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Sample records for lung gene expression

  1. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  2. Epigenetic Control of Gene Expression in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics is traditionally defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence. There are three main classes of epigenetic marks—DNA methylation, modifications of histone tails, and noncoding RNAs—each of which may be influenced by the environment, diet, diseases, and ageing. Importantly, epigenetic marks have been shown to influence immune cell maturation and are associated with the risk of developing various forms of cancer, including lung cancer. Moreover, there is emerging evidence that these epigenetic marks affect gene expression in the lung and are associated with benign lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and interstitial lung disease. Technological advances have made it feasible to study epigenetic marks in the lung, and it is anticipated that this knowledge will enhance our understanding of the dynamic biology in the lung and lead to the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for our patients with lung disease. PMID:21596832

  3. Gene expression signature of non-involved lung tissue associated with survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Antonella; Frullanti, Elisa; Anderlini, Marco; Manenti, Giacomo; Noci, Sara; Dugo, Matteo; Ambrogi, Federico; De Cecco, Loris; Spinelli, Roberta; Piazza, Rocco; Pirola, Alessandra; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Incarbone, Matteo; Alloisio, Marco; Tosi, Davide; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Pastorino, Ugo; Dragani, Tommaso A

    2013-12-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma patients of similar clinical stage and undergoing the same treatments often have marked interindividual variations in prognosis. These clinical discrepancies may be due to the genetic background modulating an individual's predisposition to fighting cancer. Herein, we hypothesized that the lung microenvironment, as reflected by its expression profile, may affect lung adenocarcinoma patients' survival. The transcriptome of non-involved lung tissue, excised from a discovery series of 204 lung adenocarcinoma patients, was evaluated using whole-genome expression microarrays (with probes corresponding to 28 688 well-annotated coding sequences). Genes associated with survival status at 60 months were identified by Cox regression analysis (adjusted for gender, age and clinical stage) and retested in a validation series of 78 additional cases. RNA-Seq analysis from non-involved lung tissue of 12 patients was performed to characterize the different isoforms of candidate genes. Ten genes for which the loge-transformed hazard ratios expressed the same direction of effect in the discovery (P < 1.0 × 10(-3)) and validation series comprised the gene expression signature associated with survival: CNTNAP1, PKNOX1, FAM156A, FRMD8, GALNTL1, TXNDC12, SNTB1, PPP3R1, SNX10 and SERPINH1. RNA sequencing highlighted the complex expression pattern of these genes in non-involved lung tissue from different patients and permitted the detection of a read-through gene fusion between PPP3R1 and the flanking gene (CNRIP1) as well as a novel isoform of CNTNAP1. Our findings support the hypothesis that individual genetic characteristics, evidenced by the expression pattern of non-involved tissue, influence the outcome of lung adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:23978379

  4. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Gate, Laurent . E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Herve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stephane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  5. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Gate, Laurent; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Hervé; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stéphane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 degrees C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  6. 'LungGENS': a web-based tool for mapping single-cell gene expression in the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Du, Yina; Guo, Minzhe; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Xu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    We developed LungGENS (Lung Gene Expression iN Single-cell), a web-based bioinformatics resource for querying single-cell gene expression databases by entering a gene symbol or a list of genes or selecting a cell type of their interest. Gene query provides quantitative RNA expression of the gene of interest in each lung cell type. Cell type query returns associated selective gene signatures and genes encoding cell surface markers and transcription factors in interactive heatmap and tables. LungGENS will be broadly applicable in respiratory research, providing a cell-specific RNA expression resource at single-cell resolution. LungGENS is freely available for non-commercial use at https://research.cchmc.org/pbge/lunggens/default.html.

  7. Differentially expressed protein-coding genes and long noncoding RNA in early-stage lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Qiu, Mantang; Xu, Youtao; Mao, Qixing; Wang, Jie; Dong, Gaochao; Xia, Wenjia; Yin, Rong; Xu, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Due to the application of low-dose computed tomography screening, more and more early-stage lung cancers have been diagnosed. Thus, it is essential to characterize the gene expression profile of early-stage lung cancer to develop potential biomarkers for early diagnosis and therapeutic targets. Here, we analyzed microarray data of 181 early-stage lung cancer patients. By comparing gene expression between different tumor and lymph node metastasis stages, we identified various differentially expressed protein-coding genes and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) in the comparisons of T2 vs. T2 and N1- vs. N0-stage lung cancer. Functional analyses revealed that these differentially expressed genes were enriched in various tumorigenesis or metastasis-related pathways. Survival analysis indicated that two protein-coding genes, C7 and SCN7A, were significantly associated survival of lung cancer. Notably, a novel lncRNA, LINC00313, was highly expressed in both T2- and N1-stage lung cancers. On the other hand, LINC00313 was also upregulated in lung cancer and metastasized lung cancer tissues, compared with adjacent lung tissues and primary lung cancer tissues. Additionally, higher expression level of LINC00313 indicated poor prognosis of lung cancer (hazard ratio = 0.658). Overall, we characterized the expression profiles of protein-coding genes and lncRNA in early-stage lung cancer and found that LINC00313 could be a biomarker for lung cancer.

  8. Gene expression profiles of small-cell lung cancers: molecular signatures of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Taniwaki, Masaya; Daigo, Yataro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Takano, Atsushi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Yasui, Wataru; Inai, Kouki; Kohno, Nobuoki; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2006-09-01

    To characterize the molecular mechanisms involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and identify molecules to be applied as novel diagnostic markers and/or for development of molecular-targeted drugs, we applied cDNA microarray profile analysis coupled with purification of cancer cells by laser-microbeam microdissection (LMM). Expression profiles of 32,256 genes in 15 SCLCs identified 252 genes that were commonly up-regulated and 851 transcripts that were down-regulated in SCLC cells compared with non-cancerous lung tissue cells. An unsupervised clustering algorithm applied to the expression data easily distinguished SCLC from the other major histological type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and identified 475 genes that may represent distinct molecular features of each of the two histological types. In particular, SCLC was characterized by altered expression of genes related to neuroendocrine cell differentiation and/or growth such as ASCL1, NRCAM, and INSM1. We also identified 68 genes that were abundantly expressed both in advanced SCLCs and advanced adenocarcinomas (ADCs), both of which had been obtained from patients with extensive chemotherapy treatment. Some of them are known to be transcription factors and/or gene expression regulators such as TAF5L, TFCP2L4, PHF20, LMO4, TCF20, RFX2, and DKFZp547I048 as well as those encoding nucleotide-binding proteins such as C9orf76, EHD3, and GIMAP4. Our data provide valuable information for better understanding of lung carcinogenesis and chemoresistance. PMID:16865272

  9. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in the mouse lung: Association with lung pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Pacurari, M.; Qian, Y.; Porter, D.W.; Wolfarth, M.; Wan, Y.; Luo, D.; Ding, M.; Castranova, V.; Guo, N.L.

    2011-08-15

    Due to the fibrous shape and durability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), concerns regarding their potential for producing environmental and human health risks, including carcinogenesis, have been raised. This study sought to investigate how previously identified lung cancer prognostic biomarkers and the related cancer signaling pathways are affected in the mouse lung following pharyngeal aspiration of well-dispersed MWCNT. A total of 63 identified lung cancer prognostic biomarker genes and major signaling biomarker genes were analyzed in mouse lungs (n = 80) exposed to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 {mu}g of MWCNT by pharyngeal aspiration at 7 and 56 days post-exposure using quantitative PCR assays. At 7 and 56 days post-exposure, a set of 7 genes and a set of 11 genes, respectively, showed differential expression in the lungs of mice exposed to MWCNT vs. the control group. Additionally, these significant genes could separate the control group from the treated group over the time series in a hierarchical gene clustering analysis. Furthermore, 4 genes from these two sets of significant genes, coiled-coil domain containing-99 (Ccdc99), muscle segment homeobox gene-2 (Msx2), nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2), and wingless-type inhibitory factor-1 (Wif1), showed significant mRNA expression perturbations at both time points. It was also found that the expression changes of these 4 overlapping genes at 7 days post-exposure were attenuated at 56 days post-exposure. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) found that several carcinogenic-related signaling pathways and carcinogenesis itself were associated with both the 7 and 11 gene signatures. Taken together, this study identifies that MWCNT exposure affects a subset of lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. - Research Highlights: > Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes affect lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. > The results suggest potentially harmful effects of MWCNT exposure on human lungs. > The results could potentially be used for

  10. Alterations in Gene Expression and DNA Methylation during Murine and Human Lung Alveolar Septation

    PubMed Central

    Cuna, Alain; Halloran, Brian; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Kelly, David; Crossman, David K.; Cui, Xiangqin; Pandit, Kusum; Kaminski, Naftali; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Ahmad, Ausaf; Mariani, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism, may regulate coordinated expression of multiple genes at specific time points during alveolar septation in lung development. The objective of this study was to identify genes regulated by methylation during normal septation in mice and during disordered septation in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In mice, newborn lungs (preseptation) and adult lungs (postseptation) were evaluated by microarray analysis of gene expression and immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). In humans, microarray gene expression data were integrated with genome-wide DNA methylation data from bronchopulmonary dysplasia versus preterm and term lung. Genes with reciprocal changes in expression and methylation, suggesting regulation by DNA methylation, were identified. In mice, 95 genes with inverse correlation between expression and methylation during normal septation were identified. In addition to genes known to be important in lung development (Wnt signaling, Angpt2, Sox9, etc.) and its extracellular matrix (Tnc, Eln, etc.), genes involved with immune and antioxidant defense (Stat4, Sod3, Prdx6, etc.) were also observed. In humans, 23 genes were differentially methylated with reciprocal changes in expression in bronchopulmonary dysplasia compared with preterm or term lung. Genes of interest included those involved with detoxifying enzymes (Gstm3) and transforming growth factor-β signaling (bone morphogenetic protein 7 [Bmp7]). In terms of overlap, 20 genes and three pathways methylated during mouse lung development also demonstrated changes in methylation between preterm and term human lung. Changes in methylation correspond to altered expression of a number of genes associated with lung development, suggesting that DNA methylation of these genes may regulate normal and abnormal alveolar septation. PMID:25387348

  11. Alterations of gene expression in skin and lung of mice exposed to light and cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Izzotti, Alberto; Cartiglia, Cristina; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Balansky, Roumen M; D'Agostini, Francesco; Lubet, Ronald A; De Flora, Silvio

    2004-10-01

    We previously showed that sunlight-mimicking light induces genotoxic damage not only in skin but also even in lung, bone marrow, and peripheral blood of hairless mice. Moreover, light and smoke acted synergically in the respiratory tract. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we investigated by cDNA-arrays the expression of 746 toxicologically relevant genes in skin and lungs of mice exposed for 28 days to light and/or environmental cigarette smoke. Glutathione-S-transferase-Pi and catalase were overexpressed in the lungs of mice exposed to light only. Moreover, the light induced in skin the expression of genes involved in carcinogenesis, photoaging, and production of genotoxic and oxidizing derivatives traveling at a distance. Smoke induced the expression of multiple genes in both skin and lung, which reflect adaptive responses and mechanisms related to cancer and, possibly, to emphysema and stroke. As shown in mice exposed to both light and smoke, the light tended to increase smoke-induced gene expression in lungs, while smoke tended to attenuate light-induced gene expression in skin. The oral administration of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac inhibited the light-induced overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 and oxidative stress-related genes in skin, and down-regulated smoke-induced genes involved in oxidative stress, removal of damaged proteins, inflammation, and immune response in lung. These results provide a mechanistic insight explaining the systemic alterations induced by both light and smoke in mouse skin and lungs.

  12. Aquaporin gene expression and regulation in the ovine fetal lung

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Hooper, S B; Armugam, A; Dawson, N; Ferraro, T; Jeyaseelan, K; Thiel, A; Koukoulas, I; Wintour, E M

    2003-01-01

    Fetal lung development is dependent upon secretion of liquid into the future airways which must be cleared at birth to establish air-breathing. Aquaporins (AQP) 1, 3, 4 and 5 are membranous water channel proteins that are present in the lung after birth in rodents, with little expression before birth. Our aim was to describe the changes in AQP1, 3, 4 and 5 expression and protein levels in the fetal lung of a long-gestation species (sheep) and in response to physiological factors known to alter fetal lung liquid dynamics. Both mRNA and high protein levels were detected for AQP1, 3, 4 and 5 by day 100 (term is ≈150 days in ovine fetuses). A cortisol infusion (120–131 days) significantly (P < 0.05) increased AQP1 (0.9 ± 0.2 (n = 4) vs.1.8 ± 0.3 (n = 5)) and AQP5 (8.8 ± 0.6 vs. 14.1 ± 1.2) mRNA levels in fetal lung (measured by real-time PCR). Ten days of tracheal obstruction significantly (P < 0.05) decreased AQP5 mRNA levels (6.1 ± 0.9 (n = 5) vs. 2.7 ± 0.3 (n = 5)). Immunohistochemistry was used to show that protein levels changed in parallel with the mRNA changes. These findings suggest that AQPs could be involved in lung liquid production and reabsorption during fetal development in long-gestation species. PMID:12819302

  13. Ion channel gene expression in lung adenocarcinoma: potential role in prognosis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae-Hong; Gu, Wanjun; Lim, Inja; Bang, Hyoweon; Ko, Eun A; Zhou, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are known to regulate cancer processes at all stages. The roles of ion channels in cancer pathology are extremely diverse. We systematically analyzed the expression patterns of ion channel genes in lung adenocarcinoma. First, we compared the expression of ion channel genes between normal and tumor tissues in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Thirty-seven ion channel genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two groups. Next, we investigated the prognostic power of ion channel genes in lung adenocarcinoma. We assigned a risk score to each lung adenocarcinoma patient based on the expression of the differentially expressed ion channel genes. We demonstrated that the risk score effectively predicted overall survival and recurrence-free survival in lung adenocarcinoma. We also found that the risk scores for ever-smokers were higher than those for never-smokers. Multivariate analysis indicated that the risk score was a significant prognostic factor for survival, which is independent of patient age, gender, stage, smoking history, Myc level, and EGFR/KRAS/ALK gene mutation status. Finally, we investigated the difference in ion channel gene expression between the two major subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer: adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma. Thirty ion channel genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two groups. We suggest that ion channel gene expression can be used to improve the subtype classification in non-small cell lung cancer at the molecular level. The findings in this study have been validated in several independent lung cancer cohorts.

  14. Nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms, gene expression and lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the pleiotropic effects of nitric oxide (NO) within the lungs, it is likely that NO is a significant factor in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to test for association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in three NO synthase (NOS) genes and lung function, as well as to examine gene expression and protein levels in relation to the genetic variation. Methods One SNP in each NOS gene (neuronal NOS (NOS1), inducible NOS (NOS2), and endothelial NOS (NOS3)) was genotyped in the Lung Health Study (LHS) and correlated with lung function. One SNP (rs1800779) was also analyzed for association with COPD and lung function in four COPD case–control populations. Lung tissue expression of NOS3 mRNA and protein was tested in individuals of known genotype for rs1800779. Immunohistochemistry of lung tissue was used to localize NOS3 expression. Results For the NOS3 rs1800779 SNP, the baseline forced expiratory volume in one second in the LHS was significantly higher in the combined AG + GG genotypic groups compared with the AA genotypic group. Gene expression and protein levels in lung tissue were significantly lower in subjects with the AG + GG genotypes than in AA subjects. NOS3 protein was expressed in the airway epithelium and subjects with the AA genotype demonstrated higher NOS3 expression compared with AG and GG individuals. However, we were not able to replicate the associations with COPD or lung function in the other COPD study groups. Conclusions Variants in the NOS genes were not associated with lung function or COPD status. However, the G allele of rs1800779 resulted in a decrease of NOS3 gene expression and protein levels and this has implications for the numerous disease states that have been associated with this polymorphism. PMID:24192154

  15. An in silico analytical study of lung cancer and smokers datasets from gene expression omnibus (GEO) for prediction of differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Atif Noorul; Ahmad, Mohammad Wakil; Madar, Inamul Hasan; Grace, B Leena; Hasan, Tarique Noorul

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer development and several genes have been identified as potential biomarker for lungs cancer. Contributing to the present scientific knowledge of biomarkers for lung cancer two different data sets, i.e. GDS3257 and GDS3054 were downloaded from NCBI׳s GEO database and normalized by RMA and GRMA packages (Bioconductor). Diffrentially expressed genes were extracted by using and were R (3.1.2); DAVID online tool was used for gene annotation and GENE MANIA tool was used for construction of gene regulatory network. Nine smoking independent gene were found whereas average expressions of those genes were almost similar in both the datasets. Five genes among them were found to be associated with cancer subtypes. Thirty smoking specific genes were identified; among those genes eight were associated with cancer sub types. GPR110, IL1RN and HSP90AA1 were found directly associated with lung cancer. SEMA6A differentially expresses in only non-smoking lung cancer samples. FLG is differentially expressed smoking specific gene and is related to onset of various cancer subtypes. Functional annotation and network analysis revealed that FLG participates in various epidermal tissue developmental processes and is co-expressed with other genes. Lung tissues are epidermal tissues and thus it suggests that alteration in FLG may cause lung cancer. We conclude that smoking alters expression of several genes and associated biological pathways during development of lung cancers.

  16. Variations of chromosome 2 gene expressions among patients with lung cancer or non-cancer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lianmin; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Haiyun; Dong, Nian; Su, Xiaoqiong; Xu, Menglin; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. The present study aimed to investigate specific genotypes of different subtypes or stages of lung cancer through gene expression variations of chromosome 2 genes, trying to identify predictors for diagnosis or prognosis of lung cancer. About 537 patients with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC), 140 patients with lung squamous carcinoma (SQC), 9 patients with lung large cell carcinoma (LCC), 56 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and 590 patients without cancer were analyzed in present study. Co-expressed, subtype-specific, and stage-specific chromosome 2 genes were identified and further analyzed by bioinformatic methods. As a result, 15 or 10 genes were significantly up- or down-regulated in all four subtypes of lung cancer. GKN1, LOC100131510, prominin-2 (PROM2), IL37, and SNORA41 were identified as ADC-specific up-regulated genes; SQC-specific up-regulated genes included HOXD family (HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD8, and HOXD9) and UGT1A family (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A5, UGT1A7, UGT1A8, UGT1A9, and UGT1A10); and LCC- or SCLC-specific genes were also identified. Nine genes were significantly up-expressed at all four stages of ADC while 230 genes at all three stages of SQC. MFSD2B, CCL20 and STAT1, or STARD7 and ZNF512 genes may be risk or protect factors in prognosis of ADC, while HTR2B, DPP4, and TGFBRAP1 genes may be risk factors in prognosis of SQC. Our results suggested that a number of altered chromosome 2 genes have the subtype or stage specificities of lung cancer and may be considered as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

  17. The expression of p73 is increased in lung cancer, independent of p53 gene alteration

    PubMed Central

    Tokuchi, Y; Hashimoto, T; Kobayashi, Y; Hayashi, M; Nishida, K; Hayashi, S; Imai, K; Nakachi, K; Ishikawa, Y; Nakagawa, K; Kawakami, Y; Tsuchiya, E

    1999-01-01

    p73 gene, a new p53 homologue, has been identified: it supposedly acts as tumour suppressor gene in neuroblastoma. To clarify whether p73 might be involved in lung carcinogenesis, we examined p73 expression in resected lung cancer and paired normal lung in 60 cases using semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We also examined p73 gene status in three representative cases using Southern blot, and p53 gene alteration in 49 cases using PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and direct sequence. In 87% of the cases (52/60) p73 expression in tumour was more than twice as high as that in paired normal lung tissues, and the difference between p73 expression in tumour and normal lung tissue was significant (P < 0.0001). However, Southern blot analysis revealed that none of the cases showed p73 gene amplification. Compared with clinicopathological characteristics, p73 expression correlates significantly with histological differences and age of patient, independently (P < 0.05). Concerning p53 gene status, 43% (21/49) showed p53 gene alteration, but there was no correlation between p73 overexpression and p53 gene alteration. Our results suggest that need for further functional analysis of the role of p73 in lung carcinogenesis. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408409

  18. Stable Somatic Gene Expression in Mouse Lungs Following Electroporation-mediated Tol2 Transposon Delivery.

    PubMed

    Muliawan, Hary Sakti; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Yagi, Keiko; Ikeda, Koji; Yagita, Kazuhiro; Hirata, Ken-ichi; Emoto, Noriaki

    2015-10-07

    Gene delivery to the lung has rapidly progressed as an important method for studying various chronic lung diseases. Viral vectors, albeit highly efficient, are limited by the host immune response. Electroporation, a well-known non-viral method, can efficiently deliver genes to the lung, but is unable to induce stable gene expression. The Tol2 transposon is another non-viral method that can induce stable gene expression by reinserting its genes into the host genome. In this study, we combined electroporation and Tol2 transposons to obtain stable, high-level gene expression in the mouse lung. Tol2 transposon plasmids (pT2A-EGFP; Tol2, pCAGGS-TP; transposase) were optimized in vitro, and the electroporation procedure (pCAG-EGFP) was optimized in mouse lungs. After optimization, a combination of electroporation plus the Tol2 transposon was used in a comparative analysis with electroporation plus pCAG-EGFP. GFP expression levels were quantified and visualized on days 4 and 7 post-electroporation. We successfully reproduced the Tol2 transposon system in vitro and the electroporation procedure in vivo. We observed sustainable GFP expression using electroporation plus the Tol2 transposon on days 4 and 7, while electroporation plus pCAG-EGFP resulted in decreased GFP expression on day 7. We were able to induce high-level, stable gene expression in mouse lungs using a combination of electroporation and the Tol2 transposon. This represents a safer method for lung gene delivery that can be used as an alternative to viral vectors.

  19. Gene expression profiling in mouse lung following polymeric hexamethylene diisocyanate exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-T.; Ylostalo, Joni; Friedman, Mitchell; Hoyle, Gary W. . E-mail: ghoyle@tulane.edu

    2005-05-15

    Isocyanates are a common cause of occupational lung disease. Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), a component of polyurethane spray paints, can induce respiratory symptoms, inflammation, lung function impairment, and isocyanate asthma. The predominant form of HDI in polyurethane paints is a nonvolatile polyisocyanate known as HDI biuret trimer (HDI-BT). Exposure of mice to aerosolized HDI-BT results in pathological effects, including pulmonary edema, lung inflammation, cellular proliferation, and fibrotic lesions, which occur with distinct time courses following exposure. To identify genes that mediate lung pathology in the distinct temporal phases after exposure, gene expression profiles in HDI-BT-exposed C57BL/6J mouse lungs were analyzed. RNase protection assay (RPA) of genes involved in apoptosis, cell survival, and inflammation revealed increased expression of I{kappa}B{alpha}, Fas, Bcl-X{sub L}, TNF{alpha}, KC, MIP-2, IL-6, and GM-CSF following HDI-BT exposure. Microarray analysis of approximately 10 000 genes was performed on lung RNA collected from mice 6, 18, and 90 h after HDI-BT exposure and from unexposed mice. Classes of genes whose expression was increased 6 h after exposure included those involved in stress responses (particularly oxidative stress and thiol redox balance), growth arrest, apoptosis, signal transduction, and inflammation. Types of genes whose expression was increased at 18 h included proteinases, anti-proteinases, cytoskeletal molecules, and inflammatory mediators. Transcripts increased at 90 h included extracellular matrix components, transcription factors, inflammatory mediators, and cell cycle regulators. This characterization of the gene expression profile in lungs exposed to HDI-BT will provide a basis for investigating injury and repair pathways that are operative during isocyanate-induced lung disease.

  20. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the Environment and Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a False Discovery Rate (FDR) ≤0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR=0.12). Sixty-three (~28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, p-value<0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study’s results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer. PMID:23681825

  1. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the environment and genetics in lung cancer etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤ 0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR = 0.12). Sixty-three (∼ 28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, P-value < 0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, and WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, and UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, and MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study's results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer. PMID:23681825

  2. SEGEL: A Web Server for Visualization of Smoking Effects on Human Lung Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Hu, Brian; Alnajm, Sammy S; Lu, Yin; Huang, Yangxin; Allen-Gipson, Diane; Cheng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major cause of death worldwide resulting in over six million deaths per year. Cigarette smoke contains complex mixtures of chemicals that are harmful to nearly all organs of the human body, especially the lungs. Cigarette smoking is considered the major risk factor for many lung diseases, particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) and lung cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of smoking-induced lung injury associated with these lung diseases still remain largely unknown. Expression microarray techniques have been widely applied to detect the effects of smoking on gene expression in different human cells in the lungs. These projects have provided a lot of useful information for researchers to understand the potential molecular mechanism(s) of smoke-induced pathogenesis. However, a user-friendly web server that would allow scientists to fast query these data sets and compare the smoking effects on gene expression across different cells had not yet been established. For that reason, we have integrated eight public expression microarray data sets from trachea epithelial cells, large airway epithelial cells, small airway epithelial cells, and alveolar macrophage into an online web server called SEGEL (Smoking Effects on Gene Expression of Lung). Users can query gene expression patterns across these cells from smokers and nonsmokers by gene symbols, and find the effects of smoking on the gene expression of lungs from this web server. Sex difference in response to smoking is also shown. The relationship between the gene expression and cigarette smoking consumption were calculated and are shown in the server. The current version of SEGEL web server contains 42,400 annotated gene probe sets represented on the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 platform. SEGEL will be an invaluable resource for researchers interested in the effects of smoking on gene expression in the lungs. The server also provides useful information

  3. Fibrotic gene expression coexists with alveolar proteinosis in early indium lung.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shuhei; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Kiyosawa, Hidenori; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-08-01

    Occupational inhalation of indium compounds can cause the so-called "indium lung disease". Most affected individuals show pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease. In animal experiments, inhalation of indium tin oxide or indium oxide has been shown to cause lung damage. However, the mechanisms by which indium compounds lead to indium lung disease remain unknown. In this study, we constructed a mouse model of indium lung disease and analyzed gene expression in response to indium exposure. Indium oxide (In2O3, 10 mg/kg, primary particle size <100 nm) was administered intratracheally to C57BL/6 mice (male, 8 weeks of age) twice a week for 8 weeks. Four weeks after the final instillation, histopathological analysis exhibited periodic acid-Schiff positive material in the alveoli, characteristic of PAP. Comprehensive gene expression analysis by RNA-Seq, however, revealed expression of fibrosis-related genes, such as surfactant associated protein D, surfactant associated protein A1, mucin 1, and collagen type I and III, was significantly increased, indicating that fibrotic gene expression progresses in early phase of indium lung. These data supported the latest hypothesis that PAP occurs as an acute phase response and is replaced by fibrosis after long-term latency.

  4. Gene expression profiles on predicting protein interaction network and exploring of new treatments for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zehui; Zheng, Rui; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we aimed to explore disease-associated genes and their functions in lung cancer. We downloaded the gene expression profile GSE4115 from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Total 97 lung cancer and 90 adjacent non-tumor lung tissue (normal) samples were applied to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) by paired t test and variance analysis in spectral angle mapper (SAM) package in R. Gene Ontology (GO) functional enrichment analysis of DEGs were performed with Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery, followed by construction of protein-protein interaction (PPI) network from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD). Finally, network modules were analyzed by the MCODE algorithm to detect protein complexes in the PPI network. Total 3,102 genes were identified as DEGs at FDR < 0.05, including 1,146 down-regulated and 1,956 up-regulated DEGs. GO functional enrichment analysis revealed that up-regulated DEGs mainly participated in cell cycle and intracellular related functions, and down-regulated DEGs might influence cell functions. There were 39,240 pairs of PPIs in human obtained from HPRD databases, 3,102 DEGs were mapped to this PPI network, in which 2,429 pairs of PPIs and 1,342 genes were identified. With MCODE algorithm, 48 modules were selected, including five corresponding modules and three modules with differences in gene expressing profiles. In addition, three DGEs, FXR2, ARFGAP1 and ELAVL1 were discovered as potential lung cancer related genes. The discovery of featured genes which were probably related to lung cancer, has a great significance on studying mechanism, distinguishing normal and cancer tissues, and exploring new treatments for lung cancer. PMID:25205123

  5. Selection of Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies related to lung injury in a preterm lamb model.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Fantini, Prue M; Rajapaksa, Anushi E; Oakley, Regina; Tingay, David G

    2016-05-23

    Preterm newborns often require invasive support, however even brief periods of supported ventilation applied inappropriately to the lung can cause injury. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qPCR) has been extensively employed in studies of ventilation-induced lung injury with the reference gene 18S ribosomal RNA (18S RNA) most commonly employed as the internal control reference gene. Whilst the results of these studies depend on the stability of the reference gene employed, the use of 18S RNA has not been validated. In this study the expression profile of five candidate reference genes (18S RNA, ACTB, GAPDH, TOP1 and RPS29) in two geographical locations, was evaluated by dedicated algorithms, including geNorm, Normfinder, Bestkeeper and ΔCt method and the overall stability of these candidate genes determined (RefFinder). Secondary studies examined the influence of reference gene choice on the relative expression of two well-validated lung injury markers; EGR1 and IL1B. In the setting of the preterm lamb model of lung injury, RPS29 reference gene expression was influenced by tissue location; however we determined that individual ventilation strategies influence reference gene stability. Whilst 18S RNA is the most commonly employed reference gene in preterm lamb lung studies, our results suggest that GAPDH is a more suitable candidate.

  6. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  7. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues of Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.; Meyers, Valerie E.; Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% respirable very fine dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Animals were euthanized at 1 day and 13 weeks after the last inhalation exposure. After being lavaged, lung tissue from each animal was collected and total RNA was isolated. Four samples of each dose group were analyzed using Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray to profile global gene expression of 44K transcripts. After background subtraction, normalization, and log transformation, t tests were used to compare the mean expression levels of each exposed group to the control group. Correction for multiple testing was made using the method of Benjamini, Krieger, and Yekuteli (1) to control the false discovery rate. Genes with significant changes of at least 1.75 fold were identified as genes of interest. Both low and high doses of lunar dust caused dramatic, dose-dependent global gene expression changes in the lung tissues. However, the responses of lung tissue to low dose lunar dust are distinguished from those of high doses, especially those associated with 61mg/m3 dust exposure. The data were further integrated into the Ingenuity system to analyze the gene ontology (GO), pathway distribution and putative upstream regulators and gene targets. Multiple pathways, functions, and upstream regulators have been identified in response to lunar dust induced damage in the lung tissue.

  8. Bronchial airway gene expression in smokers with lung or head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, Eric; Nazarov, Petr V; Muller, Arnaud; Nicot, Nathalie; Bosseler, Manon; Pierson, Sandrine; Van Moer, Kris; Palissot, Valérie; Mascaux, Céline; Knolle, Ulrich; Ninane, Vincent; Nati, Romain; Bremnes, Roy M; Vallar, Laurent; Berchem, Guy; Schlesser, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major cause of cancers of the respiratory tract, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck cancer (HNC). In order to better understand carcinogenesis of the lung and upper airways, we have compared the gene expression profiles of tumor-distant, histologically normal bronchial biopsy specimens obtained from current smokers with NSCLC or HNC (SC, considered as a single group), as well as nonsmokers (NS) and smokers without cancer (SNC). RNA from a total of 97 biopsies was used for gene expression profiling (Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array). Differentially expressed genes were used to compare NS, SNC, and SC, and functional analysis was carried out using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Smoking-related cancer of the respiratory tract was found to affect the expression of genes encoding xenobiotic biotransformation proteins, as well as proteins associated with crucial inflammation/immunity pathways and other processes that protect the airway from the chemicals in cigarette smoke or contribute to carcinogenesis. Finally, we used the prediction analysis for microarray (PAM) method to identify gene signatures of cigarette smoking and cancer, and uncovered a 15-gene signature that distinguished between SNC and SC with an accuracy of 83%. Thus, gene profiling of histologically normal bronchial biopsy specimens provided insight into cigarette-induced carcinogenesis of the respiratory tract and gene signatures of cancer in smokers. PMID:24497500

  9. An ontogenic study of adrenomedullin gene expression in the rat lung, adrenal, kidney, and heart.

    PubMed

    Wong, P F; O, W S; Tang, F

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the gene expression of adrenomedullin (Adm) in the peripheral tissues which include lung, adrenal, kidney, and heart during development was investigated in the rat. The preproadrenomedullin (preproAdm) mRNA and mRNAs of its related receptor components, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (Crlr), and receptor activity-modifying proteins (Ramp1, 2 and 3) of the lung, adrenal, kidney, and heart were measured by real-time RT-PCR and the ADM peptide measured by radioimmunoassay in 1-, 7-, 21-day-old rats and the adult rats. From day 1 to 21, preproAdm mRNA levels increased with age in the lung, the kidney, and the heart but decreased with age in the adrenal. ADM levels, however, increased with age in the lung but decreased with age in the kidney, the adrenal, and the heart. The preproAdm levels in the lung, in the kidney, and in the adrenal all increased in the adult rat. ADM peptide levels, however, decreased in the adult rat. Crlr and Ramp2 gene expression increased with age in the lung, in the kidney, and in the heart but decreased with age in the adrenal in the prepubertal rats. The results indicate that the levels of preproAdm mRNA, ADM peptide and its receptor component mRNAs in different tissues followed different patterns of changes during development.

  10. Low-dose oral cadmium increases airway reactivity and lung neuronal gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Joshua D; Wongtrakool, Cherry; Banton, Sophia A; Li, Shuzhao; Orr, Michael L; Barr, Dana Boyd; Neujahr, David C; Sutliff, Roy L; Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P

    2016-07-01

    Inhalation of cadmium (Cd) is associated with lung diseases, but less is known concerning pulmonary effects of Cd found in the diet. Cd has a decades-long half-life in humans and significant bioaccumulation occurs with chronic dietary intake. We exposed mice to low-dose CdCl2 (10 mg/L in drinking water) for 20 weeks, which increased lung Cd to a level similar to that of nonoccupationally exposed adult humans. Cd-treated mice had increased airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine challenge, and gene expression array showed that Cd altered the abundance of 443 mRNA transcripts in mouse lung. In contrast to higher doses, low-dose Cd did not elicit increased metallothionein transcripts in lung. To identify pathways most affected by Cd, gene set enrichment of transcripts was analyzed. Results showed that major inducible targets of low-dose Cd were neuronal receptors represented by enriched olfactory, glutamatergic, cholinergic, and serotonergic gene sets. Olfactory receptors regulate chemosensory function and airway hypersensitivity, and these gene sets were the most enriched. Targeted metabolomics analysis showed that Cd treatment also increased metabolites in pathways of glutamatergic (glutamate), serotonergic (tryptophan), cholinergic (choline), and catecholaminergic (tyrosine) receptors in the lung tissue. Protein abundance measurements showed that the glutamate receptor GRIN2A was increased in mouse lung tissue. Together, these results show that in mice, oral low-dose Cd increased lung Cd to levels comparable to humans, increased airway hyperresponsiveness and disrupted neuronal pathways regulating bronchial tone. Therefore, dietary Cd may promote or worsen airway hyperresponsiveness in multiple lung diseases including asthma.

  11. Low-dose oral cadmium increases airway reactivity and lung neuronal gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Joshua D; Wongtrakool, Cherry; Banton, Sophia A; Li, Shuzhao; Orr, Michael L; Barr, Dana Boyd; Neujahr, David C; Sutliff, Roy L; Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P

    2016-07-01

    Inhalation of cadmium (Cd) is associated with lung diseases, but less is known concerning pulmonary effects of Cd found in the diet. Cd has a decades-long half-life in humans and significant bioaccumulation occurs with chronic dietary intake. We exposed mice to low-dose CdCl2 (10 mg/L in drinking water) for 20 weeks, which increased lung Cd to a level similar to that of nonoccupationally exposed adult humans. Cd-treated mice had increased airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine challenge, and gene expression array showed that Cd altered the abundance of 443 mRNA transcripts in mouse lung. In contrast to higher doses, low-dose Cd did not elicit increased metallothionein transcripts in lung. To identify pathways most affected by Cd, gene set enrichment of transcripts was analyzed. Results showed that major inducible targets of low-dose Cd were neuronal receptors represented by enriched olfactory, glutamatergic, cholinergic, and serotonergic gene sets. Olfactory receptors regulate chemosensory function and airway hypersensitivity, and these gene sets were the most enriched. Targeted metabolomics analysis showed that Cd treatment also increased metabolites in pathways of glutamatergic (glutamate), serotonergic (tryptophan), cholinergic (choline), and catecholaminergic (tyrosine) receptors in the lung tissue. Protein abundance measurements showed that the glutamate receptor GRIN2A was increased in mouse lung tissue. Together, these results show that in mice, oral low-dose Cd increased lung Cd to levels comparable to humans, increased airway hyperresponsiveness and disrupted neuronal pathways regulating bronchial tone. Therefore, dietary Cd may promote or worsen airway hyperresponsiveness in multiple lung diseases including asthma. PMID:27401458

  12. Towards Mechanism Classifiers: Expression-anchored Gene Ontology Signature Predicts Clinical Outcome in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinan; Li, Haiquan; Regan, Kelly; Li, Jianrong; Huang, Yong; Lussier, Yves A.

    2012-01-01

    We aim to provide clinically applicable, reproducible, mechanistic interpretations of gene expression changes that lack in gene overlap among predictive gene-signatures. Using a method we recently developed, Functional Analysis of Individual Microarray Expression (FAIME), we provide evidence that Gene Ontology-anchored signatures (GO-signatures) show reliable prognosis in lung cancer. In order to demonstrate the biological congruence and reproducibility of FAIME-derived mechanism classifiers, we chose a disease where gene expression classifiers signatures alone had failed to significantly stratify a larger collection of samples and that exhibited poor or no genetic overlap. For each patient in the two lung adenocarcinoma studies, personalized FAIME-profiles of GO biological processes are generated from genome-wide expression profiles. For both training studies, GO-signatures significantly associated to patient mortality were identified (Prediction Analysis for Microarrays; three-fold cross-validation). These two GO-signatures could effectively stratify patients from an independent validation cohort into sub-groups that show significant differences in disease-free survival (log-rank test P=0.019; P=0.001). Importantly, significant mechanism overlaps assessed by information-theory similarity were detected between the two GO-signatures (Fischer Exact Test p=0.001). Hence, together with machine learning technologies, FAIME could be utilized to develop an ontology-driven and expression-anchored prognostic signature that is personalized for an individual patient. PMID:23304380

  13. Evaluation of reference genes for gene expression in red-tailed phascogale (Phascogale calura) liver, lung, small intestine and spleen

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Oselyne T.W.; Young, Lauren J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Reference genes serve an important role as an endogenous control/standard for data normalisation in gene expression studies. Although reference genes have recently been suggested for marsupials, independent analysis of reference genes on different immune tissues is yet to be tested. Therefore, an assessment of reference genes is needed for the selection of stable, expressed genes across different marsupial tissues. Methods The study was conducted on red-tailed phascogales (Phascogale calura) using five juvenile and five adult males. The stability of five reference genes (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GAPDH; β-actin, ACTB; 18S rRNA, 18S; 28S rRNA, 28S; and ribosomal protein L13A, RPL13A) was investigated using SYBR Green and analysed with the geNorm application available in qBasePLUS software. Results Gene stability for juvenile and adult tissue samples combined show that GAPDH was most stable in liver and lung tissue, and 18S in small intestine and spleen. While all reference genes were suitable for small intestine and spleen tissues, all reference genes except 28S were stable for lung and only 18S and 28S were stable for liver tissue. Separating the two age groups, we found that two different reference genes were considered stable in juveniles (ACTB and GAPDH) and adults (18S and 28S), and RPL13A was not stable for juvenile small intestine tissue. Except for 28S, all reference genes were stable in juvenile and adult lungs, and all five reference genes were stable in spleen tissue. Discussion Based on expression stability, ACTB and GAPDH are suitable for all tissues when studying the expression of marsupials in two age groups, except for adult liver tissues. The expression stability between juvenile and adult liver tissue was most unstable, as the stable reference genes for juveniles and adults were different. Juvenile and adult lung, small intestine and spleen share similar stable reference genes, except for small intestine tissues where

  14. DNA Methylation Profile and Expression of Surfactant Protein A2 gene in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grageda, Melissa; Silveyra, Patricia; Thomas, Neal J.; DiAngelo, Susan L.; Floros, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the methylation profile of genes allow for the identification of biomarkers that may guide diagnosis and effective treatment of disease. Human surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in lung homeostasis and immunity, and is encoded by two genes (SFTPA1 and SFTPA2). The goal of this study was to identify differentially methylated CpG sites in the promoter region of the SFTPA2 gene in lung cancer tissue, and to determine the correlation between the promoter’s methylation profile and gene expression. For this, we collected 28 pairs of cancerous human lung tissue and adjacent non-cancerous (NC) lung tissue: 17 adenocarcinoma (AC), 9 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 2 AC with SCC features, and we evaluated DNA methylation of the SFTPA2 promoter region by bisulfite conversion. Our results identified a higher methylation ratio in one CpG site of the SFTPA2 gene in cancerous tissue vs. NC tissue (0.36 vs. 0.11, p=0.001). When assessing AC samples, we also found cancerous tissues associated with a higher methylation ratio (0.43 vs. 0.10, p=0.02). In the SCC group, although cancerous tissue showed a higher methylation ratio (0.22 vs. 0.11), this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.35). Expression of SFTPA2 mRNA and total SP-A protein was significantly lower in cancer tissue when compared to adjacent NC tissue (p<0.001), and correlated with the hypermethylated status of a SFTPA2 CpG site in AC samples. The findings of this pilot study may hold promise for future use of SFTPA2 as a biomarker for the diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:25514367

  15. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  16. Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues from Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Zalesak, Selina M.; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Scully, Robert R.; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine dust (< 3 micron), that is respirable. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues from rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m(exp 3) of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized 1 day, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The total RNAs were isolated from lung tissues after being lavaged. The Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray was used to profile global gene expression (44K). The genes with significant expression changes are identified and the gene expression data were further analyzed using various statistical tools.

  17. Identification of distinct genes associated with seawater aspiration‑induced acute lung injury by gene expression profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Lei; Zhang, Minlong; Bo, Liyan; Li, Congcong; Liu, Qingqing; Wang, Li; Jin, Faguang

    2016-10-01

    Seawater aspiration‑induced acute lung injury (ALI) is a syndrome associated with a high mortality rate, which is characterized by severe hypoxemia, pulmonary edema and inflammation. The present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to analyze gene expression profiles from a rat model of seawater aspiration‑induced ALI. Adult male Sprague‑Dawley rats were instilled with seawater (4 ml/kg) in the seawater aspiration‑induced ALI group (S group) or with distilled water (4 ml/kg) in the distilled water negative control group (D group). In the blank control group (C group) the rats' tracheae were exposed without instillation. Subsequently, lung samples were examined by histopathology; total protein concentration was detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); lung wet/dry weight ratios were determined; and transcript expression was detected by gene sequencing analysis. The results demonstrated that histopathological alterations, pulmonary edema and total protein concentrations in BALF were increased in the S group compared with in the D group. Analysis of differential gene expression identified up and downregulated genes in the S group compared with in the D and C groups. A gene ontology analysis of the differential gene expression revealed enrichment of genes in the functional pathways associated with neutrophil chemotaxis, immune and defense responses, and cytokine activity. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis revealed that the cytokine‑cytokine receptor interaction pathway was one of the most important pathways involved in seawater aspiration‑induced ALI. In conclusion, activation of the cytokine‑cytokine receptor interaction pathway may have an essential role in the progression of seawater aspiration‑induced ALI, and the downregulation of tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 10 may enhance inflammation. Furthermore, IL‑6 may be considered a biomarker in seawater aspiration‑induced ALI. PMID:27509884

  18. Identification of distinct genes associated with seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury by gene expression profile analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Lei; Zhang, Minlong; Bo, Liyan; Li, Congcong; Liu, Qingqing; Wang, Li; Jin, Faguang

    2016-01-01

    Seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is a syndrome associated with a high mortality rate, which is characterized by severe hypoxemia, pulmonary edema and inflammation. The present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to analyze gene expression profiles from a rat model of seawater aspiration-induced ALI. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were instilled with seawater (4 ml/kg) in the seawater aspiration-induced ALI group (S group) or with distilled water (4 ml/kg) in the distilled water negative control group (D group). In the blank control group (C group) the rats' tracheae were exposed without instillation. Subsequently, lung samples were examined by histopathology; total protein concentration was detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); lung wet/dry weight ratios were determined; and transcript expression was detected by gene sequencing analysis. The results demonstrated that histopathological alterations, pulmonary edema and total protein concentrations in BALF were increased in the S group compared with in the D group. Analysis of differential gene expression identified up and downregulated genes in the S group compared with in the D and C groups. A gene ontology analysis of the differential gene expression revealed enrichment of genes in the functional pathways associated with neutrophil chemotaxis, immune and defense responses, and cytokine activity. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis revealed that the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathway was one of the most important pathways involved in seawater aspiration-induced ALI. In conclusion, activation of the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathway may have an essential role in the progression of seawater aspiration-induced ALI, and the downregulation of tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 10 may enhance inflammation. Furthermore, IL-6 may be considered a biomarker in seawater aspiration-induced ALI. PMID:27509884

  19. Expression of retinoic acid receptor genes in fetal and newborn rat lung.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Thet, L A; Zachman, R D

    1994-04-01

    Lung differentiation and development are affected by vitamin A and its metabolites. One mechanism through which retinoids might exert their effects is through nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RAR). The gene expression profile of the RAR family (alpha, beta, gamma) has previously been determined in both the developing mouse embryo to 14.5 days gestation, and in the adult lung. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of the RAR genes during the period of gestation that results in the formation of the saccular lung stage. Total RNA was extracted from fetal lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats at gestational days 17, 19, 20, 21, and 22, and from 12-hour-old newborns for Northern hybridization. Two transcripts of RAR alpha mRNA (3.7 and 2.7 kb) were found at each time point. At day 17, the 2.7 kb RAR alpha mRNA was increased two-fold or more than at any other time studied. At days 19-22 the levels of the 3.7 kb RAR alpha species were also lower than day 17 and newborn levels. One RAR beta mRNA transcript (3.4 kb), present at all time points, was significantly higher in the newborn than on days 17-22. Expression of RAR gamma mRNA could only be demonstrated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We speculate that the higher RAR alpha species at day 17 indicates a role for RAR alpha in the maintenance of the columnar epithelial cells of the glandular phase of lung development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8208594

  20. Products of vasopressin gene expression in small-cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, A. S.; Malott, K. A.; Memoli, V. A.; Pai, S. I.; Yu, X. M.; North, W. G.

    1994-01-01

    Small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung is known to express products related to the vasopressin gene, although these products have been reported to sometimes differ from those generated by neurones of the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. To further investigate vasopressin gene expression in neuroendocrine carcinomas, we performed immunohistochemistry on 24 histologically classified small-cell carcinomas using antibodies directed against different regions of the vasopressin precursor. All of the tumours examined contained at least two parts of the vasopressin precursor, suggesting that vasopressin might have a biological role in these tumours and indicating a role for these products in tumour diagnosis and treatment. Sixty-seven per cent of the tumours contained immunoreactivity for all major regions of the precursor: vasopressin, vasopressin-associated human neurophysin, the bridging region between the hormone and the neurophysin, and vasopressin-associated human glycopeptide. However, 33% of the tumours examined appeared to express only part of the vasopressin precursor, as evidenced by the absence of immunoreactivity for the neurophysin and/or the glycopeptide. These results support the proposition that both normal and abnormal vasopressin gene expression occurs in small-cell carcinoma of the lung. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8297723

  1. Gene expression profile of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in lung tissue of patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbpour, Eisa; Ghanei, Mostafa; Qazvini, Ali; Vahedi, Ensieh; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent that targets several organs, especially lung tissue. Although pathological effects of SM on mustard lung have been widely considered, molecular and cellular mechanisms for these pathologies are poorly understood. We investigated changes in expression of genes related to oxidative stress (OS) and antioxidant defense caused by SM in lung tissue of patients. We performed gene expression profiling of OS and antioxidant defense in lung tissue samples from healthy controls (n=5) and SM-exposed patients (n=6). Changes in gene expression were measured using a 96-well RT(2) Profiler ™PCR Array: Human Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense, which arrayed 84 genes functionally involved in cellular OS response. 47 (55.95%) genes were found to be significantly upregulated in patients with mustard lung compared with controls (p<0.05), whereas 7 (8.33%) genes were significantly downregulated (p<0.05). Among the most upregulated genes were OS responsive-1 (OXSR1), forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), and glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPX2), while metallothionein-3 (MT3) and glutathione reductase (GSR) were the most downregulated genes. Expression of hypoxia-induced genes (CYGB and MB), antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing genes were significantly altered, suggesting an increased oxidative damage in mustard lungs. Mustard lungs were characterized by hypoxia, massive production of ROS, OS, disruption of epithelial cells, surfactant dysfunction, as well as increased risk of lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. Oxidative stress induced by ROS is the major mechanism for direct effect of SM exposure on respiratory system. Antioxidant treatment may improve the main features of mustard lungs.

  2. Gene expression profile of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in lung tissue of patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbpour, Eisa; Ghanei, Mostafa; Qazvini, Ali; Vahedi, Ensieh; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent that targets several organs, especially lung tissue. Although pathological effects of SM on mustard lung have been widely considered, molecular and cellular mechanisms for these pathologies are poorly understood. We investigated changes in expression of genes related to oxidative stress (OS) and antioxidant defense caused by SM in lung tissue of patients. We performed gene expression profiling of OS and antioxidant defense in lung tissue samples from healthy controls (n=5) and SM-exposed patients (n=6). Changes in gene expression were measured using a 96-well RT(2) Profiler ™PCR Array: Human Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense, which arrayed 84 genes functionally involved in cellular OS response. 47 (55.95%) genes were found to be significantly upregulated in patients with mustard lung compared with controls (p<0.05), whereas 7 (8.33%) genes were significantly downregulated (p<0.05). Among the most upregulated genes were OS responsive-1 (OXSR1), forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), and glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPX2), while metallothionein-3 (MT3) and glutathione reductase (GSR) were the most downregulated genes. Expression of hypoxia-induced genes (CYGB and MB), antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing genes were significantly altered, suggesting an increased oxidative damage in mustard lungs. Mustard lungs were characterized by hypoxia, massive production of ROS, OS, disruption of epithelial cells, surfactant dysfunction, as well as increased risk of lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. Oxidative stress induced by ROS is the major mechanism for direct effect of SM exposure on respiratory system. Antioxidant treatment may improve the main features of mustard lungs. PMID:27085470

  3. Gene expression profile of human lung epithelial cells chronically exposed to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongquan; Stueckle, Todd A.; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Rojanasakul, Yon; Lu, Yongju; Wang, Liying

    2015-01-01

    A rapid increase in utility of engineered nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), has raised a concern over their safety. Based on recent evidence from animal studies, pulmonary exposure of CNTs may lead to nanoparticle accumulation in the deep lung without effective clearance which could interact with local lung cells for a long period of time. Physicochemical similarities of CNTs to asbestos fibers may contribute to their asbestos-like carcinogenic potential after long-term exposure, which has not been well addressed. More studies are needed to identify and predict the carcinogenic potential and mechanisms for promoting their safe use. Our previous study reported a long-term in vitro exposure model for CNT carcinogenicity and showed that 6-month sub-chronic exposure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) causes malignant transformation of human lung epithelial cells. In addition, the transformed cells induced tumor formation in mice and exhibited an apoptosis resistant phenotype, a key characteristic of cancer cells. Although the potential role of p53 in the transformation process was identified, the underlying mechanisms of oncogenesis remain largely undefined. Here, we further examined the gene expression profile by using genome microarrays to profile molecular mechanisms of SWCNT oncogenesis. Based on differentially expressed genes, possible mechanisms of SWCNT-associated apoptosis resistance and oncogenesis were identified, which included activation of pAkt/p53/Bcl-2 signaling axis, increased gene expression of Ras family for cell cycle control, Dsh-mediated Notch 1, and downregulation of apoptotic genes BAX and Noxa. Activated immune responses were among the major changes of biological function. Our findings shed light on potential molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in SWCNT oncogenic potential.

  4. Gene Co-Expression Analysis Predicts Genetic Variants Associated with Drug Responsiveness in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Sanaya; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Responsiveness to drugs is an important concern in designing personalized treatment for cancer patients. Currently genetic markers are often used to guide targeted therapy. However, deeper understanding of the molecular basis for drug responses and discovery of new predictive biomarkers for drug sensitivity are much needed. In this paper, we present a workflow for identifying condition-specific gene co-expression networks associated with responses to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Erlotinib, in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines using data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia by combining network mining and statistical analysis. Particularly, we have identified multiple gene modules specifically co-expressed in the drug responsive cell lines but not in the unresponsive group. Interestingly, most of these modules are enriched on specific cytobands, suggesting potential copy number variation events on these loci. Our results therefore imply that there are multiple genetic loci with copy number variations associated with the Erlotinib responses. The existence of CNVs in these loci is also confirmed in lung cancer tissue samples using the TCGA data. Since these structural variations are inferred from functional genomics data, these CNVs are functional variations. These results suggest the condition specific gene co- expression network mining approach is an effective approach in predicting candidate biomarkers for drug responses. PMID:27570645

  5. Gene Co-Expression Analysis Predicts Genetic Variants Associated with Drug Responsiveness in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Sanaya; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Responsiveness to drugs is an important concern in designing personalized treatment for cancer patients. Currently genetic markers are often used to guide targeted therapy. However, deeper understanding of the molecular basis for drug responses and discovery of new predictive biomarkers for drug sensitivity are much needed. In this paper, we present a workflow for identifying condition-specific gene co-expression networks associated with responses to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Erlotinib, in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines using data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia by combining network mining and statistical analysis. Particularly, we have identified multiple gene modules specifically co-expressed in the drug responsive cell lines but not in the unresponsive group. Interestingly, most of these modules are enriched on specific cytobands, suggesting potential copy number variation events on these loci. Our results therefore imply that there are multiple genetic loci with copy number variations associated with the Erlotinib responses. The existence of CNVs in these loci is also confirmed in lung cancer tissue samples using the TCGA data. Since these structural variations are inferred from functional genomics data, these CNVs are functional variations. These results suggest the condition specific gene co- expression network mining approach is an effective approach in predicting candidate biomarkers for drug responses. PMID:27570645

  6. Genome Wide Host Gene Expression Analysis in Chicken Lungs Infected with Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gandhale, Pradeep N.; Kumar, Himanshu; Kulkarni, Diwakar D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of avian influenza infection varies greatly with individual bird species and virus strain. The molecular pathogenesis of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) or the low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) infection in avian species remains poorly understood. Thus, global immune response of chickens infected with HPAI H5N1 (A/duck/India/02CA10/2011) and LPAI H9N2 (A/duck/India/249800/2010) viruses was studied using microarray to identify crucial host genetic components responsive to these infection. HPAI H5N1 virus induced excessive expression of type I IFNs (IFNA and IFNG), cytokines (IL1B, IL18, IL22, IL13, and IL12B), chemokines (CCL4, CCL19, CCL10, and CX3CL1) and IFN stimulated genes (OASL, MX1, RSAD2, IFITM5, IFIT5, GBP 1, and EIF2AK) in lung tissues. This dysregulation of host innate immune genes may be the critical determinant of the severity and the outcome of the influenza infection in chickens. In contrast, the expression levels of most of these genes was not induced in the lungs of LPAI H9N2 virus infected chickens. This study indicated the relationship between host immune genes and their roles in pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in chickens. PMID:27071061

  7. Selection of suitable reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression profile studies in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silvia, Saviozzi; Francesca, Cordero; Marco, Lo Iacono; Silvia, Novello; Giorgio V, Scagliotti; Raffaele, Calogero A

    2006-01-01

    Background In real-time RT quantitative PCR (qPCR) the accuracy of normalized data is highly dependent on the reliability of the reference genes (RGs). Failure to use an appropriate control gene for normalization of qPCR data may result in biased gene expression profiles, as well as low precision, so that only gross changes in expression level are declared statistically significant or patterns of expression are erroneously characterized. Therefore, it is essential to determine whether potential RGs are appropriate for specific experimental purposes. Aim of this study was to identify and validate RGs for use in the differentiation of normal and tumor lung expression profiles. Methods A meta-analysis of lung cancer transcription profiles generated with the GeneChip technology was used to identify five putative RGs. Their consistency and that of seven commonly used RGs was tested by using Taqman probes on 18 paired normal-tumor lung snap-frozen specimens obtained from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients during primary curative resection. Results The 12 RGs displayed showed a wide range of Ct values: except for rRNA18S (mean 9.8), the mean values of all the commercial RGs and ESD ranged from 19 to 26, whereas those of the microarray-selected RGs (BTF-3, YAP1, HIST1H2BC, RPL30) exceeded 26. RG expression stability within sample populations and under the experimental conditions (tumour versus normal lung specimens) was evaluated by: (1) descriptive statistic; (2) equivalence test; (3) GeNorm applet. All these approaches indicated that the most stable RGs were POLR2A, rRNA18S, YAP1 and ESD. Conclusion These data suggest that POLR2A, rRNA18S, YAP1 and ESD are the most suitable RGs for gene expression profile studies in NSCLC. Furthermore, they highlight the limitations of commercial RGs and indicate that meta-data analysis of genome-wide transcription profiling studies may identify new RGs. PMID:16872493

  8. Validation of Tuba1a as Appropriate Internal Control for Normalization of Gene Expression Analysis during Mouse Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Aditi; Dobersch, Stephanie; Dammann, Reinhard H.; Bellusci, Saverio; Ilinskaya, Olga N.; Braun, Thomas; Barreto, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The expression ratio between the analysed gene and an internal control gene is the most widely used normalization method for quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) expression analysis. The ideal reference gene for a specific experiment is the one whose expression is not affected by the different experimental conditions tested. In this study, we validate the applicability of five commonly used reference genes during different stages of mouse lung development. The stability of expression of five different reference genes (Tuba1a, Actb Gapdh, Rn18S and Hist4h4) was calculated within five experimental groups using the statistical algorithm of geNorm software. Overall, Tuba1a showed the least variability in expression among the different stages of lung development, while Hist4h4 and Rn18S showed the maximum variability in their expression. Expression analysis of two lung specific markers, surfactant protein C (SftpC) and Clara cell-specific 10 kDA protein (Scgb1a1), normalized to each of the five reference genes tested here, confirmed our results and showed that incorrect reference gene choice can lead to artefacts. Moreover, a combination of two internal controls for normalization of expression analysis during lung development will increase the accuracy and reliability of results. PMID:25723738

  9. Global gene expression profiling in human lung cells exposed to cobalt

    PubMed Central

    Malard, Veronique; Berenguer, Frederic; Prat, Odette; Ruat, Sylvie; Steinmetz, Gerard; Quemeneur, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that more than 1 million workers in the United States are exposed to cobalt. Occupational exposure to 59 Co occurs mainly via inhalation and leads to various lung diseases. Cobalt is classified by the IARC as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B). Although there is evidence for in vivo and in vitro toxicity, the mechanisms of cobalt-induced lung toxicity are not fully known. The purpose of this work was to identify potential signatures of acute cobalt exposure using a toxicogenomic approach. Data analysis focused on some cellular processes and protein targets that are thought to be relevant for carcinogenesis, transport and biomarker research. Results A time course transcriptome analysis was performed on A549 human pulmonary cells, leading to the identification of 85 genes which are repressed or induced in response to soluble 59 Co. A group of 29 of these genes, representing the main biological functions, was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. The expression profiles of six of them were then tested by quantitative RT-PCR in a time-dependent manner and three modulations were confirmed by Western blotting. The 85 modulated genes include potential cobalt carriers (FBXL2, ZNT1, SLC12A5), tumor suppressors or transcription factors (MAZ, DLG1, MYC, AXL) and genes linked to the stress response (UBC, HSPCB, BNIP3L). We also identified nine genes coding for secreted proteins as candidates for biomarker research. Of those, TIMP2 was found to be down-regulated and this modulation was confirmed, in a dose-dependent manner, at protein level in the supernatant of exposed cells. Conclusion Most of these genes have never been described as related to cobalt stress and provide original hypotheses for further study of the effects of this metal ion on human lung epithelial cells. A putative biomarker of cobalt toxicity was identified. PMID:17553155

  10. Expression of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in rodent lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Swafford, D.S.; Tesfaigzi, J.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Aberrations on the short arm of chromosome 9 are among the earliest genetic changes in human cancer. p16{sup INK4a} is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that lies within human 9p21, a chromosome region associated with frequent loss of heterozygosity in human lung tumors. The p16{sup INK4a} protein functions as an inhibitor of cyclin D{sub 1}-dependent kinases that phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor gene product enabling cell-cycle progression. Thus, overexpression of cyclin D{sub 1}, mutation of cyclin-dependent kinase genes, or loss of p16{sup INK4a} function, can all result in functional inactivation of Rb. Inactivation of Rb by mutation or deletion can result in an increase in p16{sup INK4a} transcription, suggesting that an increased p16{sup INK4a} expression in a tumor cell signals dysfunction of the pathway. The p16{sup (INK4a)} gene, unlike some tumor suppressor genes, is rarely inactivated by mutation. Instead, the expression of this gene is suppressed in some human cancers by hypermethylation of the CpG island within the first exon or by homozygous deletion: 686. Chromosome losses have been observed at 9p21 syntenic loci in tumors of the mouse and rat, two species often used as animal models for pulmonary carcinogenesis. Expression of p16{sup INK4a} is lost in some mouse tumor cell lines, often due to homozygous deletion. These observations indicate that p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction may play a role in the development of neoplasia in rodents as well as humans. The purpose of the current investigation was to define the extent to which p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction contributes to the development of rodent lung tumors and to determine the mechanism of inactivation of the gene. There is no evidence to suggest a loss of function of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in these primary murine lung tumors by mutation, deletion, or methylation.

