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Sample records for lung inflammatory responses

  1. Lung dendritic cells and the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Mitchell H

    2006-05-01

    To discuss the role of conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in inducing and modulating immune responses in the lung. The primary literature and selected review articles studying the role of dendritic cells in both rodent and human lungs as identified via a PubMed/MEDLINE search using the keywords dendritic cell, antigen-presenting cell, viral airway disease, asthma, allergy, and atopy. The author's knowledge of the field was used to identify studies that were relevant to the stated objective. Dendritic cells are well positioned in the respiratory tract and other mucosal surfaces to respond to any foreign protein. These cells are crucial to the initiation of the adaptive immune response through induction of antigen specific T-cell responses. These cells also play an important role in the regulation of developing and ongoing immune responses, an area that is currently under intense investigation. This review discusses the various subsets of human and rodent dendritic cells and the pathways involved in antigen processing and subsequent immune regulation by dendritic cells in the lung using both viral and nonviral allergenic protein exposure as examples. Conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells are uniquely situated in the immune cascade to not only initiate but also modulate immune responses. Therapeutic interventions in allergic and asthmatic diseases will likely be developed to take advantage of this exclusive position of the dendritic cell.

  2. Platelets protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuhua; Wang, Yabo; An, Qi; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Junfei; Zhang, Jie; Meng, Wentong; Du, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory responses can severely injure lungs, prompting efforts to explore how to attenuate such injury. Here we explored whether platelets can help attenuate lung injury in mice resulting from extracorporeal circulation (ECC)-induced systemic inflammatory responses. Mice were subjected to ECC for 30 min, then treated with phosphate-buffered saline, platelets, the GPIIb/IIIa inhibitor Tirofiban, or the combination of platelets and Tirofiban. Blood and lung tissues were harvested 60 min later, and lung injury and inflammatory status were assessed. As expected, ECC caused systemic inflammation and pulmonary dysfunction, and platelet transfusion resulted in significantly milder lung injury and higher lung function. It also led to greater numbers of circulating platelet-leukocyte aggregates and greater platelet accumulation in the lung. Platelet transfusion was associated with higher production of transforming growth factor-β and as well as lower levels of tumour necrosis factor-α and neutrophil elastase in plasma and lung. None of these platelet effects was observed in the presence of Tirofiban. Our results suggest that, at least under certain conditions, platelets can protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:28155889

  3. Mechanical ventilation increases the inflammatory response induced by lung contusion.

    PubMed

    van Wessem, Karlijn J P; Hennus, Marije P; van Wagenberg, Linda; Koenderman, Leo; Leenen, Luke P H

    2013-07-01

    Posttraumatic lung contusion is common after blunt chest trauma, and patients often need ventilatory support. Lung contusion induces an inflammatory response signified by primed polymorph neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs) in blood and tissue. Mechanical ventilation (MV) can also cause an inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to develop an animal model to investigate the effect of high-volume ventilation on the inflammatory response in blunt chest trauma. We assigned 23 male Sprague-Dawley rats to either MV or bilateral lung contusion followed by MV. We used three extra rats as controls. Lung contusion was induced by a blast generator, a device releasing a single pressure blast wave centered on the chest. We determined tissue and systemic inflammation by absolute PMN numbers in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), myeloperoxidase, interleukin (IL)-6, IL 1β, growth-related oncogene-KC, and IL-10 in both plasma and BALF. Survival after blunt chest trauma was correlated to the distance to the blast generator. Compared with controls, both MV and blast plus MV rats showed increased systemic and pulmonary inflammation, expressed by higher PMNs, myeloperoxidase levels, and cytokine levels in both blood and BALF. Blast plus MV rats showed a higher systemic and pulmonary inflammatory response than MV rats. The blast generator generated reproducible blunt chest trauma in rats. Mechanical ventilation after lung contusion induced a larger overall inflammatory response than MV alone, which indicates that local damage contributes not only to local inflammation, but also to systemic inflammation. This emphasizes the importance of lung protective ventilation strategies after pulmonary contusion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Linking lung function and inflammatory responses in ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Vincenzo; Hantos, Zoltan; Sly, Peter D; Zosky, Graeme R

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury are poorly understood. We used strain-dependent responses to mechanical ventilation in mice to identify associations between mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung. BALB/c, C57BL/6, and 129/Sv mice were ventilated using a protective [low tidal volume and moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers] or injurious (high tidal volume and zero PEEP) ventilation strategy. Lung mechanics and lung volume were monitored using the forced oscillation technique and plethysmography, respectively. Inflammation was assessed by measuring numbers of inflammatory cells, cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) levels, and protein content of the BAL. Principal components factor analysis was used to identify independent associations between lung function and inflammation. Mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung were dependent on ventilation strategy and mouse strain. Three factors were identified linking 1) pulmonary edema, protein leak, and macrophages, 2) atelectasis, IL-6, and TNF-α, and 3) IL-1β and neutrophils, which were independent of responses in lung mechanics. This approach has allowed us to identify specific inflammatory responses that are independently associated with overstretch of the lung parenchyma and loss of lung volume. These data provide critical insight into the mechanical responses in the lung that drive local inflammation in ventilator-induced lung injury and the basis for future mechanistic studies in this field.

  5. Peroxiredoxin 6 differentially regulates acute and chronic cigarette smoke–mediated lung inflammatory response and injury

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Chung, Sangwoon; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Arunachalam, Gnanapragasam; Cook, Suzanne; Yao, Hongwei; Mazur, Witold; Kinnula, Vuokko L.; Fisher, Aron B.; Rahman, Irfan

    2011-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) exerts its protective role through peroxidase activity against H2O2 and phospholipid hydroperoxides. We hypothesized that targeted disruption of Prdx6 would lead to enhanced susceptibility to cigarette smoke (CS)-mediated lung inflammation and/or emphysema in mouse lung. Prdx6 null (Prdx6−/−) mice exposed to acute CS showed no significant increase of inflammatory cell influx or any alterations in lung levels of pro inflammatory cytokines compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Lung levels of antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in acute CS-exposed Prdx6−/− compared to WT mice. Overexpressing (Prdx6+/+) mice exposed to acute CS showed significant decrease in lung antioxidant enzymes associated with increased inflammatory response compared to CS-exposed WT mice or air-exposed Prdx6−/− mice. However, chronic 6 months of CS exposure resulted in increased lung inflammatory response, mean linear intercept (Lm), and alteration in lung mechanical properties in Prdx6−/− when compared to WT mice exposed to CS. These data show that targeted disruption of Prdx6 does not lead to increased lung inflammatory response but is associated with increased antioxidants, suggesting a critical role of lung Prdx6 and several compensatory mechanisms during acute CS-induced adaptive response, whereas this protection is lost in chronic CS exposure leading to emphysema. PMID:20939758

  6. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  7. Comparison of inflammatory responses in mouse lungs exposed to atranones A and C from Stachybotrys chartarum.

    PubMed

    Rand, Thomas G; Flemming, J; David Miller, J; Womiloju, Taiwo O

    2006-07-01

    Stachybotrys chartarum isolates can be separated into two distinct chemotypes based on the toxins they produce. One chemotype produces macrocyclic trichothecenes; the other produces atranones (and sometimes simple trichothecenes, e.g., trichodermol and trichodermin). Studies using in vivo models of lung disease revealed that exposure to spores of the atranone producing S. chartarum isolates led to a variety of immunotoxic, inflammatory, and other pathological changes. However, it is unclear from these studies what role the pure atranone toxins sequestered in spores of these isolates exert on lung disease onset. This study examined dose-response (0.2, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, or 20 microg atranone/animal) and time-course (3, 6, 24, and 48 h postinstillation [PI]) relationships associated with inflammatory cell and proinflammatory chemokine/cytokine responses in mouse lungs intratracheally instilled with two pure atranones (either A or C) isolated from S. chartarum. High doses (2.0 to 20 microg toxin/animal) of atranone A and C induced significant inflammatory responses manifested as differentially elevated macrophage, neutrophil, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 concentrations in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of intratracheally exposed mice. Compared to controls, BALF macrophage and neutrophil numbers were increased to significant levels from 6 to 48 h (PI). Except for macrophage numbers in atranone A treatment animals, cells exhibited significant dose dependent-like responses. The chemokine/cytokine marker responses were significantly and dose-dependently increased from 3 to 24 h PI and declined to nonsignificant levels at 48 h PI. The results suggest not only that atranones are inflammatory but also that they exhibit different inflammatory potency with different toxicokinetics. Data also suggest that exposure to these toxins in spores of S. chartarum in contaminated building environments could contribute

  8. Sex differences in the expression of lung inflammatory mediators in response to ozone.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Noe; Mishra, Vikas; Sinha, Utkarshna; DiAngelo, Susan L; Chroneos, Zissis C; Ekpa, Ndifreke A; Cooper, Timothy K; Caruso, Carla R; Silveyra, Patricia

    2015-11-15

    Sex differences in the incidence of respiratory diseases have been reported. Women are more susceptible to inflammatory lung disease induced by air pollution and show worse adverse pulmonary health outcomes than men. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences remain unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that sex differences in the expression of lung inflammatory mediators affect sex-specific immune responses to environmental toxicants. We focused on the effects of ground-level ozone, a major air pollutant, in the expression and regulation of lung immunity genes. We exposed adult male and female mice to 2 ppm of ozone or filtered air (control) for 3 h. We compared mRNA levels of 84 inflammatory genes in lungs harvested 4 h postexposure using a PCR array. We also evaluated changes in lung histology and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell counts and protein content at 24 and 72 h postexposure. Our results revealed sex differences in lung inflammation triggered by ozone exposure and in the expression of genes involved in acute phase and inflammatory responses. Major sex differences were found in the expression of neutrophil-attracting chemokines (Ccl20, Cxcl5, and Cxcl2), the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6, and oxidative stress-related enzymes (Ptgs2, Nos2). In addition, the phosphorylation of STAT3, known to mediate IL-6-related immune responses, was significantly higher in ozone-exposed mice. Together, our observations suggest that a differential regulation of the lung immune response could be implicated in the observed increased susceptibility to adverse health effects from ozone observed in women vs. men. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Sex differences in the expression of lung inflammatory mediators in response to ozone

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Noe; Mishra, Vikas; Sinha, Utkarshna; DiAngelo, Susan L.; Chroneos, Zissis C.; Ekpa, Ndifreke A.; Cooper, Timothy K.; Caruso, Carla R.

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the incidence of respiratory diseases have been reported. Women are more susceptible to inflammatory lung disease induced by air pollution and show worse adverse pulmonary health outcomes than men. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences remain unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that sex differences in the expression of lung inflammatory mediators affect sex-specific immune responses to environmental toxicants. We focused on the effects of ground-level ozone, a major air pollutant, in the expression and regulation of lung immunity genes. We exposed adult male and female mice to 2 ppm of ozone or filtered air (control) for 3 h. We compared mRNA levels of 84 inflammatory genes in lungs harvested 4 h postexposure using a PCR array. We also evaluated changes in lung histology and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell counts and protein content at 24 and 72 h postexposure. Our results revealed sex differences in lung inflammation triggered by ozone exposure and in the expression of genes involved in acute phase and inflammatory responses. Major sex differences were found in the expression of neutrophil-attracting chemokines (Ccl20, Cxcl5, and Cxcl2), the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6, and oxidative stress-related enzymes (Ptgs2, Nos2). In addition, the phosphorylation of STAT3, known to mediate IL-6-related immune responses, was significantly higher in ozone-exposed mice. Together, our observations suggest that a differential regulation of the lung immune response could be implicated in the observed increased susceptibility to adverse health effects from ozone observed in women vs. men. PMID:26342085

  10. Mechanical Ventilation Induces an Inflammatory Response in Preinjured Lungs in Late Phase of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Wei; Zhou, Quanjun; Yao, Shanglong; Deng, Qingzhu; Wang, Tingting; Wu, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) may amplify the lung-specific inflammatory response in preinjured lungs by elevating cytokine release and augmenting damage to the alveolar integrity. In this study, we test the hypothesis that MV exerts different negative impacts on inflammatory response at different time points of postlung injury. Basic lung injury was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery in rats. Physiological indexes including blood gases were monitored during MV and samples were assessed following each experiment. Low V T (tidal volume) MV caused a slight increase in cytokine release and tissue damage at day 1 and day 4 after sepsis induced lung injury, while cytokine release from the lungs in the two moderately ventilated V T groups was amplified. Interestingly, in the two groups where rats received low V T MV, we found that infiltration of inflammatory cells was only profound at day 4 after CLP. Marked elevation of protein leakage indicated a compromise in alveolar integrity in rats that received moderate V T MV at day 4 following CLP, correlating with architectural damage to the alveoli. Our study indicates that preinjured lungs are more sensitive to mechanical MV at later phases of sepsis, and this situation may be a result of differing immune status.

  11. The emerging role of microRNAs in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in the lung.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul S; Plank, Maximilian; Collison, Adam; Tay, Hock L; Kaiko, Gerard E; Li, Jingjing; Johnston, Sebastian L; Hansbro, Philip M; Kumar, Rakesh K; Yang, Ming; Mattes, Joerg

    2013-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases of the lung are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many of these disorders can be attributed to abnormal immune responses to environmental stimuli and infections. As such, understanding the innate host defense pathways and their regulatory systems will be critical to developing new approaches to treatment. In this regard, there is increasing interest in the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of pulmonary innate host defense responses and the inflammatory sequelae in respiratory disease. In this review, we discuss recent findings that indicate an important role for miRNAs in the regulation in mouse models of various respiratory diseases and in host defense against bacterial and viral infection. We also discuss the potential utility and limitations of targeting these molecules as anti-inflammatory strategies and also as a means to improve pathogen clearance from the lung.

  12. Contribution of lung macrophages to the inflammatory responses induced by exposure to air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Kunihiko; van Eeden, Stephan F

    2013-01-01

    Large population cohort studies have indicated an association between exposure to particulate matter and cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The inhalation of toxic environmental particles and gases impacts the innate and adaptive defense systems of the lung. Lung macrophages play a critically important role in the recognition and processing of any inhaled foreign material such as pathogens or particulate matter. Alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells are the predominant cells that process and remove inhaled particulate matter from the lung. Cooperatively, they produce proinflammatory mediators when exposed to atmospheric particles. These mediators produce integrated local (lung, controlled predominantly by epithelial cells) and systemic (bone marrow and vascular system, controlled predominantly by macrophages) inflammatory responses. The systemic response results in an increase in the release of leukocytes from the bone marrow and an increased production of acute phase proteins from the liver, with both factors impacting blood vessels and leading to destabilization of existing atherosclerotic plaques. This review focuses on lung macrophages and their role in orchestrating the inflammatory responses induced by exposure to air pollutants.

  13. Contribution of Lung Macrophages to the Inflammatory Responses Induced by Exposure to Air Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2013-01-01

    Large population cohort studies have indicated an association between exposure to particulate matter and cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The inhalation of toxic environmental particles and gases impacts the innate and adaptive defense systems of the lung. Lung macrophages play a critically important role in the recognition and processing of any inhaled foreign material such as pathogens or particulate matter. Alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells are the predominant cells that process and remove inhaled particulate matter from the lung. Cooperatively, they produce proinflammatory mediators when exposed to atmospheric particles. These mediators produce integrated local (lung, controlled predominantly by epithelial cells) and systemic (bone marrow and vascular system, controlled predominantly by macrophages) inflammatory responses. The systemic response results in an increase in the release of leukocytes from the bone marrow and an increased production of acute phase proteins from the liver, with both factors impacting blood vessels and leading to destabilization of existing atherosclerotic plaques. This review focuses on lung macrophages and their role in orchestrating the inflammatory responses induced by exposure to air pollutants. PMID:24058272

  14. Attenuated allergic inflammatory response in the lungs during lactation.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Amaya, Julieta E; Marino, Larissa P; Tobaruela, Carla N; Namazu, Lilian B; Calefi, Atilio S; Margatho, Rafael; Gonçalves, Vagner; Queiroz-Hazarbassanov, Nicolle; Klein, Marianne O; Palermo-Neto, João; de Oliveira, Ana P Ligeiro; de O Massoco, Cristina; Felicio, Luciano F

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate the influence of lactation on lung immune function during allergic inflammation. Female rats, 60-90days old, were divided into three groups: no lung allergy virgins (N group), ovalbumin (OVA)-immunized and sensitized virgins (V group), and OVA-immunized and sensitized lactating females (L group). On gestation day (GD) 10, all animals in L group received a subcutaneous injection of 0.1mg·kg(-1) OVA plus aluminum hydroxide. On GD17, the L group received a subcutaneous booster injection of 10μg OVA plus 10mg aluminum hydroxide. After 7days, an inhalatory challenge with 1% OVA was given in 15min sessions for 3 consecutive days. Animals from the V group received the same treatment, meaning both tests and time intervals between OVA treatment and inhalatory challenge were the same as in the L group. Twenty-four hours after the last inhalation session, the animals were euthanized, and the following tests were performed: total and differential bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and femoral marrow lavage (FML) leukocyte counts, quantification of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interferon γ (IFN-γ) levels in BAL fluid, and quantification of plasma corticosterone and catecholamine levels. The L group presented lower BAL total leukocyte counts and decreases in the number of eosinophils and macrophages compared with the V group. They also expressed higher BAL IFN-γ and lower plasma corticosterone levels. Plasma norepinephrine levels were higher in the L group than in the N and V groups. Lactating female rats presented less intense allergic lung inflammation. Our findings suggest that lactation may protect females from asthmatic crises. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of TLR-induced inflammatory responses in COPD and control lung tissue explants

    PubMed Central

    Pomerenke, Anna; Lea, Simon R; Herrick, Sarah; Lindsay, Mark A; Singh, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Viruses are a common cause of exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). They activate toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3, 7, and 8, leading to a pro-inflammatory response. We have characterized the responses of TLR3 and TLR7/8 in lung tissue explants from COPD patients and control smokers. Methods We prepared lung whole tissue explants (WTEs) from patients undergoing surgery for confirmed or suspected lung cancer. In order to mimic the conditions of viral infection, we used poly(I:C) for TLR3 stimulation and R848 for TLR7/8 stimulation. These TLR ligands were used alone and in combination. The effects of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) neutralization and dexamethasone on TLR responses were examined. Inflammatory cytokine release was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results WTEs from COPD patients released higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with WTEs from smokers. Activation of multiple TLRs led to a greater than additive release of TNFα and CCL5. TNFα neutralization and dexamethasone treatment decreased cytokine release. Conclusion This WTE model shows an enhanced response of COPD compared with controls, suggesting an increased response to viral infection. There was amplification of innate immune responses with multiple TLR stimulation. PMID:27729782

