evaluation was performed on 310 diseased lungs form the Lung Image Database Consortium Image Collection. Other contemporary AAMs operate directly on patterns represented by vectors, i.e., before applying the AAM to a 3D lung volume,it has to be vectorized first into a vector pattern by some technique like concatenation. However, some implicit structural or local contextual information may be lost in this transformation. According to the nature of the 3D lung volume, HOSVD is introduced to represent and process the lung in tensor space. Our method can not only directly operate on the original 3D tensor patterns, but also efficiently reduce the computer memory usage. The evaluation resulted in an average Dice coefficient of 97.0 % ± 0.59 %, a mean absolute surface distance error of 1.0403 ± 0.5716 mm, a mean border positioning errors of 0.9187 ± 0.5381 pixel, and a Hausdorff Distance of 20.4064 ± 4.3855, respectively. Experimental results showed that our methods delivered significant and better segmentation results, compared with the three other model-based lung segmentation approaches, namely 3D Snake, 3D ASM and 3D AAM. PMID:27277277

  11. Early Impairment of Lung Mechanics in a Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, Juan J.; Meirelles, Thayna; Gorbenko del Blanco, Darya; Nonaka, Paula N.; Campillo, Noelia; Sarri, Elisabet; Navajas, Daniel; Egea, Gustavo; Farré, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Early morbidity and mortality in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) -a connective tissue disease caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 gene- are mainly caused by aorta aneurysm and rupture. However, the increase in the life expectancy of MFS patients recently achieved by reparatory surgery promotes clinical manifestations in other organs. Although some studies have reported respiratory alterations in MFS, our knowledge of how this connective tissue disease modifies lung mechanics is scarce. Hence, we assessed whether the stiffness of the whole lung and of its extracellular matrix (ECM) is affected in a well-characterized MFS mouse model (FBN1C1039G/+). The stiffness of the whole lung and of its ECM were measured by conventional mechanical ventilation and atomic force microscopy, respectively. We studied 5-week and 9-month old mice, whose ages are representative of early and late stages of the disease. At both ages, the lungs of MFS mice were significantly more compliant than in wild type (WT) mice. By contrast, no significant differences were found in local lung ECM stiffness. Moreover, histopathological lung evaluation showed a clear emphysematous-like pattern in MFS mice since alveolar space enlargement was significantly increased compared with WT mice. These data suggest that the mechanism explaining the increased lung compliance in MFS is not a direct consequence of reduced ECM stiffness, but an emphysema-like alteration in the 3D structural organization of the lung. Since lung alterations in MFS are almost fully manifested at an early age, it is suggested that respiratory monitoring could provide early biomarkers for diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with the Marfan syndrome. PMID:27003297

  12. Early Impairment of Lung Mechanics in a Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Juan J; Meirelles, Thayna; Gorbenko Del Blanco, Darya; Nonaka, Paula N; Campillo, Noelia; Sarri, Elisabet; Navajas, Daniel; Egea, Gustavo; Farré, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Early morbidity and mortality in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) -a connective tissue disease caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 gene- are mainly caused by aorta aneurysm and rupture. However, the increase in the life expectancy of MFS patients recently achieved by reparatory surgery promotes clinical manifestations in other organs. Although some studies have reported respiratory alterations in MFS, our knowledge of how this connective tissue disease modifies lung mechanics is scarce. Hence, we assessed whether the stiffness of the whole lung and of its extracellular matrix (ECM) is affected in a well-characterized MFS mouse model (FBN1C1039G/+). The stiffness of the whole lung and of its ECM were measured by conventional mechanical ventilation and atomic force microscopy, respectively. We studied 5-week and 9-month old mice, whose ages are representative of early and late stages of the disease. At both ages, the lungs of MFS mice were significantly more compliant than in wild type (WT) mice. By contrast, no significant differences were found in local lung ECM stiffness. Moreover, histopathological lung evaluation showed a clear emphysematous-like pattern in MFS mice since alveolar space enlargement was significantly increased compared with WT mice. These data suggest that the mechanism explaining the increased lung compliance in MFS is not a direct consequence of reduced ECM stiffness, but an emphysema-like alteration in the 3D structural organization of the lung. Since lung alterations in MFS are almost fully manifested at an early age, it is suggested that respiratory monitoring could provide early biomarkers for diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with the Marfan syndrome. PMID:27003297

  13. 24 CFR 3285.305 - Clearance under homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clearance under homes. 3285.305 Section 3285.305 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Foundations § 3285.305 Clearance...

  14. Inhibiting Integrin αvβ5 Reduces Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in an Orthotopic Lung Transplant Model in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mallavia, B; Liu, F; Sheppard, D; Looney, M R

    2016-04-01

    Primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the immediate posttransplant period and is characterized by endothelial and epithelial barrier disruption and the leakage of protein-rich edema fluid. Integrins are cell surface receptors that have an important role in maintenance of the cell barrier, and inhibition of integrins, such as αvβ5, can diminish alveolar flooding in lung injury models. We hypothesized that inhibition of αvβ5 during donor lung cold ischemia would reduce endothelial permeability during reperfusion. Using an orthotopic single lung transplantation model with and without cold ischemia, donor lungs were perfused with αvβ5-blocking antibody (ALULA) or control antibody at the time of collection, followed by transplantation, 8 h of reperfusion, and the measurement of lung injury parameters. Prolonged cold ischemia (18 h) produced increases in extravascular lung water, protein permeability, and neutrophilic alveolitis and decreased oxygenation compared with lungs without cold ischemia. Perfusion of lungs with αvβ5 antibody versus control antibody protected donor lungs from injury and significantly improved oxygenation. In summary, αvβ5 integrin blockade protects from the development of ischemia-reperfusion lung injury and is a promising approach to preventing primary graft dysfunction in human lung transplant procedures.

  15. Site clearance working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana continue to be areas with a high level of facility removal, and the pace of removal is projected to increase. Regulations were promulgated for the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana requiring that abandoned sites be cleared of debris that could interfere with fishing and shrimping activities. The site clearance regulations also required verification that the sites were clear. Additionally, government programs were established to compensate fishermen for losses associated with snagging their equipment on oil and gas related objects that remained on the water bottoms in areas other than active producing sites and sites that had been verified as clear of obstructions and snags. The oil and gas industry funds the compensation programs. This paper reviews the regulations and evolving operating practices in the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana where site clearance and fisherman`s gear compensation regulations have been in place for a number of years. Although regulations and guidelines may be in place elsewhere in the world, this paper focuses on the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana. Workshop participants are encouraged to bring up international issues during the course of the workshop. Additionally, this paper raises questions and focuses on issues that are of concern to the various Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana water surface and water bottom stakeholders. This paper does not have answers to the questions or issues. During the workshop participants will debate the questions and issues in an attempt to develop consensus opinions and/or make suggestions that can be provided to the appropriate organizations, both private and government, for possible future research or policy adjustments. Site clearance and facility removal are different activities. Facility removal deals with removal of the structures used to produce oil and gas including platforms, wells, casing, piles, pipelines, well protection structures, etc.

  16. Lung nodule segmentation and recognition using SVM classifier and active contour modeling: a complete intelligent system.

    PubMed

    Keshani, Mohsen; Azimifar, Zohreh; Tajeripour, Farshad; Boostani, Reza

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a novel method for lung nodule detection, segmentation and recognition using computed tomography (CT) images is presented. Our contribution consists of several steps. First, the lung area is segmented by active contour modeling followed by some masking techniques to transfer non-isolated nodules into isolated ones. Then, nodules are detected by the support vector machine (SVM) classifier using efficient 2D stochastic and 3D anatomical features. Contours of detected nodules are then extracted by active contour modeling. In this step all solid and cavitary nodules are accurately segmented. Finally, lung tissues are classified into four classes: namely lung wall, parenchyma, bronchioles and nodules. This classification helps us to distinguish a nodule connected to the lung wall and/or bronchioles (attached nodule) from the one covered by parenchyma (solitary nodule). At the end, performance of our proposed method is examined and compared with other efficient methods through experiments using clinical CT images and two groups of public datasets from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and ANODE09. Solid, non-solid and cavitary nodules are detected with an overall detection rate of 89%; the number of false positive is 7.3/scan and the location of all detected nodules are recognized correctly. PMID:23369568

  17. Comparing histone deacetylase inhibitor responses in genetically engineered mouse lung cancer models and a window of opportunity trial in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian; Galimberti, Fabrizio; Erkmen, Cherie P; Memoli, Vincent; Chinyengetere, Fadzai; Sempere, Lorenzo; Beumer, Jan H; Anyang, Bean N; Nugent, William; Johnstone, David; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Kurie, Jonathan M; Li, Hua; Direnzo, James; Guo, Yongli; Freemantle, Sarah J; Dragnev, Konstantin H; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2013-08-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi; vorinostat) responses were studied in murine and human lung cancer cell lines and genetically engineered mouse lung cancer models. Findings were compared with a window of opportunity trial in aerodigestive tract cancers. In human (HOP62, H522, and H23) and murine transgenic (ED-1, ED-2, LKR-13, and 393P, driven, respectively, by cyclin E, degradation-resistant cyclin E, KRAS, or KRAS/p53) lung cancer cell lines, vorinostat reduced growth, cyclin D1, and cyclin E levels, but induced p27, histone acetylation, and apoptosis. Other biomarkers also changed. Findings from transgenic murine lung cancer models were integrated with those from a window of opportunity trial that measured vorinostat pharmacodynamic responses in pre- versus posttreatment tumor biopsies. Vorinostat repressed cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression in murine transgenic lung cancers and significantly reduced lung cancers in syngeneic mice. Vorinostat also reduced cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, but increased p27 levels in post- versus pretreatment human lung cancer biopsies. Notably, necrotic and inflammatory responses appeared in posttreatment biopsies. These depended on intratumoral HDACi levels. Therefore, HDACi treatments of murine genetically engineered lung cancer models exert similar responses (growth inhibition and changes in gene expression) as observed in lung cancer cell lines. Moreover, enhanced pharmacodynamic responses occurred in the window of opportunity trial, providing additional markers of response that can be evaluated in subsequent HDACi trials. Thus, combining murine and human HDACi trials is a strategy to translate preclinical HDACi treatment outcomes into the clinic. This study uncovered clinically tractable mechanisms to engage in future HDACi trials.

  18. A novel dual ex vivo lung perfusion technique improves immediate outcomes in an experimental model of lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Noda, K; Isse, K; Tobita, K; Maniwa, Y; Bhama, J K; D'Cunha, J; Bermudez, C A; Luketich, J D; Shigemura, N

    2015-05-01

    The lungs are dually perfused by the pulmonary artery and the bronchial arteries. This study aimed to test the feasibility of dual-perfusion techniques with the bronchial artery circulation and pulmonary artery circulation synchronously perfused using ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) and evaluate the effects of dual-perfusion on posttransplant lung graft function. Using rat heart-lung blocks, we developed a dual-perfusion EVLP circuit (dual-EVLP), and compared cellular metabolism, expression of inflammatory mediators, and posttransplant graft function in lung allografts maintained with dual-EVLP, standard-EVLP, or cold static preservation. The microvasculature in lung grafts after transplant was objectively evaluated using microcomputed tomography angiography. Lung grafts subjected to dual-EVLP exhibited significantly better lung graft function with reduced proinflammatory profiles and more mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to better posttransplant function and compliance, as compared with standard-EVLP or static cold preservation. Interestingly, lung grafts maintained on dual-EVLP exhibited remarkably increased microvasculature and perfusion as compared with lungs maintained on standard-EVLP. Our results suggest that lung grafts can be perfused and preserved using dual-perfusion EVLP techniques that contribute to better graft function by reducing proinflammatory profiles and activating mitochondrial respiration. Dual-EVLP also yields better posttransplant graft function through increased microvasculature and better perfusion of the lung grafts after transplantation.

  19. Colchicine clearance is impaired in alcoholic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Leighton, J A; Bay, M K; Maldonado, A L; Schenker, S; Speeg, K V

    1991-12-01

    Colchicine may have benefit in primary biliary cirrhosis and alcoholic liver disease. It is currently used in patients with impaired liver function, yet little is known about its elimination in such patients. Colchicine clearance in the rat is significantly impaired in various models of liver disease. To study this in human beings, colchicine pharmacokinetics were compared in normal subjects and patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. Colchicine clearance was impaired in the cirrhotic patients. Normal subjects had a mean clearance of 10.65 +/- 1.82 ml/min.kg, whereas cirrhotic patients had a mean clearance of 4.22 +/- 0.45 ml/min.kg (p less than 0.01). The half-life was 57.4 +/- 14.2 min in control subjects vs. 114.4 +/- 19.7 min in cirrhotic patients (p = 0.054). Volume of distribution was not different in the two groups (0.718 +/- 0.1 L/kg in control subjects; 0.716 +/- 0.158 L/kg in cirrhotic patients, p greater than 0.99). No correlation was seen between colchicine clearance and bilirubin, albumin, prothrombin time or Child-Pugh classification, but this may be the result of the small number of patients studied. Based on the values measured, it is estimated that colchicine steady state would change from an average 1.12 ng/ml in normal individuals to 2.82 ng/ml in the cirrhotic patients if 0.6 mg were taken every 12 hr. It is unknown whether this change would be clinically significant. These data show that cirrhosis impairs colchicine clearance and demonstrates that the liver is a major route of colchicine elimination.

  20. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Loyd, J.E.; Bolds, J.M.; Wickersham, N.; Malcolm, A.W.; Brigham, K.L.

    1988-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H/sub 2/O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep.

  1. A Method for Lung Boundary Correction Using Split Bregman Method and Geometric Active Contour Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianxun; Liang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In order to get the extracted lung region from CT images more accurately, a model that contains lung region extraction and edge boundary correction is proposed. Firstly, a new edge detection function is presented with the help of the classic structure tensor theory. Secondly, the initial lung mask is automatically extracted by an improved active contour model which combines the global intensity information, local intensity information, the new edge information, and an adaptive weight. It is worth noting that the objective function of the improved model is converted to a convex model, which makes the proposed model get the global minimum. Then, the central airway was excluded according to the spatial context messages and the position relationship between every segmented region and the rib. Thirdly, a mesh and the fractal theory are used to detect the boundary that surrounds the juxtapleural nodule. Finally, the geometric active contour model is employed to correct the detected boundary and reinclude juxtapleural nodules. We also evaluated the performance of the proposed segmentation and correction model by comparing with their popular counterparts. Efficient computing capability and robustness property prove that our model can correct the lung boundary reliably and reproducibly. PMID:26089976

  2. A Method for Lung Boundary Correction Using Split Bregman Method and Geometric Active Contour Model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Changli; Zhang, Jianxun; Liang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In order to get the extracted lung region from CT images more accurately, a model that contains lung region extraction and edge boundary correction is proposed. Firstly, a new edge detection function is presented with the help of the classic structure tensor theory. Secondly, the initial lung mask is automatically extracted by an improved active contour model which combines the global intensity information, local intensity information, the new edge information, and an adaptive weight. It is worth noting that the objective function of the improved model is converted to a convex model, which makes the proposed model get the global minimum. Then, the central airway was excluded according to the spatial context messages and the position relationship between every segmented region and the rib. Thirdly, a mesh and the fractal theory are used to detect the boundary that surrounds the juxtapleural nodule. Finally, the geometric active contour model is employed to correct the detected boundary and reinclude juxtapleural nodules. We also evaluated the performance of the proposed segmentation and correction model by comparing with their popular counterparts. Efficient computing capability and robustness property prove that our model can correct the lung boundary reliably and reproducibly. PMID:26089976

  3. Characterization of free breathing patterns with 5D lung motion model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Tianyu; Lu Wei; Yang Deshan; Mutic, Sasa; Noel, Camille E.; Parikh, Parag J.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the quiet respiration breathing motion model parameters for lung cancer and nonlung cancer patients. Methods: 49 free breathing patient 4DCT image datasets (25 scans, cine mode) were collected with simultaneous quantitative spirometry. A cross-correlation registration technique was employed to track the lung tissue motion between scans. The registration results were applied to a lung motion model: X-vector=X-vector{sub 0}+{alpha}-vector{beta}-vector f, where X-vector is the position of a piece of tissue located at reference position X-vector{sub 0} during a reference breathing phase (zero tidal volume v, zero airflow f). {alpha}-vector is a parameter that characterizes the motion due to air filling (motion as a function of tidal volume v) and {beta}-vector is the parameter that accounts for the motion due to the imbalance of dynamical stress distributions during inspiration and exhalation that causes lung motion hysteresis (motion as a function of airflow f). The parameters {alpha}-vector and {beta}-vector together provide a quantitative characterization of breathing motion that inherently includes the complex hysteresis interplay. The {alpha}-vector and {beta}-vector distributions were examined for each patient to determine overall general patterns and interpatient pattern variations. Results: For 44 patients, the greatest values of |{alpha}-vector| were observed in the inferior and posterior lungs. For the rest of the patients, |{alpha}-vector| reached its maximum in the anterior lung in three patients and the lateral lung in two patients. The hysteresis motion {beta}-vector had greater variability, but for the majority of patients, |{beta}-vector| was largest in the lateral lungs. Conclusions: This is the first report of the three-dimensional breathing motion model parameters for a large cohort of patients. The model has the potential for noninvasively predicting lung motion. The majority of patients exhibited similar |{alpha}-vector| maps

  4. Mouse models of human non-small-cell lung cancer: raising the bar.

    PubMed

    Kim, C F B; Jackson, E L; Kirsch, D G; Grimm, J; Shaw, A T; Lane, K; Kissil, J; Olive, K P; Sweet-Cordero, A; Weissleder, R; Jacks, T

    2005-01-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease that presents a challenge to basic research to provide new steps toward therapeutic advances. The cell-type-specific responses to oncogenic mutations that initiate and regulate lung cancer remain poorly defined. A better understanding of the relevant signaling pathways and mechanisms that control therapeutic outcome could also provide new insight. Improved conditional mouse models are now available as tools to improve the understanding of the cellular and molecular origins of adenocarcinoma. These models have already proven their utility in proof-of-principle experiments with new technologies including genomics and imaging. Integrated thinking to apply technological advances while using the appropriate mouse model is likely to facilitate discoveries that will significantly improve lung cancer detection and intervention.