  11. A Highly Efficient Gene Expression Programming (GEP) Model for Auxiliary Diagnosis of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hongzong; Liu, Shihai; Li, Xianchao; Gao, Caihong; Cui, Lianhua; Li, Chuan; Yang, Xue; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is an important and common cancer that constitutes a major public health problem, but early detection of small cell lung cancer can significantly improve the survival rate of cancer patients. A number of serum biomarkers have been used in the diagnosis of lung cancers; however, they exhibit low sensitivity and specificity. Methods We used biochemical methods to measure blood levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), Na+, Cl-, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in 145 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients and 155 non-small cell lung cancer and 155 normal controls. A gene expression programming (GEP) model and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves incorporating these biomarkers was developed for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. Results After appropriate modification of the parameters, the GEP model was initially set up based on a training set of 115 SCLC patients and 125 normal controls for GEP model generation. Then the GEP was applied to the remaining 60 subjects (the test set) for model validation. GEP successfully discriminated 281 out of 300 cases, showing a correct classification rate for lung cancer patients of 93.75% (225/240) and 93.33% (56/60) for the training and test sets, respectively. Another GEP model incorporating four biomarkers, including CEA, NSE, LDH, and CRP, exhibited slightly lower detection sensitivity than the GEP model, including six biomarkers. We repeat the models on artificial neural network (ANN), and our results showed that the accuracy of GEP models were higher than that in ANN. GEP model incorporating six serum biomarkers performed by NSCLC patients and normal controls showed low accuracy than SCLC patients and was enough to prove that the GEP model is suitable for the SCLC patients. Conclusion We have developed a GEP model with high sensitivity and specificity for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. This GEP model has the potential for the wide use

  12. Identification of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in lung cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hassan; Du, Zhenwu; Li, Xiuying; Yang, Qiwei; Zhang, Yu Cheng; Wu, Mei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Guizhen

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to examine 10 housekeeping genes (HKGs), including 18s ribosomal RNA (18S), glyceraldehyde‑3‑phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), ribosomal protein large P0 (RPLP0), β‑actin (ACTB), peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA), phosphoglycerate kinase‑1 (PGK1), β‑2‑microglobulin (B2M), ribosomal protein LI3a (RPL13A), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase‑1 (HPRT1) and TATA box binding protein (TBP) in order to identify the most stable and suitable reference genes for use in expression studies in non‑small cell lung cancer. The mRNA expression encoding the panel of the 10 HKGs was determined using reverse transcription‑quantitative PCR (RT‑qPCR) in human lung cancer cell lines. Three software programs, BestKeeper, NormFinder and geNorm, were used to ascertain the most suitable reference genes to normalize the RNA input. The present study examined three lung cancer cell lines (A549, NCI‑H446 and NCI‑H460). The analysis of the experimental data using BestKeeper software revealed that all 10 HKGs were stable, with GADPH, followed by 18S being the most stable genes and PPIA and HPRT1 being the least stable genes. The NormFinder software results demonstrated that PPIA followed by ACTB were the most stable and B2M and RPLP0 were the least stable. The geNorm software results revealed that ACTB and PGK1, followed by PPIA were the most stable genes and B2M and RPLP0 were identified as the least stable genes. Due to discrepancies in the ranking orders of the reference genes obtained by different analyzing software programs, it was not possible to determine a single universal reference gene. The suitability of selected reference genes requires unconditional validation prior to each study. Based on the three analyzing programs, ACTB, PPIA and PGK1 were the most stable reference genes in lung cancer cell lines.

  13. Ventilation and oxygenation induce endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene expression in the lungs of fetal lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Black, S M; Johengen, M J; Ma, Z D; Bristow, J; Soifer, S J

    1997-01-01

    At birth, ventilation and oxygenation immediately decrease pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and increase pulmonary blood flow (PBF); more gradual changes occur over the next several hours. Nitric oxide, produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), mediates these gradual changes. To determine how ventilation and oxygenation affect eNOS gene expression, 12 fetal lambs were ventilated for 8 h without changing fetal descending aortic blood gases or pH (rhythmic distension) or with 100% oxygen (O2 ventilation). Vascular pressures and PBF were measured. Total RNA, protein, and tissue sections were prepared from lung tissue for RNase protection assays, Western blotting, and in situ hybridization. O2 ventilation increased PBF and decreased PVR more than rhythmic distension (P < 0.05). Rhythmic distension increased eNOS mRNA expression; O2 ventilation increased eNOS mRNA expression more and increased eNOS protein expression (P < 0.05). To define the mechanisms responsible for these changes, ovine fetal pulmonary arterial endothelial cells were exposed to 1, 21, or 95% O2 or to shear stress. 95% O2 increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.05). Shear stress increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.05). Increased oxygenation but more importantly increased PBF with increased shear stress induce eNOS gene expression and contribute to pulmonary vasodilation after birth. PMID:9294110

  14. Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Tissue of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan H.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Ploutz-Snyder Robert; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zalesak, Selina M.; Scully, Robert R.; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in the lung tissue of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. Multiple pathways and transcription factors were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool, showing the potential networks of these signaling regulations involved in lunar dust-induced prolonged proflammatory response and toxicity. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity. This work contributes not only to the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also to the understanding of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  15. Robust Prognostic Gene Expression Signatures in Bladder Cancer and Lung Adenocarcinoma Depend on Cell Cycle Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dancik, Garrett M.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Few prognostic biomarkers are approved for clinical use primarily because their initial performance cannot be repeated in independent datasets. We posited that robust biomarkers could be obtained by identifying deregulated biological processes shared among tumor types having a common etiology. We performed a gene set enrichment analysis in 20 publicly available gene expression datasets comprising 1968 patients having one of the three most common tobacco-related cancers (lung, bladder, head and neck) and identified cell cycle related genes as the most consistently prognostic class of biomarkers in bladder (BL) and lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD). We also found the prognostic value of 13 of 14 published BL and LUAD signatures were dependent on cell cycle related genes, supporting the importance of cell cycle related biomarkers for prognosis. Interestingly, no prognostic gene classes were identified in squamous cell lung carcinoma or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Next, a specific 31 gene cell cycle proliferation (CCP) signature, previously derived in prostate tumors was evaluated and found predictive of outcome in BL and LUAD cohorts in univariate and multivariate analyses. Specifically, CCP score significantly enhanced the predictive ability of multivariate models based on standard clinical variables for progression in BL patients and survival in LUAD patients in multiple cohorts. We then generated random CCP signatures of various sizes and found sets of 10–15 genes had robust performance in these BL and LUAD cohorts, a finding that was confirmed in an independent cohort. Our work characterizes the importance of cell cycle related genes in prognostic signatures for BL and LUAD patients and identifies a specific signature likely to survive additional validation. PMID:24465512

  16. Validation of the Lung Subtyping Panel in Multiple Fresh-Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Lung Tumor Gene Expression Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Faruki, Hawazin; Mayhew, Gregory M; Fan, Cheng; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Parker, Scott; Kam-Morgan, Lauren; Eisenberg, Marcia; Horten, Bruce; Hayes, D Neil; Perou, Charles M; Lai-Goldman, Myla

    2016-06-01

    Context .- A histologic classification of lung cancer subtypes is essential in guiding therapeutic management. Objective .- To complement morphology-based classification of lung tumors, a previously developed lung subtyping panel (LSP) of 57 genes was tested using multiple public fresh-frozen gene-expression data sets and a prospectively collected set of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tumor samples. Design .- The LSP gene-expression signature was evaluated in multiple lung cancer gene-expression data sets totaling 2177 patients collected from 4 platforms: Illumina RNAseq (San Diego, California), Agilent (Santa Clara, California) and Affymetrix (Santa Clara) microarrays, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Gene centroids were calculated for each of 3 genomic-defined subtypes: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and neuroendocrine, the latter of which encompassed both small cell carcinoma and carcinoid. Classification by LSP into 3 subtypes was evaluated in both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples, and agreement with the original morphology-based diagnosis was determined. Results .- The LSP-based classifications demonstrated overall agreement with the original clinical diagnosis ranging from 78% (251 of 322) to 91% (492 of 538 and 869 of 951) in the fresh-frozen public data sets and 84% (65 of 77) in the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded data set. The LSP performance was independent of tissue-preservation method and gene-expression platform. Secondary, blinded pathology review of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples demonstrated concordance of 82% (63 of 77) with the original morphology diagnosis. Conclusions .- The LSP gene-expression signature is a reproducible and objective method for classifying lung tumors and demonstrates good concordance with morphology-based classification across multiple data sets. The LSP panel can supplement morphologic assessment of lung cancers, particularly

  17. Clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 protein expression in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Changjun; Sun, Dawei; Bai, Xue; Li, Yingbin; Xu, Hai; Xu, Shidong

    2016-01-01

    Aim The clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 (beta-IGH3) protein expression in lung cancer remain unclear. This study investigated beta-IGH3 protein expression levels and biological function, as well as lung cancer prognosis. Methods Beta-IGH3 protein expression levels were measured in 236 lung cancers and were matched with adjacent noncancerous tissues by immunohistochemical staining. Subsequently, the relationship between beta-IGH3 protein expression, clinical–pathological parameters, and lung cancer prognosis was evaluated. Results Beta-IGH3 protein expression was significantly higher in lung cancer tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues (61.86% vs 22.88%; P=0.01). Of the 236 enrolled cases, 146 (61.86%) showed high beta-IGH3 levels. Tumor size, clinical stage, and lymph node metastasis were significantly related to beta-IGH3 protein expression in univariate analysis (P=0.001, 0.044, and 0.029, respectively), whereas age, sex, and histological type were not (P=0.038, 0.756, and 0.889, respectively). Finally, a Cox regression model also identified beta-IGH3 as an independent prognostic factor (P=0.01). Conclusion Beta-IGH3 is highly expressed in lung cancers and may be a potential target for lung cancer treatments. PMID:27563252

  18. Altered expression of the IQGAP1 gene in human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.E.; Palmisano, W.A.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    IQGAP1 is a GTPase activation protein that accelerates GTP hydrolysis by normal p21 ras proteins. Therefore, IQGAP1 could act as an upstream affector of p21 ras activity by convert in excess amounts of active GTP-21 ras to inactive GDP-21 ras. IQGAP1 displays extensive sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of all previously reported ras GAPs, including the tumor suppressor gene protein neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). It has been shown that abnormal NF1 protein cannot negatively regulate the activity of ras proteins in neuroblast cells. This observation supports the hypothesis that NF1 is a tumor suppressor gene whose product acts upstream of ras. IQGAP1 is primarily expressed in lung, where it may play a role similar to NF1 in regulating the activity of H-ras or K-ras proteins. IQGAP1 functions as other GAPs by controlling the activity of ras.

  19. Effects of sulfur dioxide on apoptosis-related gene expressions in lungs from rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Juli; Meng, Ziqiang

    2005-12-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is an air pollutant in densely populated areas as well as in areas polluted by coal-fired power plants, smelters, and sulfuric acid factories. In the present study, male Wistar rats were housed in exposure chambers and treated with 14.00+/-1.01, 28.00+/-1.77, and 56.00+/-3.44 mg/m3 SO2 for 6 h/day for 7 days, while control rats were exposed to filtered air in the same condition. The mRNA and protein levels of three apoptosis-related genes (p53 and bax are promoters of apoptosis, whereas bcl-2 is apoptotic suppressor) were analyzed in lungs using a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) assay and immunohistochemistry method, and caspase-3 activities were detected. The results showed that mRNA levels of p53 and bax were increased in a dose-dependent manner and at the concentrations of 28.00 and 56.00 mg/m3 SO2 the increases were significant (for p53: 1.23-fold at 28 mg/m3 and 1.39-fold at 56 mg/m3; for bax: 1.77-fold at 28 mg/m3 and 2.26-fold at 56 mg/m3, respectively), while mRNA levels of bcl-2 were decreased significantly (0.78-fold at 28 mg/m3 and 0.73-fold at 56 mg/m3) in lungs of rats exposed to SO2. Dose-dependent increase of p53 and bax proteins in the lungs was observed after SO2 inhalation, while decrease of bcl-2 protein levels was obtained using immunohistochemistry method. Caspase-3 activities were increased in lungs of rats after SO2 inhalation. These results lead to a conclusion that SO2 exposure can change the expression of apoptosis-related genes, and it suggests that SO2 can induce apoptosis in lung of rat and may have relations with some apoptosis-related diseases. Elucidating the expression patterns of those factors after SO2 inhalation may be critical to our understanding mechanisms of SO2 toxicity and helpful for the therapeutic intervention.

  20. Regulatory T cell-mediated resolution of lung injury: identification of potential target genes via expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neil R.; D'Alessio, Franco R.; Tsushima, Kenji; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Cheadle, Christopher; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2010-01-01

    In animal models of acute lung injury (ALI), gene expression studies have focused on the acute phase of illness, with little emphasis on resolution. In this study, the acute phase of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (IT LPS)-induced lung injury was similar in wild-type (WT) and recombinase-activating gene-1-deficient (Rag-1−/−) lymphocyte-deficient mice, but resolution was impaired and resolution-phase lung gene expression remained different from baseline only in Rag-1−/− mice. By focusing on groups of genes involved in similar biological processes (gene ontologies) pertinent to inflammation and the immune response, we identified 102 genes at days 4 and 10 after IT LPS with significantly different expression between WT and Rag-1−/− mice. After adoptive transfer of isolated CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) to Rag-1−/− mice at the time of IT LPS, resolution was similar to that in WT mice. Of the 102 genes distinctly changed in either WT or Rag-1−/− mice from our 7 gene ontologies, 19 genes reverted from the Rag-1−/− to the WT pattern of expression after adoptive transfer of Tregs, implicating those 19 genes in Treg-mediated resolution of ALI. PMID:20028937

  1. A gene expression signature of emphysema-related lung destruction and its reversal by the tripeptide GHK

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease consisting of emphysema, small airway obstruction, and/or chronic bronchitis that results in significant loss of lung function over time. Methods In order to gain insights into the molecular pathways underlying progression of emphysema and explore computational strategies for identifying COPD therapeutics, we profiled gene expression in lung tissue samples obtained from regions within the same lung with varying amounts of emphysematous destruction from smokers with COPD (8 regions × 8 lungs = 64 samples). Regional emphysema severity was quantified in each tissue sample using the mean linear intercept (Lm) between alveolar walls from micro-CT scans. Results We identified 127 genes whose expression levels were significantly associated with regional emphysema severity while controlling for gene expression differences between individuals. Genes increasing in expression with increasing emphysematous destruction included those involved in inflammation, such as the B-cell receptor signaling pathway, while genes decreasing in expression were enriched in tissue repair processes, including the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway, actin organization, and integrin signaling. We found concordant differential expression of these emphysema severity-associated genes in four cross-sectional studies of COPD. Using the Connectivity Map, we identified GHK as a compound that can reverse the gene-expression signature associated with emphysematous destruction and induce expression patterns consistent with TGFβ pathway activation. Treatment of human fibroblasts with GHK recapitulated TGFβ-induced gene-expression patterns, led to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and elevated the expression of integrin β1. Furthermore, addition of GHK or TGFβ restored collagen I contraction and remodeling by fibroblasts derived from COPD lungs compared to fibroblasts from former smokers without

  2. Gene expression profiling in the lung tissue of cynomolgus monkeys in response to repeated exposure to welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jeong-Doo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Choong Yong; Song, Chang-Woo; Yoon, Seokjoo; Han, Jin Soo; Yu, Il Je

    2010-03-01

    Many in the welding industry suffer from bronchitis, lung function changes, metal fume fever, and diseases related to respiratory damage. These phenomena are associated with welding fumes; however, the mechanism behind these findings remains to be elucidated. In this study, the lungs of cynomolgus monkeys were exposed to MMA-SS welding fumes for 229 days and allowed to recover for 153 days. After the exposure and recovery period, gene expression profiles were investigated using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human U133 plus 2.0. In total, it was confirmed that 1,116 genes were up-or downregulated (over 2-fold changes, P\\0.01) for the T1 (31.4 ± 2.8 mg/m3) and T2 (62.5 ± 2.7 mg/m3) dose groups. Differentially expressed genes in the exposure and recovery groups were analyzed, based on hierarchical clustering, and were imported into Ingenuity Pathways Analysis to analyze the biological and toxicological functions. Functional analysis identified genes involved in immunological disease in both groups. Additionally, differentially expressed genes in common between monkeys and rats following welding fume exposure were compared using microarray data, and the gene expression of selected genes was verified by real-time PCR. Genes such as CHI3L1, RARRES1, and CTSB were up-regulated and genes such as CYP26B1, ID4, and NRGN were down-regulated in both monkeys and rats following welding fume exposure. This is the first comprehensive gene expression profiling conducted for welding fume exposure in monkeys, and these expressed genes are expected to be useful in helping to understand transcriptional changes in monkey lungs after welding fume exposure.

  3. Deuterium depleted water effects on survival of lung cancer patients and expression of Kras, Bcl2, and Myc genes in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyi, Zoltán; Budán, Ferenc; Szabó, István; Ember, István; Kiss, István; Krempels, Krisztina; Somlyai, Ildikó; Somlyai, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Although advances in cancer therapies continue to develop, the shortness of the survival of lung cancer patients is still disappointing. Therefore, finding new adjuvant strategies is within the focus of cancer cure. Based on observations that deuterium depletion inhibits the growth of cancer cell lines and suppresses certain proto-oncogenes, we have conducted a clinical study in 129 patients with small cell and nonsmall cell lung cancers who consumed deuterium-depleted drinking water (DDW) as a nontoxic agent in addition to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Median survival time (MST) was 25.9 mo in males and 74.1 mo in female patients; the difference between genders was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Median survival of subjects with brain metastasis was 27.1 mo. Cumulative 5-yr survival probabilities were 19%, 52%, and 33% in males, females, and all patients with brain metastasis, respectively. Gene expression analysis in mouse lung indicated that DDW attenuates 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced expression of Bcl2, Kras, and Myc in females. In conclusion, DDW counteracts the DMBA-induced overexpression of Bcl2, Kras and Myc genes in mouse lung, and it may extend survival of lung cancer patients as a nontoxic anticancer dietary supplement, especially for women with tumors overexpressing cancer-related genes, because MST of DDW-consuming group was 2-4 times longer than it is generally observed in lung cancer patients.

  4. Integrated DNA Copy Number and Gene Expression Regulatory Network Analysis of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Iranmanesh, Seyed M; Guo, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Integrative analysis of multi-level molecular profiles can distinguish interactions that cannot be revealed based on one kind of data in the analysis of cancer susceptibility and metastasis. DNA copy number variations (CNVs) are common in cancer cells, and their role in cell behaviors and relationship to gene expression (GE) is poorly understood. An integrative analysis of CNV and genome-wide mRNA expression can discover copy number alterations and their possible regulatory effects on GE. This study presents a novel framework to identify important genes and construct potential regulatory networks based on these genes. Using this approach, DNA copy number aberrations and their effects on GE in lung cancer progression were revealed. Specifically, this approach contains the following steps: (1) select a pool of candidate driver genes, which have significant CNV in lung cancer patient tumors or have a significant association with the clinical outcome at the transcriptional level; (2) rank important driver genes in lung cancer patients with good prognosis and poor prognosis, respectively, and use top-ranked driver genes to construct regulatory networks with the COpy Number and EXpression In Cancer (CONEXIC) method; (3) identify experimentally confirmed molecular interactions in the constructed regulatory networks using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA); and (4) visualize the refined regulatory networks with the software package Genatomy. The constructed CNV/mRNA regulatory networks provide important insights into potential CNV-regulated transcriptional mechanisms in lung cancer metastasis. PMID:25392690

  5. Early Changes in Gene Expression Induced by Tobacco Smoke: Evidence for the Importance of Estrogen within Lung Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Sibele I.; Esteves, Gustavo H.; Hirata, Roberto; Peri, Suraj; Devarajan, Karthik; Slifker, Michael; Mosier, Stacy L.; Peng, Jing; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Hurst, Harrell E.; Neves, E. Jordao; Reis, Luiz F.; Gairola, C. Gary; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Clapper, Margie L.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S., surpassing breast cancer as the primary cause of cancer-related mortality in women. The goal of the present study was to identify early molecular changes in the lung induced by exposure to tobacco smoke and thus identify potential targets for chemoprevention. Female A/J mice were exposed to either tobacco smoke or HEPA-filtered air via a whole-body exposure chamber (6 h/day; 5 days/wk for 3, 8 and 20 wk). Gene expression profiles of lung tissue from control and smoke-exposed animals were established using a 15 K cDNA microarray. Cytochrome P450 1b1 (Cyp1b1), a Phase I enzyme involved in both the metabolism of xenobiotics and the 4-hydroxylation of 17β-estradiol, was modulated to the greatest extent following smoke exposure. A panel of 10 genes was found to be differentially expressed in control and smoke-exposed lung tissue at 3, 8 and 20 wk (P < 0.001). The interaction network of these differentially expressed genes revealed new pathways modulated by short-term smoke exposure including estrogen metabolism. In addition, 17β-estradiol was detected within murine lung tissue by gas chromatography coupled mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry. Identification of the early molecular events that contribute to lung tumor formation is anticipated to lead to the development of promising targeted chemopreventive therapies. In conclusion, the presence of 17β-estradiol within lung tissue when combined with the modulation of Cyp1b1 and other estrogen metabolism genes by tobacco smoke provides novel insight into a possible role for estrogens in lung cancer. PMID:20515954

  6. Differential expression of microRNAs and their target genes in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui-Young; Han, Seon-Sook; Rhee, Hwanseok; Park, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jae Seung; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Choi, Sun Shim; Shin, Seung-Ho; Kim, Woo Jin

    2015-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single‑stranded RNA species that constitute a class of non‑coding RNAs, and are emerging as key regulators of gene expression. Since each miRNA is capable of regulating multiple genes, miRNAs are attractive markers for studies of coordinated gene expression. In this study, we investigated miRNA expression profiling using a massively parallel sequencing technique to compare non‑small‑cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue and normal lung tissue. Lung cancer tissue and normal lung tissue were obtained from nine NSCLC patients. RNA isolated from these samples was processed using RNA sequencing (RNA Seq) and the HiSeq 2000 system. Differentially expressed miRNAs and mRNAs were analyzed using a t‑test. We selected target pairs that showed a negative correlation among significantly differentially expressed miRNAs and their putative target mRNAs using miRBase Targets. The differences in the expression levels of 222 miRNAs and 1,597 genes were statistically significant, as indicated by an absolute fold change ≥1.5 and P<0.05. miR‑577, miR‑301b, miR‑944, miR‑891a and miR‑615‑3p were generally upregulated, and miR‑338‑3p was generally downregulated. miRNA‑mRNA target pair analysis revealed that 49 miRNAs had 696 target mRNAs. There were significantly differentially expressed miRNAs and mRNAs between lung cancer and normal tissue. Further investigation of miRNAs and their target genes is warranted to better understand NSCLC.

  7. Gene identification for risk of relapse in stage I lung adenocarcinoma patients: a combined methodology of gene expression profiling and computational gene network analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludovini, Vienna; Bianconi, Fortunato; Siggillino, Annamaria; Piobbico, Danilo; Vannucci, Jacopo; Metro, Giulio; Chiari, Rita; Bellezza, Guido; Puma, Francesco; Della Fazia, Maria Agnese; Servillo, Giuseppe; Crinò, Lucio

    2016-05-24

    Risk assessment and treatment choice remains a challenge in early non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to identify novel genes involved in the risk of early relapse (ER) compared to no relapse (NR) in resected lung adenocarcinoma (AD) patients using a combination of high throughput technology and computational analysis. We identified 18 patients (n.13 NR and n.5 ER) with stage I AD. Frozen samples of patients in ER, NR and corresponding normal lung (NL) were subjected to Microarray technology and quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR). A gene network computational analysis was performed to select predictive genes. An independent set of 79 ADs stage I samples was used to validate selected genes by Q-PCR.From microarray analysis we selected 50 genes, using the fold change ratio of ER versus NR. They were validated both in pool and individually in patient samples (ER and NR) by Q-PCR. Fourteen increased and 25 decreased genes showed a concordance between two methods. They were used to perform a computational gene network analysis that identified 4 increased (HOXA10, CLCA2, AKR1B10, FABP3) and 6 decreased (SCGB1A1, PGC, TFF1, PSCA, SPRR1B and PRSS1) genes. Moreover, in an independent dataset of ADs samples, we showed that both high FABP3 expression and low SCGB1A1 expression was associated with a worse disease-free survival (DFS).Our results indicate that it is possible to define, through gene expression and computational analysis, a characteristic gene profiling of patients with an increased risk of relapse that may become a tool for patient selection for adjuvant therapy. PMID:27081700

  8. Gene identification for risk of relapse in stage I lung adenocarcinoma patients: a combined methodology of gene expression profiling and computational gene network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Siggillino, Annamaria; Piobbico, Danilo; Vannucci, Jacopo; Metro, Giulio; Chiari, Rita; Bellezza, Guido; Puma, Francesco; Fazia, Maria Agnese Della; Servillo, Giuseppe; Crinò, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessment and treatment choice remains a challenge in early non-smallcell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to identify novel genes involved in the risk of early relapse (ER) compared to no relapse (NR) in resected lung adenocarcinoma (AD) patients using a combination of high throughput technology and computational analysis. We identified 18 patients (n.13 NR and n.5 ER) with stage I AD. Frozen samples of patients in ER, NR and corresponding normal lung (NL) were subjected to Microarray technology and quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR). A gene network computational analysis was performed to select predictive genes. An independent set of 79 ADs stage I samples was used to validate selected genes by Q-PCR. From microarray analysis we selected 50 genes, using the fold change ratio of ER versus NR. They were validated both in pool and individually in patient samples (ER and NR) by Q-PCR. Fourteen increased and 25 decreased genes showed a concordance between two methods. They were used to perform a computational gene network analysis that identified 4 increased (HOXA10, CLCA2, AKR1B10, FABP3) and 6 decreased (SCGB1A1, PGC, TFF1, PSCA, SPRR1B and PRSS1) genes. Moreover, in an independent dataset of ADs samples, we showed that both high FABP3 expression and low SCGB1A1 expression was associated with a worse disease-free survival (DFS). Our results indicate that it is possible to define, through gene expression and computational analysis, a characteristic gene profiling of patients with an increased risk of relapse that may become a tool for patient selection for adjuvant therapy. PMID:27081700

  9. Gene identification for risk of relapse in stage I lung adenocarcinoma patients: a combined methodology of gene expression profiling and computational gene network analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludovini, Vienna; Bianconi, Fortunato; Siggillino, Annamaria; Piobbico, Danilo; Vannucci, Jacopo; Metro, Giulio; Chiari, Rita; Bellezza, Guido; Puma, Francesco; Della Fazia, Maria Agnese; Servillo, Giuseppe; Crinò, Lucio

    2016-05-24

    Risk assessment and treatment choice remains a challenge in early non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to identify novel genes involved in the risk of early relapse (ER) compared to no relapse (NR) in resected lung adenocarcinoma (AD) patients using a combination of high throughput technology and computational analysis. We identified 18 patients (n.13 NR and n.5 ER) with stage I AD. Frozen samples of patients in ER, NR and corresponding normal lung (NL) were subjected to Microarray technology and quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR). A gene network computational analysis was performed to select predictive genes. An independent set of 79 ADs stage I samples was used to validate selected genes by Q-PCR.From microarray analysis we selected 50 genes, using the fold change ratio of ER versus NR. They were validated both in pool and individually in patient samples (ER and NR) by Q-PCR. Fourteen increased and 25 decreased genes showed a concordance between two methods. They were used to perform a computational gene network analysis that identified 4 increased (HOXA10, CLCA2, AKR1B10, FABP3) and 6 decreased (SCGB1A1, PGC, TFF1, PSCA, SPRR1B and PRSS1) genes. Moreover, in an independent dataset of ADs samples, we showed that both high FABP3 expression and low SCGB1A1 expression was associated with a worse disease-free survival (DFS).Our results indicate that it is possible to define, through gene expression and computational analysis, a characteristic gene profiling of patients with an increased risk of relapse that may become a tool for patient selection for adjuvant therapy.

  10. PEG conjugation of a near-infrared fluorescent probe for noninvasive dual imaging of lung deposition and gene expression by pulmonary gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Yuko; Yanamoto, Shinya; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2012-11-01

    Dual imaging of lung deposition and gene expression following the pulmonary delivery of a gene formulation is useful for a precise analysis of gene transfection efficiency in vivo. As a novel probe for evaluating lung deposition, in this study, a poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated near-infrared fluorescent probe (PEG-NIRF) was newly synthesized, and compared with indocyanine green (ICG), for application to pDNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complex. PEG-NIRF had superior characteristics including a larger Stokes shift (absorption maximum, 662 nm; emission maximum, 772 nm) and relatively equivalent fluorescence intensity compared with ICG. ICG affected the physicochemical properties of pDNA/PEI complex with a loss of fluorescence intensity, while PEG-NIRF did not. Experiments in mice demonstrated that PEG-NIRF showed greater lung localization than ICG following pulmonary co-delivery with pDNA/PEI complex, indicating the possibility of accurately evaluating lung deposition. Moreover, it was clarified that the evaluation of lung deposition by PEG-NIRF even at 60 min could be significantly correlated with gene expression in each mouse following pulmonary co-delivery with pDNA/PEI complex. These results suggest that PEG-NIRF is widely applicable to the dual imaging of the lung deposition and gene expression of inhaled gene formulations.

  11. Genome wide analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression changes in the mouse lung following subchronic arsenate exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alterations in DNA methylation have been proposed as a mechanism for the complex toxicological effects of arsenic. In this study, whole genome DNA methylation and gene expression changes were evaluated in lungs from female mice exposed for 90 days to 50 ppm arsenate (As) in drink...

  12. Identification of differentially expressed genes in lung tissues of nickel-exposed rats using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Fan, Yingying; Liu, Lihong; Li, Mengjie; Zhou, Yang; Shao, Zhihua; Shi, Hongjun; Wang, Ying

    2011-11-01

    Occupational exposure to nickel compound, such as nickel refining, electroplating, and in conjunction with other metals, is harmful to the health, causing respiratory distress, and lung and nasal cancer. In this work, the different gene expression patterns of lung tissues from nickel-exposed rats and controls were investigated. The suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method was used to generate two subtracted cDNA libraries with gene transcripts differentially expressed after nickel inducing. Dot-blot hybridizations were used to confirm differential ratios of expression of obtained SSH clones. Out of 768 unique SSH clones, which were chosen randomly from the two subtraction libraries (384 of each), 319 could be verified as differentially expressed. According to blast screening and functional annotation, 28% genes in nickel-induced cDNA library were related to cell differentiation, whereas 21% in driver library were related to oxygen transport. Two novel expressed sequence tags (ESTs; NCBI Accession No. FC809414 and No. FC809411) in nickel-induced cDNA library were obtained. The genes detected in the present study are probably important genes associated with nickel-induced lung cancer.

  13. Identification of differentially expressed genes in lung tissues of nickel-exposed rats using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Fan, Yingying; Liu, Lihong; Li, Mengjie; Zhou, Yang; Shao, Zhihua; Shi, Hongjun; Wang, Ying

    2011-11-01

    Occupational exposure to nickel compound, such as nickel refining, electroplating, and in conjunction with other metals, is harmful to the health, causing respiratory distress, and lung and nasal cancer. In this work, the different gene expression patterns of lung tissues from nickel-exposed rats and controls were investigated. The suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method was used to generate two subtracted cDNA libraries with gene transcripts differentially expressed after nickel inducing. Dot-blot hybridizations were used to confirm differential ratios of expression of obtained SSH clones. Out of 768 unique SSH clones, which were chosen randomly from the two subtraction libraries (384 of each), 319 could be verified as differentially expressed. According to blast screening and functional annotation, 28% genes in nickel-induced cDNA library were related to cell differentiation, whereas 21% in driver library were related to oxygen transport. Two novel expressed sequence tags (ESTs; NCBI Accession No. FC809414 and No. FC809411) in nickel-induced cDNA library were obtained. The genes detected in the present study are probably important genes associated with nickel-induced lung cancer. PMID:21086188

  14. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in the Drinking Water Alters the Expression of Immune Response Genes in Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Kozul, Courtney D.; Hampton, Thomas H.; Davey, Jennifer C.; Gosse, Julie A.; Nomikos, Athena P.; Eisenhauer, Phillip L.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Thorpe, Jessica E.; Ihnat, Michael A.; Hamilton, Joshua W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to drinking water arsenic is a significant worldwide environmental health concern. Exposure to As is associated with an increased risk of lung disease, which may make it a unique toxicant, because lung toxicity is usually associated with inhalation rather than ingestion. Objectives The goal of this study was to examine mRNA and protein expression changes in the lungs of mice exposed chronically to environmentally relevant concentrations of As in the food or drinking water, specifically examining the hypothesis that As may preferentially affect gene and protein expression related to immune function as part of its mechanism of toxicant action. Methods C57BL/6J mice fed a casein-based AIN-76A defined diet were exposed to 10 or 100 ppb As in drinking water or food for 5–6 weeks. Results Whole genome transcriptome profiling of animal lungs revealed significant alterations in the expression of many genes with functions in cell adhesion and migration, channels, receptors, differentiation and proliferation, and, most strikingly, aspects of the innate immune response. Confirmation of mRNA and protein expression changes in key genes of this response revealed that genes for interleukin 1β, interleukin 1 receptor, a number of toll-like receptors, and several cytokines and cytokine receptors were significantly altered in the lungs of As-exposed mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that chronic low-dose As exposure at the current U.S. drinking-water standard can elicit effects on the regulation of innate immunity, which may contribute to altered disease risk, particularly in lung. PMID:19654921

  15. Similarities in Gene Expression Profiles during In Vitro Aging of Primary Human Embryonic Lung and Foreskin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Marthandan, Shiva; Priebe, Steffen; Baumgart, Mario; Groth, Marco; Cellerino, Alessandro; Guthke, Reinhard; Hemmerich, Peter; Diekmann, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Replicative senescence is of fundamental importance for the process of cellular aging, since it is a property of most of our somatic cells. Here, we elucidated this process by comparing gene expression changes, measured by RNA-seq, in fibroblasts originating from two different tissues, embryonic lung (MRC-5) and foreskin (HFF), at five different time points during their transition into senescence. Although the expression patterns of both fibroblast cell lines can be clearly distinguished, the similar differential expression of an ensemble of genes was found to correlate well with their transition into senescence, with only a minority of genes being cell line specific. Clustering-based approaches further revealed common signatures between the cell lines. Investigation of the mRNA expression levels at various time points during the lifespan of either of the fibroblasts resulted in a number of monotonically up- and downregulated genes which clearly showed a novel strong link to aging and senescence related processes which might be functional. In terms of expression profiles of differentially expressed genes with age, common genes identified here have the potential to rule the transition into senescence of embryonic lung and foreskin fibroblasts irrespective of their different cellular origin. PMID:26339636

  16. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  17. A study of myc-related gene expression in small cell lung cancer by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, J.; Linnoila, R. I.; Seibel, N. L.; Gazdar, A. F.; Minna, J. D.; Brooks, B. J.; Hollis, G. F.; Kirsch, I. R.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of myc-related genes (c-myc, N-myc, and L-myc) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was studied by RNA-RNA tissue in situ hybridization. The tissues investigated included cytospins of ten cell lines derived from patients with SCLC, four corresponding nude mouse xenografts from cell lines, and metastatic tumor tissue obtained by surgical biopsy and at autopsy. The probes were prepared as 35S labeled complementary RNA. The expression of each gene was demonstrated specifically by autoradiography in the cytoplasm of the neoplastic cell samples. The average levels of oncogene expression in each specimen corroborated previous data obtained by Northern blot assays. In addition, heterogeneity in gene expression from cell to cell in each sample was noted. This study represents the first attempt to demonstrate oncogene expression in lung cancer cell lines and tissues in situ, and confirms that the expression of these myc related genes can be seen in the primary tumor. The technique of RNA-RNA tissue in situ hybridization has great potential in answering fundamental questions of tumor cell heterogeneity and progression in SCLC. It should be useful in both prospective and retrospective studies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2456019

  18. Gene expression analysis in rat lungs after intratracheal exposure to nanoparticles doped with cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccini, Teresa; Fabbri, Marco; Roda, Elisa; Grazia Sacco, Maria; Manzo, Luigi; Gribaldo, Laura

    2011-07-01

    Silica nanoparticles (NPs) incorporating cadmium (Cd) have been developed for a range of potential application including drug delivery devices. Occupational Cd inhalation has been associated with emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis and lung tumours. Mechanistically, Cd can induce oxidative stress and mediate cell-signalling pathways that are involved in inflammation.This in vivo study aimed at investigating pulmonary molecular effects of NPs doped with Cd (NP-Cd, 1 mg/animal) compared to soluble CdCl2 (400 μg/animal), in Sprague Dawley rats treated intra-tracheally, 7 and 30 days after administration. NPs of silica containing Cd salt were prepared starting from commercial nano-size silica powder (HiSil™ T700 Degussa) with average pore size of 20 nm and surface area of 240 m2/g. Toxicogenomic analysis was performed by the DNA microarray technology (using Agilent Whole Rat Genome Microarray 4×44K) to evaluate changes in gene expression of the entire genome. These findings indicate that the whole genome analysis may represent a valuable approach to assess the whole spectrum of biological responses to cadmium containing nanomaterials.

  19. Acidic retinoids in small amounts promote retinyl ester formation in neonatal lung, with transient increases in retinoid homeostatic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mixing a small proportion, 10%, of retinoic acid (RA) into an oral dose of vitamin A (VA) has been shown to markedly increase retinol uptake and retinyl ester (RE) formation in the neonatal lung, as compared to VA given alone. Concomitantly, several retinoid homeostatic genes, lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT), RA-4-hydroxylase (CYP26B1), and stimulated by retinoic acid gene-6 (STRA6) were upregulated. However, whether multiple doses may act accumulatively and whether less than 10% RA can be used has not been determined. Methods Neonatal rats were treated once on postnatal day (PD) 4 or PD14 with VA alone or VA combined with 10% RA (VARA10%) or a stable analog, Am580 (VAAm10%), or they were treated with multiple doses on PD4, 7, 11, and 14. Results RE increased cumulatively with multiple dosing. However, LRAT, CYP26B1 and STRA6 mRNA levels were similar for single and multiple treatments, indicating a transient noncumulative impact on gene expression. Lung RE was elevated with as little as 0.5% RA (P < 0.05) in a single dosing study. Whereas all concentrations of VARA elevated lung RE in single dosing studies, only 10% RA increased lung RE after multiple dosing, suggesting an attenuation of RA action with repeated dosing. In contrast, VAAm10%, 2%, and 1% all significantly increased lung RE after multiple doses (P < 0.05), while also increasing the expression of LRAT and CYP26B1. Conclusions These results indicate that the neonatal lung is very sensitive to acidic retinoid exposure and suggest that a VA combined with a very small fraction of acidic retinoid could be effective in increasing the lung’s storage pool of VA. PMID:24351038

  20. Effect of hypoxia on lung gene expression and proteomic profile: insights into the pulmonary surfactant response

    PubMed Central

    Olmeda, Bárbara; Umstead, Todd M.; Silveyra, Patricia; Pascual, Alberto; López-Barneo, José; Phelps, David S.; Floros, Joanna; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of lung to hypoxia has been previously reported to be associated with significant alterations in the protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue. In the present work we have used a proteomic approach to describe the changes in protein complement induced by moderate long-term hypoxia (rats exposed to 10% O2 for 72 hours) in BAL and lung tissue, with a special focus on the proteins associated with pulmonary surfactant, which could indicate adaptation of this system to limited oxygen availability. The analysis of the general proteomic profile indicates a hypoxia-induced increase in proteins associated with inflammation both in lavage and lung tissue. Analysis at mRNA and protein levels revealed no significant changes induced by hypoxia on the content in surfactant proteins or their apparent oligomeric state. In contrast, we detected a hypoxia-induced significant increase in the expression and accumulation of hemoglobin in lung tissue, at both mRNA and protein levels, as well as an accumulation of hemoglobin both in BAL and associated with surface-active membranes of the pulmonary surfactant complex. Evaluation of pulmonary surfactant surface activity from hypoxic rats showed no alterations in its spreading ability, ruling out inhibition by increased levels of serum or inflammatory proteins. PMID:24576641

  1. Integrated Analysis of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Profiles Data to Identify Key Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiang; Li, Xiaodan; Guan, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the most frequent type of lung cancer and has a high metastatic rate at an early stage. This study is aimed at identifying LAC-associated genes. Materials and Methods. GSE62950 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus included a DNA methylation dataset and an mRNA expression profiles dataset, both of which included 28 LAC tissue samples and 28 adjacent normal tissue samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by Limma package in R, and their functions were predicted by enrichment analysis using TargetMine online tool. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using STRING and Cytoscape. Finally, LAC-associated methylation sites were identified by CpGassoc package in R and mapped to the DEGs to obtain LAC-associated DEGs. Results. Total 913 DEGs were identified in LAC tissues. In the PPI networks, MAD2L1, AURKB, CCNB2, CDC20, and WNT3A had higher degrees, and the first four genes might be involved in LAC through interaction. Total 8856 LAC-associated methylation sites were identified and mapped to the DEGs. And there were 29 LAC-associated methylation sites located in 27 DEGs (e.g., SH3GL2, BAI3, CDH13, JAM2, MT1A, LHX6, and IGFBP3). Conclusions. These key genes might play a role in pathogenesis of LAC. PMID:27610375

  2. Integrated Analysis of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Profiles Data to Identify Key Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiang; Li, Xiaodan; Guan, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the most frequent type of lung cancer and has a high metastatic rate at an early stage. This study is aimed at identifying LAC-associated genes. Materials and Methods. GSE62950 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus included a DNA methylation dataset and an mRNA expression profiles dataset, both of which included 28 LAC tissue samples and 28 adjacent normal tissue samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by Limma package in R, and their functions were predicted by enrichment analysis using TargetMine online tool. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using STRING and Cytoscape. Finally, LAC-associated methylation sites were identified by CpGassoc package in R and mapped to the DEGs to obtain LAC-associated DEGs. Results. Total 913 DEGs were identified in LAC tissues. In the PPI networks, MAD2L1, AURKB, CCNB2, CDC20, and WNT3A had higher degrees, and the first four genes might be involved in LAC through interaction. Total 8856 LAC-associated methylation sites were identified and mapped to the DEGs. And there were 29 LAC-associated methylation sites located in 27 DEGs (e.g., SH3GL2, BAI3, CDH13, JAM2, MT1A, LHX6, and IGFBP3). Conclusions. These key genes might play a role in pathogenesis of LAC.

  3. Integrated Analysis of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Profiles Data to Identify Key Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiang; Liu, Xingang; Li, Xiaodan; Guan, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the most frequent type of lung cancer and has a high metastatic rate at an early stage. This study is aimed at identifying LAC-associated genes. Materials and Methods. GSE62950 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus included a DNA methylation dataset and an mRNA expression profiles dataset, both of which included 28 LAC tissue samples and 28 adjacent normal tissue samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by Limma package in R, and their functions were predicted by enrichment analysis using TargetMine online tool. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using STRING and Cytoscape. Finally, LAC-associated methylation sites were identified by CpGassoc package in R and mapped to the DEGs to obtain LAC-associated DEGs. Results. Total 913 DEGs were identified in LAC tissues. In the PPI networks, MAD2L1, AURKB, CCNB2, CDC20, and WNT3A had higher degrees, and the first four genes might be involved in LAC through interaction. Total 8856 LAC-associated methylation sites were identified and mapped to the DEGs. And there were 29 LAC-associated methylation sites located in 27 DEGs (e.g., SH3GL2, BAI3, CDH13, JAM2, MT1A, LHX6, and IGFBP3). Conclusions. These key genes might play a role in pathogenesis of LAC. PMID:27610375

  4. ACUTE OZONE-INDUCED INFLAMMATORY GENE EXPRESSION IN THE RAT LUNG IS NOT RELATED TO LEVELS OF ANTIOXIDANTS IN THE LAVAGE FLUID

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Ozone causes oxidative stress and lung inflammation. We hypothesized that rat strains with or without genetic susceptibility to cardiovascular disease will have different antioxidant levels in alveolar lining, and that ozone induced inflammatory gene expression wil...

  5. Indications for distinct pathogenic mechanisms of asbestos and silica through gene expression profiling of the response of lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Timothy N.; Peeters, Paul M.; Shukla, Arti; Arijs, Ingrid; Dragon, Julie; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Reynaert, Niki L.; Mossman, Brooke T.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational and environmental exposures to airborne asbestos and silica are associated with the development of lung fibrosis in the forms of asbestosis and silicosis, respectively. However, both diseases display distinct pathologic presentations, likely associated with differences in gene expression induced by different mineral structures, composition and bio-persistent properties. We hypothesized that effects of mineral exposure in the airway epithelium may dictate deviating molecular events that may explain the different pathologies of asbestosis versus silicosis. Using robust gene expression-profiling in conjunction with in-depth pathway analysis, we assessed early (24 h) alterations in gene expression associated with crocidolite asbestos or cristobalite silica exposures in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEs). Observations were confirmed in an immortalized line (BEAS-2B) by QRT-PCR and protein assays. Utilization of overall gene expression, unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis and integrated pathway analysis revealed gene alterations that were common to both minerals or unique to either mineral. Our findings reveal that both minerals had potent effects on genes governing cell adhesion/migration, inflammation, and cellular stress, key features of fibrosis. Asbestos exposure was most specifically associated with aberrant cell proliferation and carcinogenesis, whereas silica exposure was highly associated with additional inflammatory responses, as well as pattern recognition, and fibrogenesis. These findings illustrate the use of gene-profiling as a means to determine early molecular events that may dictate pathological processes induced by exogenous cellular insults. In addition, it is a useful approach for predicting the pathogenicity of potentially harmful materials. PMID:25351596

  6. Identification of Gene Expression Differences between Lymphangiogenic and Non-Lymphangiogenic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Erin; Sibley, Robert C.; Cenik, Bercin Kutluk; Silva, Asitha; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D.; Dellinger, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that lung tumors induce the formation of lymphatic vessels. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling tumor lymphangiogenesis in lung cancer have not been fully delineated. In the present study, we identify a panel of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines that induce lymphangiogenesis and use genome-wide mRNA expression to characterize the molecular mechanisms regulating tumor lymphangiogenesis. We show that Calu-1, H1993, HCC461, HCC827, and H2122 NSCLC cell lines form tumors that induce lymphangiogenesis whereas Calu-3, H1155, H1975, and H2073 NSCLC cell lines form tumors that do not induce lymphangiogenesis. By analyzing genome-wide mRNA expression data, we identify a 17-gene expression signature that distinguishes lymphangiogenic from non-lymphangiogenic NSCLC cell lines. Importantly, VEGF-C is the only lymphatic growth factor in this expression signature and is approximately 50-fold higher in the lymphangiogenic group than in the non-lymphangiogenic group. We show that forced expression of VEGF-C by H1975 cells induces lymphangiogenesis and that knockdown of VEGF-C in H1993 cells inhibits lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the triple angiokinase inhibitor, nintedanib (small molecule that blocks all FGFRs, PDGFRs, and VEGFRs), suppresses tumor lymphangiogenesis in H1993 tumors. Together, these data suggest that VEGF-C is the dominant driver of tumor lymphangiogenesis in NSCLC and reveal a specific therapy that could potentially block tumor lymphangiogenesis in NSCLC patients. PMID:26950548

  7. Subchronic Inhalation of Soluble Manganese Induces Expression of Hypoxia-associated Angiogenic Genes in Adult Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Bredow, Sebastian; Falgout, Melanie M.; March, Thomas H.; Yingling, Christin M.; Malkoski, Stephen P.; Aden, James; Bedrick, Edward J.; Lewis, Johnnye L.; Divine, Kevin K.

    2007-01-01

    Although the lung constitutes the major exposure route for airborne manganese (Mn), little is known about the potential pulmonary effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Transition metals can mimic a hypoxia-like response, activating the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcription factor family. Through binding to the hypoxia-response element (HRE) these factors regulate expression of many genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Increases in VEGF, an important biomarker of angiogenesis, have been linked to respiratory diseases, including pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this study was to evaluate pulmonary hypoxia-associated angiogenic gene expression in response to exposure of soluble Mn(II) and to assess the genes' role as intermediaries of potential pulmonary Mn toxicity. In vitro, 0.25 mM Mn(II) altered morphology and slowed the growth of human pulmonary epithelial cell lines. Acute doses between 0.05 and 1 mM stimulated VEGF promoter activity up to 3.7-fold in transient transfection assays. Deletion of the HRE within the promoter had no effect on Mn(II)-induced VEGF expression but decreased cobalt [Co(II)]-induced activity 2-fold, suggesting that HIF-1 may not be involved in Mn(II)-induced VEGF gene transcription. Nose-only inhalation to 2 mg Mn(II)/m3 for 5 days at 6h/day produced no significant pulmonary inflammation but induced a 2-fold increase in pulmonary VEGF mRNA levels in adult mice and significantly altered expression of genes associated with murine angiogenesis. These findings suggest that even short-term exposures to soluble, occupationally relevant Mn(II) concentrations may alter pulmonary gene expression in pathways that ultimately could affect the lungs' susceptibility to respiratory disease. PMID:17467022

  8. Heterogeneity of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 gene expression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    SMIRNOV, SERHEY; PASHKEVICH, ANASTASIYA; LIUNDYSHEVA, VALERIYA; BABENKO, ANDREY; SMOLYAKOVA, RAISA

    2015-01-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) gene expression analysis is currently used widely in the molecular diagnosis of cancer. According to numerous studies, ERCC1 gene expression correlates with overall survival and effectiveness of chemotherapy with platinum agents. However, the degree of this correlation differs among various studies, with certain authors reporting a complete lack of such a correlation. These contradictions may be attributed to a number of factors, including the heterogeneity of the tumor tissue. In this study, we attempted to assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity exhibited by tissue samples obtained from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) through the expression of the ERCC1 gene. This study included 25 samples of tumor tissue from patients with a morphologically confirmed NSCLC diagnosis. A total of three randomized sections of each specimen were used. The ERCC1 gene expression was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in the TaqMan format. When planning the experiment and analysis of qPCR data, the MIQE guidelines were taken into consideration. We established that the coefficient of variation of the relative level of ERCC1 gene expression in the majority of the samples exceeded 33% (P<0.05), indicating the significant heterogeneity of the sample. We also demonstrated that the degree of heterogeneity of the tumor tissue is largely dependent on disease stage. PMID:25469300

  9. Gene Expression and Pathway Analysis of Effects of the CMAH Deactivation on Mouse Lung, Kidney and Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Chang, Byung-Soo; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-01-01

    Background N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) is generated by hydroxylation of CMP-Neu5Ac to CMP-Neu5Gc, catalyzed by CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (CMAH). However, humans lack this common mammalian cell surface molecule, Neu5Gc, due to inactivation of the CMAH gene during evolution. CMAH is one of several human-specific genes whose function has been lost by disruption or deletion of the coding frame. It has been suggested that CMAH inactivation has resulted in biochemical or physiological characteristics that have resulted in human-specific diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify differential gene expression profiles associated with the loss of Neu5Gc expression, we performed microarray analysis using Illumina MouseRef-8 v2 Expression BeadChip, using the main tissues (lung, kidney, and heart) from control mice and CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (Cmah) gene knock-out mice, respectively. Out of a total of 25,697 genes, 204, 162, and 147 genes were found to be significantly modulated in the lung, kidney, and heart tissues of the Cmah null mouse, respectively. In this study, we examined the gene expression profiles, using three commercial pathway analysis software packages: Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis, and Pathway Studio. The gene ontology analysis revealed that the top 6 biological processes of these genes included protein metabolism and modification, signal transduction, lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism, nucleoside, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, immunity and defense, and carbohydrate metabolism. Gene interaction network analysis showed a common network that was common to the different tissues of the Cmah null mouse. However, the expression of most sialytransferase mRNAs of Hanganutziu-Deicher antigen, sialy-Tn antigen, Forssman antigen, and Tn antigen was significantly down-regulated in the liver tissue of Cmah null mice. Conclusions/Significance Mice bearing a human-like deletion of the Cmah gene

  10. In vitro effects of aldehydes present in tobacco smoke on gene expression in human lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Nuan P; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Vermeulen, Jolanda P; van Schooten, Frederik J; Opperhuizen, Antoon

    2013-04-01

    Tobacco smoke consists of thousands of harmful components. A major class of chemicals found in tobacco smoke is formed by aldehydes, in particular formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein. The present study investigates the gene expression changes in human lung alveolar epithelial cells upon exposure to formaldehyde, acrolein and acetaldehyde at sub-cytotoxic levels. We exposed A549 cells in vitro to aldehydes and non-aldehyde chemicals (nicotine, hydroquinone and 2,5-dimethylfuran) present in tobacco smoke and used microarrays to obtain a global view of the transcriptomic responses. We compared responses of the individual aldehydes with that of the non-aldehydes. We also studied the response of the aldehydes when present in a mixture at relative concentrations as present in cigarette smoke. Formaldehyde gave the strongest response; a total of 66 genes were more than 1.5-fold differentially expressed mostly involved in apoptosis and DNA damage related processes, followed by acetaldehyde (57 genes), hydroquinone (55 genes) and nicotine (8 genes). For acrolein and the mixture only one gene was upregulated involved in oxidative stress. No gene expression effect was found for exposure to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Overall, aldehyde responses are primarily indicative for genotoxicity and oxidative stress. These two toxicity mechanisms are linked to respiratory diseases such as cancer and COPD, respectively. The present findings could be important in providing further understanding of the role of aldehydes emitted from cigarette smoke in the onset of pulmonary diseases.

  11. In vitro effects of aldehydes present in tobacco smoke on gene expression in human lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Nuan P; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Vermeulen, Jolanda P; van Schooten, Frederik J; Opperhuizen, Antoon

    2013-04-01

    Tobacco smoke consists of thousands of harmful components. A major class of chemicals found in tobacco smoke is formed by aldehydes, in particular formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein. The present study investigates the gene expression changes in human lung alveolar epithelial cells upon exposure to formaldehyde, acrolein and acetaldehyde at sub-cytotoxic levels. We exposed A549 cells in vitro to aldehydes and non-aldehyde chemicals (nicotine, hydroquinone and 2,5-dimethylfuran) present in tobacco smoke and used microarrays to obtain a global view of the transcriptomic responses. We compared responses of the individual aldehydes with that of the non-aldehydes. We also studied the response of the aldehydes when present in a mixture at relative concentrations as present in cigarette smoke. Formaldehyde gave the strongest response; a total of 66 genes were more than 1.5-fold differentially expressed mostly involved in apoptosis and DNA damage related processes, followed by acetaldehyde (57 genes), hydroquinone (55 genes) and nicotine (8 genes). For acrolein and the mixture only one gene was upregulated involved in oxidative stress. No gene expression effect was found for exposure to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Overall, aldehyde responses are primarily indicative for genotoxicity and oxidative stress. These two toxicity mechanisms are linked to respiratory diseases such as cancer and COPD, respectively. The present findings could be important in providing further understanding of the role of aldehydes emitted from cigarette smoke in the onset of pulmonary diseases. PMID:23416264

  12. In situ detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcripts in human lung granulomas reveals differential gene expression in necrotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Fenhalls, Gael; Stevens, Liesel; Moses, Lorraine; Bezuidenhout, Juanita; Betts, Joanna C; Helden Pv, Paul van; Lukey, Pauline T; Duncan, Ken

    2002-11-01

    We have used RNA-RNA in situ hybridization to detect the expression of several Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes in tuberculous granulomas in lung tissue sections from tuberculosis patients. The M. tuberculosis genes chosen fall into two classes. Four genes (icl, narX, and Rv2557 and Rv2558) have been implicated in the persistence of the bacterium in the host, and two genes (iniB and kasA) are upregulated in response to isoniazid exposure. Both necrotic and nonnecrotic granulomas were identified in all of the patients. Necrotic granulomas were divided into three zones: an outer lymphocyte cuff containing lymphocytes and macrophages, a transition zone consisting of necrotic material interspersed with macrophages, and a central acellular necrotic region. Transcripts of all of the genes studied were found in nonnecrotic granulomas and in the lymphocyte cuff of necrotic granulomas. Mycobacterial gene expression was associated with CD68-positive myeloid cells. Rv2557 and/or its homologue Rv2558, kasA, and iniB were expressed within the transition zone of necrotic granulomas, whereas icl and narX transcripts were absent from this area. There was no evidence of transcription of any of the genes examined in the central necrotic region, although mycobacterial DNA was present. The differential expression of genes within granulomas demonstrates that M. tuberculosis exists in a variety of metabolic states and may be indicative of the response to different microenvironments. These observations confirm that genes identified in models of persistence or in response to drug treatment in vitro are expressed in the human host. PMID:12379712

  13. Estrogen Receptor 1 Gene Expression and Its Combination with Estrogen Receptor 2 or Aromatase Expression Predicts Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aresti, Unai; Carrera, Sergio; Iruarrizaga, Eluska; Fuente, Natalia; Marrodan, Ines; de Lobera, Abigail Ruiz; Muñoz, Alberto; Buque, Aitziber; Condori, Elizabeth; Ugalde, Irene; Calvo, Begoña; Vivanco, Guillermo López

    2014-01-01

    The biological roles of estrogen receptor 1 (ERS1), estrogen receptor 2 (ERS2), and aromatase (CYP19A1) genes in the development of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear, as is the use of their expression as a prognostic factor. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of estrogen receptors and aromatase mRNA expression, along with aromatase protein concentration, in resected NSCLC patients. Tumor and non-tumor lung tissue samples were analyzed for the mRNA expression of ERS1, ERS2 and CYP19A1 by RT-PCR. Aromatase concentration was measured with an ELISA. A total of 96 patients were included. ERS1 expression was significantly higher in non-tumor tissue than in tumor samples. Two gene expression categories were created for each gene (and protein): high and low. ERS1 high category showed increased overall survival (OS) when compared to the low expression category. Aromatase protein concentration was significantly higher in tumor samples. Higher ERS1 expression in tumor tissues was related to longer overall survival. The analysis of gene expression combinations provides evidence for longer OS when both ERS1 and ERS2 are highly expressed. ESR1, alone or in combination with ERS2 or CYP19A1, is the most determining prognostic factor within the analyzed 3 genes. It seems that ERS1 can play a role in NSCLC prognosis, alone or in combination with other genes such as ERS2 or Cyp19a1. ERS2 in combination with aromatase concentration could have a similar function. PMID:25310221

  14. Gene therapy for lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ennist, D L

    1999-06-01

    Gene therapy is a new field of medical research that has great potential to influence the course of treatment of human disease. The lung has been a particularly attractive target organ for gene therapy due to its accessibility and the identification of genetic deficits for a number of lung diseases. Several clinical trials have shown evidence of low levels of gene transfer and expression, but without any benefit to the patients involved. Thus, current studies are focusing on further research and technological improvements to the vectors. Gene therapy is now beginning to benefit from a shift in emphasis from clinical trials to the development of better tools and procedures to deliver gene therapy to the bedside.