  16. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, K. Monica; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures. - Highlights: ► Obesity modulates inflammatory markers in BAL fluid after LPS exposure. ► Obese animals have a unique transcriptional signature in lung after LPS exposure. ► Obesity elevates inflammatory stress and reduces antioxidant capacity in the lung

  17. Effects of anesthetic regimes on inflammatory responses in a rat model of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Fortis, Spyridon; Spieth, Peter M.; Lu, Wei-Yang; Parotto, Matteo; Haitsma, Jack J; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Zhong, Nanshan; Mazer, C. David; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Background Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter through activation of GABA receptors. Volatile anesthetics activate type A (GABAA) receptors resulting in inhibition of synaptic transmission. Lung epithelial cells have been recently found to express GABAA receptors that exert anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that the volatile anesthetic sevoflurane (SEVO) attenuates lung inflammation through activation of lung epithelial GABAA receptors. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with SEVO or ketamine/xylazine (KX). Acute lung inflammation was induced by intratracheal instillation of endotoxin, followed by mechanical ventilation for 4 h at a tidal volume of 15 mL/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure (two-hit lung injury model). To examine the specific effects of GABA, healthy human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were challenged with endotoxin in the presence and absence of GABA with and without addition of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin. Results Anesthesia with SEVO improved oxygenation and reduced pulmonary cytokine responses compared to KX. This phenomenon was associated with increased expression of the π subunit of GABAA receptors and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). The endotoxin-induced cytokine release from BEAS-2B cells was attenuated by the treatment with GABA, which was reversed by the administration of picrotoxin. Conclusion Anesthesia with SEVO suppresses pulmonary inflammation thus protects the lung from the two-hit injury. The anti-inflammatory effect of SEVO is likely due to activation of pulmonary GABAA signaling pathways. PMID:22711173

  18. Role of lung contusions on posttraumatic inflammatory response and organ dysfunction in traumatized patients.

    PubMed

    Maier, Marcus; Geiger, Emanuel V; Wutzler, Sebastian; Lehnert, Mark; Wiercinski, Andreas; Buurman, Wim A; Marzi, Ingo

    2009-10-01

    Multiple trauma is often accompanied by lung contusion leading to secondary pulmonary inflammation and organ dysfunction. The particular role of lung contusions on the systemic inflammatory response remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the degree of lung contusion with markers of inflammation and multiple organ failure (MOF) in trauma patients. According to the Injury Severity Score (ISS), 45 patients were assigned to a low (< 25 points) and a high ISS group (> 25 points), respectively. Both groups were subdivided into minor and major lung injury groups as defined by computed tomography (CT) scan. Plasma levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors, C-reactive protein (CRP), and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase were assessed, as well as the Murray lung score (MLS) and the MOF score. Patients with low ISS present moderate activation of inflammation which is not influenced by the degree of lung contusion. In contrast, patients with a high ISS develop significant posttraumatic inflammation and MOF. Patients with high ISS and severe lung contusions present significantly higher MLS and MOF scores. Interestingly, patients of the high ISS group without severe lung contusions develop a similar degree of MLS and MOF only after 5 days following the traumatic insult. However, the initial plasma levels of IL-6 and IL-8 differ significantly in this group. Our data show that severe lung contusions contributes to an immediate onset of posttraumatic inflammation in severely traumatized patients, resulting in MOF, while in severely injured patients without lung contusion, this development requires up to 5 days.

  19. Study of inflammatory responses to crocidolite and basalt wool in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Adamis, Z; Kerényi, T; Honma, K; Jäckel, M; Tátrai, E; Ungváry, G

    2001-03-09

    The subacute effects of crocidolite and basalt wool dusts were studied by nmeans of biochemical, morphological. and histological methods 1 and .3 mo after intrabronchial instillation. The cell count, protein and phospholipid contents, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Both types of fibers induced a prolonged inflammatory reaction in the lung. All the parameters studied in the experimental groups were more markedly elevated after 3 mo. Relative to the control, the protein and LDH values were increased three- to fivefold, the phospholipid content twofold, and the number of free cells in the BAL exceeded the control level up to ninefold. The inflammatory responses to crocidolite and basalt wool in the lung did not differ significantly. In spite of this, basalt wool is recoinmended as an asbestos substitute, as the use of this man-nade fiber may result in a significantly lower release of dust than that from crocidolite.

  20. SWCNT suppress inflammatory mediator responses in human lung epithelium in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Eva Byrne, Hugh J.; Casey, Alan; Davoren, Maria; Lenz, Anke-Gabriele; Maier, Konrad L.; Duschl, Albert; Oostingh, Gertie Janneke

    2009-02-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have gained enormous popularity due to a variety of potential applications which will ultimately lead to increased human and environmental exposure to these nanoparticles. This study was carried out in order to evaluate the inflammatory response of immortalised and primary human lung epithelial cells (A549 and NHBE) to single-walled carbon nanotube samples (SWCNT). Special focus was placed on the mediating role of lung surfactant on particle toxicity. The toxicity of SWCNT dispersed in cell culture medium was compared to that of nanotubes dispersed in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, the main component of lung lining fluid). Exposure was carried out for 6 to 48 h with the latter time-point showing the most significant responses. Moreover, exposure was performed in the presence of the pro-inflammatory stimulus tumour necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) in order to mimic exposure of stimulated cells, as would occur during infection. Endpoints evaluated included cell viability, proliferation and the analysis of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, TNF-{alpha} and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Crocidolite asbestos was included as a well characterised, toxic fibre control. The results of this study showed that HiPco SWCNT samples suppress inflammatory responses of A549 and NHBE cells. This was also true for TNF-{alpha} stimulated cells. The use of DPPC improved the degree of SWCNT dispersion in A549 medium and in turn, leads to increased particle toxicity, however, it was not shown to modify NHBE cell responses.

  1. Rat lung inflammatory responses after in vivo and in vitro exposure to various stone particles.

    PubMed

    Becher, R; Hetland, R B; Refsnes, M; Dahl, J E; Dahlman, H J; Schwarze, P E

    2001-09-01

    Rat lung alveolar macrophages and type 2 cells were exposed for 20 h in vitro to various stone particles with differing contents of metals and minerals (a type of mylonite, gabbro, feldspar, and quartz). The capability to induce the release of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) was investigated. We found marked differences in potency between the various particles, with mylonite being most potent overall, followed by gabbro, and with feldspar and quartz having an approximately similar order of lower potency. The results also demonstrated differences in cytokine release pattern between the two cell types. For all particle types including quartz, type 2 cells showed the most marked increase in MIP-2 and IL-6 secretion, whereas the largest increase in TNF-alpha release was observed in macrophages. To investigate possible correlations between in vitro and in vivo inflammatory responses, rats were instilled with the same types of particles and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected after 20 h. The results demonstrated a correlation between the in vitro cytokine responses and the number of neutrophilic cells in the BAL fluid. The BAL fluid also showed a strong MIP-2 response to mylonite. However, this was the only particle type to give a significant cytokine response in the BAL fluid. We further examined whether a similar graded inflammatory response would be continued in type 2 cells and alveolar macrophages isolated from the exposed animals. Again a differential cytokine release pattern was observed between type 2 cells and macrophages, although the order of potency between particle types was altered. In conclusion, various stone particles caused differential inflammatory responses after both in vitro and in vivo exposure, with mylonite being the most potent stone particle. The results suggest the alveolar type 2 cell to be an important participant in the

  2. Lucinactant attenuates pulmonary inflammatory response, preserves lung structure, and improves physiologic outcomes in a preterm lamb model of RDS

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Marla R.; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L.; Gregory, Timothy J.; Mazela, Jan; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute inflammatory responses to supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation have been implicated in the pathophysiological sequelae of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Although surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) has contributed to lung stability, the effect on lung inflammation is inconclusive. Lucinactant contains sinapultide (KL4), a novel synthetic peptide that functionally mimics surfactant protein B, a protein with anti-inflammatory properties. We tested the hypothesis that lucinactant may modulate lung inflammatory response to mechanical ventilation in the management of RDS and may confer greater protection than animal-derived surfactants. Methods Preterm lambs (126.8 ± 0.2 SD d gestation) were randomized to receive lucinactant, poractant alfa, beractant, or no surfactant and studied for 4 h. Gas exchange and pulmonary function were assessed serially. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung histology were assessed at termination. Results SRT improved lung compliance relative to no SRT without significant difference between SRT groups. Lucinactant attenuated lung and systemic inflammatory response, supported oxygenation at lower ventilatory requirements, and preserved lung structural integrity to a greater degree than either no SRT or SRT with poractant alfa or beractant. Conclusion These data suggest that early intervention with lucinactant may more effectively mitigate pulmonary pathophysiological sequelae of RDS than the animal-derived surfactants poractant alfa or beractant. PMID:22821059

  3. Inflammatory responses to individual microorganisms in the lungs of children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gangell, Catherine; Gard, Samantha; Douglas, Tonia; Park, Judy; de Klerk, Nicholas; Keil, Tony; Brennan, Siobhain; Ranganathan, Sarath; Robins-Browne, Roy; Sly, Peter D

    2011-09-01

    We hypothesized that the inflammatory response in the lungs of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) would vary with the type of infecting organism, being greatest with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. A microbiological surveillance program based on annual bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) collected fluid for culture and assessment of inflammation was conducted. Primary analyses compared inflammation in samples that grew a single organism with uninfected samples in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Results were available for 653 samples from 215 children with CF aged 24 days to 7 years. A single agent was associated with pulmonary infection (≥10(5) cfu/mL) in 67 BAL samples, with P. aeruginosa (n = 25), S. aureus (n = 17), and Aspergillus species (n = 19) being the most common. These microorganisms were associated with increased levels of inflammation, with P. aeruginosa being the most proinflammatory. Mixed oral flora (MOF) alone was isolated from 165 BAL samples from 112 patients, with 97 of these samples having a bacterial density ≥10(5) cfu/mL, and was associated with increased pulmonary inflammation (P < .001). For patients with current, but not past, infections there was an association with a greater inflammatory response, compared with those who were never infected (P < .05). However, previous infection with S. aureus was associated with a greater inflammatory response in subsequent BAL. Pulmonary infection with P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, or Aspergillus species and growth of MOF was associated with significant inflammatory responses in young children with CF. Our data support the use of specific surveillance and eradication programs for these organisms. The inflammatory response to MOF requires additional investigation.

  4. Effect of lornoxicam in lung inflammatory response syndrome after operations for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Vretzkakis, Giorgos; Mikroulis, Dimitris; Mpakas, Andreas; Kesisis, Georgios; Arikas, Stamatis; Kolettas, Alexandros; Moschos, Giorgios; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Siminelakis, Stavros; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-03-01

    The establishment of Extracorporeal Circulation (EC) significantly contributed to improvement of cardiac surgery, but this is accompanied by harmful side-effects. The most important of them is systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Many efforts have been undertaken to minimize this problem but unfortunately without satisfied solution to date. Lornoxicam is a non steroid anti-inflammatory drug which temporally inhibits the cycloxygenase. In this clinical trial we study the effect of lornoxicam in lung inflammatory response after operations for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. In our study we conclude 14 volunteers patients with ischemic coronary disease undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with EC. In seven of them 16 mg lornoxicam was administered iv before the anesthesia induction and before the connection in heart-lung machine. In control group (7 patients) we administered the same amount of normal saline. Both groups are equal regarding pro-operative and intra-operative parameters. The inflammatory markers were calculated by Elisa method. We measured the levels of cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, e-Selectin, p-Selectin) and matrix metaloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) just after anesthesia induction, before and after cardiopulmonary bypass, just after the patients administration in ICU and after 8 and 24 hrs. In all patients we estimated the lung's inflammatory reaction with lung biopsy taken at the begging and at the end of the operation. We calculated hemodynamics parameters: Cardiac Index (CI), Systemic Vascular Resistance Index (SVRI), Pulmonary Vascular Resistance Index (PVRI), Left Ventricular Stroke Work Index (LVSWI), Right Ventricular Stroke Work Index (RVSWI), and the Pulmonary arterial pressure, and respiratory parameters too: alveolo-arterial oxygen difference D (A-a), intrapulmonary shunt (Qs/Qt) and pulmonary Compliance. IL-6 levels of lornoxicam group were statistical significant lower at 1st postoperative day

  5. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Tilton, Susan C; Waters, Katrina M; Karin, Norman J; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Zangar, Richard C; Lee, K Monica; Bigelow, Diana J; Pounds, Joel G; Corley, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures.

  6. Diet-Induced Obesity Reprograms the Inflammatory Response of the Murine Lung to Inhaled Endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, Monika K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures.

  7. Magnetite Nanoparticles Induce Genotoxicity in the Lungs of Mice via Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Totsuka, Yukari; Ishino, Kousuke; Kato, Tatsuya; Goto, Sumio; Tada, Yukie; Nakae, Dai; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are useful for their characteristic properties and are commonly used in various fields. Nanosized-magnetite (MGT) is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields, whereas their toxicological properties are not well documented. A safety assessment is thus urgently required for MGT, and genotoxicity is one of the most serious concerns. In the present study, we examined genotoxic effects of MGT using mice and revealed that DNA damage analyzed by a comet assay in the lungs of imprinting control region (ICR) mice intratracheally instilled with a single dose of 0.05 or 0.2 mg/animal of MGT was approximately two- to three-fold higher than that of vehicle-control animals. Furthermore, in gpt delta transgenic mice, gpt mutant frequency (MF) in the lungs of the group exposed to four consecutive doses of 0.2 mg MGT was significantly higher than in the control group. Mutation spectrum analysis showed that base substitutions were predominantly induced by MGT, among which G:C to A:T transition and G:C to T:A transversion were the most significant. To clarify the mechanism of mutation caused by MGT, we analyzed the formation of DNA adducts in the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. DNA was extracted from lungs of mice 3, 24, 72 and 168 h after intratracheal instillation of 0.2 mg/body of MGT, and digested enzymatically. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and lipid peroxide-related DNA adducts were quantified by stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Compared with vehicle control, these DNA adduct levels were significantly increased in the MGT-treated mice. In addition to oxidative stress- and inflammation related-DNA adduct formations, inflammatory cell infiltration and focal granulomatous formations were also observed in the lungs of MGT-treated mice. Based on these findings, it is suggested that inflammatory responses are probably involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice.

  8. Amine Modification of Nonporous Silica Nanoparticles Reduces Inflammatory Response Following Intratracheal Instillation in Murine Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Angie S.; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Lehman, Sean E.; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Thorne, Peter S.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) possess unique material properties that make them ideal for many different applications. However, the impact of these materials on human and environmental health needs to be established. We investigated nonporous silica NPs both bare and modified with amine functional groups (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)) in order to evaluate the effect of surface chemistry on biocompatibility. In vitro data showed there to be little to no cytotoxicity in a human lung cancer epithelial cell line (A549) for neither bare silica NPs nor amine-functionalized NPs using doses based on both mass concentration (below 200 μg/mL) and exposed total surface area (below 14 m2/L). To assess lung inflammation, C57/B16 mice were administered bare and amine-functionalized silica NPs via intra-tracheal instillation. Two doses (0.1 and 0.5 mg NPs/mouse) were tested using the in vivo model. At the higher dose used, bare silica NPs elicited a significantly higher inflammatory response, as evidence by increased neutrophils and total protein in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid compared to amine-functionalized NPs. From this study, we conclude that functionalization of nonporous silica NPs with APTES molecules reduces murine lung inflammation and improves the overall biocompatibility of the nanomaterial. PMID:26562768

  9. Amine modification of nonporous silica nanoparticles reduces inflammatory response following intratracheal instillation in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    Morris, Angie S; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Lehman, Sean E; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Thorne, Peter S; Larsen, Sarah C; Salem, Aliasger K

    2016-01-22

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) possess unique material properties that make them ideal for many different applications. However, the impact of these materials on human and environmental health needs to be established. We investigated nonporous silica NPs both bare and modified with amine functional groups (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)) in order to evaluate the effect of surface chemistry on biocompatibility. In vitro data showed there to be little to no cytotoxicity in a human lung cancer epithelial cell line (A549) for bare silica NPs and amine-functionalized NPs using doses based on both mass concentration (below 200μg/mL) and exposed total surface area (below 14m(2)/L). To assess lung inflammation, C57BL/6 mice were administered bare or amine-functionalized silica NPs via intra-tracheal instillation. Two doses (0.1 and 0.5mg NPs/mouse) were tested using the in vivo model. At the higher dose used, bare silica NPs elicited a significantly higher inflammatory response, as evidence by increased neutrophils and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid compared to amine-functionalized NPs. From this study, we conclude that functionalization of nonporous silica NPs with APTES molecules reduces murine lung inflammation and improves the overall biocompatibility of the nanomaterial.