  5. Paracrine Factors of Multipotent Stromal Cells Ameliorate Lung Injury in an Elastase-induced Emphysema Model

    PubMed Central

    Katsha, Ahmed M; Ohkouchi, Shinya; Xin, Hong; Kanehira, Masahiko; Sun, Ruowen; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Saijo, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) ameliorate several types of lung injury. The differentiation of MSCs into specific cells at the injury site has been considered as the important process in the MSC effect. However, although MSCs reduce destruction in an elastase-induced lung emphysema model, MSC differentiation is relatively rare, suggesting that MSC differentiation into specific cells does not adequately explain the recuperation observed. Humoral factors secreted by MSCs may also play an important role in ameliorating emphysema. To confirm this hypothesis, emphysema was induced in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice by intratracheal elastase injection 14 days before intratracheal MSC or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) administration. Thereafter, lungs were collected at several time points and evaluated. Our results showed that MSCs reduced the destruction in elastase-induced emphysema. Furthermore, double immunofluorescence staining revealed infrequent MSC engraftment and differentiation into epithelial cells. Real-time PCR showed increased levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Real-time PCR and western blotting showed enhanced production of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in the lung. In-vitro coculture studies confirmed the in vivo observations. Our findings suggest that paracrine factors derived from MSCs is the main mechanism for the protection of lung tissues from elastase injury. PMID:20842104

  6. Early coagulation events induce acute lung injury in a rat model of blunt traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hideki; Donahue, Deborah L; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2016-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic coagulopathy are serious complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that frequently lead to poor clinical outcomes. Although the release of tissue factor (TF), a potent initiator of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation, from the injured brain is thought to play a key role in coagulopathy after TBI, its function in ALI following TBI remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether the systemic appearance of TF correlated with the ensuing coagulopathy that follows TBI in ALI using an anesthetized rat blunt trauma TBI model. Blood and lung samples were obtained after TBI. Compared with controls, pulmonary edema and increased pulmonary permeability were observed as early as 5 min after TBI without evidence of norepinephrine involvement. Systemic TF increased at 5 min and then diminished 60 min after TBI. Lung injury and alveolar hemorrhaging were also observed as early as 5 min after TBI. A biphasic elevation of TF was observed in the lungs after TBI, and TF-positive microparticles (MPs) were detected in the alveolar spaces. Fibrin(ogen) deposition was also observed in the lungs within 60 min after TBI. Additionally, preadministration of a direct thrombin inhibitor, Refludan, attenuated lung injuries, thus implicating thrombin as a direct participant in ALI after TBI. The results from this study demonstrated that enhanced systemic TF may be an initiator of coagulation activation that contributes to ALI after TBI. PMID:27190065

  7. Lung tumor promotion by chromium-containing welding particulate matter in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiology suggests that occupational exposure to welding particulate matter (PM) may increase lung cancer risk. However, animal studies are lacking to conclusively link welding with an increased risk. PM derived from stainless steel (SS) welding contains carcinogenic metals such as hexavalent chromium and nickel. We hypothesized that welding PM may act as a tumor promoter and increase lung tumor multiplicity in vivo. Therefore, the capacity of chromium-containing gas metal arc (GMA)-SS welding PM to promote lung tumors was evaluated using a two-stage (initiation-promotion) model in lung tumor susceptible A/J mice. Methods Male mice (n = 28-30/group) were treated either with the initiator 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA;10 μg/g; IP) or vehicle (corn oil) followed by 5 weekly pharyngeal aspirations of GMA-SS (340 or 680 μg/exposure) or PBS. Lung tumors were enumerated at 30 weeks post-initiation. Results MCA initiation followed by GMA-SS welding PM exposure promoted tumor multiplicity in both the low (12.1 ± 1.5 tumors/mouse) and high (14.0 ± 1.8 tumors/mouse) exposure groups significantly above MCA/sham (4.77 ± 0.7 tumors/mouse; p = 0.0001). Multiplicity was also highly significant (p < 0.004) across all individual lung regions of GMA-SS-exposed mice. No exposure effects were found in the corn oil groups at 30 weeks. Histopathology confirmed the gross findings and revealed increased inflammation and a greater number of malignant lesions in the MCA/welding PM-exposed groups. Conclusions GMA-SS welding PM acts as a lung tumor promoter in vivo. Thus, this study provides animal evidence to support the epidemiological data that show welders have an increased lung cancer risk. PMID:24107379

  8. Method of Isolated Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in a Rat Model: Lessons Learned from Developing a Rat EVLP Program

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Eren, Emre; Spata, Tyler; Tadres, Malak; Hayes,, Don; Black, Sylvester M.

    2015-01-01

    The number of acceptable donor lungs available for lung transplantation is severely limited due to poor quality. Ex-Vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP) has allowed lung transplantation in humans to become more readily available by enabling the ability to assess organs and expand the donor pool. As this technology expands and improves, the ability to potentially evaluate and improve the quality of substandard lungs prior to transplant is a critical need. In order to more rigorously evaluate these approaches, a reproducible animal model needs to be established that would allow for testing of improved techniques and management of the donated lungs as well as to the lung-transplant recipient. In addition, an EVLP animal model of associated pathologies, e.g., ventilation induced lung injury (VILI), would provide a novel method to evaluate treatments for these pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a rat EVLP lung program and refinements to this method that allow for a reproducible model for future expansion. We also describe the application of this EVLP system to model VILI in rat lungs. The goal is to provide the research community with key information and “pearls of wisdom”/techniques that arose from trial and error and are critical to establishing an EVLP system that is robust and reproducible. PMID:25741794

  9. A Drosophila asthma model - what the fly tells us about inflammatory diseases of the lung.

    PubMed

    Roeder, Thomas; Isermann, Kerstin; Kallsen, Kim; Uliczka, Karin; Wagner, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Asthma and COPD are the most relevant inflammatory diseases of the airways. In western countries they show a steeply increasing prevalence, making them to a severe burden for health systems around the world. Although these diseases are typically complex ones, they have an important genetic component. Genome-wide association studies have provided us with a relatively small but comprehensive list of asthma susceptibility genes that will be extended and presumably completed in the near future. To identify the role of these genes in the physiology and pathophysiology of the lung, genetically tractable model organisms are indispensable and murine models were the only ones that have been extensively used. An urgent demand for complementary models is present that provide specific advantages lacking in murine models, especially regarding speed and flexibility. Among the model organisms available, only the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster shares a comparable organ composition and at least a lung equivalent. It has to be acknowledged that the fruit fly Drosophila has almost completely been ignored as a model organism for lung diseases, simply because it is devoid of lungs. Nevertheless, its airway system shows striking similarities with the one of mammals regarding its physiology and reaction towards pathogens, which holds the potential to function as a versatile model in asthma-related diseases.

  10. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Neelakkantan, Harini; Ruddy, Bari H.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  11. Integrated Turbine Tip Clearance and Gas Turbine Engine Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Kratz, Jonathan; Guo, Ten-Huei; Litt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gas turbine compressor and turbine blade tip clearance (i.e., the radial distance between the blade tip of an axial compressor or turbine and the containment structure) is a major contributing factor to gas path sealing, and can significantly affect engine efficiency and operational temperature. This paper details the creation of a generic but realistic high pressure turbine tip clearance model that may be used to facilitate active tip clearance control system research. This model uses a first principles approach to approximate thermal and mechanical deformations of the turbine system, taking into account the rotor, shroud, and blade tip components. Validation of the tip clearance model shows that the results are realistic and reflect values found in literature. In addition, this model has been integrated with a gas turbine engine simulation, creating a platform to explore engine performance as tip clearance is adjusted. Results from the integrated model explore the effects of tip clearance on engine operation and highlight advantages of tip clearance management.

  12. Turbomachinery Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Raymond E.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Aksit, Mahmut F.

    2007-01-01

    Controlling interface clearances is the most cost effective method of enhancing turbomachinery performance. Seals control turbomachinery leakages, coolant flows and contribute to overall system rotordynamic stability. In many instances, sealing interfaces and coatings are sacrificial, like lubricants, giving up their integrity for the benefit of the component. They are subjected to abrasion, erosion, oxidation, incursive rubs, foreign object damage (FOD) and deposits as well as extremes in thermal, mechanical, aerodynamic and impact loadings. Tribological pairing of materials control how well and how long these interfaces will be effective in controlling flow. A variety of seal types and materials are required to satisfy turbomachinery sealing demands. These seals must be properly designed to maintain the interface clearances. In some cases, this will mean machining adjacent surfaces, yet in many other applications, coatings are employed for optimum performance. Many seals are coating composites fabricated on superstructures or substrates that are coated with sacrificial materials which can be refurbished either in situ or by removal, stripping, recoating and replacing until substrate life is exceeded. For blade and knife tip sealing an important class of materials known as abradables permit blade or knife rubbing without significant damage or wear to the rotating element while maintaining an effective sealing interface. Most such tip interfaces are passive, yet some, as for the high-pressure turbine (HPT) case or shroud, are actively controlled. This work presents an overview of turbomachinery sealing. Areas covered include: characteristics of gas and steam turbine sealing applications and environments, benefits of sealing, types of standard static and dynamics seals, advanced seal designs, as well as life and limitations issues.

  13. Some Practical Payments Clearance Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumlander, Deniss

    The globalisation of corporations' operations has produced a huge volume of inter-company invoices. Optimisation of those known as payment clearance can produce a significant saving in costs associated with those transfers and handling. The paper revises some common and so practical approaches to the payment clearance problem and proposes some novel algorithms based on graphs theory and heuristic totals' distribution.

  14. A novel approach for global lung registration using 3D Markov-Gibbs appearance model.

    PubMed

    El-Baz, Ayman; Khalifa, Fahmi; Elnakib, Ahmed; Nitzken, Matthew; Soliman, Ahmed; McClure, Patrick; Abou El-Ghar, Mohamed; Gimel'farb, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    A new approach to align 3D CT data of a segmented lung object with a given prototype (reference lung object) using an affine transformation is proposed. Visual appearance of the lung from CT images, after equalizing their signals, is modeled with a new 3D Markov-Gibbs random field (MGRF) with pairwise interaction model. Similarity to the prototype is measured by a Gibbs energy of signal co-occurrences in a characteristic subset of voxel pairs derived automatically from the prototype. An object is aligned by an affine transformation maximizing the similarity by using an automatic initialization followed by a gradient search. Experiments confirm that our approach aligns complex objects better than popular conventional algorithms.

  15. Effect of air pollution on lung cancer: a Poisson regression model based on vital statistics.

    PubMed Central

    Tango, T

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a Poisson regression model for time trends of mortality to detect the long-term effects of common levels of air pollution on lung cancer, in which the adjustment for cigarette smoking is not always necessary. The main hypothesis to be tested in the model is that if the long-term and common-level air pollution had an effect on lung cancer, the death rate from lung cancer could be expected to increase gradually at a higher rate in the region with relatively high levels of air pollution than in the region with low levels, and that this trend would not be expected for other control diseases in which cigarette smoking is a risk factor. Using this approach, we analyzed the trend of mortality in females aged 40 to 79, from lung cancer and two control diseases, ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, based on vital statistics in 23 wards of the Tokyo metropolitan area for 1972 to 1988. Ward-specific mean levels per day of SO2 and NO2 from 1974 through 1976 estimated by Makino (1978) were used as the ward-specific exposure measure of air pollution. No data on tobacco consumption in each ward is available. Our analysis supported the existence of long-term effects of air pollution on lung cancer. PMID:7851329

  16. A novel telomerase activator suppresses lung damage in a murine model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Le Saux, Claude Jourdan; Davy, Philip; Brampton, Christopher; Ahuja, Seema S; Fauce, Steven; Shivshankar, Pooja; Nguyen, Hieu; Ramaseshan, Mahesh; Tressler, Robert; Pirot, Zhu; Harley, Calvin B; Allsopp, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of diseases associated with telomere dysfunction, including AIDS, aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis, has bolstered interest in telomerase activators. We report identification of a new small molecule activator, GRN510, with activity ex vivo and in vivo. Using a novel mouse model, we tested the potential of GRN510 to limit fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mTERT heterozygous mice. Treatment with GRN510 at 10 mg/kg/day activated telomerase 2-4 fold both in hematopoietic progenitors ex vivo and in bone marrow and lung tissue in vivo, respectively. Telomerase activation was countered by co-treatment with Imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor. In this model of bleomycin-induced fibrosis, treatment with GRN510 suppressed the development of fibrosis and accumulation of senescent cells in the lung via a mechanism dependent upon telomerase activation. Treatment of small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) or lung fibroblasts ex vivo with GRN510 revealed telomerase activating and replicative lifespan promoting effects only in the SAEC, suggesting that the mechanism accounting for the protective effects of GRN510 against induced lung fibrosis involves specific types of lung cells. Together, these results support the use of small molecule activators of telomerase in therapies to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  17. Comparing Benefits from Many Possible Computed Tomography Lung Cancer Screening Programs: Extrapolating from the National Lung Screening Trial Using Comparative Modeling

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Pamela M.; Meza, Rafael; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; Black, William C.; Tammemagi, C. Martin; Erdogan, Ayca; ten Haaf, Kevin; Hazelton, William; Holford, Theodore R.; Jeon, Jihyoun; Clarke, Lauren; Kong, Chung Yin; Choi, Sung Eun; Munshi, Vidit N.; Han, Summer S.; van Rosmalen, Joost; Pinsky, Paul F.; Moolgavkar, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that in current and former smokers aged 55 to 74 years, with at least 30 pack-years of cigarette smoking history and who had quit smoking no more than 15 years ago, 3 annual computed tomography (CT) screens reduced lung cancer-specific mortality by 20% relative to 3 annual chest X-ray screens. We compared the benefits achievable with 576 lung cancer screening programs that varied CT screen number and frequency, ages of screening, and eligibility based on smoking. Methods and Findings We used five independent microsimulation models with lung cancer natural history parameters previously calibrated to the NLST to simulate life histories of the US cohort born in 1950 under all 576 programs. ‘Efficient’ (within model) programs prevented the greatest number of lung cancer deaths, compared to no screening, for a given number of CT screens. Among 120 ‘consensus efficient’ (identified as efficient across models) programs, the average starting age was 55 years, the stopping age was 80 or 85 years, the average minimum pack-years was 27, and the maximum years since quitting was 20. Among consensus efficient programs, 11% to 40% of the cohort was screened, and 153 to 846 lung cancer deaths were averted per 100,000 people. In all models, annual screening based on age and smoking eligibility in NLST was not efficient; continuing screening to age 80 or 85 years was more efficient. Conclusions Consensus results from five models identified a set of efficient screening programs that include annual CT lung cancer screening using criteria like NLST eligibility but extended to older ages. Guidelines for screening should also consider harms of screening and individual patient characteristics. PMID:24979231

  18. Tracking boundary movement and exterior shape modelling in lung EIT imaging.

    PubMed

    Biguri, A; Grychtol, B; Adler, A; Soleimani, M

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has shown significant promise for lung imaging. One key challenge for EIT in this application is the movement of electrodes during breathing, which introduces artefacts in reconstructed images. Various approaches have been proposed to compensate for electrode movement, but no comparison of these approaches is available. This paper analyses boundary model mismatch and electrode movement in lung EIT. The aim is to evaluate the extent to which various algorithms tolerate movement, and to determine if a patient specific model is required for EIT lung imaging. Movement data are simulated from a CT-based model, and image analysis is performed using quantitative figures of merit. The electrode movement is modelled based on expected values of chest movement and an extended Jacobian method is proposed to make use of exterior boundary tracking. Results show that a dynamical boundary tracking is the most robust method against any movement, but is computationally more expensive. Simultaneous electrode movement and conductivity reconstruction algorithms show increased robustness compared to only conductivity reconstruction. The results of this comparative study can help develop a better understanding of the impact of shape model mismatch and electrode movement in lung EIT.

  19. Animal Models, Learning Lessons to Prevent and Treat Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a unique injury syndrome caused by prolonged injury and repair imposed on an immature and developing lung. The decreased septation and decreased microvascular development phenotype of BPD can be reproduced in newborn rodents with increased chronic oxygen exposure and in premature primates and sheep with oxygen and/or mechanical ventilation. The inflammation caused by oxidants, inflammatory agonists, and/or stretch injury from mechanical ventilation seems to promote the anatomic abnormalities. Multiple interventions targeted to specific inflammatory cells or pathways or targeted to decreasing ventilation-mediated injury can substantially prevent the anatomic changes associated with BPD in term rodents and in preterm sheep or primate models. Most of the anti-inflammatory therapies with benefit in animal models have not been tested clinically. None of the interventions that have been tested clinically are as effective as anticipated from the animal models. These inconsistencies in responses likely are explained by the antenatal differences in lung exposures of the developing animals relative to very preterm humans. The animals generally have normal lungs while the lungs of preterm infants are exposed variably to intrauterine inflammation, growth abnormalities, antenatal corticosteroids, and poorly understood effects from the causes of preterm delivery. The animal models have been essential for the definition of the mediators that can cause a BPD phenotype. These models will be necessary to develop and test future-targeted interventions to prevent and treat BPD. PMID:26301222

  20. Waste Segregation Based on Derived Clearance Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Garisto, N.C.; Parhizgari, Z.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the methodology and results of a radiological modeling in support of an application to release very low level radiologically contaminated waste from regulatory control and allow its haulage and disposal in a hazardous waste landfill. The Canadian regulatory body responsible for licensing operations involving nuclear materials (the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission), has not yet formally defined clearance levels for free release of low level radiologically contaminated waste. The IAEA clearance levels have been derived for certain situations and receptor characteristics, which might be too conservative for an actual case. A site-specific pathways analysis was therefore completed to define conditional clearance levels using the concept of de minimis dose limit. Derived Conditional Clearance Levels were calculated for each radionuclide based on the maximally exposed hypothetical individuals to determine whether each waste stream can be 'cleared' from regulatory controls. The results showed that haulage of the waste from the station to the haulage/processing facility and transportation of waste or sludge from the haulage/processing facility to the disposal facility, handling of the waste or sludge at the haulage/processing facility, and incineration and/or disposal of waste or sludge at the disposal facility would not expose the workers to doses above 0.1 {mu}Sv/yr., which is less than the de minimis dose limit of 10 {mu}Sv/yr. (authors)

  1. Lung-On-A-Chip Technologies for Disease Modeling and Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Dipasri; Devarasetty, Mahesh; Yildiz, Didem V.; Atala, Anthony; Murphy, Sean V.

    2016-01-01

    Animal and two-dimensional cell culture models have had a profound impact on not only lung research but also medical research at large, despite inherent flaws and differences when compared with in vivo and clinical observations. Three-dimensional (3D) tissue models are a natural progression and extension of existing techniques that seek to plug the gaps and mitigate the drawbacks of two-dimensional and animal technologies. In this review, we describe the transition of historic models to contemporary 3D cell and organoid models, the varieties of current 3D cell and tissue culture modalities, the common methods for imaging these models, and finally, the applications of these models and imaging techniques to lung research. PMID:27127414

  2. Redistribution of pulmonary blood flow impacts thermodilution-based extravascular lung water measurements in a model of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Easley, R. Blaine; Mulreany, Daniel G.; Lancaster, Christopher T.; Custer, Jason W.; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Simon, Brett A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies using transthoracic thermodilution have demonstrated increased extravascular lung water (EVLW) measurements attributed to progression of edema and flooding during sepsis and acute lung injury. We hypothesize that redistribution of pulmonary blood flow can cause increased apparent EVLW secondary to increased perfusion of thermally silent tissue, not increased lung edema. Methods Anesthetized, mechanically ventilated canines were instrumented with PiCCO® (Pulsion Medical, Munich, Germany) catheters and underwent lung injury by repetitive saline lavage. Hemodynamic and respiratory physiologic data were recorded. After stabilized lung injury, endotoxin was administered to inactivate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Computerized tomographic imaging was performed to quantify in vivo lung volume, total tissue (fluid) and air content, and regional distribution of blood flow. Results Lavage injury caused an increase in airway pressures and decreased arterial oxygen content with minimal hemodynamic effects. EVLW and shunt fraction increased after injury and then markedly following endotoxin administration. Computerized tomographic measurements quantified an endotoxin-induced increase in pulmonary blood flow to poorly aerated regions with no change in total lung tissue volume. Conclusions The abrupt increase in EVLW and shunt fraction after endotoxin administration is consistent with inactivation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased perfusion to already flooded lung regions that were previously thermally silent. Computerized tomographic studies further demonstrate in vivo alterations in regional blood flow (but not lung water) and account for these alterations in shunt fraction and EVLW. PMID:19809280

  3. Development of ferret as a human lung cancer model by injecting4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of new animal lung cancer models that are relevant to human lung carcinogenesis is important for lung cancer research. Previously we have shown the induction of lung tumor in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) exposed to both tobacco smoke and a tobacco carcinogen (4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino...

  4. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain

    PubMed Central

    Cevey, Ágata Carolina; Mirkin, Gerardo Ariel; Penas, Federico Nicolás; Goren, Nora Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl) due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE) of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE. PMID:26862474

  5. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain.