  15. [Abnormal expression of genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, E S; Zinovieva, O L; Oparina, N Yu; Prokofjeva, M M; Spirin, P V; Favorskaya, I A; Zborovskaya, I B; Lisitsyn, N A; Prassolov, V S; Mashkova, T D

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids are signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes and possess antitumor activity. This work presents a comprehensive description of changes in the expression of 23 genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer tumors compared to adjacent normal tissues obtained using RT-PCR. Even at early stages of malignant transformation, a significant decrease in ADH1B, ADH3, RDHL, and RALDH1 mRNA levels was observed in 82, 79, 73, and 64% of tumor specimens, respectively, and a considerable increase in AKR1B10 mRNA content was observed in 80% of tumors. Dramatic changes in the levels of these mRNAs can impair the synthesis of all-trans retinoic acid, a key natural regulatory retinoid. Apart from that, it was found that mRNA levels of nuclear retinoid receptor genes RXRγ, RARα, RXRα, and gene RDH11 were significantly decreased in 80, 67, 57, and 66% of tumor specimens, respectively. Thus, neoplastic transformation of lung tissue cells is accompanied with deregulated expression of key genes of retinoid metabolism and function.

  16. A polymorphic minisatellite region of BORIS regulates gene expression and its rare variants correlate with lung cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Se-Lyun; Roh, Yun-Gil; Chu, In-Sun; Heo, Jeonghoon; Kim, Seung Il; Chang, Heekyung; Kang, Tae-Hong; Chung, Jin Woong; Koh, Sang Seok; Larionov, Vladimir; Leem, Sun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of BORIS/CTCFL (Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites/CTCF-like protein) is reported in different malignancies. In this study, we characterized the entire promoter region of BORIS/CTCFL, including the CpG islands, to assess the relationship between BORIS expression and lung cancer. To simplify the construction of luciferase reporter cassettes with various-sized portions of the upstream region, genomic copies of BORIS were isolated using TAR cloning technology. We analyzed three promoter blocks: the GATA/CCAAT box, the CpG islands and the minisatellite region BORIS-MS2. Polymorphic minisatellite sequences were isolated from genomic DNA prepared from the blood of controls and cases. Of the three promoter blocks, the GATA/CCAAT box was determined to be a critical element of the core promoter, while the CpG islands and the BORIS-MS2 minisatellite region were found to act as regulators. Interestingly, the polymorphic minisatellite region BORIS-MS2 was identified as a negative regulator that repressed the expression levels of luciferase reporter cassettes less effectively in cancer cells compared with normal cells. We also examined the association between the size of BORIS-MS2 and lung cancer in a case-control study with 590 controls and 206 lung cancer cases. Rare alleles of BORIS-MS2 were associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of lung cancer (odds ratio, 2.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-4.08; and P=0.039). To conclude, our data provide information on the organization of the BORIS promoter region and gene regulation in normal and cancer cells. In addition, we propose that specific alleles of the BORIS-MS2 region could be used to identify the risk for lung cancer. PMID:27416782

  17. A polymorphic minisatellite region of BORIS regulates gene expression and its rare variants correlate with lung cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se-Lyun; Roh, Yun-Gil; Chu, In-Sun; Heo, Jeonghoon; Kim, Seung Il; Chang, Heekyung; Kang, Tae-Hong; Chung, Jin Woong; Koh, Sang Seok; Larionov, Vladimir; Leem, Sun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of BORIS/CTCFL (Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites/CTCF-like protein) is reported in different malignancies. In this study, we characterized the entire promoter region of BORIS/CTCFL, including the CpG islands, to assess the relationship between BORIS expression and lung cancer. To simplify the construction of luciferase reporter cassettes with various-sized portions of the upstream region, genomic copies of BORIS were isolated using TAR cloning technology. We analyzed three promoter blocks: the GATA/CCAAT box, the CpG islands and the minisatellite region BORIS-MS2. Polymorphic minisatellite sequences were isolated from genomic DNA prepared from the blood of controls and cases. Of the three promoter blocks, the GATA/CCAAT box was determined to be a critical element of the core promoter, while the CpG islands and the BORIS-MS2 minisatellite region were found to act as regulators. Interestingly, the polymorphic minisatellite region BORIS-MS2 was identified as a negative regulator that repressed the expression levels of luciferase reporter cassettes less effectively in cancer cells compared with normal cells. We also examined the association between the size of BORIS-MS2 and lung cancer in a case–control study with 590 controls and 206 lung cancer cases. Rare alleles of BORIS-MS2 were associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of lung cancer (odds ratio, 2.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–4.08; and P=0.039). To conclude, our data provide information on the organization of the BORIS promoter region and gene regulation in normal and cancer cells. In addition, we propose that specific alleles of the BORIS-MS2 region could be used to identify the risk for lung cancer. PMID:27416782

  18. Alterations in Gene Expression of Proprotein Convertases in Human Lung Cancer Have a Limited Number of Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Demidyuk, Ilya V.; Shubin, Andrey V.; Gasanov, Eugene V.; Kurinov, Alexander M.; Demkin, Vladimir V.; Vinogradova, Tatyana V.; Zinovyeva, Marina V.; Sass, Alexander V.; Zborovskaya, Irina B.; Kostrov, Sergey V.

    2013-01-01

    Proprotein convertases (PCs) is a protein family which includes nine highly specific subtilisin-like serine endopeptidases in mammals. The system of PCs is involved in carcinogenesis and levels of PC mRNAs alter in cancer, which suggests expression status of PCs as a possible marker for cancer typing and prognosis. The goal of this work was to assess the information value of expression profiling of PC genes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used for the first time to analyze mRNA levels of all PC genes as well as matrix metalloproteinase genes MMP2 and MMP14, which are substrates of PCs, in 30 matched pairs of samples of human lung cancer tumor and adjacent tissues without pathology. Significant changes in the expression of PCs have been revealed in tumor tissues: increased FURIN mRNA level (p<0.00005) and decreased mRNA levels of PCSK2 (p<0.007), PCSK5 (p<0.0002), PCSK7 (p<0.002), PCSK9 (p<0.00008), and MBTPS1 (p<0.00004) as well as a tendency to increase in the level of PCSK1 mRNA. Four distinct groups of samples have been identified by cluster analysis of the expression patterns of PC genes in tumor vs. normal tissue. Three of these groups covering 80% of samples feature a strong elevation in the expression of a single gene in cancer: FURIN, PCSK1, or PCSK6. Thus, the changes in the expression of PC genes have a limited number of scenarios, which may reflect different pathways of tumor development and cryptic features of tumors. This finding allows to consider the mRNAs of PC genes as potentially important tumor markers. PMID:23409034

  19. Phosphodiesterase-4 Inhibition Alters Gene Expression and Improves Isoniazid – Mediated Clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Rabbit Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; O'Brien, Paul; Yang, Guibin; Koo, Mi-Sun; Peixoto, Blas; Fallows, Dorothy; Dartois, Veronique; Muller, George; Kaplan, Gilla

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) treatment is hampered by the long duration of antibiotic therapy required to achieve cure. This indolent response has been partly attributed to the ability of subpopulations of less metabolically active Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to withstand killing by current anti-TB drugs. We have used immune modulation with a phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor, CC-3052, that reduces tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production by increasing intracellular cAMP in macrophages, to examine the crosstalk between host and pathogen in rabbits with pulmonary TB during treatment with isoniazid (INH). Based on DNA microarray, changes in host gene expression during CC-3052 treatment of Mtb infected rabbits support a link between PDE4 inhibition and specific down-regulation of the innate immune response. The overall pattern of host gene expression in the lungs of infected rabbits treated with CC-3052, compared to untreated rabbits, was similar to that described in vitro in resting Mtb infected macrophages, suggesting suboptimal macrophage activation. These alterations in host immunity were associated with corresponding down-regulation of a number of Mtb genes that have been associated with a metabolic shift towards dormancy. Moreover, treatment with CC-3052 and INH resulted in reduced expression of those genes associated with the bacterial response to INH. Importantly, CC-3052 treatment of infected rabbits was associated with reduced ability of Mtb to withstand INH killing, shown by improved bacillary clearance, from the lungs of co-treated animals compared to rabbits treated with INH alone. The results of our study suggest that changes in Mtb gene expression, in response to changes in the host immune response, can alter the responsiveness of the bacteria to antimicrobial agents. These findings provide a basis for exploring the potential use of adjunctive immune modulation with PDE4 inhibitors to enhance the efficacy of existing anti-TB treatment. PMID:21949656

  20. Gene-Expression Signature Predicts Postoperative Recurrence in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Wang, Liang; Liu, Pengyuan; Yang, Ping; You, Ming

    2012-01-01

    About 30% stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing resection will recur. Robust prognostic markers are required to better manage therapy options. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a novel gene-expression signature that can predict tumor recurrence of stage I NSCLC patients. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to identify recurrence-related genes and a partial Cox regression model was used to generate a gene signature of recurrence in the training dataset −142 stage I lung adenocarcinomas without adjunctive therapy from the Director's Challenge Consortium. Four independent validation datasets, including GSE5843, GSE8894, and two other datasets provided by Mayo Clinic and Washington University, were used to assess the prediction accuracy by calculating the correlation between risk score estimated from gene expression and real recurrence-free survival time and AUC of time-dependent ROC analysis. Pathway-based survival analyses were also performed. 104 probesets correlated with recurrence in the training dataset. They are enriched in cell adhesion, apoptosis and regulation of cell proliferation. A 51-gene expression signature was identified to distinguish patients likely to develop tumor recurrence (Dxy = −0.83, P<1e-16) and this signature was validated in four independent datasets with AUC >85%. Multiple pathways including leukocyte transendothelial migration and cell adhesion were highly correlated with recurrence-free survival. The gene signature is highly predictive of recurrence in stage I NSCLC patients, which has important prognostic and therapeutic implications for the future management of these patients. PMID:22292069

  1. Lentiviral Delivery of RNAi for In Vivo Lineage-Specific Modulation of Gene Expression in Mouse Lung Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew A; Kwok, Letty W; Porter, Emily L; Payne, Julie G; McElroy, Gregory S; Ohle, Sarah J; Greenhill, Sara R; Blahna, Matthew T; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Jean, Jyh C; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Kotton, Darrell N

    2013-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) has become a ubiquitous laboratory tool since its discovery 12 years ago, in vivo delivery to selected cell types remains a major technical challenge. Here, we report the use of lentiviral vectors for long-term in vivo delivery of RNAi selectively to resident alveolar macrophages (AMs), key immune effector cells in the lung. We demonstrate the therapeutic potential of this approach by RNAi-based downregulation of p65 (RelA), a component of the pro-inflammatory transcriptional regulator, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and a key participant in lung disease pathogenesis. In vivo RNAi delivery results in decreased induction of NF-κB and downstream neutrophilic chemokines in transduced AMs as well as attenuated lung neutrophilia following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Through concurrent delivery of a novel lentiviral reporter vector (lenti-NF-κB-luc-GFP) we track in vivo expression of NF-κB target genes in real time, a critical step towards extending RNAi-based therapy to longstanding lung diseases. Application of this system reveals that resident AMs persist in the airspaces of mice following the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation, thus allowing these localized cells to be used as effective vehicles for prolonged RNAi delivery in disease settings. PMID:23403494

  2. The effects of differential polyadenylation on expression of the dihydrofolate reductase-encoding gene in Chinese hamster lung cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Hussain, A; Melera, P W

    1995-10-01

    Three differently sized mRNAs are expressed from each of two DHFR (encoding dihydrofolate reductase) alleles present in the Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cell line, DC-3F. The relative abundancy of the transcripts produced from each allele differs dramatically as a result of differential utilization of the multiple poly(A) sites present in the DHFR DHFR gene and a genetic polymorphism located within the third poly(A) signal of one allele. We sought to determine whether such differences in polyadenylation affect the steady-state levels of DHFR and mRNAs expressed from either allele and, in a more general sense, to ask whether differences in 3' end RNA processing in a gene containing multiple poly(A) sites affects the final level of gene expression. An SV40 promoter-based transient expression system producing chimeric cat::DHFR transcripts was developed to regenerate the in vivo mRNA polyadenylation patterns associated with each of the two DHFR alleles. The results demonstrate that the total amount of polyadenylated RNA expressed from each of these constructs in vitro is the same regardless of the differential utilization of the poly(A) signals that occurs between them. Moreover, measurement of the individual turnover rates of the DHFR mRNAs expressed in vivo from each allele, as determined by pulse-chase labeling and actinomycin D inhibition studies, revealed no significant allele-specific differences in transcript half-lives. Finally, measuring the steady-state levels of DHFR poly(A)+ mRNA in parental DC-3F cells demonstrated that both alleles are expressed to the same extent during normal growth. Thus, even though dramatic allele-specific differences in 3' end processing of DHFR transcripts occur in vivo, such differences do not appear to influence the steady-state levels of DHFR gene expression. PMID:7590264

  3. Bioinforrnatics of Gene Expression Profiling Data Provide Mechanistic Understanding of Acute Ozone-Induced Lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized. A few studies have used gene expression profiling to determine the types of changes induced by ozone; however the mechanisms or the pathways involved are less well understood. We presumed that robust bi...

  4. Differences in gene expression and cytokine production by crystalline vs. amorphous silica in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to respirable crystalline silica particles, as opposed to amorphous silica, is associated with lung inflammation, pulmonary fibrosis (silicosis), and potentially with lung cancer. We used Affymetrix/GeneSifter microarray analysis to determine whether gene expression profiles differed in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS 2B) exposed to cristobalite vs. amorphous silica particles at non-toxic and equal surface areas (75 and 150 × 106μm2/cm2). Bio-Plex analysis was also used to determine profiles of secreted cytokines and chemokines in response to both particles. Finally, primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) were used to comparatively assess silica particle-induced alterations in gene expression. Results Microarray analysis at 24 hours in BEAS 2B revealed 333 and 631 significant alterations in gene expression induced by cristobalite at low (75) and high (150 × 106μm2/cm2) amounts, respectively (p < 0.05/cut off ≥ 2.0-fold change). Exposure to amorphous silica micro-particles at high amounts (150 × 106μm2/cm2) induced 108 significant gene changes. Bio-Plex analysis of 27 human cytokines and chemokines revealed 9 secreted mediators (p < 0.05) induced by crystalline silica, but none were induced by amorphous silica. QRT-PCR revealed that cristobalite selectively up-regulated stress-related genes and cytokines (FOS, ATF3, IL6 and IL8) early and over time (2, 4, 8, and 24 h). Patterns of gene expression in NHBE cells were similar overall to BEAS 2B cells. At 75 × 106μm2/cm2, there were 339 significant alterations in gene expression induced by cristobalite and 42 by amorphous silica. Comparison of genes in response to cristobalite (75 × 106μm2/cm2) revealed 60 common, significant gene alterations in NHBE and BEAS 2B cells. Conclusions Cristobalite silica, as compared to synthetic amorphous silica particles at equal surface area concentrations, had comparable effects on the viability of human bronchial epithelial cells

  5. Profiling Analysis of Histone Modifications and Gene Expression in Lewis Lung Carcinoma Murine Cells Resistant to Anti-VEGF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yanhua; Chen, Kaiming; Liu, Zhenping; Li, Bing; Li, Jie; Tao, Fei; Gu, Hua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells become resistant after long-term use of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents. Our previous study shows that treatment with a VEGF inhibitor (VEGF-Trap) facilitates to develop tumor resistance through regulating angiogenesis-related genes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Histone modifications as a key epigenetic factor play a critical role in regulation of gene expression. Here, we explore the potential epigenetic gene regulatory functions of key histone modifications during tumor resistance in a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell line. We generated high resolution genome-wide maps of key histone modifications in sensitive tumor sample (LLC-NR) and resistant tumor sample (LLC-R) after VEGF-Trap treatment. Profiling analysis of histone modifications shows that histone modification levels are effectively predictive for gene expression. Composition of promoters classified by histone modification state is different between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines regardless of CpG content. Histone modification state change between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines shows different patterns in CpG-rich and CpG-poor promoters. As a consequence, genes with different level of CpG content whose gene expression level are altered are enriched in distinct functions. Notably, histone modification state change in promoters of angiogenesis-related genes consists with their expression alteration. Taken together, our findings suggest that treatment with anti-VEGF therapy results in extensive histone modification state change in promoters with multiple functions, particularly, biological processes related to angiogenesis, likely contributing to tumor resistance development. PMID:27362259

  6. Persistent Expression Changes of Fibrosis-Related Genes in the Lung Tissues of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Wu, Honglu; Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine respirable dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the toxicity of Apollo moon dust in rodents to assess the health risk of dust exposures to humans. One of the particular interests in the study is to evaluate dust-induced changes of the expression of fibrosis-related genes, and to identify specific signaling pathways involved in lunar dustinduced toxicity. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 milligrams per cubic meters of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected by lavaging with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). A zymosan-induced luminolbased chemiluminescence assay was used to assess the activity of BAL cells. The lavaged lung tissue was snap frozen in LN2 and total RNA was isolated using the Qigen RNeasy kit. The expression of 84 fibrosisrelated genes were analyzed using the RT2 Profiler PCR Array technique. The expression of 18 genes of interest were further measured using real-time PCR technique in all the samples. 10 out of 18 genes of interest showed persistently significant expression changes in the local lung tissue exposed to lunar dust, indicating a prolonged proinflammatory response. The expressions of several of these genes were dose- and time-dependent and were significantly correlated with other pathological parameters. The potential signaling pathways and upstream regulators were further analyzed using IPA pathway analysis tool based on the gene expression data. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explore the

  7. Persistent Expression Changes of Fibrosis Related Genes in the Lung Tissues of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Theriot, Corey; Zalesak, Selina; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of reactive dust, containing 1-2% of respirable fine dust (< 3 microns). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the toxicity of Apollo moon dust in rodents through inhalation to assess the health risk of dust exposures to humans and to identify the mechanisms and potential pathways involved in lunar dust-induced toxicity. Ccl3, Ccl12, Cxcl2, Cxcl5, Itgb8, Tnf, Ldhc, Clec4e, Bmp7, and Smad6, showed persistently significant expression changes in the lung tissue. The expression of several of these genes were dose- and time- dependent, and were significantly correlated with other pathological. Our previous data showed that no pathological changes were detected in low dose groups. However, several genes, primarily produced by lung epithelial, were significantly altered persistently in response to low-dose dust exposure. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity, contributing not only the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also understandings of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  8. Expression of Human α1-Antitrypsin in Mice and Dogs Following AAV6 Vector-mediated Gene Transfer to the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Halbert, Christine L; Madtes, David K; Vaughan, Andrew E; Wang, Zejing; Storb, Rainer; Tapscott, Stephen J; Miller, A Dusty

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the potential of lung-directed gene therapy for α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency using an adeno-associated virus type 6 (AAV6) vector containing a human AAT (hAAT) complementary DNA (cDNA) delivered to the lungs of mice and dogs. The results in normal and immune-deficient mice showed that hAAT concentrations were much higher in lung fluid than in plasma, and therapeutic levels were obtained even in normal mice. However, in normal mice an immune response against the vector and/or transgene limited long-term gene expression. An AAV6 vector expressing a marker protein verified that AAV6 vectors efficiently transduced lung cells in dogs. Delivery of AAV6-hAAT resulted in low levels of hAAT in dog serum but therapeutic levels in the lung that persisted for at least 58 days to 4 months in three immunosuppressed dogs. Expression in the serum was not detectable after 45 days in one nonimmune suppressed dog. A lymphoproliferative response to AAV capsid but not to hAAT was detected even after immunosuppression. These results in mice and dogs show the feasibility of expression of therapeutic levels of AAT in the lungs after AAV vector delivery, and advocate for approaches to prevent cellular immune responses to AAV capsid proteins for persistence of gene expression in humans. PMID:20372105

  9. Tilmicosin does not inhibit interleukin-8 gene expression in the bovine lung experimentally infected with Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Goubau, S; Morck, D W; Buret, A

    2000-10-01

    The expression of the interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene was examined by in situ hybridization in lung tissues from calves experimentally infected with Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica and treated with tilmicosin. Interleukin-8 mRNA expression was detected in alveolar areas, particularly along interlobular septa, in the lumen, and in the epithelial cells of some bronchioles. In lesional lung tissues from animals that had received tilmicosin, we found large areas with limited inflammation. There was no staining for IL-8 mRNA in these areas. In contrast, in strongly inflamed areas, the same patterns and intensities of staining for IL-8 mRNA were detected in tilmicosin- and sham-treated animals. We conclude that tilmicosin does not affect the expression of IL-8 mRNA in tissue showing microscopic signs of inflammation. Together with previous reports, this supports the view that the pro-apoptotic properties of tilmicosin on neutrophils do not compromise the host defense mechanisms required to control the infection.

  10. Use of a Multiplex Transcript Method for Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gene Expression Profiles in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Alex H; Willger, Sven D; Dolben, Emily L; Moulton, Lisa A; Dorman, Dana B; Bean, Heather; Hill, Jane E; Hampton, Thomas H; Ashare, Alix; Hogan, Deborah A

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of therapies that modulate Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence or that can eradicate chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) will be advanced by an improved understanding of P. aeruginosa behavior in vivo We demonstrate the use of multiplexed Nanostring technology to monitor relative abundances of P. aeruginosa transcripts across clinical isolates, in serial samples, and for the purposes of comparing microbial physiology in vitro and in vivo The expression of 75 transcripts encoded by genes implicated in CF lung disease was measured in a variety of P. aeruginosa strains as well as RNA serial sputum samples from four P. aeruginosa-colonized subjects with CF collected over 6 months. We present data on reproducibility, the results from different methods of normalization, and demonstrate high concordance between transcript relative abundance data obtained by Nanostring or transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis. Furthermore, we address considerations regarding sequence variation between strains during probe design. Analysis of P. aeruginosa grown in vitro identified transcripts that correlated with the different phenotypes commonly observed in CF clinical isolates. P. aeruginosa transcript profiles in RNA from CF sputum indicated alginate production in vivo, and transcripts involved in quorum-sensing regulation were less abundant in sputum than strains grown in the laboratory. P. aeruginosa gene expression patterns from sputum clustered closely together relative to patterns for laboratory-grown cultures; in contrast, laboratory-grown P. aeruginosa showed much greater transcriptional variation with only loose clustering of strains with different phenotypes. The clustering within and between subjects was surprising in light of differences in inhaled antibiotic and respiratory symptoms, suggesting that the pathways represented by these 75 transcripts are stable in chronic CF P. aeruginosa lung infections. PMID:27481238

  11. DNA Repair Genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Chemotherapy Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Jingyan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Hongxing; Liu, Qi; Han, Junqing

    2016-06-12

    BACKGROUND Surgery combined with chemotherapy is an important therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, chemotherapy drug resistance seriously hinders the curative effect. Studies show that DNA repair genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 are associated with NSCLC chemotherapy, but their expression and mechanism in NSCLC chemotherapy drug-resistant cells has not been elucidated. MATERIAL AND METHODS NSCLC cell line A549 and drug resistance cell line A549/DDP were cultured. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to detect ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA expression. A549/DDP cells were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control group; the siRNA-negative control group (scramble group); and the siRNA ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection group. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression. MTT was used to detect cell proliferation activity. Caspase 3 activity was tested by use of a kit. Western blot analysis was performed to detect PI3K, AKT, phosphorylated PI3K, and phosphorylated AKT protein expression. RESULTS ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in A549/DDP compared with A549 (P<0.05). ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection can significantly reduce ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 expression obviously inhibited cell proliferation and increased caspase 3 activity (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 significantly decreased PI3K and AKT phosphorylation levels (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in NSCLC drug-resistant cells, and they regulated lung cancer occurrence and development through the phosphorylating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  12. DNA Repair Genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Chemotherapy Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Jingyan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Hongxing; Liu, Qi; Han, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgery combined with chemotherapy is an important therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, chemotherapy drug resistance seriously hinders the curative effect. Studies show that DNA repair genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 are associated with NSCLC chemotherapy, but their expression and mechanism in NSCLC chemotherapy drug-resistant cells has not been elucidated. Material/Methods NSCLC cell line A549 and drug resistance cell line A549/DDP were cultured. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to detect ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA expression. A549/DDP cells were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control group; the siRNA-negative control group (scramble group); and the siRNA ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection group. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression. MTT was used to detect cell proliferation activity. Caspase 3 activity was tested by use of a kit. Western blot analysis was performed to detect PI3K, AKT, phosphorylated PI3K, and phosphorylated AKT protein expression. Results ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in A549/DDP compared with A549 (P<0.05). ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection can significantly reduce ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 expression obviously inhibited cell proliferation and increased caspase 3 activity (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 significantly decreased PI3K and AKT phosphorylation levels (P<0.05). Conclusions ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in NSCLC drug-resistant cells, and they regulated lung cancer occurrence and development through the phosphorylating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:27289442

  13. Inhibition of growth, induction of apoptosis and alteration of gene expression by tea polyphenols in the highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Chaiti; Saha, Prosenjit; Panda, Chinmay Kr; Das, Sukta

    2005-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex group of diseases but each lesion is thought to originate from a single mutated progenitor cell. It is evident that multiple genetic changes are involved in the generation of each specific type of lung cancer. Due to the high complexity of these processes and rapid metastasis, treatment of advanced lung cancer, particularly of NSCLCs, is far from satisfactory. Thus, there is a need for innovative strategies for modulation of adverse alteration in protooncogene or tumor suppressor genes so that lung carcinogenesis can be suppressed or delayed. To this end, we have evaluated the effects of tea compounds (theaflavins, epicatechin-gallate and epigallo-catechin-gallate) on proliferation and apoptosis and associated gene expression in a highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460. Significant reduction of cell proliferation, detected in situ by BrdU incorporation, and induction of apoptosis, assessed by the by the TUNEL method, were noted following treatments. Expression of p53, Bcl-2, c-Myc and H-Ras, was localized by immunocytochemistry and analysed by Western blotting. Tea compounds upregulated expression of p53, downregulated expression of Bcl-2 but there was no significant influence on H-ras and c-Myc expressions. It is suggested that tea compounds can influence genetic alteration to disfavour, growth and survival of lung cancer cells. PMID:16235994

  14. Modulation of MDR1 and MRP3 Gene Expression in Lung Cancer Cells after Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Melguizo, Consolación; Prados, Jose; Luque, Raquel; Ortiz, Raúl; Caba, Octavio; Álvarez, Pablo J.; Gonzalez, Beatriz; Aranega, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    Carboplatin-paclitaxel is a reference regimen in the treatment of locally advanced or disseminated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This paper discusses the multidrug resistance developed with this drug combination, which is one of the major obstacles to successful treatment. In order to understand and overcome the drug resistance pattern of NSCLC after carboplatin plus paclitaxel exposure, levels of mRNA expression of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3) were investigated in primary NSCLC cell lines (A-549 and A-427) and a metastasis-derived NSCLC cell line (NODO). Our results showed that exposure of the three NSCLC lines to plasma concentrations of paclitaxel (5 μM) produced an increase in MDR1 expression, while MRP3 showed no alteration in expression. By contrast, the same cells exposed to carboplatin plasma concentrations (30 μM) showed overexpression of MRP3. In these cells, MDR1 showed no expression changes. Interestingly, the combination of both paclitaxel and carboplatin caused increased expression of the MDR1 drug resistance gene rather than the individual treatments. These results suggest that carboplatin and paclitaxel may induce drug resistance mediated by MDR1 and MRP3, which may be enhanced by the simultaneous use of both drugs. PMID:23443122

  15. Demethoxycurcumin alters gene expression associated with DNA damage, cell cycle and apoptosis in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yang-Ching; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Hsia, Te-Chun; Yang, Su-Tso; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths and new lung cancer cases are continuously emerging around the globe; however, treatment of lung cancer remains unsatisfactory. Demethoxycurcumin (DMC) has been shown to exert cytotoxic effects in human cancer cells via induction of apoptosis. However, the effects of DMC on genetic mechanisms associated with these actions have not been yet elucidated. Human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells were incubated with or without 35 μM of DMC for 24 h and total RNA was extracted for cDNA synthesis labeling and microarray hybridization, followed by fluor-labeled cDNA hybridization on chip. Expression Console software with default Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) parameters were used for detecting and quantitating the localized concentrations of fluorescent molecules. The GeneGo software was used for investigating key genes involved and their possible interaction pathways. Genes associated with DNA damage and repair, cell-cycle check point and apoptosis could be altered by DMC; in particular, 144 genes were found up-regulated and 179 genes down-regulated in NCI-H460 cells after exposure to DMC. In general, DMC-altered genes may offer information to understand the cytotoxic mechanism of this agent at the genetic level since gene alterations can be useful biomarkers or targets for the diagnosis and treatment of human lung cancer in the future.

  16. DEP-induced fra-1 expression correlates with a distinct activation of AP-1-dependent gene transcription in the lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Kleeberger, Steven R; Reddy, Sekhar P

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies indicate a potential role for Fra-1, a heterodimeric partner of activator protein (AP)-1, in toxicant-induced epithelial injury, repair, and cellular transformation. Here we have investigated the effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on fra-1 expression in C10 cells, a murine lung epithelial cell line. DEP markedly upregulated fra-1, but not fra-2, expression. The increase in fra-1 mRNA expression correlated well with its protein- and DNA-binding activity. DNA-binding assays also revealed a predominant presence of Jun-B and Jun-D in the AP-1 complex. Interestingly, DEP did not alter Jun-B and Jun-D protein levels. Transcriptional analysis revealed that fra-1 induction is regulated in part at the transcriptional level. The -379 to +32 bp 5'-flanking region mediated this induction. Furthermore, inhibitors of ERK1/2, JNK1, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) significantly suppressed DEP-stimulated fra-1 transcription, suggesting their involvement in the induction process. Consistent with this finding, DEP stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1, and p38 MAPKs with a distinct activation pattern. Overexpression of Fra-1 downregulated c-Jun and Nrf2 enhanced AP-1- and ARE-mediated reporter gene expression, respectively. In contrast, Fra-1 had the opposite effect on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 promoter activity. In particular, it bound to the functional AP-1 site of the MMP-9 promoter after DEP stimulation. Consistent with this result, DEP also markedly upregulated MMP-9 promoter activity. Collectively, these findings suggest that fra-1 induction by DEP may play a role in selectively regulating gene expression involved in alveolar epithelial cell injury and repair. PMID:14565943

  17. Cigarette smoke-induced emphysema in A/J mice is associated with pulmonary oxidative stress, apoptosis of lung cells, and global alterations in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Misra, Vikas; Zhen, Lijie; Tankersley, Clarke G.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Biswal, Shyam

    2009-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the fourth leading cause of deaths in the United States. Despite recent advances, the molecular mechanisms involved in the initiation and progression of this disease remain elusive. We used Affymetrix Gene Chip arrays to determine the temporal alterations in global gene expression during the progression of pulmonary emphysema in A/J mice. Chronic cigarette smoke (CS) exposure caused pulmonary emphysema in A/J mice, which was associated with pronounced bronchoalveolar inflammation, enhanced oxidative stress, and increased apoptosis of alveolar septal cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of 1,190, 715, 260, and 246 genes and the downregulation of 1,840, 730, 442, and 236 genes in the lungs of mice exposed to CS for 5 h, 8 days, and 1.5 and 6 mo, respectively. Most of the genes belong to the functional categories of phase I genes, Nrf2-regulated antioxidant and phase II genes, phase III detoxification genes, and others including immune/inflammatory response genes. Induction of the genes encoding multiple phase I enzymes was markedly higher in the emphysematous lungs, whereas reduced expression of various cytoprotective genes constituting ubiquitin-proteasome complex, cell survival pathways, solute carriers and transporters, transcription factors, and Nrf2-regulated antioxidant and phase II-responsive genes was noted. Our data indicate that the progression of CS-induced emphysema is associated with a steady decline in the expression of various genes involved in multiple pathways in the lungs of A/J mice. Many of the genes discovered in this study could rationally play an important role in the susceptibility to CS-induced emphysema. PMID:19286929

  18. Wnt signaling induces gene expression of factors associated with bone destruction in lung and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachelle W; Merkel, Alyssa R; Page, Jonathan M; Ruppender, Nazanin S; Guelcher, Scott A; Sterling, Julie A

    2014-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is an important regulator of bone destruction in bone metastatic tumors. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) stimulates PTHrP production in part through the transcription factor Gli2, which is regulated independent of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in osteolytic cancer cells. However, inhibition of TGF-β in vivo does not fully inhibit tumor growth in bone or tumor-induced bone destruction, suggesting other pathways are involved. While Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 in development, the role of Wnt signaling in bone metastasis is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 expression in tumor cells that induce bone destruction. We report here that Wnt activation by β-catenin/T cell factor 4 (TCF4) over-expression or lithium chloride (LiCl) treatment increased Gli2 and PTHrP expression in osteolytic cancer cells. This was mediated through the TCF and Smad binding sites within the Gli2 promoter as determined by promoter mutation studies, suggesting cross-talk between TGF-β and Wnt signaling. Culture of tumor cells on substrates with bone-like rigidity increased Gli2 and PTHrP production, enhanced autocrine Wnt activity and led to an increase in the TCF/Wnt signaling reporter (TOPFlash), enriched β-catenin nuclear accumulation, and elevated Wnt-related genes by PCR-array. Stromal cells serve as an additional paracrine source of Wnt ligands and enhanced Gli2 and PTHrP mRNA levels in MDA-MB-231 and RWGT2 cells in vitro and promoted tumor-induced bone destruction in vivo in a β-catenin/Wnt3a-dependent mechanism. These data indicate that a combination of matrix rigidity and stromal-secreted factors stimulate Gli2 and PTHrP through Wnt signaling in osteolytic breast cancer cells, and there is significant cross-talk between the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways. This suggests that the Wnt signaling pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for inhibiting tumor cell response to the bone

  19. Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization is associated with enhanced Th1 inflammatory gene expression in lungs of humans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Meghan E.; Tedrow, John R.; Hillenbrand, Maria E.; Lucht, Lorrie; Richards, Thomas; Norris, Karen A.; Zhang, Yingze; Sciurba, Frank C.; Kaminski, Naftali; Morris, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disease, the pathogenesis of which remains incompletely understood. Colonization with Pneumocystis jirovecii may play a role in COPD pathogenesis; however, the mechanisms by which such colonization contributes to COPD are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine lung gene expression profiles associated with Pneumocystis colonization in patients with COPD to identify potential key pathways involved in disease pathogenesis. Using COPD lung tissue samples made available through the Lung Tissue Research Consortium (LTRC), Pneumocystis colonization status was determined by nested PCR. Microarray gene expression profiles were performed for each sample and the profiles of colonized and non-colonized samples compared. Overall, 18 participants (8.5%) were Pneumocystis-colonized. Pneumocystis colonization was associated with fold increase in expression of four closely related genes: INF-γ and the three chemokine ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11. These ligands are chemoattractants for the common cognate receptor CXCR3, which is predominantly expressed on activated Th1 T-lymphocytes. Although these ligand–receptor pairs have previously been implicated in COPD pathogenesis, few initiators of ligand expression and subsequent lymphocyte trafficking have been identified: our findings implicate Pneumocystis as a potential trigger. The finding of upregulation of these inflammatory genes in the setting of Pneumocystis colonization sheds light on infectious-immune relationships in COPD. PMID:24438206

  20. Hidden Treasures in “Ancient” Microarrays: Gene-Expression Portrays Biology and Potential Resistance Pathways of Major Lung Cancer Subtypes and Normal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kerkentzes, Konstantinos; Lagani, Vincenzo; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Vyberg, Mogens; Røe, Oluf Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Novel statistical methods and increasingly more accurate gene annotations can transform “old” biological data into a renewed source of knowledge with potential clinical relevance. Here, we provide an in silico proof-of-concept by extracting novel information from a high-quality mRNA expression dataset, originally published in 2001, using state-of-the-art bioinformatics approaches. Methods: The dataset consists of histologically defined cases of lung adenocarcinoma (AD), squamous (SQ) cell carcinoma, small-cell lung cancer, carcinoid, metastasis (breast and colon AD), and normal lung specimens (203 samples in total). A battery of statistical tests was used for identifying differential gene expressions, diagnostic and prognostic genes, enriched gene ontologies, and signaling pathways. Results: Our results showed that gene expressions faithfully recapitulate immunohistochemical subtype markers, as chromogranin A in carcinoids, cytokeratin 5, p63 in SQ, and TTF1 in non-squamous types. Moreover, biological information with putative clinical relevance was revealed as potentially novel diagnostic genes for each subtype with specificity 93–100% (AUC = 0.93–1.00). Cancer subtypes were characterized by (a) differential expression of treatment target genes as TYMS, HER2, and HER3 and (b) overrepresentation of treatment-related pathways like cell cycle, DNA repair, and ERBB pathways. The vascular smooth muscle contraction, leukocyte trans-endothelial migration, and actin cytoskeleton pathways were overexpressed in normal tissue. Conclusion: Reanalysis of this public dataset displayed the known biological features of lung cancer subtypes and revealed novel pathways of potentially clinical importance. The findings also support our hypothesis that even old omics data of high quality can be a source of significant biological information when appropriate bioinformatics methods are used. PMID:25325012

  1. Curcumin alters gene expression-associated DNA damage, cell cycle, cell survival and cell migration and invasion in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-Tsang; Wang, Wei-Shu; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Su-Tso; Tang, Nou-Ying; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality and new cases are on the increase worldwide. However, the treatment of lung cancer remains unsatisfactory. Curcumin has been shown to induce cell death in many human cancer cells, including human lung cancer cells. However, the effects of curcumin on genetic mechanisms associated with these actions remain unclear. Curcumin (2 µM) was added to NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells and the cells were incubated for 24 h. Total RNA was extracted from isolated cells for cDNA synthesis, labeling, microarray hybridization and flour‑labeled cDNA hybridized on chip. Localized concentrations of fluorescent molecules were detected and quantified using Expression Console software (Affymetrix) with default RMA parameters. GeneGo software was used for the key genes involved and their possible interaction pathways. The results showed that ~170 genes were significantly upregulated and 577 genes were significantly downregulated in curcumin‑treated cells. Specifically, the up‑ and downregulated genes included CCNE2, associated with DNA damage; ID3, associated with cell survival and 146 genes with a >2- to 3-fold change including the TP53INP1 gene, associated with DNA damage; CDC6, CDCA5, TAKMIP2, CDK14, CDK5, CDCA76, CDC25A, CDC5L and SKP2, associated with cell cycle; the CARD6, ID1 and ID2 genes, associated with cell survival and the BRMS1L, associated with cell migration and invasion. Additionally, 59 downregulated genes exhibited a >4-fold change, including the DDIT3 gene, associated with DNA damage; while 97 genes had a >3- to 4-fold change including the DDIT4 gene, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle and 321 genes with a >2- to 3-fold including the GADD45A and CGREF1 genes, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle, the TNFRSF10B, GAS5, TSSC1 and TNFRSF11B gene, associated with cell survival and the ARHAP29 and CADM2 genes, associated with cell migration

  2. DIFFERENTIAL LUNG GENE EXPRESSION IN IMMUNOLOGICALLY-CHALLENGED RATS EXPOSED TO CONCENTRATED AIRBORNE PARTICULATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children residing in urbanized areas suffer disproportionately higher asthma-related morbidity and mortality. One explanation is that inner city children are exposured to higher levels of environmental asthma triggers such as airborne particulate matter. To elucidate gene-environ...

  3. Effects of exercise training on atrophy gene expression in skeletal muscle of mice with chronic allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Durigan, J L Q; Peviani, S M; Russo, T L; Silva, A C D; Vieira, R P; Martins, M A; Carvalho, C R F; Salvini, T F

    2009-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of chronic allergic airway inflammation and of treadmill training (12 weeks) of low and moderate intensity on muscle fiber cross-sectional area and mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in the mouse tibialis anterior muscle. Six 4-month-old male BALB/c mice (28.5 +/- 0.8 g) per group were examined: 1) control, non-sensitized and non-trained (C); 2) ovalbumin sensitized (OA, 20 microg per mouse); 3) non-sensitized and trained at 50% maximum speed _ low intensity (PT50%); 4) non-sensitized and trained at 75% maximum speed _ moderate intensity (PT75%); 5) OA-sensitized and trained at 50% (OA+PT50%), 6) OA-sensitized and trained at 75% (OA+PT75%). There was no difference in muscle fiber cross-sectional area among groups and no difference in atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression between C and OA groups. All exercised groups showed significantly decreased expression of atrogin-1 compared to C (1.01 +/- 0.2-fold): PT50% = 0.71 +/- 0.12-fold; OA+PT50% = 0.74 +/- 0.03-fold; PT75% = 0.71 +/- 0.09-fold; OA+PT75% = 0.74 +/- 0.09-fold. Similarly significant results were obtained regarding MuRF1 gene expression compared to C (1.01 +/- 0.23-fold): PT50% = 0.53 +/- 0.20-fold; OA+PT50% = 0.55 +/- 0.11-fold; PT75% = 0.35 +/- 0.15-fold; OA+PT75% = 0.37 +/- 0.08-fold. A short period of OA did not induce skeletal muscle atrophy in the mouse tibialis anterior muscle and aerobic training at low and moderate intensity negatively regulates the atrophy pathway in skeletal muscle of healthy mice or mice with allergic lung inflammation.

  4. Systematic comparison of RNA extraction techniques from frozen and fresh lung tissues: checkpoint towards gene expression studies

    PubMed Central

    Muyal, Jai Prakash; Muyal, Vandana; Kaistha, Brajesh Pratap; Seifart, Carola; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Background The reliability of gene expression profiling-based technologies to detect transcriptional differences representative of the original samples is affected by the quality of the extracted RNA. It strictly depends upon the technique that has been employed. Hence, the present study aimed at systematically comparing silica-gel column (SGC) and guanidine isothiocyanate (GTC) techniques of RNA isolation to answer the question which technique is preferable when frozen, long-term stored or fresh lung tissues have to be evaluated for the downstream molecular analysis. Methods Frozen lungs (n = 3) were prepared by long-term storage (2.5 yrs) in -80°C while fresh lungs (n = 3) were harvested and processed immediately. The purity and quantification of RNA was determined with a spectrophotometer whereas the total amounted copy numbers of target sequences were determined with iCycler detection system for assessment of RNA intactness (28S and 18S) and fragment sizes, i.e. short (GAPDH-3' UTR), medium (GAPDH), and long (PBGD) with 200 bp, 700 bp, and 1400 bp distance to the 3'ends of mRNA motif, respectively. Results Total yield of RNA was higher with GTC than SGC technique in frozen as well as fresh tissues while the purity of RNA remained comparable. The quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction data revealed that higher mean copy numbers of 28S and a longer fragment (1400 bp) were obtained from RNA isolated with SGC than GTC technique using fresh as well as frozen tissues. Additionally, a high mean copy number of 18S and medium fragment (700 bp) were obtained in RNA isolated with SGC technique from fresh tissues, only. For the shorter fragment, no significant differences between both techniques were noticed. Conclusion Our data demonstrated that although the GTC technique has yielded a higher amount of RNA, the SGC technique was much more superior with respect to the reliable generation of an intact RNA and effectively amplified longer products in

  5. Retinoid Homeostatic Gene Expression in Liver, Lung and Kidney: Ontogeny and Response to Vitamin A-Retinoic Acid (VARA) Supplementation from Birth to Adult Age

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Sarah A.; Ross, A. Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA, retinol) metabolism is homeostatically controlled, but little is known of its regulation in the postnatal period. Here, we determined the postnatal trajectory of VA storage and metabolism in major compartments of VA metabolism–plasma, liver, lung, and kidney from postnatal (P) day 1 to adulthood. We also investigated the response to supplementation with VARA, a combination of VA and 10% all-trans-retinoic acid that previously was shown to synergistically increase retinol uptake and storage in lung. Nursling pups of dams fed a VA-marginal diet received an oral dose of oil (placebo) or VARA on each of four neonatal days: P1, P4, P7, and P10; and again as adults. Tissues were collected 6 h after the final dosing on P1, P4, P10, and at adult age. Gene transcripts for Lrat and Rbp4 in liver and Raldh-1 and Raldh-3 in lung, did not differ in the neonatal period but were higher, P<0.05, in adults, while Cyp26B1, Stra6, megalin, and Raldh-2 in lung did not differ from perinatal to adult ages. VARA supplementation increased total retinol in plasma, liver and lung, with a dose-by-dose accumulation in neonatal liver and lung, while transcripts for Lrat in liver, megalin in kidney, Cyp26A1/B1 in liver and lung, respectively, and Stra6 in lung, were all increased, suggesting pathways of VA uptake, storage and RA oxidation were each augmented after VARA. VARA decreased hepatic expression of Rbp4, responsible for VA trafficking from liver to plasma, and, in lung, of Raldh-1 and Raldh-2, which function in RA production. Our results define retinoid homeostatic gene expression from neonatal and adult age and show that while supplementation with VARA acutely alters retinol content and retinoid homeostatic gene expression in neonatal and adult lung, liver and kidney, VARA supplementation of neonates increased adult-age VA content only in the liver. PMID:26731668

  6. Deep Sequence Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Integrated Analysis of Gene Expression, Alternative Splicing, and Single Nucleotide Variations in Lung Adenocarcinomas with and without Oncogenic KRAS Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kalari, Krishna R.; Rossell, David; Necela, Brian M.; Asmann, Yan W.; Nair, Asha; Baheti, Saurabh; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Younkin, Curtis S.; Baker, Tiffany; Carr, Jennifer M.; Tang, Xiaojia; Walsh, Michael P.; Chai, High-Seng; Sun, Zhifu; Hart, Steven N.; Leontovich, Alexey A.; Hossain, Asif; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Perez, Edith A.; Reisman, David N.; Fields, Alan P.; Thompson, E. Aubrey

    2012-01-01

    KRAS mutations are highly prevalent in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and tumors harboring these mutations tend to be aggressive and resistant to chemotherapy. We used next-generation sequencing technology to identify pathways that are specifically altered in lung tumors harboring a KRAS mutation. Paired-end RNA-sequencing of 15 primary lung adenocarcinoma tumors (8 harboring mutant KRAS and 7 with wild-type KRAS) were performed. Sequences were mapped to the human genome, and genomic features, including differentially expressed genes, alternate splicing isoforms and single nucleotide variants, were determined for tumors with and without KRAS mutation using a variety of computational methods. Network analysis was carried out on genes showing differential expression (374 genes), alternate splicing (259 genes), and SNV-related changes (65 genes) in NSCLC tumors harboring a KRAS mutation. Genes exhibiting two or more connections from the lung adenocarcinoma network were used to carry out integrated pathway analysis. The most significant signaling pathways identified through this analysis were the NFκB, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways. A 27 gene mutant KRAS-specific sub network was extracted based on gene–gene connections from the integrated network, and interrogated for druggable targets. Our results confirm previous evidence that mutant KRAS tumors exhibit activated NFκB, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways and may be preferentially sensitive to target therapeutics toward these pathways. In addition, our analysis indicates novel, previously unappreciated links between mutant KRAS and the TNFR and PPARγ signaling pathways, suggesting that targeted PPARγ antagonists and TNFR inhibitors may be useful therapeutic strategies for treatment of mutant KRAS lung tumors. Our study is the first to integrate genomic features from RNA-Seq data from NSCLC and to define a first draft genomic landscape model that is unique to tumors with oncogenic KRAS mutations. PMID:22655260

  7. Expression of genes involved in mouse lung cell differentiation/regulation after acute exposure to photons and protons with or without low-dose preirradiation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Zhao, WeiLing; Tian, Sisi; Slater, James M; Deng, Zhiyong; Gridley, Daila S

    2011-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effects of acute 2 Gy irradiation with photons (0.8 Gy/min) or protons (0.9 Gy/min), both with and without pre-exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays (0.01 Gy at 0.03 cGy/h), on 84 genes involved in stem cell differentiation or regulation in mouse lungs on days 21 and 56. Genes with a ≥1.5-fold difference in expression and P < 0.05 compared to 0 Gy controls are emphasized. Two proteins specific for lung stem cells/progenitors responsible for local tissue repair were also compared. Overall, striking differences were present between protons and photons in modulating the genes. More genes were affected by protons than by photons (22 compared to 2 and 6 compared to 2 on day 21 and day 56, respectively) compared to 0 Gy. Preirradiation with low-dose-rate γ rays enhanced the acute photon-induced gene modulation on day 21 (11 compared to 2), and all 11 genes were significantly downregulated on day 56. On day 21, seven genes (aldh2, bmp2, cdc2a, col1a1, dll1, foxa2 and notch1) were upregulated in response to most of the radiation regimens. Immunoreactivity of Clara cell secretory protein was enhanced by all radiation regimens. The number of alveolar type 2 cells positive for prosurfactant protein C in irradiated groups was higher on day 56 (12.4-14.6 cells/100) than on day 21 (8.5-11.2 cells/100) (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results showed that acute photons and protons induced different gene expression profiles in the lungs and that pre-exposure to low-dose-rate γ rays sometimes had modulatory effects. In addition, proteins associated with lung-specific stem cells/progenitors were highly sensitive to radiation.

  8. Association and Virulence Gene Expression Vary among Serotype III Group B Streptococcus Isolates following Exposure to Decidual and Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korir, Michelle L.; Knupp, David; LeMerise, Kathryn; Boldenow, Erica; Loch-Caruso, Rita; Aronoff, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) causes severe disease in neonates, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. GBS species are highly diverse and can be classified by serotype and multilocus sequence typing. Sequence type 17 (ST-17) strains cause invasive neonatal disease more frequently than strains of other STs. Attachment and invasion of host cells are key steps in GBS pathogenesis. We investigated whether four serotype III strains representing ST-17 (two strains), ST-19, and ST-23 differ in their abilities to attach to and invade both decidual cells and lung epithelial cells. Virulence gene expression following host cell association and exposure to amnion cells was also tested. The ST-17 strains differed in their abilities to attach to and invade decidual cells, whereas there were no differences with lung epithelial cells. The ST-19 and ST-23 strains, however, attached to and invaded decidual cells less than both ST-17 strains. Although the ST-23 strain attached to lung epithelial cells better than ST-17 and -19 strains, none of the strains effectively invaded the lung epithelial cells. Notably, the association with host cells resulted in the differential expression of several virulence genes relative to basal expression levels. Similar expression patterns of some genes were observed regardless of cell type used. Collectively, these results show that GBS strains differ in their abilities to attach to distinct host cell types and express key virulence genes that are relevant to the disease process. Enhancing our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms could aid in the identification of novel therapeutic targets or vaccine candidates that could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality associated with neonatal infections. PMID:25135682

  9. Foxp1/2/4-NuRD interactions regulate gene expression and epithelial injury response in the lung via regulation of interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Chokas, Ann L; Trivedi, Chinmay M; Lu, Min Min; Tucker, Philip W; Li, Shanru; Epstein, Jonathan A; Morrisey, Edward E

    2010-04-23

    To determine the underlying mechanism of Foxp1/2/4-mediated transcriptional repression, a yeast two-hybrid screen was performed that identified p66beta, a transcriptional repressor and component of the NuRD chromatin-remodeling complex. We show that direct interactions between Foxp1/4 and p66beta are mediated by the CR2 domain within p66beta and the zinc finger/leucine zipper repression domain found in Foxp1/2/4. These direct interactions are functionally relevant as overexpression of p66beta in combination with Foxp factors cooperatively represses Foxp target gene expression, whereas loss of p66 and Foxp factors results in de-repression of endogenous Foxp target genes in lung epithelial cells. Moreover, the NuRD components HDAC1/2 associate in a macromolecular complex with Foxp proteins, and loss of expression or inhibition of HDAC1/2 activity leads to de-repression of Foxp target gene expression. Importantly, we show in vivo that Foxp1 and HDAC2 act cooperatively to regulate expression of the cytoprotective cytokine interleukin-6, which results in increased resistance to hyperoxic lung injury in Foxp1/HDAC2 compound mutant animals. These data reveal an important interaction between the Foxp transcription factors and the NuRD chromatin-remodeling complex that modulates transcriptional repression critical for the lung epithelial injury response. PMID:20185820

  10. Promoter methylation status of tumor suppressor genes and inhibition of expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bangqing; Song, Jianfei; Luan, Jiaqiang; Sun, Xiaolin; Bai, Jian; Wang, Haiyong; Li, Angui; Zhang, Lifei; Feng, Xiaoyan; Du, Zhenzong

    2016-08-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic DNA modification catalyzed by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). The purpose of this study was to investigate DNMT1 gene and protein expression and the effects of methylation status on tumor suppressor genes in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines grown in vitro and in vivo Human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, A549 and H838, were grown in vitro and inoculated subcutaneously into nude mice to form tumors and were then treated with the DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, with and without treatment with the benzamide histone deacetylase inhibitor, entinostat (MS-275). DNMT1 protein expression was quantified by Western blot. Promoter methylation status of tumor suppressor genes (RASSF1A, ASC, APC, MGMT, CDH13, DAPK, ECAD, P16, and GATA4) was evaluated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Methylation status of the tumor suppressor genes was regulated by the DNMT1 gene, with the decrease of DNMT1 expression following DNA methylation treatment. Demethylation of tumor suppressor genes (APC, ASC, and RASSF1A) restored tumor growth in nude mice. The results of this study support a role for methylation of DNA as a potential epigenetic clinical biomarker of prognosis or response to therapy and for DNMT1 as a potential therapeutic target in NSCLC. PMID:27190263

  11. Health risk assessment for air pollutants: alterations in lung and cardiac gene expression in mice exposed to Milano winter fine particulate matter (PM2.5).

    PubMed

    Sancini, Giulio; Farina, Francesca; Battaglia, Cristina; Cifola, Ingrid; Mangano, Eleonora; Mantecca, Paride; Camatini, Marina; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, endothelial cell dysfunction, atherosclerosis and cardiac autonomic dysfunction have been linked to urban particulate matter exposure. The chemical composition of airborne pollutants in Milano is similar to those of other European cities though with a higher PM2.5 fraction. Milano winter fine particles (PM2.5win) are characterized by the presence of nitrate, organic carbon fraction, with high amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and elements such as Pb, Al, Zn, V, Fe, Cr and others, with a negligible endotoxin presence. In BALB/c mice, we examined, at biochemical and transcriptomic levels, the adverse effects of repeated Milano PM2.5win exposure in lung and heart. We found that ET-1, Hsp70, Cyp1A1, Cyp1B1 and Hsp-70, HO-1, MPO respectively increased within lung and heart of PM2.5win-treated mice. The PM2.5win exposure had a strong impact on global gene expression of heart tissue (181 up-regulated and 178 down-regulated genes) but a lesser impact on lung tissue (14 up-regulated genes and 43 down-regulated genes). Focusing on modulated genes, in lung we found two- to three-fold changes of those genes related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and calcium signalling. Within heart the most striking aspect is the twofold to threefold increase in collagen and laminin related genes as well as in genes involved in calcium signaling. The current study extends our previous findings, showing that repeated instillations of PM2.5win trigger systemic adverse effects. PM2.5win thus likely poses an acute threat primarily to susceptible people, such as the elderly and those with unrecognized coronary artery or structural heart disease. The study of genomic responses will improve understanding of disease mechanisms and enable future clinical testing of interventions against the toxic effects of air pollutant. PMID:25296036

  12. Health Risk Assessment for Air Pollutants: Alterations in Lung and Cardiac Gene Expression in Mice Exposed to Milano Winter Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5)

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Cristina; Cifola, Ingrid; Mangano, Eleonora; Mantecca, Paride; Camatini, Marina; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, endothelial cell dysfunction, atherosclerosis and cardiac autonomic dysfunction have been linked to urban particulate matter exposure. The chemical composition of airborne pollutants in Milano is similar to those of other European cities though with a higher PM2.5 fraction. Milano winter fine particles (PM2.5win) are characterized by the presence of nitrate, organic carbon fraction, with high amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and elements such as Pb, Al, Zn, V, Fe, Cr and others, with a negligible endotoxin presence. In BALB/c mice, we examined, at biochemical and transcriptomic levels, the adverse effects of repeated Milano PM2.5win exposure in lung and heart. We found that ET-1, Hsp70, Cyp1A1, Cyp1B1 and Hsp-70, HO-1, MPO respectively increased within lung and heart of PM2.5win-treated mice. The PM2.5win exposure had a strong impact on global gene expression of heart tissue (181 up-regulated and 178 down-regulated genes) but a lesser impact on lung tissue (14 up-regulated genes and 43 down-regulated genes). Focusing on modulated genes, in lung we found two- to three-fold changes of those genes related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and calcium signalling. Within heart the most striking aspect is the twofold to threefold increase in collagen and laminin related genes as well as in genes involved in calcium signaling. The current study extends our previous findings, showing that repeated instillations of PM2.5win trigger systemic adverse effects. PM2.5win thus likely poses an acute threat primarily to susceptible people, such as the elderly and those with unrecognized coronary artery or structural heart disease. The study of genomic responses will improve understanding of disease mechanisms and enable future clinical testing of interventions against the toxic effects of air pollutant. PMID:25296036

  13. Differences in the expression of chromosome 1 genes between lung telocytes and other cells: mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, alveolar type II cells, airway epithelial cells and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoru; Zheng, Minghuan; Zhang, Miaomiao; Qian, Mengjia; Zheng, Yonghua; Li, Meiyi; Cretoiu, Dragos; Chen, Chengshui; Chen, Luonan; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are a unique type of interstitial cells with specific, extremely long prolongations named telopodes (Tps). Our previous study showed that TCs are distinct from fibroblasts (Fbs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as concerns gene expression and proteomics. The present study explores patterns of mouse TC-specific gene profiles on chromosome 1. We investigated the network of main genes and the potential functional correlations. We compared gene expression profiles of mouse pulmonary TCs, MSCs, Fbs, alveolar type II cells (ATII), airway basal cells (ABCs), proximal airway cells (PACs), CD8+ T cells from bronchial lymph nodes (T-BL) and CD8+ T cells from lungs (T-LL). The functional and feature networks were identified and compared by bioinformatics tools. Our data showed that on TC chromosome 1, there are about 25% up-regulated and 70% down-regulated genes (more than onefold) as compared with the other cells respectively. Capn2, Fhl2 and Qsox1 were over-expressed in TCs compared to the other cells, indicating that biological functions of TCs are mainly associated with morphogenesis and local tissue homoeostasis. TCs seem to have important roles in the prevention of tissue inflammation and fibrogenesis development in lung inflammatory diseases and as modulators of immune cell response. In conclusion, TCs are distinct from the other cell types. PMID:24826900

  14. Coordinate regulation of transforming growth factor beta gene expression and cell proliferation in hamster lungs undergoing bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Raghow, B; Irish, P; Kang, A H

    1989-01-01

    The number of mesenchymal cells, as well as their ability to synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) components, greatly increase in the interstitium of fibrotic lungs. We have previously shown that the transcription of type I procollagen and fibronectin genes in the lungs is preferentially elevated during the early stages of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (Raghow, R., S. Lurie, J. M. Seyer, and A. H. Kang. 1985, J. Clin. Invest. 76:1734-1739. Since a cytokine-like transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) that is capable of enhancing mesenchymal cell proliferation and ECM synthesis could be potentially involved in this process, we investigated the temporal relationship between the regulation of TGF beta gene transcription and cellular proliferation in the bleomycin-treated hamster lungs. We observed a transient 5-7-fold increase in the accumulation of TGF beta transcripts, a concomitant 3-4-fold elevation in the cellular proliferation, and 8-10-fold stimulation of DNA synthesis in these lungs; all three parameters peaked around day 10 after bleomycin administration. Based on these results, we conclude that regulation of TGF beta gene expression may contribute significantly to the early events that lead to bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Images PMID:2480367

  15. Sodium butyrate up-regulates cathelicidin gene expression via activator protein-1 and histone acetylation at the promoter region in a human lung epithelial cell line, EBC-1.

    PubMed

    Kida, Yutaka; Shimizu, Takashi; Kuwano, Koichi

    2006-05-01

    The antimicrobial protein cathelicidin is considered to play an important role in the defense mechanisms against bacterial infection. Recent studies show that sodium butyrate induces cathelicidin gene expression in human colonic, gastric and hepatic cells. However, little is known about the precise regulatory mechanisms underlying sodium butyrate-induced cathelicidin gene expression. In this study, we examined the regulatory mechanisms involved in sodium butyrate-induced cathelicidin gene expression using a human lung epithelial cell line, EBC-1. Our results indicate that sodium butyrate induces both cathelicidin mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, deletion or mutation of a putative activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding site in the cathelicidin gene promoter abrogated the response to sodium butyrate stimulation. Three different mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors suppressed sodium butyrate-induced transactivation of the cathelicidin promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed that nuclear extracts prepared from sodium butyrate-stimulated EBC-1 cells generated specific binding to probe including a putative AP-1 binding site in the cathelicidin gene promoter. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated that sodium butyrate augmented histone acetylation of the cathelicidin promoter in EBC-1 cells. Therefore, these results indicate that AP-1 and histone acetylation of the cathelicidin promoter play a critical role in the regulation of inducible cathelicidin gene expression in EBC-1 cells stimulated with sodium butyrate.