  10. α1-Antitrypsin Activates Protein Phosphatase 2A to Counter Lung Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Patrick; Eden, Edward; Pillai, Manju; Campos, Michael; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: α1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) was identified as a plasma protease inhibitor; however, it is now recognized as a multifunctional protein that modulates immunity, inflammation, proteostasis, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Like A1AT, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major serine-threonine phosphatase, regulates similar biologic processes and plays a key role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: Given their common effects, this study investigated whether A1AT acts via PP2A to alter tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling, inflammation, and proteolytic responses in this disease. Methods: PP2A activity was measured in peripheral blood neutrophils from A1AT-deficient (PiZZ) and healthy (PiMM) individuals and in alveolar macrophages from normal (60 mg/kg) and high-dose (120 mg/kg) A1AT-treated PiZZ subjects. PP2A activation was assessed in human neutrophils, airway epithelial cells, and peripheral blood monocytes treated with plasma purified A1AT protein. Similarly, lung PP2A activity was measured in mice administered intranasal A1AT. PP2A was silenced in lung epithelial cells treated with A1AT and matrix metalloproteinase and cytokine production was then measured following TNF-α stimulation. Measurements and Main Results: PP2A was significantly lower in neutrophils isolated from PiZZ compared with PiMM subjects. A1AT protein activated PP2A in human alveolar macrophages, monocytes, neutrophils, airway epithelial cells, and in mouse lungs. This activation required functionally active A1AT protein and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B expression. A1AT treatment acted via PP2A to prevent p38 and IκBα phosphorylation and matrix metalloproteinase and cytokine induction in TNF-α–stimulated epithelial cells. Conclusions: Together, these data indicate that A1AT modulates PP2A to counter inflammatory and proteolytic responses induced by TNF signaling in the lung. PMID:25341065

  11. Ambient particulate air pollution from vehicles promotes lipid peroxidation and inflammatory responses in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C E L; Heck, T G; Saldiva, P H N; Rhoden, C R

    2007-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of particle-dependent lung injury. Ambient particle levels from vehicles have not been previously shown to cause oxidative stress to the lungs. The present study was conducted to a) determine whether short-term exposure to ambient levels of particulate air pollution from vehicles elicits inflammatory responses and lipid peroxidation in rat lungs, and b) determine if intermittent short-term exposures (every 4 days) induce some degree of tolerance. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were exposed to ambient particulate matter (PM) from vehicles (N = 30) for 6 or 20 continuous hours, or for intermittent (5 h) periods during 20 h for 4 consecutive days or to filtered air (PM <10 microm; N = 30). Rats continuously breathing polluted air for 20 h (P-20) showed a significant increase in the total number of leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage compared to control (C-20: 2.61 x 105 +/- 0.51;P-20: 5.01 x 105 +/- 0.81; P < 0.05) and in lipid peroxidation ([MDA] nmol/mg protein: C-20: 0.148 +/- 0.01; P-20: 0.226 +/- 0.02; P < 0.05). Shorter exposure (6 h) and intermittent 5-h exposures over a period of 4 days did not cause significant changes in leukocytes. Lipid damage resulting from 20-h exposure to particulate air pollution did not cause a significant increase in lung water content. These data suggest oxidative stress as one of the mechanisms responsible for the acute adverse respiratory effects of particles, and suggest that short-term inhalation of ambient particulate air pollution from street with high automobile traffic represents a biological hazard.

  12. PEGylated polyplex with optimized PEG shielding enhances gene introduction in lungs by minimizing inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Itaka, Keiji; Chen, Qixian; Osada, Kensuke; Ishii, Takehiko; Shibata, Masa-Aki; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    Safety is a critical issue in clinical applications of nonviral gene delivery systems. Safe and effective gene introduction into the lungs was previously achieved using polyplexes from poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG)-block-polycation [PEG-block-PAsp(DET)] and plasmid DNA (pDNA). Although PEGylated polyplexes appeared to be safe, an excess ratio of polycation to pDNA was needed to obtain sufficient transgene expression, which may cause toxicities shortly after gene introduction. In the present study, we investigated the combined use of two polymers, PEG-block-PAsp(DET) (B) and homo PAsp(DET) (H) across a range of mixing ratios to construct polyplexes. Although transgene expressions following in vitro transfections increased in parallel with increased proportions of H, polyplexes with B/H = 50/50 formulation produced the highest expression level following in vivo intratracheal administration. Higher proportions of H elicited high levels of cytokine induction with significant inflammation as assessed by histopathological examinations. Based on the aggregation behavior of polyplexes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs), we suggested that rapid aggregation of polyplexes in the lung induced acute inflammatory responses, resulting in reduced transgene expression. B/H formulation of polyplex can help to improve gene therapy for the respiratory system because it achieves both effective PEG shielding of polyplexes and functioning of PAsp(DET) polycations to enhance endosomal escape.

  13. Inflammatory response to isocyanates and onset of genomic instability in cultured human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mishra, P K; Bhargava, A; Raghuram, G V; Gupta, S; Tiwari, S; Upadhyaya, R; Jain, S K; Maudar, K K

    2009-02-10

    Lungs comprise the primary organ exposed to environmental toxic chemicals, resulting in diverse respiratory ailments and other disorders, including carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage phenomenon, which involves a series of genetic alterations that begin with genomic instability provoked by certain factors such as inflammation and DNA damage and end with the development of cancer. Isocyanates such as methyl isocyanate are the chief metabolic intermediates in many industrial settings with diverse applications; exposure to them can lead to severe hypersensitive, mutagenic and genotoxic alterations. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying isocyanate-mediated inflammatory responses and their probable role in the onset of genomic instability in cultured IMR-90 human lung fibroblasts. The isocyanates induced inflammation, resulting in extensive DNA damage, evidenced by increases in ATM, ATR, gammaH2AX, and p53 expression levels. The apoptotic index also increased. Chromosomal anomalies in treated cells included over-expression of centrosome protein and variable amplification of inter-simple sequence repeats, further demonstrating isocyanate-induced genomic instability. This information could be useful in the design of new approaches for risk assessment of potential industrial disasters.

  14. Carbon fullerenes (C60s) can induce inflammatory responses in the lung of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hero; Kim, Younghun; Yi, Jongheop; Choi, Kyunghee; Park, Kwangsik

    2010-04-15

    Fullerenes (C60s) occur in the environment due to natural and anthropogenic sources such as volcanic eruptions, forest fires, and the combustion of carbon-based materials. Recently, production and application of engineered C60s have also rapidly increased in diverse industrial fields and biomedicine due to C60' unique physico-chemical properties, so toxicity assessment on environmental and human health is being evaluated as a valuable work. However, data related to the toxicity of C60s have not been abundant up to now. In this study, we studied the immunotoxic mechanism and change of gene expression caused by the instillation of C60s. As a result, C60s induced an increase in sub G1 and G1 arrest in BAL cells, an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, TNF-alpha, and IL-6, and an increase of Th1 cytokines such as IL-12 and IFN-r in BAL fluid. In addition, IgE reached the maximum at 1 day after treatment in both BAL fluid and the blood, and decreased in a time-dependent manner. Gene expression of the MHC class II (H2-Eb1) molecule was stronger than that of the MHC class I (H2-T23), and an increase in T cell distribution was also observed during the experiment period. Furthermore, cell infiltration and expression of tissue damage related genes in lung tissue were constantly observed during the experiment period. Based on this, C60s may induce inflammatory responses in the lung of mice.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA-Induced Inflammatory Responses and Lung Injury in Thermal Injury Rat Model: Protective Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiqi; Xu, Fei; Si, Si; Zhao, Xueshan; Bi, Siwei; Cen, Ying

    Lungs are easily damaged by the inflammatory responses induced after extensive burns. The aim here was to investigate the protective role of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-mediated inflammatory responses and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a rat model of thermal injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to five groups. In the first experiment, a full-thickness thermal injury or control procedure, covering 30% of the TBSA, was inflicted on three groups designated as the thermal injury, EGCG, and sham control groups. In the second experiment, another two groups were established by transfusion with either mtDNA (mtDNA group) or phosphate-buffered saline (phosphate-buffered saline group). Blood samples and lung tissue from all five groups were collected and the plasma concentrations of mtDNA and inflammatory mediators were measured. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected and histological analysis of the lung tissue was performed to evaluate the severity of ARDS. Significant increases in mtDNA and inflammatory mediator plasma concentrations were seen in the thermal injury and EGCG groups when compared with controls (P < .05). The plasma concentrations of mtDNA and inflammatory mediators were significantly decreased after the administration of EGCG (P < .05). EGCG also significantly reduced the severity of acute lung injury (P < .05). Intravenous administration of mtDNA significantly increased concentrations of inflammatory mediators and caused severe ARDS (P < .05). Our results suggest that mtDNA is important for thermal injury-induced inflammation and associated ARDS. EGCG possesses anti-inflammatory and lung-protective properties, and might act by limiting mtDNA release after thermal injury.

  16. Therapeutic effect of inhaled budesonide (Pulmicort® Turbuhaler) on the inflammatory response to one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Ju, N Y; Gao, H; Huang, W; Niu, F F; Lan, W X; Li, F; Gao, W

    2014-01-01

    This prospective, double-blind trial was designed to evaluate the effect of inhaled budesonide on lung function and the inflammatory response to one-lung ventilation. One hundred patients scheduled for lobectomy were allocated randomly to pre-operative nebulised budesonide or saline. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected from either the collapsed or the ventilated lung both before one-lung ventilation and 30 min after re-expansion of the lung. The concentrations of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytokines were determined. Budesonide treatment, compared with saline, reduced both peak (mean (SD) 3.7 (0.4) vs 2.5 (0.2) kPa) and plateau (mean (SD) 3.1 (0.2) vs 2.2 (0.1) kPa, respectively, p < 0.001 for both) ventilatory pressures. Thirty minutes after re-expansion, lung compliance increased in the budesonide group compared with saline (57.5 (4.1) vs 40.1 (3.5) ml.cmH(2) O(-1), respectively p < 0.001). Budesonide also reduced the concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but increased interleukin-10 30 min after re-expansion (p < 0.05 for all measures). Pre-operative nebulisation of budesonide may be effective in improving ventilatory mechanics and reducing the inflammatory response to one-lung ventilation during thoracic surgery.

  17. Lung epithelial CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-β is necessary for the integrity of inflammatory responses to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Didon, Lukas; Barton, Jenny L; Roos, Abraham B; Gaschler, Gordon J; Bauer, Carla M T; Berg, Tove; Stämpfli, Martin R; Nord, Magnus

    2011-07-15

    Cigarette smoke is the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. The mechanisms by which smoking induces pulmonary dysfunction are complex, involving stress from toxic components and inflammatory responses. Although CCCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-β is known as a key intracellular regulator of inflammatory signaling, its role in pulmonary inflammation has not been established. To characterize the role of C/EBPβ in the airway epithelial response to cigarette smoke. mRNA expression in the airway epithelium of current, former, and never-smokers, and in in vitro cigarette smoke extract-treated primary human airway epithelial cells, was analyzed by microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Mice with lung epithelial-specific inactivation of C/EBPβ were generated and exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 or 11 days. Lung histology, bronchoalveolar lavage cell differentials, and expression of inflammatory and innate immune mediators in the lungs were assessed. C/EBPβ was significantly down-regulated in the airway epithelium of both current and former smokers compared with never-smokers, and in cigarette smoke-treated primary human airway epithelial cells in vitro. Cigarette smoke-exposed mice with a lung epithelial-specific inactivation of C/EBPβ displayed blunted respiratory neutrophil influx and compromised induction of neutrophil chemoattractants growth-regulated oncogene-α, macrophage inflammatory protein-1γ, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and serum amyloid A 3 and proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, compared with smoke-exposed controls. Inhibition of C/EBPβ in human airway cells in vitro caused a similarly compromised response to smoke. Our data suggest a previously unknown role for C/EBPβ and the airway epithelium in mediating inflammatory and innate immune responses to cigarette smoke.

  18. Vapors Produced by Electronic Cigarettes and E-Juices with Flavorings Induce Toxicity, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammatory Response in Lung Epithelial Cells and in Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Chad A.; Sundar, Isaac K.; Yao, Hongwei; Gerloff, Janice; Ossip, Deborah J.; McIntosh, Scott; Robinson, Risa; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are the key events in the pathogenesis of chronic airway diseases. The consumption of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) with a variety of e-liquids/e-juices is alarmingly increasing without the unrealized potential harmful health effects. We hypothesized that electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS)/e-cigs pose health concerns due to oxidative toxicity and inflammatory response in lung cells exposed to their aerosols. The aerosols produced by vaporizing ENDS e-liquids exhibit oxidant reactivity suggesting oxidants or reactive oxygen species (OX/ROS) may be inhaled directly into the lung during a “vaping” session. These OX/ROS are generated through activation of the heating element which is affected by heating element status (new versus used), and occurs during the process of e-liquid vaporization. Unvaporized e-liquids were oxidative in a manner dependent on flavor additives, while flavors containing sweet or fruit flavors were stronger oxidizers than tobacco flavors. In light of OX/ROS generated in ENDS e-liquids and aerosols, the effects of ENDS aerosols on tissues and cells of the lung were measured. Exposure of human airway epithelial cells (H292) in an air-liquid interface to ENDS aerosols from a popular device resulted in increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, human lung fibroblasts exhibited stress and morphological change in response to treatment with ENDS/e-liquids. These cells also secrete increased IL-8 in response to a cinnamon flavored e-liquid and are susceptible to loss of cell viability by ENDS e-liquids. Finally, exposure of wild type C57BL/6J mice to aerosols produced from a popular e-cig increase pro-inflammatory cytokines and diminished lung glutathione levels which are critical in maintaining cellular redox balance. Thus, exposure to e-cig aerosols/juices incurs measurable oxidative and inflammatory responses in lung cells and tissues that could lead to

  19. Clopidogrel reduces the inflammatory response of lung in a rat model of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Hong; Fang, Yi-Qun; Yuan, Heng-Rong; You, Pu; Ma, Jun; Wang, Fang-Fang

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation and platelet activation are critical phenomena in the setting of decompression sickness. Clopidogrel (Clo) inhibits platelet activation and may also reduce inflammation. The goal of this study was to investigate if Clo had a protective role in decompression sickness (DCS) through anti-inflammation way. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=111) were assigned to three groups: control+vehicle group, DCS+vehicle, DCS+Clo group. The experimental group received 50 mg/kg of Clo or vehicle for 3 days, then compressed to 1,600 kPa (150 msw) in 28 s, maintained at 150 msw for 242 s and decompressed to surface at 3m/s. In a control experiment, rats were also treated with vehicle for 3 days and maintained at atmospheric pressure for an equivalent period of time. Clinical assessment took place over a period of 30 min after surfacing. At the end, blood samples were collected for blood cells counts and cytokine detection. The pathology and the wet/dry ratio of lung tissues, immunohistochemical detection of lung tissue CD41 expression, the numbers of P-selectin positive platelets and platelet-leukocyte conjugates in blood were tested. We found that Clo significantly reduced the DCS mortality risk (mortality rate: 11/45 with Clo vs. 28/46 in the untreated group, P<0.01). Clo reduced the lung injury, the wet/dry ratio of lung, the accumulation of platelet and leukocyte in lung, the fall in platelet count, the WBC count, the numbers of activated platelets and platelet-leukocyte complexes in peripheral blood. It was concluded that Clo can play a protective role in decompression sickness through reducing post-decompression platelet activation and inflammatory process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Double-Stranded RNA Interacts With Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Driving the Acute Inflammatory Response Following Lung Contusion.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Madathilparambil V; Thomas, Bivin; Machado-Aranda, David; Dolgachev, Vladislov A; Kumar Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh; Talarico, Nicholas; Cavassani, Karen; Sherman, Matthew A; Hemmila, Mark R; Kunkel, Steven L; Walter, Nils G; Hogaboam, Cory M; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    toll-like receptor 3 drives the acute inflammatory response following lung contusion.

  1. Exogenous nitric oxide donor and related compounds protect against lung inflammatory response after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Prado, Roberto; Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H; Walsh, J; Guo, R F; Reuben, J; Ward, Peter A

    2004-11-01

    Resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock triggers an inflammatory response characterized by upregulation of cytokine and adhesion molecule expression, increased leukocyte activity, and accumulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in a variety of tissues. This study investigated the capability of an exogenous nitric oxide (NO) donor, sodium nitroprusside (NP); a NO substrate, L-arginine; and an inducible NO synthase inhibitor, L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine (L-NIL) to reduce lung injury in an animal model of mixed controlled and uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. For this study, 72 Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250 to 300 g were subjected to a model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock for 150 minutes. Six groups of animals were included in this study (12 per group): sham-saline, sham-NP, shock-saline, shock-NP, shock-L-arginine, and shock-L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine. After the period of hemorrhagic shock, resuscitation of the groups was accomplished using normal saline (groups 1 and 3), NP (0.5 mg/kg) (groups 2 and 4), L-arginine (300 mg/kg) (group 5), or L-NIL (50 mg/kg) (group 6). The following indices were evaluated: fluid requirements for resuscitation, mean arterial pressure (MAP), arterial po2, pco2, and pH, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, lung histology and cytokine (interleukin [IL]-1 alpha, IL-beta 1, tumor necrosis factor-beta [TNF beta], IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, TNF alpha, IL-2, interferon-gamma [IFN gamma]), and mRNA expression in the lung by a ribonuclease protection assay (RPA). Sodium nitroprusside significantly increased MAP and reduced fluid requirements during resuscitation after hemorrhage. There also was a significant improvement in lung function, as expressed by improvements in po2, pco2, and pH, and reduction of the wet-to-dry weight ratio. In addition, a significant reduction in acute lung injury was observed in the histologic studies. Furthermore, the expression of cytokines was reduced by NP treatment. The use of L-arginine and L-NIL offered similar

  2. Inhibition of inflammatory responses by ambroxol, a mucolytic agent, in a murine model of acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiao; Wang, Ling; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether ambroxol inhibits inflammatory responses in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Mice (n=295) were first intratracheally instilled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce ALI and then received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either normal saline (NS), ambroxol (30 or 90 mg/kg per day) or dexamethasone (2.5 or 5 mg/kg per day) for 7 days. Metabolism (n=10, each), lung morphology (n=5, each) and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (n=10, each) were studied. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1) and the protein concentration (n=5 or 7, each) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were measured. Mice with LPS-induced ALI that were treated with ambroxol at a dosage of 90 mg/kg per day significantly gained weight compared to the control and dexamethasone-treated groups. Ambroxol and dexamethasone significantly reduced the lung hemorrhage, edema, exudation, neutrophil infiltration and total lung injury histology score at 24 and 48 h. In addition, ambroxol and dexamethasone significantly attenuated the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio at 24 and 48 h (p<0.05). Compared to the control group, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and TGF-beta1 levels in the BAL in both ambroxol- and dexamethasone-treated groups were significantly reduced at 24 and 48 h. The protein in BAL, an index of vascular permeability, was also significantly decreased in the ambroxol- and dexamethasone-treated groups (p<0.05). Ambroxol inhibited proinflammatory cytokines, reduced lung inflammation and accelerated recovery from LPS-induced ALI.