    PubMed

    Cevey, Ágata Carolina; Mirkin, Gerardo Ariel; Penas, Federico Nicolás; Goren, Nora Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl) due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE) of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE. PMID:26862474

  6. Transthyretin stabilization by iododiflunisal promotes amyloid-β peptide clearance, decreases its deposition, and ameliorates cognitive deficits in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carlos A; Oliveira, Sandra Marisa; Guido, Luis F; Magalhães, Ana; Valencia, Gregorio; Arsequell, Gemma; Saraiva, Maria João; Cardoso, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and now represents 50-70% of total dementia cases. Over the last two decades, transthyretin (TTR) has been associated with AD and, very recently, a novel concept of TTR stability has been established in vitro as a key factor in TTR/amyloid-β (Aβ) interaction. Small compounds, TTR stabilizers (usually non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs), bind to the thyroxine (T4) central binding channel, increasing TTR tetrameric stability and TTR/Aβ interaction. In this work, we evaluated in vivo the effects of one of the TTR stabilizers identified as improving TTR/Aβ interaction, iododiflunisal (IDIF), in Aβ deposition and other AD features, using AβPPswe/PS1A246E transgenic mice, either carrying two or just one copy of the TTR gene (AD/TTR+/+ or AD/TTR+/-, respectively), available and characterized in our laboratory. The results showed that IDIF administered orally bound TTR in plasma and stabilized the protein, as assessed by T4 displacement assays, and was able to enter the brain as revealed by mass spectrometry analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. TTR levels, both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, were not altered. In AD/TTR+/- mice, IDIF administration resulted not only in decreased brain Aβ levels and deposition but also in improved cognitive function associated with the AD-like neuropathology in this mouse model, although no improvements were detectable in the AD/TTR+/+ animals. Further, in AD/TTR+/- mice, Aβ levels were reduced in plasma suggesting TTR promoted Aβ clearance from the brain and from the periphery. Taken together, these results strengthen the importance of TTR stability in the design of therapeutic drugs, highlighting the capacity of IDIF to be used in AD treatment to prevent and to slow the progression of the disease. PMID:24169237

  7. Multi-Modal Imaging in a Mouse Model of Orthotopic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priya; Kato, Tatsuya; Ujiie, Hideki; Wada, Hironobu; Lee, Daiyoon; Hu, Hsin-pei; Hirohashi, Kentaro; Ahn, Jin Young; Zheng, Jinzi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigation of CF800, a novel PEGylated nano-liposomal imaging agent containing indocyanine green (ICG) and iohexol, for real-time near infrared (NIR) fluorescence and computed tomography (CT) image-guided surgery in an orthotopic lung cancer model in nude mice. Methods CF800 was intravenously administered into 13 mice bearing the H460 orthotopic human lung cancer. At 48 h post-injection (peak imaging agent accumulation time point), ex vivo NIR and CT imaging was performed. A clinical NIR imaging system (SPY®, Novadaq) was used to measure fluorescence intensity of tumor and lung. Tumor-to-background-ratios (TBR) were calculated in inflated and deflated states. The mean Hounsfield unit (HU) of lung tumor was quantified using the CT data set and a semi-automated threshold-based method. Histological evaluation using H&E, the macrophage marker F4/80 and the endothelial cell marker CD31, was performed, and compared to the liposomal fluorescence signal obtained from adjacent tissue sections Results The fluorescence TBR measured when the lung is in the inflated state (2.0 ± 0.58) was significantly greater than in the deflated state (1.42 ± 0.380 (n = 7, p<0.003). Mean fluorescent signal in tumor was highly variable across samples, (49.0 ± 18.8 AU). CT image analysis revealed greater contrast enhancement in lung tumors (a mean increase of 110 ± 57 HU) when CF800 is administered compared to the no contrast enhanced tumors (p = 0.0002). Conclusion Preliminary data suggests that the high fluorescence TBR and CT tumor contrast enhancement provided by CF800 may have clinical utility in localization of lung cancer during CT and NIR image-guided surgery. PMID:27584018

  8. Optimizing principal component models for representing interfraction variation in lung cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Badawi, Ahmed M.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Sleeman, William C. IV; Yan Chenyu; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To optimize modeling of interfractional anatomical variation during active breath-hold radiotherapy in lung cancer using principal component analysis (PCA). Methods: In 12 patients analyzed, weekly CT sessions consisting of three repeat intrafraction scans were acquired with active breathing control at the end of normal inspiration. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and lungs were delineated and reviewed on the first week image by physicians and propagated to all other images using deformable image registration. PCA was used to model the target and lung variability during treatment. Four PCA models were generated for each specific patient: (1) Individual models for the GTV and each lung from one image per week (week to week, W2W); (2) a W2W composite model of all structures; (3) individual models using all images (weekly plus repeat intrafraction images, allscans); and (4) composite model with all images. Models were reconstructed retrospectively (using all available images acquired) and prospectively (using only data acquired up to a time point during treatment). Dominant modes representing at least 95% of the total variability were used to reconstruct the observed anatomy. Residual reconstruction error between the model-reconstructed and observed anatomy was calculated to compare the accuracy of the models. Results: An average of 3.4 and 4.9 modes was required for the allscans models, for the GTV and composite models, respectively. The W2W model required one less mode in 40% of the patients. For the retrospective composite W2W model, the average reconstruction error was 0.7{+-}0.2 mm, which increased to 1.1{+-}0.5 mm when the allscans model was used. Individual and composite models did not have significantly different errors (p=0.15, paired t-test). The average reconstruction error for the prospective models of the GTV stabilized after four measurements at 1.2{+-}0.5 mm and for the composite model after five measurements at 0.8{+-}0.4 mm. Conclusions

  9. Quantifying lung morphology with respiratory-gated micro-CT in a murine model of emphysema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, N. L.; Martin, E. L.; Lewis, J. F.; Veldhuizen, R. A. W.; Holdsworth, D. W.; Drangova, M.

    2009-04-01

    Non-invasive micro-CT imaging techniques have been developed to investigate lung structure in free-breathing rodents. In this study, we investigate the utility of retrospectively respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging in an emphysema model to determine if anatomical changes could be observed in the image-derived quantitative analysis at two respiratory phases. The emphysema model chosen was a well-characterized, genetically altered model (TIMP-3 knockout mice) that exhibits a homogeneous phenotype. Micro-CT scans of the free-breathing, anaesthetized mice were obtained in 50 s and retrospectively respiratory sorted and reconstructed, providing 3D images representing peak inspiration and end expiration with 0.15 mm isotropic voxel spacing. Anatomical measurements included the volume and CT density of the lungs and the volume of the major airways, along with the diameters of the trachea, left bronchus and right bronchus. From these measurements, functional parameters such as functional residual capacity and tidal volume were calculated. Significant differences between the wild-type and TIMP-3 knockout groups were observed for measurements of CT density over the entire lung, indicating increased air content in the lungs of TIMP-3 knockout mice. These results demonstrate retrospective respiratory-gated micro-CT, providing images at multiple respiratory phases that can be analyzed quantitatively to investigate anatomical changes in murine models of emphysema.

  10. Optimal Determination of Respiratory Airflow Patterns Using a Nonlinear Multicompartment Model for a Lung Mechanics System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hancao; Haddad, Wassim M.

    2012-01-01

    We develop optimal respiratory airflow patterns using a nonlinear multicompartment model for a lung mechanics system. Specifically, we use classical calculus of variations minimization techniques to derive an optimal airflow pattern for inspiratory and expiratory breathing cycles. The physiological interpretation of the optimality criteria used involves the minimization of work of breathing and lung volume acceleration for the inspiratory phase, and the minimization of the elastic potential energy and rapid airflow rate changes for the expiratory phase. Finally, we numerically integrate the resulting nonlinear two-point boundary value problems to determine the optimal airflow patterns over the inspiratory and expiratory breathing cycles. PMID:22719793

  11. Novel electrospun gelatin/oxycellulose nanofibers as a suitable platform for lung disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Švachová, Veronika; Vojtová, Lucy; Pavliňák, David; Vojtek, Libor; Sedláková, Veronika; Hyršl, Pavel; Alberti, Milan; Jaroš, Josef; Hampl, Aleš; Jančář, Josef

    2016-10-01

    Novel hydrolytically stable gelatin nanofibers modified with sodium or calcium salt of oxycellulose were prepared by electrospinning method. The unique inhibitory effect of these nanofibers against Escherichia coli bacteria was examined by luminometric method. Biocompatibility of these gelatin/oxycellulose nanofibers with eukaryotic cells was tested using human lung adenocarcinoma cell line NCI-H441. Cells firmly adhered to nanofiber surface, as determined by scanning electron microscopy, and no signs of cell dying were detected by fluorescent live/dead assay. We propose that the newly developed gelatin/oxycellulose nanofibers could be used as promising scaffold for lung disease modeling and anti-cancer drug testing.

  12. The Audible Human Project: Modeling Sound Transmission in the Lungs and Torso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zoujun

    Auscultation has been used qualitatively by physicians for hundreds of years to aid in the monitoring and diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable changes in lung sound production and transmission. Numerous acoustic measurements have revealed the differences of breath sounds and transmitted sounds in the lung under normal and pathological conditions. Compared to the extensive cataloging of lung sound measurements, the mechanism of sound transmission in the pulmonary system and how it changes with alterations of lung structural and material properties has received less attention. A better understanding of sound transmission and how it is altered by injury and disease might improve interpretation of lung sound measurements, including new lung imaging modalities that are based on an array measurement of the acoustic field on the torso surface via contact sensors or are based on a 3-dimensional measurement of the acoustic field throughout the lungs and torso using magnetic resonance elastography. A long-term goal of the Audible Human Project (AHP ) is to develop a computational acoustic model that would accurately simulate generation, transmission and noninvasive measurement of sound and vibration within the pulmonary system and torso caused by both internal (e.g. respiratory function) and external (e.g. palpation) sources. The goals of this dissertation research, fitting within the scope of the AHP, are to develop specific improved theoretical understandings, computational algorithms and experimental methods aimed at transmission and measurement. The research objectives undertaken in this dissertation are as follows. (1) Improve theoretical modeling and experimental identification of viscoelasticity in soft biological tissues. (2) Develop a poroviscoelastic model for lung tissue vibroacoustics. (3) Improve lung airway acoustics modeling and its

  13. Testing of an intrathoracic artificial lung in a pig model.

    PubMed

    Cook, K E; Makarewicz, A J; Backer, C L; Mockros, L F; Przybylo, H J; Crawford, S E; Hernandez, J M; Leonard, R J; Mavroudis, C

    1996-01-01

    A low input impedance, intrathoracic artificial lung is being developed for use in acute respiratory failure or as a bridge to transplantation. The device uses microporous, hollow fibers in a 0.74 void fraction, 1.83 m2 surface area bundle. The bundle is placed within a thermoformed polyethylene terephthalate glucose modified housing with a gross volume of 800 cm3. The blood inlet and outlet are 18 mm inner diameter vascular grafts. Between the inlet graft and the device is a 1 inch inner diameter, thin-walled, latex tubing compliance chamber. These devices were implanted in Yorkshire pigs via median sternotomy with an end to side anastomosis to the pulmonary artery and left atrium. The distal pulmonary artery was occluded to divert the right ventricular output to the device. Pigs 1 and 2 were supported fully for 24 hrs and then killed. Pig 3 was supported partially for 20 hrs and died from bleeding complications. The first implant, in a 55 kg male pig, transferred an average of 176 ml/min +/- 42.4 of O2 and 190 ml/min +/- 39.7 of CO2 with an average blood flow rate of 2.71/min +/- 0.46. The normalized average right ventricular output power, Pn, was 0.062 W/(L/min) +/- 0.0082, and the average device resistance, R, was 3.5 mmHg/(L/min) +/- 0.62. The second implant, in a 60 kg male pig, transferred an average of 204 ml/min +/- 22.5 of O2 and 242 ml/min +/- 17.2 of CO2 with an average blood flow rate of 3.7 L/min +/- 0.45, Pn of 0.064 W/(L/min) +/- 0.0067, and R of 4.3 mmHg/(L/min) +/- 0.89. The third implant, in an 89 kg male pig, transferred an average of 156 ml/min +/- 39.6 of O2 and 187 ml/min +/- 21.4 of CO2 with an average blood flow rate of 2.5 L/min +/- 0.49, Pn of 0.052 W/(l/min) +/- 0.0067, and R of 3.4 mmHg/(L/min) +/- 0.74. These experiments suggest that such an artificial lung can temporarily support the gas transfer requirements of adult humans without over-loading the right ventricle.

  14. Erlotinib resistance in mouse models of epidermal growth factor receptor-induced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Katerina; Fan, Pang-Dian; Shen, Ronglai; Zakowski, Maureen; Varmus, Harold

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Seventy-five percent of lung adenocarcinomas with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations respond to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib; however, drug-resistant tumors eventually emerge. In 60% of cases, resistant tumors carry a secondary mutation in EGFR (T790M), amplification of MET, or both. Here, we describe the establishment of erlotinib resistance in lung tumors, which were induced by mutant EGFR, in transgenic mice after multiple cycles of drug treatment; we detect the T790M mutation in five out of 24 tumors or Met amplification in one out of 11 tumors in these mice. This preclinical mouse model, therefore, recapitulates the molecular changes responsible for resistance to TKIs in human tumors and holds promise for the discovery of additional mechanisms of drug resistance in lung cancer. PMID:20007486

  15. Erlotinib resistance in mouse models of epidermal growth factor receptor-induced lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Politi, Katerina; Fan, Pang-Dian; Shen, Ronglai; Zakowski, Maureen; Varmus, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of lung adenocarcinomas with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations respond to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib; however, drug-resistant tumors eventually emerge. In 60% of cases, resistant tumors carry a secondary mutation in EGFR (T790M), amplification of MET, or both. Here, we describe the establishment of erlotinib resistance in lung tumors, which were induced by mutant EGFR, in transgenic mice after multiple cycles of drug treatment; we detect the T790M mutation in five out of 24 tumors or Met amplification in one out of 11 tumors in these mice. This preclinical mouse model, therefore, recapitulates the molecular changes responsible for resistance to TKIs in human tumors and holds promise for the discovery of additional mechanisms of drug resistance in lung cancer.

  16. [A nonlinear multi-compartment lung model for optimization of breathing airflow pattern].

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongming; Gu, Lingyan; Chen, Fuhua

    2015-02-01

    It is difficult to select the appropriate ventilation mode in clinical mechanical ventilation. This paper presents a nonlinear multi-compartment lung model to solve the difficulty. The purpose is to optimize respiratory airflow patterns and get the minimum of the work of inspiratory phrase and lung volume acceleration, minimum of the elastic potential energy and rapidity of airflow rate changes of expiratory phrase. Sigmoidal function is used to smooth the respiratory function of nonlinear equations. The equations are established to solve nonlinear boundary conditions BVP, and finally the problem was solved with gradient descent method. Experimental results showed that lung volume and the rate of airflow after optimization had good sensitivity and convergence speed. The results provide a theoretical basis for the development of multivariable controller monitoring critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:25997262

  17. The Rabbit as a Model for Studying Lung Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kamaruzaman, Nurfatin Asyikhin; Kamaldin, Nurulain ‘Atikah; Latahir, Ahmad Zaeri; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2013-01-01

    No single animal model can reproduce all of the human features of both acute and chronic lung diseases. However, the rabbit is a reliable model and clinically relevant facsimile of human disease. The similarities between rabbits and humans in terms of airway anatomy and responses to inflammatory mediators highlight the value of this species in the investigation of lung disease pathophysiology and in the development of therapeutic agents. The inflammatory responses shown by the rabbit model, especially in the case of asthma, are comparable with those that occur in humans. The allergic rabbit model has been used extensively in drug screening tests, and this model and humans appear to be sensitive to similar drugs. In addition, recent studies have shown that the rabbit serves as a good platform for cell delivery for the purpose of stem-cell-based therapy. PMID:23653896

  18. Fractal Geometry Enables Classification of Different Lung Morphologies in a Model of Experimental Asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obert, Martin; Hagner, Stefanie; Krombach, Gabriele A.; Inan, Selcuk; Renz, Harald

    2015-06-01

    Animal models represent the basis of our current understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma and are of central importance in the preclinical development of drug therapies. The characterization of irregular lung shapes is a major issue in radiological imaging of mice in these models. The aim of this study was to find out whether differences in lung morphology can be described by fractal geometry. Healthy and asthmatic mouse groups, before and after an acute asthma attack induced by methacholine, were studied. In vivo flat-panel-based high-resolution Computed Tomography (CT) was used for mice's thorax imaging. The digital image data of the mice's lungs were segmented from the surrounding tissue. After that, the lungs were divided by image gray-level thresholds into two additional subsets. One subset contained basically the air transporting bronchial system. The other subset corresponds mainly to the blood vessel system. We estimated the fractal dimension of all sets of the different mouse groups using the mass radius relation (mrr). We found that the air transporting subset of the bronchial lung tissue enables a complete and significant differentiation between all four mouse groups (mean D of control mice before methacholine treatment: 2.64 ± 0.06; after treatment: 2.76 ± 0.03; asthma mice before methacholine treatment: 2.37 ± 0.16; after treatment: 2.71 ± 0.03; p < 0.05). We conclude that the concept of fractal geometry allows a well-defined, quantitative numerical and objective differentiation of lung shapes — applicable most likely also in human asthma diagnostics.

  19. Particle deposition and clearance of atmospheric particles in the human respiratory tract during LACE 98

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Hänel, G.

    2003-04-01

    During the LACE 98footnote{Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment, (Germany) 1998} experiment microphysical, chemical and optical properties of atmospheric particles were measured by several groups. (Bundke et al.). The particle deposition and clearance of the particles in the human respiratory tract was calculated using the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) deposition and clearance model (ICRP 1994). Particle growth as function of relative humidity outside the body was calculated from measurement data using the model introduced by Bundke et al.. Particle growth inside the body was added using a non-equilibrium particle growth model. As a result of the calculations, time series of the total dry particle mass and -size distribution were obtained for all compartments of the human respiratory tract defined by ICRP 1994. The combined ICRP deposition and clearance model was initialized for different probationers like man, woman, children of different ages and several circumstances like light work, sitting, sleeping etc. Keeping the conditions observed during LACE 98 constant a approximation of the aerosol burdens of the different compartments was calculated up to 4 years of exposure and compared to the results from Snipes et al. for the "Phoenix" and "Philadelphia" aerosol. References: footnotesize{ Bundke, U. et al.,it{Aerosol Optical Properties during the Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (LACE 98)} ,10.1029/2000JD000188, JGR, 2002 ICRP,it{Human Respiratory Tract Model for Radiological Protection, Bd. ICRP Publication 66}, Annals of the ICRP, 24,1-3, Elsevier Science, Ocford, 1994 Snipes et al. ,it{The 1994 ICRP66 Human Respiratory Tract Model as a Tool for predicting Lung Burdens from Exposure to Environmental Aerosols}, Appl. Occup. Environ. Hyg., 12, 547-553,1997}

  20. Multiscale Airflow Model and Aerosol Deposition in Healthy and Emphysematous Rat Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Jessica; Marsden, Alison; Grandmont, Celine; Darquenne, Chantal; Vignon-Clementel, Irene

    2012-11-01

    The fate of aerosol particles in healthy and emphysematic lungs is needed to determine the toxic or therapeutic effects of inhalable particles. In this study we used a multiscale numerical model that couples a 0D resistance and capacitance model to 3D airways generated from MR images. Airflow simulations were performed using an in-house 3D finite element solver (SimVascular, simtk.org). Seven simulations were performed; 1 healthy, 1 uniform emphysema and 5 different cases of heterogeneous emphysema. In the heterogeneous emphysema cases the disease was confined to a single lobe. As a post processing step, 1 micron diameter particles were tracked in the flow field using Lagrangian particle tracking. The simulation results showed that the inhaled flow distribution was equal for the healthy and uniform emphysema cases. However, in the heterogeneous emphysema cases the delivery of inhaled air was larger in the diseased lobe. Additionally, there was an increase in delivery of aerosol particles to the diseased lobe. This suggests that as the therapeutic particles would reach the diseased areas of the lung, while toxic particles would increasingly harm the lung. The 3D-0D model described here is the first of its kind to be used to study healthy and emphysematic lungs. NSF Graduate Fellowship (Oakes), Burroughs Wellcome Fund (Marsden, Oakes) 1R21HL087805-02 from NHLBI at NIH, INRIA Team Grant.