  16. Oxidative DNA damage and defence gene expression in the mouse lung after short-term exposure to diesel exhaust particles by inhalation.

    PubMed

    Risom, Lotte; Dybdahl, Marianne; Bornholdt, Jette; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen

    2003-11-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) is suspected to contribute to lung cancer and cardiopulmonary diseases. In recent years generation of reactive oxygen species capable of inducing cellular oxidative stress has been in focus as one of the underlying mechanisms behind the genotoxic effects of particles. However, the role of the antioxidative defence system still needs to be clarified, especially in relation to low-dose DEP exposures. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of short-term exposure to DEP in terms of DNA damage and expression of key response genes towards oxidative stress in lungs of mice. Mice were exposed by inhalation to 20 or 80 mg/m3 DEP inhaled as either a single dose, or four lower doses (5 and 20 mg/m3) inhaled on four consecutive days. Our results indicate that HO-1 mRNA expression in lung tissue was up-regulated after both types of DEP exposures, whereas OGG1 expression was only up-regulated after repeated exposures. The level of oxidative DNA damage in terms of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) was increased in the lung tissue after a single exposure, whereas increased levels of DNA strand breaks was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage cells after repeated DEP exposures. The levels of 8-oxodG and OGG1 mRNA in lung tissue were mirror images. This suggests that after repeated exposures, up-regulation of DNA repair counteracts an increased rate of 8-oxodG formation leaving the steady state level of 8-oxodG in DNA unchanged. In conclusion, this study indicates that a single high dose of DEP generates 8-oxodG in lung tissue, whereas the same dose inhaled as four low-exposures may up-regulate the antioxidative defence system and protect against generation of 8-oxodG. PMID:12919962

  17. Early changes in pulmonary gene expression following tobacco exposure shed light on the role of estrogen metabolism in lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Siegfried, Jill M

    2010-06-01

    This perspective on Meireles et al. (beginning on p. 707 in this issue of the journal) discusses the increasing evidence for the role of female steroid hormones in lung cancer development and progression. The novel work of Meireles et al. is the first evidence for the rapid upregulation by tobacco smoke of a key cytochrome P450 gene that can metabolize estrogens such as beta-estradiol to potentially carcinogenic catechol and quinine forms, as well as the first evidence for the colocalization of beta-estradiol and estrogen receptors in murine airway epithelium. Actions of estrogens that contribute to lung carcinogenesis, especially in the presence of tobacco smoke, may involve both reactive intermediates that damage DNA and steroid hormone receptor signaling that promotes growth.

  18. Beta-carotene affects gene expression in lungs of male and female Bcmo1−/− mice in opposite directions

    PubMed Central

    van Helden, Yvonne G. J.; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; Swarts, Hans J. M.; Hollman, Peter C. H.; van Schooten, Frederik J.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms triggered by high dietary beta-carotene (BC) intake in lung are largely unknown. We performed microarray gene expression analysis on lung tissue of BC supplemented beta-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase 1 knockout (Bcmo1−/−) mice, which are—like humans—able to accumulate BC. Our main observation was that the genes were regulated in an opposite direction in male and female Bcmo1−/− mice by BC. The steroid biosynthetic pathway was overrepresented in BC-supplemented male Bcmo1−/− mice. Testosterone levels were higher after BC supplementation only in Bcmo1−/− mice, which had, unlike wild-type (Bcmo1+/+) mice, large variations. We hypothesize that BC possibly affects hormone synthesis or metabolism. Since sex hormones influence lung cancer risk, these data might contribute to an explanation for the previously found increased lung cancer risk after BC supplementation (ATBC and CARET studies). Moreover, effects of BC may depend on the presence of frequent human BCMO1 polymorphisms, since these effects were not found in wild-type mice. PMID:20820853

  19. Gene expression profiles reveal distinct immunological responses of cobalt and cerium dioxide nanoparticles in two in vitro lung epithelial cell models.

    PubMed

    Verstraelen, Sandra; Remy, Sylvie; Casals, Eudald; De Boever, Patrick; Witters, Hilda; Gatti, Antonietta; Puntes, Victor; Nelissen, Inge

    2014-08-01

    Fragmentary knowledge exists on cellular signaling responses underlying possible adverse health effects of CoO- and CeO2-nanoparticles (NP)s after inhalation. We aimed to perform a time kinetic study of gene expression profiles induced by these NPs in alveolar A549 and bronchial BEAS-2B epithelial cells, and investigated possible immune system modulation. The kinetics of the cell responses induced by the NPs were different between the lung epithelial models. Both CoO- and CeO2-NP exposure induced mainly downregulation of gene transcription. BEAS-2B cells were found to be more sensitive, as they showed a higher number of differentially expressed transcripts (DET) at a 10-fold lower NP-concentration than A549 cells. Hierarchical clustering of all DET indicated that the transcriptional responses were heterogeneous among the two cell types and two NPs. Between 1% and 14% DET encoding markers involved in immune processes were observed. The transcriptional impact of the metal oxide NPs appeared to be cell-dependent, both at the general and immune response level, whereas each lung epithelial cell model responded differently to the two NP types. Thus, the study provides gene expression markers and immune processes involved in CoO- and CeO2-NP-induced toxicity, and demonstrates the usefulness of comprehensive-omics studies to differentiate between NP responses.

  20. Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates maintain the biofilm formation capacity and the gene expression profiles during the chronic lung infection of CF patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Baoleri; Schjerling, Charlotte K; Kirkby, Nikolai; Hoffmann, Nadine; Borup, Rehannah; Molin, Søren; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2011-04-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic diversifications of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) promote long-term survival of bacteria during chronic lung infection. Twelve clonally related, sequential mucoid and non-mucoid paired P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from three Danish CF patients were investigated. The in vitro biofilm formation capacity was studied under static and flow through conditions and the global gene expression profiles were investigated by Affymetrix GeneChip. Regulatory genes of alginate production and quorum sensing (QS) system were sequenced and measurements of the alginate production and the detection of the QS signal molecules were performed. Comparisons of mucoid and non-mucoid isolates from early and late stages of the infection showed that the mucoid phenotype maintained over a decade the capacity to form in vitro biofilm and showed an unaltered transcriptional profile, whereas substantial alterations in the transcriptional profiles and loss of the capacity to form in vitro biofilms were observed in corresponding isolates of the non-mucoid phenotype. The conserved gene expression pattern in the mucoid isolates vs the diversity of changes in non-mucoid isolates observed in this particular P. aeruginosa clone reflects different adaptation strategies used by these two phenotypes in the different niches of the CF lung environment. PMID:21492226

  1. Expression of inflammation-related genes in the lung of BALB/c mice response to H7N9 influenza A virus with different pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meng; Wang, Qingnan; Qi, Wenbao; Zhang, Kaizhao; Liu, Jianxin; Tao, Pan; Ge, Shikun; Liao, Ming; Ning, Zhangyong

    2016-10-01

    H7N9 influenza A virus (IAV)-infected human cases are increasing and reported over 200 mortalities since its first emergence in 2013. Host inflammatory response contributes to the clearance of influenza virus; meanwhile, the induced "cytokine storm" also leads to pathological lesions. However, what inflammation-related response of the host for H7N9 influenza A virus infection to survival from injures of exuberant cytokine release is still obscure. In this research, expression pattern and histological distribution of inflammation-related genes, RIP3, NLRP3, IL-1β, TNF-α, Slit2 and Robo4 in the lung of BALB/c mice infected with two H7N9 IAV strains with only a PB2 residue 627 difference were investigated, as well as the histopathological injury of the lung. Results showed that significantly higher expression level of NLRP3, RIP3, IL-1β and TNF-α in H7N9-infected groups compared with the control would play a key role in driving lung pathological lesion. While the expression level of Slit2 and Robo4 in H7N9 rVK627E group had significantly increased trend than VK627 which might be the main factor to inhibit the interstitial pneumonia and infiltration. Also, H7N9 induced the histopathological changes in the lung of infected mice, and RIP3, NLRP3, IL-1β, TNF-α, Slit2 and Robo4 showed cell-specific distribution in the lung. The results will provide basic data for further research on the mechanism of inflammatory response and understanding of the role of site 627 in PB2 in H7N9 IAVs infection. In addition, enhancing the resilience of the host vascular system to the inflammatory response by regulation of Slit2-Robo4 signaling pathway might provide a novel strategy for H7N9 IAVs infection. PMID:27401907

  2. TCDD and a putative endogenous AhR ligand, ITE, elicit the same immediate changes in gene expression in mouse lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Henry, Ellen C; Welle, Stephen L; Gasiewicz, Thomas A

    2010-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates toxicity of several classes of xenobiotics and also has important physiological roles in differentiation, reproduction, and immunity, although the endogenous ligand(s) mediating these functions is/are as yet unidentified. One candidate endogenous ligand, 2-(1'H-indolo-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), is a potent AhR agonist in vitro, activates the murine AhR in vivo, but does not induce toxicity. We hypothesized that ITE and the toxic ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), may modify transcription of different sets of genes to account for their different toxicity. To test this hypothesis, primary mouse lung fibroblasts were exposed to 0.5muM ITE, 0.2nM TCDD, or vehicle for 4 h, and total gene expression was evaluated using microarrays. After this short-term and low-dose treatment, several hundred genes were changed significantly, and the response to ITE and TCDD was remarkably similar, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Induced gene sets included the expected battery of AhR-dependent xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, as well as several sets that reflect the inflammatory role of lung fibroblasts. Real time quantitative RT-qPCR assay of several selected genes confirmed these microarray data and further suggested that there may be kinetic differences in expression between ligands. These data suggest that ITE and TCDD elicit an analogous change in AhR conformation such that the initial transcription response is the same. Furthermore, if the difference in toxicity between TCDD and ITE is mediated by differences in gene expression, then it is likely that secondary changes enabled by the persistent TCDD, but not by the shorter lived ITE, are responsible.

  3. Gene Therapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Roth, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived to treat monogenic diseases. The replacement of a defective gene with a functional gene can theoretically cure the disease. In cancer, multiple genetic defects are present and the molecular profile changes during the course of the disease, making the replacement of all defective genes impossible. To overcome these difficulties, various gene therapy strategies have been adopted, including immune stimulation, transfer of suicide genes, inhibition of driver oncogenes, replacement of tumor-suppressor genes that could mediate apoptosis or anti-angiogenesis, and transfer of genes that enhance conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some of these strategies have been tested successfully in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the results of laboratory studies and clinical trials are reviewed herein. PMID:27481008

  4. Acute high-level exposure to WTC particles alters expression of genes associated with oxidative stress and immune function in the lung.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ward, William O; Peltier, Richard E; Zelikoff, Judith; Chen, Lung-chi

    2015-01-01

    First responders (FR) present at Ground Zero in the first 72 h after the World Trade Center (WTC) collapsed have progressively exhibited significant respiratory injuries. The few toxicology studies performed to date evaluated effects from just fine (< 2.5 µm) WTC dusts; none examined health effects/toxicities from atmospheres bearing larger particle sizes, despite the fact the majority (> 96%) of dusts were > 10 µm and most FR likely entrained dusts by mouth breathing. Using a system that generated/delivered supercoarse (10-53 µm) WTC dusts to F344 rats (in a manner that mimicked FR exposures), this study sought to examine potential toxicities in the lungs. In this exploratory study, rats were exposed for 2 h to 100 mg WTC dust/m(3) (while under isoflurane [ISO] anesthesia) or an air/ISO mixture; this dose conservatively modeled likely exposures by mouth-breathing FR facing ≈750-1000 mg WTC dust/m(3). Lungs were harvested 2 h post-exposure and total RNA extracted for subsequent global gene expression analysis. Among the >  1000 genes affected by WTC dust (under ISO) or ISO alone, 166 were unique to the dust exposure. In many instances, genes maximally-induced by the WTC dust exposure (relative to in naïve rats) were unchanged/inhibited by ISO only; similarly, several genes maximally inhibited in WTC dust rats were largely induced/unchanged in rats that received ISO only. These outcomes reflect likely contrasting effects of ISO and the WTC dust on lung gene expression. Overall, the data show that lungs of rats exposed to WTC dust (under ISO) - after accounting for any impact from ISO alone - displayed increased expression of genes related to lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle control, while several involved in anti-oxidant function were inhibited. These changes suggested acute inflammogenic effects and oxidative stress in the lungs of WTC dust-exposed rats. This study, thus, concludes that a single very high exposure

  5. Acute high-level exposure to WTC particles alters expression of genes associated with oxidative stress and immune function in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell D.; Vaughan, Joshua M.; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Ward, William O.; Peltier, Richard E.; Zelikoff, Judith; Chen, Lung-chi

    2015-01-01

    First responders (FR) present at Ground Zero in the first 72 h after the World Trade Center (WTC) collapsed have progressively exhibited significant respiratory injuries. The few toxicology studies performed to date evaluated effects from just fine (<2.5 µm) WTC dusts; none examined health effects/toxicities from atmospheres bearing larger particle sizes, despite the fact the majority (496%) of dusts were >10µm and most FR likely entrained dusts by mouth breathing. Using a system that generated/delivered supercoarse (10–53 µm) WTC dusts to F344 rats (in a manner that mimicked FR exposures), this study sought to examine potential toxicities in the lungs. In this exploratory study, rats were exposed for 2 h to 100 mg WTC dust/m3 (while under isoflurane [ISO] anesthesia) or an air/ISO mixture; this dose conservatively modeled likely exposures by mouth-breathing FR facing ≈750–1000 mg WTC dust/m3. Lungs were harvested 2 h post-exposure and total RNA extracted for subsequent global gene expression analysis. Among the > 1000 genes affected by WTC dust (under ISO) or ISO alone, 166 were unique to the dust exposure. In many instances, genes maximally-induced by the WTC dust exposure (relative to in naïve rats) were unchanged/inhibited by ISO only; similarly, several genes maximally inhibited in WTC dust rats were largely induced/unchanged in rats that received ISO only. These outcomes reflect likely contrasting effects of ISO and the WTC dust on lung gene expression. Overall, the data show that lungs of rats exposed to WTC dust (under ISO) – after accounting for any impact from ISO alone – displayed increased expression of genes related to lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle control, while several involved in anti-oxidant function were inhibited. These changes suggested acute inflammogenic effects and oxidative stress in the lungs of WTC dust-exposed rats. This study, thus, concludes that a single very high exposure to WTC dusts could

  6. Investigation by microarray analysis of effects of cigarette design characteristics on gene expression in human lung mucoepidermoid cancer cells NCI-H292 exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Chikako; Fukano, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    The effects of tobacco leaf types and the presence or absence of charcoal in the cigarette filters on gene expression were investigated using cigarette prototypes made of either flue-cured (FC) leaf or burley (BLY) leaf and Kentucky Reference 2R4F as a representative blend cigarette with cellulose acetate filters or charcoal filters. NCI-H292, human lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma cell line, was exposed to the total particulate matter (TPM) and gas/vapor phase (GVP) from each prototype for 8h and then the changes in gene expression from microarray data were analyzed. A number of genes associated with oxidative stress, inflammation, DNA damage and xenobiotic response were modified by the two fractions, TPM and GVP, from the three prototypes with cellulose acetate filters. Both TPM and GVP fractions strongly enhanced the gene expression of HMOX1, which is encoding the limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of oxidative stress and inflammatory process. Comparing the effects of TPM and GVP fraction, TPM strongly activated Nrf2 pathway-mediated anti-oxidative stress reaction, whereas GVP caused notable DNA damage response. In comparison of FC and BLY, TPM from FC more strongly induced the expression of histone family proteins than that from BLY. GVP from FC markedly induced gene expression associated with HSP70-mediated inflammation relative to that from BLY. Charcoal included in the filter strongly reduced the effects of GVP from each cigarette on gene expression. However, charcoal did not modified the effects of TPM. As a whole, charcoal is a useful material for reducing the biological effects of GVP.

  7. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Profiles in Lung Tissues of Pig Breeds Differing in Resistance to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenhua; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Nan; Li, Yanping; Yang, Lijuan; Jiang, Chenglan; Zhang, Chaoyang; Wen, Changhong; Jiang, Yunliang

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) caused by PRRS virus (PRRSV) is an infectious disease characterized by severe reproductive deficiency in pregnant sows, typical respiratory symptoms in piglets, and high mortality rate of piglets. In this study, we employed an Affymetrix microarray chip to compare the gene expression profiles of lung tissue samples from Dapulian (DPL) pigs (a Chinese indigenous pig breed) and Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire (DLY) pigs after infection with PRRSV. During infection with PRRSV, the DLY pigs exhibited a range of clinical features that typify the disease, whereas the DPL pigs showed only mild signs of the disease. Overall, the DPL group had a lower percentage of CD4+ cells and lower CD4+/CD8+ratios than the DLY group (p<0.05). For both IL-10 and TNF-α, the DLY pigs had significantly higher levels than the DPL pigs (p<0.01). The DLY pigs have lower serum IFN-γ levels than the DPL pigs (p<0.01). The serum IgG levels increased slightly from 0 dpi to 7 dpi, and peaked at 14 dpi (p<0.0001). Microarray data analysis revealed 16 differentially expressed (DE) genes in the lung tissue samples from the DLY and DPL pigs (q≤5%), of which LOC100516029 and LOC100523005 were up-regulated in the PRRSV-infected DPL pigs, while the other 14 genes were down-regulated in the PRRSV-infected DPL pigs compared with the PRRSV-infected DLY pigs. The mRNA expression levels of 10 out of the 16 DE genes were validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and their fold change was consistent with the result of microarray data analysis. We further analyzed the mRNA expression level of 8 differentially expressed genes between the DPL and DLY pigs for both uninfected and infected groups, and found that TF and USP18 genes were important in underlying porcine resistance or susceptibility to PRRSV. PMID:24465897

  8. p53 gene product expression in resected non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, with studies of concurrent cytological preparations and microwave antigen retrieval.

    PubMed Central

    Binks, S; Clelland, C A; Ronan, J; Bell, J

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To document the frequency and extent of p53 gene product expression in paraffin sections of resected non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and in cytological preparations of the same tumours; to determine the effect of microwave antigen retrieval on antigen detection. METHODS: Representative paraffin sections of 50 non-small cell carcinomas were stained with an antibody to p53 gene product (DO-7) both with and without prior microwave antigen retrieval. Cytoblocks and cell smears obtained from 19 cases were similarly stained. RESULTS: Using a histochemical scoring system (0-300) which takes into account staining intensity and extent, 78% (n = 39) of microwave pretreated paraffin sections and 52% (n = 26) of non-pretreated sections scored between 5 and 300; p = 0.001; 56% (n = 28) of microwave pretreated sections and only 2% (n = 1) of non-pretreated sections scored between 100 and 300 (p = 0.0001); 75% of direct smears of tumours and 80% of cytoblocks stained similarly to the paraffin sections of the resected specimens. No smears or cytoblocks stained positively when the sections of the resected specimen were negative. CONCLUSIONS: As up to 78% of non-small cell lung carcinomas overexpress p53 gene product, this may prove to be a valuable diagnostic method in biopsy or cytological material when the morphological diagnosis is uncertain. Microwave antigen retrieval is effective on formalin fixed tissue. Images PMID:9215149

  9. cDNA microarray analysis of the effect of cantharidin on DNA damage, cell cycle and apoptosis-associated gene expression in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yu, Chien-Chih; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Yu, Chun-Shu; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-07-01

    Cantharidin (CTD) induces cytotoxic effects in different types of human cancer cell; however, to date, there have been no studies on the effects of CTD on gene expression in human lung cancer cells and the potential associated signaling pathways. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate how CTD affects the expression of key genes and functional pathways of human H460 lung cancer cells using complementary DNA microarray analysis. Human H460 lung cancer cells were cultured for 24 h in the presence or absence of 10 µM CTD; gene expression was then examined using microarray analysis. The results indicated that 8 genes were upregulated > 4-fold, 29 genes were upregulated >3-4-fold and 156 genes were upregulated >2-3-fold. In addition, 1 gene was downregulated >4 fold, 14 genes were downregulated >3-4-fold and 150 genes were downregulated >2-3 fold in H460 cells following exposure to CTD. It was found that CTD affected DNA damage genes, including DNIT3 and GADD45A, which were upregulated 2.26- and 2.60-fold, respectively, as well as DdiT4, which was downregulated 3.14-fold. In addition, the expression of genes associated with the cell cycle progression were altered, including CCND2, CDKL3 and RASA4, which were upregulated 2.72-, 2.19- and 2.72-fold, respectively; however, CDC42EP3 was downregulated 2.16-fold. Furthermore, apoptosis-associated genes were differentially expressed, including CARD6, which was upregulated 3.54-fold. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that CTD affected the expression of genes associated with DNA damage, cell cycle progression and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer H460 cells.

  10. Targeting Chromatin-Mediated Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Therapy: Preclinical Rationale and Clinical Results.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Alice; Delmonte, Angelo; Tesei, Anna; Calistri, Daniele; Giordano, Emanuele

    2015-10-01

    Targeting chromatin-mediated transcriptional control of gene expression is nowadays considered a promising new strategy, transcending conventional anticancer therapy. As a result, molecules acting as DNA demethylating agents or histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have entered the clinical arena in the last decade. Given the evidence suggesting that epigenetic regulation is significantly involved in lung cancer development and progression, the potential of epigenetically active compounds to modulate gene expression and reprogram cancer cells to a less aggressive phenotype is, at present, a promising strategy. Accordingly, a large number of compounds that interact with the epigenetic machinery of gene expression regulation are now being developed and tested as potential antitumor agents, either alone or in combination with standard therapy. The preclinical rationale and clinical data concerning the pharmacological modulation of chromatin organization in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is described in this review. Although preclinical data suggest that a pharmacological treatment targeting the epigenetic machinery has relevant activity over the neoplastic phenotype of NSCLC cells, clinical results are disappointing, leading only to short periods of disease stabilization in NSCLC patients. This evidence calls for a significant rethinking of strategies for an effective epigenetic therapy of NSCLC. The synergistic effect of concurrent epigenetic therapies, use at low doses, the priming of current treatments with previous epigenetic drugs, and the selection of clinical trial populations based on epigenetic biomarkers/signatures appear to be the cornerstones of a mature therapeutic strategy aiming to establish new regimens for reprogramming malignant cells and improving the clinical history of affected patients. PMID:26347133

  11. Alterations in cathepsin L expression in lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Okudela, Koji; Mitsui, Hideaki; Woo, Tetsukan; Arai, Hiromasa; Suzuki, Takehisa; Matsumura, Mai; Kojima, Yoko; Umeda, Shigeaki; Tateishi, Yoko; Masuda, Munetaka; Ohashi, Kenichi

    2016-07-01

    We herein investigated the potential role of cathepsin L in lung carcinogenesis. Lung cancer cell lines and surgically resected tumors were examined for the expression of the cathepsin L protein and copy number alterations in its gene locus. Cathepsin L was stably expressed in bronchiolar epithelial cells. Neoplastic cells expressed cathepsin L at various levels, whereas its expression was completely lost in most of the lung cancer cell lines (63.6%, 7/11) examined. Furthermore, expression levels were lower in a large fraction of lung tumors (69.5%, 139/200) than in bronchiolar epithelia. The expression of cathepsin L was lost in some tumors (16.0%, 32/200). In adenocarcinomas, expression levels were significantly lower in high-grade tumors than in low-grade tumors (one-way ANOVA, P < 0.0500). Copy number alterations were found in 18.0% (36 [32 gain + 4 loss] /200) of lung tumors. No relationship existed between cathepsin L protein expression levels and the copy number of its gene locus (Spearman's rank-order correlation, P = 0.3096). Collectively, these results suggest that the down-regulated expression of cathepsin L, which is caused by an undefined mechanism other than copy number alterations, is involved in the progression of lung adenocarcinomas.

  12. The effects of HIF-1alpha on gene expression profiles of NCI-H446 human small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene targeted therapy refers to any therapy focused on one of the many biological features of the tumor. Such features are mediated by specific genes that are involved in tumor metastasis, recurrence, poor response to chemotherapy and others. Hypoxia is an important pathognomonic feature of many malignant tumors including SCLC (small cell lung cancer). HIF-1alpha, which is induced by hypoxia, is the most important regulatory factor of many specific genes that can influence the biological features of tumors. Methods In this study, we tried to elucidate the changes in gene expression profiles of SCLC NCI-H446 cells mediated by HIF-1alpha. According to different treatments of cells, three experimental pairwise comparisons were designed: hypoxia group vs. control group, Ad5-HIF-1alpha group vs. Ad5 group, and Ad5-siHIF-1 alpha group Vs Ad5 group. Results Results from the analysis of gene expression profiles indicated that there were 65 genes upregulated and 28 genes downregulated more than two-fold in all three experimental pairwise comparisons. These genes were involved in transport, signal-transduction, cell adhesion/motility, growth factor/cytokines, transcription, inflammatory response, metabolic process, in addition to others. SOCS1, IGFBP5, IL-6 and STAT3 were also upregulated at protein level. SOCS1 could significantly induce apoptosis and suppress growth of NCI-H446 cells but HIF-1alpha could induce growth and suppress apoptosis. Conclusions Through this research, we are trying to find novel functional genes that are mediated by HIF-1alpha and provide the theoretical basis for new therapeutic targets. HIF-1 alpha maybe upregulate the expression of SOCS1 through mediation of STAT3 and IL-6. In addition, SOCS1 could significantly induce apoptosis and suppress growth of NCI-H446 cells. This was contrary to HIF-1alpha and it indicated that there might be an antagonism effect between HIF-1alpha and SOCS1 on regulating growth and apoptosis of NCI-H446

  13. Efficient down-regulation of PKC-α gene expression in A549 lung cancer cells mediated by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in dendrosomes.

    PubMed

    Movassaghian, Sara; Moghimi, Hamid R; Shirazi, Farshad H; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Trivedi, Malav S; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-01-30

    The completion of human genome project has increased our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of many diseases, including cancer, thus providing new opportunities for gene therapy. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AsODN) possess great potential as sequence-specific therapeutic agents, which in contrast to classic treatments provide more efficient and target-specific approach to modulate disease-related genes. To be therapeutically effective, sufficient concentrations of intact AsODN must bypass membrane barriers and access the site of action. In this study, a dendrosome delivery strategy was designed to improve the encapsulation of AsODN in non-cationic liposomes to target PKC-α in lung cancer cells in vitro. Subcellular trafficking of fluorescently labeled AsODN was visualized using confocal microscopy. Uptake and expression of mRNA and target protein after AsODN delivery was measured by flow cytometry, qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Dendrosomes showed favorable physicochemical parameters: high encapsulation efficiency and uptake in serum-containing medium with no apparent cytotoxicity. AsODN encapsulated in dendrosome efficiently and specifically suppress the target gene at both mRNA and protein levels. Additional in vivo studies on the application of dendrosome as a delivery system for nucleic acid molecules may lead to improvement of this technology and facilitate the development of therapeutic antisense techniques. PMID:23262426

  14. Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma Prevents Lung Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhengwang; Li, Lei; Lin, Zaijun; Xu, Wei; Han, Shuai; Cao, Wenjiao; Xu, Yunfei; Song, Dianwen; Yang, Xinghai; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide. The poor survival rate is largely due to the extensive local invasion and metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cells remain largely elusive. In this study, we examined the role of preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) in lung cancer metastasis. Our results show that PRAME is downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma and lung bone metastasis compared with normal human lung. Knockdown of PRAME decreases the expression of E-Cadherin and promotes the proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of lung cancer cells by regulating multiple critical genes, most of which are related to cell migration, including MMP1, CCL2, CTGF, and PLAU. Clinical data analysis reveals that the expression of MMP1 correlates with the clinical features and outcome of lung adenocarcinoma. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PRAME plays a role in preventing the invasion and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma and novel diagnostic or therapeutic strategies can be developed by targeting PRAME. PMID:27391090

  15. Gene Delivery Potential of Biofunctional Carbonate Apatite Nanoparticles in Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Alhaji, Suleiman Yusuf; Chowdhury, Ezharul Houque; Rosli, Rozita

    2014-01-01

    Existing nonviral gene delivery systems to lungs are inefficient and associated with dose limiting toxicity in mammalian cells. Therefore, carbonate apatite (CO3Ap) nanoparticles were examined as an alternative strategy for effective gene delivery to the lungs. This study aimed to (1) assess the gene delivery efficiency of CO3Ap in vitro and in mouse lungs, (2) evaluate the cytotoxicity effect of CO3Ap/pDNA in vitro, and (3) characterize the CO3Ap/pDNA complex formulations. A significantly high level of reporter gene expression was detected from the lung cell line transfected with CO3Ap/pDNA complex prepared in both serum and serum-free medium. Cytotoxicity analysis revealed that the percentage of the viable cells treated with CO3Ap to be almost similar to the untreated cells. Characterization analyses showed that the CO3Ap/pDNA complexes are in a nanometer range with aggregated spherical structures and tended to be more negatively charged. In the lung of mice, highest level of transgene expression was observed when CO3Ap (8 μL) was complexed with 40 μg of pDNA at day 1 after administration. Although massive reduction of gene expression was seen beyond day 1 post administration, the level of expression remained significant throughout the study period. PMID:25143941

  16. Drug exposure in a metastatic human lung adenocarcinoma cell line gives rise to cells with differing adhesion, proliferation, and gene expression: Implications for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiling; He, Jianxing; Zhong, Nanshan; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    The Am1010 cell line was previously established from a metastatic deposit in an arm muscle from a patient with lung adenocarcinoma who had undergone four cycles of chemotherapy with cisplatin and taxol. Am1010 cells were labeled with red fluorescent protein or green fluorescent protein. A total of eight sublines were isolated following in vitro exposure to cisplatin or taxol. The sublines differed with regard to their adhesion and proliferation properties, with certain sublines exhibiting an increased proliferation rate and/or decreased surface adhesion. Gene expression assays demonstrated that tenascin C; cyclin D1; collagen, type 1, α2; integrin α1; related RAS viral (r‑ras) oncogene homolog 2; platelet‑derived growth factor C; and Src homolog 2 domain containing in the focal adhesion pathway, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, F11 receptor, claudin 7 and cadherin 1 in the cell adhesion pathway, varied in expression among the sublines. The results of the present study suggested that drug exposure may alter the aggressiveness and metastatic potential of cancer cells, which has important implications for cancer chemotherapy.

  17. Significance of stem cell marker Nanog gene in the diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zeng; Zhang, Jing; Kang, Honggang; Sun, Guiming; Wang, Baozhong; Wang, Yanwen; Yang, Mengxiang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the stem cell marker, Nanog gene, for the diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer cases, and to study its application in the diagnosis of lung cancer. In total, 100 patients diagnosed with lung cancer between April, 2013 and May, 2015 were included in the present study. The patients were randomly divided into group A (lung cancer) and group B (squamous cell lung carcinoma). RT-PCR was used to detect the cancer and adjacent tissues, and Nanog gene expression was detected in groups A and B in cells. The results showed that, analysis of Nanog gene expression in the two groups of patients varied to different degrees. There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to age, gender, disease stage and lymph node metastasis. Nanog gene expression in patients with carcinoma were significantly higher than that in the adjacent tissues (p<0.05). By contrast, differentiated and well-differentiated carcinoma tissue showed a significantly higher Nanog gene expression than poorly differentiated and undifferentiated carcinoma (p<0.05). The expression of Nanog in normal cells was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissues and benign lesions in lung cancer stem cells. Nanog was highly expressed in CD44+ cells, and Nanog expression in lung cancer stem cells was significantly higher (p<0.05). In conclusion, for groups A (lung cancer) and B (squamous cell lung carcinoma) the Nanog gene expression was significantly higher. The data of the present study show that the patients with stage III and IV lung cancer had a higher Nanog gene expression. In addition, there was a higher expression of Nanog in lung cancer patients. By contrast, a lower degree of cell differentiation was associated with strong Nanog gene expression in lung cancer.

  18. Differentially expressed pro- and anti-apoptogenic genes in response to benzene exposure: Immunohistochemical localization of p53, Bag, Bad, Bax, Bcl-2, and Bcl-w in lung epithelia.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Cyprian V; Liu, Shi-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Benzene, a well-known human carcinogen, is a commonly used industrial chemical that evokes further toxicological concern because of its potential genotoxic risks as a constituent of petrol and the byproduct of combustion and cigarette smoke. The present study investigated the effects of benzene inhalation on the expression of pro- and antiapoptogenic genes in lung epithelia. Immunohistochemical expression was assessed for antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, including Bcl-2, Bcl-w, and Bag-1 as well as proapoptotic subfamily members with Bcl-2 homology (BH)1 1-3, namely Bax, those that consist of only the BH3 region, represented by Bad, and proapoptotic gene expression for p53. Rats exposed to benzene via inhalation (300 ppm) for 7 days showed a significant upregulation of proapoptotic gene expression for p53, Bax, and Bad as assessed by a semiquantitative segmental analysis of the lung epithelia, including bronchioles, terminal bronchioles, respiratory bronchioles, and alveoli. Bag-1, an antiapoptogenic gene, was also found to have significant upregulated expression in lung epithelia. Since the underlying mechanisms by which Bag-1 exerts its antiapoptogenic effects are not known, benzene may target the protein chaperones hsc70/hsp70, or RING finger protein associated with Bag-1 activity. Alternatively, the significant downregulation of Bcl-2 may have diminished the antiapoptotic synergism necessary for the effectiveness of Bag-1. Both Bcl-2 and Bcl-w were found to be significantly downregulated compared to the proapoptotic counterparts. These data support the role of benzene in activating proapoptogenic events that lead to the upregulation of gene expression that may provide a crucial defense mechanism within lung parenchyma to reduce mutation hazard and potential carcinogenic effects of benzene-initiated pathogenesis.

  19. A network-based method for identifying prognostic gene modules in lung squamous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaitai; Wang, Guiqi; Zhang, Lei; An, Ning; Cheng, Shujun

    2016-01-01

    Similarities in gene expression between both developing embryonic and precancerous tissues and cancer tissues may help identify much-needed biomarkers and therapeutic targets in lung squamous carcinoma. In this study, human lung samples representing ten successive time points, from embryonic development to carcinogenesis, were used to construct global gene expression profiles. Differentially expressed genes with similar expression in precancerous and cancer samples were identified. Using a network-based greedy searching algorithm to analyze the training cohort (n = 69) and three independent testing cohorts, we successfully identified a significant 22-gene module in which expression levels were correlated with overall survival in lung squamous carcinoma patients. PMID:26919109

  20. Classification of human lung carcinomas by mRNA expression profiling reveals distinct adenocarcinoma subclasses.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, A; Richards, W G; Staunton, J; Li, C; Monti, S; Vasa, P; Ladd, C; Beheshti, J; Bueno, R; Gillette, M; Loda, M; Weber, G; Mark, E J; Lander, E S; Wong, W; Johnson, B E; Golub, T R; Sugarbaker, D J; Meyerson, M

    2001-11-20

    We have generated a molecular taxonomy of lung carcinoma, the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we analyzed mRNA expression levels corresponding to 12,600 transcript sequences in 186 lung tumor samples, including 139 adenocarcinomas resected from the lung. Hierarchical and probabilistic clustering of expression data defined distinct subclasses of lung adenocarcinoma. Among these were tumors with high relative expression of neuroendocrine genes and of type II pneumocyte genes, respectively. Retrospective analysis revealed a less favorable outcome for the adenocarcinomas with neuroendocrine gene expression. The diagnostic potential of expression profiling is emphasized by its ability to discriminate primary lung adenocarcinomas from metastases of extra-pulmonary origin. These results suggest that integration of expression profile data with clinical parameters could aid in diagnosis of lung cancer patients. PMID:11707567

  1. Expression of selenoprotein-coding genes SEPP1, SEP15 and hGPX1 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gresner, Peter; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Jablonska, Ewa; Kaczmarski, Jacek; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2009-07-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate the mRNA expression level of selenoprotein P (SEPP1), 15-kDa selenoprotein (SEP15) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (hGPX1) in paired malignant and non-malignant tissue. To achieve this goal, the quantitative real-time PCR technique was utilized in paired tissue samples from 33 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Simultaneously, the activity of glutathione peroxidases (GPX) and the level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) in paired tissue specimens and the blood plasma selenium level was measured. We found significant down-regulation of SEPP1 expression level in tumorous lung tissue (2.732-fold; p<0.001). The expression of hGPX1 and SEP15 in tumorous tissue remained unchanged compared to healthy tissue. The level of TBARS in malignant tissue was significantly increased (p<0.005) and negatively correlated with SEPP1 expression level (R(S)=-0.3238; p<0.05). The activity of GPX in malignant tissue was significantly increased compared to the non-malignant one (p<0.005) and negatively correlated with the expression level of SEPP1. It seems possible, that the down-regulation of SEPP1 expression may lead to an increased oxidative stress possibly resulting in lung carcinogenesis. Increased activity of GPX in tumorous lung tissue seems to be a feedback mechanism. PMID:19058871

  2. Suppressive effects of a proton beam on tumor growth and lung metastasis through the inhibition of metastatic gene expression in 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yun-Suk; Lee, Kyu-Shik; Chun, So-Young; Jang, Tae Jung; Nam, Kyung-Soo

    2016-07-01

    A proton beam is a next generation tool to treat intractable cancer. Although the therapeutic effects of a proton beam are well known, the effect on tumor metastasis is not fully described. Here, we investigated the effects of a proton beam on metastasis in highly invasive 4T1 murine breast cancer cells and their orthotopic breast cancer model. Cells were irradiated with 2, 4, 8 or 16 Gy proton beam, and changes in cell proliferation, survival, and migration were observed by MTT, colony forming and wound healing assays. 4T1 breast cancer cell-implanted BALB/c mice were established and the animals were randomly divided into 4 groups when tumor size reached 200 mm3. Breast tumors were selectively irradiated with 10, 20 or 30 Gy proton beam. Breast tumor sizes were measured twice a week, and breast tumor and lung tissues were pathologically observed. Metastasis-regulating gene expression was assessed with quantitative RT-PCR. A proton beam dose-dependently decreased cell proliferation, survival and migration in 4T1 murine breast cancer cells. Also, growth of breast tumors in the 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model was significantly suppressed by proton beam irradiation without significant change of body weight. Furthermore, fewer tumor nodules metastasized from breast tumor into lung in mice irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam, but not with 10 and 20 Gy, than in control. We observed correspondingly lower expression levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which are important factors in cancer metastasis, in breast tumor irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam. Proton beam irradiation did not affect expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2. Taken together, the data suggest that, although proton beam therapy is an effective tool for breast cancer treatment, a suitable dose is necessary to prevent metastasis-linked relapse and poor prognosis. PMID:27176787

  3. Epigenetics and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gibney, E R; Nolan, C M

    2010-07-01

    Transcription, translation and subsequent protein modification represent the transfer of genetic information from the archival copy of DNA to the short-lived messenger RNA, usually with subsequent production of protein. Although all cells in an organism contain essentially the same DNA, cell types and functions differ because of qualitative and quantitative differences in their gene expression. Thus, control of gene expression is at the heart of differentiation and development. Epigenetic processes, including DNA methylation, histone modification and various RNA-mediated processes, are thought to influence gene expression chiefly at the level of transcription; however, other steps in the process (for example, translation) may also be regulated epigenetically. The following paper will outline the role epigenetics is believed to have in influencing gene expression.

  4. A gene expression screen.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Brown, D D

    1991-01-01

    A gene expression screen identifies mRNAs that differ in abundance between two mRNA mixtures by a subtractive hybridization method. The two mRNA populations are converted to double-stranded cDNAs, fragmented, and ligated to linkers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The multiple cDNA fragments isolated from any given gene can be treated as alleles in a genetic screen. Probability analysis of the frequency with which multiple alleles are found provides an estimation of the total number of up- and down-regulated genes. We have applied this method to genes that are differentially expressed in amphibian tadpole tail tissue in the first 24 hr after thyroid hormone treatment, which ultimately induces tail resorption. We estimate that there are about 30 up-regulated genes; 16 have been isolated. Images PMID:1722336

  5. Basal Gene Expression by Lung CD4+ T Cells in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Identifies Independent Molecular Correlates of Airflow Obstruction and Emphysema Extent

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Christine M.; McCubbrey, Alexandra L.; Crudgington, Sean; Nelson, Joshua; Martinez, Fernando J.; Han, MeiLan K.; Washko, George R.; Chensue, Stephen W.; Arenberg, Douglas A.; Meldrum, Catherine A.; McCloskey, Lisa; Curtis, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Lung CD4+ T cells accumulate as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) progresses, but their role in pathogenesis remains controversial. To address this controversy, we studied lung tissue from 53 subjects undergoing clinically-indicated resections, lung volume reduction, or transplant. Viable single-cell suspensions were analyzed by flow cytometry or underwent CD4+ T cell isolation, followed either by stimulation with anti-CD3 and cytokine/chemokine measurement, or by real-time PCR analysis. In lung CD4+ T cells of most COPD subjects, relative to lung CD4+ T cells in smokers with normal spirometry: (a) stimulation induced minimal IFN-γ or other inflammatory mediators, but many subjects produced more CCL2; (b) the T effector memory subset was less uniformly predominant, without correlation with decreased IFN-γ production. Analysis of unstimulated lung CD4+ T cells of all subjects identified a molecular phenotype, mainly in COPD, characterized by markedly reduced mRNA transcripts for the transcription factors controlling TH1, TH2, TH17 and FOXP3+ T regulatory subsets and their signature cytokines. This mRNA-defined CD4+ T cell phenotype did not result from global inability to elaborate mRNA; increased transcripts for inhibitory CD28 family members or markers of anergy; or reduced telomerase length. As a group, these subjects had significantly worse spirometry, but not DLCO, relative to subjects whose lung CD4+ T cells expressed a variety of transcripts. Analysis of mRNA transcripts of unstimulated lung CD4+ T cell among all subjects identified two distinct molecular correlates of classical COPD clinical phenotypes: basal IL-10 transcripts correlated independently and inversely with emphysema extent (but not spirometry); by contrast, unstimulated IFN-γ transcripts correlated independently and inversely with reduced spirometry (but not reduced DLCO or emphysema extent). Aberrant lung CD4+ T cells polarization appears to be common in advanced COPD, but also

  6. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  7. Identification of rat lung – prominent genes by a parallel DNA microarray hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongming; Chen, Jiwang; Weng, Tingting; Jin, Nili; Liu, Lin

    2006-01-01

    Background The comparison of organ transcriptomes is an important strategy for understanding gene functions. In the present study, we attempted to identify lung-prominent genes by comparing the normal transcriptomes of rat lung, heart, kidney, liver, spleen, and brain. To increase the efficiency and reproducibility, we first developed a novel parallel hybridization system, in which 6 samples could be hybridized onto a single slide at the same time. Results We identified the genes prominently expressed in the lung (147) or co-expressed in lung-heart (23), lung-liver (37), lung-spleen (203), and lung-kidney (98). The known functions of the lung-prominent genes mainly fell into 5 categories: ligand binding, signal transducer, cell communication, development, and metabolism. Real-time PCR confirmed 13 lung-prominent genes, including 5 genes that have not been investigated in the lung, vitamin D-dependent calcium binding protein (Calb3), mitogen activated protein kinase 13 (Mapk13), solute carrier family 29 transporters, member 1 (Slc29a1), corticotropin releasing hormone receptor (Crhr1), and lipocalin 2 (Lcn2). Conclusion The lung-prominent genes identified in this study may provide an important clue for further investigation of pulmonary functions. PMID:16533406

  8. Combined Use of Gene Expression Modeling and siRNA Screening Identifies Genes and Pathways Which Enhance the Activity of Cisplatin When Added at No Effect Levels to Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ada W Y; Hung, Stacy S; Backstrom, Ian; Ricaurte, Daniel; Kwok, Brian; Poon, Steven; McKinney, Steven; Segovia, Romulo; Rawji, Jenna; Qadir, Mohammed A; Aparicio, Samuel; Stirling, Peter C; Steidl, Christian; Bally, Marcel B

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based combination chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While cisplatin is effective, its use is not curative and resistance often emerges. As a consequence of microenvironmental heterogeneity, many tumour cells are exposed to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. Further, genomic heterogeneity and unique tumor cell sub-populations with reduced sensitivities to cisplatin play a role in its effectiveness within a site of tumor growth. Being exposed to sub-lethal doses will induce changes in gene expression that contribute to the tumour cell's ability to survive and eventually contribute to the selective pressures leading to cisplatin resistance. Such changes in gene expression, therefore, may contribute to cytoprotective mechanisms. Here, we report on studies designed to uncover how tumour cells respond to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. A microarray study revealed changes in gene expressions that occurred when A549 cells were exposed to a no-observed-effect level (NOEL) of cisplatin (e.g. the IC10). These data were integrated with results from a genome-wide siRNA screen looking for novel therapeutic targets that when inhibited transformed a NOEL of cisplatin into one that induced significant increases in lethality. Pathway analyses were performed to identify pathways that could be targeted to enhance cisplatin activity. We found that over 100 genes were differentially expressed when A549 cells were exposed to a NOEL of cisplatin. Pathways associated with apoptosis and DNA repair were activated. The siRNA screen revealed the importance of the hedgehog, cell cycle regulation, and insulin action pathways in A549 cell survival and response to cisplatin treatment. Results from both datasets suggest that RRM2B, CABYR, ALDH3A1, and FHL2 could be further explored as cisplatin-enhancing gene targets. Finally, pathways involved in repairing double-strand DNA breaks and INO80 chromatin remodeling were enriched in both

  9. Combined Use of Gene Expression Modeling and siRNA Screening Identifies Genes and Pathways Which Enhance the Activity of Cisplatin When Added at No Effect Levels to Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ada W. Y.; Hung, Stacy S.; Backstrom, Ian; Ricaurte, Daniel; Kwok, Brian; Poon, Steven; McKinney, Steven; Segovia, Romulo; Rawji, Jenna; Qadir, Mohammed A.; Aparicio, Samuel; Stirling, Peter C.; Steidl, Christian; Bally, Marcel B.

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based combination chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While cisplatin is effective, its use is not curative and resistance often emerges. As a consequence of microenvironmental heterogeneity, many tumour cells are exposed to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. Further, genomic heterogeneity and unique tumor cell sub-populations with reduced sensitivities to cisplatin play a role in its effectiveness within a site of tumor growth. Being exposed to sub-lethal doses will induce changes in gene expression that contribute to the tumour cell’s ability to survive and eventually contribute to the selective pressures leading to cisplatin resistance. Such changes in gene expression, therefore, may contribute to cytoprotective mechanisms. Here, we report on studies designed to uncover how tumour cells respond to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. A microarray study revealed changes in gene expressions that occurred when A549 cells were exposed to a no-observed-effect level (NOEL) of cisplatin (e.g. the IC10). These data were integrated with results from a genome-wide siRNA screen looking for novel therapeutic targets that when inhibited transformed a NOEL of cisplatin into one that induced significant increases in lethality. Pathway analyses were performed to identify pathways that could be targeted to enhance cisplatin activity. We found that over 100 genes were differentially expressed when A549 cells were exposed to a NOEL of cisplatin. Pathways associated with apoptosis and DNA repair were activated. The siRNA screen revealed the importance of the hedgehog, cell cycle regulation, and insulin action pathways in A549 cell survival and response to cisplatin treatment. Results from both datasets suggest that RRM2B, CABYR, ALDH3A1, and FHL2 could be further explored as cisplatin-enhancing gene targets. Finally, pathways involved in repairing double-strand DNA breaks and INO80 chromatin remodeling were enriched in both

  10. Combined Use of Gene Expression Modeling and siRNA Screening Identifies Genes and Pathways Which Enhance the Activity of Cisplatin When Added at No Effect Levels to Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ada W Y; Hung, Stacy S; Backstrom, Ian; Ricaurte, Daniel; Kwok, Brian; Poon, Steven; McKinney, Steven; Segovia, Romulo; Rawji, Jenna; Qadir, Mohammed A; Aparicio, Samuel; Stirling, Peter C; Steidl, Christian; Bally, Marcel B

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based combination chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While cisplatin is effective, its use is not curative and resistance often emerges. As a consequence of microenvironmental heterogeneity, many tumour cells are exposed to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. Further, genomic heterogeneity and unique tumor cell sub-populations with reduced sensitivities to cisplatin play a role in its effectiveness within a site of tumor growth. Being exposed to sub-lethal doses will induce changes in gene expression that contribute to the tumour cell's ability to survive and eventually contribute to the selective pressures leading to cisplatin resistance. Such changes in gene expression, therefore, may contribute to cytoprotective mechanisms. Here, we report on studies designed to uncover how tumour cells respond to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. A microarray study revealed changes in gene expressions that occurred when A549 cells were exposed to a no-observed-effect level (NOEL) of cisplatin (e.g. the IC10). These data were integrated with results from a genome-wide siRNA screen looking for novel therapeutic targets that when inhibited transformed a NOEL of cisplatin into one that induced significant increases in lethality. Pathway analyses were performed to identify pathways that could be targeted to enhance cisplatin activity. We found that over 100 genes were differentially expressed when A549 cells were exposed to a NOEL of cisplatin. Pathways associated with apoptosis and DNA repair were activated. The siRNA screen revealed the importance of the hedgehog, cell cycle regulation, and insulin action pathways in A549 cell survival and response to cisplatin treatment. Results from both datasets suggest that RRM2B, CABYR, ALDH3A1, and FHL2 could be further explored as cisplatin-enhancing gene targets. Finally, pathways involved in repairing double-strand DNA breaks and INO80 chromatin remodeling were enriched in both

  11. Gene structure and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book describes the structure of genes in molecular terms and summarizes present knowledge about how their activity is regulated. It covers a range of topics, including a review of the structure and replication of DNA, transcription and translation, prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene organization and expression, retroviruses and oncogenes. The book also includes a chapter on the methodology of DNA manipulation including sections on site-directed mutagenesis, the polymerase chain reaction, reporter genes and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The hemoglobin gene system and the genetics of the proteins of the immune system are presented in the latter half of the book to show the structure and expression of the most well-studied systems in higher eukaryotes. The final chapter reviews the differences between prokaryotic and the eukaryotic genomes.

  12. VARIATION OF THE EXPRESSION OF ENDOGENOUS "HOUSEKEEPING" GENES IN B[A]P TREATED MOUSE LUNGS MEASURED BY qRT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative RT-PCR is frequently used to analyze gene expression in different experimental systems. In this assay, housekeeping genes are frequently used to normalize for the variability between samples (relative quantification). We have examined the utility of using qRT-PCR and...

  13. Assessment of expressions of Bcl-XL, b-FGF, Bmp-2, Caspase-3, PDGFR-α, Smad1 and TGF-β1 genes in a rat model of lung ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Şimşek, Hasan; Demiryürek, Şeniz; Demir, Tuncer; Atabay, Hüsne Didem; Çeribasi, Ali Osman; Bayraktar, Recep; Kaplan, Davut Sinan; Öztuzcu, Serdar; Cengiz, Beyhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Ischemia is described as organs and tissues are destitute of oxygen due to decreased arterial or venous blood flow. Many mechanisms play role in cell death happened as a consequence of a new blood flow is needed for both cell regeneration and to clean toxic metabolites during ischemia and later. Lung damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a frequent problem in lung transplantation. Apoptosis (programmed cell death) is known as cell suicide, and plays a key role in embryonic developmental and in maintain adult tissue’s life. Materials and Methods: It is investigated expressions of Smad1, Bmp-2, Bcl-XL, b-FGF, Caspase-3, TGF-β1, PDGFR-α genes for molecular changes in lung tissues, after I/R is formed, in this study. For this, we included 40 Wistar albino rats to this study and divided 4 groups (n=10). The Groups were determined as Control (C), Group 1= 1 hr ischemia (I), Group 2= 1 hr ischemia+2 hr reperfusion (I+2R), Group 3= 1 hr ischemia+4 hr reperfusion (I+4R). Besides, molecular analysis and histopathologic examinations of tissues were performed, and the results were evaluated by normalization and statistics analysis. Results: We have found a significant increase in expression of Bcl-XL (P=0.046) and Caspase-3 (P=0.026) genes of group 1, and it was not monitored any significant difference in Group 2 and Group 3. In all groups, the changes in b-FGF (P=0.087), Bmp-2 (P=0.457), TGF-β1 (P=0.201) and PDGFR-α (P=0.116) were not significant compared to control group. We did not see any mRNA expression of Smad1 gene in all groups include control. Conclusion: These findings suggest that I/R injury may trigger apoptotic mechanism in lung. PMID:27081467

  14. A genome-scale study of transcription factor expression in the branching mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Herriges, John C.; Yi, Lan; Hines, Elizabeth A.; Harvey, Julie F.; Xu, Guoliang; Gray, Paul; Ma, Qiufu; Sun, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammalian lung development consists of a series of precisely choreographed events that drive the progression from simple lung buds to the elaborately branched organ that fulfills the vital function of gas exchange. Strict transcriptional control is essential for lung development. Among the large number of transcription factors encoded in the mouse genome, only a small portion of them are known to be expressed and function in the developing lung. Thus a systematic investigation of transcription factors expressed in the lung is warranted. Results To enrich for genes that may be responsible for regional growth and patterning, we performed a screen using RNA in situ hybridization to identify genes that show restricted expression patterns in the embryonic lung. We focused on the pseudoglandular stage during which the lung undergoes branching morphogenesis, a cardinal event of lung development. Using a genome-scale probe set that represents over 90% of the transcription factors encoded in the mouse genome, we identified sixty-two transcription factor genes with localized expression in the epithelium, mesenchyme or both. Many of these genes have not been previously implicated in lung development. Conclusions Our findings provide new starting points for the elucidation of the transcriptional circuitry that controls lung development. PMID:22711520

  15. "Stealth" adenoviruses blunt cell-mediated and humoral immune responses against the virus and allow for significant gene expression upon readministration in the lung.

    PubMed

    Croyle, M A; Chirmule, N; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J M

    2001-05-01

    Most of the early gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis have been with adenovirus vectors. First-generation viruses with E1a and E1b deleted are limited by transient expression of the transgene and substantial inflammatory responses. Gene transfer is also significantly curtailed following a second dose of virus. In an effort to reduce adenovirus-associated inflammation, capsids of first-generation vectors were modified with various activated monomethoxypolyethylene glycols. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte production was significantly reduced in C57BL/6 mice after a single intratracheal administration of modified vectors, and length of gene expression was extended from 4 to 42 days. T-cell subsets from mice exposed to the conjugated vectors demonstrated a marked decrease in Th1 responses and slight enhancement of Th2 responses compared to animals dosed with native virus. Neutralizing antibodies (NAB) against adenovirus capsid proteins were reduced in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of animals after a single dose of modified virus, allowing significant levels of gene expression upon rechallenge with native adenovirus. Modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG) also allowed substantial gene expression from the new vectors in animals previously immunized with unmodified virus. However, gene expression was significantly reduced after two doses of the same PEG-conjugated vector. Alternating the activation group of PEG between doses did produce significant gene expression upon readministration. This technology in combination with second-generation or helper-dependent adenovirus could produce dosing strategies which promote successful readministration of vector in clinical trials and marked expression in patients with significant anti-adenovirus NAB levels and reduce the possibility of immune reactions against viral vectors for gene therapy.

  16. Expression profiling identifies genes involved in emphysema severity.

    PubMed

    Francis, Santiyagu M Savarimuthu; Larsen, Jill E; Pavey, Sandra J; Bowman, Rayleen V; Hayward, Nicholas K; Fong, Kwun M; Yang, Ian A

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem. The aim of this study was to identify genes involved in emphysema severity in COPD patients.Gene expression profiling was performed on total RNA extracted from non-tumor lung tissue from 30 smokers with emphysema. Class comparison analysis based on gas transfer measurement was performed to identify differentially expressed genes. Genes were then selected for technical validation by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR) if also represented on microarray platforms used in previously published emphysema studies. Genes technically validated advanced to tests of biological replication by qRT-PCR using an independent test set of 62 lung samples.Class comparison identified 98 differentially expressed genes (p < 0.01). Fifty-one of those genes had been previously evaluated in differentiation between normal and severe emphysema lung. qRT-PCR confirmed the direction of change in expression in 29 of the 51 genes and 11 of those validated, remaining significant at p < 0.05. Biological replication in an independent cohort confirmed the altered expression of eight genes, with seven genes differentially expressed by greater than 1.3 fold, identifying these as candidate determinants of emphysema severity.Gene expression profiling of lung from emphysema patients identified seven candidate genes associated with emphysema severity including COL6A3, SERPINF1, ZNHIT6, NEDD4, CDKN2A, NRN1 and GSTM3. PMID:19723343

  17. Expression profiling identifies genes involved in emphysema severity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem. The aim of this study was to identify genes involved in emphysema severity in COPD patients. Gene expression profiling was performed on total RNA extracted from non-tumor lung tissue from 30 smokers with emphysema. Class comparison analysis based on gas transfer measurement was performed to identify differentially expressed genes. Genes were then selected for technical validation by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR) if also represented on microarray platforms used in previously published emphysema studies. Genes technically validated advanced to tests of biological replication by qRT-PCR using an independent test set of 62 lung samples. Class comparison identified 98 differentially expressed genes (p < 0.01). Fifty-one of those genes had been previously evaluated in differentiation between normal and severe emphysema lung. qRT-PCR confirmed the direction of change in expression in 29 of the 51 genes and 11 of those validated, remaining significant at p < 0.05. Biological replication in an independent cohort confirmed the altered expression of eight genes, with seven genes differentially expressed by greater than 1.3 fold, identifying these as candidate determinants of emphysema severity. Gene expression profiling of lung from emphysema patients identified seven candidate genes associated with emphysema severity including COL6A3, SERPINF1, ZNHIT6, NEDD4, CDKN2A, NRN1 and GSTM3. PMID:19723343

  18. Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease Demonstrate Distinctive Pulmonary Gene Expressions for Vascular Response Genes: Impact of Ozone Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative gene expression profiling of multiple tissues from rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can help decode the transcriptional program that governs organ-specific functions. We examined expressions of CVD genes in the lungs of ...

  19. Identification of Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma as a Potential Tumor Suppressor in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Quan; Li, Lin; Lin, Zaijun; Xu, Wei; Han, Shuai; Zhao, Chenglong; Li, Lei; Cao, Wenjiao; Yang, Xinghai; Wei, Haifeng; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-01-01

    Background Preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) is known as a tumor-associated antigen that is altered in a variety of malignancies, including lung cancer. However, the role of PRAME in lung cancer remains unclear. Material/Methods We analyzed the expression of PRAME in human lung adenocarcinomas and studied the function of PRAME using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced gene knockdown in lung cancer cell lines PC9 and A549. Results We found that PRAME expression is down-regulated in lung adenocarcinomas. Knockdown of PRAME promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of PC9 and A549 cells. Conclusions In line with its roles in controlling cell growth, RPAME regulates multiple critical cell-growth related genes, including IGF1R oncogene. IGF1R up-regulation contributes to increase of cell growth upon the knockdown of PRAME. Taken together, our results suggest that PRAME has inhibitory roles in lung cancer. PMID:27241212

  20. Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Ruprecht

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer-the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide-biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes' squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives.

  1. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Cancer.gov

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  2. Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kuner, Ruprecht

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer—the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide—biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes’ squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives.