  3. Acute inflammatory responses to Stachybotrys chartarum in the lungs of infant rats: time course and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yike, Iwona; Rand, Thomas G; Dearborn, Dorr G

    2005-04-01

    Stachybotrys chartarum has been linked to building-related respiratory problems including pulmonary hemorrhage in infants. The macrocyclic trichothecenes produced by S. chartarum have been the primary focus of many investigations. However, in addition to trichothecenes this fungus is capable of producing other secondary metabolites and a number of protein factors. This study examines the effects of intact, autoclaved, and ethanol-extracted spores on the lungs of infant rats as an approach to differentiate between secondary metabolites and protein factors. Seven-day-old infant rats were exposed intratracheally to 1 x 10(5) spores/g body weight (toxic strain JS58-17) and sacrificed at various times up to 72 h. The inflammatory response was measured by morphometric analysis of the lungs and determination of inflammatory cells and cytokine concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Alveolar space was greatly reduced in animals exposed to fungal spores compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-treated controls. The largest effects were observed in pups treated with intact spores where alveolar space 24 h after treatment was 42.1% compared to 56.8% for autoclaved spores, 51.1% for ethanol-extracted spores, and 60.6% for PBS-treated controls. The effects of different spore preparations on inflammatory cells, cytokine, and protein concentrations in the BAL fluid can be ranked as intact > autoclaved > extracted. Tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1beta), and neutrophils were the most sensitive indicators of inflammation. The difference between autoclaved (100% trichothecene toxicity, denatured/enzymatically inactive proteins) and intact (100% trichothecene activity, unaltered/released proteins) spores indicates the involvement of fungal proteins in the inflammatory response to S. chartarum and sheds new light on the clinical importance of "nontoxic" strains.

  4. Early inflammatory response to asbestos exposure in rat and hamster lungs: role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Dörger, Martina; Allmeling, Anne-Marie; Kiefmann, Rainer; Münzing, Silvia; Messmer, Konrad; Krombach, Fritz

    2002-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a role in the development of asbestos-related pulmonary disorders. The pulmonary reactions of rats and hamsters upon exposure to asbestos fibers are well known to be disparate. In addition, in vitro experiments have indicated that mononuclear phagocytes from hamsters, in contrast to those from rats, lack the iNOS pathway. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether rats and hamsters differ in lung iNOS expression in vivo upon exposure to asbestos fibers and whether differences in iNOS induction are associated with differences in the acute pulmonary inflammatory reaction. Body weight, alveolar-arterial oxygen difference, differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, total protein leakage, lung myeloperoxidase activity and lipidperoxidation, wet/dry ratio, iNOS mRNA and protein expression, and nitrotyrosine staining of lung tissue were determined 1 and 7 days after intratracheal instillation of asbestos fibers in CD rats and Syrian golden hamsters. Exposure of rats to asbestos fibers resulted in enhanced pulmonary iNOS expression and nitrotyrosine staining together with an acute inflammation that was characterized by an influx of neutrophils, enhanced myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation, damage of the alveolar-capillary membrane, edema formation, and impairment of gas exchange. In comparison, instillation of asbestos fibers in hamsters resulted in a significantly milder inflammatory reaction of the lung with no induction of iNOS in pulmonary cells. The data obtained provide important information to understand the underlying mechanisms of species differences in the pulmonary response upon exposure to asbestos fibers.

  5. Effects of MK-801 and amphetamine treatments on allergic lung inflammatory response in mice.

    PubMed

    Hamasato, Eduardo Kenji; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz de Paula, Viviane; Peron, Jean Pierre Schatzmann; Damazo, Amílcar Sabino; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan; Palermo-Neto, João

    2013-08-01

    Glutamate acts as a neurotransmitter within the Central Nervous System (CNS) and modifies immune cell activity. In lymphocytes, NMDA glutamate receptors regulate intracellular calcium, the production of reactive oxygen species and cytokine synthesis. MK-801, a NMDA receptor open-channel blocker, inhibits calcium entry into mast cells, thereby preventing mast cell degranulation. Several lines of evidence have shown the involvement of NMDA glutamate receptors in amphetamine (AMPH)-induced effects. AMPH treatment has been reported to modify allergic lung inflammation. This study evaluated the effects of MK-801 (0.25mg/kg) and AMPH (2.0mg/kg), given alone or in combination, on allergic lung inflammation in mice and the possible involvement of NMDA receptors in this process. In OVA-sensitized and challenged mice, AMPH and MK-801 given alone decreased cellular migration into the lung, reduced IL-13 and IL10 levels in BAL supernatant, reduced ICAM-1 and L-selectin expression in granulocytes in the BAL and decreased mast cell degranulation. AMPH treatment also decreased IL-5 levels. When both drugs were administered, treatment with MK-801 reversed the decrease in the number of eosinophils and neutrophils induced by AMPH in the BAL of OVA-sensitized and challenged mice as well as the effects on the expression of L-selectin and ICAM-1 in granulocytes, the IL-10, IL-5 and IL-13 levels in BAL supernatants and increased mast cell degranulation. At the same time, treatment with MK-801, AMPH or with MK-801+AMPH increased corticosterone serum levels in allergic mice. These results are discussed in light of possible indirect effects of AMPH and MK-801 via endocrine outflow from the CNS (i.e., HPA-axis activity) to the periphery and/or as a consequence of the direct action of these drugs on immune cell activity, with emphasis given to mast cell participation in the allergic lung response of mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fibronectin Matrix Remodeling in the Regulation of the Inflammatory Response within the Lung: An Early Step in Lung Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    such as that which occurs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema , is associated with increased risk of lung cancer. These...the mechanical properties of lung tissue are seen in a number of disease states including cancer, COPD, asthma and emphysema , where changes in the

  7. Effect of hypertonic saline treatment on the inflammatory response after hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Holms, Carla Augusto; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Kahvegian, Marcia; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Fantoni, Denise Tabacchi; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Junior, Jose Otavio Costa Auler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertonic saline has been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade in certain experimental conditions, including pulmonary inflammation caused by inhaled gastric contents. The present study aimed to assess the potential anti-inflammatory effects of administering a single intravenous dose of 7.5% hypertonic saline in an experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid. METHODS: Thirty-two pigs were anesthetized and randomly allocated into the following four groups: Sham, which received anesthesia and were observed; HS, which received intravenous 7.5% hypertonic saline solution (4 ml/kg); acute lung injury, which were subjected to acute lung injury with intratracheal hydrochloric acid; and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline, which were subjected to acute lung injury with hydrochloric acid and treated with hypertonic saline. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters were recorded over four hours. Subsequently, bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected at the end of the observation period to measure cytokine levels using an oxidative burst analysis, and lung tissue was collected for a histological analysis. RESULTS: Hydrochloric acid instillation caused marked changes in respiratory mechanics as well as blood gas and lung parenchyma parameters. Despite the absence of a significant difference between the acute lung injury and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline groups, the acute lung injury animals presented higher neutrophil and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed pulmonary edema, congestion and alveolar collapse in both groups; however, the differences between groups were not significant. Despite the lower cytokine and neutrophil levels observed in the acute lung injury + hypertonic saline group, significant differences were not observed among the treated and non-treated groups. CONCLUSIONS: Hypertonic saline

  8. Effect of hypertonic saline treatment on the inflammatory response after hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in pigs.

    PubMed

    Holms, Carla Augusto; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Kahvegian, Marcia; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Fantoni, Denise Tabacchi; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Auler Junior, Jose Otavio Costa

    2015-08-01

    Hypertonic saline has been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade in certain experimental conditions, including pulmonary inflammation caused by inhaled gastric contents. The present study aimed to assess the potential anti-inflammatory effects of administering a single intravenous dose of 7.5% hypertonic saline in an experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid. Thirty-two pigs were anesthetized and randomly allocated into the following four groups: Sham, which received anesthesia and were observed; HS, which received intravenous 7.5% hypertonic saline solution (4 ml/kg); acute lung injury, which were subjected to acute lung injury with intratracheal hydrochloric acid; and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline, which were subjected to acute lung injury with hydrochloric acid and treated with hypertonic saline. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters were recorded over four hours. Subsequently, bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected at the end of the observation period to measure cytokine levels using an oxidative burst analysis, and lung tissue was collected for a histological analysis. Hydrochloric acid instillation caused marked changes in respiratory mechanics as well as blood gas and lung parenchyma parameters. Despite the absence of a significant difference between the acute lung injury and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline groups, the acute lung injury animals presented higher neutrophil and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed pulmonary edema, congestion and alveolar collapse in both groups; however, the differences between groups were not significant. Despite the lower cytokine and neutrophil levels observed in the acute lung injury + hypertonic saline group, significant differences were not observed among the treated and non-treated groups. Hypertonic saline infusion after intratracheal hydrochloric

  9. [Screening of malnutrition risk versus indicators of nutritional status and systemic inflammatory response in newly diagnosed lung cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Illa, P; Tomíšková, M; Skřičková, J

    2014-01-01

    Most lung cancers are already advanced at the time of dia-gnosis. In these patients, a frequent symptom is protein energy malnutrition, often diagnosed prior to oncological treatment. Malnutrition results in poor tolerance of treatment and increased morbidity and mortality. Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 adapted for oncological patients was used to assess the risk of undernutrition in a group of 188 lung cancer patients. The risk was evaluated on a 6- point scale according to common signs of nutritional status and tumor and its treatment risk factors. A score of 3 and more (called "nutritional risk") means a significant risk of malnutrition. Furthermore, pretreatment nutritional characteristics were evaluated in patients (including the value of BMI) and laboratory values indicating malnutrition/ acute phase response (albumin/ C reactive protein - CRP). Acceptable NRS score was found in 50.6%, while in 45.3% was suggested into risk of malnutrition ("nutritional risk"). Only 6.6% of our patients had a BMI less than 20 kg/ m2. Significant differences in albumin and CRP values in various categories of NRS were confirmed. Initial signs of cancer malnutrition may be overlooked in patients who fall within or above the range of BMI for adequate weight, although these patients may be at significant risk of malnutrition. The indicators of nutritional status and systemic inflammatory responses were significantly associated with resulting values NRS score.

  10. Gene expression profiling of the effects of organic dust in lung epithelial and THP-1 cells reveals inductive effects on inflammatory and immune response genes.

    PubMed

    Boggaram, Vijay; Loose, David S; Gottipati, Koteswara R; Natarajan, Kartiga; Mitchell, Courtney T

    2016-04-01

    The intensification and concentration of animal production operations expose workers to high levels of organic dusts in the work environment. Exposure to organic dusts is a risk factor for the development of acute and chronic respiratory symptoms and diseases. Lung epithelium plays important roles in the control of immune and inflammatory responses to environmental agents to maintain lung health. To better understand the effects of organic dust on lung inflammatory responses, we characterized the gene expression profiles of A549 alveolar and Beas2B bronchial epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells influenced by exposure to poultry dust extract by DNA microarray analysis using Illumina Human HT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip. We found that A549 alveolar and Beas2B bronchial epithelial and THP-1 cells responded with unique changes in the gene expression profiles with regulation of genes encoding inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and other inflammatory proteins being common to all the three cells. Significantly induced genes included IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, ICAM-1, CCL2, CCL5, TLR4, and PTGS2. Validation by real-time qRT-PCR, ELISA, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical staining of lung sections from mice exposed to dust extract validated DNA microarray results. Pathway analysis indicated that dust extract induced changes in gene expression influenced functions related to cellular growth and proliferation, cell death and survival, and cellular development. These data show that a broad range of inflammatory mediators produced in response to poultry dust exposure can modulate lung immune and inflammatory responses. This is the first report on organic dust induced changes in expression profiles in lung epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells.

  11. Gene expression profiling of the effects of organic dust in lung epithelial and THP-1 cells reveals inductive effects on inflammatory and immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    Loose, David S.; Gottipati, Koteswara R.; Natarajan, Kartiga; Mitchell, Courtney T.

    2016-01-01

    The intensification and concentration of animal production operations expose workers to high levels of organic dusts in the work environment. Exposure to organic dusts is a risk factor for the development of acute and chronic respiratory symptoms and diseases. Lung epithelium plays important roles in the control of immune and inflammatory responses to environmental agents to maintain lung health. To better understand the effects of organic dust on lung inflammatory responses, we characterized the gene expression profiles of A549 alveolar and Beas2B bronchial epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells influenced by exposure to poultry dust extract by DNA microarray analysis using Illumina Human HT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip. We found that A549 alveolar and Beas2B bronchial epithelial and THP-1 cells responded with unique changes in the gene expression profiles with regulation of genes encoding inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and other inflammatory proteins being common to all the three cells. Significantly induced genes included IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, ICAM-1, CCL2, CCL5, TLR4, and PTGS2. Validation by real-time qRT-PCR, ELISA, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical staining of lung sections from mice exposed to dust extract validated DNA microarray results. Pathway analysis indicated that dust extract induced changes in gene expression influenced functions related to cellular growth and proliferation, cell death and survival, and cellular development. These data show that a broad range of inflammatory mediators produced in response to poultry dust exposure can modulate lung immune and inflammatory responses. This is the first report on organic dust induced changes in expression profiles in lung epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells. PMID:26884459

  12. The Immediate Intramedullary Nailing Surgery Increased the Mitochondrial DNA Release That Aggravated Systemic Inflammatory Response and Lung Injury Induced by Elderly Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Gan, Li; Zhong, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ruhui; Sun, Tiansheng; Li, Qi; Chen, Xiaobin; Zhang, Jianzheng

    2015-01-01

    Conventional concept suggests that immediate surgery is the optimal choice for elderly hip fracture patients; however, few studies focus on the adverse effect of immediate surgery. This study aims to examine the adverse effect of immediate surgery, as well as to explore the meaning of mtDNA release after trauma. In the experiment, elderly rats, respectively, received hip fracture operations or hip fracture plus intramedullary nail surgery. After fracture operations, the serum mtDNA levels as well as the related indicators of systemic inflammatory response and lung injury significantly increased in the rats. After immediate surgery, the above variables were further increased. The serum mtDNA levels were significantly related with the serum cytokine (TNF-α and IL-10) levels and pulmonary histological score. In order to identify the meaning of mtDNA release following hip fracture, the elderly rats received injections with mtDNA. After treatment, the related indicators of systemic inflammatory response and lung injury significantly increased in the rats. These results demonstrated that the immediate surgery increased the mtDNA release that could aggravate systemic inflammatory response and lung injury induced by elderly hip fracture; serum mtDNA might serve as a potential biomarker of systemic inflammatory response and lung injury following elderly hip fracture.

  13. Metformin attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung injury in neonatal rats by reducing the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueyu; Walther, Frans J; Sengers, Rozemarijn M A; Laghmani, El Houari; Salam, Asma; Folkerts, Gert; Pera, Tonio; Wagenaar, Gerry T M

    2015-08-01

    Because therapeutic options are lacking for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), there is an urgent medical need to discover novel targets/drugs to treat this neonatal chronic lung disease. Metformin, a drug commonly used to lower blood glucose in type 2 diabetes patients, may be a novel therapeutic option for BPD by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and improving vascularization. We investigated the therapeutic potential of daily treatment with 25 and 100 mg/kg metformin, injected subcutaneously in neonatal Wistar rats with severe experimental BPD, induced by continuous exposure to 100% oxygen for 10 days. Parameters investigated included survival, lung and heart histopathology, pulmonary fibrin and collagen deposition, vascular leakage, right ventricular hypertrophy, and differential mRNA expression in the lungs of key genes involved in BPD pathogenesis, including inflammation, coagulation, and alveolar development. After daily metformin treatment rat pups with experimental BPD had reduced mortality, alveolar septum thickness, lung inflammation, and fibrosis, demonstrated by a reduced influx of macrophages and neutrophils and hyperoxia-induced collagen III and fibrin deposition (25 mg/kg), as well as improved vascularization (100 mg/kg) compared with control treatment. However, metformin did not ameliorate alveolar enlargement, small arteriole wall thickening, vascular alveolar leakage, and right ventricular hypertrophy. In conclusion metformin prolongs survival and attenuates pulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation, coagulation, and fibrosis but does not affect alveolar development or prevent pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy in neonatal rats with severe hyperoxia-induced experimental BPD.

  14. Metformin attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung injury in neonatal rats by reducing the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueyu; Walther, Frans J.; Sengers, Rozemarijn M. A.; Laghmani, El Houari; Salam, Asma; Folkerts, Gert; Pera, Tonio

    2015-01-01

    Because therapeutic options are lacking for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), there is an urgent medical need to discover novel targets/drugs to treat this neonatal chronic lung disease. Metformin, a drug commonly used to lower blood glucose in type 2 diabetes patients, may be a novel therapeutic option for BPD by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and improving vascularization. We investigated the therapeutic potential of daily treatment with 25 and 100 mg/kg metformin, injected subcutaneously in neonatal Wistar rats with severe experimental BPD, induced by continuous exposure to 100% oxygen for 10 days. Parameters investigated included survival, lung and heart histopathology, pulmonary fibrin and collagen deposition, vascular leakage, right ventricular hypertrophy, and differential mRNA expression in the lungs of key genes involved in BPD pathogenesis, including inflammation, coagulation, and alveolar development. After daily metformin treatment rat pups with experimental BPD had reduced mortality, alveolar septum thickness, lung inflammation, and fibrosis, demonstrated by a reduced influx of macrophages and neutrophils and hyperoxia-induced collagen III and fibrin deposition (25 mg/kg), as well as improved vascularization (100 mg/kg) compared with control treatment. However, metformin did not ameliorate alveolar enlargement, small arteriole wall thickening, vascular alveolar leakage, and right ventricular hypertrophy. In conclusion metformin prolongs survival and attenuates pulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation, coagulation, and fibrosis but does not affect alveolar development or prevent pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy in neonatal rats with severe hyperoxia-induced experimental BPD. PMID:26047641

  15. Absence of TNF-α enhances inflammatory response in the newborn lung undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Harald; Pritzke, Tina; Oak, Prajakta; Kossert, Melina; Biebach, Luisa; Förster, Kai; Koschlig, Markus; Alvira, Cristina M; Hilgendorff, Anne

    2016-05-15

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), characterized by impaired alveolarization and vascularization in association with lung inflammation and apoptosis, often occurs after mechanical ventilation with oxygen-rich gas (MV-O2). As heightened expression of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α has been described in infants with BPD, we hypothesized that absence of TNF-α would reduce pulmonary inflammation, and attenuate structural changes in newborn mice undergoing MV-O2 Neonatal TNF-α null (TNF-α(-/-)) and wild type (TNF-α(+/+)) mice received MV-O2 for 8 h; controls spontaneously breathed 40% O2 Histologic, mRNA, and protein analysis in vivo were complemented by in vitro studies subjecting primary pulmonary myofibroblasts to mechanical stretch. Finally, TNF-α level in tracheal aspirates from preterm infants were determined by ELISA. Although MV-O2 induced larger and fewer alveoli in both, TNF-α(-/-) and TNF-α(+/+) mice, it caused enhanced lung apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3/-6/-8), infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils, and proinflammatory mediator expression (IL-1β, CXCL-1, MCP-1) in TNF-α(-/-) mice. These differences were associated with increased pulmonary transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, decreased TGF-β inhibitor SMAD-7 expression, and reduced pulmonary NF-κB activity in ventilated TNF-α(-/-) mice. Preterm infants who went on to develop BPD showed significantly lower TNF-α levels at birth. Our results suggest a critical balance between TNF-α and TGF-β signaling in the developing lung, and underscore the critical importance of these key pathways in the pathogenesis of BPD. Future treatment strategies need to weigh the potential benefits of inhibiting pathologic cytokine expression against the potential of altering key developmental pathways.