  1. A Human-Mouse Chimeric Model of Obliterative Bronchiolitis after Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jianmin; Zhu, Xuehai; George, M. Patricia; Myerburg, Michael M.; Stoner, Michael W.; Pilewski, Joseph W.; Duncan, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis is a frequent, morbid, and usually refractory complication of lung transplantation. Mechanistic study of obliterative bronchiolitis would be aided by development of a relevant model that uses human immune effector cells and airway targets. Our objective was to develop a murine chimera model that mimics obliterative bronchiolitis of lung allograft recipients in human airways in vivo. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were adoptively transferred to immunodeficient mice lacking activity of T, B, and NK cells, with and without concurrent transplantations of human small airways dissected from allogeneic cadaveric lungs. Chimerism with human T cells occurred in the majority of recipient animals. The chimeric T cells became highly activated, rapidly infiltrated into the small human airway grafts, and caused obliterative bronchiolitis. In contrast, airways implanted into control mice that did not also receive human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transfers remained intact. In vitro proliferation assays indicated that the chimeric T cells had enhanced specific proliferative responses to donor airway alloantigens. This model confirms the critical role of T cells in development of obliterative bronchiolitis among human lung allograft recipients and provides a novel and easily implemented mechanism for detailed, reductionist in vivo studies of human T-cell responses to allogeneic human small airways. PMID:21801868

  2. Lung cancer mortality trends in Chile and six-year projections using Bayesian dynamic linear models.

    PubMed

    Torres-Avilés, Francisco; Moraga, Tomás; Núñez, Loreto; Icaza, Gloria

    2015-09-01

    The objectives were to analyze lung cancer mortality trends in Chile from 1990 to 2009, and to project the rates six years forward. Lung cancer mortality data were obtained from the Chilean Ministry of Health. To obtain mortality rates, population projections were used, based on the 2002 National Census. Rates were adjusted using the world standard population as reference. Bayesian dynamic linear models were fitted to estimate trends from 1990 to 2009 and to obtain projections for 2010-2015. During the period under study, there was a 19.9% reduction in the lung cancer mortality rate in men. In women, there was increase of 28.4%. The second-order model showed a better fit for men, and the first-order model a better fit for women. Between 2010 and 2015 the downward trend continued in men, while a trend to stabilization was projected for lung cancer mortality in women in Chile. This analytical approach could be useful implement surveillance systems for chronic non-communicable disease and to evaluate preventive strategies. PMID:26578021

  3. Late gestational lung hypoplasia in a mouse model of the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongwei; Wessels, Andy; Chen, Jianliang; Phelps, Aimee L; Oatis, John; Tint, G Stephen; Patel, Shailendra B

    2004-01-01

    Background Normal post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis is important for mammalian embryonic development. Neonatal mice lacking functional dehydrocholesterol Δ7-reductase (Dhcr7), a model for the human disease of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, die within 24 hours of birth. Although they have a number of biochemical and structural abnormalities, one cause of death is from apparent respiratory failure due to developmental pulmonary abnormalities. Results In this study, we characterized further the role of cholesterol deficiency in lung development of these mice. Significant growth retardation, beginning at E14.5~E16.5, was observed in Dhcr7-/- embryos. Normal lobation but smaller lungs with a significant decrease in lung-to-body weight ratio was noted in Dhcr7-/- embryos, compared to controls. Lung branching morphogenesis was comparable between Dhcr7-/- and controls at early stages, but delayed saccular development was visible in all Dhcr7-/- embryos from E17.5 onwards. Impaired pre-alveolar development of varying severity, inhibited cell proliferation, delayed differentiation of type I alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and delayed vascular development were all evident in knockout lungs. Differentiation of type II AECs was apparently normal as judged by surfactant protein (SP) mRNAs and SP-C immunostaining. A significant amount of cholesterol was detectable in knockout lungs, implicating some maternal transfer of cholesterol. No significant differences of the spatial-temporal localization of sonic hedgehog (Shh) or its downstream targets by immunohistochemistry were detected between knockout and wild-type lungs and Shh autoprocessing occurred normally in tissues from Dhcr7-/- embryos. Conclusion Our data indicated that cholesterol deficiency caused by Dhcr7 null was associated with a distinct lung saccular hypoplasia, characterized by failure to terminally differentiate alveolar sacs, a delayed differentiation of type I AECs and an immature vascular network at late

  4. Surfactant secretion and clearance in the newborn

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, P.A.; Wright, J.R.; Clements, J.A. )

    1989-10-01

    Pregnant rabbits (30 days) were injected intravenously with (3H)choline 8 h before delivery. The fetuses were delivered, and lung lavage and lamellar body phospholipids (PL) were analyzed. Some newborns also received radioactively labeled surfactant intratracheally on delivery and were permitted to breathe. With time, intratracheal label decreased in lavage and appeared in the lamellar body fraction, and intravenous label accumulated in both pools. Using a tracer analysis for non-steady state, we calculated surfactant secretion and clearance rates for the newborn period. Before birth, both rates rose slightly from 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 at 6 h before birth to 7.3 at birth. Immediately after birth, secretion rate rose to 37.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1. Between 1.5 and 2 h after birth it fell to a minimum of 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 and then rose slowly to 6.0 at 12 h. After birth, clearance rate increased less than secretion rate (maximum 24.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 shortly after birth) then followed the same pattern but did not balance secretion rate in the 1st day.

  5. Assessing lung cancer risk in railroad workers using a first hitting time regression model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Ling Ting; Whitmore, G. A.; Laden, Francine; Hart, Jaime E.; Garshick, Eric

    2005-01-01

    SUMMARY This article examines the application of a first hitting time (FHT) model, using an operational time scale, to assess mortality risk differentials of the work environment. A major case application is presented that applies the model to three job categories of railroad workers. The data set involves a study of more than 50 000 workers with mortality assessed from 1959 to 1996. Lung cancer mortality was assessed because of a suspected link to diesel exhaust exposure. Based on a model that stipulates that death occurs when the disease state of a subject first hits a threshold value, the FHT model provides insights into factors influencing disease progression. In this application, in particular, the findings suggest that a job category in 1959 alters the risk of death from lung cancer. PMID:16741563

  6. Calculation of tip clearance effects in a transonic compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.

    1996-01-01

    The flow through the tip clearance region of a transonic compressor rotor (NASA rotor 37) was computed and compared to aerodynamic probe and laser anemometer data. Tip clearance effects were modeled both by gridding the clearance gap and by using a simple periodicity model across the ungridded gap. The simple model was run with both the full gap height, and with half the gap height to simulate a vena-contracta effect. Comparisons between computed and measured performance maps and downstream profiles were used to validate the models and to assess the effects of gap height on the simple clearance model. Recommendations were made concerning the use of the simple clearance model. Detailed comparisons were made between the gridded clearance gap solution and the laser anemometer data near the tip at two operating points. The computer results agreed fairly well with the data but overpredicted the extent of the casing separation and underpredicted the wake decay rate. The computations were then used to describe the interaction of the tip vortex, the passage shock, and the casing boundary layer.

  7. Calculation of Tip Clearance Effects in a Transonic Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.

    1998-01-01

    The flow through the tip clearance region of a transonic compressor rotor (NASA rotor 37) was computed and compared to aerodynamic probe and laser anemometer data. Tip clearance effects were modeled both by gridding the clearance gap and by using a simple periodicity model across the ungridded gap. The simple model was run with both the full gap height, and with half the gap height to simulate a vena-contracta effect. Comparisons between computed and measured performance maps and downstream profiles were used to validate the models and to assess the effects of gap height on the simple clearance model. Recommendations were made concern- ing the use of the simple clearance model Detailed comparisons were made between the gridded clearance gap solution and the laser anemometer data near the tip at two operating points. The computed results agreed fairly well with the data but overpredicted the extent of the casing separation and underpredicted the wake decay rate. The computations were then used to describe the interaction of the tip vortex, the passage shock, and the casing boundary layer.

  8. Inhaled Hydrogen Sulfide Improves Graft Function in an Experimental Model of Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    George, Timothy J.; Arnaoutakis, George J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Jandu, Simran K.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Shah, Ashish S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Ischemia-reperfusion(IRI) is a common complication of lung transplantation(LTx). Hydrogen sulfide(H2S) is a novel agent previously shown to slow metabolism and scavenge reactive oxygen species, potentially mitigating IRI. We hypothesized that pre-treatment with inhaled H2S would improve graft function in an ex vivo model of LTx. Methods: Rabbits(n=10) were ventilated for 2 hours prior to heart-lung bloc procurement. The treatment group(n=5) inhaled room air(21% O2) supplemented with 150 ppm H2S while the control group(n=5) inhaled room air alone. Both groups were gradually cooled to 34 C. All heart-lung blocs were then recovered and cold-stored in low potassium dextran solution for 18 hours. Following storage, the blocs were reperfused with donor rabbit blood in an ex vivo apparatus. Serial clinical parameters were assessed and serial tissue biochemistry was examined. Results: Prior to heart-lung bloc procurement, rabbits pre-treated with H2S exhibited similar oxygenation(p=0.1), ventilation(p=0.7), and heart rate(p=0.5); however, treated rabbits exhibited consistently higher mean arterial blood pressures(p=0.01). During reperfusion, lungs pre-treated with H2S had better oxygenation(p<0.01) and ventilation(p=0.02) as well as lower pulmonary artery pressures(p<0.01). Reactive oxygen species levels were lower in treated lungs during reperfusion(p=0.01). Additionally, prior to reperfusion, treated lungs demonstrated more preserved mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity(p=0.01). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study represents the first reported therapeutic use of inhaled H2S in an experimental model of LTx. After prolonged ischemia, lungs pre-treated with inhaled H2S exhibited improved graft function during reperfusion. Donor pre-treatment with inhaled H2S represents a potentially novel adjunct to conventional preservation techniques and merits further exploration. PMID:22771242

  9. Development and validation of risk models to select ever-smokers for CT lung-cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Katki, Hormuzd A.; Kovalchik, Stephanie A.; Berg, Christine D.; Cheung, Li C.; Chaturvedi, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends computed-tomography (CT) lung-cancer screening for ever-smokers ages 55-80 years who smoked at least 30 pack-years with no more than 15 years since quitting. However, selecting ever-smokers for screening using individualized lung-cancer risk calculations may be more effective and efficient than current USPSTF recommendations. Objective Comparison of modeled outcomes from risk-based CT lung-screening strategies versus USPSTF recommendations. Design/Setting/Participants Empirical risk models for lung-cancer incidence and death in the absence of CT screening using data on ever-smokers from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO; 1993-2009) control group. Covariates included age, education, sex, race, smoking intensity/duration/quit-years, Body Mass Index, family history of lung-cancer, and self-reported emphysema. Model validation in the chest radiography groups of the PLCO and the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST; 2002-2009), with additional validation of the death model in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS; 1997-2001), a representative sample of the US. Models applied to US ever-smokers ages 50-80 (NHIS 2010-2012) to estimate outcomes of risk-based selection for CT lung-screening, assuming screening for all ever-smokers yields the percent changes in lung-cancer detection and death observed in the NLST. Exposure Annual CT lung-screening for 3 years. Main Outcomes and Measures Model validity: calibration (number of model-predicted cases divided by number of observed cases (Estimated/Observed)) and discrimination (Area-Under-Curve (AUC)). Modeled screening outcomes: estimated number of screen-avertable lung-cancer deaths, estimated screening effectiveness (number needed to screen (NNS) to prevent 1 lung-cancer death). Results Lung-cancer incidence and death risk models were well-calibrated in PLCO and NLST. The lung-cancer death model calibrated and

  10. Clearance from the anterior chamber of RBCs from human diabetics

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.A.; Hatchell, D.L.; Collier, B.D.; Knobel, J.

    1984-06-01

    Erythrocytes from diabetic patients manifest decreased deformability and increased adherence. These abnormal membrane properties may diminish the ability of erythrocytes (RBCs) from diabetics to undergo deformation in passage through the trabecular meshwork. Using sodium chromate Cr 51-labeled RBCs from type I diabetic patients with proliferative retinopathy and normal control subjects, we studied RBC clearance from the rabbit anterior chamber. The mean time for 50% clearance (T50) of RBCs from diabetics (76 hours) was significantly longer than that for RBCs from normal subjects (19.5 hours). In this model, RBCs from diabetics have a slower clearance from the anterior chamber than do RBCs from normal subjects.

  11. Toward a Fast-Response Active Turbine Tip Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Kypuros, Javier A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, technologies developed for clearance control can benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first portion of the paper addresses the research from a programmatic viewpoint. Recent studies that provide motivation for the work, identification of key technologies, and NASA's plan for addressing deficiencies in the technologies are discussed. The later portion of the paper drills down into one of the key technologies by presenting equations and results for a preliminary dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena.

  12. Deposition and clearance of inhaled particles.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, B O

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical models of respiratory tract deposition of inhaled particles are compared to experimental studies of deposition patterns in humans and animals, as determined principally by particle size, density, respiratory rate and flow parameters. Various models of inhaled particle deposition make use of convenient approximations of the respiratory tract to predict tractional deposition according to fundamental physical processes of impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion. These theoretical models for both total deposition and regional (nasopharyngeal, tracheobronchial, and pulmonary) deposition are compared with experimental studies of inhaled dusts in humans or experimental animals that have been performed in many laboratories over several decades. Reasonable correlation has been obtained between theoretical and experimental studies, but the behavior of very fine (less than 0.01 mum) particles requires further refinement.Properties of particle shape, charge, and hygroscopicity as well as the degree of respiratory tract pathology also influence deposition patterns and further experimental work is urgently needed in these areas. The influence upon deposition patterns of dynamic alterations in inspiratory flow profiles caused by a variety of breathing patterns also requires further study, and the use of such techniques with selected inhaled particle size holds promise in possible diagnostic aid in diagnosis of normal versus disease conditions. Mechanisms of conducting airway and alveolar clearance processes involving mucociliary clearance, dissolution, transport to systemic circulation, and translocation via regional lymphatic clearance are discussed. The roles of the pulmonary macrophage in airway and alveolar clearance are described, and the applicability of recent solubility models for translocation or deposited materials to liver, skeleton, or other systemic organs is discussed. PMID:797567

  13. High Inorganic Phosphate Intake Promotes Tumorigenesis at Early Stages in a Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Somin; Kim, Ji-Eun; Hong, Seong-Ho; Lee, Ah-Young; Park, Eun-Jung; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Doble, Philip; Bishop, David; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is required by all living organisms for the development of organs such as bone, muscle, brain, and lungs, regulating the expression of several critical genes as well as signal transduction. However, little is known about the effects of prolonged dietary Pi consumption on lung cancer progression. This study investigated the effects of a high-phosphate diet (HPD) in a mouse model of adenocarcinoma. K-rasLA1 mice were fed a normal diet (0.3% Pi) or an HPD (1% Pi) for 1, 2, or 4 months. Mice were then sacrificed and subjected to inductively coupled plasma mass/optical emission spectrometry and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry analyses, western blot analysis, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and immunocytochemical analyses to evaluate tumor formation and progression (including cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis), changes in ion levels and metabolism, autophagy, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and protein translation in the lungs. An HPD accelerated tumorigenesis, as evidenced by increased adenoma and adenocarcinoma rates as well as tumor size. However, after 4 months of the HPD, cell proliferation was arrested, and marked increases in liver and lung ion levels and in energy production via the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the liver were observed, which were accompanied by increased autophagy and decreased angiogenesis and apoptosis. These results indicate that an HPD initially promotes but later inhibits lung cancer progression because of metabolic adaptation leading to tumor cell quiescence. Moreover, the results suggest that carefully regulated Pi consumption are effective in lung cancer prevention. PMID:26285136

  14. High Inorganic Phosphate Intake Promotes Tumorigenesis at Early Stages in a Mouse Model of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Somin; Kim, Ji-Eun; Hong, Seong-Ho; Lee, Ah-Young; Park, Eun-Jung; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Doble, Philip; Bishop, David; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is required by all living organisms for the development of organs such as bone, muscle, brain, and lungs, regulating the expression of several critical genes as well as signal transduction. However, little is known about the effects of prolonged dietary Pi consumption on lung cancer progression. This study investigated the effects of a high-phosphate diet (HPD) in a mouse model of adenocarcinoma. K-rasLA1 mice were fed a normal diet (0.3% Pi) or an HPD (1% Pi) for 1, 2, or 4 months. Mice were then sacrificed and subjected to inductively coupled plasma mass/optical emission spectrometry and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry analyses, western blot analysis, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and immunocytochemical analyses to evaluate tumor formation and progression (including cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis), changes in ion levels and metabolism, autophagy, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and protein translation in the lungs. An HPD accelerated tumorigenesis, as evidenced by increased adenoma and adenocarcinoma rates as well as tumor size. However, after 4 months of the HPD, cell proliferation was arrested, and marked increases in liver and lung ion levels and in energy production via the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the liver were observed, which were accompanied by increased autophagy and decreased angiogenesis and apoptosis. These results indicate that an HPD initially promotes but later inhibits lung cancer progression because of metabolic adaptation leading to tumor cell quiescence. Moreover, the results suggest that carefully regulated Pi consumption are effective in lung cancer prevention. PMID:26285136

  15. CD36 and Proteoglycan-Mediated Pathways for (n-3) Fatty Acid–Enriched Triglyceride-Rich Particle Blood Clearance in Mouse Models In Vivo and in Peritoneal Macrophages In Vitro1,2

    PubMed Central

    Densupsoontorn, Narumon; Carpentier, Yvon A.; Racine, Radjini; Murray, Faith M.; Seo, Toru; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Deckelbaum, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Because the mechanisms of (n-3) fatty acid–enriched triglyceride-rich particle [(n-3)-TGRP] uptake are not well characterized, we questioned whether (n-3)-TGRP are removed via “nonclassical” pathways, e.g., pathways other than an LDL receptor and/or involving apolipoprotein E (apoE). Chylomicron-sized model (n-3)-TGRP labeled with [3H]cholesteryl ether were injected into wild-type (WT) and CD36 knockout (CD36−/−) mice at low, nonsaturating and high, saturating doses. Blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP was determined by calculating fractional catabolic rates. At saturating doses, blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP was slower in CD36−/− mice relative to WT mice, suggesting that in part CD36 contributes to (n-3)-TGRP uptake. To further examine the potential nonclassical clearance pathways, peritoneal-elicited macrophages from WT and CD36−/− mice were incubated with (n-3)-TGRP in the presence of apoE, lactoferrin, and/or sodium chlorate. Cellular (n-3)-TGRP uptake was measured to test the roles of apoE-mediated pathways and/or proteoglycans. ApoE-mediated pathways compensated in part for defective (n-3)-TGRP uptake in CD36−/− cells. Lactoferrin decreased (n-3)-TGRP uptake in the presence of apoE. Inhibition of cell proteoglycan synthesis by chlorate reduced (n-3)-TGRP uptake in both groups of macrophages, and chlorate effects were independent of apoE. We conclude that although CD36 is involved, it is not the primary contributor to the blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP. The removal of (n-3)-TGRP likely relies more on nonclassical pathways, such as proteoglycan-mediated pathways. PMID:18203888

  16. Automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images using fuzzy Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Wang; Sa, Yu; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF) model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  17. The Effect of Different Doses of Cigarette Smoke in a Mouse Lung Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Ludmilla Nadir; de Camargo Fenley, Juliana; Braga, Lúcia Campanario; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Cury, Patrícia M.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have used Balb/c mice as an animal model for lung carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effect of different doses of cigarette smoking in the urethane-induced Balb/c mouse lung cancer model. After injection of 3mg/kg urethane intraperitoneally, the mice were then exposed to tobacco smoke once or twice a day, five times a week, in a closed chamber. The animals were randomly divided into four groups. The control group (G0) received urethane only. The experimental groups (G1, G2 and G3) received urethane and exposure to the smoke of 3 cigarettes for 10 minutes once a day, 3 cigarettes for 10 minutes twice a day, and 6 cigarettes for 10 minutes twice a day, respectively. The mice were sacrificed after 16 weeks of exposure, and the number of nodules and hyperplasia in the lungs was counted. The results showed no statistically significant difference in the mean number of nodules and hyperplasia among the different groups, suggesting that the Balb/c mice are not suitable to study the pathogenesis of tobacco smoking-induced tumor progression in the lungs. PMID:19079653

  18. Dual clearance squeeze film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A dual clearance hydrodynamic liquid squeeze film damper for a gas turbine engine is described. Under normal operating conditions, the device functions as a conventional squeeze film damper, using only one of its oil films. When an unbalance reaches abusive levels, as may occur with a blade loss or foreign object damage, a second, larger clearance film becomes active, controlling vibration amplitudes in a near optimum manner until the engine can be safely shut down and repaired.