  3. CDX-2 Expression in Primary Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Morgan L; Li, Qing K; Illei, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation is a rare subtype of lung adenocarcinoma that is recognized as a variant type of primary adenocarcinoma in the 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung tumors. Published immunohistochemistry studies show variable staining pattern for CDX-2 ranging from positivity in 71% of the cases to no staining. As little is known about CDX-2 expression in lung adenocarcinomas lacking histologic features of enteric differentiation, our aim was to determine the rate of CDX-2 positivity in non-enteric-type lung adenocarcinomas. We performed immunohistochemistry for CDX-2, CK7, CK20, TTF-1, napsin A, and p40 using 4-μm sections of a previously constructed tissue microarray containing 93 primary lung adenocarcinomas that lack morphologic evidence of enteric differentiation. The cohort included 22 well, 54 moderately, and 17 poorly differentiated tumors (55 female, 38 male; age range: 42 to 86, median: 64.5). All 93 tumors were strongly CK7 positive, whereas variable CK20 staining was seen in 4 tumors (1 strong, 1 moderate, and 2 focal). Both TTF-1 and napsin A were positive in 81 of 93 (87%) tumors with only 6 of 93 (6.5%) tumors negative for both the markers. Eleven tumors were CDX-2 positive (5 strong, 3 moderate, and 3 weak), all of which were also TTF-1 and napsin A positive and p40 negative. One CDX-2-positive tumor showed focal CK20 staining. Mutation studies for EGFR/K-ras/ALK were performed in four CDX-2-positive tumors and detected a K-ras mutation in one of them. CDX-2 positivity can be seen in a subset (12%) of lung adenocarcinoma. These tumors are CK7, TTF-1, and napsin A positive and p40 negative. Focal CK20 staining is only seen in rare cases. CDX-2 positivity should not be used as the only criteria to exclude lung origin. PMID:26469326

  4. CDX-2 Expression in Primary Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Morgan L; Li, Qing K; Illei, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation is a rare subtype of lung adenocarcinoma that is recognized as a variant type of primary adenocarcinoma in the 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung tumors. Published immunohistochemistry studies show variable staining pattern for CDX-2 ranging from positivity in 71% of the cases to no staining. As little is known about CDX-2 expression in lung adenocarcinomas lacking histologic features of enteric differentiation, our aim was to determine the rate of CDX-2 positivity in non-enteric-type lung adenocarcinomas. We performed immunohistochemistry for CDX-2, CK7, CK20, TTF-1, napsin A, and p40 using 4-μm sections of a previously constructed tissue microarray containing 93 primary lung adenocarcinomas that lack morphologic evidence of enteric differentiation. The cohort included 22 well, 54 moderately, and 17 poorly differentiated tumors (55 female, 38 male; age range: 42 to 86, median: 64.5). All 93 tumors were strongly CK7 positive, whereas variable CK20 staining was seen in 4 tumors (1 strong, 1 moderate, and 2 focal). Both TTF-1 and napsin A were positive in 81 of 93 (87%) tumors with only 6 of 93 (6.5%) tumors negative for both the markers. Eleven tumors were CDX-2 positive (5 strong, 3 moderate, and 3 weak), all of which were also TTF-1 and napsin A positive and p40 negative. One CDX-2-positive tumor showed focal CK20 staining. Mutation studies for EGFR/K-ras/ALK were performed in four CDX-2-positive tumors and detected a K-ras mutation in one of them. CDX-2 positivity can be seen in a subset (12%) of lung adenocarcinoma. These tumors are CK7, TTF-1, and napsin A positive and p40 negative. Focal CK20 staining is only seen in rare cases. CDX-2 positivity should not be used as the only criteria to exclude lung origin.

  5. Triptolide reverses the Taxol resistance of lung adenocarcinoma by inhibiting the NF-κB signaling pathway and the expression of NF-κB-regulated drug-resistant genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ning; Dong, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Suo-Lin; You, Qing-Yong; Jiang, Xing-Tao; Zhao, Xiao-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (or Taxol®) is a first-line chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer; however, resistance to the drug is an important factor, which influences the outcome of chemotherapy. The present study aimed to investigate the role of triptolide (TPL) in reversing Taxol‑resistant human lung adenocarcinoma and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism of resistance reversal mediated by TPL. It was hypothesized that this experimental approach would assist in solving the problem of chemotherapeutic resistance in non‑small cell lung cancer, thereby improving the clinical outcomes. The human Taxol‑resistant lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549/Taxol, was established. The resistance index of the cell line was calculated, according to the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of A549/Taxol IC50 of A549, to be 51.87. The levels of apoptosis and the cell cycle in the A549/Taxol cell line were assessed to confirm the effects of TPL at three different concentrations (0.03, 0.3 and 3 µmol/l) and treatment durations (2, 4, 6 and 12 h) by flow cytometric analysis, and the inhibition of the NF‑κB signaling pathway and the expression of NF‑κB‑regulated drug‑resistant proteins were determined by immunofluorescence and western blotting, respectively. The administration of TPL promoted cell apoptosis in the A549/Taxol lung adenocarcinoma Taxol‑resistant cell line and also promoted cell cycle regulation. The drug was also able to elicit a reversal of the drug resistance. TPL inhibited the nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) signaling pathway and the expression of NF‑κB‑regulated drug‑resistant genes, including those for FLICE‑like inhibitory protein, X‑linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, Bcl‑2, Bcl‑xL and cyclo‑oxygenase‑2. TPL exerted a marked drug‑resistance‑reversal effect on human lung adenocarcinoma Taxol resistance, and the effect was revealed to be dose‑ and time‑dependent. In conclusion, TPL

  6. Differential Gene Expression Profiles of Radioresistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Established by Fractionated Irradiation: Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Protein 3 Confers Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sook; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kwon, Myung-Sang

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread use of radiotherapy as a local and regional modality for the treatment of cancer, some non-small-cell lung cancers commonly develop resistance to radiation. We thus sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to radiation. Methods and Materials: We established the radioresistant cell line H460R from radiosensitive parental H460 cells. To identify the radioresistance-related genes, we performed microarray analysis and selected several candidate genes. Results: Clonogenic and MTT assays showed that H460R was 10-fold more resistant to radiation than H460. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression levels of 1,463 genes were altered more than 1.5-fold in H460R compared with parental H460. To evaluate the putative functional role, we selected one interesting gene tumor protein p53-inducible protein 3 (TP53I3), because that this gene was significantly downregulated in radioresistant H460R cells and that it was predicted to link p53-dependent cell death signaling. Interestingly, messenger ribonucleic acid expression of TP53I3 differed in X-ray-irradiated H460 and H460R cells, and overexpression of TP53I3 significantly affected the cellular radiosensitivity of H460R cells. Conclusions: These results show that H460R may be useful in searching for candidate genes that are responsible for radioresistance and elucidating the molecular mechanism of radioresistance.

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future. PMID:27362942

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  9. Identification of candidate lung cancer susceptibility genes in mouse using oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, W; Bernert, H; Sun, H; Wang, Y; You, M

    2002-01-01

    We applied microarray gene expression profiling to lungs from mouse strains having variable susceptibility to lung tumour development as a means to identify, within known quantitative trait loci (QTLs), candidate genes responsible for susceptibility or resistance to lung cancer. At least eight chromosomal regions of mice have been mapped and verified to be linked with lung tumour susceptibility or resistance. In this study, high density oligonucleotide arrays were used to measure the relative expression levels of >36 000 genes and ESTs in lung tissues of A/J, BALB/cJ, SM/J, C3H/HeJ, and C57BL/6J mice. A number of differentially expressed genes were found in each of the lung cancer susceptibility QTLs. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes located within QTLs produced 28 susceptibility candidates and 22 resistance candidates. These candidates may be extremely helpful in the ultimate identification of the precise genes responsible for lung tumour susceptibility or resistance in mice and, through follow up, humans. Complete data sets are available at http://thinker.med.ohio-state.edu. PMID:12205107

  10. Expression of hPNAS-4 Radiosensitizes Lewis Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Hui; Yuan Zhu; Zhu Hong; Li Lei; Shi Huashan; Wang Zi; Fan Yu; Deng Qian; Zeng Jianshuang; He Yinbo; Xiao Jianghong; Li Zhiping

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to transfer the hPNAS-4 gene, a novel apoptosis-related human gene, into Lewis lung cancer (LL2) and observe its radiosensitive effect on radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The hPNAS-4 gene was transfected into LL2 cells, and its expression was detected via western blot. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the growth and apoptosis of cells treated with irradiation/PNAS-4 in vitro. The hPNAS-4 gene was transferred into LL2-bearing mice through tail vein injection of the liposome/gene complex. The tumor volumes were recorded after radiation therapy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect the tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vivo. Results: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue, and its overexpressions were confirmed via western blot analysis. Compared with the control, empty plasmid, hPNAS-4, radiation, and empty plasmid plus radiation groups, the hPNAS-4 plus radiation group more significantly inhibited growth and enhanced apoptosis of LL2 cells in vitro and in vivo (P<.05). Conclusions: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue and was expressed in both LL2 cell and tumor tissue. The hPNAS-4 gene therapy significantly enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis of LL2 tumor cells by radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, it may be a potential radiosensitive treatment of radiation therapy for lung cancer.

  11. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine.

  12. New genes linked to lung cancer susceptibility in Asian women

    Cancer.gov

    An international group of scientists has identified three genes that predispose Asian women who have never smoked to lung cancer. The discovery of specific genetic variations, which have not previously been associated with lung cancer risk in other popul

  13. Expression of pleiotrophin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Q; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a kind of heparin binding growth factor closely related to tumor progression. This study aimed to discuss the significance of the expression of PTN in benign and malignant lung cancer tissues, especially small cell lung cancer. Lung cancer samples were collected for study and lung tissue samples with benign lesions were taken as controls. The expression of PTN was detected using tissue chip combined with the immunohistochemical method, and the differences of small cell lung cancer with non-small cell lung cancer and benign lesion tissue were compared. It was found that PTN expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells; PTN expression in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01), and PTN expression in the small cell cancer group was higher than that in the squamous carcinoma group and glandular cancer group (p < 0.05). In addition, PTN expression quantity in patients with lung cancer were in close correlation with TNM staging, pathological type and tumor differentiation degree (p < 0.05). PTN was found to express abnormally high in lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer tissue. PTN is most likely to be a new tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer. PMID:25864755

  14. Global gene profiling of aging lungs in Atp8b1 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Ramani; Stearns, Timothy M.; Czachor, Alexander; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Turn, Christina; Westermann-Clark, Emma; Breitzig, Mason; Tan, Lee; Lockey, Richard F.; King, Benjamin L.; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent studies implicate cardiolipin oxidation in several age-related diseases. Atp8b1 encoding Type 4 P-type ATPases is a cardiolipin transporter. Mutation in Atp8b1 gene or inflammation of the lungs impairs the capacity of Atp8b1 to clear cardiolipin from lung fluid. However, the link between Atp8b1 mutation and age-related gene alteration is unknown. Therefore, we investigated how Atp8b1 mutation alters age-related genes. Methods We performed Affymetrix gene profiling of lungs isolated from young (7-9 wks, n=6) and aged (14 months, 14 M, n=6) C57BL/6 and Atp8b1 mutant mice. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was performed. Differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results Global transcriptome analysis revealed 532 differentially expressed genes in Atp8b1 lungs, 157 differentially expressed genes in C57BL/6 lungs, and 37 overlapping genes. IPA of age-related genes in Atp8b1 lungs showed enrichment of Xenobiotic metabolism and Nrf2-mediated signaling pathways. The increase in Adamts2 and Mmp13 transcripts in aged Atp8b1 lungs was validated by qRT-PCR. Similarly, the decrease in Col1a1 and increase in Cxcr6 transcripts was confirmed in both Atp8b1 mutant and C57BL/6 lungs. Conclusion Based on transcriptome profiling, our study indicates that Atp8b1 mutant mice may be susceptible to age-related lung diseases. PMID:27689529

  15. Decreased Laminin Expression by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Cultured in Acellular Lung Scaffolds from Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Lindsay M.; Sandri, Brian J.; Wagner, Darcy E.; Meyer, Carolyn M.; Price, Andrew P.; Akinnola, Ifeolu; Weiss, Daniel J.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The lung changes functionally and structurally with aging. However, age-related effects on the extracellular matrix (ECM) and corresponding effects on lung cell behavior are not well understood. We hypothesized that ECM from aged animals would induce aging-related phenotypic changes in healthy inoculated cells. Decellularized whole organ scaffolds provide a powerful model for examining how ECM cues affect cell phenotype. The effects of age on ECM composition in both native and decellularized mouse lungs were assessed as was the effect of young vs old acellular ECM on human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs) and lung fibroblasts (hLFs). Native aged (1 year) lungs demonstrated decreased expression of laminins α3 and α4, elastin and fibronectin, and elevated collagen, compared to young (3 week) lungs. Proteomic analyses of decellularized ECM demonstrated similar findings, and decellularized aged lung ECM contained less diversity in structural proteins compared to young ECM. When seeded in old ECM, hBECs and hLFs demonstrated lower gene expression of laminins α3 and α4, respectively, as compared to young ECM, paralleling the laminin deficiency of aged ECM. ECM changes appear to be important factors in potentiating aging-related phenotypes and may provide clues to mechanisms that allow for aging-related lung diseases. PMID:26954258

  16. Nonadditive gene expression in polyploids.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Liu, Xiaoxian; Pires, J Chris; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    Allopolyploidy involves hybridization and duplication of divergent parental genomes and provides new avenues for gene expression. The expression levels of duplicated genes in polyploids can show deviation from parental additivity (the arithmetic average of the parental expression levels). Nonadditive expression has been widely observed in diverse polyploids and comprises at least three possible scenarios: (a) The total gene expression level in a polyploid is similar to that of one of its parents (expression-level dominance); (b) total gene expression is lower or higher than in both parents (transgressive expression); and (c) the relative contribution of the parental copies (homeologs) to the total gene expression is unequal (homeolog expression bias). Several factors may result in expression nonadditivity in polyploids, including maternal-paternal influence, gene dosage balance, cis- and/or trans-regulatory networks, and epigenetic regulation. As our understanding of nonadditive gene expression in polyploids remains limited, a new generation of investigators should explore additional phenomena (i.e., alternative splicing) and use other high-throughput "omics" technologies to measure the impact of nonadditive expression on phenotype, proteome, and metabolome. PMID:25421600

  17. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  18. Serial analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velculescu, V E; Zhang, L; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1995-10-20

    The characteristics of an organism are determined by the genes expressed within it. A method was developed, called serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. To demonstrate this strategy, short diagnostic sequence tags were isolated from pancreas, concatenated, and cloned. Manual sequencing of 1000 tags revealed a gene expression pattern characteristic of pancreatic function. New pancreatic transcripts corresponding to novel tags were identified. SAGE should provide a broadly applicable means for the quantitative cataloging and comparison of expressed genes in a variety of normal, developmental, and disease states. PMID:7570003

  19. Pilot study exploring lung allograft surfactant protein A (SP-A) expression in association with lung transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    D'Ovidio, F; Kaneda, H; Chaparro, C; Mura, M; Lederer, D; Di Angelo, S; Takahashi, H; Gutierrez, C; Hutcheon, M; Singer, L G; Waddell, T K; Floros, J; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-10-01

    Primary graft failure and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) limit lung transplant long-term outcomes. Various lung diseases have been correlated with surfactant protein (SP) expression and polymorphisms. We sought to investigate the role of SP expression in lung allografts prior to implantation, in relation to posttransplant outcomes. The expression of SP-(A, B, C, D) mRNA was assayed in 42 allografts. Posttransplant assessments include pulmonary function tests, bronchoscopy, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and biopsies to determine allograft rejection. BALF was assayed for SP-A, SP-D in addition to cytokines IL-8, IL-12 and IL-2. The diagnosis of CLAD was evaluated 6 months after transplantation. Lung allografts with low SP-A mRNA expression prior to implantation reduced survival (Log-rank p < 0.0001). No association was noted for the other SPs. Allografts with low SP-A mRNA had greater IL-2 (p = 0.03) and IL-12 (p < 0.0001) in the BALF and a greater incidence of rejection episodes (p = 0.003). Levels of SP-A mRNA expression were associated with the SP-A2 polymorphisms (p = 0.015). Specifically, genotype 1A1A(0) was associated with lower SP-A mRNA expression (p < 0.05). Lung allografts with low levels of SP-A mRNA expression are associated with reduced survival. Lung allograft SP-A mRNA expression appears to be associated with SP-A gene polymorphisms.

  20. Canine Adenovirus Vectors for Lung-Directed Gene Transfer: Efficacy, Immune Response, and Duration of Transgene Expression Using Helper-Dependent Vectors†

    PubMed Central

    Keriel, Anne; René, Céline; Galer, Chad; Zabner, Joseph; Kremer, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    A major hurdle to the successful clinical use of some viral vectors relates to the innate, adaptive, and memory immune responses that limit the efficiency and duration of transgene expression. Some of these drawbacks may be circumvented by using vectors derived from nonhuman viruses such as canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2). Here, we evaluated the potential of CAV-2 vectors for gene transfer to the respiratory tract. We found that CAV-2 transduction was efficient in vivo in the mouse respiratory tract, and ex vivo in well-differentiated human pulmonary epithelia. Notably, the in vivo and ex vivo efficiency was poorly inhibited by sera from mice immunized with a human adenovirus type 5 (HAd5, a ubiquitous human pathogen) vector or by human sera containing HAd5 neutralizing antibodies. Following intranasal instillation in mice, CAV-2 vectors also led to a lower level of inflammatory cytokine secretion and cellular infiltration compared to HAd5 vectors. Moreover, CAV-2 transduction efficiency was increased in vitro in human pulmonary cells and in vivo in the mouse respiratory tract by FK228, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Finally, by using a helper-dependent CAV-2 vector, we increased the in vivo duration of transgene expression to at least 3 months in immunocompetent mice without immunosuppression. Our data suggest that CAV-2 vectors may be efficient and safe tools for long-term clinical gene transfer to the respiratory tract. PMID:16415025

  1. Selective expression of transthyretin in subtypes of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuai; Sun, Suozhu; Xiao, Xueyuan; He, Dacheng; Liu, Liyun

    2016-06-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is expressed primarily in liver, choroid plexus of brain and pancreatic islet A and B cells. It is also synthesized in some endocrine tumors. In the present study, the protein expression of TTR in lung cancer tissues and cell lines was investigated by western blot. The mRNA expression of TTR in 24 pairs of frozen lung cancer tissues was examined by RT-PCR. The specific expression and cellular distribution of TTR were also evaluated in 104 paraffin-embedded lung cancer samples and 3 normal lung tissues by immunohistochemistry. Similarly, the subcellular localization and expression of TTR were further analyzed in lung cancer cell lines. With the exception of mucinous adenocarcinoma, the expression of TTR protein was observed in all tested subtypes of lung carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma displayed the highest positive expression rate of TTR, accounting for 84.4 %, and the positive expression rate of TTR was up to 85.7 % at stages III and IV. The secretory bubbles with strong TTR staining were observed in luminal cells of lung cancer. Furthermore, the localization of TTR in the cytoplasm of lung cancer cells and the secretion of TTR into extracellular milieu were also confirmed. Taken together, TTR is selectively synthesized in lung cancer cells and can be secreted extracellularly. PMID:26943652

  2. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chiung-Yao; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B) has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP) packaged with an SP-B promoter–driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk) for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp) or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk) under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter’s tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP’s gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV) were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter–driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and large cell carcinoma (H460) cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk–carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk–carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV), a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27322500

  3. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chun-Nun; Lin, Mien-Chun; Fang, Chiung-Yao; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B) has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP) packaged with an SP-B promoter-driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk) for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp) or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk) under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter's tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP's gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV) were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter-driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and large cell carcinoma (H460) cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV), a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27322500

  4. A Catalog of Genes Homozygously Deleted in Human Lung Cancer and the Candidacy of PTPRD as a Tumor Suppressor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Takashi; Otsuka, Ayaka; Girard, Luc; Sato, Masanori; Iwakawa, Reika; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Minna, John D.; Yokota, Jun

    2010-01-01

    A total of 176 genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer were identified by DNA array-based whole genome scanning of 52 lung cancer cell lines and subsequent genomic PCR in 74 cell lines, including the 52 cell lines scanned. One or more exons of these genes were homozygously deleted in one (1%) to 20 (27%) cell lines. These genes included known tumor suppressor genes, e.g., CDKN2A/p16, RB1, and SMAD4, and candidate tumor suppressor genes whose hemizygous or homozygous deletions were reported in several types of human cancers, such as FHIT, KEAP1, and LRP1B/LRP-DIP. CDKN2A/p16 and p14ARF located in 9p21 were most frequently deleted (20/74, 27%). The PTPRD gene was most frequently deleted (8/74, 11%) among genes mapping to regions other than 9p21. Somatic mutations, including a nonsense mutation, of the PTPRD gene were detected in 8/74 (11%) of cell lines and 4/95 (4%) of surgical specimens of lung cancer. Reduced PTPRD expression was observed in the majority (>80%) of cell lines and surgical specimens of lung cancer. Therefore, PTPRD is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. Microarray-based expression profiling of 19 lung cancer cell lines also indicated that some of the 176 genes, such as KANK and ADAMTS1, are preferentially inactivated by epigenetic alterations. Genetic/epigenetic as well as functional studies of these 176 genes will increase our understanding of molecular mechanisms behind lung carcinogenesis. PMID:20073072

  5. A catalog of genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer and the candidacy of PTPRD as a tumor suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takashi; Otsuka, Ayaka; Girard, Luc; Sato, Masanori; Iwakawa, Reika; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Minna, John D; Yokota, Jun

    2010-04-01

    A total of 176 genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer were identified by DNA array-based whole genome scanning of 52 lung cancer cell lines and subsequent genomic PCR in 74 cell lines, including the 52 cell lines scanned. One or more exons of these genes were homozygously deleted in one (1%) to 20 (27%) cell lines. These genes included known tumor suppressor genes, e.g., CDKN2A/p16, RB1, and SMAD4, and candidate tumor suppressor genes whose hemizygous or homozygous deletions were reported in several types of human cancers, such as FHIT, KEAP1, and LRP1B/LRP-DIP. CDKN2A/p16 and p14ARF located in 9p21 were most frequently deleted (20/74, 27%). The PTPRD gene was most frequently deleted (8/74, 11%) among genes mapping to regions other than 9p21. Somatic mutations, including a nonsense mutation, of the PTPRD gene were detected in 8/74 (11%) of cell lines and 4/95 (4%) of surgical specimens of lung cancer. Reduced PTPRD expression was observed in the majority (>80%) of cell lines and surgical specimens of lung cancer. Therefore, PTPRD is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. Microarray-based expression profiling of 19 lung cancer cell lines also indicated that some of the 176 genes, such as KANK and ADAMTS1, are preferentially inactivated by epigenetic alterations. Genetic/epigenetic as well as functional studies of these 176 genes will increase our understanding of molecular mechanisms behind lung carcinogenesis.

  6. Oncogenic cooperation and coamplification of developmental transcription factor genes in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Jude; Liu, Qing; Bakleh, Amy; Krasnitz, Alex; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Lakshmi, B; Gerald, William L; Powers, Scott; Mu, David

    2007-10-16

    We used high-resolution array analysis to discover a recurrent lung cancer amplicon located at 14q13.3. Low-level gain of this region was detected in 15% of lung cancer samples, and high-level amplification was detected in an additional 4% of samples. High-level focal amplification appears to be specific to lung cancers, because it was not detected in >500 samples of other tumor types. Mapping of the commonly amplified region revealed there are three genes in the core region, all of which encode transcription factors with either established lung developmental function (TTF1/NKX2-1, NKX2-8) or potential lung developmental function (PAX9). All three genes were overexpressed to varying degrees in amplified samples, although TTF1/NKX2-1 was not expressed in the squamous cancer subtype, consistent with previous reports. Remarkably, overexpression of any pairwise combination of these genes showed pronounced synergy in promoting the proliferation of immortalized human lung epithelial cells. Analysis of human lung cancer cell lines by both RNAi and ectopic overexpression further substantiates an oncogenic role for these transcription factors. These results, taken together with previous reports of oncogenic alterations of transcription factors involved in lung development (p63, CEBPA), suggest genetic alterations that directly interfere with transcriptional networks normally regulating lung development may be a more common feature of lung cancer than previously realized.

  7. Regulation of proto-oncogene expression in adult and developing lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Molinar-Rode, R; Smeyne, R J; Curran, T; Morgan, J I

    1993-01-01

    Activation of immediate-early gene expression has been associated with mitogenesis, differentiation, nerve cell depolarization, and recently, terminal differentiation processes and programmed cell death. Previous evidence also suggested that immediate-early genes play a role in the physiology of the lungs (J. I. Morgan, D. R. Cohen, J. L. Hempstead, and T. Curran, Science 237:192-197, 1987). Therefore, we analyzed c-fos expression in adult and developing lung tissues. Seizures elicited by chemoconvulsants induced expression of mRNA for c-fos, c-jun, and junB and Fos-like immunoreactivity in lung tissue. The use of pharmacological antagonists and adrenalectomy indicated that this increased expression was neurogenic. Interestingly, by using a fos-lacZ transgenic mouse, it was shown that Fos-LacZ expression in response to seizure occurred preferentially in clusters of epithelial cells at the poles of the bronchioles. This was the same location of Fos-LacZ expression detected during early lung development. These data imply that pharmacological induction of immediate-early gene expression in adult mice recapitulates an embryological program of gene expression. Images PMID:8497249

  8. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  9. The impact of self-identified race on epidemiologic studies of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunita; Murphy, Amy; Howrylak, Judie; Himes, Blanca; Cho, Michael H; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Hunninghake, Gary M; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Klanderman, Barbara; Ziniti, John; Senter-Sylvia, Jody; Liu, Andy; Szefler, Stanley J; Strunk, Robert; Castro, Mario; Hansel, Nadia N; Diette, Gregory B; Vonakis, Becky M; Adkinson, N Franklin; Carey, Vincent J; Raby, Benjamin A

    2011-02-01

    Although population differences in gene expression have been established, the impact on differential gene expression studies in large populations is not well understood. We describe the effect of self-reported race on a gene expression study of lung function in asthma. We generated gene expression profiles for 254 young adults (205 non-Hispanic whites and 49 African Americans) with asthma on whom concurrent total RNA derived from peripheral blood CD4(+) lymphocytes and lung function measurements were obtained. We identified four principal components that explained 62% of the variance in gene expression. The dominant principal component, which explained 29% of the total variance in gene expression, was strongly associated with self-identified race (P<10(-16)). The impact of these racial differences was observed when we performed differential gene expression analysis of lung function. Using multivariate linear models, we tested whether gene expression was associated with a quantitative measure of lung function: pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)). Though unadjusted linear models of FEV(1) identified several genes strongly correlated with lung function, these correlations were due to racial differences in the distribution of both FEV(1) and gene expression, and were no longer statistically significant following adjustment for self-identified race. These results suggest that self-identified race is a critical confounding covariate in epidemiologic studies of gene expression and that, similar to genetic studies, careful consideration of self-identified race in gene expression profiling studies is needed to avoid spurious association.

  10. Gene expression and fractionation resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous work on whole genome doubling in plants established the importance of gene functional category in provoking or suppressing duplicate gene loss, or fractionation. Other studies, particularly in Paramecium have correlated levels of gene expression with vulnerability or resistance to duplicate loss. Results Here we analyze the simultaneous effect of function category and expression in two plant data sets, rosids and asterids. Conclusion We demonstrate function category and expression level have independent effects, though expression does not play the dominant role it does in Paramecium. PMID:25573431

  11. Impact of Collection and Storage of Lung Tumor Tissue on Whole Genome Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Freidin, Maxim B.; Bhudia, Neesa; Lim, Eric; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Cookson, William O.; Moffatt, Miriam F.

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression profiling could assist in revealing biomarkers of lung cancer prognosis and progression. The handling of biological samples may strongly influence global gene expression, a fact that has not been addressed in many studies. We sought to investigate the changes in gene expression that may occur as a result of sample processing time and conditions. Using Illumina Human WG-6 arrays, we quantified gene expression in lung carcinoma samples from six patients obtained at chest opening before and immediately after lung resection with storage in RNAlater [T1a(CO) and T1b(LR)], after receipt of the sample for histopathology, placed in RNAlater [T2a(HP)]; snap frozen [T2b(HP.SF)]; or snap frozen and stored for 1 week [T2c(HP.SFA)], as well as formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) block samples. Sampling immediately after resection closely represented the tissue obtained in situ, with only 1% of genes differing more than twofold [T1a(CO) versus T1b(LR)]. Delaying tissue harvest for an average of 30 minutes from the operating theater had a significant impact on gene expression, with approximately 25% of genes differing between T1a(CO) and T2a(HP). Many genes previously identified as lung cancer biomarkers were altered during this period. Examination of FFPE specimens showed minimal correlation with fresh samples. This study shows that tissue collection immediately after lung resection with conservation in RNAlater is an optimal strategy for gene expression profiling. PMID:22240448

  12. Ets2 binding site single nucleotide polymorphism at the hTERT gene promoter--effect on telomerase expression and telomere length maintenance in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chung-Ping; Hsu, Nan-Yuan; Lee, Li-Wen; Ko, Jiunn-Liang

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the occurrence of DNA sequence changes in the promoter region of hTERT gene, and its effect on telomerase expression and telomere length maintenance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between January 2002 and December 2003, 66 NSCLC patients were studied. The expression of hTERT, telomerase activity (TA), and c-Myc were examined, and the terminal restriction fragment length (TRFL) was measured. A t/n-TRFLR was obtained by dividing the TRFL of the tumour tissue by TRFL of the paired normal tissue. PCR products were sequenced and compared with known hTERT gene promoter sequence for a length of 716 bp upstream of the transcription starting code. The changes of any known sequence and/or c-Myc expression with their impact on telomerase activity and TRFL maintenance were measured. Positive hTERT, TA and c-Myc expression was observed in 43 (65.2%), 39 (59.1%) and 59 (89.4%) of the tumour tissue samples, respectively. Except for one patient who had C/C (in normal tissue) homozygotes to T/C (in tumour tissue) heterozygotes point mutation, a novel single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -245 kb upstream (Ets2 binding site) of the hTERT gene was observed in all normal and tumour tissues, including C/C in 9, T/C in 35, and T/T in 22 of the tumour tissues. The TA of C/C homozygotes was lower than that of T/T homozygotes (P=0.0331), while the t/n-TRFLR of C/C homozygotes was higher than that of T/T homozygotes (P=0.0621). The latter was even more obvious when c-Myc were positive (P=0.0185). Our data shows that T/T homozygotes have a lower t/n-TRFLR, but a stronger TA expression, suggesting that the studied Ets2 binding site is a positive regulator of hTERT gene. SNP may interfere with Ets2 binding and lower TA expression in T/C heterozygotes and C/C homozygotes.

  13. Peripheral blood gene expression profiles in COPD subjects.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Tyagi, Shivraj; Srisuma, Sorachai; Demeo, Dawn L; Shapiro, Steven D; Bueno, Raphael; Silverman, Edwin K; Reilly, John J; Mariani, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    To identify non-invasive gene expression markers for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we performed genome-wide expression profiling of peripheral blood samples from 12 subjects with significant airflow obstruction and an equal number of non-obstructed controls. RNA was isolated from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) and gene expression was assessed using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 arrays.Tests for gene expression changes that discriminate between COPD cases (FEV1< 70% predicted, FEV1/FVC < 0.7) and controls (FEV1> 80% predicted, FEV1/FVC > 0.7) were performed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) and Bayesian Analysis of Differential Gene Expression (BADGE). Using either test at high stringency (SAM median FDR = 0 or BADGE p < 0.01) we identified differential expression for 45 known genes. Correlation of gene expression with lung function measurements (FEV1 & FEV1/FVC), using both Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients (p < 0.05), identified a set of 86 genes. A total of 16 markers showed evidence of significant correlation (p < 0.05) with quantitative traits and differential expression between cases and controls. We further compared our peripheral gene expression markers with those we previously identified from lung tissue of the same cohort. Two genes, RP9and NAPE-PLD, were identified as decreased in COPD cases compared to controls in both lung tissue and blood. These results contribute to our understanding of gene expression changes in the peripheral blood of patients with COPD and may provide insight into potential mechanisms involved in the disease. PMID:21884629

  14. Complex Sources of Variation in Tissue Expression Data: Analysis of the GTEx Lung Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    McCall, Matthew N; Illei, Peter B; Halushka, Marc K

    2016-09-01

    The sources of gene expression variability in human tissues are thought to be a complex interplay of technical, compositional, and disease-related factors. To better understand these contributions, we investigated expression variability in a relatively homogeneous tissue expression dataset from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) resource. In addition to identifying technical sources, such as sequencing date and post-mortem interval, we also identified several biological sources of variation. An in-depth analysis of the 175 genes with the greatest variation among 133 lung tissue samples identified five distinct clusters of highly correlated genes. One large cluster included surfactant genes (SFTPA1, SFTPA2, and SFTPC), which are expressed exclusively in type II pneumocytes, cells that proliferate in ventilator associated lung injury. High surfactant expression was strongly associated with death on a ventilator and type II pneumocyte hyperplasia. A second large cluster included dynein (DNAH9 and DNAH12) and mucin (MUC5B and MUC16) genes, which are exclusive to the respiratory epithelium and goblet cells of bronchial structures. This indicates heterogeneous bronchiole sampling due to the harvesting location in the lung. A small cluster included acute-phase reactant genes (SAA1, SAA2, and SAA2-SAA4). The final two small clusters were technical and gender related. To summarize, in a collection of normal lung samples, we found that tissue heterogeneity caused by harvesting location (medial or lateral lung) and late therapeutic intervention (mechanical ventilation) were major contributors to expression variation. These unexpected sources of variation were the result of altered cell ratios in the tissue samples, an underappreciated source of expression variation. PMID:27588449

  15. Regulation of Neuronal Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Gerald; Lietz, Michael; Leichter, Michael

    Humans as multicellular organisms contain a variety of different cell types where each cell population must fulfill a distinct function in the interest of the whole organism. The molecular basis for the variations in morphology, biochemistry, molecular biology, and function of the various cell types is the cell-type specific expression of genes. These genes encode proteins necessary for executing the specialized functions of each cell type within an organism. We describe here a regulatory mechanism for the expression of neuronal genes. The zinc finger protein REST binds to the regulatory region of many neuronal genes and represses neuronal gene expression in nonneuronal tissues. A negative regulatory mechanism, involving a transcriptional repressor, seems to play an important role in establishing the neuronal phenotype.

  16. High expression of cellular retinol binding protein-1 in lung adenocarcinoma is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Doldo, Elena; Costanza, Gaetana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Pompeo, Eugenio; Agostinelli, Sara; Bellezza, Guido; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Giunta, Alessandro; Sidoni, Angelo; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adenocarcinoma, the most common non-small cell lung cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, with a low overall survival (OS) despite increasing attempts to achieve an early diagnosis and accomplish surgical and multimodality treatment strategies. Cellular retinol binding protein-1 (CRBP-1) regulates retinol bioavailability and cell differentiation, but its role in lung cancerogenesis remains uncertain. Experimental design CRBP-1 expression, clinical outcome and other prognostic factors were investigated in 167 lung adenocarcinoma patients. CRBP-1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry of tissue microarray sections, gene copy number analysis and tumor methylation specific PCR. Effects of CRBP-1 expression on proliferation/apoptosis gene array, protein and transcripts were investigated in transfected A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Results CRBP-1High expression was observed in 62.3% of adenocarcinomas and correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS as an independent prognostic factor. CRBP-1 gene copy gain also associated with tumor CRBP-1High status and dedifferentiation. CRBP-1-transfected (CRBP-1+) A549 grew more than CRBP-1− A549 cells. At >1μM concentrations, all trans-retinoic acid and retinol reduced viability more in CRBP-1+ than in CRBP-1− A549 cells. CRBP-1+ A549 cells showed up-regulated RARα/ RXRα and proliferative and transcriptional genes including pAkt, pEGFR, pErk1/2, creb1 and c-jun, whereas RARβ and p53 were strongly down-regulated; pAkt/pErk/ pEGFR inhibitors counteracted proliferative advantage and increased RARα/RXRα, c-jun and CD44 expression in CRBP-1+ A549 cells. Conclusion CRBP-1High expression in lung adenocarcinoma correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS, likely through increased Akt/Erk/EGFR-mediated cell proliferation and differentiation. CRBP-1High expression can be considered an additional marker of poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:26807202

  17. Identification of common prognostic gene expression signatures with biological meanings from microarray gene expression datasets.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Zhao, Qi; Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Li; Liu, Xiaoming; Yung, W K Alfred; Weinstein, John N

    2012-01-01

    Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures for breast cancer were generated previously with few overlap and limited insight into the biology of the disease. Here we introduce a novel algorithm named SCoR (Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard regression and Random resampling) to apply random resampling and clustering methods in identifying gene features correlated with time to event data. This is shown to reduce overfitting noises involved in microarray data analysis and discover functional gene sets linked to patient survival. SCoR independently identified a common poor prognostic signature composed of cell proliferation genes from six out of eight breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, a sequential SCoR analysis on highly proliferative breast cancers repeatedly identified T/B cell markers as favorable prognosis factors. In glioblastoma, SCoR identified a common good prognostic signature of chromosome 10 genes from two gene expression datasets (TCGA and REMBRANDT), recapitulating the fact that loss of one copy of chromosome 10 (which harbors the tumor suppressor PTEN) is linked to poor survival in glioblastoma patients. SCoR also identified prognostic genes on sex chromosomes in lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting patient gender might be used to predict outcome in this disease. These results demonstrate the power of SCoR to identify common and biologically meaningful prognostic gene expression signatures.

  18. Identification of Common Prognostic Gene Expression Signatures with Biological Meanings from Microarray Gene Expression Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Zhao, Qi; Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Li; Liu, Xiaoming; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Weinstein, John N.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures for breast cancer were generated previously with few overlap and limited insight into the biology of the disease. Here we introduce a novel algorithm named SCoR (Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard regression and Random resampling) to apply random resampling and clustering methods in identifying gene features correlated with time to event data. This is shown to reduce overfitting noises involved in microarray data analysis and discover functional gene sets linked to patient survival. SCoR independently identified a common poor prognostic signature composed of cell proliferation genes from six out of eight breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, a sequential SCoR analysis on highly proliferative breast cancers repeatedly identified T/B cell markers as favorable prognosis factors. In glioblastoma, SCoR identified a common good prognostic signature of chromosome 10 genes from two gene expression datasets (TCGA and REMBRANDT), recapitulating the fact that loss of one copy of chromosome 10 (which harbors the tumor suppressor PTEN) is linked to poor survival in glioblastoma patients. SCoR also identified prognostic genes on sex chromosomes in lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting patient gender might be used to predict outcome in this disease. These results demonstrate the power of SCoR to identify common and biologically meaningful prognostic gene expression signatures. PMID:23029298

  19. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26647728

  20. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26647728

  1. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-12-09

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma.

  2. Beryllium-induced lung disease exhibits expression profiles similar to sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Silveira, Lori J; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Gillespie, May; Mroz, Peggy M; Mayer, Annyce S; Fingerlin, Tasha E; Maier, Lisa A

    2016-06-01

    A subset of beryllium-exposed workers develop beryllium sensitisation (BeS) which precedes chronic beryllium disease (CBD). We conducted an in-depth analysis of differentially expressed candidate genes in CBD.We performed Affymetrix GeneChip 1.0 ST array analysis on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 10 CBD, 10 BeS and 10 beryllium-exposed, nondiseased controls stimulated with BeSO4 or medium. The differentially expressed genes were validated by high-throughput real-time PCR in this group and in an additional group of cases and nonexposed controls. The functional roles of the top candidate genes in CBD were assessed using a pharmacological inhibitor. CBD gene expression data were compared with whole blood and lung tissue in sarcoidosis from the Gene Expression Omnibus.We confirmed almost 450 genes that were significantly differentially expressed between CBD and controls. The top enrichment of genes was for JAK (Janus kinase)-STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) signalling. A JAK2 inhibitor significantly decreased tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ production. Furthermore, we found 287 differentially expressed genes overlapped in CBD/sarcoidosis. The top shared pathways included cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, and Toll-like receptor, chemokine and JAK-STAT signalling pathways.We show that PBMCs demonstrate differentially expressed gene profiles relevant to the immunnopathogenesis of CBD. CBD and sarcoidosis share similar differential expression of pathogenic genes and pathways. PMID:27103383

  3. Beryllium-induced lung disease exhibits expression profiles similar to sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Silveira, Lori J; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Gillespie, May; Mroz, Peggy M; Mayer, Annyce S; Fingerlin, Tasha E; Maier, Lisa A

    2016-06-01

    A subset of beryllium-exposed workers develop beryllium sensitisation (BeS) which precedes chronic beryllium disease (CBD). We conducted an in-depth analysis of differentially expressed candidate genes in CBD.We performed Affymetrix GeneChip 1.0 ST array analysis on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 10 CBD, 10 BeS and 10 beryllium-exposed, nondiseased controls stimulated with BeSO4 or medium. The differentially expressed genes were validated by high-throughput real-time PCR in this group and in an additional group of cases and nonexposed controls. The functional roles of the top candidate genes in CBD were assessed using a pharmacological inhibitor. CBD gene expression data were compared with whole blood and lung tissue in sarcoidosis from the Gene Expression Omnibus.We confirmed almost 450 genes that were significantly differentially expressed between CBD and controls. The top enrichment of genes was for JAK (Janus kinase)-STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) signalling. A JAK2 inhibitor significantly decreased tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ production. Furthermore, we found 287 differentially expressed genes overlapped in CBD/sarcoidosis. The top shared pathways included cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, and Toll-like receptor, chemokine and JAK-STAT signalling pathways.We show that PBMCs demonstrate differentially expressed gene profiles relevant to the immunnopathogenesis of CBD. CBD and sarcoidosis share similar differential expression of pathogenic genes and pathways.

  4. The significance of PIWI family expression in human lung embryogenesis and non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Alfons; Tejero, Rut; Viñolas, Nuria; Cordeiro, Anna; Marrades, Ramon M; Fuster, Dolors; Caritg, Oriol; Moises, Jorge; Muñoz, Carmen; Molins, Laureano; Ramirez, Josep; Monzo, Mariano

    2015-10-13

    The expression of Piwi-interacting RNAs, small RNAs that bind to PIWI proteins, was until recently believed to be limited to germinal stem cells. We have studied the expression of PIWI genes during human lung embryogenesis and in paired tumor and normal tissue prospectively collected from 71 resected non-small-cell lung cancer patients. The mRNA expression analysis showed that PIWIL1 was highly expressed in 7-week embryos and downregulated during the subsequent weeks of development. PIWIL1 was expressed in 11 of the tumor samples but in none of the normal tissue samples. These results were validated by immunohistochemistry, showing faint cytoplasmic reactivity in the PIWIL1-positive samples. Interestingly, the patients expressing PIWIL1 had a shorter time to relapse (TTR) (p = 0.006) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0076) than those without PIWIL1 expression. PIWIL2 and 4 were downregulated in tumor tissue in comparison to the normal tissue (p < 0.001) and the patients with lower levels of PIWIL4 had shorter TTR (p = 0.048) and OS (p = 0.033). In the multivariate analysis, PIWIL1 expression emerged as an independent prognostic marker. Using 5-Aza-dC treatment and bisulfite sequencing, we observed that PIWIL1 expression could be regulated in part by methylation. Finally, an in silico study identified a stem-cell expression signature associated with PIWIL1 expression.

  5. Predicting Diagnostic Gene Biomarkers for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bin; Shao, Yang; Long, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the primary reason for death due to cancer worldwide, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common subtype of lung cancer. Most patients die from complications of NSCLC due to poor diagnosis. In this paper, we aimed to predict gene biomarkers that may be of use for diagnosis of NSCLC by integrating differential gene expression analysis with functional association network analysis. We first constructed an NSCLC-specific functional association network by combining gene expression correlation with functional association. Then, we applied a network partition algorithm to divide the network into gene modules and identify the most NSCLC-specific gene modules based on their differential expression pattern in between normal and NSCLC samples. Finally, from these modules, we identified genes that exhibited the most impact on the expression of their functionally associated genes in between normal and NSCLC samples and predicted them as NSCLC biomarkers. Literature review of the top predicted gene biomarkers suggested that most of them were already considered critical for development of NSCLC. PMID:27579312

  6. Susceptibility loci for lung cancer are associated with mRNA levels of nearby genes in the lung.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Justin Dang Uy; Lamontagne, Maxime; Couture, Christian; Conti, Massimo; Paré, Peter D; Sin, Don D; Hogg, James C; Nickle, David; Postma, Dirkje S; Timens, Wim; Laviolette, Michel; Bossé, Yohan

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies identified three genetic loci reproducibly associated with lung cancer in populations of European ancestry, namely 15q25, 5p15 and 6p21. The goals of this study are first to confirm whether these loci are associated with lung cancer in a French Canadian population and second to identify disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influencing messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of genes in the lung, that is expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). SNPs were genotyped in 420 patients undergoing lung cancer surgery and compared with 3151 controls of European ancestry. Genome-wide gene expression levels in non-tumor lung tissues of the same 420 patients were also measured to identify eQTLs. Significant eQTLs were then followed-up in two replication sets (n = 339 and 363). SNPs found in the three susceptibility loci were associated with lung cancer in the French Canadian population. Strong eQTLs were found on chromosome 15q25 with the expression levels of CHRNA5 (P = 2.23 × 10(-) (22) with rs12907966). The CHRNA5-rs12907966 eQTL was convincingly validated in the two replication sets (P = 3.46 × 10(-) (16) and 2.01 × 10(-) (15)). On 6p21, a trend was observed for rs3131379 to be associated with the expression of APOM (P = 3.58 × 10(-) (4)) and validated in the replication sets (P = 1.11 × 10(-) (8) and 6.84 × 10(-) (4)). On 5p15, no significant eQTLs were found. This study confirmed that chromosomes 15q25, 5p15 and 6p21 harbored susceptibility loci for lung cancer in French Canadians. Most importantly, this study suggests that the risk alleles at 15q25 and 6p21 may mediate their effect by regulating the mRNA expression levels of CHRNA5 and APOM in the lung.

  7. Susceptibility loci for lung cancer are associated with mRNA levels of nearby genes in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Justin Dang Uy; Lamontagne, Maxime; Couture, Christian; Conti, Massimo; Paré, Peter D.; Sin, Don D.; Hogg, James C.; Nickle, David; Postma, Dirkje S.; Timens, Wim; Laviolette, Michel; Bossé, Yohan

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies identified three genetic loci reproducibly associated with lung cancer in populations of European ancestry, namely 15q25, 5p15 and 6p21. The goals of this study are first to confirm whether these loci are associated with lung cancer in a French Canadian population and second to identify disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influencing messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of genes in the lung, that is expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). SNPs were genotyped in 420 patients undergoing lung cancer surgery and compared with 3151 controls of European ancestry. Genome-wide gene expression levels in non-tumor lung tissues of the same 420 patients were also measured to identify eQTLs. Significant eQTLs were then followed-up in two replication sets (n = 339 and 363). SNPs found in the three susceptibility loci were associated with lung cancer in the French Canadian population. Strong eQTLs were found on chromosome 15q25 with the expression levels of CHRNA5 (P = 2.23 × 10− 22 with rs12907966). The CHRNA5-rs12907966 eQTL was convincingly validated in the two replication sets (P = 3.46 × 10− 16 and 2.01 × 10− 15). On 6p21, a trend was observed for rs3131379 to be associated with the expression of APOM (P = 3.58 × 10− 4) and validated in the replication sets (P = 1.11 × 10− 8 and 6.84 × 10− 4). On 5p15, no significant eQTLs were found. This study confirmed that chromosomes 15q25, 5p15 and 6p21 harbored susceptibility loci for lung cancer in French Canadians. Most importantly, this study suggests that the risk alleles at 15q25 and 6p21 may mediate their effect by regulating the mRNA expression levels of CHRNA5 and APOM in the lung. PMID:25187487

  8. Evaluation of tetrafunctional block copolymers as synthetic vectors for lung gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Richard-Fiardo, Peggy; Hervouet, Catherine; Marsault, Robert; Franken, Philippe R; Cambien, Béatrice; Guglielmi, Julien; Warnez-Soulie, Julie; Darcourt, Jacques; Pourcher, Thierry; Colombani, Thibault; Haudebourg, Thomas; Peuziat, Pauline; Pitard, Bruno; Vassaux, Georges

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we evaluated, in mice, the efficacy of the tetrafunctional block copolymer 704 as a nonviral gene delivery vector to the lungs. SPECT/CT molecular imaging of gene expression, biochemical assays, and immunohistochemistry were used. Our dataset shows that the formulation 704 resulted in higher levels of reporter gene expression than the GL67A formulation currently being used in a clinical trial in cystic fibrosis patients. The inflammatory response associated with this gene transfer was lower than that induced by the GL67A formulation, and the 704 formulation was amenable to repeated administrations. The cell types transfected by the 704 formulation were type I and type II pneumocytes, and transgene expression could not be detected in macrophages. These results emphasize the relevance of the 704 formulation as a nonviral gene delivery vector for lung gene therapy. Further studies will be required to validate this vector in larger animals, in which the lungs are more similar to human lungs.

  9. Nutritional regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cousins, R J

    1999-01-25

    Genes are regulated by complex arrays of response elements that influence the rate of transcription. Nutrients and hormones either act directly to influence these rates or act indirectly through specialized signaling pathways. Metabolites of vitamins A and D, fatty acids, some sterols, and zinc are among the nutrients that influence transcription directly. Components of dietary fiber may influence gene expression indirectly through changes in hormonal signaling, mechanical stimuli, and metabolites produced by the intestinal microflora. In addition, consumption of water-soluble fibers may lead to changes in gene expression mediated through indirect mechanisms that influence transcription rates. In the large intestine, short-chain fatty acids, including butyric acid, are produced by microflora. Butyric acid can indirectly influence gene expression. Some sources of fiber limit nutrient absorption, particularly of trace elements. This could have direct or indirect effects on gene expression. Identification of genes in colonic epithelial cells that are differentially regulated by dietary fiber will be an important step toward understanding the role of dietary factors in colorectal cancer progression.

  10. Gene expression profiling of candidate genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells for predicting toxicity of diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita; Sharma, Amit; Yadav, Sanjay; Flora, Swaran J S; Dwivedi, Uppendra N; Parmar, Devendra

    2014-02-01

    To validate gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a surrogate for monitoring tissue expression, this study using RT-PCR-based TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) was initiated to investigate similarities in the mRNA expression of target genes altered by exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) in freshly prepared PBMCs and in lungs. Adult Wistar rats were treated transtracheally with a single dose of 7.5 or 15 or 30mg/kg DEPs and sacrificed 24h later. Blood and lungs were immediately taken out and processed for RT-PCR. DEP treatment induced similar patterns of increase in the expression of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-responsive cytochrome P450s, the phase II enzymes, and their associated transcription factors in both lungs and PBMCs, at all doses. Similar to that seen in lungs, a dose-dependent increase was observed in the expression of genes involved in inflammation, such as cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, in PBMCs. The expression of various genes involved in DNA repair and apoptosis was also increased in a dose-dependent manner in PBMCs and lungs. The present TLDA data indicating similarities in the responsiveness of candidate genes involved in the toxicity of DEPs between PBMCs and lungs after exposure to DEPs demonstrate that expression profiles of genes in PBMCs could be used as a surrogate for monitoring the acute toxicity of fine and ultrafine particulate matter present in vehicular emissions. PMID:24216475

  11. Gene expression profiling of candidate genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells for predicting toxicity of diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita; Sharma, Amit; Yadav, Sanjay; Flora, Swaran J S; Dwivedi, Uppendra N; Parmar, Devendra

    2014-02-01

    To validate gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a surrogate for monitoring tissue expression, this study using RT-PCR-based TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) was initiated to investigate similarities in the mRNA expression of target genes altered by exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) in freshly prepared PBMCs and in lungs. Adult Wistar rats were treated transtracheally with a single dose of 7.5 or 15 or 30mg/kg DEPs and sacrificed 24h later. Blood and lungs were immediately taken out and processed for RT-PCR. DEP treatment induced similar patterns of increase in the expression of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-responsive cytochrome P450s, the phase II enzymes, and their associated transcription factors in both lungs and PBMCs, at all doses. Similar to that seen in lungs, a dose-dependent increase was observed in the expression of genes involved in inflammation, such as cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, in PBMCs. The expression of various genes involved in DNA repair and apoptosis was also increased in a dose-dependent manner in PBMCs and lungs. The present TLDA data indicating similarities in the responsiveness of candidate genes involved in the toxicity of DEPs between PBMCs and lungs after exposure to DEPs demonstrate that expression profiles of genes in PBMCs could be used as a surrogate for monitoring the acute toxicity of fine and ultrafine particulate matter present in vehicular emissions.

  12. Network Completion for Static Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Natsu

    2014-01-01

    We tackle the problem of completing and inferring genetic networks under stationary conditions from static data, where network completion is to make the minimum amount of modifications to an initial network so that the completed network is most consistent with the expression data in which addition of edges and deletion of edges are basic modification operations. For this problem, we present a new method for network completion using dynamic programming and least-squares fitting. This method can find an optimal solution in polynomial time if the maximum indegree of the network is bounded by a constant. We evaluate the effectiveness of our method through computational experiments using synthetic data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our proposed method can distinguish the differences between two types of genetic networks under stationary conditions from lung cancer and normal gene expression data. PMID:24826192

  13. Identification of reference genes for qRT-PCR in human lung squamous-cell carcinoma by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Cheng; Zhang, Yongxing; Ma, Jun; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Wei; Shi, Yu; Wang, Qun

    2014-04-01

    Although the accuracy of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is highly dependent on the reliable reference genes, many commonly used reference genes are not stably expressed and as such are not suitable for quantification and normalization of qRT-PCR data. The aim of this study was to identify novel reliable reference genes in lung squamous-cell carcinoma. We used RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to survey the whole genome expression in 5 lung normal samples and 44 lung squamous-cell carcinoma samples. We evaluated the expression profiles of 15 commonly used reference genes and identified five additional candidate reference genes. To validate the RNA-Seq dataset, we used qRT-PCR to verify the expression levels of these 20 genes in a separate set of 100 pairs of normal lung tissue and lung squamous-cell carcinoma samples, and then analyzed these results using geNorm and NormFinder. With respect to 14 of the 15 common reference genes (B2M, GAPDH, GUSB, HMBS, HPRT1, IPO8, PGK1, POLR2A, PPIA, RPLP0, TBP, TFRC, UBC, and YWHAZ), the expression levels were either too low to be easily detected, or exhibited a high degree of variability either between lung normal and squamous-cell carcinoma samples, or even among samples of the same tissue type. In contrast, 1 of the 15 common reference genes (ACTB) and the 5 additional candidate reference genes (EEF1A1, FAU, RPS9, RPS11, and RPS14) were stably and constitutively expressed at high levels in all the samples tested. ACTB, EEF1A1, FAU, RPS9, RPS11, and RPS14 are ideal reference genes for qRT-PCR analysis of lung squamous-cell carcinoma, while 14 commonly used qRT-PCR reference genes are less appropriate in this context.

  14. Lentivirus IL-10 gene therapy down-regulates IL-17 and attenuates mouse orthotopic lung allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, S; Sato, M; Loisel-Meyer, S; Matsuda, Y; Oishi, H; Guan, Z; Saito, T; Yeung, J; Cypel, M; Hwang, D M; Medin, J A; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy to target lung allograft rejection in a mouse orthotopic left lung transplantation model. IL-10 may regulate posttransplant immunity mediated by IL-17. Lentivirus-mediated trans-airway luciferase gene transfer to the donor lung resulted in persistent luciferase activity up to 6 months posttransplant in the isograft (B6 to B6); luciferase activity decreased in minor-mismatched allograft lungs (B10 to B6) in association with moderate rejection. Fully MHC-mismatched allograft transplantation (BALB/c to B6) resulted in severe rejection and complete loss of luciferase activity. In minor-mismatched allografts, IL-10-encoding lentivirus gene therapy reduced the acute rejection score compared with the lentivirus-luciferase control at posttransplant day 28 (3.0 ± 0.6 vs. 2.0 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD); p = 0.025; n = 6/group). IL-10 gene therapy also significantly reduced gene expression of IL-17, IL-23, and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)-γt without affecting levels of IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Cells expressing IL-17 were dramatically reduced in the allograft lung. In conclusion, lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy significantly reduced expression of IL-17 and other associated genes in the transplanted allograft lung and attenuated posttransplant immune responses after orthotopic lung transplantation. PMID:23601206

  15. Elevated expression of CDK4 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression of Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in lung cancer and its correlation with clinicopathologic features. Furthermore, the involvement of CDK4-mediated cell cycle progression and its molecular basis were investigated in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. Methods Using immunohistochemistry analysis, we analyzed CDK4 protein expression in 89 clinicopathologically characterized lung cancer patients (59 males and 30 females) with ages ranging from 36 to 78 years and compared them to 23 normal lung tissues. Cases with cytoplasmic and nuclear CDK4 immunostaining score values greater than or equal to 7 were regarded as high expression while scores less than 7 were considered low expression. The correlation between the expression level of CDK4 and clinical features was analyzed. Furthermore, we used lentiviral-mediated shRNA to suppress the expression of CDK4 and investigate its function and molecular mechanism for mediating cell cycle progression. Results The expression level of CDK4 protein was significantly increased in lung cancer tissues compared to normal tissues (P < 0.001). In addition, high levels of CDK4 protein were positively correlated with the status of pathology classification (P = 0.047), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.007), and clinical stage (P = 0.004) of lung cancer patients. Patients with higher CDK4 expression had a markedly shorter overall survival time than patients with low CDK4 expression. Multivariate analysis suggested the level of CDK4 expression was an independent prognostic indicator (P < 0.001) for the survival of patients with lung cancer. Use of lentiviral-mediated shRNA to inhibit the expression of CDK4 in lung cancer cell line A549 not only inhibited cell cycle progression, but also dramatically suppressed cell proliferation, colony formation, and migration. Furthermore, suppressing CDK4 expression also significantly elevated the expression of cell cycle regulator p21

  16. Sex differences in the expression of lung inflammatory mediators in response to ozone.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Noe; Mishra, Vikas; Sinha, Utkarshna; DiAngelo, Susan L; Chroneos, Zissis C; Ekpa, Ndifreke A; Cooper, Timothy K; Caruso, Carla R; Silveyra, Patricia

    2015-11-15

    Sex differences in the incidence of respiratory diseases have been reported. Women are more susceptible to inflammatory lung disease induced by air pollution and show worse adverse pulmonary health outcomes than men. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences remain unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that sex differences in the expression of lung inflammatory mediators affect sex-specific immune responses to environmental toxicants. We focused on the effects of ground-level ozone, a major air pollutant, in the expression and regulation of lung immunity genes. We exposed adult male and female mice to 2 ppm of ozone or filtered air (control) for 3 h. We compared mRNA levels of 84 inflammatory genes in lungs harvested 4 h postexposure using a PCR array. We also evaluated changes in lung histology and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell counts and protein content at 24 and 72 h postexposure. Our results revealed sex differences in lung inflammation triggered by ozone exposure and in the expression of genes involved in acute phase and inflammatory responses. Major sex differences were found in the expression of neutrophil-attracting chemokines (Ccl20, Cxcl5, and Cxcl2), the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6, and oxidative stress-related enzymes (Ptgs2, Nos2). In addition, the phosphorylation of STAT3, known to mediate IL-6-related immune responses, was significantly higher in ozone-exposed mice. Together, our observations suggest that a differential regulation of the lung immune response could be implicated in the observed increased susceptibility to adverse health effects from ozone observed in women vs. men.