  16. Oxidative stress and inflammatory response to printer toner particles in human epithelial A549 lung cells.

    PubMed

    Könczöl, Mathias; Weiß, Adilka; Gminski, Richard; Merfort, Irmgard; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2013-02-04

    Reports on adverse health effects related to occupational exposure to toner powder are still inconclusive. Therefore, we have previously conducted an in vitro-study to characterize the genotoxic potential of three commercially available black printer toner powders in A549 lung cells. In these cell-based assays it was clearly demonstrated that the tested toner powders damage DNA and induce micronucleus (MN) formation. Here, we have studied the cytotoxic and proinflammatory potential of these three types of printer toner particles and the influence of ROS and NF-κB induction in order to unravel the underlying mechanisms. A549 cells were exposed to various concentrations of printer toner particle suspensions for 24 h. The toner particles were observed to exert significant cytotoxic effects in the WST-1 and neutral red (NR)-assays, although to a varying extent. Caspase 3/7 activity increased, while the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was not affected. Particles of all three printer toner powders induced concentration-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as measured in the DCFH-DA assay. Furthermore, toner particle exposure enhanced interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 production, which is in agreement with activation of the transcription factor NF-κB in A549 cells shown by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Therefore, it can be concluded that exposure of A549 lung cells to three selected printer toner powders caused oxidative stress through induction of ROS. Increased ROS formation may trigger genotoxic effects and activate proinflammatory pathways.

  17. Exposure, lung function decline and systemic inflammatory response in asphalt workers.

    PubMed

    Ulvestad, Bente; Randem, Britt Grethe; Hetland, Siri; Sigurdardottir, Gudmunda; Johannessen, Egil; Lyberg, Torstein

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between exposures in asphalt work and changes in lung function, blood concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), micro-C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen among asphalt workers during a work season. Blood samples from all asphalt workers (N=140) in Norway's largest road construction and maintenance company were taken in April-May 2005 and again in September-October 2005. Spirometric tests of the asphalt workers and a reference group (heavy construction workers, N=126) were carried out before the asphalt season, and the asphalt workers were tested again at the end of the season. Exposure to total dust, oil mist, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and gases was measured by personal samplers during the asphalt season. The asphalt workers had a significantly a lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) and forced expiratory flow rate of 50% of the forced vital capacity than the reference group at the beginning of the season. The asphalt workers were divided according to their exposure into two groups, asphalt pavers (N=81) and asphalt plant operators and truck drivers (N=54). The screedmen, a group of the asphalt pavers, had a statistically significant lower FVC and FEV(1) after one season of asphalt work than all of the other asphalt workers (P<0.05). The mean plasma concentration of IL-6 increased among the asphalt pavers from 1.55 pg/ml before the season to 2.67 pg/ml at the season's end (P=0.04, adjusted for current smoking). Exposure in asphalt paving may enhance the risk of lung function decline.

  18. Impact of a lung-protective ventilatory strategy on systemic and pulmonary inflammatory responses during laparoscopic surgery: is it really helpful?

    PubMed

    Kokulu, Serdar; Günay, Ersin; Baki, Elif Doğan; Ulasli, Sevinc Sarinc; Yilmazer, Mehmet; Koca, Buğra; Arıöz, Dagistan Tolga; Ela, Yüksel; Sivaci, Remziye Gül

    2015-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is performed by carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation, but this may induce stress responses. The aim of this study is to compare the level of inflammatory mediators in patients receiving low tidal volume (VT) versus traditional VT during gynecological laparoscopic surgery. Forty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status 1 and 2 subjects older than 18 years old undergoing laparoscopic gynecological surgery were included. Systemic inflammatory response was assessed with serum IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-8, and IL-1β in patients receiving intraoperative low VT and traditional VT during laparoscopic surgery [within the first 5 min after endotracheal intubation (T1), 60 min after the initiation of mechanical ventilation (T2), and in the postanesthesia care unit 30 min after tracheal extubation (T3)]. Additionally, inflammatory response was assessed with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at T1 and T3 periods. An increase in the serum levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-8, and IL-1β was observed in both groups during the time periods of T1, T2, and T3. No significant differences were found in the serum and BAL levels of inflammatory mediators during time periods between groups. The results of the present study suggested that the lung-protective ventilation and traditional strategies are not different in terms of lung injury and inflammatory response during conventional laparoscopic gynecological surgery.

  19. The Relationship between Sarcopenia and Systemic Inflammatory Response for Cancer Cachexia in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Young Saing; Seo, Ja-Young; Park, Inkeun; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Jeong, Yu Mi; Kim, Jeong Ho; Kim, Nambeom

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognostic significance of sarcopenia, an important component of cancer cachexia, has been demonstrated in oncologic patients. Catabolic drivers have been suggested to be key features of cancer cachexia. Objective To determine the relationship between systemic inflammatory markers and CT-determined muscle mass in patients with SCLC. Methods Cross-sectional muscle areas were evaluated at the level of the third lumbar vertebra (L3) using baseline CT images in 186 SCLC patients. Sarcopenia was defined as a L3 muscle index (L3MI, muscle area at L3/height2) of < 55 cm2/m2 for men and of < 39 cm2/m2 for women. Systemic inflammatory markers investigated included serum white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil: lymphocyte ratio (NLR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and albumin. Results Mean L3MI was 47.9 ± 9.7 cm2/m2 for men and 41.6 ± 7.0 cm2/m2 for women. Sarcopenia was present in 128 patients (68.8%), and sarcopenic patients had significant serum lymphocyte counts and albumin levels (p = 0.002 and 0.041, respectively), and higher NLRs and CRP levels (p = 0.011 and 0.026) than non-sarcopenic patients. Multivariable analysis revealed that CRP independently predicted L3MI (β = -0.208; 95% CI, -0.415 to -0.002; p = 0.048), along with gender and BMI (p values < 0.001) and performance status (p = 0.010). Conclusion The present study confirms a significant linear relationship exists between CT-determined muscle mass and CRP in SCLC patients. This association might provide a better understanding of the mechanism of cancer cachexia. PMID:27537502

  20. Association between inflammatory mediators and response to inhaled nitric oxide in a model of endotoxin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Trachsel, Sebastien; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Maurenbrecher, Edwige; Nys, Monique; Lamy, Maurice; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) allows selective pulmonary vasodilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome and improves PaO2 by redistribution of pulmonary blood flow towards better ventilated parenchyma. One-third of patients are nonresponders to INO, however, and it is difficult to predict who will respond. The aim of the present study was to identify, within a panel of inflammatory mediators released during endotoxin-induced lung injury, specific mediators that are associated with a PaO2 response to INO. Methods After animal ethics committee approval, pigs were anesthetized and exposed to 2 hours of endotoxin infusion. Levels of cytokines, prostanoid, leucotriene and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were sampled prior to endotoxin exposure and hourly thereafter. All animals were exposed to 40 ppm INO: 28 animals were exposed at either 4 hours or 6 hours and a subgroup of nine animals was exposed both at 4 hours and 6 hours after onset of endotoxin infusion. Results Based on the response to INO, the animals were retrospectively placed into a responder group (increase in PaO2 ≥ 20%) or a nonresponder group. All mediators increased with endotoxin infusion although no significant differences were seen between responders and nonresponders. There was a mean difference in ET-1, however, with lower levels in the nonresponder group than in the responder group, 0.1 pg/ml versus 3.0 pg/ml. Moreover, five animals in the group exposed twice to INO switched from responder to nonresponder and had decreased ET-1 levels (3.0 (2.5 to 7.5) pg/ml versus 0.1 (0.1 to 2.1) pg/ml, P < 0.05). The pulmonary artery pressure and ET-1 level were higher in future responders to INO. Conclusions ET-1 may therefore be involved in mediating the response to INO. PMID:18954441

  1. Metal-Sulfide Mineral Ores, Fenton Chemistry and Disease – Particle Induced Inflammatory Stress Response in Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Andrea D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E.; Schoonen, Martin A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002 m2/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30 minutes and measured systematically for up to 24 hours). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. This study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management. PMID:25107347

  2. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease. Particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells

    DOE PAGES

    Harrington, Andrea D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E.; ...

    2014-07-10

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleteriousmore » nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002 m2/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30 min and measured systematically for up to 24 h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.« less

  3. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease. Particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Andrea D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2014-07-10

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002 m2/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30 min and measured systematically for up to 24 h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.

  4. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease--particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea D; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E; Schoonen, Martin A A

    2015-01-01

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002m(2)/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30min and measured systematically for up to 24h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. This study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.

  5. Effects of smoking and irradiated volume on inflammatory response in the lung of irradiated breast cancer patients evaluated with bronchoalveolar lavage

    SciTech Connect

    Bjermer, L.; Franzen, L.; Littbrand, B.; Nilsson, K.; Angstroem, T.H.; Henriksson, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Quantitative measurements of the effects of irradiation on normal tissues in humans have been hard to obtain because most tissues are inaccessible and/or direct responses are difficult to quantify in a nondestructive manner. Pneumonitis and fibrotic lung disease are adverse effects seen in varying intensity in patients treated with radiotherapy for carcinomas of the thorax, e.g., breast cancer. In the present study the aim was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction in the underlying parenchyma following postoperative irradiation with bronchoalveolar lavage technique. Twenty-one patients with breast cancer stage T1N0M0 received radiotherapy with photons to a target dose of 56 Gy following breast conservative surgery. Nineteen healthy controls were also included. The results showed a clear elevation of neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the total irradiated groups, compared to controls. When subclassifying the material according to smoking habit, it was obvious that the smokers displayed a significantly decreased inflammatory reaction, i.e., reduced levels of mast cells and lymphocytes, compared to both nonsmoking controls and patients. Eosinophils were seen in an elevated number in all irradiated patients. Radiological signs of pneumonitis were observed in three patients, all in the nonsmoking group. No correlation was found between the volume of lung irradiated and the inflammatory response. It is concluded that bronchoalveolar lavage is a suitable and sensitive method for investigating radiotherapy-induced reactions in the human lung. Furthermore, ongoing smoking during the treatment depressed the inflammatory response in the lung parenchyma induced by irradiation. The present study as well as earlier observations justify further studies concerning the possibility of interaction of smoking with cancer treatment.

  6. Adenovirus-delivered angiopoietin-1 suppresses NF-κB and p38 MAPK and attenuates inflammatory responses in phosgene-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    He, Dai-Kun; Shao, Yi-Ru; Zhang, Lin; Shen, Jie; Zhong, Zhi-Yue; Wang, Jing; Xu, Guoxiong

    2014-02-01

    Animals exposed to phosgene (Psg) result in acute lung injury (ALI). We have recently reported that angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) reduces inflammation and vascular hyperpermeability in ALI animals. In this study, we examined whether the beneficial effects of adenovirus-delivered Ang1 (Ad/Ang1) on inflammatory responses in Psg-induced ALI rats are due to the suppression of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which play crucial roles in inflammatory responses in ALI. We demonstrated that Psg increased Ang2 and inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-4 (IL-4), IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10, in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of ALI rats, determined by ELISA. Ang1 inhibits pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8) and has no effect on anti-inflammatory mediators (IL-4 and IL-10). Furthermore, the inhibitory action of Ang1 was mediated by the suppression of the NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways, leading to the attenuation of inflammatory responses of ALI. Thus, Ad/Ang1 may provide a useful tool for the effective treatment in Psg-induced ALI.

  7. A novel imidazopyridine derivative, X22, attenuates sepsis-induced lung and liver injury by inhibiting the inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiangting; Feng, Zhiguo; Xu, Tingting; Wu, Beibei; Chen, Hongjin; Xu, Fengli; Fu, Lili; Shan, Xiaoou; Dai, Yuanrong; Zhang, Yali; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite years of extensive research, effective drugs to treat sepsis in the clinic are lacking. In this study, we found a novel imidazopyridine derivative, X22, which has powerful anti-inflammatory activity. X22 dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages. X22 also downregulated the LPS-induced proinflammatory gene expression in vitro. In vivo, X22 exhibited a significant protection against LPS-induced death. Pretreatment or treatment with X22 attenuated the sepsis-induced lung and liver injury by inhibiting the inflammatory response. In addition, X22 showed protection against LPS-induced acute lung injury. We additionally found that pretreatment with X22 reduced the inflammatory pain in the acetic acid and formalin models and reduced the dimethylbenzene-induced ear swelling and acetic acid-increased vascular permeability. Together, these data confirmed that X22 has multiple anti-inflammatory effects and may be a potential therapeutic option in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:27390516

  8. Inflammatory and cytotoxic responses in mouse lungs exposed to purified toxins from building isolated Penicillium brevicompactum Dierckx and P. chrysogenum Thom.

    PubMed

    Rand, Thomas G; Giles, S; Flemming, J; Miller, J David; Puniani, Eva

    2005-09-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that building-associated Penicillium spores and spore extracts can induce significant inflammatory responses in lung cells and animal models of lung disease. However, because spores and spore extracts comprise mixtures of bioactive constituents often including toxins, it is impossible to resolve which constituent mediates inflammatory responses. This study examined dose-response (0.5 nM, 2.5 nM, 5.0 nM, 12.5 nM/g body weight (BW) animal) and time-course (3, 6, 24 and 48 h post instillation (PI)) relationships associated with inflammatory and cytotoxic responses in mouse lungs intratracheally instilled with pure brevianamide A, mycophenolic acid, and roquefortine C. High doses (5.0 nM and/or 12.5 nM/g BW animal) of brevianamide A and mycophenolic acid, the dominant metabolites of P. brevicompactum, and roquefortine C, the dominant metabolite of P. chrysogenum, induced significant inflammatory responses within 6 h PI, expressed as differentially elevated macrophage, neutrophil, MIP-2, TNF, and IL-6 concentrations in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of intratracheally exposed mice. Macrophage and neutrophil numbers were maximal at 24 h PI; responses of the other inflammatory markers were maximal at 6 h PI. Except for macrophage numbers in mycophenolic acid-treatment animals, cells exhibited significant dose-dependent-like responses; for the chemo-/cytokine markers, dose dependency was lacking except for MIP-2 concentration in brevianamide A-treatment animals. It was also found that brevianamide A induced cytotoxicity expressed as significantly increased LDH concentration in mouse BALF, at concentrations of 12.5 nM/g BW animal and at 6 and 24 h PI. Albumin concentrations, measured as a nonspecific marker of vascular leakage, were significantly elevated in the BALF of mice treated with 12.5 nM/g nM brevianamide A/animal from 6 to 24 h PI and in > or =5.0 nM/g mycophenolic acid-treated animals at 6 to 24 h PI. These results

  9. Dietary Enrichment with 20% Fish Oil Decreases Mucus Production and the Inflammatory Response in Mice with Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jean A.; Hartman, Jaye; Skinner, Monica M.; Schwindt, Adam R.; Fischer, Kay A.; Vorachek, William R.; Bobe, Gerd; Valentine, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent decades, which may be related to higher dietary intake of (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and lower intake of (n-3) PUFA, e.g., those contained in fish oil. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary PUFA enrichment decreases mucus production or the inflammatory response associated with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic lung inflammation. Mice (n = 10/group) were fed control, 20% fish oil, or 20% corn oil enriched diets for a total of 12 weeks. At 8 and 10 weeks, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of saline (10 control-fed mice) or OVA (30 remaining mice). Once at 10 weeks and on 3 consecutive days during week 12, mice were challenged by nebulizing with saline or OVA. Mice were euthanized 24 hours after the last challenge and blood was collected for plasma FA analysis. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected to determine cell composition and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-13) concentrations. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) + mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue were quantified using morphometric analysis. Relative abundance of mRNA for mucin (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) genes were compared with ß-actin by qPCR. Supplementation with either corn oil or fish oil effectively altered plasma FA profiles towards more (n-6) FA or (n-3) FA, respectively (P < 0.0001). Sensitization and challenge with OVA increased the proportion of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, and decreased the proportion of macrophages and concentrations of IL-13 in BAL fluid; increased the percentage of PAS+ mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue; and increased gene expression of mucins (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) in lung tissue of control-fed mice. Dietary PUFA reversed the increase in PAS+ mucus-producing cells (P = 0.003). In addition, dietary

  10. Dietary Enrichment with 20% Fish Oil Decreases Mucus Production and the Inflammatory Response in Mice with Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jean A; Hartman, Jaye; Skinner, Monica M; Schwindt, Adam R; Fischer, Kay A; Vorachek, William R; Bobe, Gerd; Valentine, Beth A

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent decades, which may be related to higher dietary intake of (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and lower intake of (n-3) PUFA, e.g., those contained in fish oil. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary PUFA enrichment decreases mucus production or the inflammatory response associated with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic lung inflammation. Mice (n = 10/group) were fed control, 20% fish oil, or 20% corn oil enriched diets for a total of 12 weeks. At 8 and 10 weeks, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of saline (10 control-fed mice) or OVA (30 remaining mice). Once at 10 weeks and on 3 consecutive days during week 12, mice were challenged by nebulizing with saline or OVA. Mice were euthanized 24 hours after the last challenge and blood was collected for plasma FA analysis. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected to determine cell composition and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-13) concentrations. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) + mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue were quantified using morphometric analysis. Relative abundance of mRNA for mucin (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) genes were compared with ß-actin by qPCR. Supplementation with either corn oil or fish oil effectively altered plasma FA profiles towards more (n-6) FA or (n-3) FA, respectively (P < 0.0001). Sensitization and challenge with OVA increased the proportion of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, and decreased the proportion of macrophages and concentrations of IL-13 in BAL fluid; increased the percentage of PAS+ mucus-producing cells and CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltrates in lung tissue; and increased gene expression of mucins (Muc4, Muc5ac, and Muc5b) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) in lung tissue of control-fed mice. Dietary PUFA reversed the increase in PAS+ mucus-producing cells (P = 0.003). In addition, dietary

  11. The mc2-CMX vaccine induces an enhanced immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis compared to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin but with similar lung inflammatory effects

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Fábio Muniz; Trentini, Monalisa Martins; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Kipnis, André

    2016-01-01

    Although the attenuated Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has been used since 1921, tuberculosis (TB) control still proceeds at a slow pace. The main reason is the variable efficacy of BCG protection against TB among adults, which ranges from 0-80%. Subsequently, the mc2-CMX vaccine was developed with promising results. Nonetheless, this recombinant vaccine needs to be compared to the standard BCG vaccine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immune response induced by mc2-CMX and compare it to the response generated by BCG. BALB/c mice were immunised with both vaccines and challenged withMycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The immune and inflammatory responses were evaluated by ELISA, flow cytometry, and histopathology. Mice vaccinated with mc2-CMX and challenged with Mtb induced an increase in the IgG1 and IgG2 levels against CMX as well as recalled specific CD4+ T-cells that produced T-helper 1 cytokines in the lungs and spleen compared with BCG vaccinated and challenged mice. Both vaccines reduced the lung inflammatory pathology induced by the Mtb infection. The mc2-CMX vaccine induces a humoral and cellular response that is superior to BCG and is efficiently recalled after challenge with Mtb, although both vaccines induced similar inflammatory reductions. PMID:27074251

  12. Octanal-induced inflammatory responses in cells relevant for lung toxicity: expression and release of cytokines in A549 human alveolar cells.