  19. Mutational landscape of EGFR-, MYC-, and Kras-driven genetically engineered mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, David G.; Politi, Katerina; Bhutkar, Arjun; Chen, Frances K.; Song, Xiaoling; Pirun, Mono; Santiago, Philip M.; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Platt, James T.; Lee, Emily; Hodges, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Jacks, Tyler; Varmus, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer are increasingly being used to assess putative driver mutations identified by large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes. To accurately interpret experiments that introduce additional mutations, an understanding of the somatic genetic profile and evolution of GEMM tumors is necessary. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing of tumors from three GEMMs of lung adenocarcinoma driven by mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras), or overexpression of MYC proto-oncogene. Tumors from EGFR- and Kras-driven models exhibited, respectively, 0.02 and 0.07 nonsynonymous mutations per megabase, a dramatically lower average mutational frequency than observed in human lung adenocarcinomas. Tumors from models driven by strong cancer drivers (mutant EGFR and Kras) harbored few mutations in known cancer genes, whereas tumors driven by MYC, a weaker initiating oncogene in the murine lung, acquired recurrent clonal oncogenic Kras mutations. In addition, although EGFR- and Kras-driven models both exhibited recurrent whole-chromosome DNA copy number alterations, the specific chromosomes altered by gain or loss were different in each model. These data demonstrate that GEMM tumors exhibit relatively simple somatic genotypes compared with human cancers of a similar type, making these autochthonous model systems useful for additive engineering approaches to assess the potential of novel mutations on tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug sensitivity. PMID:27702896

  20. Modelling staphylococcal pneumonia in a human 3D lung tissue model system delineates toxin-mediated pathology.

    PubMed

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Chen, Puran; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Bergsten, Helena; Vandenesch, Francois; Siemens, Nikolai; Lina, Gerard; Monk, Ian R; Foster, Timothy J; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is recognized as a toxin-mediated disease, yet the tissue-destructive events remain elusive, partly as a result of lack of mechanistic studies in human lung tissue. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model composed of human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts was used to delineate the role of specific staphylococcal exotoxins in tissue pathology associated with severe pneumonia. To this end, the models were exposed to the mixture of exotoxins produced by S. aureus strains isolated from patients with varying severity of lung infection, namely necrotizing pneumonia or lung empyema, or to purified toxins. The necrotizing pneumonia strains secreted high levels of α-toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and triggered high cytotoxicity, inflammation, necrosis and loss of E-cadherin from the lung epithelium. In contrast, the lung empyema strain produced moderate levels of PVL, but negligible amounts of α-toxin, and triggered limited tissue damage. α-toxin had a direct damaging effect on the epithelium, as verified using toxin-deficient mutants and pure α-toxin. Moreover, PVL contributed to pathology through the lysis of neutrophils. A combination of α-toxin and PVL resulted in the most severe epithelial injury. In addition, toxin-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators from lung tissue models resulted in enhanced neutrophil migration. Using a collection of 31 strains from patients with staphylococcal pneumonia revealed that strains producing high levels of α-toxin and PVL were cytotoxic and associated with fatal outcome. Also, the strains that produced the highest toxin levels induced significantly greater epithelial disruption. Of importance, toxin-mediated lung epithelium destruction could be inhibited by polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin containing antibodies against α-toxin and PVL. This study introduces a novel model system for study of staphylococcal pneumonia in a human setting. The

  1. Modelling staphylococcal pneumonia in a human 3D lung tissue model system delineates toxin-mediated pathology.

    PubMed

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Chen, Puran; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Bergsten, Helena; Vandenesch, Francois; Siemens, Nikolai; Lina, Gerard; Monk, Ian R; Foster, Timothy J; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is recognized as a toxin-mediated disease, yet the tissue-destructive events remain elusive, partly as a result of lack of mechanistic studies in human lung tissue. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model composed of human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts was used to delineate the role of specific staphylococcal exotoxins in tissue pathology associated with severe pneumonia. To this end, the models were exposed to the mixture of exotoxins produced by S. aureus strains isolated from patients with varying severity of lung infection, namely necrotizing pneumonia or lung empyema, or to purified toxins. The necrotizing pneumonia strains secreted high levels of α-toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and triggered high cytotoxicity, inflammation, necrosis and loss of E-cadherin from the lung epithelium. In contrast, the lung empyema strain produced moderate levels of PVL, but negligible amounts of α-toxin, and triggered limited tissue damage. α-toxin had a direct damaging effect on the epithelium, as verified using toxin-deficient mutants and pure α-toxin. Moreover, PVL contributed to pathology through the lysis of neutrophils. A combination of α-toxin and PVL resulted in the most severe epithelial injury. In addition, toxin-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators from lung tissue models resulted in enhanced neutrophil migration. Using a collection of 31 strains from patients with staphylococcal pneumonia revealed that strains producing high levels of α-toxin and PVL were cytotoxic and associated with fatal outcome. Also, the strains that produced the highest toxin levels induced significantly greater epithelial disruption. Of importance, toxin-mediated lung epithelium destruction could be inhibited by polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin containing antibodies against α-toxin and PVL. This study introduces a novel model system for study of staphylococcal pneumonia in a human setting. The

  2. Modelling staphylococcal pneumonia in a human 3D lung tissue model system delineates toxin-mediated pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Chen, Puran; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Bergsten, Helena; Vandenesch, Francois; Siemens, Nikolai; Lina, Gerard; Monk, Ian R.; Foster, Timothy J.; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is recognized as a toxin-mediated disease, yet the tissue-destructive events remain elusive, partly as a result of lack of mechanistic studies in human lung tissue. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model composed of human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts was used to delineate the role of specific staphylococcal exotoxins in tissue pathology associated with severe pneumonia. To this end, the models were exposed to the mixture of exotoxins produced by S. aureus strains isolated from patients with varying severity of lung infection, namely necrotizing pneumonia or lung empyema, or to purified toxins. The necrotizing pneumonia strains secreted high levels of α-toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and triggered high cytotoxicity, inflammation, necrosis and loss of E-cadherin from the lung epithelium. In contrast, the lung empyema strain produced moderate levels of PVL, but negligible amounts of α-toxin, and triggered limited tissue damage. α-toxin had a direct damaging effect on the epithelium, as verified using toxin-deficient mutants and pure α-toxin. Moreover, PVL contributed to pathology through the lysis of neutrophils. A combination of α-toxin and PVL resulted in the most severe epithelial injury. In addition, toxin-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators from lung tissue models resulted in enhanced neutrophil migration. Using a collection of 31 strains from patients with staphylococcal pneumonia revealed that strains producing high levels of α-toxin and PVL were cytotoxic and associated with fatal outcome. Also, the strains that produced the highest toxin levels induced significantly greater epithelial disruption. Of importance, toxin-mediated lung epithelium destruction could be inhibited by polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin containing antibodies against α-toxin and PVL. This study introduces a novel model system for study of staphylococcal pneumonia in a human

  3. Analysis of viral clearance unit operations for monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Miesegaes, George; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2010-06-01

    Demonstration of viral clearance is a critical step in assuring the safety of biotechnology products. We generated a viral clearance database that contains product information, unit operation process parameters, and viral clearance data from monoclonal antibody and antibody-related regulatory submissions to FDA. Here we present a broad overview of the database and resulting analyses. We report that the diversity of model viruses tested expands as products transition to late-phase. We also present averages and ranges of viral clearance results by Protein A and ion exchange chromatography steps, low pH chemical inactivation, and virus filtration, focusing on retro- and parvoviruses. For most unit operations, an average log reduction value (LRV, a measure of clearance power) for retrovirus of >4 log(10) were measured. Cases where clearance data fell outside of the anticipated range (i.e., outliers) were rationally explained. Lastly, a historical analysis did not find evidence of any improvement trend in viral clearance over time. The data collectively suggest that many unit operations in general can reliably clear viruses.

  4. Role of TNFR1 in lung injury and altered lung function induced by the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-02-01

    Lung toxicity induced by sulfur mustard is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. To elucidate mechanisms mediating pulmonary damage, we used 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. Male mice (B6129) were treated intratracheally with CEES (3 or 6 mg/kg) or control. Animals were sacrificed 3, 7 or 14 days later and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue collected. Treatment of mice with CEES resulted in an increase in BAL protein, an indication of alveolar epithelial damage, within 3 days. Expression of Ym1, an oxidative stress marker also increased in the lung, along with inducible nitric oxide synthase, and at 14 days, cyclooxygenase-2 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, inflammatory proteins implicated in tissue injury. These responses were attenuated in mice lacking the p55 receptor for TNF{alpha} (TNFR1-/-), demonstrating that signaling via TNFR1 is key to CEES-induced injury, oxidative stress, and inflammation. CEES-induced upregulation of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and MnSOD was delayed or absent in TNFR1-/- mice, relative to WT mice, suggesting that TNF{alpha} mediates early antioxidant responses to lung toxicants. Treatment of WT mice with CEES also resulted in functional alterations in the lung including decreases in compliance and increases in elastance. Additionally, methacholine-induced alterations in total lung resistance and central airway resistance were dampened by CEES. Loss of TNFR1 resulted in blunted functional responses to CEES. These effects were most notable in the airways. These data suggest that targeting TNF{alpha} signaling may be useful in mitigating lung injury, inflammation and functional alterations induced by vesicants.

  5. Ethanol alters alveolar fluid balance via Nadph oxidase (NOX) signaling to epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in the lung.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Trac, David Q; Kreiner, Lisa H; Eaton, Amity F; Johnson, Nicholle M; Brown, Lou Ann; Helms, My N

    2013-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption is associated with increased incidence of ICU-related morbidity and mortality, primarily from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. One explanation is that alcohol regulates epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) via oxidant signaling to promote a pro- injury environment. We used small rodent models to mimic acute and chronic alcohol consumption and tested the hypothesis that ethanol (EtOH) would affect lung fluid clearance by up-regulating ENaC activity in the lung. Fluorescence labeling of rat lung slices and in vivo mouse lung revealed an increase in ROS production in response to acute EtOH exposure. Using western blots and fluorescein-5-maleimide labeling, we conclude that EtOH exposure modifies cysteines of α-ENaC while data from single channel patch clamp analysis confirm that 0.16% EtOH increased ENaC activity in rat alveolar cells. In vivo lung fluid clearance demonstrated a latent increase in fluid clearance in mice receiving EtOH diet. Ethanol mice given a tracheal instillation of LPS demonstrated early lung fluid clearance compared to caloric control mice and C57Bl/6 mice. Standard biochemical techniques reveal that chronic EtOH consumption resulted in greater protein expression of the catalytic gp91(phox) subunit and the obligate Rac1 protein. Collectively these data suggest that chronic EtOH consumption may lead to altered regulation of ENaC, contributing to a 'pro-injury' environment in the alcohol lung. PMID:23382956

  6. 14 CFR 23.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 23.925 Section 23.925... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances, with the airplane at the...

  7. 14 CFR 25.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 25.925 Section 25.925... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances with the airplane at maximum weight, with the most...

  8. 14 CFR 23.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 23.925 Section 23.925... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances, with the airplane at the...

  9. 14 CFR 25.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 25.925 Section 25.925... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances with the airplane at maximum weight, with the most...

  10. 14 CFR 25.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 25.925 Section 25.925... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances with the airplane at maximum weight, with the most...

  11. 14 CFR 23.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 23.925 Section 23.925... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances, with the airplane at the...

  12. 14 CFR 23.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 23.925 Section 23.925... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances, with the airplane at the...

  13. 14 CFR 25.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 25.925 Section 25.925... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances with the airplane at maximum weight, with the most...

  14. 14 CFR 25.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 25.925 Section 25.925... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances with the airplane at maximum weight, with the most...

  15. 14 CFR 23.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 23.925 Section 23.925... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances, with the airplane at the...

  16. RC-3095, a Selective Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist, Does Not Protect the Lungs in an Experimental Model of Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Freitas, Vera L.; Thomaz, Leonardo Dalla Giacomassa Rocha; Simoneti, Lucas Elias Lise; Malfitano, Christiane; De Angelis, Kátia; Ulbrich, Jane Maria; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Andrade, Cristiano Feijó

    2015-01-01

    RC-3095, a selective GRPR antagonist, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties in different models of inflammation. However, its protective effect on lungs submitted to lung ischemia-reperfusion injury has not been addressed before. Then, we administrated RC-3095 intravenously before and after lung reperfusion using an animal model of lung ischemia-reperfusion injury (LIRI) by clamping the pulmonary hilum. Twenty Wistar rats were subjected to an experimental model in four groups: SHAM, ischemia-reperfusion (IR), RC-Pre, and RC-Post. The final mean arterial pressure significantly decreased in IR and RC-Pre compared to their values before reperfusion (P < 0.001). The RC-Post group showed significant decrease of partial pressure of arterial oxygen at the end of the observation when compared to baseline (P = 0.005). Caspase-9 activity was significantly higher in the RC-Post as compared to the other groups (P < 0.013). No significant differences were observed in eNOS activity among the groups. The groups RC-Pre and RC-Post did not show any significant decrease in IL-1β (P = 0.159) and TNF-α (P = 0.260), as compared to IR. The histological score showed no significant differences among the groups. In conclusion, RC-3095 does not demonstrate a protective effect in our LIRI model. Additionally, its use after reperfusion seems to potentiate cell damage, stimulating apoptosis. PMID:25893195

  17. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System Phase I: Hypo-Elastic Model for CFD Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2011-04-14

    An isotropic constitutive model for the parenchyma of lung has been derived from the theory of hypo-elasticity. The intent is to use it to represent the mechanical response of this soft tissue in sophisticated, computational, fluid-dynamic models of the lung. This demands that the continuum model be accurate, yet simple and effcient. An objective algorithm for its numeric integration is provided. The response of the model is determined for several boundary-value problems whose experiments are used for material characterization. The effective elastic, bulk, and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio, as tangent functions, are also derived. The model is characterized against published experimental data for lung. A bridge between this continuum model and a dodecahedral model of alveolar geometry is investigated, with preliminary findings being reported.

  18. A decremental PEEP trial for determining open-lung PEEP in a rabbit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yi-Ming; Lien, Shao-Hung; Liu, Tao-Yuan; Lee, Chuen-Ming; Yuh, Yeong-Seng

    2008-04-01

    A positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) above the lower inflection point (LIP) of the pressure-volume curve has been thought necessary to maintain recruited lung volume in acute lung injury (ALI). We used a strategy to identify the level of open-lung PEEP (OLP) by detecting the maximum tidal compliance during a decremental PEEP trial (DPT). We performed a randomized controlled study to compare the effect of the OLP to PEEP above LIP and zero PEEP on pulmonary mechanics, gas exchange, hemodynamic change, and lung injury in 26 rabbits with ALI. After recruitment maneuver, the lavage-injured rabbits received DPTs to identify the OLP. Animals were randomized to receive volume controlled ventilation with either: (a) PEEP = 0 cm H2O (ZEEP); (b) PEEP = 2 cm H2O above OLP (OLP + 2); or (c) PEEP = 2 cm H2O above LIP (LIP + 2). Peak inspiratory pressure and mean airway pressure were recorded and arterial blood gases were analyzed every 30 min. Mean blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously. Lung injury severity was assessed by lung wet/dry weight ratio. Animals in OLP + 2 group had less lung injury as well as relatively better compliance, more stable pH, and less hypercapnia compared to the LIP + 2 and ZEEP groups. We concluded that setting PEEP according to the OLP identified by DPTs is an effective method to attenuate lung injury. This strategy could be used as an indicator for optimal PEEP. The approach is simple and noninvasive and may be of clinical interest. PMID:18293413

  19. Therapeutic Effects of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Models of Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; He, Hongli; Liu, Airan; Xu, Jingyuan; Han, Jibin; Chen, Qihong; Hu, Shuling; Xu, Xiuping; Huang, Yingzi; Guo, Fengmei; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer a promising therapy for acute lung injury (ALI). However, whether the same MSC treatments possess similar potential for different ALI models is not fully clear. The present study evaluated the distribution and therapeutic effects of intravenous MSC administration for the treatment of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intrapulmonary ALI and intravenous LPS/zymosan-induced extrapulmonary ALI, matched with lung injury severity, at 30 min and 1, 3, and 7 days. We found that MSC transplantation attenuated lung injury and inhibited lung inflammation in both ALI models. The benefits of MSCs were more significant in the intrapulmonary ALI mice. In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging showed that MSCs primarily homed into the lung. However, more MSCs were recruited into the lungs of the intrapulmonary ALI mice than those of the extrapulmonary ALI mice over the time course. A few MSCs were also detected in the liver and spleen at days 3 and 7. In addition, the two ALI models showed different extrapulmonary organ dysfunction. A lower percentage of cell apoptosis and SDF-1α levels was found in the liver and spleen of the intrapulmonary ALI mice than in those of the extrapulmonary ALI mice. These results suggested that the two ALI models were accompanied with different degrees of extrapulmonary organ damage, which resulted in differences in the trafficking and accumulation of MSCs to the injured lung and consequently accounted for different therapeutic effects of MSCs for lung repair in the two ALI models. These data suggest that intravenous administration of MSCs has a greater potential for the treatment of intrapulmonary ALI than extrapulmonary ALI matched with lung injury severity; these differences were due to more recruitment of MSCs in the lungs of intrapulmonary ALI mice than those of extrapulmonary ALI mice. This finding may contribute to the clinical use of MSCs for the treatment of ALI. PMID

  20. Scaling of lunge feeding in rorqual whales: an integrated model of engulfment duration.

    PubMed

    Potvin, J; Goldbogen, J A; Shadwick, R E

    2010-12-01

    Rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) obtain their food by lunge feeding, a dynamic process that involves the intermittent engulfment and filtering of large amounts of water and prey. During a lunge, whales accelerate to high speed and open their mouth wide, thereby exposing a highly distensible buccal cavity to the flow and facilitating its inflation. Unsteady hydrodynamic models suggest that the muscles associated with the ventral groove blubber undergo eccentric contraction in order to stiffen and control the inflation of the buccal cavity; in doing so the engulfed water mass is accelerated forward as the whale's body slows down. Although the basic mechanics of lunge feeding are relatively well known, the scaling of this process remains poorly understood, particularly with regards to its duration (from mouth opening to closure). Here we formulate a new theory of engulfment time which integrates prey escape behavior with the mechanics of the whale's body, including lunge speed and acceleration, gape angle dynamics, and the controlled inflation of the buccal cavity. Given that the complex interaction between these factors must be highly coordinated in order to maximize engulfment volume, the proposed formulation rests on the scenario of Synchronized Engulfment, whereby the filling of the cavity (posterior to the temporomandibular joint) coincides with the moment of maximum gape. When formulated specifically for large rorquals feeding on krill, our analysis predicts that engulfment time increases with body size, but in amounts dictated by the specifics of krill escape and avoidance kinematics. The predictions generated by the model are corroborated by limited empirical data on a species-specific basis, particularly for humpback and blue whales chasing krill. A sensitivity analysis applied to all possible sized fin whales also suggests that engulfment duration and lunge speed will increase intra-specifically with body size under a wide range of predator-prey scenarios

  1. Scaling of lunge feeding in rorqual whales: an integrated model of engulfment duration.

    PubMed

    Potvin, J; Goldbogen, J A; Shadwick, R E

    2010-12-01

    Rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) obtain their food by lunge feeding, a dynamic process that involves the intermittent engulfment and filtering of large amounts of water and prey. During a lunge, whales accelerate to high speed and open their mouth wide, thereby exposing a highly distensible buccal cavity to the flow and facilitating its inflation. Unsteady hydrodynamic models suggest that the muscles associated with the ventral groove blubber undergo eccentric contraction in order to stiffen and control the inflation of the buccal cavity; in doing so the engulfed water mass is accelerated forward as the whale's body slows down. Although the basic mechanics of lunge feeding are relatively well known, the scaling of this process remains poorly understood, particularly with regards to its duration (from mouth opening to closure). Here we formulate a new theory of engulfment time which integrates prey escape behavior with the mechanics of the whale's body, including lunge speed and acceleration, gape angle dynamics, and the controlled inflation of the buccal cavity. Given that the complex interaction between these factors must be highly coordinated in order to maximize engulfment volume, the proposed formulation rests on the scenario of Synchronized Engulfment, whereby the filling of the cavity (posterior to the temporomandibular joint) coincides with the moment of maximum gape. When formulated specifically for large rorquals feeding on krill, our analysis predicts that engulfment time increases with body size, but in amounts dictated by the specifics of krill escape and avoidance kinematics. The predictions generated by the model are corroborated by limited empirical data on a species-specific basis, particularly for humpback and blue whales chasing krill. A sensitivity analysis applied to all possible sized fin whales also suggests that engulfment duration and lunge speed will increase intra-specifically with body size under a wide range of predator-prey scenarios

  2. Local Origin of Mesenchymal Cells in a Murine Orthotopic Lung Transplantation Model of Bronchiolitis Obliterans

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Takeshi; Walker, Natalie; Aoki, Yoshiro; Manning, Casey M.; Murdock, Benjamin J.; Myers, Jeffery L.; Lagstein, Amir; Osterholzer, John J.; Lama, Vibha N.