  17. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  18. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-02-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1; i.e., they obey Zipf’s law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intracellular reaction network, we found that Zipf’s law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  19. 15q12 Variants, Sputum Gene Promoter Hypermethylation, and Lung Cancer Risk: A GWAS in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Liu, Yushi; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Han, Younghun; Picchi, Maria A.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Willink, Randall P.; Gaither Davis, Autumn L.; Do, Kieu C.; Nukui, Tomoko; Zhang, Xiequn; Burki, Elizabeth A.; Van Den Berg, David; Romkes, Marjorie; Gauderman, W. James; Crowell, Richard E.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Stidley, Christine A.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gilliland, Frank D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Detection of promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in exfoliated cells from the lung provides an assessment of field cancerization that in turn predicts lung cancer. The identification of genetic determinants for this validated cancer biomarker should provide novel insights into mechanisms underlying epigenetic reprogramming during lung carcinogenesis. Methods: A genome-wide association study using generalized estimating equations and logistic regression models was conducted in two geographically independent smoker cohorts to identify loci affecting the propensity for cancer-related gene methylation that was assessed by a 12-gene panel interrogated in sputum. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 15q12 (rs73371737 and rs7179575) that drove gene methylation were discovered and replicated with rs73371737 reaching genome-wide significance (P = 3.3×10–8). A haplotype carrying risk alleles from the two 15q12 SNPs conferred 57% increased risk for gene methylation (P = 2.5×10–9). Rs73371737 reduced GABRB3 expression in lung cells and increased risk for smoking-induced chronic mucous hypersecretion. Furthermore, subjects with variant homozygote of rs73371737 had a two-fold increase in risk for lung cancer (P = .0043). Pathway analysis identified DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSBR-HR) as a major pathway affecting susceptibility for gene methylation that was validated by measuring chromatid breaks in lymphocytes challenged by bleomycin. Conclusions: A functional 15q12 variant was identified as a risk factor for gene methylation and lung cancer. The associations could be mediated by GABAergic signaling that drives the smoking-induced mucous cell metaplasia. Our findings also substantiate DSBR-HR as a critical pathway driving epigenetic gene silencing. PMID:25713168

  20. Biological and clinical significance of epigenetic silencing of MARVELD1 gene in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ming; Wang, Shan; Yao, Yuanfei; Li, Yiqun; Zhang, Hao; Han, Fang; Nie, Huan; Su, Jie; Wang, Zeyu; Yue, Lei; Cao, Jingyan; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic silence in cancer frequently altered signal-transduction pathways during the early stages of tumor development. Recent progress in the field of cancer epigenetics has led to new opportunities for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. We previously demonstrated that novel identified nuclear factor MARVELD1 was widely expressed in human tissues, but down-regulated by promoter methylation in multiple cancers. This study was carried out to determine the biological and clinical significance of MARVELD1 gene silencing in lung cancer. Here, we found the reduced MARVELD1 expression significantly correlated with diagnostic histopathology and malignant degree of lung cancers. DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation synergistically inactivated MARVELD1 gene in lung cancer cells. Moreover, MARVELD1 modulated the efficiency of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) through interaction with NMD core factor SMG1. The decreased MARVELD1 level in lung cancer reduces NMD efficiency through diminishing the association between NMD complex component UPF1/SMG1 and premature termination codons containing mRNA (PTC-mRNA). The results suggested that MARVELD1 silencing is an appealing diagnostic biomarker for lung cancer and epigenetic silencing of MARVELD1 gene links with the regulatory mechanism of NMD pathway in lung cancer, which may be required for tumorigenesis. PMID:25520033

  1. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Hurst, Laurence D

    2015-07-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene's expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking.

  2. Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of mouse lung development and Nmyc target genes

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Brian; Kislinger, Thomas; Wigle, Dennis A; Kannan, Anitha; Brown, Kevin; Okubo, Tadashi; Hogan, Brigid; Jurisica, Igor; Frey, Brendan; Rossant, Janet; Emili, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Although microarray analysis has provided information regarding the dynamics of gene expression during development of the mouse lung, no extensive correlations have been made to the levels of corresponding protein products. Here, we present a global survey of protein expression during mouse lung organogenesis from embryonic day E13.5 until adulthood using gel-free two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to shotgun tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT). Mathematical modeling of the proteomic profiles with parallel DNA microarray data identified large groups of gene products with statistically significant correlation or divergence in coregulation of protein and transcript levels during lung development. We also present an integrative analysis of mRNA and protein expression in Nmyc loss- and gain-of-function mutants. This revealed a set of 90 positively and negatively regulated putative target genes. These targets are evidence that Nmyc is a regulator of genes involved in mRNA processing and a repressor of the imprinted gene Igf2r in the developing lung. PMID:17486137

  3. Low p53 protein expression in salivary gland tumours compared with lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Soini, Y; Kamel, D; Nuorva, K; Lane, D P; Vähäkangas, K; Pääkkö, P

    1992-01-01

    Fifty-one salivary gland tumours (23 pleomorphic adenomas, 5 Warthin's tumours, 12 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 7 adenoid cystic carcinomas, 3 undifferentiated carcinomas and 1 acinic cell tumour) and 27 lung carcinomas (18 squamous cell carcinomas) were analysed immunohistochemically for the expression of p53 nuclear phosphoprotein. Eight out of 51 (16%) salivary gland tumours were p53 positive. Three of these were benign and 5 malignant. All 3 benign salivary gland tumours were pleomorphic adenomas and expressed only occasional nuclear positivity with less than 1% of tumour cells positive. Of the 5 p53-positive malignant tumours, 3 were mucoepidermoid carcinomas and 2 undifferentiated carcinomas. The malignant salivary gland tumours expressed more than 1% of positive nuclei in every case. Seventeen lung carcinomas were p53 positive (63%). Thirteen of these were squamous cell carcinomas, 3 were adenocarcinomas and 1 small cell lung carcinoma. The results show that mutations of the p53 gene may be infrequent in salivary gland tumours when compared with lung carcinomas. The relatively indolent course of some histological types of malignant salivary gland tumours could be associated with the preservation of the non-mutated p53 gene in most of these tumours. The presence of p53 positivity in some pleomorphic adenomas might, on one hand, suggest that p53 gene alterations are also present in these tumours; on the other hand, the accumulation of the p53 protein in these tumours might also be due to some unknown mechanism, not necessarily related to p53 gene mutation.

  4. Repression of Igf1 expression by Ezh2 prevents basal cell differentiation in the developing lung

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Laura A.; Holik, Aliaksei Z.; Short, Kieran M.; Pasquet, Julie; Lun, Aaron T. L.; Blewitt, Marnie E.; Smyth, Ian M.; Ritchie, Matthew E.; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms involved in the establishment of lung epithelial cell lineage identities during development are largely unknown. Here, we explored the role of the histone methyltransferase Ezh2 during lung lineage determination. Loss of Ezh2 in the lung epithelium leads to defective lung formation and perinatal mortality. We show that Ezh2 is crucial for airway lineage specification and alveolarization. Using optical projection tomography imaging, we found that branching morphogenesis is affected in Ezh2 conditional knockout mice and the remaining bronchioles are abnormal, lacking terminally differentiated secretory club cells. Remarkably, RNA-seq analysis revealed the upregulation of basal genes in Ezh2-deficient epithelium. Three-dimensional imaging for keratin 5 further showed the unexpected presence of a layer of basal cells from the proximal airways to the distal bronchioles in E16.5 embryos. ChIP-seq analysis indicated the presence of Ezh2-mediated repressive marks on the genomic loci of some but not all basal genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of action of Ezh2. We found that loss of Ezh2 de-represses insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) expression and that modulation of IGF1 signaling ex vivo in wild-type lungs could induce basal cell differentiation. Altogether, our work reveals an unexpected role for Ezh2 in controlling basal cell fate determination in the embryonic lung endoderm, mediated in part by repression of Igf1 expression. PMID:25790853

  5. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  6. Functional repair of human donor lungs by IL-10 gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cypel, Marcelo; Liu, Mingyao; Rubacha, Matt; Yeung, Jonathan C; Hirayama, Shin; Anraku, Masaki; Sato, Masaaki; Medin, Jeffrey; Davidson, Beverly L; de Perrot, Marc; Waddell, Thomas K; Slutsky, Arthur S; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2009-10-28

    More than 80% of potential donor lungs are injured during brain death of the donor and from complications experienced in the intensive care unit, and therefore cannot be used for transplantation. These lungs show inflammation and disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leading to poor gas exchange. Although the number of patients in need of lung transplantation is increasing, the number of donors is static. We investigated the potential to use gene therapy with an adenoviral vector encoding human interleukin-10 (AdhIL-10) to repair injured donor lungs ex vivo before transplantation. IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that mainly exerts its suppressive functions by the inactivation of antigen-presenting cells with consequent inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In pigs, AdhIL-10-treated lungs exhibited attenuated inflammation and improved function after transplantation. Lungs from 10 human multiorgan donors that had suffered brain death were determined to be clinically unsuitable for transplantation. They were then maintained for 12 hours at body temperature in an ex vivo lung perfusion system with or without intra-airway delivery of AdhIL-10 gene therapy. AdhIL-10-treated lungs showed significant improvement in function (arterial oxygen pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance) when compared to controls, a favorable shift from proinflammatory to anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, and recovery of alveolar-blood barrier integrity. Thus, treatment of injured human donor lungs with the cytokine IL-10 can improve lung function, potentially rendering injured lungs suitable for transplantation into patients. PMID:20368171

  7. Integrative analysis of lung development-cancer expression associations reveals the roles of signatures with inverse expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlong; Li, Chunquan; Xu, Yanjun; Feng, Li; Shang, Desi; Yang, Xinmiao; Han, Junwei; Sun, Zeguo; Li, Yixue; Li, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have focused on exploring the associations between organ development and malignant tumors; however, the clinical relevance of the development signatures was inadequately addressed in lung cancer. In this study, we explored the associations between lung development and lung cancer progression by analyzing a total of two development and seven cancer datasets. We identified representative expression patterns (continuously up- and down-regulated) from development and cancer profiles, and inverse pattern associations were observed at both the gene and functional levels. Furthermore, we dissected the biological processes dominating the associations, and found that proliferation and immunity were respectively involved in the two inverse development-cancer expression patterns. Through sub-pathway analysis of the signatures with inverse expression patterns, we finally identified a 13-gene risk signature from the cell cycle sub-pathway, and evaluated its predictive performance for lung cancer patient clinical outcome using independent cohorts. Our findings indicated that the integrative analysis of development and cancer expression patterns provided a framework for identifying effective molecular signatures for clinical utility.

  8. Large Scale Gene Expression Meta-Analysis Reveals Tissue-Specific, Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Benjamin T.; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Buckberry, Sam; Breen, James; Clifton, Vicki; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Roberts, Claire T.

    2016-01-01

    The severity and prevalence of many diseases are known to differ between the sexes. Organ specific sex-biased gene expression may underpin these and other sexually dimorphic traits. To further our understanding of sex differences in transcriptional regulation, we performed meta-analyses of sex biased gene expression in multiple human tissues. We analyzed 22 publicly available human gene expression microarray data sets including over 2500 samples from 15 different tissues and 9 different organs. Briefly, by using an inverse-variance method we determined the effect size difference of gene expression between males and females. We found the greatest sex differences in gene expression in the brain, specifically in the anterior cingulate cortex, (1818 genes), followed by the heart (375 genes), kidney (224 genes), colon (218 genes), and thyroid (163 genes). More interestingly, we found different parts of the brain with varying numbers and identity of sex-biased genes, indicating that specific cortical regions may influence sexually dimorphic traits. The majority of sex-biased genes in other tissues such as the bladder, liver, lungs, and pancreas were on the sex chromosomes or involved in sex hormone production. On average in each tissue, 32% of autosomal genes that were expressed in a sex-biased fashion contained androgen or estrogen hormone response elements. Interestingly, across all tissues, we found approximately two-thirds of autosomal genes that were sex-biased were not under direct influence of sex hormones. To our knowledge this is the largest analysis of sex-biased gene expression in human tissues to date. We identified many sex-biased genes that were not under the direct influence of sex chromosome genes or sex hormones. These may provide targets for future development of sex-specific treatments for diseases. PMID:27790248

  9. Vascular gene expression: a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Navarro, Angélica C.; Galván-Gordillo, Santiago V.; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a “primitive” vascular tissue (a lycophyte), as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte), and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non-vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT, and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants. PMID:23882276

  10. ADH IB expression, but not ADH III, is decreased in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mutka, Sarah C; Green, Lucia H; Verderber, Evie L; Richards, Jane P; Looker, Doug L; Chlipala, Elizabeth A; Rosenthal, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous S-nitrosothiols, including S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), mediate nitric oxide (NO)-based signaling, inflammatory responses, and smooth muscle function. Reduced GSNO levels have been implicated in several respiratory diseases, and inhibition of GSNO reductase, (GSNOR) the primary enzyme that metabolizes GSNO, represents a novel approach to treating inflammatory lung diseases. Recently, an association between decreased GSNOR expression and human lung cancer risk was proposed in part based on immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal GSNOR antibody. GSNOR is an isozyme of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family, and we demonstrate that the antibody used in those studies cross reacts substantially with other ADH proteins and may not be an appropriate reagent. We evaluated human lung cancer tissue arrays using monoclonal antibodies highly specific for human GSNOR with minimal cross reactivity to other ADH proteins. We verified the presence of GSNOR in ≥85% of specimens examined, and extensive analysis of these samples demonstrated no difference in GSNOR protein expression between cancerous and normal lung tissues. Additionally, GSNOR and other ADH mRNA levels were evaluated quantitatively in lung cancer cDNA arrays by qPCR. Consistent with our immunohistochemical findings, GSNOR mRNA levels were not changed in lung cancer tissues, however the expression levels of other ADH genes were decreased. ADH IB mRNA levels were reduced (>10-fold) in 65% of the lung cancer cDNA specimens. We conclude that the previously reported results showed an incorrect association of GSNOR and human lung cancer risk, and a decrease in ADH IB, rather than GSNOR, correlates with human lung cancer.

  11. ADH IB Expression, but Not ADH III, Is Decreased in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mutka, Sarah C.; Green, Lucia H.; Verderber, Evie L.; Richards, Jane P.; Looker, Doug L.; Chlipala, Elizabeth A.; Rosenthal, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous S-nitrosothiols, including S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), mediate nitric oxide (NO)-based signaling, inflammatory responses, and smooth muscle function. Reduced GSNO levels have been implicated in several respiratory diseases, and inhibition of GSNO reductase, (GSNOR) the primary enzyme that metabolizes GSNO, represents a novel approach to treating inflammatory lung diseases. Recently, an association between decreased GSNOR expression and human lung cancer risk was proposed in part based on immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal GSNOR antibody. GSNOR is an isozyme of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family, and we demonstrate that the antibody used in those studies cross reacts substantially with other ADH proteins and may not be an appropriate reagent. We evaluated human lung cancer tissue arrays using monoclonal antibodies highly specific for human GSNOR with minimal cross reactivity to other ADH proteins. We verified the presence of GSNOR in ≥85% of specimens examined, and extensive analysis of these samples demonstrated no difference in GSNOR protein expression between cancerous and normal lung tissues. Additionally, GSNOR and other ADH mRNA levels were evaluated quantitatively in lung cancer cDNA arrays by qPCR. Consistent with our immunohistochemical findings, GSNOR mRNA levels were not changed in lung cancer tissues, however the expression levels of other ADH genes were decreased. ADH IB mRNA levels were reduced (>10-fold) in 65% of the lung cancer cDNA specimens. We conclude that the previously reported results showed an incorrect association of GSNOR and human lung cancer risk, and a decrease in ADH IB, rather than GSNOR, correlates with human lung cancer. PMID:23285246

  12. ADH IB expression, but not ADH III, is decreased in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mutka, Sarah C; Green, Lucia H; Verderber, Evie L; Richards, Jane P; Looker, Doug L; Chlipala, Elizabeth A; Rosenthal, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous S-nitrosothiols, including S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), mediate nitric oxide (NO)-based signaling, inflammatory responses, and smooth muscle function. Reduced GSNO levels have been implicated in several respiratory diseases, and inhibition of GSNO reductase, (GSNOR) the primary enzyme that metabolizes GSNO, represents a novel approach to treating inflammatory lung diseases. Recently, an association between decreased GSNOR expression and human lung cancer risk was proposed in part based on immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal GSNOR antibody. GSNOR is an isozyme of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family, and we demonstrate that the antibody used in those studies cross reacts substantially with other ADH proteins and may not be an appropriate reagent. We evaluated human lung cancer tissue arrays using monoclonal antibodies highly specific for human GSNOR with minimal cross reactivity to other ADH proteins. We verified the presence of GSNOR in ≥85% of specimens examined, and extensive analysis of these samples demonstrated no difference in GSNOR protein expression between cancerous and normal lung tissues. Additionally, GSNOR and other ADH mRNA levels were evaluated quantitatively in lung cancer cDNA arrays by qPCR. Consistent with our immunohistochemical findings, GSNOR mRNA levels were not changed in lung cancer tissues, however the expression levels of other ADH genes were decreased. ADH IB mRNA levels were reduced (>10-fold) in 65% of the lung cancer cDNA specimens. We conclude that the previously reported results showed an incorrect association of GSNOR and human lung cancer risk, and a decrease in ADH IB, rather than GSNOR, correlates with human lung cancer. PMID:23285246

  13. Coordinated DNA methylation and gene expression changes in smoker alveolar macrophages: specific effects on VEGF receptor 1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Philibert, Robert A.; Sears, Rory A.; Powers, Linda S.; Nash, Emma; Bair, Thomas; Gerke, Alicia K.; Hassan, Ihab; Thomas, Christie P.; Gross, Thomas J.; Monick, Martha M.

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is implicated in numerous diseases, including emphysema and lung cancer. The clinical expression of lung disease in smokers is not well explained by currently defined variations in gene expression or simple differences in smoking exposure. Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in the inflammation and remodeling of the lung parenchyma in smoking-related lung disease. Significant gene expression changes in alveolar macrophages from smokers have been identified. However, the mechanism for these changes remains unknown. One potential mechanism for smoking-altered gene expression is via changes in cytosine methylation in DNA regions proximal to gene-coding sequences. In this study, alveolar macrophage DNA from heavy smokers and never smokers was isolated and methylation status at 25,000 loci determined. We found differential methylation in genes from immune-system and inflammatory pathways. Analysis of matching gene expression data demonstrated a parallel enrichment for changes in immune-system and inflammatory pathways. A significant number of genes with smoking-altered mRNA expression had inverse changes in methylation status. One gene highlighted by this data was the FLT1, and further studies found particular up-regulation of a splice variant encoding a soluble inhibitory form of the receptor. In conclusion, chronic cigarette smoke exposure altered DNA methylation in specific gene promoter regions in human alveolar macrophages. PMID:22427682

  14. Eotaxin Expression in Sephadex-Induced Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ren-Feng; Ward, Peter A.; Jordan, Jacqueline A.; Huber-Lang, Markus; Warner, Roscoe L.; Shi, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    The CC chemokine eotaxin is a potent and specific eosinophil chemoattractant. Eosinophil-dependent tissue injury has been shown to contribute to airway inflammation such as that in asthma. In the present study, We investigated eotaxin expression in a rat model of pulmonary inflammation (featuring accumulation of eosinophils) induced by intratracheal instillation of cross-linked dextran beads (Sephadex G200). Intratracheal instillation of 5 mg/kg Sephadex caused a time-dependent eosinophil infiltration into the lung, reaching a peak at 24 hours. Eotaxin mRNA in the lung paralleled the eosinophil influx. Eotaxin protein in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluids and lung homogenates was shown by Western blot and immunostaining to be maximally expressed by 24 hours. Sephadex-induced lung injury, as measured by 125I-labeled albumin leakage from the pulmonary vasculature, developed in a time-dependent manner. Intravenous injection of blocking antibody to eotaxin significantly decreased eosinophil infiltration and lung permeability. These data suggest that, in the Sephadex model of lung inflammation, eotaxin up-regulation mediates intrapulmonary accumulation of eosinophils and the development of lung injury. PMID:10595930

  15. Polymorphisms associated with expression of BPIFA1/BPIFB1 and lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Saferali, Aabida; Obeidat, Ma'en; Bérubé, Jean-Christophe; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bossé, Yohan; Laviolette, Michel; Hao, Ke; Nickle, David C; Timens, Wim; Sin, Don D; Postma, Dirkje S; Strug, Lisa J; Gallins, Paul J; Paré, Peter D; Bingle, Colin D; Sandford, Andrew J

    2015-11-01

    BPI fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1) and BPIFB1 are putative innate immune molecules expressed in the upper airways. Because of their hypothesized roles in airway defense, these molecules may contribute to lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis (CF). We interrogated BPIFA1/BPIFB1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in data from an association study of CF modifier genes and found an association of the G allele of rs1078761 with increased lung disease severity (P = 2.71 × 10(-4)). We hypothesized that the G allele of rs1078761 is associated with decreased expression of BPIFA1 and/or BPIFB1. Genome-wide lung gene expression and genotyping data from 1,111 individuals with lung disease, including 51 patients with CF, were tested for associations between genotype and BPIFA1 and BPIFB1 gene expression levels. Findings were validated by quantitative PCR in a subset of 77 individuals. Western blotting was used to measure BPIFA1 and BPIFB1 protein levels in 93 lung and 101 saliva samples. The G allele of rs1078761 was significantly associated with decreased mRNA levels of BPIFA1 (P = 4.08 × 10(-15)) and BPIFB1 (P = 0.0314). These findings were confirmed with quantitative PCR and Western blotting. We conclude that the G allele of rs1078761 may be detrimental to lung function in CF owing to decreased levels of BPIFA1 and BPIFB1.

  16. Gene amplification of the transcription factor DP1 and CTNND1 in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sandra D; Angulo, Barbara; Suarez-Gauthier, Ana; Melchor, Lorenzo; Medina, Pedro P; Sanchez-Verde, Lydia; Torres-Lanzas, Juan; Pita, Guillermo; Benitez, Javier; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2010-09-01

    The search for novel oncogenes is important because they could be the target of future specific anticancer therapies. In the present paper we report the identification of novel amplified genes in lung cancer by means of global gene expression analysis. To screen for amplicons, we aligned the gene expression data according to the position of transcripts in the human genome and searched for clusters of over-expressed genes. We found several clusters with gene over-expression, suggesting an underlying genomic amplification. FISH and microarray analysis for DNA copy number in two clusters, at chromosomes 11q12 and 13q34, confirmed the presence of amplifications spanning about 0.4 and 1 Mb for 11q12 and 13q34, respectively. Amplification at these regions each occurred at a frequency of 3%. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR of each individual transcript within the amplicons allowed us to verify the increased in gene expression of several genes. The p120ctn and DP1 proteins, encoded by two candidate oncogenes, CTNND1 and TFDP1, at 11q12 and 13q amplicons, respectively, showed very strong immunostaining in lung tumours with gene amplification. We then focused on the 13q34 amplicon and in the TFDP1 candidate oncogene. To further determine the oncogenic properties of DP1, we searched for lung cancer cell lines carrying TFDP1 amplification. Depletion of TFDP1 expression by small interference RNA in a lung cancer cell line (HCC33) with TFDP1 amplification and protein over-expression reduced cell viability by 50%. In conclusion, we report the identification of two novel amplicons, at 13q34 and 11q12, each occurring at a frequency of 3% of non-small cell lung cancers. TFDP1, which encodes the E2F-associated transcription factor DP1 is a candidate oncogene at 13q34. The data discussed in this publication have been deposited in NCBIs Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) and are accessible through GEO Series Accession No. GSE21168.

  17. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  18. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  19. Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Won-Min; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gene co-expression network analysis has been shown effective in identifying functional co-expressed gene modules associated with complex human diseases. However, existing techniques to construct co-expression networks require some critical prior information such as predefined number of clusters, numerical thresholds for defining co-expression/interaction, or do not naturally reproduce the hallmarks of complex systems such as the scale-free degree distribution of small-worldness. Previously, a graph filtering technique called Planar Maximally Filtered Graph (PMFG) has been applied to many real-world data sets such as financial stock prices and gene expression to extract meaningful and relevant interactions. However, PMFG is not suitable for large-scale genomic data due to several drawbacks, such as the high computation complexity O(|V|3), the presence of false-positives due to the maximal planarity constraint, and the inadequacy of the clustering framework. Here, we developed a new co-expression network analysis framework called Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (MEGENA) by: i) introducing quality control of co-expression similarities, ii) parallelizing embedded network construction, and iii) developing a novel clustering technique to identify multi-scale clustering structures in Planar Filtered Networks (PFNs). We applied MEGENA to a series of simulated data and the gene expression data in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). MEGENA showed improved performance over well-established clustering methods and co-expression network construction approaches. MEGENA revealed not only meaningful multi-scale organizations of co-expressed gene clusters but also novel targets in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26618778

  20. Angiogenin and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in lungs of lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Rozman, Ales; Silar, Mira; Kosnik, Mitja

    2012-01-01

    Background. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Angiogenesis is crucial process in cancer growth and progression. This prospective study evaluated expression of two central regulatory molecules: angiogenin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in patients with lung cancer. Patients and methods. Clinical data, blood samples and broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) from 23 patients with primary lung carcinoma were collected. BAL fluid was taken from part of the lung with malignancy, and from corresponding healthy side of the lung. VEGF and angiogenin concentrations were analysed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Dilution of bronchial secretions in the BAL fluid was calculated from urea concentration ratio between serum and BAL fluid. Results. We found no statistical correlation between angiogenin concentrations in serum and in bronchial secretions from both parts of the lung. VEGF concentrations were greater in bronchial secretions in the affected side of the lung than on healthy side. Both concentrations were greater than serum VEGF concentration. VEGF concentration in serum was in positive correlation with tumour size (p = 0,003) and with metastatic stage of disease (p = 0,041). There was correlation between VEGF and angiogenin concentrations in bronchial secretions from healthy side of the lung and between VEGF and angiogenin concentrations in bronchial secretions from part of the lung with malignancy. Conclusion. Angiogenin and VEGF concentrations in systemic, background and local samples of patients with lung cancer are affected by different mechanisms. Pro-angiogenic activity of lung cancer has an important influence on the levels of angiogenin and VEGF. PMID:23412843

  1. Duplicate genes increase gene expression diversity within and between species.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenglong; Rifkin, Scott A; White, Kevin P; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2004-06-01

    Using microarray gene expression data from several Drosophila species and strains, we show that duplicated genes, compared with single-copy genes, significantly increase gene expression diversity during development. We show further that duplicate genes tend to cause expression divergences between Drosophila species (or strains) to evolve faster than do single-copy genes. This conclusion is also supported by data from different yeast strains.

  2. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  3. The expression and function of microRNA-203 in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jianhua; Deng, Jianzhong; Wang, Fang; Xia, Xiyi; Qiu, Tiefeng; Lu, Wenbin; Li, Xianwen; Zhang, Hua; Gu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yungang; Cao, Weiguo; Shao, Wenlong

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to determine the expression of microRNA-203 (miR-203) in human lung cancer cell lines and to evaluate the effects of miR-203 by targeting survivin, on the lung cancer cell line 95-D to provide potential new strategies for treating lung cancer. The expression of miR-203 was detected using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in the in vitro cultured lung cancer cells A549, HCC827, NCI-H1299, and 95-D as well as in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Following a 72-h transfection with the miR-203 precursor in 95-D lung cancer cells, the change in miR-203 expression was detected using qRT-PCR and the resulting effect on survivin protein expression was ascertained by Western blot analysis. The influence of miR-203 on the viability of 95-D lung cancer cells was evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effect of miR-203 on 95-D cell proliferation was analyzed using flow cytometry. The consequences of miR-203 expression on 95-D cell apoptosis were analyzed by Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining coupled with flow cytometry. The role of miR-203 in the invasive potential of 95-D cells was studied using a transwell chamber assay. A luciferase reporter gene system was used to verify that survivin is a target gene for miR-203. By qRT-PCR, the expression of miR-203 was lower in lung cancer cells than in normal bronchial epithelial cells (p < 0.01), and the expression of miR-203 in 95-D lung cancer cells was significantly higher after a 72-h transfection with the miR-203 precursor (p < 0.01). After a 72-h transfection with the miR-203 precursor, survivin protein levels in 95-D cells were significantly decreased (p < 0.01). Cell viability, as assessed with an MTT assay, decreased following an increase in miR-203 expression (p < 0.05). The flow cytometry results indicated that after miR-203 expression increased, the cell proliferation index decreased (p < 0.05) and the number of apoptotic

  4. Cancer genes in lung cancer: racial disparities: are there any?

    PubMed

    El-Telbany, Ahmed; Ma, Patrick C

    2012-07-01

    Cancer is now known as a disease of genomic alterations. Mutational analysis and genomics profiling in recent years have advanced the field of lung cancer genetics/genomics significantly. It is becoming more accepted now that the identification of genomic alterations in lung cancer can impact therapeutics, especially when the alterations represent "oncogenic drivers" in the processes of tumorigenesis and progression. In this review, we will highlight the key driver oncogenic gene mutations and fusions identified in lung cancer. The review will summarize and report the available demographic and clinicopathological data as well as molecular details behind various lung cancer gene alterations in the context of race. We hope to shed some light into the disparities in the incidence of various genetic mutations among lung cancer patients of different racial backgrounds. As molecularly targeted therapy continues to advance in lung cancer, racial differences in specific genetic/genomic alterations can have an important impact in the choices of therapeutics and in our understanding of the drug sensitivity/resistance profile. The most relevant genes in lung cancer described in this review include the following: EGFR, KRAS, MET, LKB1, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, RET, and ROS1. Commonly identified genetic/genomic alterations such as missense or nonsense mutations, small insertions or deletions, alternative splicing, and chromosomal fusion rearrangements were discussed. Relevance in current targeted therapeutic drugs was mentioned when appropriate. We also highlighted various targeted therapeutics that are currently under clinical development, such as the MET inhibitors and antibodies. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the landscape of genomic alterations in lung cancer is expected to be much transformed and detailed in upcoming years. These genomic landscape differences in the context of racial disparities should be emphasized both in tumorigenesis and in drug sensitivity

  5. CFTR gene transfer to lung epithelium--on the trail of a target cell.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, S; Harrison, D J

    2002-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal inherited disease that afflicts up to 1 in 2,500 people in the western world. Since 1989, when mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene were identified as responsible for the disease, intense effort has been applied to the development of replacement gene therapy strategies to cure CF. Problems with basic gene delivery techniques along with limited knowledge of the pathogenesis of CF have hindered progress so far. However, recent insights into the expression patterns and functions of CFTR in developing and adult lungs are now advancing our understanding of this disease. It is becoming apparent that progress in gene delivery to cure CF may be best served by identification of a target cell(s) around which gene transfer strategies can be specifically tailored to most closely reproduce the effects of normal CFTR expression. In fact, accurate restoration of endogenous expression patterns may be crucial, not only for disease reversal, but also to avoid potentially deleterious effects of inappropriate expression. This approach is in turn confounded however, by ill-defined stem and progenitor cell pathways within the lung epithelium. Nonetheless, studies to date suggest that these pathways are relatively plastic and may respond differently during homeostasis compared with repair following injury. It may therefore be feasible to target the lung epithelium in a non-cell specific manner and allow endogenous differentiation pathways to subsequently establish correct CFTR distribution patterns. In this review, emerging information on CFTR expression and function in developing and adult lungs is discussed in the context of putative stem cell populations and their potential for current gene delivery approaches. PMID:12109214

  6. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression in human airway correlates with lung function.

    PubMed

    Lam, David Chi-Leung; Luo, Susan Yang; Fu, Kin-Hang; Lui, Macy Mei-Sze; Chan, Koon-Ho; Wistuba, Ignacio Ivans; Gao, Boning; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Ip, Mary Sau-Man; Minna, John Dorrance

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine and its derivatives, by binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on bronchial epithelial cells, can regulate cellular signaling and inflammatory processes. Delineation of nAChR subtypes and their responses to nicotine stimulation in bronchial epithelium may provide information for therapeutic targeting in smoking-related inflammation in the airway. Expression of nAChR subunit genes in 60 bronchial epithelial biopsies and immunohistochemical staining for the subcellular locations of nAChR subunit expression were evaluated. Seven human bronchial epithelial cell lines (HBECs) were exposed to nicotine in vitro for their response in nAChR subunit gene expression to nicotine exposure and removal. The relative normalized amount of expression of nAChR α4, α5, and α7 and immunohistochemical staining intensity of nAChR α4, α5, and β3 expression showed significant correlation with lung function parameters. Nicotine stimulation in HBECs resulted in transient increase in the levels of nAChR α5 and α6 but more sustained increase in nAChR α7 expression. nAChR expression in bronchial epithelium was found to correlate with lung function. Nicotine exposure in HBECs resulted in both short and longer term responses in nAChR subunit gene expression. These results gave insight into the potential of targeting nAChRs for therapy in smoking-related inflammation in the airway. PMID:26608528

  7. Site-Specific Gene Expression in Vivo by Direct Gene Transfer into the Arterial Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Plautz, Gregory; Nabel, Gary J.

    1990-09-01

    A recombinant β-galactosidase gene has been expressed in a specific arterial segment in vivo by direct infection with a murine amphotropic retroviral vector or by DNA transfection with the use of liposomes. Several cell types in the vessel wall were transduced, including endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. After retroviral infection, a recombinant reporter gene was expressed for at least 5 months, and no helper virus was detected. Recombinant gene expression achieved by direct retroviral infection or liposome-mediated DNA transfection was limited to the site of infection and was absent from liver, lung, kidney, and spleen. These results demonstrate that site-specific gene expression can be achieved by direct gene transfer in vivo and could be applied to the treatment of such human diseases as atherosclerosis or cancer.

  8. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  9. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  10. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  11. Frequent loss of Fas expression and function in human lung tumours with overexpression of FasL in small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Viard-Leveugle, Isabelle; Veyrenc, Sylvie; French, Lars E; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth

    2003-10-01

    Fas (CD95) and its ligand FasL signal apoptosis and are involved in tissue homeostasis and the elimination of target cells by cytotoxic T cells. Corruption of this signalling pathway in tumour cells, for example by reduced Fas expression or increased FasL expression, can participate in tumour development and immune escape. The present study has analysed Fas/FasL expression and Fas death signalling function in vivo in lung tumour tissues [57 non-small cell lung carcinomas and 64 neuroendocrine lung tumours including small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC)] in comparison with normal lung tissue, and in vitro in neuroendocrine tumour cell lines in comparison with normal human bronchial epithelial cells. The Fas expression score was markedly decreased compared with normal lung tissue in 90% of the 121 lung tumours and was completely lost in 24%. The Fas staining pattern suggested cytoplasmic Fas expression in tumours, whereas membrane expression was observed in normal lung tissue. Loss of Fas at the cell surface was also shown in vitro by FACS analysis of neuroendocrine tumour cell lines and was concomitant with the resistance of tumour cells to FasL-mediated apoptosis according to in vitro cell viability. The lack of cell surface Fas expression in tumour cell lines resulted from the lack of intracellular Fas protein due to impaired Fas gene transcription. The FasL expression score was also decreased in most non-small cell lung carcinomas compared with normal bronchial cells, whereas 91% of SCLCs had higher expression than normal cells. FasL overexpression was related to advanced tumour stage as well as to a Fas/FasL ratio less than 1. It is concluded that a marked decrease in Fas expression may be part of lung tumourigenesis allowing tumour cells to escape from apoptosis. FasL overexpression in the context of Fas down-regulation in SCLC predicts the ability of SCLC cells to induce paracrine killing of Fas-expressing cytotoxic T cells. In lung tumours, Fas restoration may

  12. Differentially Expressed miRNAs in Tumor, Adjacent, and Normal Tissues of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhenzhu; Shen, Yanting; Lu, Jiafeng; Xie, Xueying; Ge, Qinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the major type of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression profiles of miRNAs in adenocarcinoma (AC), one major subtype of NSCLC. In this study, the miRNAs were detected in normal, adjacent, and tumor tissues by next-generation sequencing. Then the expression levels of differential miRNAs were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In the results, 259, 401, and 389 miRNAs were detected in tumor, adjacent, and normal tissues of pooled AC samples, respectively. In addition, for the first time we have found that miR-21-5p and miR-196a-5p were gradually upregulated from normal to adjacent to tumor tissues; miR-218-5p was gradually downregulated with 2-fold or greater change in AC tissues. These 3 miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Lastly, we predicted target genes of these 3 miRNAs and enriched the potential functions and regulatory pathways. The aberrant miR-21-5p, miR-196a-5p, and miR-218-5p may become biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. This research may be useful for lung adenocarcinoma diagnosis and the study of pathology in lung cancer. PMID:27247934

  13. In utero lung gene transfer using adeno-associated viral and lentiviral vectors in mice.

    PubMed

    Joyeux, Luc; Danzer, Enrico; Limberis, Maria P; Zoltick, Philip W; Radu, Antoneta; Flake, Alan W; Davey, Marcus G

    2014-06-01

    Virus-mediated gene transfer to the fetal lung epithelium holds considerable promise for the therapeutic management of prenatally diagnosed, potentially life-threatening inherited lung diseases. In this study we hypothesized that efficient and life-long lung transduction can be achieved by in utero gene therapy, using viral vectors. To facilitate diffuse entry into the lung, viral vector was injected into the amniotic sac of C57BL/6 mice on embryonic day 16 (term, ∼ 20 days) in a volume of 10 μl. Vectors investigated included those based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) (serotypes 5, 6.2, 9, rh.64R1) and vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped HIV-1-based lentivirus (LV). All vectors expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the transcriptional control of various promoters including chicken β-actin (CB) or cytomegalovirus (CMV) for AAV and CMV or MND (myeloproliferative sarcoma virus enhancer, negative control region deleted) for LV. Pulmonary GFP gene expression was detected by fluorescence stereoscopic microscopy and immunohistochemistry for up to 9 months after birth. At equivalent vector doses (mean, 12 × 10(10) genome copies per fetus) three AAV vectors resulted in long-term (up to 9 months) pulmonary epithelium transduction. AAV2/6.2 transduced predominantly cells of the conducting airway epithelium, although transduction decreased 2 months after vector delivery. AAV2/9-transduced cells of the alveolar epithelium with a type 1 pneumocyte phenotype for up to 6 months. Although minimal levels of GFP expression were observed with AAV2/5 up to 9 months, the transduced cells immunostained positive for F480 and were retrievable by bronchoalveolar lavage, confirming an alveolar macrophage phenotype. No GFP expression was observed in lung epithelial cells after AAV2/rh.64R1 and VSV-G-LV vector-mediated gene transfer. We conclude that these experiments demonstrate that prenatal lung gene transfer with AAV vectors engineered to target

  14. Target genes regulated by transcription factor E2F1 in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zun-Ling; Jiao, Fei; Ma, Ying; Yue, Zhen; Kong, Li-Jun

    2016-06-25

    Previously, we have reported that transcription factor E2F1 expression is up-regulated in approximately 95% of small cell lung cancer tissue samples and closely associated with invasion and metastasis, but few studies have investigated specific target genes regulated by E2F1 in this disease. The aim of this study was to clarify the target genes controlled by E2F1 in the small cell lung cancer cell line H1688. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) showed that total 5 326 potential target genes were identified, in which 4 700 were structural genes and 626 long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Gene Ontology (GO) and enrichment map analysis results indicated that these target genes were associated with three main functions: (1) cell cycle regulation, (2) chromatin and histone modification, and (3) protein transport. MEME4.7.0 software was used to identify the E2F1 binding DNA motif, and six motifs were discovered for coding genes and lncRNAs. These results clarify the target genes of E2F1, and provide the experimental basis for further exploring the roles of E2F1 in tumorigenesis, development, invasion and metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance in small cell lung cancer.

  15. Enhanced expressions and histological characteristics of intravenously administered plasmid DNA in rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Rha, S. J.; Wang, Y. P.

    2001-01-01

    Cationic liposome-mediated gene transfection is a promising method for gene therapy. In this study, the transfection efficiency and histological patterns were evaluated in rat lung after intravenous administration via femoral vein of naked plasmid DNA, naked plasmid DNA with pretreatment of DOTAP, and DOTAP-cholesterol-plasmid DNA complex. Plasmid DNA encoding bacterial LacZ gene was used. For quantification of LacZ gene expression, beta-galactosidase assay was performed. For histologic examination, X-gal staining and immunohistochemical staining for transfected gene products were performed. Pretreatment of DOTAP prior to the infusion of naked plasmid DNA increased transfection efficiency up to a level comparable to DOTAP-cholesterol-plasmid DNA complex injection. Transfected genes were mainly expressed in type II pneumocytes and alveolar macrophages in all animals. We conclude that the high transfection efficiency is achievable by intravenous administration of naked plasmid DNA with pretreatment of DOTAP, to a level comparable to DOTAP-cholesterol-plasmid DNA complex. In this regard, naked plasmid DNA administration with pretreatment of DOTAP could be a more feasible option for intravenous gene transfer than DOTAP-cholesterol-plasmid DNA complex, in that the former is technically easier and more cost-effective than the latter with a comparable efficacy, in terms of intravenous gene delivery to the lung. PMID:11641524

  16. Targeting gene expression to the wool follicle in transgenic sheep.

    PubMed

    Damak, S; Jay, N P; Barrell, G K; Bullock, D W

    1996-02-01

    To establish the feasibility of overexpressing foreign genes in the wool follicle, transgenic sheep were produced by pronuclear microinjection of a DNA construct consisting of a mouse ultrahigh-sulfur keratin promoter linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene. Four of 31 lambs born were transgenic. The overall efficiency of transgenesis was 1.1% of zygotes injected and transferred. Two transgenic rams were mated to nontransgenic ewes, and both transmitted the gene to their offspring in Mendelian fashion. CAT expression was found in the skin of one G0 ram and in 9 out of 26 transgenic G1 progeny. Two G1 lambs were sacrificed to study tissue specificity. Both had high levels of expression in skin but One had high expression in spleen and kidney with lower levels of expression in lung; the other had low expression in spleen, lung, and muscle. In situ hybridization demonstrated that transgene expression in the skin was confined to the keratogenous zone of the wool follicle cortex. Expression of CAT activity in skin was correlated with diet-induced or seasonal changes in the rate of wool growth. This keratin promoter appears useful for overexpressing factors in the wool follicle that might influence wool production or properties.

  17. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  18. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, Alexis A.; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized “mitochondrial RNA granules,” mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  19. DIFFERENTIAL GENE EXPRESSION BY CHAPEL HILL FINE PARTICLES IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pollutant particles (PM) induce systemic and lung inflammation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) are one of the lung cells directly exposed to PM that may initiate these responses. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile induced by Chapel Hill fine particles (PM2.5) in ...

  20. Nuclear Receptor Expression and Function in Human Lung Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihye; Sato, Mitsuo; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Larsen, Jill E.; Minna, John D.; Cha, Jeong-Heon; Jeong, Yangsik

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is caused by combinations of diverse genetic mutations. Here, to understand the relevance of nuclear receptors (NRs) in the oncogene-associated lung cancer pathogenesis, we investigated the expression profile of the entire 48 NR members by using QPCR analysis in a panel of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) that included precancerous and tumorigenic HBECs harboring oncogenic K-rasV12 and/or p53 alterations. The analysis of the profile revealed that oncogenic alterations accompanied transcriptional changes in the expression of 19 NRs in precancerous HBECs and 15 NRs according to the malignant progression of HBECs. Amongst these, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a NR chosen as a proof-of-principle study, showed increased expression in precancerous HBECs, which was surprisingly reversed when these HBECs acquired full in vivo tumorigenicity. Notably, PPARγ activation by thiazolidinedione (TZD) treatment reversed the increased expression of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) in precancerous HBECs. In fully tumorigenic HBECs with inducible expression of PPARγ, TZD treatments inhibited tumor cell growth, clonogenecity, and cell migration in a PPARγ-sumoylation dependent manner. Mechanistically, the sumoylation of liganded-PPARγ decreased COX2 expression and increased 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression. This suggests that ligand-mediated sumoylation of PPARγ plays an important role in lung cancer pathogenesis by modulating prostaglandin metabolism. PMID:26244663

  1. TGF-β1 Upregulates the Expression of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1 in Murine Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Li; Zhou, Yong; Dong, Liang; Chen, Rui-Qi; Sun, Guo-Ying; Liu, Tian; Ran, Wen-Zhuo; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) increases the expression of TGF-β family genes, which are known as profibrogenic cytokines in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we determined whether TGF-β1 regulated the expression of TREM-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. The expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1 was increased on day 7, 14, and 21 after single intratracheal injection of bleomycin (BLM). And there was positive correlation between the expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1. TGF-β1 increased expression of TREM-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. The expression of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) was increased in lung tissues from mouse after BLM injection and in mouse macrophages after TGF-β1 treatment, respectively. TGF-β1 significantly increased the relative activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with plasmid contenting wild type-promoter of TREM-1. But TGF-β1 had no effect on the activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with a mutant-TREM1 plasmid carrying mutations in the AP-1 promoter binding site. In conclusion, we found the expression of TREM-1 was increased in lung tissues from mice with pulmonary fibrosis. TGF-β1 increased the expression of TREM-1 in mouse macrophages partly via the transcription factor AP-1. PMID:26738569

  2. Genetic Determinants for Promoter Hypermethylation in the Lungs of Smokers: A Candidate Gene-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Stidley, Christine A.; Liu, Yushi; Edlund, Christopher K.; Willink, Randall P.; Han, Younghun; Landi, Maria Teresa; Thun, Michael; Picchi, Maria A.; Bruse, Shannon E.; Crowell, Richard E.; Van Den Berg, David; Caporaso, Neil E.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siegfried, Jill M.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Gilliland, Frank D.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of tumor suppressor gene promoter methylation in sputum-derived exfoliated cells predicts early lung cancer. Here we identified genetic determinants for this epigenetic process and examined their biological effects on gene regulation. A two-stage approach involving discovery and replication was employed to assess the association between promoter hypermethylation of a 12-gene panel and common variation in 40 genes involved in carcinogen metabolism, regulation of methylation, and DNA damage response in members of the Lovelace Smokers Cohort (n=1434). Molecular validation of three identified variants was conducted using primary bronchial epithelial cells. Association of study-wide significance (P<8.2×10−5) was identified for rs1641511, rs3730859, and rs1883264 in TP53, LIG1, and BIK, respectively. These SNPs were significantly associated with altered expression of the corresponding genes in primary bronchial epithelial cells. In addition, rs3730859 in LIG1 was also moderately associated with increased risk for lung cancer among Caucasian smokers. Together, our findings suggest that genetic variation in DNA replication and apoptosis pathways impacts the propensity for gene promoter hypermethylation in the aerodigestive tract of smokers. The incorporation of genetic biomarkers for gene promoter hypermethylation with clinical and somatic markers may improve risk assessment models for lung cancer. PMID:22139380

  3. Differential expression of forkhead box transcription factors following butylated hydroxytoluene lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kalinichenko, V V; Lim, L; Shin, B; Costa, R H

    2001-04-01

    The forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a growing family of transcription factors that have important roles in cellular proliferation and differentiation and in organ morphogenesis. The Fox family members hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-3beta (Foxa2) and HNF-3/forkhead homolog (HFH)-8 (FREAC-1, Foxf1) are expressed in adult pulmonary epithelial and mesenchymal cells, respectively, but these cells display only low expression levels of the proliferation-specific HFH-11B gene (Trident, Foxm1b). The regulation of these Fox transcription factors in response to acute lung injury, however, has yet to be determined. We report here on the use of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-mediated lung injury to demonstrate that HFH-11 protein and RNA levels were markedly increased throughout the period of lung repair. The maximum levels of HFH-11 were observed by day 2 following BHT injury when both bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells were undergoing extensive proliferation. Although BHT lung injury did not alter epithelial cell expression of HNF-3beta, a 65% reduction in HFH-8 mRNA levels was observed during the period of mesenchymal cell proliferation. HFH-8-expressing cells were colocalized with platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1-positive alveolar endothelial cells and with alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive peribronchiolar smooth muscle cells.

  4. Identification of crucial microRNAs and genes in hypoxia-induced human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ying; Deng, Lili; Su, Dongju; Xiao, Jinling; Ge, Dongjie; Bao, Yongxia; Jing, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Variations of microRNA (miRNA) expression profile in hypoxic lung cancer cells have not been studied so far. Therefore, using miRNA microarray technology, this study aimed to study the miRNA expression profile and investigate the potential crucial miRNAs and their target genes in hypoxia-induced human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Materials and methods Based on miRNA microarray, miRNA expression profiling of hypoxia-induced lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells was obtained. After identification of differentially expressed miRNAs (DE-miRNAs) in hypoxic cells, target genes of DE-miRNAs were predicted, and functional enrichment analysis of targets was conducted. Furthermore, the expression levels of DE-miRNAs and their target genes were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, using miRNA mimics, the effect of overexpressed DE-miRNAs on A549 cell behaviors (cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis) was evaluated. Results In total, 14 DE-miRNAs (nine upregulated miRNAs and five downregulated miRNAs) were identified in hypoxic cells, compared with normoxic cells. Target genes of both upregulated and downregulated miRNAs were enriched in the functions such as chromatin modification, and pathways such as Wnt signaling pathway and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway. The expression levels of several miRNAs and their target genes were confirmed, including hsa-miR-301b/FOXF2, hsa-miR-148b-3p/WNT10B, hsa-miR-769-5p/(SMAD2, ARID1A), and hsa-miR-622. Among them, hsa-miR-301b was verified to regulate FOXF2, and hsa-miR-769-5p was verified to modulate ARID1A. In addition, the overexpression of hsa-miR-301b and hsa-miR-769-5p significantly affected the cell cycle of A549 cells, but not cell proliferation and apoptosis. Conclusion miRNA expression profile was changed in hypoxia-induced lung cancer cells. Those validated miRNAs and genes may play crucial roles in the response of lung cancer cells to hypoxia. PMID:27524914

  5. Influence of beta(2)-integrin adhesion molecule expression and pulmonary infection with Pasteurella haemolytica on cytokine gene expression in cattle.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Y; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A; Gallup, J M; Ackermann, M R

    2000-07-01

    beta(2)-Integrins are leukocyte adhesion molecules composed of alpha (CD11a, -b, -c, or -d) and beta (CD18) subunit heterodimers. Genetic CD18 deficiency results in impaired neutrophil egress into tissues that varies between conducting airways and alveoli of the lung. In this study, we investigated whether CD18 deficiency in cattle affects proinflammatory cytokine (PIC) expression in pulmonary tissue after respiratory infection with Pasteurella haemolytica. Cattle were infected with P. haemolytica via fiberoptic deposition of organisms into the posterior part of the right cranial lung lobe. Animals were euthanized at 2 or 4 h postinoculation (p.i.), and tissues were collected to assess PIC gene expression using antisense RNA probes specific for bovine interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) along with the beta-actin (beta-Act) housekeeping gene. Expression of PIC was induced at 2 h p.i. in P. haemolytica-infected cattle and continued to 4 h p.i. At 2 h p.i., induction of gene expression and increase of cells that expressed PIC were observed both in CD18(+) and CD18(-) cattle after inoculation of P. haemolytica. The induction of gene expression with P. haemolytica inoculation was more prominent in CD18(-) cattle than in CD18(+) cattle by comparison to pyrogen-free saline (PFS)-inoculated control animals. At 4 h p.i., however, the induction of PIC, especially IL-1alpha, IL-6, and IFN-gamma, in the lungs of CD18(+) cattle inoculated with P. haemolytica was greater than that in lungs of the CD18(-) cattle. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha genes were not increased in P. haemolytica-inoculated CD18(-) cattle lungs compared to the PFS-inoculated control lungs at 4 h p.i. In PFS-inoculated lungs, we generally observed a higher percentage of cells and higher level of gene expression in the lungs of CD18(-) cattle than in the lungs of CD18(+) cattle, especially at 4 h p.i. The rate of neutrophil

  6. Study of the combined treatment of lung cancer using gene-loaded immunomagnetic albumin nanospheres in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Liang, Chen; Hou, Xinxin; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy for lung cancer has garnered widespread attention. Radiation therapy, gene therapy, and molecular targeted therapy for lung cancer have certain effects, but the disadvantages of these treatment methods are evident. Combining these methods can decrease their side effects and increase their curative effects. In this study, we constructed a pYr-ads-8-5HRE-cfosp-iNOS-IFNG plasmid (a gene circuit that can express IFNγ), which is a gene circuit, and used that plasmid together with C225 (cetuximab) to prepare gene-loaded immunomagnetic albumin nanospheres (IMANS). Moreover, we investigated the therapeutic effects of gene-loaded IMANS in combination with radiation therapy on human lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that this gene circuit was successively constructed and confirmed that the expression of INFγ was increased due to the gene circuit. Gene-loaded IMANS combined with radiation therapy demonstrated improved results in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, gene-loaded IMANS enhanced the efficacy of combination therapy, solved problems related to gene transfer, and specifically targeted lung cancer cells. PMID:27042059

  7. Micro RNA-98 interferes with expression interleukin-10 in peripheral B cells of patients with lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Rong, Jian; Qin, Jie; He, Jin-Yuan; Chen, Hui-Guo; Huang, Shao-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10-producing B cells (B10 cells) plays an important role in the tumor tolerance. High frequency of peripheral B10 cell was reported in patients with lung cancer recently. Micro RNA (miR) regulates some gene expression. This study test a hypothesis that miR-98 suppresses the expression of IL-10 in B cells of subjects with lung cancer. The results showed that the levels of miR-98 were significantly less in peripheral B cells of patients with lung cancer than that in healthy subjects. IL-10 mRNA levels in peripheral B cells were significantly higher in lung cancer patients as compared with healthy controls. A negative correlation was identified between miR-98 and IL-10 in peripheral B cells. Serum IL-13 was higher in lung cancer patients than that in healthy controls. The levels of IL-13 were also negatively correlated with IL-10 in B cells. Exposure B10 cells to IL-13 in the culture or over expression of miR-98 reduced the expression of IL-10 in B cells. Administration with miR-98-laden liposomes inhibited the lung cancer growth in a mouse model. In conclusion, up regulation of miR-98 inhibits the expression of IL-10 in B cells, which may contribute to inhibit the lung cancer tolerance in the body.

  8. Micro RNA-98 interferes with expression interleukin-10 in peripheral B cells of patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Rong, Jian; Qin, Jie; He, Jin-Yuan; Chen, Hui-Guo; Huang, Shao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10-producing B cells (B10 cells) plays an important role in the tumor tolerance. High frequency of peripheral B10 cell was reported in patients with lung cancer recently. Micro RNA (miR) regulates some gene expression. This study test a hypothesis that miR-98 suppresses the expression of IL-10 in B cells of subjects with lung cancer. The results showed that the levels of miR-98 were significantly less in peripheral B cells of patients with lung cancer than that in healthy subjects. IL-10 mRNA levels in peripheral B cells were significantly higher in lung cancer patients as compared with healthy controls. A negative correlation was identified between miR-98 and IL-10 in peripheral B cells. Serum IL-13 was higher in lung cancer patients than that in healthy controls. The levels of IL-13 were also negatively correlated with IL-10 in B cells. Exposure B10 cells to IL-13 in the culture or over expression of miR-98 reduced the expression of IL-10 in B cells. Administration with miR-98-laden liposomes inhibited the lung cancer growth in a mouse model. In conclusion, up regulation of miR-98 inhibits the expression of IL-10 in B cells, which may contribute to inhibit the lung cancer tolerance in the body. PMID:27605397

  9. Micro RNA-98 interferes with expression interleukin-10 in peripheral B cells of patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Rong, Jian; Qin, Jie; He, Jin-yuan; Chen, Hui-guo; Huang, Shao-hong

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10-producing B cells (B10 cells) plays an important role in the tumor tolerance. High frequency of peripheral B10 cell was reported in patients with lung cancer recently. Micro RNA (miR) regulates some gene expression. This study test a hypothesis that miR-98 suppresses the expression of IL-10 in B cells of subjects with lung cancer. The results showed that the levels of miR-98 were significantly less in peripheral B cells of patients with lung cancer than that in healthy subjects. IL-10 mRNA levels in peripheral B cells were significantly higher in lung cancer patients as compared with healthy controls. A negative correlation was identified between miR-98 and IL-10 in peripheral B cells. Serum IL-13 was higher in lung cancer patients than that in healthy controls. The levels of IL-13 were also negatively correlated with IL-10 in B cells. Exposure B10 cells to IL-13 in the culture or over expression of miR-98 reduced the expression of IL-10 in B cells. Administration with miR-98-laden liposomes inhibited the lung cancer growth in a mouse model. In conclusion, up regulation of miR-98 inhibits the expression of IL-10 in B cells, which may contribute to inhibit the lung cancer tolerance in the body. PMID:27605397

  10. Early response of gene clusters is associated with mouse lung resistance or sensitivity to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Cavarra, Eleonora; Fardin, Paolo; Fineschi, Silvia; Ricciardi, Annamaria; De Cunto, Giovanna; Sallustio, Fabio; Zorzetto, Michele; Luisetti, Maurizio; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Varesio, Luigi

    2009-03-01

    We have investigated the effects of cigarette smoke exposure in three different strains of mice. DBA/2 and C57BL/6J are susceptible to smoke and develop different lung changes in response to chronic exposure, whereas ICR mice are resistant to smoke and do not develop emphysema. The present study was carried out to determine early changes in the gene expression profile of mice exposed to cigarette smoke with either a susceptible or resistant phenotype. The three strains of mice were exposed to smoke from three cigarettes per day, 5 days/wk, for 4 wk. Microarray analysis was carried out on total RNA extracted from the lung using the Affymetrix platform. Cigarette smoke modulates several clusters of genes (i.e., proemphysematous, acute phase response, and cell adhesion) in smoke-sensitive DBA/2 or C57BL/6J strains, but the same genes are not altered by smoke in ICR resistant mice. Only a few genes were commonly modulated by smoke in the three strains of mice. This pattern of gene expression suggests that the response to smoke is strain-dependent and may involve different molecular signaling pathways. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to verify the pattern of modulation of selected genes and their potential biological relevance. We conclude that gene expression response to smoke is highly dependent on the mouse genetic background. We speculate that the definition of gene clusters associated, to various degrees, with mouse susceptibility or resistance to smoke may be instrumental in defining the molecular basis of the individual response to smoke-induced lung injury in humans.

  11. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeutic efficacy of gene delivery, various carriers have been engineered and developed to provide protection to the genetic materials and efficient delivery to targeted cancer cells. Nanoparticles play an important role in the area of drug delivery and have been widely applied in cancer treatments for the purposes of controlled release and cancer cell targeting. Nanoparticles composed of artificial polymers, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences to target cancer. In addition, the effectiveness of cancer targeting has been enhanced by surface modification or conjugation with biomolecules on the surface of nanoparticles. In this review article we provide an overview on the latest developments in nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancers. Firstly, we outline the conventional therapies and discuss strategies for targeted gene therapy using nanoparticles. Secondly, we provide the most representative and recent researches in lung cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma, mainly focusing on the application of Polymeric, Lipid-based, and Metal-based nanoparticles. Finally, we discuss current achievements and future challenges. PMID:27294004

  12. Expression of antioxidant enzymes in rat lungs after inhalation of asbestos or silica.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Y M; Marsh, J P; Absher, M P; Hemenway, D; Vacek, P M; Leslie, K O; Borm, P J; Mossman, B T

    1992-05-25

    Several studies indicate that active oxygen species play an important role in the development of pulmonary disease (asbestosis and silicosis) after exposure to mineral dust. The present study was conducted to determine if inhaled fibrogenic minerals induced changes in gene expression and activities of antioxidant enzymes (AOE) in rat lung. Two different fibrogenic minerals were compared, crocidolite, an amphibole asbestos fiber, and cristobalite, a crystalline silicon dioxide particle. Steady-state mRNA levels, immunoreactive protein, and activities of selected AOE were measured in lungs 1-10 days after initiation of exposure and at 14 days after cessation of a 10-day exposure period. Exposure to asbestos resulted in significant increases in steady-state mRNA levels of manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) at 3 and 9 days and of glutathione peroxidase at 6 and 9 days. An increase in steady-state mRNA levels of copper, zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), was observed at 6 days. Exposure to asbestos also resulted in overall increased enzyme activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and total superoxide dismutase in lung. In contrast, silica caused a dramatic increase in steady-state levels of MnSOD mRNA at all time periods and an increase in glutathione peroxidase mRNA levels at 9 days. Activities of AOE remained unchanged in silica-exposed lungs. In both models, increases in gene expression of MnSOD correlated with increased amounts of MnSOD immunoreactive protein in lung and the pattern and extent of inflammation. These data indicate that the profiles of AOE are dissimilar during the development of experimental asbestosis or silicosis and suggest different mechanisms of lung defense in response to these minerals. PMID:1316905

  13. Differential expression of Dickkopf-1 among non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiao Jun; Liu, Ya Wen; Chen, Dian Dian; Yu, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is a negative regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which is expressed in various human cancers. It was hypothesized that DKK1 was oncogenic and involved in invasive growth in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. The present study aimed to investigate whether DKK1 gene expression levels differ among various NSCLC cells. The DKK1 expression pattern was analyzed in various human NSCLC cell lines and tissues. The DKK1 protein and gene expression levels were quantified using immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunohistochemistry. The majority of the lung cancer cell lines analyzed revealed increased expression levels of DKK1. Furthermore, DKK1 expression was highly transactivated in the majority of these cancer cell lines. Clinical samples were obtained from 98 NSCLC patients for immunohistochemical analysis. Of the 98 samples analyzed, 62 (63.3%) demonstrated positive staining for DKK1, whereas the remaining 36 (37%) exhibited negative staining. However, no immunohistopathological staining was detected in normal tissues. The relative effects of DKK1 were assessed in a high-expression cell line (LTEP-a-2) and a low-expression cell line (95D). The differential expression of genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, signaling pathway, invasion and metastasis were evaluated, relative to DKK1 levels. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that DKK1 functioned as a key regulator in the progression of NSCLC. The results confirmed the differential expression of DKK1 in NSCLC cells, which may present a potential therapeutic target for cancer prevention.