    PubMed

    Song, M-K; Lee, H-S; Choi, H-S; Shin, C-Y; Kim, Y-J; Park, Y-K; Ryu, J-C

    2014-07-01

    Inhalation is an important route of aldehyde exposure, and lung is one of the main targets of aldehyde toxicity. Octanal is distributed ubiquitously in the environment and is a component of indoor air pollutants. We investigated whether octanal exposure enhances the inflammatory response in the human respiratory system by increasing the expression and release of cytokines and chemokines. The effect of octanal in transcriptomic modulation was assessed in the human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 using oligonucleotide arrays. We identified a set of genes differentially expressed upon octanal exposure that may be useful for monitoring octanal pulmonary toxicity. These genes were classified according to the Gene Ontology functional category and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis to explore the biological processes related to octanal-induced pulmonary toxicity. The results show that octanal affects the expression of several chemokines and inflammatory cytokines and increases the levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 released. In conclusion, octanal exposure modulates the expression of cytokines and chemokines important in the development of lung injury and disease. This suggests that inflammation contributes to octanal-induced lung damage and that the inflammatory genes expressed should be studied in detail, thereby laying the groundwork for future biomonitoring studies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. [Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung. Case report].

    PubMed

    Santos, Nelson; Guerra, Miguel; Ferreira, Diva; Leal, Francisco; Miranda, José; Shiang, Teresa; Leal, Francisco; Vouga, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung is a rare entity, of unknown etiology and variable clinical evolution. The histological variety of this entity makes the diagnosis difficult, which is generally obtained after surgical removal of the lesion. The authors report the clinical case of a 32 years old woman presenting with hemoptysis and radiologic appearance of aspergilloma. The lesion was surgically removed and the diagnosis of inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung was confirmed by pathologic and immunohistochemical analysis.

  14. Styrene induces an inflammatory response in human lung epithelial cells via oxidative stress and NF-{kappa}B activation

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder-Stolinski, Carmen Fischaeder, Gundula Oostingh, Gertie Janneke Feltens, Ralph Kohse, Franziska; Bergen, Martin von Moerbt, Nora Eder, Klaus Duschl, Albert Lehmann, Irina

    2008-09-01

    Styrene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is widely used as a solvent in many industrial settings. Chronic exposure to styrene can result in irritation of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Contact of styrene with epithelial cells stimulates the expression of a variety of inflammatory mediators, including the chemotactic cytokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). To characterise the underlying mechanisms of the induction of inflammatory signals by styrene, we investigated the influence of this compound on the induction of oxidative stress and the activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signalling pathway in human lung epithelial cells (A549). The results demonstrate that styrene-induced MCP-1 expression, as well as the expression of the oxidative stress marker glutathione S-transferase (GST), is associated with a concentration dependent pattern of NF-{kappa}B activity. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B, IKK-NBD, and the anti-inflammatory antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) were both effective in suppressing styrene-induced MCP-1 secretion. In addition, NAC was capable of inhibiting the upregulation of GST expression. Our findings suggest that the activation of the NF-{kappa}B signalling pathway by styrene is mediated via a redox-sensitive mechanism.

  15. Metastasized lung cancer suppression by Morinda citrifolia (Noni) leaf compared to Erlotinib via anti-inflammatory, endogenous antioxidant responses and apoptotic gene activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Swee-Ling; Mustapha, Noordin M; Goh, Yong-Meng; Bakar, Nurul Ain Abu; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2016-05-01

    Metastasized lung and liver cancers cause over 2 million deaths annually, and are amongst the top killer cancers worldwide. Morinda citrifolia (Noni) leaves are traditionally consumed as vegetables in the tropics. The macro and micro effects of M. citrifolia (Noni) leaves on metastasized lung cancer development in vitro and in vivo were compared with the FDA-approved anti-cancer drug Erlotinib. The extract inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis in A549 cells (IC50 = 23.47 μg/mL) and mouse Lewis (LL2) lung carcinoma cells (IC50 = 5.50 μg/mL) in vitro, arrested cancer cell cycle at G0/G1 phases and significantly increased caspase-3/-8 without changing caspase-9 levels. The extract showed no toxicity on normal MRC5 lung cells. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549-induced BALB/c mice were fed with 150 and 300 mg/kg M. citrifolia leaf extract and compared with Erlotinib (50 mg/kg body weight) for 21 days. It significantly increased the pro-apoptotic TRP53 genes, downregulated the pro-tumourigenesis genes (BIRC5, JAK2/STAT3/STAT5A) in the mice tumours, significantly increased the anti-inflammatory IL4, IL10 and NR3C1 expression in the metastasized lung and hepatic cancer tissues and enhanced the NFE2L2-dependent antioxidant responses against oxidative injuries. The extract elevated serum neutrophils and reduced the red blood cells, haemoglobin, corpuscular volume and cell haemoglobin concentration in the lung cancer-induced mammal. It suppressed inflammation and oedema, and upregulated the endogenous antioxidant responses and apoptotic genes to suppress the cancer. The 300 mg/kg extract was more effective than the 50 mg/kg Erlotinib for most of the parameters measured.

  16. Systemic inflammatory response and downmodulation of peripheral CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells in patients undergoing radiofrequency thermal ablation for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Fietta, Anna Maria; Morosini, Monica; Passadore, Ileana; Cascina, Alessandro; Draghi, Paola; Dore, Roberto; Rossi, Sandro; Pozzi, Ernesto; Meloni, Federica

    2009-07-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) is a local tumor-destructing technique that can potentially modulate the host immune response through mechanisms that are not clearly defined. We assessed whether RFTA could affect multiple systemic inflammatory and immunological parameters, including CD25+Foxp+ cells, in patients with primary or metastatic lung tumors. Three days after RFTA, a moderate and temporary systemic inflammatory response developed, as demonstrated by the increase in peripheral neutrophils and monocytes and in plasma levels of proinflammatory chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, eotaxin, and interleukin[IL]-8) and acute phase reactants (complement C3 and C4, serum amyloid, alpha1 antichymotrypsin, and C-reactive protein). Moreover, we found a concomitant release of the anti-inflammatory factor IL-10. Thirty days after RFTA, a significant reduction in CD25+Foxp3+ counts with an increase in CD4+ T-cell proliferation and number of interferon-gamma-secreting cells was observed. The reduction in CD25+Foxp3+ cells lasted up to 90 days after treatment. The use of RFTA in lung cancer patients has an immunomodulatory activity: it induces a self-limiting systemic inflammation early and later a reduction of circulating CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs. In addition to tumor ablation, downmodulation of this regulatory subset might be an important mechanism involved in the long-term clinical efficacy of RFTA.

  17. Evaluation of cytotoxic, genotoxic and inflammatory responses of micro- and nano-particles of granite on human lung fibroblast cell IMR-90.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Khan, Mohd Imran; Patil, Govil; Chauhan, L K S

    2012-02-05

    Occupational exposure of granite workers is well known to cause lung impairment and silicosis. Toxicological profiles of different size particles of granite dust, however, are not yet understood. Present evaluation of micro- and nano-particles of granite dust as on human lung fibroblast cells IMR-90, revealed that their toxic effects were dose-dependent, and nanoparticles in general were more toxic. In this study we first demonstrated that nanoparticles caused oxidative stress, inflammatory response and genotoxicity, as seen by nearly 2 fold induction of ROS and LPO, mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, and induction in micronuclei formation. All these were significantly higher when compared with the effect of micro particles. Thus, the study suggests that separate health safety standards would be required for granite particles of different sizes.

  18. The inflammatory response in lungs of rats exposed on the airborne particles collected during different seasons in four European cities.

    PubMed

    Halatek, Tadeusz; Stepnik, Maciej; Stetkiewicz, Jan; Krajnow, Aleksander; Kur, Barbara; Szymczak, Wieslaw; Rydzynski, Konrad; Dybing, Erik; Cassee, Fleming R

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported associations of ambient particulate air pollution, especially particulate matter (PM) less than 10 μm with exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In an in vivo model, we have tested the toxicity of urban airborne particles collected during spring, summer, and winter seasons in four cities (Amsterdam, Lodz, Oslo, and Rome) spread across Europe. The seasonal differences in inflammatory responses were striking, and almost all the study parameters were affected by PM. Coarse fractions of the urban particle samples were less potent per unit mass than the fine fractions in increasing cytokine [macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α] levels and in reducing Clara-cell secretory protein (CC16) levels. This study shows that PM collected at 4 contrasting sites across Europe and during different seasons have differences in toxic potency. These differences were even more prominent between the fine and coarse fractions of the PM.

  19. CD4+ CD25+ transforming growth factor-beta-producing T cells are present in the lung in murine tuberculosis and may regulate the host inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Mason, C M; Porretta, E; Zhang, P; Nelson, S

    2007-06-01

    CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells produce the anti-inflammatory cytokines transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta or interleukin (IL)-10. Regulatory T cells have been recognized to suppress autoimmunity and promote self-tolerance. These cells may also facilitate pathogen persistence by down-regulating the host defence response during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We evaluated TGF-beta(+) and IL-10(+) lung CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells in a murine model of M. tuberculosis. BALB/c mice were infected with approximately 50 colony-forming units of M. tuberculosis H37Rv intratracheally. At serial times post-infection, lung cells were analysed for surface marker expression (CD3, CD4, CD25) and intracellular IL-10, TGF-beta, and interferon (IFN)-gamma production (following stimulation in vitro with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies). CD4(+) lung lymphocytes were also selected positively after lung digestion, and stimulated in vitro for 48 h with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies in the absence and presence of anti-TGF-beta antibody, anti-IL-10 antibody or rmTGF-beta soluble receptor II/human Fc chimera (TGFbetasrII). Supernatants were assayed for elicited IFN-gamma and IL-2. Fluorescence activated cell sorter analyses showed that TGF-beta- and IL-10-producing CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells are present in the lungs of infected mice. Neutralization of TGF-beta and IL-10 each resulted in increases in elicited IFN-gamma, with the greatest effect seen when TGFbetasrII was used. Elicited IL-2 was not affected significantly by TGF-beta neutralization. These results confirm the presence of CD4(+) CD25(+) TGF-beta(+) T cells in murine pulmonary tuberculosis, and support the possibility that TGF-beta may contribute to down-regulation of the host response.

  20. Ethanol Upregulates Glucocorticoid-induced Leucine Zipper Expression and Modulates Cellular Inflammatory Responses in Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Marla; Raju, Sammeta V.; Viswanathan, Anand; Painter, Richard G.; Bonvillain, Ryan; Byrne, Patrick; Nguyen, Doan H.; Bagby, Gregory J.; Kolls, Jay K.; Nelson, Steve; Wang, Guoshun

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with immunosuppressive and infectious sequelae. Particularly, alcoholics are more susceptible to pulmonary infections. In this report, gene transcriptional profiles of primary human airway epithelial cells, exposed to varying doses of alcohol (0, 50 and 100 mM), were obtained. Comparison of gene transcription levels between 0 mM and 50 mM alcohol treatments resulted in 2 genes being up-regulated and 16 genes down-regulated by at least two-fold. Moreover, 0 mM and 100 mM alcohol exposure led to the up-regulation of 14 genes and down-regulation of 157 genes. Among the up-regulated genes, glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) responded to alcohol in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, GILZ protein levels also correlated with this transcriptional pattern. Lentiviral expression of GILZ siRNA in human airway epithelial cells diminished the alcohol-induced upregulation, confirming that GILZ is indeed an alcohol-responsive gene. Gene-silencing of GILZ in A549 cells resulted in secretion of significantly higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines in response to IL-1β stimulation. The GILZ-silenced cells were more resistant to alcohol-mediated suppression of cytokine secretion. Further data demonstrated that the glucocorticoid receptor is involved in the regulation of GILZ by alcohol. Because GILZ is a key glucocorticoid-responsive factor mediating the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive actions of steroids, we propose that similar signaling pathways may play a role in the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of alcohol. PMID:20382889

  1. Glutathione S-transferase pi modulates NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory responses in lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jane T.; Qian, Xi; van der Velden, Jos L.J.; Chia, Shi Biao; McMillan, David H.; Flemer, Stevenson; Hoffman, Sidra M.; Lahue, Karolyn G.; Schneider, Robert W.; Nolin, James D.; Anathy, Vikas; van der Vliet, Albert; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a transcription factor family critical in the activation of pro- inflammatory responses. The NF-κB pathway is regulated by oxidant-induced post-translational modifications. Protein S-glutathionylation, or the conjugation of the antioxidant molecule, glutathione to reactive cysteines inhibits the activity of inhibitory kappa B kinase beta (IKKβ), among other NF-κB proteins. Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP) is an enzyme that has been shown to catalyze protein S-glutathionylation (PSSG) under conditions of oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to determine whether GSTP regulates NF-κB signaling, S-glutathionylation of IKK, and subsequent pro-inflammatory signaling. We demonstrated that, in unstimulated cells, GSTP associated with the inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBα. However, exposure to LPS resulted in a rapid loss of association between IκBα and GSTP, and instead led to a protracted association between IKKβ and GSTP. LPS exposure also led to increases in the S-glutathionylation of IKKβ. SiRNA-mediated knockdown of GSTP decreased IKKβ-SSG, and enhanced NF-κB nuclear translocation, transcriptional activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TLK117, an isotype-selective inhibitor of GSTP, also enhanced LPS-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, suggesting that the catalytic activity of GSTP is important in repressing NF-κB activation. Expression of both wild-type and catalytically-inactive Y7F mutant GSTP significantly attenuated LPS- or IKKβ-induced production of GM-CSF. These studies indicate a complex role for GSTP in modulating NF-κB, which may involve S-glutathionylation of IKK proteins, and interaction with NF-κB family members. Our findings suggest that targeting GSTP is a potential avenue for regulating the activity of this prominent pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory transcription factor. PMID:27058114

  2. Depletion of Neutrophils Exacerbates the Early Inflammatory Immune Response in Lungs of Mice Infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Damaris; Urán-Jiménez, Martha Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils predominate during the acute phase of the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. Herein, we determined the role of the neutrophil during the early stages of experimental pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis using a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for neutrophils. Male BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with 1.5 × 106 or 2 × 106 P. brasiliensis yeast cells. The mAb was administered 24 h before infection, followed by doses every 48 h until mice were sacrificed. Survival time was evaluated and mice were sacrificed at 48 h and 96 h after inoculation to assess cellularity, fungal load, cytokine/chemokine levels, and histopathological analysis. Neutrophils from mAb-treated mice were efficiently depleted (99.04%). Eighty percent of the mice treated with the mAb and infected with 1.5 × 106 yeast cells died during the first two weeks after infection. When mice were treated and infected with 2 × 106 yeast cells, 100% of them succumbed by the first week after infection. During the acute inflammatory response significant increases in numbers of eosinophils, fungal load and levels of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines were observed in the mAb-treated mice. We also confirmed that neutrophils are an important source of IFN-γ and IL-17. These results indicate that neutrophils are essential for protection as well as being important for regulating the early inflammatory immune response in experimental pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:27642235

  3. Source apportionment of Beijing air pollution during a severe winter haze event and associated pro-inflammatory responses in lung epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingyang; Baumgartner, Jill; Zhang, Yuanxun; Schauer, James J.