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans is the leading cause of chronic graft failure and long-term mortality in lung transplant recipients. Here, we used a novel murine model to characterize allograft fibrogenesis within a whole-lung microenvironment. Unilateral left lung transplantation was performed in mice across varying degrees of major histocompatibility complex mismatch combinations. B6D2F1/J (a cross between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J) (Haplotype H2b/d) lungs transplanted into DBA/2J (H2d) recipients were identified to show histopathology for bronchiolitis obliterans in all allogeneic grafts. Time course analysis showed an evolution from immune cell infiltration of the bronchioles and vessels at day 14, consistent with acute rejection and lymphocytic bronchitis, to subepithelial and intraluminal fibrotic lesions of bronchiolitis obliterans by day 28. Allografts at day 28 showed a significantly higher hydroxyproline content than the isografts (33.21 ± 1.89 versus 22.36 ± 2.33 μg/mL). At day 40 the hydroxyproline content had increased further (48.91 ± 7.09 μg/mL). Flow cytometric analysis was used to investigate the origin of mesenchymal cells in fibrotic allografts. Collagen I–positive cells (89.43% ± 6.53%) in day 28 allografts were H2Db positive, showing their donor origin. This novel murine model shows consistent and reproducible allograft fibrogenesis in the context of single-lung transplantation and represents a major step forward in investigating mechanisms of chronic graft failure. PMID:25848843

  3. Targeted Type 2 Alveolar Cell Depletion. A Dynamic Functional Model for Lung Injury Repair.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Orquidea; Hiatt, Michael J; Lundin, Amber; Lee, Jooeun; Reddy, Raghava; Navarro, Sonia; Kikuchi, Alex; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) are regarded as the progenitor population of the alveolus responsible for injury repair and homeostatic maintenance. Depletion of this population is hypothesized to underlie various lung pathologies. Current models of lung injury rely on either uncontrolled, nonspecific destruction of alveolar epithelia or on targeted, nontitratable levels of fixed AEC2 ablation. We hypothesized that discrete levels of AEC2 ablation would trigger stereotypical and informative patterns of repair. To this end, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the surfactant protein-C promoter drives expression of a mutant SR39TK herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase specifically in AEC2. Because of the sensitivity of SR39TK, low doses of ganciclovir can be administered to these animals to induce dose-dependent AEC2 depletion ranging from mild (50%) to lethal (82%) levels. We demonstrate that specific levels of AEC2 depletion cause altered expression patterns of apoptosis and repair proteins in surviving AEC2 as well as distinct changes in distal lung morphology, pulmonary function, collagen deposition, and expression of remodeling proteins in whole lung that persist for up to 60 days. We believe SPCTK mice demonstrate the utility of cell-specific expression of the SR39TK transgene for exerting fine control of target cell depletion. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that specific levels of type 2 alveolar epithelial cell depletion produce characteristic injury repair outcomes. Most importantly, use of these mice will contribute to a better understanding of the role of AEC2 in the initiation of, and response to, lung injury.

  4. Treatment of malignant effusion by oncolytic virotherapy in an experimental subcutaneous xenograft model of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is associated with advanced stages of lung cancer and is mainly dependent on invasion of the pleura and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by cancer cells. As MPE indicates an incurable disease with limited palliative treatment options and poor outcome, there is an urgent need for new and efficient treatment options. Methods In this study, we used subcutaneously generated PC14PE6 lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in athymic mice that developed subcutaneous malignant effusions (ME) which mimic pleural effusions of the orthotopic model. Using this approach monitoring of therapeutic intervention was facilitated by direct observation of subcutaneous ME formation without the need of sacrificing mice or special imaging equipment as in case of MPE. Further, we tested oncolytic virotherapy using Vaccinia virus as a novel treatment modality against ME in this subcutaneous PC14PE6 xenograft model of advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Results We demonstrated significant therapeutic efficacy of Vaccinia virus treatment of both advanced lung adenocarcinoma and tumor-associated ME. We attribute the efficacy to the virus-mediated reduction of tumor cell-derived VEGF levels in tumors, decreased invasion of tumor cells into the peritumoral tissue, and to viral infection of the blood vessel-invading tumor cells. Moreover, we showed that the use of oncolytic Vaccinia virus encoding for a single-chain antibody (scAb) against VEGF (GLAF-1) significantly enhanced mono-therapy of oncolytic treatment. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oncolytic virotherapy using tumor-specific Vaccinia virus represents a novel and promising treatment modality for therapy of ME associated with advanced lung cancer. PMID:23635329

  5. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Culture Extract from Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus Using a Rat Model of Chronic Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alasil, Saad Musbah; Omar, Rahmat; Yusof, Mohd Yasim

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a key regulator of virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Microorganisms that inhabit soil are of strategic importance in the discovery of compounds with anti-QS properties. The objective of the study was to test the culture extract of a taxonomically novel species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI for its inhibitory effects on the QS-controlled virulence factors and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. The Paenibacillus sp. culture extract was used to test its anti-QS effects on the LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyoverdin production, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa as well as evaluate its therapeutic effects on lung bacteriology, pathology, hematological profile, and serum antibody responses of experimental animals in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Results showed significant decrease in the activities of QS-controlled LasA protease, LasB elastase pyoverdin, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa caused by the culture extract. Moreover, the extract significantly prolonged the survival times of rats and facilitated the clearance of biofilm infections from infected lungs. In conclusion, the antiquorum sensing effects of culture extract from a novel species of Paenibacillus provide new insights to combat biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26904749

  6. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Culture Extract from Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus Using a Rat Model of Chronic Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Alasil, Saad Musbah; Omar, Rahmat; Ismail, Salmah; Yusof, Mohd Yasim

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a key regulator of virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Microorganisms that inhabit soil are of strategic importance in the discovery of compounds with anti-QS properties. The objective of the study was to test the culture extract of a taxonomically novel species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI for its inhibitory effects on the QS-controlled virulence factors and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. The Paenibacillus sp. culture extract was used to test its anti-QS effects on the LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyoverdin production, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa as well as evaluate its therapeutic effects on lung bacteriology, pathology, hematological profile, and serum antibody responses of experimental animals in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Results showed significant decrease in the activities of QS-controlled LasA protease, LasB elastase pyoverdin, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa caused by the culture extract. Moreover, the extract significantly prolonged the survival times of rats and facilitated the clearance of biofilm infections from infected lungs. In conclusion, the antiquorum sensing effects of culture extract from a novel species of Paenibacillus provide new insights to combat biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26904749

  7. Targeting interleukin-13 with tralokinumab attenuates lung fibrosis and epithelial damage in a humanized SCID idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis model.

    PubMed

    Murray, Lynne A; Zhang, Huilan; Oak, Sameer R; Coelho, Ana Lucia; Herath, Athula; Flaherty, Kevin R; Lee, Joyce; Bell, Matt; Knight, Darryl A; Martinez, Fernando J; Sleeman, Matthew A; Herzog, Erica L; Hogaboam, Cory M

    2014-05-01

    The aberrant fibrotic and repair responses in the lung are major hallmarks of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Numerous antifibrotic strategies have been used in the clinic with limited success, raising the possibility that an effective therapeutic strategy in this disease must inhibit fibrosis and promote appropriate lung repair mechanisms. IL-13 represents an attractive target in IPF, but its disease association and mechanism of action remains unknown. In the present study, an overexpression of IL-13 and IL-13 pathway markers was associated with IPF, particularly a rapidly progressive form of this disease. Targeting IL-13 in a humanized experimental model of pulmonary fibrosis using tralokinumab (CAT354) was found to therapeutically block aberrant lung remodeling in this model. However, targeting IL-13 was also found to promote lung repair and to restore epithelial integrity. Thus, targeting IL-13 inhibits fibrotic processes and enhances repair processes in the lung.

  8. Dynamic Characteristics of Mechanical Ventilation System of Double Lungs with Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure Model

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dongkai; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    In recent studies on the dynamic characteristics of ventilation system, it was considered that human had only one lung, and the coupling effect of double lungs on the air flow can not be illustrated, which has been in regard to be vital to life support of patients. In this article, to illustrate coupling effect of double lungs on flow dynamics of mechanical ventilation system, a mathematical model of a mechanical ventilation system, which consists of double lungs and a bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP) controlled ventilator, was proposed. To verify the mathematical model, a prototype of BIPAP system with a double-lung simulators and a BIPAP ventilator was set up for experimental study. Lastly, the study on the influences of key parameters of BIPAP system on dynamic characteristics was carried out. The study can be referred to in the development of research on BIPAP ventilation treatment and real respiratory diagnostics.

  9. Dynamic Characteristics of Mechanical Ventilation System of Double Lungs with Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure Model

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dongkai; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    In recent studies on the dynamic characteristics of ventilation system, it was considered that human had only one lung, and the coupling effect of double lungs on the air flow can not be illustrated, which has been in regard to be vital to life support of patients. In this article, to illustrate coupling effect of double lungs on flow dynamics of mechanical ventilation system, a mathematical model of a mechanical ventilation system, which consists of double lungs and a bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP) controlled ventilator, was proposed. To verify the mathematical model, a prototype of BIPAP system with a double-lung simulators and a BIPAP ventilator was set up for experimental study. Lastly, the study on the influences of key parameters of BIPAP system on dynamic characteristics was carried out. The study can be referred to in the development of research on BIPAP ventilation treatment and real respiratory diagnostics. PMID:27660646

  10. Regional pulmonary inflammation in an endotoxemic ovine acute lung injury model.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bustamante, A; Easley, R B; Fuld, M; Mulreany, D; Chon, D; Lewis, J F; Simon, B A

    2012-08-15

    The regional distribution of inflammation during acute lung injury (ALI) is not well known. In an ovine ALI model we studied regional alveolar inflammation, surfactant composition, and CT-derived regional specific volume change (sVol) and specific compliance (sC). 18 ventilated adult sheep received IV lipopolysaccharide (LPS) until severe ALI was achieved. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from apical and basal lung regions were obtained at baseline and injury time points, for analysis of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β), BAL protein and surfactant composition. Whole lung CT images were obtained in 4 additional sheep. BAL protein and IL-1β were significantly higher in injured apical vs. basal regions. No significant regional surfactant composition changes were observed. Baseline sVol and sC were lower in apex vs. base; ALI enhanced this cranio-caudal difference, reaching statistical significance only for sC. This study suggests that apical lung regions show greater inflammation than basal ones during IV LPS-induced ALI which may relate to differences in regional mechanical events.

  11. The protective effects of glutamine in a rat model of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Ming; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Li, Chien-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background The mortality rate of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is still high despite the use of protective ventilatory strategies. We sought to examine the pharmacological effects of glutamine (GLN) in a two-hit model of endotoxin-induced inflammation followed by ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). We hypothesized that the administration of GLN ameliorates the VILI. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and given lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intratracheally as a first hit to induce lung inflammation, followed 24 h later by a second hit of mechanical ventilation (MV) with either low tidal volume (6 mL/kg) with 5 cmH2O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or high tidal volume (22 mL/kg) with zero PEEP for 4 h. GLN or lactated Ringer’s solution as the placebo was administered intravenously 15 min prior to MV. Results In the LPS-challenged rats ventilated with high tidal volume, the treatment with GLN improved lung injury indices, lung mechanics and cytokine responses compared with the placebo group. Conclusions The administration of GLN given immediately prior to MV may be beneficial in the context of reducing VILI. PMID:25589963

  12. Evaluation of Lung Metastasis in Mouse Mammary Tumor Models by Quantitative Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Melissa A.; Grek, Christina L.; Ghatnekar, Gautam S.; Yeh, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the spread of malignant tumor cells from the primary cancer site to a distant organ and is the primary cause of cancer associated death 1. Common sites of metastatic spread include lung, lymph node, brain, and bone 2. Mechanisms that drive metastasis are intense areas of cancer research. Consequently, effective assays to measure metastatic burden in distant sites of metastasis are instrumental for cancer research. Evaluation of lung metastases in mammary tumor models is generally performed by gross qualitative observation of lung tissue following dissection. Quantitative methods of evaluating metastasis are currently limited to ex vivo and in vivo imaging based techniques that require user defined parameters. Many of these techniques are at the whole organism level rather than the cellular level 3–6. Although newer imaging methods utilizing multi-photon microscopy are able to evaluate metastasis at the cellular level 7, these highly elegant procedures are more suited to evaluating mechanisms of dissemination rather than quantitative assessment of metastatic burden. Here, a simple in vitro method to quantitatively assess metastasis is presented. Using quantitative Real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), tumor cell specific mRNA can be detected within the mouse lung tissue. PMID:26862835

  13. Antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory activity of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nintedanib in experimental models of lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wollin, Lutz; Maillet, Isabelle; Quesniaux, Valérie; Holweg, Alexander; Ryffel, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor nintedanib (BIBF 1120) is in clinical development for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To explore its mode of action, nintedanib was tested in human lung fibroblasts and mouse models of lung fibrosis. Human lung fibroblasts expressing platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and -β were stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor BB (homodimer) (PDGF-BB). Receptor activation was assessed by autophosphorylation and cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-induced fibroblast to myofibroblast transformation was determined by α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) mRNA analysis. Lung fibrosis was induced in mice by intratracheal bleomycin or silica particle administration. Nintedanib was administered every day by gavage at 30, 60, or 100 mg/kg. Preventive nintedanib treatment regimen started on the day that bleomycin was administered. Therapeutic treatment regimen started at various times after the induction of lung fibrosis. Bleomycin caused increased macrophages and lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), and collagen in lung tissue. Histology revealed chronic inflammation and fibrosis. Silica-induced lung pathology additionally showed elevated BAL neutrophils, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) levels, and granuloma formation. Nintedanib inhibited PDGF receptor activation, fibroblast proliferation, and fibroblast to myofibroblast transformation. Nintedanib significantly reduced BAL lymphocytes and neutrophils but not macrophages. Furthermore, interleukin-1β, KC, TIMP-1, and lung collagen were significantly reduced. Histologic analysis showed significantly diminished lung inflammation, granuloma formation, and fibrosis. The therapeutic effect was dependent on treatment start and duration. Nintedanib inhibited receptor tyrosine kinase activation and the proliferation and

  14. Mechanobiology in Lung Epithelial Cells: Measurements, Perturbations, and Responses

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Christopher M.; Roan, Esra; Navajas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells of the lung are located at the interface between the environment and the organism and serve many important functions including barrier protection, fluid balance, clearance of particulate, initiation of immune responses, mucus and surfactant production, and repair following injury. Because of the complex structure of the lung and its cyclic deformation during the respiratory cycle, epithelial cells are exposed to continuously varying levels of mechanical stresses. While normal lung function is maintained under these conditions, changes in mechanical stresses can have profound effects on the function of epithelial cells and therefore the function of the organ. In this review, we will describe the types of stresses and strains in the lungs, how these are transmitted, and how these may vary in human disease or animal models. Many approaches have been developed to better understand how cells sense and respond to mechanical stresses, and we will discuss these approaches and how they have been used to study lung epithelial cells in culture. Understanding how cells sense and respond to changes in mechanical stresses will contribute to our understanding of the role of lung epithelial cells during normal function and development and how their function may change in diseases such as acute lung injury, asthma, emphysema, and fibrosis. PMID:23728969

  15. Conventional physiotherapy and forced expiration manoeuvres have similar effects on tracheobronchial clearance.

    PubMed

    van Hengstum, M; Festen, J; Beurskens, C; Hankel, M; Beekman, F; Corstens, F

    1988-08-01

    This study compared the effect of two forms of chest physiotherapy. In the "conventional" form of physiotherapy, postural drainage was combined with percussion and directed coughing. The other, relatively new form of physiotherapy, was the forced expiration technique, i.e. huffing combined with postural drainage, breathing exercises and, if necessary, coughing. Eight patients (six with cystic fibrosis, two with agammaglobulinaemia) took part in the study. No difference was found in tracheobronchial clearance, regional lung clearance, sputum production or lung function between the two forms of treatment. The forced expiration technique can be performed without an assistant. Therefore, it is concluded that in general the forced expiration technique is preferable.

  16. Lung cancer risk prediction to select smokers for screening CT--a model based on the Italian COSMOS trial.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Bellomi, Massimo; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Bertolotti, Raffaella; Rotmensz, Nicole; Field, John K; Decensi, Andrea; Veronesi, Giulia

    2011-11-01

    Screening with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) has been shown to significantly reduce lung cancer mortality but the optimal target population and time interval to subsequent screening are yet to be defined. We developed two models to stratify individual smokers according to risk of developing lung cancer. We first used the number of lung cancers detected at baseline screening CT in the 5,203 asymptomatic participants of the COSMOS trial to recalibrate the Bach model, which we propose using to select smokers for screening. Next, we incorporated lung nodule characteristics and presence of emphysema identified at baseline CT into the Bach model and proposed the resulting multivariable model to predict lung cancer risk in screened smokers after baseline CT. Age and smoking exposure were the main determinants of lung cancer risk. The recalibrated Bach model accurately predicted lung cancers detected during the first year of screening. Presence of nonsolid nodules (RR = 10.1, 95% CI = 5.57-18.5), nodule size more than 8 mm (RR = 9.89, 95% CI = 5.84-16.8), and emphysema (RR = 2.36, 95% CI = 1.59-3.49) at baseline CT were all significant predictors of subsequent lung cancers. Incorporation of these variables into the Bach model increased the predictive value of the multivariable model (c-index = 0.759, internal validation). The recalibrated Bach model seems suitable for selecting the higher risk population for recruitment for large-scale CT screening. The Bach model incorporating CT findings at baseline screening could help defining the time interval to subsequent screening in individual participants. Further studies are necessary to validate these models.

  17. In Vivo Evaluation of Lung Microwave Ablation in a Porcine Tumor Mimic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Planche, Olivier; Teriitehau, Christophe; Boudabous, Sana; Robinson, Joey Marie; Rao, Pramod; Deschamps, Frederic; Farouil, Geoffroy; Baere, Thierry de

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the microwave ablation of created tumor mimics in the lung of a large animal model (pigs), with examination of the ablative synergy of multiple antennas. Fifty-six tumor-mimic models of various sizes were created in 15 pigs by using barium-enriched minced collected thigh muscle injected into the lung of the same animal. Tumors were ablated under fluoroscopic guidance by single-antenna and multiple-antenna microwaves. Thirty-five tumor models were treated in 11 pigs with a single antenna at 75 W for 15 min, with 15 measuring 20 mm in diameter, 10 measuring 30 mm, and 10 measuring 40 mm. Mean circularity of the single-antenna ablation zones measured 0.64 {+-} 0.12, with a diameter of 35.7 {+-} 8.7 mm along the axis of the antenna and 32.7 {+-} 12.8 mm perpendicular to the feeding point. Multiple-antenna delivery of 75 W for 15 min caused intraprocedural death of 2 animals; modified protocol to 60 W for 10 min resulted in an ablation zone with a diameter of 43.0 {+-} 7.7 along the axis of the antenna and 54.8 {+-} 8.5 mm perpendicular to the feeding point; circularity was 0.70 {+-} 0.10. A single microwave antenna can create ablation zones large enough to cover lung tumor mimic models of {<=}4 cm with no heat sink effect from vessels of {<=}6 mm. Synergic use of 3 antennas allows ablation of larger volumes than single-antenna or radiofrequency ablation, but great caution must be taken when 3 antennas are used simultaneously in the lung in clinical practice.