  14. Gene expression profiles of bronchoalveolar cells in Pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Bindu; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Belitskaya-Lévy, Ilana; Dawson, Rod; Ress, Stanley; Gold, Jeffrey A.; Condos, Rany; Pine, Richard; Brown, Stuart; Nolan, Anna; Rom, William N.; Weiden, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis includes macrophage activation, inflammation with increased immune effector cells, tissue necrosis and cavity formation, and fibrosis, distortion, and bronchiectasis. To evaluate the molecular basis of the immune response in the lungs of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), we used bronchoalveolar lavage to obtain cells at the site of infection. Affymetrix Genechip micro-arrays and cDNA nylon filter microarrays interrogated gene expression in BAL cells from 11 healthy controls and 17 patients with active pulmonary TB. We found altered gene expression for 69 genes in TB versus normal controls that included cell surface markers, cytokines, chemokines, receptors, transcription factors, and complement components. In addition, TB BAL cell gene expression patternssegregated into 2 groups: one suggestive of a T helper type 1 (Th1) cellular immune response with increased STAT-4, IFN-γ receptor, and MIG expression with increased IFN-γ protein levels in BAL fluid; the other group displayed characteristics of Th2 immunity with increased STAT-6, CD81, and IL-10 receptor expression. We were able to demonstrate that a Th2 presentation could change to a Th1 pattern after anti-tuberculous treatment in one TB patient studied serially. These gene expression data support the conclusion that pulmonary TB produces a global change in the BAL cell transcriptome with manifestations of either Th1 or Th2 immunity. PMID:17921069

  15. Identification of most stable endogenous control genes for microRNA quantification in the developing mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Bouhaddioui, Wafae; Provost, Pierre R; Tremblay, Yves

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small non coding RNAs acting as negative regulators. miRNA are involved in lung development and pulmonary diseases. Measurement of their levels by qPCR is directly influenced by the stability of normalization gene(s), which can be affected by the experimental conditions. The developing lung is a changing tissue and one normalization gene showing stability on one developmental day may be modulated over time. Moreover, some developmental events are affected by sex, which also has to be considered. In this study, we compared stability of five putative control genes in the lung between sexes from the pseudoglandular to the alveolar stages and in adult lungs. Expression of sno135, sno142, sno202, sno234, and sno251 was studied by qPCR in male and female lung samples collected at seven time points from GD 15.5 to PN 30. Cq values of sno251 showed the highest variation across the different developmental stages, while sno234 was the most stable gene. Gene expression stability was studied by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Our data showed that ranking of genes based on expression stability changed according to developmental time and sex. sno135/sno234 and sno142/sno234 were proposed as best combinations of normalization genes when both sexes and all the studied developmental stages are considered. Normalization of let7-a RNA levels with different pairs of control genes proposed by geNorm and NormFinder gave similar data, while the use of less stable genes introduced a statistically significant difference on PN 0. In conclusion, variations in stability of normalization gene expression are observed over time and according to sex during lung development. Best pairs of normalization genes are presented for specific developmental stages, and for the period extending from the pseudoglandular to the alveolar stages. The use of normalization genes selected for their expression stability is essential in lung development studies.

  16. Highly compacted biodegradable DNA nanoparticles capable of overcoming the mucus barrier for inhaled lung gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; da Silva, Adriana L; Chisholm, Jane; Song, Eric; Choi, Won Kyu; Boyle, Michael P; Morales, Marcelo M; Hanes, Justin; Suk, Jung Soo

    2015-07-14

    Gene therapy has emerged as an alternative for the treatment of diseases refractory to conventional therapeutics. Synthetic nanoparticle-based gene delivery systems offer highly tunable platforms for the delivery of therapeutic genes. However, the inability to achieve sustained, high-level transgene expression in vivo presents a significant hurdle. The respiratory system, although readily accessible, remains a challenging target, as effective gene therapy mandates colloidal stability in physiological fluids and the ability to overcome biological barriers found in the lung. We formulated highly stable DNA nanoparticles based on state-of-the-art biodegradable polymers, poly(β-amino esters) (PBAEs), possessing a dense corona of polyethylene glycol. We found that these nanoparticles efficiently penetrated the nanoporous and highly adhesive human mucus gel layer that constitutes a primary barrier to reaching the underlying epithelium. We also discovered that these PBAE-based mucus-penetrating DNA nanoparticles (PBAE-MPPs) provided uniform and high-level transgene expression throughout the mouse lungs, superior to several gold standard gene delivery systems. PBAE-MPPs achieved robust transgene expression over at least 4 mo following a single administration, and their transfection efficiency was not attenuated by repeated administrations, underscoring their clinical relevance. Importantly, PBAE-MPPs demonstrated a favorable safety profile with no signs of toxicity following intratracheal administration.

  17. Matrine Attenuates COX-2 and ICAM-1 Expressions in Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Prevents Acute Lung Injury in LPS-Induced Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Chian-Jiun; Lai, You-Rong; Chen, Ya-Ling; Chang, Yi-Hsien; Li, Zih-Ying; Huang, Wen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Matrine is isolated from Sophora flavescens and shows anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages. Here we evaluated matrine's suppressive effects on cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressions in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated human lung epithelial A549 cells. Additionally, BALB/c mice were given various matrine doses by intraperitoneal injection, and then lung injury was induced via intratracheal instillation of LPS. In LPS-stimulated A549 cells, matrine inhibited the productions of interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and IL-6 and decreased COX-2 expression. Matrine treatment also decreased ICAM-1 protein expression and suppressed the adhesion of neutrophil-like cells to inflammatory A549 cells. In vitro results demonstrated that matrine significantly inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and decreased nuclear transcription factor kappa-B subunit p65 protein translocation into the nucleus. In vivo data indicated that matrine significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration and suppressed productions of tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6 in mouse bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum. Analysis of lung tissue showed that matrine decreased the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, COX-2, and ICAM-1. Our findings suggest that matrine improved lung injury in mice and decreased the inflammatory response in human lung epithelial cells. PMID:26880863

  18. Matrine Attenuates COX-2 and ICAM-1 Expressions in Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Prevents Acute Lung Injury in LPS-Induced Mice.

    PubMed

    Liou, Chian-Jiun; Lai, You-Rong; Chen, Ya-Ling; Chang, Yi-Hsien; Li, Zih-Ying; Huang, Wen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Matrine is isolated from Sophora flavescens and shows anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages. Here we evaluated matrine's suppressive effects on cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressions in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated human lung epithelial A549 cells. Additionally, BALB/c mice were given various matrine doses by intraperitoneal injection, and then lung injury was induced via intratracheal instillation of LPS. In LPS-stimulated A549 cells, matrine inhibited the productions of interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and IL-6 and decreased COX-2 expression. Matrine treatment also decreased ICAM-1 protein expression and suppressed the adhesion of neutrophil-like cells to inflammatory A549 cells. In vitro results demonstrated that matrine significantly inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and decreased nuclear transcription factor kappa-B subunit p65 protein translocation into the nucleus. In vivo data indicated that matrine significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration and suppressed productions of tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6 in mouse bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum. Analysis of lung tissue showed that matrine decreased the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, COX-2, and ICAM-1. Our findings suggest that matrine improved lung injury in mice and decreased the inflammatory response in human lung epithelial cells.

  19. Smoking-induced CXCL14 expression in the human airway epithelium links chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Sackrowitz, Rachel; Fukui, Tomoya; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Chao, Ion Wa; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Downey, Robert J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-09-01

    CXCL14, a recently described epithelial cytokine, plays putative multiple roles in inflammation and carcinogenesis. In the context that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are both smoking-related disorders associated with airway epithelial disorder and inflammation, we hypothesized that the airway epithelium responds to cigarette smoking with altered CXCL14 gene expression, contributing to the disease-relevant phenotype. Using genome-wide microarrays with subsequent immunohistochemical analysis, the data demonstrate that the expression of CXCL14 is up-regulated in the airway epithelium of healthy smokers and further increased in COPD smokers, especially within hyperplastic/metaplastic lesions, in association with multiple genes relevant to epithelial structural integrity and cancer. In vitro experiments revealed that the expression of CXCL14 is induced in the differentiated airway epithelium by cigarette smoke extract, and that epidermal growth factor mediates CXCL14 up-regulation in the airway epithelium through its effects on the basal stem/progenitor cell population. Analyses of two independent lung cancer cohorts revealed a dramatic up-regulation of CXCL14 expression in adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma. High expression of the COPD-associated CXCL14-correlating cluster of genes was linked in lung adenocarcinoma with poor survival. These data suggest that the smoking-induced expression of CXCL14 in the airway epithelium represents a novel potential molecular link between smoking-associated airway epithelial injury, COPD, and lung cancer.

  20. Classification of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Significance Analysis of Microarray-Gene Set Reduction Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linlin; Du, Bochuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Pu

    2016-01-01

    Among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two major histology subtypes, accounting for roughly 40% and 30% of all lung cancer cases, respectively. Since AC and SCC differ in their cell of origin, location within the lung, and growth pattern, they are considered as distinct diseases. Gene expression signatures have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for distinguishing AC and SCC. Gene set analysis is regarded as irrelevant to the identification of gene expression signatures. Nevertheless, we found that one specific gene set analysis method, significance analysis of microarray-gene set reduction (SAMGSR), can be adopted directly to select relevant features and to construct gene expression signatures. In this study, we applied SAMGSR to a NSCLC gene expression dataset. When compared with several novel feature selection algorithms, for example, LASSO, SAMGSR has equivalent or better performance in terms of predictive ability and model parsimony. Therefore, SAMGSR is a feature selection algorithm, indeed. Additionally, we applied SAMGSR to AC and SCC subtypes separately to discriminate their respective stages, that is, stage II versus stage I. Few overlaps between these two resulting gene signatures illustrate that AC and SCC are technically distinct diseases. Therefore, stratified analyses on subtypes are recommended when diagnostic or prognostic signatures of these two NSCLC subtypes are constructed. PMID:27446945

  1. Classification of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Significance Analysis of Microarray-Gene Set Reduction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linlin; Du, Bochuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Pu; Tian, Suyan

    2016-01-01

    Among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two major histology subtypes, accounting for roughly 40% and 30% of all lung cancer cases, respectively. Since AC and SCC differ in their cell of origin, location within the lung, and growth pattern, they are considered as distinct diseases. Gene expression signatures have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for distinguishing AC and SCC. Gene set analysis is regarded as irrelevant to the identification of gene expression signatures. Nevertheless, we found that one specific gene set analysis method, significance analysis of microarray-gene set reduction (SAMGSR), can be adopted directly to select relevant features and to construct gene expression signatures. In this study, we applied SAMGSR to a NSCLC gene expression dataset. When compared with several novel feature selection algorithms, for example, LASSO, SAMGSR has equivalent or better performance in terms of predictive ability and model parsimony. Therefore, SAMGSR is a feature selection algorithm, indeed. Additionally, we applied SAMGSR to AC and SCC subtypes separately to discriminate their respective stages, that is, stage II versus stage I. Few overlaps between these two resulting gene signatures illustrate that AC and SCC are technically distinct diseases. Therefore, stratified analyses on subtypes are recommended when diagnostic or prognostic signatures of these two NSCLC subtypes are constructed. PMID:27446945

  2. Local long-term expression of lentivirally delivered IL-10 in the lung attenuates obliteration of intrapulmonary allograft airways.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Shin; Sato, Masaaki; Liu, Mingyao; Loisel-Meyer, Severine; Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Zehong, Guan; Medin, Jeffrey A; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-11-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) is a form of chronic rejection after lung transplantation. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) facilitate long-term gene transduction in many tissues and organs. We hypothesized that lentiviral gene transfer of interleukin (IL)-10, a potent immune-modulating cytokine, to the lung could modulate the alloimmune responses in the lung after transplantation. C57BL6 mice received LVs encoding luciferase, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), or human IL-10 (huIL-10) through airways and underwent repeated bioluminescent imaging, immunofluorescence imaging, or ELISA of lung tissues, respectively. Luciferase activities peaked at day 7 and were stable after day 28 to over 15 months. eGFP staining demonstrated LV-mediated gene transduction mainly in alveolar macrophages. LV-huIL-10 delivery resulted in stable long-term expression of huIL-10 in the lung tissue (average 3.66 pg/mg at 1 year). Intrapulmonary allograft tracheal transplantation (BALBc→C57BL6) was used as a model of OB. LV-huIL-10 or LV-eGFP were delivered 7 days before transplantation and compared with no LV-transfection group. Allograft airways at day 28 were almost completely obliterated in all the groups. However, at day 42, allograft airways treated with LV-huIL-10 showed a spectrum of attenuation in airway fibrosis ranging from complete obliteration through bubble-like partial opening to complete patency with epithelial coverage in association with a significantly reduced obliteration ratio compared with the other groups (p<0.05). In conclusion, lentivirus-mediated gene transduction is useful in achieving long-term transgene expression in the lung. Long-term IL-10 expression has the potential to attenuate allograft airway obliteration. LV-mediated gene therapy could be a useful strategy to prevent or treat OB after lung transplantation. PMID:21568692

  3. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  4. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2008-06-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  5. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  6. Suitability of commonly used housekeeping genes in gene expression studies for space radiation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, A.; Stojicic, N.; Lau, P.; Hellweg, C. E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    Research on the effects of ionizing radiation exposure involves the use of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for measuring changes in gene expression. Several variables need to be controlled for gene expression analysis, such as different amounts of starting material between the samples, variations in enzymatic efficiencies of the reverse transcription step, and differences in RNA integrity. Normalization of the obtained data to an invariant endogenous control gene (reference gene) is the elementary step in relative quantification strategy. There is a strong correlation between the quality of the normalized data and the stability of the reference gene itself. This is especially relevant when the samples have been obtained after exposure to radiation qualities inducing different amounts and kinds of damage, leading to effects on cell cycle delays or even on cell cycle blocks. In order to determine suitable reference genes as internal controls in qRT-PCR assays after exposure to ionizing radiation, we studied the gene expression levels of nine commonly used reference genes which are constitutively expressed in A549 lung cancer cells. Expression levels obtained for ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, PBGD, 18S rRNA, G6PDH, HPRT, UBC, TFRC and SDHA were determined after exposure to 2 and 6 Gy X-radiation. Gene expression data for Growth arrest and damage-inducible gene 45 (GADD45α) and Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A/p21CIP1) were selected to elucidate the influence of normalization by using appropriate and inappropriate internal control genes. According to these results, we strongly recommend the use of a panel of reference genes instead of only one.

  7. Pulmonary microRNA expression profiling in an immature piglet model of cardiopulmonary bypass-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlei; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jinping; Wang, Xu; Li, Shoujun

    2015-04-01

    After surgery performed under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), severe lung injury often occurs in infants. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potentially involved in diverse pathophysiological processes via regulation of gene expression. The objective of this study was to investigate differentially expressed miRNAs and their potential target genes in immature piglet lungs in response to CPB. Fourteen piglets aged 18.6 ± 0.5 days were equally divided into two groups that underwent sham sternotomy or CPB. The duration of aortic cross-clamping was 2 h, followed by 2 h reperfusion. Lung injury was evaluated by lung function indices, levels of cytokines, and histological changes. We applied miRNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis to determine miRNA expression. Meanwhile, qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for validation of predicted mRNA targets. The deterioration of lung function and histopathological changes revealed the piglets' lungs were greatly impaired due to CPB. The levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and interleukin 10 increased in the lung tissue after CPB. Using miRNA microarray, statistically significant differences were found in the levels of 16 miRNAs in the CPB group. Up-regulation of miR-21 was verified by PCR. We also observed down-regulation in the levels of miR-127, miR-145, and miR-204, which were correlated with increases in the expression of the products of their potential target genes PIK3CG, PTGS2, ACE, and IL6R in the CPB group, suggesting a potential role for miRNA in the regulation of inflammatory response. Our results show that CPB induces severe lung injury and dynamic changes in miRNA expression in piglet lungs. Moreover, the changes in miRNA levels and target gene expression may provide a basis for understanding the pathogenesis of CPB-induced injury to immature lungs.

  8. Maternally imprinted microRNAs are differentially expressed during mouse and human lung development

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Andrew E.; Moschos, Sterghios A.; Perry, Mark M.; Barnes, Peter J.; Lindsay, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of non-coding genes that regulate the translation of target mRNA. More than 300 miRNAs have now been discovered in humans, although the function of most is still unknown. A highly sensitive, semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was utilised to reveal the differential expression of a number of miRNAs during the development of both mouse and human lung. Of note was the upregulation in neonatal mouse and fetal human lung of a maternally imprinted miRNA cluster located at human chromosome 14q32.21 (mouse chromosome 12F2), which includes the miR-154 and miR-335 families and is situated within the Gtl2-Dio3 domain. Conversely, several miRNAs were upregulated in adult compared to neonatal/fetal lung including miR-29a and miR-29b. Differences in the spatial expression patterns of miR-154, miR-29a and miR-26a was demonstrated using in situ hybridisation of mouse neonatal and adult tissue using miRNA-specific LNA probes. Interestingly, miR-154 appeared to be localised to the stroma of fetal but not adult lungs. The overall expression profile was similar for mouse and human tissue suggesting evolutionary conservation of miRNA expression during lung development and demonstrating the importance of maternally imprinted miRNAs in the developmental process. PMID:17191223

  9. Increased Lung Expression of Anti-Angiogenic Factors in Down Syndrome: Potential Role in Abnormal Lung Vascular Growth and the Risk for Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Galambos, Csaba; Minic, Angela D.; Bush, Douglas; Nguyen, Dominique; Dodson, Blair; Seedorf, Gregory; Abman, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Infants with Down syndrome (DS) or Trisomy 21, are at high risk for developing pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but mechanisms that increase susceptibility are poorly understood. Laboratory studies have shown that early disruption of angiogenesis during development impairs vascular and alveolar growth and causes PAH. Human chromosome 21 encodes known anti-angiogenic factors, including collagen18a1 (endostatin, ES), ß-amyloid peptide (BAP) and Down Syndrome Critical Region 1 (DSCR-1). Therefore, we hypothesized that fetal lungs from subjects with DS are characterized by early over-expression of anti-angiogenic factors and have abnormal lung vascular growth in utero. Methods Human fetal lung tissue from DS and non-DS subjects were obtained from a biorepository. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to assay 84 angiogenesis-associated genes and individual qRT-PCR was performed for ES, amyloid protein precursor (APP) and DSCR1. Western blot analysis (WBA) was used to assay lung ES, APP and DSCR-1 protein contents. Lung vessel density and wall thickness were determined by morphometric analysis. Results The angiogenesis array identified up-regulation of three anti-angiogenic genes: COL18A1 (ES), COL4A3 (tumstatin) and TIMP3 (tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidase 3) in DS lungs. Single qRT-PCR and WBA showed striking elevations of ES and APP mRNA (p = 0.022 and p = 0.001) and protein (p = 0.040 and p = 0.002; respectively). Vessel density was reduced (p = 0.041) and vessel wall thickness was increased in DS lung tissue (p = 0.033) when compared to non-DS subjects. Conclusions We conclude that lung anti-angiogenic factors, including COL18A1 (ES), COL4A3, TIMP3 and APP are over-expressed and fetal lung vessel growth is decreased in subjects with DS. We speculate that increased fetal lung anti-angiogenic factor expression due to trisomy 21 impairs lung vascular growth and signaling, which impairs alveolarization and

  10. Identification of differentially expressed genes in rat silicosis model by suppression subtractive hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhongyuan; Liu, Baoan; Feng, Deyun; Chen, Chen; Li, Xiang; Hu, Yongbin; Peng, Jinwu; Liu, Yu; Du, Jing; Fu, Chunyan; Wen, Jifang

    2008-08-01

    The critical molecular mechanism in the development of the pulmonary fibrosis remains unknown, leaving diagnosed patients with a poor prognosis. To isolate the genes specifically up-regulated in pulmonary fibrosis, we established a rat silicosis model 360 d after treatment with crystalline silica suspension. Radiographs of chests showed that some scattered high-density shadows appeared in the lung field. Typical microscopic fibrosing silicotic nodules formed in the lung, alveolar epithelial cells and bronchial epithelial cells, particularly around the partial fibrosing silicotic nodules; some of them showed atypical hyperplasia that suggested a correlation between silicosis and lung cancer. Suppression subtractive hybridization analysis was performed to compare gene expression in lung tissue with silicosis and normal lung tissue. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that the expressions of seven novel cDNA sequences identified by suppression subtractive hybridization in lung tissue with silicosis differed from normal lung tissue. Bioinformatics analysis showed that 47 positive clones represented 35 genes containing two putative proteins and four predicted similar proteins. The analysis also showed that some screened genes in silicosis, such as prolyl 4-hydroxylases, actin-related protein-2/3 complex and acidic mammalian chitinase, have not been previously reported. These genes may provide new clues for investigating the molecular mechanisms in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:18685790

  11. The role of doxorubicin in non-viral gene transfer in the lung.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Meng, Cuixiang; Farley, Raymond; Gardner, Aaron; Brake, Maresa A; Frankel, Gad M; Gruenert, Dieter C; Cheng, Seng H; Scheule, Ronald K; Alton, Eric W F W

    2009-04-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have been shown to increase adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated transduction in vitro and in vivo. To assess if proteasome inhibitors also increase lipid-mediated gene transfer with relevance to cystic fibrosis (CF), we first assessed the effects of doxorubicin and N-acetyl-l-leucinyl-l-leucinal-l-norleucinal in non-CF (A549) and CF (CFTE29o-) airway epithelial cell lines. CFTE29o- cells did not show a response to Dox or LLnL; however, gene transfer in A549 cells increased in a dose-related fashion (p < 0.05), up to approximately 20-fold respectively at the optimal dose (no treatment: 9.3 x 10(4) +/- 1.5 x 10(3), Dox: 1.6 x 10(6)+/-2.6 x 10(5), LLnL: 1.9 x 10(6) +/- 3.2 x 10(5)RLU/mg protein). As Dox is used clinically in cancer chemotherapy we next assessed the effect of this drug on non-viral lung gene transfer in vivo. CF knockout mice were injected intraperitoneally (IP) with Dox (25-100 mg/kg) immediately before nebulisation with plasmid DNA carrying a luciferase reporter gene under the control of a CMV promoter/enhancer (pCIKLux) complexed to the cationic lipid GL67A. Dox also significantly (p < 0.05) increased expression of a plasmid regulated by an elongation factor 1alpha promoter (hCEFI) approximately 8-fold. Although administration of Dox before lung gene transfer may not be a clinically viable option, understanding how Dox increases lung gene expression may help to shed light on intracellular bottle-necks to gene transfer, and may help to identify other adjuncts that may be more appropriate for use in man. PMID:19152975

  12. Suitability of Commonly Used Housekeeping Genes in Gene Expression Studies for Space Radiation Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, A.; Hellweg, C. E.; Bogner, S.; Lau, P.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    Research on the effects of ionizing radiation exposure involves the use of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction qRT-PCR for measuring changes in gene expression Several variables needs to be controlled for gene expression analysis -- different amounts of starting material between the samples variations in enzymatic efficiencies of the reverse transcription step and differences in RNA integrity Normalization of the obtained data to an invariant endogenous control gene reference gene is the elementary step in relative quantification strategy There is a strong correlation between the quality of the normalized data and the stability of the reference gene itself This is especially relevant when the samples have been obtained after exposure to radiation qualities inducing different amounts and kinds of damage leading to a cell cycle delay or even to a cell cycle block In order to determine suitable reference genes as internal controls in qRT-PCR assays after exposure to ionizing radiation we studied the gene expression levels of commonly used reference genes in A549 lung cancer cells Expression levels obtained for human beta actin ACTB human beta-2-microglobulin B2M human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase GAPDH human porphobilinogen deaminase PBGD human 18S ribosomal RNA 18S rRNA human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase G6PDH human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase HPRT human ubiquitin C UBC human transferrin TFRC

  13. Profiling Gene Expression in Germinating Brassica Roots.

    PubMed

    Park, Myoung Ryoul; Wang, Yi-Hong; Hasenstein, Karl H

    2014-01-01

    Based on previously developed solid-phase gene extraction (SPGE) we examined the mRNA profile in primary roots of Brassica rapa seedlings for highly expressed genes like ACT7 (actin7), TUB (tubulin1), UBQ (ubiquitin), and low expressed GLK (glucokinase) during the first day post-germination. The assessment was based on the mRNA load of the SPGE probe of about 2.1 ng. The number of copies of the investigated genes changed spatially along the length of primary roots. The expression level of all genes differed significantly at each sample position. Among the examined genes ACT7 expression was most even along the root. UBQ was highest at the tip and root-shoot junction (RS). TUB and GLK showed a basipetal gradient. The temporal expression of UBQ was highest in the MZ 9 h after primary root emergence and higher than at any other sample position. Expressions of GLK in EZ and RS increased gradually over time. SPGE extraction is the result of oligo-dT and oligo-dA hybridization and the results illustrate that SPGE can be used for gene expression profiling at high spatial and temporal resolution. SPGE needles can be used within two weeks when stored at 4 °C. Our data indicate that gene expression studies that are based on the entire root miss important differences in gene expression that SPGE is able to resolve for example growth adjustments during gravitropism.

  14. Expression Profiling Identifies Bezafibrate as Potential Therapeutic Drug for Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyan; Yang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Xinmei; Zhang, Yantao; Pan, Xuebin; Wang, Guiping; Ye, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced gene expression patterns that invert disease profiles have recently been illustrated to be a new strategy for drug-repositioning. In the present study, we validated this approach and focused on prediction of novel drugs for lung adenocarcinoma (AC), for which there is a pressing need to find novel therapeutic compounds. Firstly, connectivity map (CMap) analysis computationally predicted bezafibrate as a putative compound against lung AC. Then this hypothesis was verified by in vitro assays of anti-proliferation and cell cycle arrest. In silico docking evidence indicated that bezafibrate could target cyclin dependent kinase 2(CDK2), which regulates progression through the cell cycle. Furthermore, we found that bezafibrate can significantly down-regulate the expression of CDK2 mRNA and p-CDK2. Using a nude mice xenograft model, we also found that bezafibrate could inhibit tumor growth of lung AC in vivo. In conclusion, this study proposed bezafibrate as a potential therapeutic option for lung AC patients, illustrating the potential of in silico drug screening. PMID:26535062

  15. Expression Profiling Identifies Bezafibrate as Potential Therapeutic Drug for Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyan; Yang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Xinmei; Zhang, Yantao; Pan, Xuebin; Wang, Guiping; Ye, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced gene expression patterns that invert disease profiles have recently been illustrated to be a new strategy for drug-repositioning. In the present study, we validated this approach and focused on prediction of novel drugs for lung adenocarcinoma (AC), for which there is a pressing need to find novel therapeutic compounds. Firstly, connectivity map (CMap) analysis computationally predicted bezafibrate as a putative compound against lung AC. Then this hypothesis was verified by in vitro assays of anti-proliferation and cell cycle arrest. In silico docking evidence indicated that bezafibrate could target cyclin dependent kinase 2(CDK2), which regulates progression through the cell cycle. Furthermore, we found that bezafibrate can significantly down-regulate the expression of CDK2 mRNA and p-CDK2. Using a nude mice xenograft model, we also found that bezafibrate could inhibit tumor growth of lung AC in vivo. In conclusion, this study proposed bezafibrate as a potential therapeutic option for lung AC patients, illustrating the potential of in silico drug screening. PMID:26535062

  16. Clinical, Pathological, and Molecular Features of Lung Adenocarcinomas with AXL Expression

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Kenichi; Shimizu, Shigeki; Sakai, Kazuko; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase AXL is a member of the Tyro3-Axl-Mer receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily. AXL affects several cellular functions, including growth and migration. AXL aberration is reportedly a marker for poor prognosis and treatment resistance in various cancers. In this study, we analyzed clinical, pathological, and molecular features of AXL expression in lung adenocarcinomas (LADs). We examined 161 LAD specimens from patients who underwent pulmonary resections. When AXL protein expression was quantified (0, 1+, 2+, 3+) according to immunohistochemical staining intensity, results were 0: 35%; 1+: 20%; 2+: 37%; and 3+: 7% for the 161 samples. AXL expression status did not correlate with clinical features, including smoking status and pathological stage. However, patients whose specimens showed strong AXL expression (3+) had markedly poorer prognoses than other groups (P = 0.0033). Strong AXL expression was also significantly associated with downregulation of E-cadherin (P = 0.025) and CD44 (P = 0.0010). In addition, 9 of 12 specimens with strong AXL expression had driver gene mutations (6 with EGFR, 2 with KRAS, 1 with ALK). In conclusion, we found that strong AXL expression in surgically resected LADs was a predictor of poor prognosis. LADs with strong AXL expression were characterized by mesenchymal status, higher expression of stem-cell-like markers, and frequent driver gene mutations. PMID:27100677

  17. A Simple Two-Gene Prognostic Model for Adenocarcinoma of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Carolyn E.; Graham, Amanda; Hoda, Rana S.; Khoor, Andras; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Wallace, Michael B.; Mitas, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that clinical outcome of resected early stage adenocarcinoma of the lung can be predicted by the expression of a few critically important genes as measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) primary tumors. Methods Twenty-two prognostic genes for the metastatic phenotype were identified through cDNA microarray analysis of four cancer cell lines and bioinformatics analysis. Expression levels of a subset of these genes (n=13) were measured by real-time RT-PCR in FFPE primary adenocarcinoma from patients who recurred within 2 years (n=9) and who did not recur (n=11). ROC curve analysis was performed to establish prognostic values of single genes. The most informative gene was combined with the remaining genes to determine if there was a particular pair(s) that yielded high diagnostic accuracy. A small validation study was performed. Results ROC curve analysis of the single genes revealed that high expression of CK19 was associated with non-recurrence (AUC=0.859, CI=0.651–0.970). The CK19/EpCAM2 gene ratio had the most reproducible prognostic accuracy, followed by the CK19/P-cadherin ratio. A Kaplan Meier survival analysis generated from the CK19/EpCAM2 ratio resulted in highly significant curves as a function of marker positivity (p=0.0007; HR=10.7). Significance declined but was maintained in the validation study. Conclusions This preliminary study provides evidence that the CK19/EpCAM2 and/or CK19/P-cadherin ratio(s) may be a simple and accurate prognostic indicator of clinical outcome in early stage adenocarcinoma of the lung. If further validation studies from large patient cohorts confirm the results, adjuvant therapy could be targeted to this high risk group. PMID:18329483

  18. Impact of cytokine expression in the pre-implanted donor lung on the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction subtypes.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Takahashi, H; Kaneda, H; Binnie, M; Azad, S; Sato, M; Waddell, T K; Cypel, M; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-12-01

    The long-term success of lung transplantation continues to be challenged by the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cytokine expression levels in pre-implanted donor lungs and the posttransplant development of CLAD and its subtypes, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and restrictive allograft syndrome (RAS). Of 109 patients who underwent bilateral lung or heart-lung transplantation and survived for more than 3 months, 50 BOS, 21 RAS and 38 patients with No CLAD were identified by pulmonary function test results. Using donor lung tissue biopsies sampled from each patient, expression levels of IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA were measured. IL-6 expression levels were significantly higher in pre-implanted lungs of patients that ultimately developed BOS compared to RAS and No CLAD (p = 0.025 and 0.011, respectively). Cox regression analysis demonstrated an association between high IL-6 expression levels and BOS development (hazard ratio = 4.98; 95% confidence interval = 2.42-10.2, p < 0.001). In conclusion, high IL-6 mRNA expression levels in pre-implanted donor lungs were associated with the development of BOS, not RAS. This association further supports the contention that early graft injury impacts on both late graft function and early graft function. PMID:24164971

  19. Daurinol Enhances the Efficacy of Radiotherapy in Lung Cancer via Suppression of Aurora Kinase A/B Expression.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jong Kyu; Kang, Ju-Hee; Shin, DongYun; Park, Seong-Hyeok; Kang, Kyungsu; Nho, Chu Won; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-07-01

    The aurora kinases constitute one family of serine/threonine kinases whose activity is essential for mitotic progression. The aurora kinases are frequently upregulated in human cancers and are associated with sensitivity to chemotherapy in certain ones. In the present study, we investigated whether aurora kinases could be a target to overcome radioresistance or enhance the radiosensitivity of lung cancer. For that purpose, we determined the therapeutic potential of daurinol, an investigational topoisomerase inhibitor, alone and in combination with radiation, by observing its effect on aurora kinases. Daurinol decreased cell viability and proliferation in human colon and lung cancer cells. Gene expression in daurinol-treated human colon cancer cells was evaluated using RNA microarray. The mRNA expression of 18 genes involved in the mitotic spindle check point, including aurora kinase A (AURKA) and aurora kinase B (AURKB), was decreased in daurinol-treated human colon cancer cells as compared with vehicle-treated cells. As expected, radiation increased expression levels of AURKA and AURKB. This increase was effectively attenuated by siRNAs against AURKA and AURKB, which suppressed cell growth and increased apoptosis under radiation. Furthermore, the expression of AURKA and AURKB was suppressed by daurinol in the presence or absence of radiation in colon and lung cancer cells. Daurinol alone or in combination with radiation decreased lung cancer growth in xenograft mouse models. Our data clearly confirm the antitumor and radiosensitizing activity of daurinol in human lung cancer cells through the inhibition of AURKA and AURKB. PMID:25882311

  20. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  1. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  2. Gearbox gene expression and growth rate.

    PubMed

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Tormo, A

    1993-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression in prokaryotic cells usually takes place at the level of transcription initiation. Different forms of RNA polymerase recognizing specific promoters are engaged in the control of many prokaryotic regulons. This also seems to be the case for some Escherichia coli genes that are induced at low growth rates and by nutrient starvation. Their gene products are synthesized at levels inversely proportional to growth rate, and this mode of regulation has been termed gearbox gene expression. This kind of growth-rate modulation is exerted by specific transcriptional initiation signals, the gearbox promoters, and some of them depend on a putative new σ factor (RpoS). Gearbox promoters drive expression of morphogenetic and cell division genes at constant levels per cell and cycle to meet the demands of cell division and septum formation. A mechanism is proposed that could sense the growth rate of the cell to alter gene expression by the action of specific σ factors.

  3. The gene expression signatures of melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Haqq, Christopher; Nosrati, Mehdi; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Crothers, Julia; Khodabakhsh, Daniel; Pulliam, Brian L.; Federman, Scot; Miller, James R.; Allen, Robert E.; Singer, Mark I.; Leong, Stanley P. L.; Ljung, Britt-Marie; Sagebiel, Richard W.; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2005-01-01

    Because of the paucity of available tissue, little information has previously been available regarding the gene expression profiles of primary melanomas. To understand the molecular basis of melanoma progression, we compared the gene expression profiles of a series of nevi, primary melanomas, and melanoma metastases. We found that metastatic melanomas exhibit two dichotomous patterns of gene expression, which unexpectedly reflect gene expression differences already apparent in comparing laser-capture microdissected radial and vertical phases of a large primary melanoma. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering accurately separated nevi and primary melanomas. Multiclass significance analysis of microarrays comparing normal skin, nevi, primary melanomas, and the two types of metastatic melanoma identified 2,602 transcripts that significantly correlated with sample class. These results suggest that melanoma pathogenesis can be understood as a series of distinct molecular events. The gene expression signatures identified here provide the basis for developing new diagnostics and targeting therapies for patients with malignant melanoma. PMID:15833814

  4. EGFR gene deregulation mechanisms in lung adenocarcinoma: A molecular review.

    PubMed

    Tsiambas, Evangelos; Lefas, Alicia Y; Georgiannos, Stavros N; Ragos, Vasileios; Fotiades, Panagiotis P; Grapsa, Dimitra; Stamatelopoulos, Athanasios; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Patsouris, Efstratios; Syrigos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    For the last two decades, evolution in molecular biology has expanded our knowledge in decoding a broad spectrum of genomic imbalances that progressively lead normal cells to a neoplastic state and finally to complete malignant transformation. Concerning oncogenes and signaling transduction pathways mediated by them, identification of specific gene alterations remains a critical process for handling patients by applying targeted therapeutic regimens. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in normal cells. EGFR mutations and amplification represent the gene's main deregulation mechanisms in cancers of different histo-genetic origin. Furthermore, intra-cancer molecular heterogeneity due to clonal rise and expansion mainly explains the variable resistance to novel anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb), and also tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). According to recently published 2015 WHO new classification, lung cancer is the leading cause of death related to cancer and its incidence is still on the increase worldwide. The majority of patients suffering from lung cancer are diagnosed with epithelial tumors (adenocarcinoma predominantly and squamous cell carcinoma represent ∼85% of all pathologically defined lung cancer cases). In those patients, EGFR-activating somatic mutations in exons 18/19/20/21 modify patients' sensitivity (i.e. exon 21 L858R, exon 19 LREA deletion) or resistance (ie exon 20 T790M and/or insertion) to TKI mediated targeted therapeutic strategies. Additionally, the role of specific micro-RNAs that affect EGFR regulation is under investigation. In the current review, we focused on EGFR gene/protein structural and functional aspects and the corresponding alterations that occur mainly in lung adenocarcinoma to critically modify its molecular landscape. PMID:27461822

  5. Non-Viral Transfection Methods Optimized for Gene Delivery to a Lung Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Jaberipour, Mansooreh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Mehr-80 is a newly established adherent human large cell lung cancer cell line that has not been transfected until now. This study aims to define the optimal transfection conditions and effects of some critical elements for enhancing gene delivery to this cell line by utilizing different non-viral transfection Procedures. Methods In the current study, calcium phosphate (CaP), DEAE-dextran, superfect, electroporation and lipofection transfection methods were used to optimize delivery of a plasmid construct that expressed Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Transgene expression was detected by fluorescent microscopy and flowcytometry. Toxicities of the methods were estimated by trypan blue staining. In order to evaluate the density of the transfected gene, we used a plasmid construct that expressed the Stromal cell-Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) gene and measured its expression by real-time PCR. Results Mean levels of GFP-expressing cells 48 hr after transfection were 8.4% (CaP), 8.2% (DEAE-dextran), 4.9% (superfect), 34.1% (electroporation), and 40.1% (lipofection). Lipofection had the highest intense SDF-1 expression of the analyzed methods. Conclusion This study has shown that the lipofection and electroporation methods were more efficient at gene delivery to Mehr-80 cells. The quantity of DNA per transfection, reagent concentration, and incubation time were identified as essential factors for successful transfection in all of the studied methods. PMID:23799175

  6. Modulation of microRNA expression by volatile organic compounds in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Li, Chonglei; Liu, Wei; Jin, Yihe

    2014-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one of main pollutants indoors. Exposure to VOCs is associated with cancer, asthma disease, and multiple chemical allergies. Despite the adverse health effects of VOCs, the molecular mechanisms underlying VOCs-induced disease remain largely unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), as key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, may influence cellular disease state. To investigate whether lung miRNA expression profiles in mice are modified by VOCs mixture exposure, 44 male Kunming mice were exposed in 4 similar static chambers, 0 (control) and 3 different doses of VOCs mixture (groups 1-3). The concentrations of VOCs mixture were as follows: formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and xylene 3.0 + 3.3 + 6.0 + 6.0 mg/m(3) , 5.0 + 5.5 + 10.0 + 10.0 mg/m(3) , 10.0 + 11.0 + 20.0 + 20.0 mg/m(3) , respectively, which corresponded to 30, 50, and 100 times of indoor air quality standard in China, after exposure to 2 weeks (2 h/day, 5 days/week). Small RNAs in lung and protein isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected and analyzed for miRNA expression using microarray analysis and for interleukin-8 (IL-8) protein levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. VOCs exposure altered the miRNA expression profiles in lung in mice. Specifically, 69 miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in VOCs-exposed samples versus controls. Functional annotation analysis of the predicted miRNA transcript targets revealed that VOCs exposure potentially alters signaling pathways associated with cancer, chemokine signaling, Wnt signaling, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, and cell adhesion molecules. IL-8 isolated from BALF and nitric oxide synthase of lung increased significantly, whereas GSH of lung decreased significantly in mice exposed to VOCs. These results indicate that inhalation of VOCs alters miRNA patterns that regulate gene expression, potentially leading to the initiation of cancer and inflammatory

  7. The Mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD)

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T.; Begley, Dale A.; Corradi, John P.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; Hill, David P.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2001-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is a community resource of gene expression information for the laboratory mouse. By combining the different types of expression data, GXD aims to provide increasingly complete information about the expression profiles of genes in different mouse strains and mutants, thus enabling valuable insights into the molecular networks that underlie normal development and disease. GXD is integrated with the Mouse Genome Database (MGD). Extensive interconnections with sequence databases and with databases from other species, and the development and use of shared controlled vocabularies extend GXD’s utility for the analysis of gene expression information. GXD is accessible through the Mouse Genome Informatics web site at http://www.informatic s.jax.org/ or directly at http://www.informatics.jax.org/me nus/expression_menu.shtml. PMID:11125060

  8. Association with Amino Acids Does Not Enhance Efficacy of Polymerized Liposomes As a System for Lung Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Elga; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Chiaramoni, Nadia; Ferreira, Débora; Fernandez-Ruocco, Maria J; Prieto, Maria J; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Perrotta, Ramiro M; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Rocco, Patricia R M; Alonso, Silvia Del Valle; Morales, Marcelo M

    2016-01-01

    Development of improved drug and gene delivery systems directly into the lungs is highly desirable given the important burden of respiratory diseases. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of liposomes composed of photopolymerized lipids [1,2-bis-(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine] associated with amino acids as vectors for gene delivery into the lungs of healthy animals. Lipopolymer vesicles, in particular, are more stable than other types of liposomes. In this study, lipopolymers were associated with l-arginine, l-tryptophan, or l-cysteine. We hypothesized that the addition of these amino acids would enhance the efficacy of gene delivery to the lungs by the lipopolymers. l-Arginine showed the highest association efficiency due to its positive charge and better surface interactions. None of the formulations caused inflammation or altered lung mechanics, suggesting that these lipopolymers can be safely administered as aerosols. All formulations were able to induce eGFP mRNA expression in lung tissue, but the addition of amino acids reduced delivery efficacy when compared with the simple lipopolymer particle. These results indicate that this system could be further explored for gene or drug delivery targeting lung diseases. PMID:27199766

  9. Photosynthetic gene expression in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Berry, James O; Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Zielinski, Amy M; Mure, Christopher M

    2013-11-01

    Within the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, photosynthesis converts light into biological energy, fueling the assimilation of atmospheric carbon dioxide into biologically useful molecules. Two major steps, photosynthetic electron transport and the Calvin-Benson cycle, require many gene products encoded from chloroplast as well as nuclear genomes. The expression of genes in both cellular compartments is highly dynamic and influenced by a diverse range of factors. Light is the primary environmental determinant of photosynthetic gene expression. Working through photoreceptors such as phytochrome, light regulates photosynthetic genes at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Other processes that affect photosynthetic gene expression include photosynthetic activity, development, and biotic and abiotic stress. Anterograde (from nucleus to chloroplast) and retrograde (from chloroplast to nucleus) signaling insures the highly coordinated expression of the many photosynthetic genes between these different compartments. Anterograde signaling incorporates nuclear-encoded transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators, such as sigma factors and RNA-binding proteins, respectively. Retrograde signaling utilizes photosynthetic processes such as photosynthetic electron transport and redox signaling to influence the expression of photosynthetic genes in the nucleus. The basic C3 photosynthetic pathway serves as the default form used by most of the plant species on earth. High temperature and water stress associated with arid environments have led to the development of specialized C4 and CAM photosynthesis, which evolved as modifications of the basic default expression program. The goal of this article is to explain and summarize the many gene expression and regulatory processes that work together to support photosynthetic function in plants.

  10. Glycosyltransferase Gene Expression Profiles Classify Cancer Types and Propose Prognostic Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Naidoo, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation in tumours stem from altered glycosyltransferase (GT) gene expression but can the expression profiles of these signature genes be used to classify cancer types and lead to cancer subtype discovery? The differential structural changes to cellular glycan structures are predominantly regulated by the expression patterns of GT genes and are a hallmark of neoplastic cell metamorphoses. We found that the expression of 210 GT genes taken from 1893 cancer patient samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) microarray data are able to classify six cancers; breast, ovarian, glioblastoma, kidney, colon and lung. The GT gene expression profiles are used to develop cancer classifiers and propose subtypes. The subclassification of breast cancer solid tumour samples illustrates the discovery of subgroups from GT genes that match well against basal-like and HER2-enriched subtypes and correlates to clinical, mutation and survival data. This cancer type glycosyltransferase gene signature finding provides foundational evidence for the centrality of glycosylation in cancer. PMID:27198045

  11. Glycosyltransferase Gene Expression Profiles Classify Cancer Types and Propose Prognostic Subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Naidoo, Kevin J.

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant glycosylation in tumours stem from altered glycosyltransferase (GT) gene expression but can the expression profiles of these signature genes be used to classify cancer types and lead to cancer subtype discovery? The differential structural changes to cellular glycan structures are predominantly regulated by the expression patterns of GT genes and are a hallmark of neoplastic cell metamorphoses. We found that the expression of 210 GT genes taken from 1893 cancer patient samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) microarray data are able to classify six cancers; breast, ovarian, glioblastoma, kidney, colon and lung. The GT gene expression profiles are used to develop cancer classifiers and propose subtypes. The subclassification of breast cancer solid tumour samples illustrates the discovery of subgroups from GT genes that match well against basal-like and HER2-enriched subtypes and correlates to clinical, mutation and survival data. This cancer type glycosyltransferase gene signature finding provides foundational evidence for the centrality of glycosylation in cancer.

  12. Gene Expression Noise, Fitness Landscapes, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel

    The stochastic (or noisy) process of gene expression can have fitness consequences for living organisms. For example, gene expression noise facilitates the development of drug resistance by increasing the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. The present work investigates the relationship between gene expression noise and the fitness landscape. By incorporating the costs and benefits of gene expression, we track how the fluctuation magnitude and timescale of expression noise evolve in simulations of cell populations under stress. We find that properties of expression noise evolve to maximize fitness on the fitness landscape, and that low levels of expression noise emerge when the fitness benefits of gene expression exceed the fitness costs (and that high levels of noise emerge when the costs of expression exceed the benefits). The findings from our theoretical/computational work offer new hypotheses on the development of drug resistance, some of which are now being investigated in evolution experiments in our laboratory using well-characterized synthetic gene regulatory networks in budding yeast. Nserc Postdoctoral Fellowship (Grant No. PDF-453977-2014).

  13. p120-catenin expressed in alveolar type II cells is essential for the regulation of lung innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Chignalia, Andreia Z; Vogel, Stephen M; Reynolds, Albert B; Mehta, Dolly; Dull, Randal O; Minshall, Richard D; Malik, Asrar B; Liu, Yuru

    2015-05-01

    The integrity of the lung alveolar epithelial barrier is required for the gas exchange and is important for immune regulation. Alveolar epithelial barrier is composed of flat type I cells, which make up approximately 95% of the gas-exchange surface, and cuboidal type II cells, which secrete surfactants and modulate lung immunity. p120-catenin (p120; gene symbol CTNND1) is an important component of adherens junctions of epithelial cells; however, its function in lung alveolar epithelial barrier has not been addressed in genetic models. Here, we created an inducible type II cell-specific p120-knockout mouse (p120EKO). The mutant lungs showed chronic inflammation, and the alveolar epithelial barrier was leaky to (125)I-albumin tracer compared to wild type. The mutant lungs also demonstrated marked infiltration of inflammatory cells and activation of NF-κB. Intracellular adhesion molecule 1, Toll-like receptor 4, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 were all up-regulated. p120EKO lungs showed increased expression of the surfactant proteins Sp-B, Sp-C, and Sp-D, and displayed severe inflammation after pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared with wild type. In p120-deficient type II cell monolayers, we observed reduced transepithelial resistance compared to control, consistent with formation of defective adherens junctions. Thus, although type II cells constitute only 5% of the alveolar surface area, p120 expressed in these cells plays a critical role in regulating the innate immunity of the entire lung. PMID:25773174

  14. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah.; Cho, Michael H.; Mancini, John D.; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M.; Litonjua, Gus; Bakke, Per S.; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog Interacting Protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:23459001

  15. Novel Candidate Key Drivers in the Integrative Network of Genes, MicroRNAs, Methylations, and Copy Number Variations in Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yu-dong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of lung cancer are highly complex. Not only mRNA gene expression but also microRNAs, DNA methylation, and copy number variation (CNV) play roles in tumorigenesis. It is difficult to incorporate so much information into a single model that can comprehensively reflect all these lung cancer mechanisms. In this study, we analyzed the 129 TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) squamous cell lung carcinoma samples with gene expression, microRNA expression, DNA methylation, and CNV data. First, we used variance inflation factor (VIF) regression to build the whole genome integrative network. Then, we isolated the lung cancer subnetwork by identifying the known lung cancer genes and their direct regulators. This subnetwork was refined by the Bayesian method, and the directed regulations among mRNA genes, microRNAs, methylations, and CNVs were obtained. The novel candidate key drivers in this refined subnetwork, such as the methylation of ARHGDIB and HOXD3, microRNA let-7a and miR-31, and the CNV of AGAP2, were identified and analyzed. On three large public available lung cancer datasets, the key drivers ARHGDIB and HOXD3 demonstrated significant associations with the overall survival of lung cancer patients. Our results provide new insights into lung cancer mechanisms. PMID:25802847

  16. Cloning and expression characteristics of the pig Stra8 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Tingfeng; Song, Chengyi; Gao, Bo; Zhang, Yani

    2014-07-15

    Stra8 (Stimulated by Retinoic Acid 8) is considered a meiotic gatekeeper gene. Using reverse transcriptase PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), the complete sequence of the pig Stra8 gene was cloned. Bioinformatics analyses of this sequence were performed. Using semi-quantitative methods, the expression characteristics of Stra8 in Testis, cauda epididymis, body epididymis, caput epididymis, seminal vesicles, prostate gland, Cowper's gland, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, cerebrum, cerebellum, and hippocampus of adult Meishan boar and sow tissues were examined. The expression pattern in the testis of 2-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 150-day old Meishan boars were analyzed using real-time PCR. We constructed a eukaryotic expression vector for the Stra8 gene and used it to transfect NIH-3T3 cells and third generation pig spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) cultured in vitro. Testes weight and sperm count in the cauda epididymis were evaluated at various time points. The results showed that the length of the pig Stra8 gene cDNA was 1444 bp encoding 366 amino acids with one typical helix-loop-helix (HLH) domain. It is testes-specific expression. Expression was first detected in boar testis starting at day 2, and its expression significantly (p<0.05) increased with age and body weight. When NIH-3T3 cells and pig SSCs were transfected with the eukaryotic expression vector EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein)-N1-pStra8, it was expressed in the cytoplasm of NIH-3T3 cells. However, in SSCs, Stra8 was expressed predominantly in cytoplasm and few in nucleus. Our data suggest that perhaps Stra8 acts as a transcription factor to initiate meiosis in young boar.

  17. Cloning and Expression Characteristics of the Pig Stra8 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Tingfeng; Song, Chengyi; Gao, Bo; Zhang, Yani

    2014-01-01

    Stra8 (Stimulated by Retinoic Acid 8) is considered a meiotic gatekeeper gene. Using reverse transcriptase PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), the complete sequence of the pig Stra8 gene was cloned. Bioinformatics analyses of this sequence were performed. Using semi-quantitative methods, the expression characteristics of Stra8 in Testis, cauda epididymis, body epididymis, caput epididymis, seminal vesicles, prostate gland, Cowper’s gland, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, cerebrum, cerebellum, and hippocampus of adult Meishan boar and sow tissues were examined. The expression pattern in the testis of 2-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 150-day old Meishan boars were analyzed using real-time PCR. We constructed a eukaryotic expression vector for the Stra8 gene and used it to transfect NIH-3T3 cells and third generation pig spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) cultured in vitro. Testes weight and sperm count in the cauda epididymis were evaluated at various time points. The results showed that the length of the pig Stra8 gene cDNA was 1444 bp encoding 366 amino acids with one typical helix-loop-helix (HLH) domain. It is testes-specific expression. Expression was first detected in boar testis starting at day 2, and its expression significantly (p < 0.05) increased with age and body weight. When NIH-3T3 cells and pig SSCs were transfected with the eukaryotic expression vector EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein)-N1-pStra8, it was expressed in the cytoplasm of NIH-3T3 cells. However, in SSCs, Stra8 was expressed predominantly in cytoplasm and few in nucleus. Our data suggest that perhaps Stra8 acts as a transcription factor to initiate meiosis in young boar. PMID:25029539

  18. A new liposome-based gene delivery system targeting lung epithelial cells using endothelin antagonist.

    PubMed

    Allon, Nahum; Saxena, Ashima; Chambers, Carolyn; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2012-06-10

    We formulated a new gene delivery system based on targeted liposomes. The efficacy of the delivery system was demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo models. The targeting moiety consists of a high-affinity 7-amino-acid peptide, covalently and evenly conjugated to the liposome surface. The targeting peptide acts as an endothelin antagonist, and accelerates liposome binding and internalization. It is devoid of other biological activity. Liposomes with high phosphatidyl serine (PS) were specially formulated to help their fusion with the endosomal membrane at low pH and enable release of the liposome payload into the cytoplasm. A DNA payload, pre-compressed by protamine, was encapsulated into the liposomes, which directed the plasmid into the cell's nucleus. Upon exposure to epithelial cells, binding of the liposomes occurred within 5-10 min, followed by facilitated internalization of the complex. Endosomal escape was complete within 30 min, followed by DNA accumulation in the nucleus 2h post-transfection. A549 lung epithelial cells transfected with plasmid encoding for GFP encapsulated in targeted liposomes expressed significantly more protein than those transfected with plasmid complexed with Lipofectamine. The intra-tracheal instillation of plasmid encoding for GFP encapsulated in targeted liposomes into rat lungs resulted in the expression of GFP in bronchioles and alveoli within 5 days. These results suggest that this delivery system has great potential in targeting genes to lungs.

  19. Stretch regulates expression and binding of chymotrypsin-like elastase 1 in the postnatal lung.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rashika; Liu, Sheng; Brown, Montell D; Young, Sarah M; Batie, Matthew; Kofron, J Matthew; Xu, Yan; Weaver, Timmothy E; Apsley, Karen; Varisco, Brian M

    2016-02-01

    Lung stretch is critical for normal lung development and for compensatory lung growth after pneumonectomy (PNX), but the mechanisms by which strain induces matrix remodeling are unclear. Our prior work demonstrated an association of chymotrypsin-like elastase 1 (Cela1) with lung elastin remodeling, and that strain triggered a near-instantaneous elastin-remodeling response. We sought to determine whether stretch regulates Cela1 expression and Cela1 binding to lung elastin. In C57BL/6J mice, Cela1 protein increased 176-fold during lung morphogenesis. Cela1 was covalently bound to serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A, member 1, resulting in a higher molecular mass in lung homogenate compared to pancreas homogenate. Post-PNX, Cela1 mRNA increased 6-fold, protein 3-fold, and Cela1-positive cells 2-fold. Cela1 was expressed predominantly in alveolar type II cells in the embryonic lung and predominantly in CD90-positive lung fibroblasts postnatally. During compensatory lung growth, Cela1 expression was induced in nonproliferative mesenchymal cells. In ex vivo mouse lung sections, stretch increased Cela1 binding to lung tissue by 46%. Competitive inhibition with soluble elastin completely abrogated this increase. Areas of stretch-induced elastase activity and Cela1 binding colocalized. The stretch-dependent expression and binding kinetics of Cela1 indicate an important role in stretch-dependent remodeling of the peripheral lung during development and regeneration. PMID:26443822

  20. Stretch regulates expression and binding of chymotrypsin-like elastase 1 in the postnatal lung.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rashika; Liu, Sheng; Brown, Montell D; Young, Sarah M; Batie, Matthew; Kofron, J Matthew; Xu, Yan; Weaver, Timmothy E; Apsley, Karen; Varisco, Brian M

    2016-02-01

    Lung stretch is critical for normal lung development and for compensatory lung growth after pneumonectomy (PNX), but the mechanisms by which strain induces matrix remodeling are unclear. Our prior work demonstrated an association of chymotrypsin-like elastase 1 (Cela1) with lung elastin remodeling, and that strain triggered a near-instantaneous elastin-remodeling response. We sought to determine whether stretch regulates Cela1 expression and Cela1 binding to lung elastin. In C57BL/6J mice, Cela1 protein increased 176-fold during lung morphogenesis. Cela1 was covalently bound to serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A, member 1, resulting in a higher molecular mass in lung homogenate compared to pancreas homogenate. Post-PNX, Cela1 mRNA increased 6-fold, protein 3-fold, and Cela1-positive cells 2-fold. Cela1 was expressed predominantly in alveolar type II cells in the embryonic lung and predominantly in CD90-positive lung fibroblasts postnatally. During compensatory lung growth, Cela1 expression was induced in nonproliferative mesenchymal cells. In ex vivo mouse lung sections, stretch increased Cela1 binding to lung tissue by 46%. Competitive inhibition with soluble elastin completely abrogated this increase. Areas of stretch-induced elastase activity and Cela1 binding colocalized. The stretch-dependent expression and binding kinetics of Cela1 indicate an important role in stretch-dependent remodeling of the peripheral lung during development and regeneration.

  1. Role and regulation of coordinately expressed de novo purine biosynthetic enzymes PPAT and PAICS in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Moloy T; Chen, Guoan; Chakravarthi, Balabhadrapatruni V S K; Pathi, Satya S; Anand, Sharath K; Carskadon, Shannon L; Giordano, Thomas J; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Thomas, Dafydd G; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Beer, David G; Varambally, Sooryanarayana

    2015-09-15

    Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolism including aerobic glycolysis that channels several glycolytic intermediates into de novo purine biosynthetic pathway. We discovered increased expression of phosphoribosyl amidotransferase (PPAT) and phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase, phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase (PAICS) enzymes of de novo purine biosynthetic pathway in lung adenocarcinomas. Transcript analyses from next-generation RNA sequencing and gene expression profiling studies suggested that PPAT and PAICS can serve as prognostic biomarkers for aggressive lung adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of PAICS performed on tissue microarrays showed increased expression with disease progression and was significantly associated with poor prognosis. Through gene knockdown and over-expression studies we demonstrate that altering PPAT and PAICS expression modulates pyruvate kinase activity, cell proliferation and invasion. Furthermore we identified genomic amplification and aneuploidy of the divergently transcribed PPAT-PAICS genomic region in a subset of lung cancers. We also present evidence for regulation of both PPAT and PAICS and pyruvate kinase activity by L-glutamine, a co-substrate for PPAT. A glutamine antagonist, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) blocked glutamine mediated induction of PPAT and PAICS as well as reduced pyruvate kinase activity. In summary, this study reveals the regulatory mechanisms by which purine biosynthetic pathway enzymes PPAT and PAICS, and pyruvate kinase activity is increased and exposes an existing metabolic vulnerability in lung cancer cells that can be explored for pharmacological intervention. PMID:26140362

  2. Role and regulation of coordinately expressed de novo purine biosynthetic enzymes PPAT and PAICS in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pathi, Satya S.; Anand, Sharath K.; Carskadon, Shannon L.; Giordano, Thomas J.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Beer, David G.; Varambally, Sooryanarayana

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolism including aerobic glycolysis that channels several glycolytic intermediates into de novo purine biosynthetic pathway. We discovered increased expression of phosphoribosyl amidotransferase (PPAT) and phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase, phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase (PAICS) enzymes of de novo purine biosynthetic pathway in lung adenocarcinomas. Transcript analyses from next-generation RNA sequencing and gene expression profiling studies suggested that PPAT and PAICS can serve as prognostic biomarkers for aggressive lung adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of PAICS performed on tissue microarrays showed increased expression with disease progression and was significantly associated with poor prognosis. Through gene knockdown and over-expression studies we demonstrate that altering PPAT and PAICS expression modulates pyruvate kinase activity, cell proliferation and invasion. Furthermore we identified genomic amplification and aneuploidy of the divergently transcribed PPAT-PAICS genomic region in a subset of lung cancers. We also present evidence for regulation of both PPAT and PAICS and pyruvate kinase activity by L-glutamine, a co-substrate for PPAT. A glutamine antagonist, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) blocked glutamine mediated induction of PPAT and PAICS as well as reduced pyruvate kinase activity. In summary, this study reveals the regulatory mechanisms by which purine biosynthetic pathway enzymes PPAT and PAICS, and pyruvate kinase activity is increased and exposes an existing metabolic vulnerability in lung cancer cells that can be explored for pharmacological intervention. PMID:26140362

  3. Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, characterized by low plasma levels of the serine protease inhibitor AAT, is associated with emphysema secondary to insufficient protection of the lung from neutrophil proteases. Although AAT augmentation therapy with purified AAT protein is efficacious, it requires weekly to monthly intravenous infusion of AAT purified from pooled human plasma, has the risk of viral contamination and allergic reactions, and is costly. As an alternative, gene therapy offers the advantage of single administration, eliminating the burden of protein infusion, and reduced risks and costs. The focus of this review is to describe the various strategies for AAT gene therapy for the pulmonary manifestations of AAT deficiency and the state of the art in bringing AAT gene therapy to the bedside. PMID:27564673

  4. Gene expression correlates of unexplained fatigue.

    PubMed

    Whistler, Toni; Taylor, Renee; Craddock, R Cameron; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2006-04-01

    Quantitative trait analysis (QTA) can be used to test whether the expression of a particular gene significantly correlates with some ordinal variable. To limit the number of false discoveries in the gene list, a multivariate permutation test can also be performed. The purpose of this study is to identify peripheral blood gene expression correlates of fatigue using quantitative trait analysis on gene expression data from 20,000 genes and fatigue traits measured using the multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI). A total of 839 genes were statistically associated with fatigue measures. These mapped to biological pathways such as oxidative phosphorylation, gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, and several signal transduction pathways. However, more than 50% are not functionally annotated or associated with identified pathways. There is some overlap with genes implicated in other studies using differential gene expression. However, QTA allows detection of alterations that may not reach statistical significance in class comparison analyses, but which could contribute to disease pathophysiology. This study supports the use of phenotypic measures of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and QTA as important for additional studies of this complex illness. Gene expression correlates of other phenotypic measures in the CFS Computational Challenge (C3) data set could be useful. Future studies of CFS should include as many precise measures of disease phenotype as is practical.