    2016-02-01

    Air pollution is a leading risk factor for the disease burden in China and globally. Few epidemiologic studies have characterized the particulate matter (PM) components and sources that are most responsible for adverse health outcomes, particularly in developing countries. In January 2013, a severe haze event occurred over 25 days in urban Beijing, China. Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected at a central urban site in Beijing from January 16-31, 2013. We analyzed the samples for water soluble ions, metals, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and individual organic molecular markers including n-alkanes, hopanes, PAHs and sterols. Chemical components were used to quantify the source contributions to PM2.5 using the chemical mass balance (CMB) model by the conversion of the OC estimates combined with inorganic secondary components (e.g. NH4+, SO42-, NO3-). Water extracts of PM were exposed to lung epithelial cells, and supernatants recovered from cell cultures were assayed for the pro-inflammatory cytokines by a quantitative ELLSA method. Linear regression models were used to estimate the associations between PM sources and components with pro-inflammatory responses in lung epithelial cells following 24-hrs and 48-hrs of exposure. The largest contributors to PM2.5 during the monitoring period were inorganic secondary ions (53.2% and 54.0% on haze and non-haze days, respectively). Other organic matter (OM) contributed to a larger proportion of PM2.5 during haze days (16.9%) compared with non-haze days (12.9%), and coal combustion accounted for 10.9% and 8.7% on haze and non-haze days, respectively. We found PM2.5 mass and specific sources (e.g. coal combustion, traffic emission, dust, other OM, and inorganic secondary ions) were highly associated with inflammatory responses of lung epithelial cells. Our results showed greater responses in the exposure to 48-hr PM2.5 mass and its sources compared to 24-hr PM exposure, and that secondary and coal

  4. In Mice, Tuberculosis Progression Is Associated with Intensive Inflammatory Response and the Accumulation of Gr-1dim Cells in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Lyadova, Irina V.; Tsiganov, Evgeny N.; Kapina, Marina A.; Shepelkova, Galena S.; Sosunov, Vasily V.; Radaeva, Tatiana V.; Majorov, Konstantin B.; Shmitova, Natalya S.; van den Ham, Henk-Jan; Ganusov, Vitaly V.; De Boer, Rob J.; Racine, Rachael; Winslow, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) results in different clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic containment to rapidly progressing tuberculosis (TB). The mechanisms controlling TB progression in immunologically-competent hosts remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings To address these mechanisms, we analyzed TB progression in a panel of genetically heterogeneous (A/SnxI/St) F2 mice, originating from TB-highly-susceptible I/St and more resistant A/Sn mice. In F2 mice the rates of TB progression differed. In mice that did not reach terminal stage of infection, TB progression did not correlate with lung Mtb loads. Nor was TB progression correlated with lung expression of factors involved in antibacterial immunity, such as iNOS, IFN-γ, or IL-12p40. The major characteristics of progressing TB was high lung expression of the inflammation-related factors IL-1β, IL-6, IL-11 (p<0.0003); CCL3, CCL4, CXCL2 (p<0.002); MMP-8 (p<0.0001). The major predictors of TB progression were high expressions of IL-1β and IL-11. TNF-α had both protective and harmful effects. Factors associated with TB progression were expressed mainly by macrophages (F4-80+ cells) and granulocytes (Gr-1hi/Ly-6Ghi cells). Macrophages and granulocytes from I/St and A/Sn parental strains exhibited intrinsic differences in the expression of inflammatory factors, suggesting that genetically determined peculiarities of phagocytes transcriptional response could account for the peculiarities of gene expression in the infected lungs. Another characteristic feature of progressing TB was the accumulation in the infected lungs of Gr-1dim cells that could contribute to TB progression. Conclusions/Significance In a population of immunocompetent hosts, the outcome of TB depends on quantitatively- and genetically-controlled differences in the intensity of inflammatory responses, rather than being a direct consequence of mycobacterial colonization. Local accumulation of Gr-1dim cells is

  5. Short-term cigarette smoke exposure induces reversible changes in energy metabolism and cellular redox status independent of inflammatory responses in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit R; Zhao, Liqin; Sancheti, Harsh; Sundar, Isaac K; Rahman, Irfan; Cadenas, Enrique

    2012-11-15

    Cigarette smoking leads to alteration in cellular redox status, a hallmark in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study examines the role of cigarette smoke (CS) exposure in the impairment of energy metabolism and, consequently, mitochondrial dysfunction. Male A/J mice were exposed to CS generated by a smoking machine for 4 or 8 wk. A recovery group was exposed to CS for 8 wk and allowed to recover for 2 wk. Acute CS exposure altered lung glucose metabolism, entailing a decrease in the rate of glycolysis and an increase in the pentose phosphate pathway, as evidenced by altered expression and activity of GAPDH and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, respectively. Impairment of GAPDH was found to be due to glutathionylation of its catalytic site cysteines. Metabolic changes were associated with changes in cellular and mitochondrial redox status, assessed in terms of pyridine nucleotides and glutathione. CS exposure elicited an upregulation of the expression of complexes II, III, IV, and V and of the activity of complexes II, IV, and V. Microarray analysis of gene expression in mouse lungs after exposure to CS for 8 wk revealed upregulation of a group of genes involved in metabolism, electron transfer chain, oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial transport and dynamics, and redox regulation. These changes occurred independently of inflammatory responses. These findings have implications for the early onset of alterations in energy and redox metabolism upon acute lung exposure to CS.

  6. Type 1 Interferons Suppress Accelerated Osteoclastogenesis and Prevent Loss of Bone Mass During Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Pneumocystis Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilkison, Michelle; Gauss, Katherine; Ran, Yanchao; Searles, Steve; Taylor, David; Meissner, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    HIV infection causes loss of CD4+ T cells and type 1 interferon (IFN)–producing and IFN-responsive dendritic cells, resulting in immunodeficiencies and susceptibility to opportunistic infections, such as Pneumocystis. Osteoporosis and bone marrow failure are additional unexplained complications in HIV-positive patients and patients with AIDS, respectively. We recently demonstrated that mice that lack lymphocytes and IFN a/b receptor (IFrag−/−) develop bone marrow failure after Pneumocystis lung infection, whereas lymphocyte-deficient, IFN α/β receptor–competent mice (RAG−/−) had normal hematopoiesis. Interestingly, infected IFrag−/− mice also exhibited bone fragility, suggesting loss of bone mass. We quantified bone changes and evaluated the potential connection between progressing bone fragility and bone marrow failure after Pneumocystis lung infection in IFrag−/− mice. We found that Pneumocystis infection accelerated osteoclastogenesis as bone marrow failure progressed. This finding was consistent with induction of osteoclastogenic factors, including receptor-activated nuclear factor-κB ligand and the proapoptotic factor tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand, in conjunction with their shared decoy receptor osteoprotegerin, in the bone marrow of infected IFrag−/− mice. Deregulation of this axis has also been observed in HIV-positive individuals. Biphosphonate treatment of IFrag−/− mice prevented bone loss and protected loss of hematopoietic precursor cells that maintained activity in vitro but did not prevent loss of mature neutrophils. Together, these data show that bone loss and bone marrow failure are partially linked, which suggests that the deregulation of the receptor-activated nuclear factor-κB ligand/osteoprotegerin/tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand axis may connect the two phenotypes in our model. PMID:22626807

  7. All the "RAGE" in lung disease: The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a major mediator of pulmonary inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Oczypok, Elizabeth A; Perkins, Timothy N; Oury, Tim D

    2017-06-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a pro-inflammatory pattern recognition receptor (PRR) that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous inflammatory diseases. It was discovered in 1992 on endothelial cells and was named for its ability to bind advanced glycation endproducts and promote vascular inflammation in the vessels of patients with diabetes. Further studies revealed that RAGE is most highly expressed in lung tissue and spurred numerous explorations into RAGE's role in the lung. These studies have found that RAGE is an important mediator in allergic airway inflammation (AAI) and asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute lung injury, pneumonia, cystic fibrosis, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. RAGE has not yet been targeted in the lungs of paediatric or adult clinical populations, but the development of new ways to inhibit RAGE is setting the stage for the emergence of novel therapeutic agents for patients suffering from these pulmonary conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Reduction in (pro-)inflammatory responses of lung cells exposed in vitro to diesel exhaust treated with a non-catalyzed diesel particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Sandro; Czerwinski, Jan; Comte, Pierre; Müller, Loretta L.; Heeb, Norbert V.; Mayer, Andreas; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly stringent regulation of particulate matter emissions from diesel vehicles has led to the widespread use of diesel particle filters (DPFs), the effect of which on exhaust toxicity is so far poorly understood. We exposed a cellular model of the human respiratory epithelium at the air-liquid interface to non-catalyzed wall-flow DPF-filtered diesel exhaust and compared the resulting biological responses to the ones observed upon exposure to unfiltered exhaust. Filtered diesel exhaust acted highly oxidative, even though to a lesser extent than unfiltered exhaust (quantification of total reduced glutathione), and both exhaust types triggered comparable responses to oxidative stress (measurement of heme-oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) and superoxide-dismutase (SOD1) gene expression). Further, diesel exhaust filtration significantly reduced pro-inflammatory responses (measurement of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene expression and quantification of the secretion of their gene products TNF-α and IL-8). Because inflammatory processes are central to the onset of adverse respiratory health effects caused by diesel exhaust inhalation, our results imply that DPFs may make a valuable contribution to the detoxification of diesel vehicle emissions. The induction of significant oxidative stress by filtered diesel exhaust however, also implies that the non-particulate exhaust components also need to be considered for lung cell risk assessment.

  9. Differences in allergic inflammatory responses between urban PM2.5 and fine particle derived from desert-dust in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Ichinose, Takamichi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Seiichi; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa; Sun, Guifan; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2016-04-15

    The biological and chemical natures of materials adsorbed onto fine particulate matter (PM2.5) vary by origin and passage routes. The exacerbating effects of the two samples-urban PM2.5 (U-PM2.5) collected during the hazy weather in a Chinese city and fine particles (ASD-PM2.5) collected during Asian sand dust (ASD) storm event days in Japan-on murine lung eosinophilia were compared to clarify the role of toxic materials in PM2.5. The amounts of β-glucan and mineral components were higher in ASD-PM2.5 than in U-PM2.5. On the other hand, organic chemicals, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were higher in U-PM2.5 than in ASD-PM2.5. When BALB/c mice were intratracheally instilled with U-PM2.5 and ASD-PM2.5 (total 0.4 mg/mouse) with or without ovalbumin (OVA), various biological effects were observed, including enhancement of eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the submucosa of the airway, goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium, synergic increase of OVA-induced eosinophil-relevant cytokines and a chemokine in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and increase of serum OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE. Data demonstrate that U-PM2.5 and ASD-PM2.5 induced allergic inflammatory changes and caused lung pathology. U-PM2.5 and ASD-PM2.5 increased F4/80(+) CD11b(+) cells, indicating that an influx of inflammatory and exudative macrophages in lung tissue had occurred. The ratio of CD206 positive F4/80(+) CD11b(+) cells (M2 macrophages) in lung tissue was higher in the OVA+ASD-PM2.5 treated mice than in the OVA+U-PM2.5 treated mice. These results suggest that the lung eosinophilia exacerbated by both PM2.5 is due to activation of a Th2-associated immune response along with induced M2 macrophages and the exacerbating effect is greater in microbial element (β-glucan)-rich ASD-PM2.5 than in organic chemical-rich U-PM2.5.

  10. Complement facilitates macrophage phagocytosis of inhaled iron particles but has little effect in mediating silica-induced lung inflammatory and clearance responses

    SciTech Connect

    Warheit, D.B.; Carakostas, M.C.; Bamberger, J.R.; Hartsky, M.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The present studies were undertaken to investigate the role of complement in mediating pulmonary inflammation and/or phagocytosis as a function of particle clearance in rats exposed to silica or carbonyl iron (CI) particles. Both particle types were shown to be weak activators of serum complement in vitro. In these studies, normal and complement-depressed (CVFD-treated) rats were exposed to aerosols of Ci or silica particles for 6 hr at 100 mg/m{sup 3}. Following exposure, alveolar fluids and cells from sham and dust-exposed animals were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at several time periods postexposure and measured for a variety of biochemical and cellular indices. In addition, pulmonary macrophages were cultured and studied for morphology and phagocytosis. The authors results showed that CI exposure did not produce cellular or biochemical indices of pulmonary inflammation, either in normal or complement-depleted rats. However, fewer phagocytic macrophages were recovered from the lungs of CVF-treated, CI-exposed rats than from normal exposed animals. In contrast, silica inhalation produced a sustained PMN inflammatory response in the lungs of exposed rats, measured up through 1 month postexposure, along with significant increases in BAL fluid levels of LDH, protein, and alkaline phosphatase and deficits in pulmonary macrophage phagocytic functions.

  11. The sterile inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kenneth L; Latz, Eicke; Ontiveros, Fernando; Kono, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    The acute inflammatory response is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it plays a key role in initial host defense, particularly against many infections. On the other hand, its aim is imprecise, and as a consequence, when it is drawn into battle, it can cause collateral damage in tissues. In situations where the inciting stimulus is sterile, the cost-benefit ratio may be high; because of this, sterile inflammation underlies the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. Although there have been major advances in our understanding of how microbes trigger inflammation, much less has been learned about this process in sterile situations. This review focuses on a subset of the many sterile stimuli that can induce inflammation-specifically dead cells and a variety of irritant particles, including crystals, minerals, and protein aggregates. Although this subset of stimuli is structurally very diverse and might appear to be unrelated, there is accumulating evidence that the innate immune system may recognize them in similar ways and stimulate the sterile inflammatory response via common pathways. Here we review established and emerging data about these responses.

  12. IN VITRO LUNG ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS - MODULATION BY EXPOSURE TO TNF-ALPHA, IL-BETA, OR IFN-GAMMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO LUNG ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS - MODULATION BY EXPOSURE TO TNF , IL-1 , OR IFN .

    JA Dye, KE Peoples*, CL Hayes?. US EPA, ORD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, RTP, NC, *HHMI-SRI, NCSU, Raleigh, NC...

  13. IN VITRO LUNG ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS - MODULATION BY EXPOSURE TO TNF-ALPHA, IL-BETA, OR IFN-GAMMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO LUNG ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS - MODULATION BY EXPOSURE TO TNF , IL-1 , OR IFN .

    JA Dye, KE Peoples*, CL Hayes?. US EPA, ORD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, RTP, NC, *HHMI-SRI, NCSU, Raleigh, NC...

  14. Matrix Metalloproteinase Mmp-1a Is Dispensable for Normal Growth and Fertility in Mice and Promotes Lung Cancer Progression by Modulating Inflammatory Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Fanjul-Fernández, Miriam; Folgueras, Alicia R.; Fueyo, Antonio; Balbín, Milagros; Suárez, María F.; Fernández-García, M. Soledad; Shapiro, Steven D.; Freije, José M. P.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Human MMP-1 is a matrix metalloproteinase repeatedly associated with many pathological conditions, including cancer. Thus, MMP1 overexpression is a poor prognosis marker in a variety of advanced cancers, including colorectal, breast, and lung carcinomas. Moreover, MMP-1 plays a key role in the metastatic behavior of melanoma, breast, and prostate cancer cells. However, functional and mechanistic studies on the relevance of MMP-1 in cancer have been hampered by the absence of an in vivo model. In this work, we have generated mice deficient in Mmp1a, the murine ortholog of human MMP1. Mmp1a−/− mice are viable and fertile and do not exhibit obvious abnormalities, which has facilitated studies of cancer susceptibility. These studies have shown a decreased susceptibility to develop lung carcinomas induced by chemical carcinogens in Mmp1a−/− mice. Histopathological analysis indicated that tumors generated in Mmp1a−/− mice are smaller than those of wild-type mice, consistently with the idea that the absence of Mmp-1a hampers tumor progression. Proteomic analysis revealed decreased levels of chitinase-3-like 3 and accumulation of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products and its ligand S100A8 in lung samples from Mmp1a−/− mice compared with those from wild-type. These findings suggest that Mmp-1a could play a role in tumor progression by modulating the polarization of a Th1/Th2 inflammatory response to chemical carcinogens. On the basis of these results, we propose that Mmp1a knock-out mice provide an excellent in vivo model for the functional analysis of human MMP-1 in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:23548910

  15. MWCNTs of different physicochemical properties cause similar inflammatory responses, but differences in transcriptional and histological markers of fibrosis in mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.; Williams, Andrew; Andersen, Ole; Købler, Carsten; Atluri, Rambabu; Pozzebon, Maria E.; Mucelli, Stefano P.; Simion, Monica; Rickerby, David; Mortensen, Alicja; Jackson, Petra; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; and others

    2015-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are an inhomogeneous group of nanomaterials that vary in lengths, shapes and types of metal contamination, which makes hazard evaluation difficult. Here we present a toxicogenomic analysis of female C57BL/6 mouse lungs following a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162 μg/mouse of a small, curled (CNT{sub Small}, 0.8 ± 0.1 μm in length) or large, thick MWCNT (CNT{sub Large}, 4 ± 0.4 μm in length). The two MWCNTs were extensively characterized by SEM and TEM imaging, thermogravimetric analysis, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Lung tissues were harvested 24 h, 3 days and 28 days post-exposure. DNA microarrays were used to analyze gene expression, in parallel with analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lung histology, DNA damage (comet assay) and the presence of reactive oxygen species (dichlorodihydrofluorescein assay), to profile and characterize related pulmonary endpoints. Overall changes in global transcription following exposure to CNT{sub Small} or CNT{sub Large} were similar. Both MWCNTs elicited strong acute phase and inflammatory responses that peaked at day 3, persisted up to 28 days, and were characterized by increased cellular influx in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, interstitial pneumonia and gene expression changes. However, CNT{sub Large} elicited an earlier onset of inflammation and DNA damage, and induced more fibrosis and a unique fibrotic gene expression signature at day 28, compared to CNT{sub Small}. The results indicate that the extent of change at the molecular level during early response phases following an acute exposure is greater in mice exposed to CNT{sub Large}, which may eventually lead to the different responses observed at day 28. - Highlights: • We evaluate the toxicogenomic response in mice following MWCNT instillation. • Two MWCNTs of different properties were examined and thoroughly characterized. • MWCNT exposure leads to increased pulmonary

  16. Casticin, an active compound isolated from Vitex Fructus, ameliorates the cigarette smoke-induced acute lung inflammatory response in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeonhoon; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hangyul; Park, Soojin; Choi, Woosung; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine of the effect of casticin, as an anti-inflammatory agent, on an acute lung inflammation in vivo model established through exposure to cigarette smoke (CS). Casticin is a phytochemical from Vitex species such as Vitex rotundifolia and Vitex agnus-castus that was recently shown to exert an anti-inflammatory effect in vivo. To demonstrate the effects of casticin, C57BL/6 mice were whole-body exposed to mainstream CS or fresh air for two weeks and treated with 1, 2, and 10mg/kg casticin via an i.p. injection. Immune cell infiltrations and cytokine productions were assessed from bronchoalveolar lavage Fluid (BALF), and lung histological analysis was performed. Treatment with casticin was observed to significantly inhibit the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes and reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the BALF. In addition, casticin significantly decreased the infiltration of peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cells and the epithelium thickness. The results of this study indicate that casticin has significant effects on the lung inflammation induced by CS in a mouse model. According to these outcomes, casticin may have therapeutic potential in inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  17. Mycobacterium terrae isolated from indoor air of a moisture-damaged building induces sustained biphasic inflammatory response in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Juha; Komulainen, Hannu; Huttunen, Kati; Roponen, Marjut; Iivanainen, Eila; Torkko, Pirjo; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Pelkonen, Jukka; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2002-11-01