  18. Acute exposure to acid fog. Effects on mucociliary clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Laube, B.L.; Bowes, S.M. III; Links, J.M.; Thomas, K.K.; Frank, R. )

    1993-05-01

    Submicrometric sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol can affect mucociliary clearance without eliciting irritative symptoms or changes in pulmonary function. The effect of larger fog droplets containing H2SO4 on mucociliary clearance is unknown. We quantified mucociliary clearance from the trachea (n = 4) and small airways (n = 7) of young healthy male adults after an acute exposure to H2SO4 fog (MMAD = 10.3 microns; pH = 2.0; liquid water content = 481 +/- 65 mg/m3; osmolarity = 30 mOsm). Acid fog (AF) or saline fog (SF) (10.9 microns; 492 +/- 116 mg/m3; 30 mOsm) was administered for 40 min of unencumbered breathing (no mouth-piece) at rest and for 20 min of exercise sufficient to produce oronasal breathing. Fog exposures were followed by a methacholine (MCh) challenge (a measure of airway reactivity) or inhalation of technetium-99M radioaerosol (MMAD = 3.4 microns) on 2 study days each. Changes in symptoms and forced ventilatory function were also assessed. Clearance was quantified from computer-assisted analyses of gamma camera images of the lower respiratory tract in terms of %removal/min of the radiolabel from the trachea 25 min after inhalation and from the outer zone of the right lung after 1.9 to 3 h. Symptoms, forced ventilatory function, and MCh response were unaffected by either fog. Tracheal clearance was more rapid in four of four subjects after AF (0.83 +/- 1.58% removal/min) compared with that after SF (-0.54 +/- 0.85% removal/min). Outer zone clearance was more rapid in six of seven subjects after AF (0.22 +/- 0.15% removal/min) compared with that after SF (0.01 +/- 0.09% removal/min).

  19. Bioaerosols in the lungs of subjects with different ages-part 1: deposition modeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In this contribution the inhalation and deposition of bioaerosols including particles with various shapes and sizes were investigated for probands with different ages (1, 5, 15 and 20 y). The study should help to increase our knowledge with regard to the behavior of variably shaped and sized particles in lungs being subject to different developmental stages. Methods Simulation of particle transport and deposition in single structures of the respiratory tract was conducted by using a stochastic model of the tracheobronchial tree and well-validated analytical and empirical deposition formulae. Possible effects of particle geometry on deposition were taken into consideration by application of the aerodynamic diameter concept. Age-dependent lung morphometry and breathing parameters were computed by using appropriate scaling factors. Results Theoretical simulations came to the result that bioparticle deposition in infants and children clearly differs from that in adolescents and adults insofar as the amount of deposited mass exhibits a positive correlation with age. Nose breathing results in higher extrathoracic deposition rates than mouth breathing and, as a consequence of that, lower particle amounts are enabled to enter the lung structures after passing the nasal airways. Under sitting breathing conditions highest alveolar deposition rates were calculated for particles adopting aerodynamic diameters of 10 nm and 4 µm, respectively. Conclusions The study comes to the conclusion that bioparticles have a lower chance to reach the alveoli in infants’ and children’s lungs, but show a higher alveolar deposition probability in the lungs of adolescents and adults. Despite of this circumstance also young subjects may increasingly suffer from biogenic particle burden, when they are subject to a long-term exposure to certain bioaerosols. PMID:27386485

  20. Pulmonary Delivery of Butyrylcholinesterase as a Model Protein to the Lung.

    PubMed

    Rahhal, Tojan B; Fromen, Catherine A; Wilson, Erin M; Kai, Marc P; Shen, Tammy W; Luft, J Christopher; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary delivery has great potential for delivering biologics to the lung if the challenges of maintaining activity, stability, and ideal aerosol characteristics can be overcome. To study the interactions of a biologic in the lung, we chose butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) as our model enzyme, which has application for use as a bioscavenger protecting against organophosphate exposure or for use with pseudocholinesterase deficient patients. In mice, orotracheal administration of free BuChE resulted in 72 h detection in the lungs and 48 h in the broncheoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Free BuChE administered to the lung of all mouse backgrounds (Nude, C57BL/6, and BALB/c) showed evidence of an acute cytokine (IL-6, TNF-α, MIP2, and KC) and cellular immune response that subsided within 48 h, indicating relatively safe administration of this non-native biologic. We then developed a formulation of BuChE using Particle Replication in Non-Wetting Templates (PRINT). Aerosol characterization demonstrated biologically active BuChE 1 μm cylindrical particles with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 2.77 μm, indicative of promising airway deposition via dry powder inhalers (DPI). Furthermore, particulate BuChE delivered via dry powder insufflation showed residence time of 48 h in the lungs and BALF. The in vivo residence time, immune response, and safety of particulate BuChE delivered via a pulmonary route, along with the cascade impaction distribution of dry powder PRINT BuChE, showed promise in the ability to deliver active enzymes with ideal deposition characteristics. These findings provide evidence for the feasibility of optimizing the use of BuChE in the clinic; PRINT BuChE particles can be readily formulated for use in DPIs, providing a convenient and effective treatment option. PMID:27012934

  1. Enhanced cough reflex in a model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Blanco, Joan Antoni; Aguilera, Mònica; Domènech, Anna; Tarrasón, Gema; Prats, Neus; Miralpeix, Montse; De Alba, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    Fibrotic lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, are associated with spontaneous dry cough and hypersensitivity to tussive agents. Understanding the pathophysiology driving enhanced cough may help us to define better therapies for patients. We hypothesized that lung fibrosis induced by intratracheal bleomycin would exacerbate the cough reflex induced by tussive agents in guinea pigs. Disease progression in the lungs was characterized at days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after bleomycin administration. Inflammatory and fibrotic markers, as well as neurotrophin levels, were assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and/or lung tissue. Cough sensitivity to citric acid, capsaicin and allylisothiocyanate was evaluated in conscious animals at days 14 and 21 after bleomycin administration. Pulmonary lesions evolved from an early inflammatory phase (from day 1 to day 7) to a fibrotic stage (between days 14 and 28). Fibrosis was related to increased levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (day 21: saline, 0.26 ng/ml; bleomycin, 0.49 ng/ml). At day 14, we also observed increased cough reflexes to citric acid (163%), capsaicin (125%) and allylisothiocyanate (178%). Cough exacerbation persisted, but at a lower extent, by day 21 for capsaicin (100%) and allylisothiocyanate (54%). Moreover, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, suggested to induce nerve remodelling in chronic cough, were also enhanced (day 1: saline, 14.21 pg/ml; bleomycin, 30.09 pg/ml). In summary, our model of bleomycin-induced cough exacerbation may be a valuable tool to investigate cough hypersensitivity and develop antitussive therapies for fibrotic lung diseases.

  2. Modeling Lung Carcinogenesis in Radon-Exposed Miner Cohorts: Accounting for Missing Information on Smoking.

    PubMed

    van Dillen, Teun; Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kreuzer, Michaela; Grosche, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological miner cohort data used to estimate lung cancer risks related to occupational radon exposure often lack cohort-wide information on exposure to tobacco smoke, a potential confounder and important effect modifier. We have developed a method to project data on smoking habits from a case-control study onto an entire cohort by means of a Monte Carlo resampling technique. As a proof of principle, this method is tested on a subcohort of 35,084 former uranium miners employed at the WISMUT company (Germany), with 461 lung cancer deaths in the follow-up period 1955-1998. After applying the proposed imputation technique, a biologically-based carcinogenesis model is employed to analyze the cohort's lung cancer mortality data. A sensitivity analysis based on a set of 200 independent projections with subsequent model analyses yields narrow distributions of the free model parameters, indicating that parameter values are relatively stable and independent of individual projections. This technique thus offers a possibility to account for unknown smoking habits, enabling us to unravel risks related to radon, to smoking, and to the combination of both.

  3. An orthotopic mouse model of small cell lung cancer reflects the clinical course in patients.

    PubMed

    Taromi, Sanaz; Kayser, Gian; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Reichardt, Wilfried; Braun, Friederike; Weber, Wolfgang A; Zeiser, Robert; Burger, Meike

    2016-10-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive subtype of lung cancer with very poor prognosis due to early metastatic spread and development of chemoresistance. In the last 30 years the study of SCLC has been constrained by a lack of primary human tumor specimen thus highlighting the need of a suitable mouse model. In this article we present the establishment of an orthotopic xenograft mouse model which accurately reproduced the clinical course of SCLC. Orthotopic implantation enabled engraftment of primary lung tumors in all injected mice. Furthermore, immunodeficiency of mice allowed formation of spontaneous metastases in characteristic organs. Bioluminescence Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron emission tomography were applied to monitor engraftment, metabolism and the exact growth of tumors over time. In order to mimic the extensive disease stage, mice were injected with aggressive human chemoresistant cells leading to development of chemoresistant tumors and early metastatic spread. As a proof of concept treatment of tumor-bearing mice with conventional chemotherapeutics reduced tumor volumes, but a complete regression of tumors was not achieved. By mimicking the extensive disease stage our mouse model can facilitate the study of mechanisms contributing to chemoresistance and metastasis formation, as well as drug screening and evaluation of new treatment strategies for SCLC patients. PMID:27380917

  4. Modeling Lung Carcinogenesis in Radon-Exposed Miner Cohorts: Accounting for Missing Information on Smoking.

    PubMed

    van Dillen, Teun; Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kreuzer, Michaela; Grosche, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological miner cohort data used to estimate lung cancer risks related to occupational radon exposure often lack cohort-wide information on exposure to tobacco smoke, a potential confounder and important effect modifier. We have developed a method to project data on smoking habits from a case-control study onto an entire cohort by means of a Monte Carlo resampling technique. As a proof of principle, this method is tested on a subcohort of 35,084 former uranium miners employed at the WISMUT company (Germany), with 461 lung cancer deaths in the follow-up period 1955-1998. After applying the proposed imputation technique, a biologically-based carcinogenesis model is employed to analyze the cohort's lung cancer mortality data. A sensitivity analysis based on a set of 200 independent projections with subsequent model analyses yields narrow distributions of the free model parameters, indicating that parameter values are relatively stable and independent of individual projections. This technique thus offers a possibility to account for unknown smoking habits, enabling us to unravel risks related to radon, to smoking, and to the combination of both. PMID:27198876

  5. A Prediction Model for ROS1-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinomas based on Histologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jing; Kong, Mei; Sun, Ke; Wang, Bo; Chen, Xi; Ding, Wei; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Aims To identify the clinical and histological characteristics of ROS1-rearranged non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) and build a prediction model to prescreen suitable patients for molecular testing. Methods and Results We identified 27 cases of ROS1-rearranged lung adenocarcinomas in 1165 patients with NSCLCs confirmed by real-time PCR and FISH and performed univariate and multivariate analyses to identify predictive factors associated with ROS1 rearrangement and finally developed prediction model. Detected with ROS1 immunochemistry, 59 cases of 1165 patients had a certain degree of ROS1 expression. Among these cases, 19 cases (68%, 19/28) with 3+ and 8 cases (47%, 8/17) with 2+ staining were ROS1 rearrangement verified by real-time PCR and FISH. In the resected group, the acinar-predominant growth pattern was the most commonly observed (57%, 8/14), while in the biopsy group, solid patterns were the most frequently observed (78%, 7/13). Based on multiple logistic regression analysis, we determined that female sex, cribriform structure and the presence of psammoma body were the three most powerful indicators of ROS1 rearrangement, and we have developed a predictive model for the presence of ROS1 rearrangements in lung adenocarcinomas. Conclusions Female, cribriform structure and presence of psammoma body were the three most powerful indicator of ROS1 rearrangement status, and predictive formula was helpful in screening ROS1-rearranged NSCLC, especially for ROS1 immunochemistry equivocal cases. PMID:27648828

  6. Antibody-Mediated Clearance of Alphavirus Infection from Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Beth; Hardwick, J. Marie; Trapp, Bruce D.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Griffin, Diane E.

    1991-11-01

    Humoral immunity is important for protection against viral infection and neutralization of extracellular virus, but clearance of virus from infected tissues is thought to be mediated solely by cellular immunity. However, in a SCID mouse model of persistent alphavirus encephalomyelitis, adoptive transfer of hyperimmune serum resulted in clearance of infectious virus and viral RNA from the nervous system, whereas adoptive transfer of sensitized T lymphocytes had no effect on viral replication. Three monoclonal antibodies to two different epitopes on the E2 envelope glycoprotein mediated viral clearance. Treatment of alphavirus-infected primary cultured rat neurons with these monoclonal antibodies to E2 resulted in decreased viral protein synthesis, followed by gradual termination of mature infectious virion production. Thus, antibody can mediate clearance of alphavirus infection from neurons by restricting viral gene expression.

  7. Two alternative models concerning the perialveolar microcirculation in mammalian lungs.

    PubMed

    Günther, Bruno; Morgado, Enrique; Cociña, Manuela

    2005-01-01

    Despite the fact that the concept of sheet-flow in the pulmonary microcirculation of mammals was introduced more than three decades ago, the capillary circulatory model still prevails in the physiological literature. Since cardiac output is identical in the systemic and in pulmonary circulations, it is noteworthy that in the former, the resulting arterial pressure is five times higher than that of the latter, which means that the corresponding microcirculations must be radically different. The present study addresses this problem from both morphological and physiological perspectives.

  8. On the Pathogenesis of Acute Exacerbations of Mucoobstructive Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Mucoobstructive lung diseases have highlighted the importance of a proper description of the normal mucus clearance system. A useful description of the normal mucus clearance apparatus requires the presence of two gels on the airway surface (i.e., a mucus layer gel and a periciliary gel). Importantly, most mucoobstructive lung diseases are distributed heterogeneously in the lung, and exacerbations may reflect spread of the disease to previously normal areas. The spread may reflect disturbances in the balance of water between the two gel layers, producing heterogeneous mucus adhesion and infection within the lung. Ultimately, spread can produce losses of lung function that may be associated with acute exacerbation frequency.

  9. On the Pathogenesis of Acute Exacerbations of Mucoobstructive Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mucoobstructive lung diseases have highlighted the importance of a proper description of the normal mucus clearance system. A useful description of the normal mucus clearance apparatus requires the presence of two gels on the airway surface (i.e., a mucus layer gel and a periciliary gel). Importantly, most mucoobstructive lung diseases are distributed heterogeneously in the lung, and exacerbations may reflect spread of the disease to previously normal areas. The spread may reflect disturbances in the balance of water between the two gel layers, producing heterogeneous mucus adhesion and infection within the lung. Ultimately, spread can produce losses of lung function that may be associated with acute exacerbation frequency. PMID:26595733

  10. Particle-macrophage relationships during the clearance of particles from the alveolar macrophage compartment

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Toevs, K.E.; Valdez, Y.E.; Sebring, R.J.

    1988-11-01

    In this study, we quantitatively characterized the distributions of particles among lavageable AM over a 30 day period after the acute intratracheal instillation of /approximately/3 mg of 1.9 ..mu..m dia. polystyrene microspheres into the lungs of rats. Information obtained for particles retained in the lavageable AM compartment and particle-AM distribution data were collectively examined using a simple, first order kinetic model for AM removal from the lung. The results of our analyses suggest that a volume load of particles in a macrophage up to at least /approximately/450 ..mu..m/sup 3/ does not inhibit the mobilization of macrophages from the alveolar compartment. Additionally, the kinetic analyses of the particle-macrophage distributions suggest that macrophages that replenish those AM that are translocated from the lung on a continual basis during alveolar clearance are not and/or do not remain particle-free in the alveoli. This latter observation can be explained by: (1) the influx of particle-bearing macrophages into the alveoli, or (2) the in situ proliferation of particle bearing AM, or (3) the release of particles by AM and the subsequent phagocytosis of the particles by newly arrived cells, or (4) a combination of these possibilities. 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The lung mucosa: A critical environmental battleground

    SciTech Connect

    Bergofsky, E.H. )

    1991-10-21

    The entirety of the lung mucous membrane and epithelial surface are exposed to the environment; react to noxious environmental gases, vapors, and particles; and are under physiologic and humoral mediator control. In recent years much information has been gained regarding the mucous membrane of the tracheobronchial tree, its physiology, and its reaction to environmental hazards. The pharmacologic control of secretion, ciliary beat rate, and net mucus flow governs both the clearance of mucus and the clearance of particles. The physiologic factors that govern this clearance mechanism can be influenced by pharmacologic agents in patients with lung disease and presumably also in patients with purely environmental injury. The effects of ozone on lung function, lung compliance, and airway resistance have been well documented in adults and children. Environmental ozone also alters mucous membrane function, increasing mucociliary secretion rate and peripheral lung clearance. The speed-up in clearance implies an increase in mucous gland secretion, which may act unfavorably when ciliary beat is damaged, glandular hypertrophy is present, or flow-limiting segments exist, as is usually the case in bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thus, whereas the consequences of ozone may be modest for a normal, healthy individual, they presumably increase hazards for the individual with lung disease or damage. For this reason, efforts should be made to control or limit damage by ozone or other environmental inhalants in such individuals. This goal may be facilitated by a wider knowledge of the pharmacologic control of the mucous membrane.30 references.

  12. [Airway clearance techniques in chronic obstructive pulmonary syndrome : 2011 update].

    PubMed

    Opdekamp, C

    2011-09-01

    For many years the airway clearance techniques used in chest physical therapy were assimilated with the singular technique of postural drainage, percussions and vibrations. However the side effects and counter indications and the lack of scientific proof regarding this technique have forced reflection and development of other techniques more comfortable and without deleterious effects. If all these techniques show a high efficiency in terms of improved mucociliary clearance, the literature is unanimous on how little effect these techniques have in the short and the long-term with regards to lung function and arterial blood gases. In view of the scientific literature, it is clear that the airway clearance techniques don't have the same recognition concerning their efficiency in all obstructive pulmonary diseases. As the cornerstone in the management of cystic fibrosis, the efficiency of the bronchial hygiene techniques are in general poorly documented in the management of the non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, bronchitis or emphysema. The use of the chest physical therapy seems more to do with the interpretation of the imagery and symptomatology. The airway clearance techniques should be individualised according to symptoms, the amount of expectorated mucus and the objectives signs of secretions retention or subjective signs of difficulty expectorating secretions with progression of the disease. PMID:22034769

  13. Inherited Disorders of Bilirubin Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-01-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective 1) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, 2) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g. Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), 3) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or 4) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  14. Inherited disorders of bilirubin clearance.

    PubMed

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-03-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective (i) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, (ii) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g., Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), (iii) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or (iv) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  15. Semi-empirical stochastic model of aerosol bolus dispersion in the human lung.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Werner; Pawlak, Elzbieta; Sturm, Robert

    2008-09-01

    Aerosol bolus dispersion, that is, the broadening of an inhaled narrow aerosol bolus upon exhalation, was simulated by Monte Carlo methods using a stochastic, asymmetric morphometric model of the human lung. Physical mechanisms considered to contribute to bolus dispersion were (1) axial diffusion in conductive airways, approximated by effective diffusivities, (2) convective mixing at airway bifurcation sites, (3) differences in inspiratory and expiratory velocity profiles, (4) mixing with residual air in alveoli, and (5) inhomogeneous ventilation of the lung lobes due to asymmetric flow spitting at bifurcations and asymmetric and asynchronous filling of the five lung lobes. Theoretical predictions of the bolus dispersion model were compared to experimental data for 79 healthy volunteers, which provide detailed information on statistical bolus parameters (half-width, standard deviation, skewness, and mode shift) and total bolus deposition as a function of the depth of bolus penetration into the airway system. Predicted bolus dispersion and deposition data show excellent agreement with the published experimental data, suggesting that axial diffusion in conductive airways and convective mixing in alveoli, resulting in irreversible particle transport, are the major determinants of bolus dispersion. The variability and asymmetry of the branching airway network, leading to asymmetric flow splitting at airway bifurcations, greatly enhances the effect of irreversibility and the resulting dispersion of the inhaled bolus.