  5. Ex Vivo Adenoviral Vector Gene Delivery Results in Decreased Vector-associated Inflammation Pre- and Post–lung Transplantation in the Pig

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function. PMID:22453765

  6. Ex vivo adenoviral vector gene delivery results in decreased vector-associated inflammation pre- and post-lung transplantation in the pig.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-06-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function. PMID:22453765

  7. Noise Minimisation in Gene Expression Switches

    PubMed Central

    Monteoliva, Diana; McCarthy, Christina B.; Diambra, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is subject to stochastic variation which leads to fluctuations in the rate of protein production. Recently, a study in yeast at a genomic scale showed that, in some cases, gene expression variability alters phenotypes while, in other cases, these remain unchanged despite fluctuations in the expression of other genes. These studies suggested that noise in gene expression is a physiologically relevant trait and, to prevent harmful stochastic variation in the expression levels of some genes, it can be subject to minimisation. However, the mechanisms for noise minimisation are still unclear. In the present work, we analysed how noise expression depends on the architecture of the cis-regulatory system, in particular on the number of regulatory binding sites. Using analytical calculations and stochastic simulations, we found that the fluctuation level in noise expression decreased with the number of regulatory sites when regulatory transcription factors interacted with only one other bound transcription factor. In contrast, we observed that there was an optimal number of binding sites when transcription factors interacted with many bound transcription factors. This finding suggested a new mechanism for preventing large fluctuations in the expression of genes which are sensitive to the concentration of regulators. PMID:24376783

  8. Noise minimisation in gene expression switches.

    PubMed

    Monteoliva, Diana; McCarthy, Christina B; Diambra, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is subject to stochastic variation which leads to fluctuations in the rate of protein production. Recently, a study in yeast at a genomic scale showed that, in some cases, gene expression variability alters phenotypes while, in other cases, these remain unchanged despite fluctuations in the expression of other genes. These studies suggested that noise in gene expression is a physiologically relevant trait and, to prevent harmful stochastic variation in the expression levels of some genes, it can be subject to minimisation. However, the mechanisms for noise minimisation are still unclear. In the present work, we analysed how noise expression depends on the architecture of the cis-regulatory system, in particular on the number of regulatory binding sites. Using analytical calculations and stochastic simulations, we found that the fluctuation level in noise expression decreased with the number of regulatory sites when regulatory transcription factors interacted with only one other bound transcription factor. In contrast, we observed that there was an optimal number of binding sites when transcription factors interacted with many bound transcription factors. This finding suggested a new mechanism for preventing large fluctuations in the expression of genes which are sensitive to the concentration of regulators.

  9. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-08-18

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  10. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  11. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  12. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions.

  13. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene deletion alters bleomycin-induced lung injury, but not development of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Habgood, Anthony N; Tatler, Amanda L; Porte, Joanne; Wahl, Sharon M; Laurent, Geoffrey J; John, Alison E; Johnson, Simon R; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal disease with limited treatment options. Protease mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activation has been proposed as a pathogenic mechanism of lung fibrosis. Protease activity in the lung is tightly regulated by protease inhibitors, particularly secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). The bleomycin model of lung fibrosis was used to determine the effect of increased protease activity in the lungs of Slpi−/− mice following injury. Slpi−/−, and wild-type, mice received oropharyngeal administration of bleomycin (30 IU) and the development of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed. Pro and active forms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 were measured. Lung fibrosis was determined by collagen subtype specific gene expression, hydroxyproline concentration, and histological assessment. Alveolar TGF-β activation was measured using bronchoalveolar lavage cell pSmad2 levels and global TGF-β activity was assessed by pSmad2 immunohistochemistry. The active-MMP-9 to pro-MMP-9 ratio was significantly increased in Slpi−/− animals compared with wild-type animals, demonstrating enhanced metalloproteinase activity. Wild-type animals showed an increase in TGF-β activation following bleomycin, with a progressive and sustained increase in collagen type I, alpha 1 (Col1α1), III, alpha 1(Col3α1), IV, alpha 1(Col4α1) mRNA expression, and a significant increase in total lung collagen 28 days post-bleomycin. In contrast Slpi−/− mice showed no significant increase of alveolar TGF-β activity following bleomycin, above their already elevated levels, although global TGF-β activity did increase. Slpi−/− mice had impaired collagen gene expression but animals demonstrated minimal reduction in lung fibrosis compared with wild-type animals. These data suggest that enhanced proteolysis does not further enhance TGF-β activation, and inhibits sustained Col1α1, Col3α1 and Col4α1 gene

  14. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene deletion alters bleomycin-induced lung injury, but not development of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Habgood, Anthony N; Tatler, Amanda L; Porte, Joanne; Wahl, Sharon M; Laurent, Geoffrey J; John, Alison E; Johnson, Simon R; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive, fatal disease with limited treatment options. Protease-mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activation has been proposed as a pathogenic mechanism of lung fibrosis. Protease activity in the lung is tightly regulated by protease inhibitors, particularly secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). The bleomycin model of lung fibrosis was used to determine the effect of increased protease activity in the lungs of Slpi(-/-) mice following injury. Slpi(-/-), and wild-type, mice received oropharyngeal administration of bleomycin (30 IU) and the development of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed. Pro and active forms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were measured. Lung fibrosis was determined by collagen subtype-specific gene expression, hydroxyproline concentration, and histological assessment. Alveolar TGF-β activation was measured using bronchoalveolar lavage cell pSmad2 levels and global TGF-β activity was assessed by pSmad2 immunohistochemistry. The active-MMP-9 to pro-MMP-9 ratio was significantly increased in Slpi(-/-) animals compared with wild-type animals, demonstrating enhanced metalloproteinase activity. Wild-type animals showed an increase in TGF-β activation following bleomycin, with a progressive and sustained increase in collagen type I, alpha 1 (Col1α1), III, alpha 1(Col3α1), IV, alpha 1(Col4α1) mRNA expression, and a significant increase in total lung collagen 28 days post bleomycin. In contrast Slpi(-/-) mice showed no significant increase of alveolar TGF-β activity following bleomycin, above their already elevated levels, although global TGF-β activity did increase. Slpi(-/-) mice had impaired collagen gene expression but animals demonstrated minimal reduction in lung fibrosis compared with wild-type animals. These data suggest that enhanced proteolysis does not further enhance TGF-β activation, and inhibits sustained Col1α1, Col3α1, and Col4α1 gene expression

  15. Regulation of Flagellar Gene Expression in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Osterman, I A; Dikhtyar, Yu Yu; Bogdanov, A A; Dontsova, O A; Sergiev, P V

    2015-11-01

    The flagellum of a bacterium is a supramolecular structure of extreme complexity comprising simultaneously both a unique system of protein transport and a molecular machine that enables the bacterial cell movement. The cascade of expression of genes encoding flagellar components is closely coordinated with the steps of molecular machine assembly, constituting an amazing regulatory system. Data on structure, assembly, and regulation of flagellar gene expression are summarized in this review. The regulatory mechanisms and correlation of the process of regulation of gene expression and flagellum assembly known from the literature are described. PMID:26615435

  16. A Panel of Stably Expressed Reference Genes for Real-Time qPCR Gene Expression Studies of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Chapman, Joanne R; Helin, Anu S; Wille, Michelle; Atterby, Clara; Järhult, Josef D; Fridlund, Jimmy S; Waldenström, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Determining which reference genes have the highest stability, and are therefore appropriate for normalising data, is a crucial step in the design of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) gene expression studies. This is particularly warranted in non-model and ecologically important species for which appropriate reference genes are lacking, such as the mallard--a key reservoir of many diseases with relevance for human and livestock health. Previous studies assessing gene expression changes as a consequence of infection in mallards have nearly universally used β-actin and/or GAPDH as reference genes without confirming their suitability as normalisers. The use of reference genes at random, without regard for stability of expression across treatment groups, can result in erroneous interpretation of data. Here, eleven putative reference genes for use in gene expression studies of the mallard were evaluated, across six different tissues, using a low pathogenic avian influenza A virus infection model. Tissue type influenced the selection of reference genes, whereby different genes were stable in blood, spleen, lung, gastrointestinal tract and colon. β-actin and GAPDH generally displayed low stability and are therefore inappropriate reference genes in many cases. The use of different algorithms (GeNorm and NormFinder) affected stability rankings, but for both algorithms it was possible to find a combination of two stable reference genes with which to normalise qPCR data in mallards. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies in ducks. The fact that nearly all previous studies of the influence of pathogen infection on mallard gene expression have used a single, non-validated reference gene is problematic. The toolkit of putative reference genes provided here offers a solid foundation for future studies of gene expression in mallards and other waterfowl.

  17. A Panel of Stably Expressed Reference Genes for Real-Time qPCR Gene Expression Studies of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Joanne R.; Helin, Anu S.; Wille, Michelle; Atterby, Clara; Järhult, Josef D.; Fridlund, Jimmy S.; Waldenström, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Determining which reference genes have the highest stability, and are therefore appropriate for normalising data, is a crucial step in the design of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) gene expression studies. This is particularly warranted in non-model and ecologically important species for which appropriate reference genes are lacking, such as the mallard—a key reservoir of many diseases with relevance for human and livestock health. Previous studies assessing gene expression changes as a consequence of infection in mallards have nearly universally used β-actin and/or GAPDH as reference genes without confirming their suitability as normalisers. The use of reference genes at random, without regard for stability of expression across treatment groups, can result in erroneous interpretation of data. Here, eleven putative reference genes for use in gene expression studies of the mallard were evaluated, across six different tissues, using a low pathogenic avian influenza A virus infection model. Tissue type influenced the selection of reference genes, whereby different genes were stable in blood, spleen, lung, gastrointestinal tract and colon. β-actin and GAPDH generally displayed low stability and are therefore inappropriate reference genes in many cases. The use of different algorithms (GeNorm and NormFinder) affected stability rankings, but for both algorithms it was possible to find a combination of two stable reference genes with which to normalise qPCR data in mallards. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies in ducks. The fact that nearly all previous studies of the influence of pathogen infection on mallard gene expression have used a single, non-validated reference gene is problematic. The toolkit of putative reference genes provided here offers a solid foundation for future studies of gene expression in mallards and other waterfowl. PMID:26886224

  18. Transcriptome Analysis in Prenatal IGF1-Deficient Mice Identifies Molecular Pathways and Target Genes Involved in Distal Lung Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Porras, Isabel; López, Icíar Paula; De Las Rivas, Javier; Pichel, José García

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1) is a multifunctional regulator of somatic growth and development throughout evolution. IGF1 signaling through IGF type 1 receptor (IGF1R) controls cell proliferation, survival and differentiation in multiple cell types. IGF1 deficiency in mice disrupts lung morphogenesis, causing altered prenatal pulmonary alveologenesis. Nevertheless, little is known about the cellular and molecular basis of IGF1 activity during lung development. Methods/Principal Findings Prenatal Igf1−/− mutant mice with a C57Bl/6J genetic background displayed severe disproportional lung hypoplasia, leading to lethal neonatal respiratory distress. Immuno-histological analysis of their lungs showed a thickened mesenchyme, alterations in extracellular matrix deposition, thinner smooth muscles and dilated blood vessels, which indicated immature and delayed distal pulmonary organogenesis. Transcriptomic analysis of Igf1−/− E18.5 lungs using RNA microarrays identified deregulated genes related to vascularization, morphogenesis and cellular growth, and to MAP-kinase, Wnt and cell-adhesion pathways. Up-regulation of immunity-related genes was verified by an increase in inflammatory markers. Increased expression of Nfib and reduced expression of Klf2, Egr1 and Ctgf regulatory proteins as well as activation of ERK2 MAP-kinase were corroborated by Western blot. Among IGF-system genes only IGFBP2 revealed a reduction in mRNA expression in mutant lungs. Immuno-staining patterns for IGF1R and IGF2, similar in both genotypes, correlated to alterations found in specific cell compartments of Igf1−/− lungs. IGF1 addition to Igf1−/− embryonic lungs cultured ex vivo increased airway septa remodeling and distal epithelium maturation, processes accompanied by up-regulation of Nfib and Klf2 transcription factors and Cyr61 matricellular protein. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated the functional tissue specific implication of IGF1 on fetal lung

  19. A search for novel cancer/testis antigens in lung cancer identifies VCX/Y genes expanding the repertoire of potential immunotherapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Taylor, Allen D.; Rodriguez, Jaime; Çeliktaş, Müge; Liu, Hui; Ma, Xiaotu; Zhang, Qing; Wong, Chee-Hong; Chin, Alice; Girard, Luc; Behrens, Carmen; Lam, Wan L.; Lam, Stephen; Minna, John D.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Hanash, Samir M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer/testis (CT) antigens are potential immunotherapeutic targets in cancer. However, the expression of particular antigens is limited to a subset of tumors of a given type. Thus, there is a need to identify antigens with complementary expression patterns for effective therapeutic intervention. In this study, we searched for genes that were distinctly expressed at a higher level in lung tumor tissue and the testes compared to other non-tumor tissues and identified members of the VCX/Y gene family as novel CT antigens. VCX3A, a member of the VCX/Y gene family, was expressed at the protein level in approximately 20% of lung adenocarcinomas and 35% of squamous cell carcinomas, but not expressed in normal lung tissues. Among CT antigens with concordant mRNA and protein expression levels, four CT antigens, XAGE1, VCX, IL13RA2, and SYCE1, were expressed, alone or in combination, in about 80% of lung adenocarcinoma tumors. The CT antigen VCX/Y gene family broadens the spectrum of CT antigens expressed in lung adenocarcinomas for clinical applications. PMID:24970476

  20. Identification of lung cancer oncogenes based on the mRNA expression and single nucleotide polymorphism profile data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Mei, Q; Ai, Y Q; Li, R Q; Chang, L; Li, Y F; Xia, Y X; Li, W H; Chen, Y

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the oncogenes associated with lung cancer based on the mRNA and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) profile data. The mRNA expression profile data of GSE43458 (80 cancer and 30 normal samples) and SNP profile data of GSE33355 (61 pairs of lung cancer samples and control samples) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Common genes between the mRNA profile and SNP profile were identified as the lung cancer oncogenes. Risk subpathways of the selected oncogenes with the SNP locus were analyzed using the iSubpathwayMiner package in R. Moreover, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of the oncogenes was constructed using the HPRD database and then visualized using the Cytoscape. Totally, 3004 DEGs (1105 up-regulated and 1899 down-regulated) and 125 significant SNPs closely related to 174 genes in the lung cancer samples were identified. Also, 39 common genes, like PFKP (phosphofructokinase, platelet) and DGKH-rs11616202 (diacylglycerol kinase, eta) that enriched in sub-pathways such as galactose metabolism, fructose and mannose metabolism, and pentose phosphate pathway, were identified as the lung cancer oncogenes. Besides, PIK3R1 (phosphoinositide-3-kinase, regulatory subunit 1), RORA (RAR-related orphan receptor A), MAGI3 (membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 3), PTPRM (protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type, M), and BMP6 (bone morphogenetic protein 6) were the hub genes in PPI network. Our study suggested that PFKP and DGKH that enriched in galactose metabolism, fructose and mannose metabolism pathway, as well as PIK3R1, RORA, and MAGI3, may be the lung cancer oncogenes.

  1. Gene 33/Mig6 inhibits hexavalent chromium-induced DNA damage and cell transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyoung; Li, Cen; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Xu, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human lung carcinogens and environmental/occupational hazards. The molecular mechanisms of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis appear to be complex and are poorly defined. In this study, we investigated the potential role of Gene 33 (ERRFI1, Mig6), a multifunctional adaptor protein, in Cr(VI)-mediated lung carcinogenesis. We show that the level of Gene 33 protein is suppressed by both acute and chronic Cr(VI) treatments in a dose- and time-dependent fashion in BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells. The inhibition also occurs in A549 lung bronchial carcinoma cells. Cr(VI) suppresses Gene 33 expression mainly through post-transcriptional mechanisms, although the mRNA level of gene 33 also tends to be lower upon Cr(VI) treatments. Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage appears primarily in the S phases of the cell cycle despite the high basal DNA damage signals at the G2M phase. Knockdown of Gene 33 with siRNA significantly elevates Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage in both BEAS-2B and A549 cells. Depletion of Gene 33 also promotes Cr(VI)-induced micronucleus (MN) formation and cell transformation in BEAS-2B cells. Our results reveal a novel function of Gene 33 in Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage and lung epithelial cell transformation. We propose that in addition to its role in the canonical EGFR signaling pathway and other signaling pathways, Gene 33 may also inhibit Cr(VI)-induced lung carcinogenesis by reducing DNA damage triggered by Cr(VI). PMID:26760771

  2. Use of N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine)-antibody conjugate as a carrier for targeted gene delivery in mouse lung endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Kennel, S J; Huang, L

    1992-01-01

    A DNA targeted delivery and expression system has been designed based on an N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine) (NPLL)-antibody conjugate, which readily forms a complex with plasmid DNA. Monoclonal antibodies against the cell-surface thrombomodulin conjugated with NPLL were used for targeted delivery of foreign plasmid DNA to an antigen-expressing mouse lung endothelial cell line in vitro and to mouse lungs in vivo. In both cases significant amounts of DNA can be specifically bound to the target cells or tissues. Specific gene expression was observed in the treated mouse lung endothelial cells.

  3. MAGEA10 gene expression in non-small cell lung cancer and A549 cells, and the affinity of epitopes with the complex of HLA-A(∗)0201 alleles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Likui; Xu, Yuefang; Luo, Cheng; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Jinlu; Lee, Ming-Wei; Bai, Aiping; Chen, Guanhua; Frenz, Christopher M; Li, Zhengguo; Huang, Wenlin

    2015-09-01

    MAGEA10, a cancer/testis antigens expressed in tumors but not in normal tissues with the exception of testis and placenta, represents an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. However, suppressive cytoenvironment and requirement of specific HLA-alleles presentation frequently led to immunotherapy failure. In this study MAGEA10 was scarcely expressed in cancer patients, but enhanced by viili polysaccharides, which indicates a possibility of increasing epitopes presentation. Furthermore the correlation of gene expression with methylation, indicated by R(2) value for MAGEA10 that was 3 times higher than the value for other MAGE genes tested, provides an explanation of why MAGEA10 was highly inhibited, this is also seen by Kaplan-Meier analysis because MAGEA10 did not change the patients' lifespan. By using Molecular-Docking method, 3 MAGEA10 peptides were found binding to the groove position of HLA-A(∗)0210 as same as MAGEA4 peptide co-crystallized with HLA-A(∗)0210, which indicates that they could be promising for HLA-A(∗)0201 presentation in immunotherapy. PMID:26058806

  4. Candidate reference genes for gene expression studies in water lily.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huolin; Chen, Sumei; Wan, Hongjian; Chen, Fadi; Gu, Chunsun; Liu, Zhaolei

    2010-09-01

    The selection of an appropriate reference gene(s) is a prerequisite for the proper interpretation of quantitative Real-Time polymerase chain reaction data. We report the evaluation of eight candidate reference genes across various tissues and treatments in the water lily by the two software packages geNorm and NormFinder. Across all samples, clathrin adaptor complexes medium subunit (AP47) and actin 11 (ACT11) emerged as the most suitable reference genes. Across different tissues, ACT11 and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1alpha) exhibited a stable expression pattern. ACT11 and AP47 also stably expressed in roots subjected to various treatments, but in the leaves of the same plants the most stably expressed genes were ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 16 (UBC16) and ACT11. PMID:20452325

  5. Constitutive and allergen-induced expression of eotaxin mRNA in the guinea pig lung

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Eotaxin is a member of the C-C family of chemokines and is related during antigen challenge in a guinea pig model of allergic airway inflammation (asthma). Consistent with its putative role in eosinophilic inflammation, eotaxin induces the selective infiltration of eosinophils when injected into the lung and skin. Using a guinea pig lung cDNA library, we have cloned full-length eotaxin cDNA. The cDNA encodes a protein of 96 amino acids, including a putative 23-amino acid hydrophobic leader sequence, followed by 73 amino acids composing the mature active eotaxin protein. The protein-coding region of this cDNA is 73, 71, 50, and 48% identical in nucleic acid sequence to those of human macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP) 3, MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1 alpha, and RANTES, respectively. Analysis of genomic DNA suggested that there is a single eotaxin gene in guinea pig which is apparently conserved in mice. High constitutive levels of eotaxin mRNA expression were observed in the lung, while the intestines, stomach, spleen, liver, heart, thymus, testes, and kidney expressed lower levels. To determine if eotaxin mRNA levels are elevated during allergen-induced eosinophilic airway inflammation, ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized guinea pigs were challenged with aerosolized antigen. Compared with the lungs from saline-challenged animals, eotaxin mRNA levels increased sixfold within 3 h and returned to baseline by 6 h. Thus, eotaxin mRNA levels are increased in response to allergen challenge during the late phase response. The identification of constitutive eotaxin mRNA expression in multiple tissues suggests that in addition to regulating airway eosinophilia, eotaxin is likely to be involved in eosinophil recruitment into other tissues as well as in baseline tissue homing. PMID:7869037

  6. Expression of Polarity Genes in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wan-Hsin; Asmann, Yan W; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes are crucial for epithelial apical–basal polarity and directed cell migration. Since alterations of these processes are common in cancer, polarity proteins have been proposed to function as tumor suppressors or oncogenic promoters. Here, we review the current understanding of polarity protein functions in epithelial homeostasis, as well as tumor formation and progression. As most previous studies focused on the function of single polarity proteins in simplified model systems, we used a genomics approach to systematically examine and identify the expression profiles of polarity genes in human cancer. The expression profiles of polarity genes were distinct in different human tissues and classified cancer types. Additionally, polarity expression profiles correlated with disease progression and aggressiveness, as well as with identified cancer types, where specific polarity genes were commonly altered. In the case of Scribble, gene expression analysis indicated its common amplification and upregulation in human cancer, suggesting a tumor promoting function. PMID:25991909

  7. Optogenetic Control of Gene Expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yick-Bun; Alekseyenko, Olga V.; Kravitz, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    To study the molecular mechanism of complex biological systems, it is important to be able to artificially manipulate gene expression in desired target sites with high precision. Based on the light dependent binding of cryptochrome 2 and a cryptochrome interacting bHLH protein, we developed a split lexA transcriptional activation system for use in Drosophila that allows regulation of gene expression in vivo using blue light or two-photon excitation. We show that this system offers high spatiotemporal resolution by inducing gene expression in tissues at various developmental stages. In combination with two-photon excitation, gene expression can be manipulated at precise sites in embryos, potentially offering an important tool with which to examine developmental processes. PMID:26383635

  8. Expression of polarity genes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Hsin; Asmann, Yan W; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes are crucial for epithelial apical-basal polarity and directed cell migration. Since alterations of these processes are common in cancer, polarity proteins have been proposed to function as tumor suppressors or oncogenic promoters. Here, we review the current understanding of polarity protein functions in epithelial homeostasis, as well as tumor formation and progression. As most previous studies focused on the function of single polarity proteins in simplified model systems, we used a genomics approach to systematically examine and identify the expression profiles of polarity genes in human cancer. The expression profiles of polarity genes were distinct in different human tissues and classified cancer types. Additionally, polarity expression profiles correlated with disease progression and aggressiveness, as well as with identified cancer types, where specific polarity genes were commonly altered. In the case of Scribble, gene expression analysis indicated its common amplification and upregulation in human cancer, suggesting a tumor promoting function.

  9. Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Consuelo; Esther Ramirez, M.; Calixto-Galvez, Mercedes; Medel, Olivia; Rodríguez, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or drug resistance, and the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in that control could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. However, until now these mechanisms are poorly understood in protozoa. Recent investigations into gene expression in protozoa parasites suggest that they possess many of the canonical machineries employed by higher eukaryotes for the control of gene expression at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, but they also contain exclusive mechanisms. Here, we review the current understanding about the regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium sp., Trypanosomatids, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. PMID:20204171

  10. Dynamic modeling of gene expression data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holter, N. S.; Maritan, A.; Cieplak, M.; Fedoroff, N. V.; Banavar, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the time evolution of gene expression levels by using a time translational matrix to predict future expression levels of genes based on their expression levels at some initial time. We deduce the time translational matrix for previously published DNA microarray gene expression data sets by modeling them within a linear framework by using the characteristic modes obtained by singular value decomposition. The resulting time translation matrix provides a measure of the relationships among the modes and governs their time evolution. We show that a truncated matrix linking just a few modes is a good approximation of the full time translation matrix. This finding suggests that the number of essential connections among the genes is small.

  11. Triple-layer dissection of the lung adenocarcinoma transcriptome: regulation at the gene, transcript, and exon levels.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Min-Kung; Wu, I-Ching; Cheng, Ching-Chia; Su, Jen-Liang; Hsieh, Chang-Huain; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Chen, Feng-Chi

    2015-10-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is one of the most deadly human diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease, particularly RNA splicing, have remained underexplored. Here, we report a triple-level (gene-, transcript-, and exon-level) analysis of lung adenocarcinoma transcriptomes from 77 paired tumor and normal tissues, as well as an analysis pipeline to overcome genetic variability for accurate differentiation between tumor and normal tissues. We report three major results. First, more than 5,000 differentially expressed transcripts/exonic regions occur repeatedly in lung adenocarcinoma patients. These transcripts/exonic regions are enriched in nicotine metabolism and ribosomal functions in addition to the pathways enriched for differentially expressed genes (cell cycle, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, and axon guidance). Second, classification models based on rationally selected transcripts or exonic regions can reach accuracies of 0.93 to 1.00 in differentiating tumor from normal tissues. Of the 28 selected exonic regions, 26 regions correspond to alternative exons located in such regulators as tumor suppressor (GDF10), signal receptor (LYVE1), vascular-specific regulator (RASIP1), ubiquitination mediator (RNF5), and transcriptional repressor (TRIM27). Third, classification systems based on 13 to 14 differentially expressed genes yield accuracies near 100%. Genes selected by both detection methods include C16orf59, DAP3, ETV4, GABARAPL1, PPAR, RADIL, RSPO1, SERTM1, SRPK1, ST6GALNAC6, and TNXB. Our findings imply a multilayered lung adenocarcinoma regulome in which transcript-/exon-level regulation may be dissociated from gene-level regulation. Our described method may be used to identify potentially important genes/transcripts/exonic regions for the tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma and to construct accurate tumor vs. normal classification systems for this disease.

  12. Effect of proton and gamma irradiation on human lung carcinoma cells: Gene expression, cell cycle, cell death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer-stem cell trait as biological end points.

    PubMed

    Narang, Himanshi; Kumar, Amit; Bhat, Nagesh; Pandey, Badri N; Ghosh, Anu

    2015-10-01

    Proton beam therapy is a cutting edge modality over conventional gamma radiotherapy because of its physical dose deposition advantage. However, not much is known about its biological effects vis-a-vis gamma irradiation. Here we investigated the effect of proton- and gamma- irradiation on cell cycle, death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and "stemness" in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549). Proton beam (3MeV) was two times more cytotoxic than gamma radiation and induced higher and longer cell cycle arrest. At equivalent doses, numbers of genes responsive to proton irradiation were ten times higher than those responsive to gamma irradiation. At equitoxic doses, the proton-irradiated cells had reduced cell adhesion and migration ability as compared to the gamma-irradiated cells. It was also more effective in reducing population of Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) like cells as revealed by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and surface phenotyping by CD44(+), a CSC marker. These results can have significant implications for proton therapy in the context of suppression of molecular and cellular processes that are fundamental to tumor expansion.

  13. Identification of VEGF-regulated genes associated with increased lung metastatic potential: functional involvement of tenascin-C in tumor growth and lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, A; Catena, R; Noble, MS; Carbott, D; Gil-Bazo, I; Gonzalez-Moreno, O; Huh, J-I; Sharp, R; Qiu, T-H; Anver, MR; Merlino, G; Dickson, RB; Johnson, MD; Green, JE

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in patients with breast cancer. Overexpression of c-myc in humans correlates with metastases, but transgenic mice only show low rates of micrometastases. We have generated transgenic mice that overexpress both c-myc and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (Myc/VEGF) in the mammary gland, which develop high rates of pulmonary macrometastases. Gene expression profiling revealed a set of deregulated genes in Myc/VEGF tumors compared to Myc tumors associated with the increased metastatic phenotype. Cross-comparisons between this set of genes with a human breast cancer lung metastasis gene signature identified five common targets: tenascin-C (TNC), matrix metalloprotease-2, collagen-6-A1, mannosidase-α-1A and HLA-DPA1. Signaling blockade or knockdown of TNC in MDA-MB-435 cells resulted in a significant impairment of cell migration and anchorage-independent cell proliferation. Mice injected with clonal MDA-MB-435 cells with reduced expression of TNC demonstrated a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in (1) primary tumor growth; (2) tumor relapse after surgical removal of the primary tumor and (3) incidence of lung metastasis. Our results demonstrate that VEGF induces complex alterations in tissue architecture and gene expression. The TNC signaling pathway plays an important role in mammary tumor growth and metastases, suggesting that TNC may be a relevant target for therapy against metastatic breast cancer. PMID:18504437

  14. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in vitro: concordance with in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Snyder-Talkington, Brandi N.; Dong, Chunlin; Zhao, Xiangyi; Dymacek, Julian; Porter, Dale W.; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Castranova, Vincent; Qian, Yong; Guo, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    There is a current interest in reducing the in vivo toxicity testing of nanomaterials in animals by increasing toxicity testing using in vitro cellular assays; however, toxicological results are seldom concordant between in vivo and in vitro models. This study compared global multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-induced gene expression from human lung epithelial and microvascular endothelial cells in monoculture and coculture with gene expression from mouse lungs exposed to MWCNT. Using a cutoff of 10% false discovery rate and 1.5 fold change, we determined that there were more concordant genes (gene expression both up- or downregulated in vivo and in vitro) expressed in both cell types in coculture than in monoculture. When reduced to only those genes involved in inflammation and fibrosis, known outcomes of in vivo MWCNT exposure, there were more disease-related concordant genes expressed in coculture than monoculture. Additionally, different cellular signaling pathways are activated in response to MWCNT dependent upon culturing conditions. As coculture gene expression better correlated with in vivo gene expression, we suggest that cellular cocultures may offer enhanced in vitro models for nanoparticle risk assessment and the reduction of in vivo toxicological testing. PMID:25511174

  15. CBX7 Modulates the Expression of Genes Critical for Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Sepe, Romina; Federico, Antonella; Forzati, Floriana; Bianco, Mimma; Fusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that the expression of CBX7 is drastically decreased in several human carcinomas and that its expression progressively decreases with the appearance of a highly malignant phenotype. The aim of our study has been to investigate the mechanism by which the loss of CBX7 expression may contribute to the emergence of a more malignant phenotype. Methods We analyzed the gene expression profile of a thyroid carcinoma cell line after the restoration of CBX7 and, then, analyzed the transcriptional regulation of identified genes. Finally, we evaluated the expression of CBX7 and regulated genes in a panel of thyroid and lung carcinomas. Results We found that CBX7 negatively or positively regulates the expression of several genes (such as SPP1, SPINK1, STEAP1, and FOS, FOSB, EGR1, respectively) associated to cancer progression, by interacting with their promoter regions and modulating their transcriptional activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses in human thyroid and lung carcinoma tissues revealed a negative correlation between CBX7 and its down-regulated genes, while a positive correlation was observed with up-regulated genes. Conclusion In conclusion, the loss of CBX7 expression might play a critical role in advanced stages of carcinogenesis by deregulating the expression of specific effector genes. PMID:24865347

  16. Conditional Gene Inactivation Reveals Roles for Fgf10 and Fgfr2 in Establishing a Normal Pattern of Epithelial Branching in the Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Abler, Lisa L.; Mansour, Suzanne L.; Sun, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) signaling through FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) is required for lung initiation. While studies indicate that Fgf10 and Fgfr2 are also important at later stages of lung development, their roles in early branching events remain unclear. We addressed this question through conditional inactivation of both genes in mouse subsequent to lung initiation. Inactivation of Fgf10 in lung mesenchyme resulted in smaller lobes with a reduced number of branches. Inactivation of Fgfr2 in lung epithelium resulted in disruption of lobes and small epithelial outgrowths that arose arbitrarily along the main bronchi. In both mutants, there was an increase in cell death. Also, the expression patterns of key signaling molecules implicated in branching morphogenesis were altered and a proximal lung marker was expanded distally. Our results indicate that both Fgf10 and Fgfr2 are required for a normal branching program and for proper proximal-distal patterning of the lung. PMID:19618463

  17. Gene Positioning Effects on Expression in Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy Q; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The packaging and organization of the genome within the eukaryotic interphase nucleus directly influence how the genes are expressed. An underappreciated aspect of genome structure is that it is highly dynamic and that the physical positioning of a gene can impart control over its transcriptional status. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how gene positioning at different levels of genome organization can directly influence gene expression during interphase. The levels of organization discussed include chromatin looping, topologically associated domains, chromosome territories, and nuclear compartments. We discuss specific studies demonstrating that gene positioning is a dynamic and highly regulated feature of the eukaryotic genome that allows for the essential spatiotemporal regulation of genes.

  18. Homeobox genes expressed during echinoderm arm regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ben Khadra, Yousra; Said, Khaled; Thorndyke, Michael; Martinez, Pedro

    2014-04-01

    Regeneration in echinoderms has proved to be more amenable to study in the laboratory than the more classical vertebrate models, since the smaller genome size and the absence of multiple orthologs for different genes in echinoderms simplify the analysis of gene function during regeneration. In order to understand the role of homeobox-containing genes during arm regeneration in echinoderms, we isolated the complement of genes belonging to the Hox class that are expressed during this process in two major echinoderm groups: asteroids (Echinaster sepositus and Asterias rubens) and ophiuroids (Amphiura filiformis), both of which show an extraordinary capacity for regeneration. By exploiting the sequence conservation of the homeobox, putative orthologs of several Hox genes belonging to the anterior, medial, and posterior groups were isolated. We also report the isolation of a few Hox-like genes expressed in the same systems. PMID:24309817

  19. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  20. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  1. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  2. Mechanisms of control of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, B.; Gage, L.P.; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.; Skalka, A.M.; Weissbach, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines an array of topics on the regulation of gene expression, including an examination of DNA-protein interactions and the role of oncogene proteins in normal and abnormal cellular responses. The book focuses on the control of mRNA transcription in eykaryotes and delineates other areas including gene regulation in prokaryotes and control of stable RNA synthesis.

  3. Perspectives: Gene Expression in Fisheries Management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Pavey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional genes and gene expression have been connected to physiological traits linked to effective production and broodstock selection in aquaculture, selective implications of commercial fish harvest, and adaptive changes reflected in non-commercial fish populations subject to human disturbance and climate change. Gene mapping using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify functional genes, gene expression (analogue microarrays and real-time PCR), and digital sequencing technologies looking at RNA transcripts present new concepts and opportunities in support of effective and sustainable fisheries. Genomic tools have been rapidly growing in aquaculture research addressing aspects of fish health, toxicology, and early development. Genomic technologies linking effects in functional genes involved in growth, maturation and life history development have been tied to selection resulting from harvest practices. Incorporating new and ever-increasing knowledge of fish genomes is opening a different perspective on local adaptation that will prove invaluable in wild fish conservation and management. Conservation of fish stocks is rapidly incorporating research on critical adaptive responses directed at the effects of human disturbance and climate change through gene expression studies. Genomic studies of fish populations can be generally grouped into three broad categories: 1) evolutionary genomics and biodiversity; 2) adaptive physiological responses to a changing environment; and 3) adaptive behavioral genomics and life history diversity. We review current genomic research in fisheries focusing on those that use microarrays to explore differences in gene expression among phenotypes and within or across populations, information that is critically important to the conservation of fish and their relationship to humans.

  4. Reading Genomes and Controlling Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libchaber, Albert

    2000-03-01

    Molecular recognition of DNA sequences is achieved by DNA hybridization of complementary sequences. We present various scenarios for optimization, leading to microarrays and global measurement. Gene expression can be controlled using gene constructs immobilized on a template with micron scale temperature heaters. We will discuss and present results on protein microarrays.

  5. Bayesian modeling of differential gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Alex; Richardson, Sylvia; Marshall, Clare; Glazier, Anne; Aitman, Tim

    2006-03-01

    We present a Bayesian hierarchical model for detecting differentially expressing genes that includes simultaneous estimation of array effects, and show how to use the output for choosing lists of genes for further investigation. We give empirical evidence that expression-level dependent array effects are needed, and explore different nonlinear functions as part of our model-based approach to normalization. The model includes gene-specific variances but imposes some necessary shrinkage through a hierarchical structure. Model criticism via posterior predictive checks is discussed. Modeling the array effects (normalization) simultaneously with differential expression gives fewer false positive results. To choose a list of genes, we propose to combine various criteria (for instance, fold change and overall expression) into a single indicator variable for each gene. The posterior distribution of these variables is used to pick the list of genes, thereby taking into account uncertainty in parameter estimates. In an application to mouse knockout data, Gene Ontology annotations over- and underrepresented among the genes on the chosen list are consistent with biological expectations.

  6. Profiling of Differentially Expressed Genes Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization in an Equine Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Lefebvre-Lavoie, Josiane; Leclere, Mathilde; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Chamberland, Annie; Laprise, Catherine; Lussier, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene expression analyses are used to investigate signaling pathways involved in diseases. In asthma, they have been primarily derived from the analysis of bronchial biopsies harvested from mild to moderate asthmatic subjects and controls. Due to ethical considerations, there is currently limited information on the transcriptome profile of the peripheral lung tissues in asthma. Objective To identify genes contributing to chronic inflammation and remodeling in the peripheral lung tissue of horses with heaves, a naturally occurring asthma-like condition. Methods Eleven adult horses (6 heaves-affected and 5 controls) were studied while horses with heaves were in clinical remission (Pasture), and during disease exacerbation induced by a 30-day natural antigen challenge during stabling (Challenge). Large peripheral lung biopsies were obtained by thoracoscopy at both time points. Using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), lung cDNAs of controls (Pasture and Challenge) and asymptomatic heaves-affected horses (Pasture) were subtracted from cDNAs of horses with heaves in clinical exacerbation (Challenge). The differential expression of selected genes of interest was confirmed using quantitative PCR assay. Results Horses with heaves, but not controls, developed airway obstruction when challenged. Nine hundred and fifty cDNA clones isolated from the subtracted library were screened by dot blot array and 224 of those showing the most marked expression differences were sequenced. The gene expression pattern was confirmed by quantitative PCR in 15 of 22 selected genes. Novel genes and genes with an already defined function in asthma were identified in the subtracted cDNA library. Genes of particular interest associated with asthmatic airway inflammation and remodeling included those related to PPP3CB/NFAT, RhoA, and LTB4/GPR44 signaling pathways. Conclusions Pathways representing new possible targets for anti-inflammatory and anti-remodeling therapies for

  7. Inducible gene expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, G N; Hamilton, F S; Hoppler, S

    2000-07-13

    The amphibian Xenopus laevis has been successfully used for many years as a model system for studying vertebrate development. Because of technical limitations, however, molecular investigations have mainly concentrated on early stages. We have developed a straightforward method for stage-specific induction of gene expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos [1] [2]. This method is based on the Xenopus heat shock protein 70 (Xhsp70 [3]) promoter driving the expression of desired gene products. We found that ubiquitous expression of the transgene is induced upon relatively mild heat treatment. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used as a marker to monitor successful induction of gene expression in transgenic embryos. We used this method to study the stage specificity of Wnt signalling function. Transient ectopic Wnt-8 expression during early neurulation was sufficient to repress anterior head development and this capacity was restricted to early stages of neurulation. By transient over-expression at different stages of development, we show that frizzled-7 disrupted morphogenesis sequentially from anterior to posterior along the dorsal axis as development proceeds. These results demonstrate that this method for inducible gene expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos will be a very powerful tool for temporal analysis of gene function and for studying molecular mechanisms of vertebrate organogenesis.

  8. Assessing Gene Expression of the Endocannabinoid System.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Mariangela; D'Addario, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR), a major development of PCR technology, is a powerful and sensitive gene analysis technique that revolutionized the field of measuring gene expression. Here, we describe in detail RNA extraction, reverse transcription (RT), and relative quantification of genes belonging to the endocannabinoid system in mouse, rat, or human samples. PMID:27245909

  9. A novel profibrotic mechanism mediated by TGF-β-stimulated collagen prolyl hydroxylase expression in fibrotic lung mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongfeng; Xu, Wei; Chen, Hui; Warburton, David; Dong, Rachel; Qian, Bangping; Selman, Moisés; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Shi, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a severe chronic lung disease with a high mortality rate. Excessive TGF-β signaling is recognized as a central player in lung fibrosis. However, the related mechanisms remain unclear. Herein we used a novel Tbx4 lung enhancer-driven Tet-On transgenic system to inhibit TGF-β signaling in mouse lung resident mesenchymal cells at different stages of bleomycin-induced fibrosis by conditionally knocking out TGF-β receptor II or expressing a dominant-negative TGF-β receptor II. Abrogation of mesenchymal TGF-β signaling markedly attenuated bleomycin-induced fibrotic pathology, which was independent of altered early inflammation. Furthermore, a novel TGF-β downstream target gene P4HA3 (an α-subunit of collagen prolyl hydroxylase) was identified, and its expression was significantly increased in fibroblastic foci of both bleomycin-induced fibrotic mouse lungs and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients’ lungs. The relationship between activated TGF-β signaling, upregulation of P4HA3, as well as increased hydroxyproline/collagen production was further verified in cultured lung fibroblasts. Moreover, inhibition of collagen prolyl hydroxylase by pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylate attenuated both TGF-β-stimulated collagen production in cultured fibroblasts and bleomycin-induced mouse lung fibrosis. These data indicate that increased expression and activity of collagen prolyl hydroxylase is one of the important mechanisms underlying TGF-β-mediated profibrotic effects. Inhibition of collagen prolyl hydroxylase may be a new promising approach for preventing and treating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25779936

  10. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuefel; Kang, Huining; Fields, Chris; Cowie, Jim R.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Xu, Yuexian; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul; Andries, Erik; Ar, Kerem; Potter, Jeffrey; Willman, Cheryl L.; Murphy, Maurice H.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  11. Lung Epithelial Cell-Specific Expression of Human Lysosomal Acid Lipase Ameliorates Lung Inflammation and Tumor Metastasis in Lipa(-/-) Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Ding, Xinchun; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway of neutral lipids, has a close connection with inflammation and tumor progression. One major manifestation in LAL-deficient (Lipa(-/-)) mice is an increase of tumor growth and metastasis associated with expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In the lung, LAL is highly expressed in alveolar type II epithelial cells. To assess how LAL in lung epithelial cells plays a role in this inflammation-related pathogenic process, lung alveolar type II epithelial cell-specific expression of human LAL (hLAL) in Lipa(-/-) mice was established by crossbreeding of CCSP-driven rtTA transgene and (TetO)7-CMV-hLAL transgene into Lipa(-/-) mice (CCSP-Tg/KO). hLAL expression in lung epithelial cells not only reduced tumor-promoting myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the lung, but also down-regulated the synthesis and secretion of tumor-promoting cytokines and chemokines into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of Lipa(-/-) mice. hLAL expression reduced the immunosuppressive functions of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells, inhibited bone marrow cell transendothelial migration, and inhibited endothelial cell proliferation and migration in Lipa(-/-) mice. As a result, hLAL expression in CCSP-Tg/KO mice corrected pulmonary damage, and inhibited tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and tumor metastasis to the lung in vivo. These results support a concept that LAL is a critical metabolic enzyme in lung epithelial cells that regulates lung homeostasis, immune response, and tumor metastasis. PMID:27461363

  12. Expression of nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2-mediated genes differentiates tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhongqing; Lv, Jingzhu; Kelly, Gabriel T; Wang, Hongtao; Zhang, Xiaojie; Gu, Wanjun; Yin, Xiaofeng; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong

    2016-07-01

    During infection and host defense, nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (Nrf2) dependent signaling is an efficient antioxidant defensive mechanism used by host cells to control the destructive effects of reactive oxygen species. This allows for effective defense responses against microbes while minimizing oxidative injury to the host cell itself. As a central regulator of antioxidant genes, Nrf2 has gained great attention in its pivotal role in infection, especially in tuberculosis (TB), the top infectious disease killer worldwide. To elucidate the genes potentially regulated by Nrf2 in TB, we conducted a meta-analysis on published gene expression datasets. Firstly, we compared the global gene expression profiles between control and Nrf2-deficient human cells. The differentially expressed genes were deemed as "Nrf2-mediated genes". Next, the whole blood gene expression pattern of TB patients was compared with that of healthy controls, pneumonia patients, and lung cancer patients. We found that the genes deregulated in TB significantly overlap with the Nrf2-mediated genes. Based on the intersection of Nrf2-mediated and TB-regulated genes, we identified an Nrf2-mediated 17-gene signature, which reflects a cluster of gene ontology terms highly related to TB physiology. We demonstrated that the 17-gene signature can be used to distinguish TB patients from healthy controls and patients with latent TB infection, pneumonia, or lung cancer. Also, the Nrf2-mediated gene signature can be used as an indicator of the anti-TB therapeutic response. More importantly, we confirmed that the predictive power of the Nrf2-mediated 17-gene signature is significantly better than the random gene sets selected from the human transcriptome. Also, the 17-gene signature performs even better than the random gene signatures selected from TB-associated genes. Our study confirms the central role of Nrf2 in TB pathogenesis and provides a novel and useful diagnostic method to differentiate TB

  13. Modeling gene expression in time and space.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Cell populations rarely exhibit gene-expression profiles that are homogeneous in time and space. In the temporal domain, dynamical behaviors such as oscillations and pulses of protein production pervade cell biology, underlying phenomena as diverse as circadian rhythmicity, cell cycle control, stress and damage responses, and stem-cell pluripotency. In multicellular populations, spatial heterogeneities are crucial for decision making and development, among many other functions. Cells need to exquisitely coordinate this temporal and spatial variation to survive. Although the spatiotemporal character of gene expression is challenging to quantify experimentally at the level of individual cells, it is beneficial from the modeling viewpoint, because it provides strong constraints that can be probed by theoretically analyzing mathematical models of candidate gene and protein circuits. Here, we review recent examples of temporal dynamics and spatial patterning in gene expression to show how modeling such phenomenology can help us unravel the molecular mechanisms of cellular function.

  14. Murine tissue factor gene expression in vivo. Tissue and cell specificity and regulation by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Mackman, N.; Sawdey, M. S.; Keeton, M. R.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Regulation of tissue factor (TF) gene expression was studied in vivo employing a murine model system. In untreated mice, TF mRNA was detected in brain, lung, kidney, and heart by Northern blot analysis. After administration of lipopolysaccharide, steady-state levels of TF mRNA were unchanged in brain, decreased in heart, and increased in both kidney and lung. In the brain, Bergmann glia within the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum and neuroglia within the cerebral cortex expressed TF mRNA by in situ hybridization. Epidermal cells of the skin and tongue also expressed TF mRNA. At present, we have not identified the cell type(s) in the kidney and lung responsible for increased TF gene expression. These results demonstrate tissue- and cell-specific TF gene expression in vivo. Lipopolysaccharide-mediated increases in TF expression in the kidney and lung may promote fibrin deposition in these organs during Gram-negative sepsis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8317556

  15. Introduction to the Gene Expression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Segundo-Val, Ignacio San; Sanz-Lozano, Catalina S

    2016-01-01

    In 1941, Beadle and Tatum published experiments that would explain the basis of the central dogma of molecular biology, whereby the DNA through an intermediate molecule, called RNA, results proteins that perform the functions in cells. Currently, biomedical research attempts to explain the mechanisms by which develops a particular disease, for this reason, gene expression studies have proven to be a great resource. Strictly, the term "gene expression" comprises from the gene activation until the mature protein is located in its corresponding compartment to perform its function and contribute to the expression of the phenotype of cell.The expression studies are directed to detect and quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of a specific gene. The development of the RNA-based gene expression studies began with the Northern Blot by Alwine et al. in 1977. In 1969, Gall and Pardue and John et al. independently developed the in situ hybridization, but this technique was not employed to detect mRNA until 1986 by Coghlan. Today, many of the techniques for quantification of RNA are deprecated because other new techniques provide more information. Currently the most widely used techniques are qPCR, expression microarrays, and RNAseq for the transcriptome analysis. In this chapter, these techniques will be reviewed. PMID:27300529

  16. Thyroid-specific gene expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2011-12-16

    Previously, we demonstrated that Runx2 (Cbfa1/AML3), a chondrocyte-specific transcription factor, is expressed in thyroid glands of mice, where it stimulates expression of the thyroglobulin (Tg) gene. Here, we reverse transcribed thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), Pax-8, Tg, thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and Na(+)/I(-) symporter (NIS) cDNAs from mouse trachea and bronchus RNA samples, but were unable to recover these cDNAs from mouse liver RNA samples. Tg mRNA levels in trachea and bronchus were about 5.1% and 2.1% of those in thyroid glands. ATDC-5 cells, cultured chondrocytes, expressed about 30-fold more Tg mRNA than undifferentiated cells. Gel shift and Tg gene reporter assay revealed that TTF-1 stimulated Tg gene expression in these cells. These results indicate that chondrocytes turn on some aspects of the thyroid gene expression program and that TTF-1 plays important roles in Tg gene expression in chondrocyte. PMID:21945616

  17. β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase gene therapy upregulates tight junctions to rescue lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Barravecchia, M; Kothari, P; Young, J L; Dean, D A

    2016-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with diverse disorders and characterized by disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leakage of edema fluid into the lung, and substantial inflammation leading to acute respiratory failure. Gene therapy is a potentially powerful approach to treat ALI/ARDS through repair of alveolar epithelial function. Herein, we show that delivery of a plasmid expressing β1-subunit of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase) alone or in combination with epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) α1-subunit using electroporation not only protected from subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated lung injury, but also treated injured lungs. However, transfer of α1-subunit of ENaC (α1-ENaC) alone only provided protection benefit rather than treatment benefit although alveolar fluid clearance had been remarkably enhanced. Gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, but not α1-ENaC, not only enhanced expression of tight junction protein zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) and occludin both in cultured cells and in mouse lungs, but also reduced pre-existing increase of lung permeability in vivo. These results demonstrate that gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase upregulates tight junction formation and therefore treats lungs with existing injury, whereas delivery of α1-ENaC only maintains pre-existing tight junction but not for generation. This indicates that the restoration of epithelial/endothelial barrier function may provide better treatment of ALI/ARDS. PMID:26910760

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 of 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.

  19. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:21539748

  20. Intergrin gene expression profiles of humanhepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lian-Xin; Jiang, Hong-Chi; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Hui; Zhu, An-Long; Wang, Xiu-Qin; Wu, Min

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gene expression profiles of intergrin genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through the usage of Atlas Human Cancer Array membranes, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot. METHODS: Hybridization of cDNA array membrane was performed with α 32P-labeled cDNA probes synthesized from RNA isolated from hepatocellular carcinoma and adjacent non-cirrhotic liver. AtlasImage, which is a software specific to array, was used to analyze the result. RT-PCR of 24 pairs specimen and Northern blot of 4 pairs specimen were used to confirm the expression pattern of some intergrin genes identified by Atlas arrays hybridization. RESULTS: Among 588 genes spotted in membrane, 17 genes were related to intergrin. Four genes were up-regulated, such as intergrin alpha8, beta1, beta7 and beta8 in HCC. Whereas there were no genes down-regulated in HCC. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis of intergrin beta1 gene gave results consistent with cDNA array findings. CONCLUSION: Investigation of these intergrin genes should help to disclose the molecular mechanism of the cell adhesion, invasive and metastasis of HCC. A few genes are reported to have changed in HCC for the first time. The quick and high-throughout method of profiling gene expression by cDNA array provides us overview of key factors that may involved in HCC, and may find the clue of the study of HCC metastasis and molecular targets of anti-metastasis therapy. The precise relationship between the altered genes and HCC is a matter of further investigation. PMID:12174369

  1. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-01-15

    All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  2. Soybean physiology and gene expression during drought.

    PubMed

    Stolf-Moreira, R; Medri, M E; Neumaier, N; Lemos, N G; Pimenta, J A; Tobita, S; Brogin, R L; Marcelino-Guimarães, F C; Oliveira, M C N; Farias, J R B; Abdelnoor, R V; Nepomuceno, A L

    2010-10-05

    Soybean genotypes MG/BR46 (Conquista) and BR16, drought-tolerant and -sensitive, respectively, were compared in terms of morphophysiological and gene-expression responses to water stress during two stages of development. Gene-expression analysis showed differential responses in Gmdreb1a and Gmpip1b mRNA expression within 30 days of water-deficit initiation in MG/BR46 (Conquista) plants. Within 45 days of initiating stress, Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b had relatively higher expression. Initially, BR16 showed increased expression only for Gmdreb1a, and later (45 days) for Gmp5cs, Gmdefensin and Gmpip1b. Only BR16 presented down-regulated expression of genes, such as Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b, 30 days after the onset of moisture stress, and Gmgols after 45 days of stress. The faster perception of water stress in MG/BR46 (Conquista) and the better maintenance of up-regulated gene expression than in the sensitive BR16 genotype imply mechanisms by which the former is better adapted to tolerate moisture deficiency.

  3. Associations between clinical characteristics and oncogene expression in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Yu, D P; Zhou, S J; Song, X Y; Li, Y S; Xiao, N; Liu, Z D; Sun, X J; Zhao, Q Y; Liu, S K

    2014-10-31

    More than 40 oncogenes associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been identified with varied gene expression. The correlations between specific clinical characteristics and oncogene expression in NSCLC patients were examined. From October 2011 to September 2012, a total of 60 patients with NSCLC (male:female, 34:24; mean age, 59.5 ± 10.6 years; age range, 31-81 years) were diagnosed and evaluated for treatment with radical resection at a single facility. Eligible patients exhibiting tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage I-III NSCLC confirmed by post-surgical pathology were included. mRNA expression was detected by branched DNA-liquidchip technology (bDNA-LCT) and mutations were detected at EGFR exons 18, 19, 20, and 21, KRAS exons 2 and 3, BRAF and PIK3CA exons 9 and 20. Correlations between gene expression at mutations and clinical characteristics of gender, age, histological type, degree of differentiation, smoking status, immunohistochemical (IHC) evaluation of TTF-1, TNM staging, and discrete age ("nage") were examined. Significant associations were observed between IHC staining for TTF-1 and histological type (P = 0.00001) and with BRAC1, TYMS, RRM1, and TUBB3 expression (P = 0.0187, 0.0051, 0.024, and 0.0238, respectively). Significant cross-correlations were observed between TYMS, BRAC1, TOP2A, STMN1, TUBB3, and RRM1 expression (P < 0.05), but not between EGFR exon 21, KRAS exon 2, and PIK3CA exon 9 expression and any other mutation expression (P > 0.05). Relationships between clinical characteristics and oncogene expression in NSCLC, particularly those of TTF-1 level and smoking status, may be useful indicators of prognosis and development of anti-cancer drug resistance.

  4. An overlapping set of genes is regulated by both NFIB and the glucocorticoid receptor during lung maturation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lung maturation is a late fetal developmental event in both mice and humans. Because of this, lung immaturity is a serious problem in premature infants. Disruption of genes for either the glucocorticoid receptor (Nr3c1) or the NFIB transcription factors results in perinatal lethality due to lung immaturity. In both knockouts, the phenotype includes excess cell proliferation, failure of saccularization and reduced expression of markers of epithelial differentiation. This similarity suggests that the two genes may co-regulate a specific set of genes essential for lung maturation. Results We analyzed the roles of these two transcription factors in regulating transcription using ChIP-seq data for NFIB, and RNA expression data and motif analysis for both. Our new ChIP-seq data for NFIB in lung at E16.5 shows that NFIB binds to a NFI motif. This motif is over-represented in the promoters of genes that are under-expressed in Nfib-KO mice at E18.5, suggesting an activator role for NFIB. Using available microarray data from Nr3c1-KO mice, we further identified 52 genes that are under-expressed in both Nfib and Nr3c1 knockouts, an overlap which is 13.1 times larger than what would be expected by chance. Finally, we looked for enrichment of 738 recently published transcription factor motifs in the promoters of these putative target genes and found that the NFIB and glucocorticoid receptor motifs were among the most enriched, suggesting that a subset of these genes may be directly activated by Nfib and Nr3c1. Conclusions Our data provide the first evidence for Nfib and Nr3c1 co-regulating genes related to lung maturation. They also establish that the in vivo DNA-binding specificity of NFIB is the same as previously seen in vitro, and highly similar to that of the other NFI-family members NFIA, NFIC and NFIX. PMID:24661679

  5. Correlations between EGFR gene polymorphisms and pleural metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Haisheng; Xing, Yunhui; Mu, Ailan; Li, Xia; Li, Tingshan; Bian, Xia; Yang, Chunmei; Zhang, Xiaolei; Liu, Yuefen; Wang, Xunguo

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation, growth, and differentiation of cells are strictly controlled by the signal system of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). If any link of the EGFR signals system is interfered with or damaged, the proliferation, growth, and differentiation of cells would become uncontrolled. EGFR is overexpressed in a variety of malignant tumors, such as non-small-cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer and breast cancer. Results of the study have proved that EGFR overexpression is closely associated with mutations and variants of the EGFR genes, whose mutations and variants are associated with occurrence, metastasis, and prognosis of different types of tumors, including lung cancer. This study is aimed at investigating whether the polymorphisms of CA simple sequence repeat in intron 1 (CA-SSR1), -216G/T, and R497K in the EGFR are able to induce EGFR activation and whether overexpression is associated with pleural metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 432 lung adenocarcinoma patients with pleural metastasis (metastasis group) and 424 patients with lung adenocarcinoma but without pleural metastasis (nonmetastasis group) were enrolled in this study. For all patients, the CA-SSR1 genotypes were determined by capillary electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction amplification, and direct DNA sequencing, and the R497K and -216G/T genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct DNA sequencing. EGFR expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining in primary tumor tissues with different -216G/T, R497K, and CA-SSR1 genotypes. Our results showed significant differences between pleural metastasis and nonmetastasis groups in the genotype and allele distribution of -216G/T, R497K, and CA-SSR1 polymorphisms of the EGFR gene. The -216T allele, Arg allele, and shorter CA-SSR1 (<17) had significantly increased risks of pleural metastasis compared with the -216G allele, Lys allele, and longer CA-SSR1 (≥17), respectively. The expression

  6. Correlations