  16. Application of an artificial neural network model for selection of potential lung cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ligor, Tomasz; Pater, Łukasz; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2015-06-01

    Determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the exhaled breath samples of lung cancer patients and healthy controls was carried out by SPME-GC/MS (solid phase microextraction- gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry) analyses. In order to compensate for the volatile exogenous contaminants, ambient air blank samples were also collected and analyzed. We recruited a total of 123 patients with biopsy-confirmed lung cancer and 361 healthy controls to find the potential lung cancer biomarkers. Automatic peak deconvolution and identification were performed using chromatographic data processing software (AMDIS with NIST database). All of the VOCs sample data operation, storage and management were performed using the SQL (structured query language) relational database. The selected eight VOCs could be possible biomarker candidates. In cross-validation on test data sensitivity was 63.5% and specificity 72.4% AUC 0.65. The low performance of the model has been mainly due to overfitting and the exogenous VOCs that exist in breath. The dedicated software implementing a multilayer neural network using a genetic algorithm for training was built. Further work is needed to confirm the performance of the created experimental model. PMID:25944812

  17. A deformable lung tumor tracking method in fluoroscopic video using active shape models: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J; Schowengerdt, Robert A; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-09-01

    A dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) can be used to track a moving target during radiotherapy. One of the major benefits for DMLC tumor tracking is that, in addition to the compensation for tumor translational motion, DMLC can also change the aperture shape to conform to a deforming tumor projection in the beam's eye view. This paper presents a method that can track a deforming lung tumor in fluoroscopic video using active shape models (ASM) (Cootes et al 1995 Comput. Vis. Image Underst. 61 38-59). The method was evaluated by comparing tracking results against tumor projection contours manually edited by an expert observer. The evaluation shows the feasibility of using this method for precise tracking of lung tumors with deformation, which is important for DMLC-based real-time tumor tracking.

  18. Application to Rat Lung of the Extended Rorschach-Hazlewood Model of Spin-Lattice Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackmann, Andreas; Ailion, David C.; Ganesan, Krishnamurthy; Goodrich, K. Craig; Chen, Songhua; Laicher, Gernot; Cutillo, Antonio G.

    1996-02-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation timeT1was measured in excised degassed (airless) rat lungs over the frequency range 6.7 to 80.5 MHz. The observed frequency dependence was fitted successfully to the water-biopolymer cross-relaxation theory proposed by H. E. Rorschach and C. F. Hazlewood (RH) [J. Magn. Reson.70,79 (1986)]. The rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation timeT1ρwas also measured in rat lung fragments over the frequency range 0.56 to 5.6 kHz, and the observed frequency dependence was explained with an extension of the RH model. The agreement between the theory and the experimental data in both cases is good.

  19. Volume and secretion rate of lung liquid in the final days of gestation and labour in the fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Riccardo E; Ramsden, C Andrew; Neil, Heather L; Kyriakides, Mary A; Berger, Philip J

    2001-01-01

    Most of the liquid that fills the lung of the fetal sheep in late gestation is cleared by the end of labour. Clearance of this liquid has a beneficial effect on postnatal gas exchange and therefore represents an important adaptation for postnatal life. Despite its importance, there is disagreement about whether clearance begins prior to labour, or occurs entirely within labour. To address this issue, we made serial determinations of lung liquid volume by indicator dilution during late gestation and labour in the fetal sheep. Regression analysis demonstrated that lung liquid volume exhibited a plateau level in the near-term fetus before it began to decline. Two models provided a fit to the decline in volume. In one, lung liquid clearance occurred in two linear phases, the first beginning 70 h before the study was terminated when the ewe was in advanced labour, the second occupying the last 8 h of the study period. In the initial phase, average lung liquid volume fell from 38.3 to 26.4 ml kg−1 before a rapid decline in the second phase reduced the volume to 13.8 ml kg−1. An exponential decay model was also found to fit the data; this showed a gradual decline in lung liquid volume in the 2 days preceding onset of labour, followed by a much more rapid decline within labour. The rate of lung liquid secretion also declined in two linear phases, both of which commenced earlier than the changes in lung liquid volume. An exponential decay model also gave a significant fit to the data, but the fit was significantly weaker than that achieved with the two-slope model. We conclude that clearance of lung liquid begins well before commencement of labour in the full term fetal sheep, and then accelerates once labour is established. In our study, lung liquid volume fell even in the absence of reabsorption of liquid across the pulmonary epithelium, indicating that outflow of liquid through the trachea must have occurred at a rate in excess of the secretion rate. PMID:11559783

  20. Lamb Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus–Associated Lung Disease: Insights to Pathogenesis and Novel Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a risk factor for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and hospitalization. The pathogenesis underlying this is not fully understood, and in vivo studies are needed to better clarify essential cellular features and molecular mechanisms. Such studies include analysis of lung tissue from affected human infants and various animal models. The preterm and newborn lamb lung has developmental, structural, cellular, physiologic, and immunologic features similar to that of human infants. Also, the lamb lung is susceptible to various strains of RSV that infect infants and cause similar bronchiolar lesions. Studies in lambs suggest that viral replication in airways (especially bronchioles) is extensive by 4 days after infection, along with bronchiolitis characterized by degeneration and necrosis of epithelial cells, syncytial cell formation, neutrophil infiltration, epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and innate and adaptive immune responses. RSV bronchiolitis greatly affects airflow and gaseous exchange. RSV disease severity is increased in preterm lambs compared with full-term lambs; similar to human infants. The lamb is conducive to experimental assessment of novel, mechanistic therapeutic interventions such as delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor and enhancement of airway epithelial oxidative responses, Club (Clara) cell protein 10, and synthesized compounds such as nanobodies. In contrast, exposure of the fetal ovine lung in vivo to ethanol, a risk factor for preterm birth, reduces pulmonary alveolar development and surfactant protein A expression. Because the formalin-inactivated RSV vaccination enhances some inflammatory responses to RSV infection in lambs, this model has the potential to assess mechanisms of formalin-inactivated RSV enhanced disease as well as newly developed vaccines. PMID:24936027

  1. Size Influences the Effect of Hydrophobic Nanoparticles on Lung Surfactant Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Mridula V.; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Koshkina, Olga; Maskos, Michael; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar lung surfactant (LS) is a complex lipid protein mixture that forms an interfacial monolayer reducing the surface tension to near zero values and thus preventing the lungs from collapse. Due to the expanding field of nanotechnology and the corresponding unavoidable exposure of human beings from the air, it is crucial to study the potential effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on the structural organization of the lung surfactant system. In the present study, we investigated both, the domain structure in pure DPPC monolayers as well as in lung surfactant model systems. In the pure lipid system we found that two different sized hydrophobic polymeric nanoparticles with diameter of ∼12 nm and ∼136 nm have contrasting effect on the functional and structural behavior. The small nanoparticles inserted into fluid domains at the LE-LC phase transition are not visibly disturbing the phase transition but disrupting the domain morphology of the LE phase. The large nanoparticles led to an expanded isotherm and to a significant decrease in the line tension and thus to a drastic disruption of the domain structures at a much lower number of nanoparticles with respect to the lipid. The surface activity of the model LS films again showed drastic variations due to presence of different sized NPs illustrated by the film balance isotherms and the atomic force microscopy. AFM revealed laterally profuse multilayer protrusion formation on compression but only in the presence of 136 nm sized nanoparticles. Moreover we investigated the vesicle insertion process into a preformed monolayer. A severe inhibition was observed only in the presence of ∼136 nm NPs compared to minor effects in the presence of ∼12 nm NPs. Our study clearly shows that the size of the nanoparticles made of the same material determines the interaction with biological membranes. PMID:24411261

  2. Home energy efficiency and radon related risk of lung cancer: modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Milner, James; Shrubsole, Clive; Das, Payel; Jones, Benjamin; Ridley, Ian; Chalabi, Zaid; Hamilton, Ian; Armstrong, Ben; Davies, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of reducing home ventilation as part of household energy efficiency measures on deaths from radon related lung cancer. Design Modelling study. Setting England. Intervention Home energy efficiency interventions, motivated in part by targets for reducing greenhouse gases, which entail reduction in uncontrolled ventilation in keeping with good practice guidance. Main outcome measures Modelled current and future distributions of indoor radon levels for the English housing stock and associated changes in life years due to lung cancer mortality, estimated using life tables. Results Increasing the air tightness of dwellings (without compensatory purpose-provided ventilation) increased mean indoor radon concentrations by an estimated 56.6%, from 21.2 becquerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3) to 33.2 Bq/m3. After the lag in lung cancer onset, this would result in an additional annual burden of 4700 life years lost and (at peak) 278 deaths. The increases in radon levels for the millions of homes that would contribute most of the additional burden are below the threshold at which radon remediation measures are cost effective. Fitting extraction fans and trickle ventilators to restore ventilation will help offset the additional burden but only if the ventilation related energy efficiency gains are lost. Mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery may lower radon levels and the risk of cancer while maintaining the advantage of energy efficiency for the most airtight dwellings but there is potential for a major adverse impact on health if such systems fail. Conclusion Unless specific remediation is used, reducing the ventilation of dwellings will improve energy efficiency only at the expense of population wide adverse impact on indoor exposure to radon and risk of lung cancer. The implications of this and other consequences of changes to ventilation need to be carefully evaluated to ensure that the desirable health and environmental benefits of

  3. Increased intestinal protein permeability in a model of lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate.

    PubMed

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Weisbrode, S E; Dorinsky, P M

    1991-11-01

    Multiple nonpulmonary organ failure is a frequent complication of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and contributes significantly to the high mortality rate associated with this disorder. Although previous studies suggest that systemic organ injury may be an integral component of ARDS, little is known about the specific functional alterations that occur in these target organs. The present study was designed, therefore, to test the hypothesis that endothelial damage, as assessed by microvascular permeability changes, develops in systemic organs in a model of acute lung injury. To test this postulate, the microvascular permeability for total protein was estimated using the steady-state relationship between the lymph (CL) to plasma (Cp) protein concentration ratio (i.e., CL/Cp) and lymph flow in autoperfused cat ileum preparations. Specifically, CL/Cp was measured in five cats, 2 h after acute lung injury was induced by intravenously administered phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), 15 micrograms/kg, and the results were compared with those of seven time-matched control animals. Prior to PMA infusion, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 451 +/- 28 in both groups and remained unchanged (486 +/- 26) in the control group. By contrast, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio fell to 275 +/- 95 after PMA infusion (p less than 0.05). In addition, whereas CL/Cp was 0.099 +/- 0.008 in the control animals, it increased to 0.36 +/- 0.06 in the PMA-injured animals (p less than 0.01). In summary, this study demonstrated that in this model of acute lung injury produced by PMA-induced activation of circulating inflammatory cells, both acute lung injury and systemic organ injury (i.e., morphologic and permeability alterations) occurred.

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Decreases Reactive Oxygen in a Model of Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    George, Timothy J.; Arnaoutakis, George J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Jandu, Simran K.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Shah, Ashish S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Ischemia-reperfusion injury(IRI) is a common complication following lung transplantation(LTx). IRI is thought to be mediated by reactive oxygen species(ROS). Hydrogen sulfide(H2S) is a novel agent that has been previously shown to scavenge ROS and slow metabolism. We evaluated the impact of infused H2S on the presence of ROS after reperfusion in an ex vivo model of LTx. Methods Heart-Lung blocks were recovered from New Zealand White rabbits(n=12) and cold stored in Perfadex solution for 18 hours. Following storage, the heart-lung blocks were reperfused ex vivo with donor rabbit blood. In the treatment group(n=7), a bolus of sodium hydrogen sulfide was added at the beginning of reperfusion(100ug/kg) and continuously infused throughout the two hour experiment(1mg/kg/hr). The vehicle group(n=5) received an equivalent volume of saline. Serial airway and pulmonary artery pressures were measured along with arterial and venous blood gases. Results Oxygenation and pulmonary artery pressures were similar between the two groups. However, treatment with H2S resulted in a dramatic reduction in the presence of ROS after 2 hours of reperfusion(4851 ± 2139 vs. 235 ± 462 RFU/mg protein, p=0.003). There was a trend toward increased levels of cGMP in the H2S treated group(3.08 ± 1.69 vs. 1.73 ± 1.41 fmol/mg tissue, p=0.23). Conclusions After prolonged ischemia, infusion of H2S during reperfusion is associated with a significant decrease in the presence of ROS, a suspected mediator of IRI. To our knowledge, this study represents the first reported therapeutic use of H2S in an experimental model of lung transplant. PMID:22464394

  5. Models for comparing lung-cancer risks in radon- and plutonium-exposed experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.; Cross, F.T.; Sanders, C.L.; Dagle, G.E.

    1990-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies of radon-exposed underground miners have provided the primary basis for estimating human lung-cancer risks resulting from radon exposure. These studies are sometimes used to estimate lung-cancer risks resulting from exposure to other alpha- emitters as well. The latter use, often referred to as the dosimetric approach, is based on the assumption that a specified dose to the lung produces the same lung-tumor risk regardless of the substance producing the dose. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory, experiments have been conducted in which laboratory rodents have been given inhalation exposures to radon and to plutonium ({sup 239}PuO{sub 2}). These experiments offer a unique opportunity to compare risks, and thus to investigate the validity of the dosimetric approach. This comparison is made most effectively by modeling the age-specific risk as a function of dose in a way that is comparable to analyses of human data. Such modeling requires assumptions about whether tumors are the cause of death or whether they are found incidental to death from other causes. Results based on the assumption that tumors are fatal indicate that the radon and plutonium dose-response curves differ, with a linear function providing a good description of the radon data, and a pure quadratic function providing a good description of the plutonium data. However, results based on the assumption that tumors are incidental to death indicate that the dose-response curves for the two exposures are very similar, and thus support the dosimetric approach. 14 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Respiratory tract lung geometry and dosimetry model for male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2014-08-26

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague- Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  7. Respiratory Tract Lung Geometry and Dosimetry Model for Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2015-07-24

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague-Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  8. Rapid clearance of xanthines from airway and pulmonary tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Kroell, F.K.; Karlsson, J.A.; Nilsson, E.; Ryrfeldt, A.; Persson, C.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The airway and pulmonary fate of two antiasthma xanthines was examined in a guinea pig perfused lung preparation where the airway mechanics and airway microvascular perfusion are maintained at near normal values. 14C-theophylline or 14C-enprofylline was infused for 10, 30, and 300 s into the pulmonary artery of the guinea pig isolated lung. The radioactivity increased rapidly (within 10 s) in tracheobronchial as well as in lung tissue, confirming that the large airway microcirculation was well supplied also by the perfusion. The effluent concentrations of total 3H and 14C radioactivity at the onset, during, and after intrapulmonary infusion of 14C-labeled xanthines and 3H-sucrose were closely associated, suggesting that the xanthines, like sucrose, largely distributed in extracellular fluid and were not taken up by the tissues. No metabolites of enprofylline or theophylline could be detected in the lung tissue or lung effluent, suggesting that xanthines are not biotransformed by the guinea pig lung. After intratracheal instillation of 14C-theophylline, the peak radioactivity in the lung effluent appeared in the second 15-s fraction after instillation, and after 10 and 60 min, 68.1 +/- 4.7% and 86.9 +/- 8.4%, respectively, of the given dose had appeared in the lung effluent. The present data suggest a mainly extracellular distribution and a rapid clearance of xanthines from the lung and airway tissues. The rapid disappearance of topical theophylline may explain the lack of success of inhalation therapy with this drug.

  9. Numerical simulation of air flow in a model of lungs with mouth cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcner, Jakub; Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    The air flow in a realistic geometry of human lung is simulated with computational flow dynamics approach as stationary inspiration. Geometry used for the simulation includes oral cavity, larynx, trachea and bronchial tree up to the seventh generation of branching. Unsteady RANS approach was used for the air flow simulation. Velocities corresponding to 15, 30 and 60 litres/min of flow rate were set as boundary conditions at the inlet to the model. These flow rates are frequently used as a representation of typical human activities. Character of air flow in the model for these different flow rates is discussed with respect to future investigation of particle deposition.

  10. Prognostic modeling in early stage lung cancer: an evolving process from histopathology to genomics.

    PubMed

    Harpole, David H

    2007-05-01

    The goal is to validate a molecular-based tumor model that identifies patients at low-risk for cancer recurrence and who will not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The remaining patients will be randomized to observation (present standard of care) or adjuvant chemotherapy to determine efficacy of adjuvant in this population. Investigators have focused on the identification of markers that may predict poor prognosis as a way to "enrich" the population by separating those likely to have early recurrence and cancer death from those not needing additional treatment after resection. The initial projects refined predictive models of cancer recurrence after resection for patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

  11. Hierarchical Bayesian modeling of spatio-temporal patterns of lung cancer incidence risk in Georgia, USA: 2000-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ping; Mu, Lan; Madden, Marguerite; Vena, John E.

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in both men and women in Georgia, USA. However, the spatio-temporal patterns of lung cancer risk in Georgia have not been fully studied. Hierarchical Bayesian models are used here to explore the spatio-temporal patterns of lung cancer incidence risk by race and gender in Georgia for the period of 2000-2007. With the census tract level as the spatial scale and the 2-year period aggregation as the temporal scale, we compare a total of seven Bayesian spatio-temporal models including two under a separate modeling framework and five under a joint modeling framework. One joint model outperforms others based on the deviance information criterion. Results show that the northwest region of Georgia has consistently high lung cancer incidence risk for all population groups during the study period. In addition, there are inverse relationships between the socioeconomic status and the lung cancer incidence risk among all Georgian population groups, and the relationships in males are stronger than those in females. By mapping more reliable variations in lung cancer incidence risk at a relatively fine spatio-temporal scale for different Georgian population groups, our study aims to better support healthcare performance assessment, etiological hypothesis generation, and health policy making.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Lung Tissue in a Rat Acute Lung Injury Model: Identification of PRDX1 as a Promoter of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongdong; Mao, Pu; Huang, Yongbo; Liu, Yiting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Pang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a high morbidity and mortality disease entity in critically ill patients, despite decades of numerous investigations into its pathogenesis. To obtain global protein expression changes in acute lung injury (ALI) lung tissues, we employed a high-throughput proteomics method to identify key components which may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALI. In the present study, we analyzed lung tissue proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced ALI rats and identified eighteen proteins whose expression levels changed more than twofold as compared to normal controls. In particular, we found that PRDX1 expression in culture medium was elevated by a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in airway epithelial cells in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of PRDX1 increased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas knockdown of PRDX1 led to downregulated expression of cytokines induced by LPS. In conclusion, our findings provide a global alteration in the proteome of lung tissues in the ALI rat model and indicate that PRDX1 may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ARDS by promoting inflammation and represent a novel strategy for the development of new therapies against ALI. PMID:25024510

  13. Exploring the influential factors in incident clearance time: Disentangling causation from self-selection bias.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chuan; Ma, Xiaolei; Wang, Yinhai; Wang, Yunpeng

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the relationships between influential factors and incident clearance time is crucial to make effective countermeasures for incident management agencies. Although there have been a certain number of achievements on incident clearance time modeling, limited effort is made to investigate the relative role of incident response time and its self-selection in influencing the clearance time. To fill this gap, this study uses the endogenous switching model to explore the influential factors in incident clearance time, and aims to disentangle causation from self-selection bias caused by response process. Under the joint two-stage model framework, the binary probit model and switching regression model are formulated for both incident response time and clearance time, respectively. Based on the freeway incident data collected in Washington State, full information maximum likelihood (FIML) method is utilized to estimate the endogenous switching model parameters. Significant factors affecting incident response time and clearance time can be identified, including incident, temporal, geographical, environmental, traffic and operational attributes. The estimate results reveal the influential effects of incident, temporal, geographical, environmental, traffic and operational factors on incident response time and clearance time. In addition, the causality of incident response time itself and its self-selection correction on incident clearance time are found to be indispensable. These findings suggest that the causal effect of response time on incident clearance time will be overestimated if the self-selection bias is not considered.

  14. Exploring the influential factors in incident clearance time: Disentangling causation from self-selection bias.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chuan; Ma, Xiaolei; Wang, Yinhai; Wang, Yunpeng

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the relationships between influential factors and incident clearance time is crucial to make effective countermeasures for incident management agencies. Although there have been a certain number of achievements on incident clearance time modeling, limited effort is made to investigate the relative role of incident response time and its self-selection in influencing the clearance time. To fill this gap, this study uses the endogenous switching model to explore the influential factors in incident clearance time, and aims to disentangle causation from self-selection bias caused by response process. Under the joint two-stage