    Occupants in moisture-damaged buildings suffer frequently from respiratory symptoms. This may be partly due to the presence of abnormal microbial growth or the altered microbial flora in the damaged buildings. However, the specific effects of the microbes on respiratory health and the way they provoke clinical manifestations are poorly understood. In the present study, we exposed mice via intratracheal instillation to a single dose of Mycobacterium terrae isolated from the indoor air of a moisture-damaged building (1 X 10(7), 5 X 10(7), or 1 X 10(8) microbes). Inflammation and toxicity in lungs were evaluated 2 hr later. The time course of the effects was assessed with the dose of 1 X 10(8) bacterial cells for up to 28 days. M. terrae caused a sustained biphasic inflammation in mouse lungs. The characteristic features for the first phase, which lasted from 6 hr to 3 days, were elevated proinflammatory cytokine [i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)] levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). TNF-alpha was produced in the lungs more intensively than was IL-6. Neutrophils were the most abundant cells in the airways during the first phase, although their numbers in BALF remained elevated up to 21 days. The characteristics of the second phase, which lasted from 7 to 28 days, were elevated TNF-alpha levels in BALF, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in BAL cells, and recruitment of mononuclear cells such as lymphocytes and macrophages into the airways. Moreover, total protein, albumin, and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations were elevated in both phases in BALF. The bacteria were detected in lungs up to 28 days. In summary, these observations indicate that M. terrae is capable of provoking a sustained, biphasic inflammation in mouse lungs and can cause a moderate degree of cytotoxicity. Thus, M. terrae can be considered a species with potential to adversely affect the health of the occupants of moisture

  18. Plant Proteinase Inhibitor BbCI Modulates Lung Inflammatory Responses and Mechanic and Remodeling Alterations Induced by Elastase in Mice.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Theodoro-Junior, Osmar A; Oliveira, Bruno T M; Oliva, Leandro V; Toledo-Arruda, Alessandra C; Bonturi, Camila R; Brito, Marlon V; Lopes, Fernanda D T Q S; Prado, Carla M; Florencio, Ariana C; Martins, Mílton A; Owen, Caroline A; Leick, Edna A; Oliva, Maria L V; Tibério, Iolanda F L C

    2017-01-01

    Background. Proteinases play a key role in emphysema. Bauhinia bauhinioides cruzipain inhibitor (BbCI) is a serine-cysteine proteinase inhibitor. We evaluated BbCI treatment in elastase-induced pulmonary alterations. Methods.  C57BL/6 mice received intratracheal elastase (ELA group) or saline (SAL group). One group of mice was treated with BbCI (days 1, 15, and 21 after elastase instillation, ELABC group). Controls received saline and BbCI (SALBC group). After 28 days, we evaluated respiratory mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In lung tissue we measured airspace enlargement, quantified neutrophils, TNFα-, MMP-9-, MMP-12-, TIMP-1-, iNOS-, and eNOS-positive cells, 8-iso-PGF2α, collagen, and elastic fibers in alveolar septa and airways. MUC-5-positive cells were quantified only in airways. Results. BbCI reduced elastase-induced changes in pulmonary mechanics, airspace enlargement and elastase-induced increases in total cells, and neutrophils in BALF. BbCI reduced macrophages and neutrophils positive cells in alveolar septa and neutrophils and TNFα-positive cells in airways. BbCI attenuated elastic and collagen fibers, MMP-9- and MMP-12-positive cells, and isoprostane and iNOS-positive cells in alveolar septa and airways. BbCI reduced MUC5ac-positive cells in airways. Conclusions. BbCI improved lung mechanics and reduced lung inflammation and airspace enlargement and increased oxidative stress levels induced by elastase. BbCI may have therapeutic potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  19. Plant Proteinase Inhibitor BbCI Modulates Lung Inflammatory Responses and Mechanic and Remodeling Alterations Induced by Elastase in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Theodoro-Junior, Osmar A.; Oliveira, Bruno T. M.; Oliva, Leandro V.; Toledo-Arruda, Alessandra C.; Bonturi, Camila R.; Brito, Marlon V.; Prado, Carla M.; Florencio, Ariana C.; Martins, Mílton A.; Owen, Caroline A.; Oliva, Maria L. V.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Proteinases play a key role in emphysema. Bauhinia bauhinioides cruzipain inhibitor (BbCI) is a serine-cysteine proteinase inhibitor. We evaluated BbCI treatment in elastase-induced pulmonary alterations. Methods.  C57BL/6 mice received intratracheal elastase (ELA group) or saline (SAL group). One group of mice was treated with BbCI (days 1, 15, and 21 after elastase instillation, ELABC group). Controls received saline and BbCI (SALBC group). After 28 days, we evaluated respiratory mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In lung tissue we measured airspace enlargement, quantified neutrophils, TNFα-, MMP-9-, MMP-12-, TIMP-1-, iNOS-, and eNOS-positive cells, 8-iso-PGF2α, collagen, and elastic fibers in alveolar septa and airways. MUC-5-positive cells were quantified only in airways. Results. BbCI reduced elastase-induced changes in pulmonary mechanics, airspace enlargement and elastase-induced increases in total cells, and neutrophils in BALF. BbCI reduced macrophages and neutrophils positive cells in alveolar septa and neutrophils and TNFα-positive cells in airways. BbCI attenuated elastic and collagen fibers, MMP-9- and MMP-12-positive cells, and isoprostane and iNOS-positive cells in alveolar septa and airways. BbCI reduced MUC5ac-positive cells in airways. Conclusions. BbCI improved lung mechanics and reduced lung inflammation and airspace enlargement and increased oxidative stress levels induced by elastase. BbCI may have therapeutic potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:28466019

  20. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce an adaptive inflammatory response and invasion and proliferation of lung epithelial cells in chorioallantoic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Medina-Reyes, Estefany I.; Déciga-Alcaraz, Alejandro; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L.; Flores-Flores, José O.; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; García-Cuéllar, Claudia M.; and others

    2015-01-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2} NPs) studies have been performed using relatively high NPs concentration under acute exposure and limited studies have compared shape effects. We hypothesized that midterm exposure to low TiO{sub 2} NPs concentration in lung epithelial cells induces carcinogenic characteristics modulated partially by NPs shape. To test our hypothesis we synthesized NPs shaped as belts (TiO{sub 2}-B) using TiO{sub 2} spheres (TiO{sub 2}-SP) purchased from Sigma Aldrich Co. Then, lung epithelial A549 cells were low-exposed (10 µg/cm{sup 2}) to both shapes during 7 days and internalization, cytokine release and invasive potential were determined. Results showed greater TiO{sub 2}-B effect on agglomerates size, cell size and granularity than TiO{sub 2}-SP. Agglomerates size in cell culture medium was 310 nm and 454 nm for TiO{sub 2}-SP and TiO{sub 2}-B, respectively; TiO{sub 2}-SP and TiO{sub 2}-B induced 23% and 70% cell size decrease, respectively, whilst TiO{sub 2}-SP and TiO{sub 2}-B induced 7 and 14-fold of granularity increase. NO{sub x} production was down-regulated (31%) by TiO{sub 2}-SP and up-regulated (70%) by TiO{sub 2}-B. Both NPs induced a transient cytokine release (IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) after 4 days, but cytokines returned to basal levels in TiO{sub 2}-SP exposed cells while TiO{sub 2}-B induced a down-regulation after 7 days. Midterm exposure to both shapes of NPs induced capability to degrade cellular extracellular matrix components from chorioallantoic membrane and Ki-67 marker showed that TiO{sub 2}-B had higher proliferative potential than TiO{sub 2}-SP. We conclude that midterm exposure to low NPs concentration of NPs has an impact in the acquisition of new characteristics of exposed cells and NPs shape influences cellular outcome. - Graphical abstract: (A) Lung epithelial cells were low exposed (below 10 µg/cm{sup 2}) to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2}-NPs) shaped as spheres (TiO{sub 2

  1. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce an adaptive inflammatory response and invasion and proliferation of lung epithelial cells in chorioallantoic membrane.

    PubMed

    Medina-Reyes, Estefany I; Déciga-Alcaraz, Alejandro; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L; Flores-Flores, José O; Gutiérrez-López, Gustavo F; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; García-Cuéllar, Claudia M; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) studies have been performed using relatively high NPs concentration under acute exposure and limited studies have compared shape effects. We hypothesized that midterm exposure to low TiO2 NPs concentration in lung epithelial cells induces carcinogenic characteristics modulated partially by NPs shape. To test our hypothesis we synthesized NPs shaped as belts (TiO2-B) using TiO2 spheres (TiO2-SP) purchased from Sigma Aldrich Co. Then, lung epithelial A549 cells were low-exposed (10 µg/cm(2)) to both shapes during 7 days and internalization, cytokine release and invasive potential were determined. Results showed greater TiO2-B effect on agglomerates size, cell size and granularity than TiO2-SP. Agglomerates size in cell culture medium was 310 nm and 454 nm for TiO2-SP and TiO2-B, respectively; TiO2-SP and TiO2-B induced 23% and 70% cell size decrease, respectively, whilst TiO2-SP and TiO2-B induced 7 and 14-fold of granularity increase. NOx production was down-regulated (31%) by TiO2-SP and up-regulated (70%) by TiO2-B. Both NPs induced a transient cytokine release (IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) after 4 days, but cytokines returned to basal levels in TiO2-SP exposed cells while TiO2-B induced a down-regulation after 7 days. Midterm exposure to both shapes of NPs induced capability to degrade cellular extracellular matrix components from chorioallantoic membrane and Ki-67 marker showed that TiO2-B had higher proliferative potential than TiO2-SP. We conclude that midterm exposure to low NPs concentration of NPs has an impact in the acquisition of new characteristics of exposed cells and NPs shape influences cellular outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sarcandra glabra combined with lycopene protect rats from lipopolysaccharide induced acute lung injury via reducing inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Yin; Chen, Shi-Biao

    2016-12-01

    Sarcandra glabra (Chinese name, Zhongjiefeng) is an important herb widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. Lycopene has been shown to be a powerful antioxidant. This study aims to test the hypothesis that Sarcandra glabra combined with lycopene protect rats from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI). Metabolomics approach combined with pathological inspection, serum biochemistry examination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting were used to explore the protective effects of Sarcandra glabra and lycopene on LPS-induced ALI, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Results showed that Sarcandra glabra and lycopene could significantly ameliorate LPS-induced histopathological injuries, improve the anti-oxidative activities of rats, decrease the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, suppress the activations of MAPK and transcription factor NF-κB and reverse the disturbed metabolism towards the normal status. Taken together, this integrated study revealed that Sarcandra glabra combined with lycopene had great potential in protecting rats from LPS-induced ALI, which would be helpful to guide the clinical medication.

  3. DIESEL PARTICLE INSTILLATION ENHANCES INFLAMMATORY AND NEUROTROPHIN RESPONSES IN THE LUNGS OF ALLERGIC BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airways resistance and inflammation. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airways resistance associated with the allergen-specific airways responses in mice. ...

  4. DIESEL PARTICLE INSTILLATION ENHANCES INFLAMMATORY AND NEUROTROPHIN RESPONSES IN THE LUNGS OF ALLERGIC BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airways resistance and inflammation. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airways resistance associated with the allergen-specific airways responses in mice. ...

  5. Phosphatidic acid signaling mediates lung cytokine expression and lung inflammatory injury after hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Bursten, S; Shenkar, R; Allbee, J; Tuder, R; Woodson, P; Guidot, D M; Rice, G; Singer, J W; Repine, J E

    1995-02-01

    Because phosphatidic acid (PA) pathway signaling may mediate many basic reactions involving cytokine-dependent responses, we investigated the effects of CT1501R, a functional inhibitor of the enzyme lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT) which converts lysophosphatidic acid (Lyso-PA) to PA. We found that CT1501R treatment not only prevented hypoxia-induced PA increases and lyso-PA consumption in human neutrophils, but also prevented neutrophil chemotaxis and adherence in vitro, and lung injury and lung neutrophil accumulation in mice subjected to hemorrhage and resuscitation. In addition, CT1501R treatment prevented increases in mRNA levels and protein production of a variety of proinflammatory cytokines in multiple lung cell populations after blood loss and resuscitation. Our results indicate the fundamental role of PA metabolism in the development of acute inflammatory lung injury after blood loss.

  6. Lung Ischemia Reperfusion (IR) is a Sterile Inflammatory Process influenced by Commensal Microbiota in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Arun; Sundar, Shirin V.; Zhu, Ying-gang; Tran, Alphonso; Lee, Jae-Woo; Lowell, Clifford; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung ischemia reperfusion (IR) complicates numerous clinical processes, such as cardiac arrest, transplantation, and major trauma. These conditions generate sterile inflammation, which can cause or augment acute lung injury. We previously reported that lung and systemic inflammation in a mouse model of ventilated lung IR depends on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling and the presence of alveolar macrophages. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiome has a role in influencing the inflammatory response to lung IR. Methods Lung IR was created in intubated mechanically ventilated mice via reversible left pulmonary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Inflammatory markers and histology were tracked over varying periods of reperfusion (from 1h to 24h). Separate groups of mice were given intestinally-localized antibiotics for 8-10 weeks, and then were subjected to left lung IR and analysis of lungs and plasma for markers of inflammation. Alveolar macrophages from antibiotic-treated or control mice were tested ex vivo for inflammatory responses to bacterial TLR agonists, namely LPS and Pam3Cys. Results Inflammation generated by left lung IR was rapid in onset and dissipated within 12-24h. Treatment of mice with intestinally localized antibiotics was associated with a marked attenuation of circulating and lung inflammatory markers, and histologic evidence of infiltrating cells and edema in the lung following IR. Alveolar macrophages from antibiotic-treated mice produced less cytokines ex vivo when stimulated with TLR agonists as compared to those from control mice. Conclusions Our data indicate that the inflammatory response induced by lung IR is transient and is strongly influenced by intestinal microbiota. These data suggest that the intestinal microbiome could potentially be manipulated to attenuate the post-IR pulmonary inflammatory response. PMID:26196836

  7. Ginkgo biloba extracts attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in acute lung injury by inhibiting the COX-2 and NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Chen, Nan; Ma, Chun-Hua; Tao, Jing; Bao, Jian-An; Zong-Qi, Cheng; Chen, Zu-Tao; Miao, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the role of Ginkgo biloba extract in lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS. G. biloba extract (12 and 24 mg·kg(-1)) and dexamethasone (2 mg·kg(-1)), as a positive control, were given by i.p. injection. The cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted. The degree of animal lung edema was evaluated by measuring the wet/dry weight ratio. The superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were assayed by SOD and MPO kits, respectively. The levels of inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor-a, interleukin-1b, and interleukin-6, were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pathological changes of lung tissues were observed by H&E staining. The levels of NF-κB p65 and COX-2 expression were detected by Western blotting. Compared to the LPS group, the treatment with the G. biloba extract at 12 and 24 mg·kg(-1) markedly attenuated the inflammatory cell numbers in the BALF, decreased NF-κB p65 and COX-2 expression, and improved SOD activity, and inhibited MPO activity. The histological changes of the lungs were also significantly improved. The results indicated that G. biloba extract has a protective effect on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. The protective mechanism of G. biloba extract may be partly attributed to the inhibition of NF-κB p65 and COX-2 activation.

  8. Genotoxic and inflammatory effects of nanofibrillated cellulose in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Julia; Rydman, Elina; Aimonen, Kukka; Hannukainen, Kati-Susanna; Suhonen, Satu; Vanhala, Esa; Moreno, Carlos; Meyer, Valérie; Perez, Denilson da Silva; Sneck, Asko; Forsström, Ulla; Højgaard, Casper; Willemoes, Martin; Winther, Jacob R; Vogel, Ulla; Wolff, Henrik; Alenius, Harri; Savolainen, Kai M; Norppa, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) is a sustainable and renewable nanomaterial, with diverse potential applications in the paper and medical industries. As NFC consists of long fibres of high aspect ratio, we examined here whether TEMPO-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-oxyl) oxidised NFC (length 300-1000nm, thickness 10-25nm), administrated by a single pharyngeal aspiration, could be genotoxic to mice, locally in the lungs or systemically in the bone marrow. Female C57Bl/6 mice were treated with four different doses of NFC (10, 40, 80 and 200 µg/mouse), and samples were collected 24h later. DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung cells, and chromosome damage by the bone marrow erythrocyte micronucleus assay. Inflammation was evaluated by BAL cell counts and analysis of cytokines and histopathological alterations in the lungs. A significant induction of DNA damage was observed at the two lower doses of NFC in lung cells, whereas no increase was seen in BAL cells. No effect was detected in the bone marrow micronucleus assay, either. NFC increased the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the lungs, together with a dose-dependent increase in mRNA expression of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukins 1β and 6, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5, although there was no effect on the levels of the respective proteins. The histological analysis showed a dose-related accumulation of NFC in the bronchi, the alveoli and some in the cytoplasm of macrophages. In addition, neutrophilic accumulation in the alveolar lung space was observed with increasing dose. Our findings showed that NFC administered by pharyngeal aspiration caused an acute inflammatory response and DNA damage in the lungs, but no systemic genotoxic effect in the bone marrow. The present experimental design did not, however, allow us to determine whether the responses were transient or could persist for a longer time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University

  9. Inflammatory lung disease in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Leoncini, Silvia; Chisci, Glauco; Signorini, Cinzia; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Ginori, Alessandro; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with "high" (39.8%) and "low" (34.8%) patterns dominating over "mixed" (19.6%) and "simple mismatch" (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease.

  10. Inflammatory Lung Disease in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Chisci, Glauco; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with “high” (39.8%) and “low” (34.8%) patterns dominating over “mixed” (19.6%) and “simple mismatch” (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease. PMID:24757286

  11. Inflammatory effects of inhaled sulfur mustard in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Cervelli, Jessica; Anderson, Dana R.; Holmes, Wesley W.; Conti, Michele L.; Gordon, Ronald E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-10-15

    Inhalation of sulfur mustard (SM), a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes severe lung damage, is a significant threat to both military and civilian populations. The mechanisms mediating its cytotoxic effects are unknown and were investigated in the present studies. Male rats Crl:CD(SD) were anesthetized, and then intratracheally intubated and exposed to 0.7-1.4 mg/kg SM by vapor inhalation. Animals were euthanized 6, 24, 48 h or 7 days post-exposure and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue collected. Exposure of rats to SM resulted in rapid pulmonary toxicity, including focal ulceration and detachment of the trachea and bronchial epithelia from underlying mucosa, thickening of alveolar septal walls and increased numbers of inflammatory cells in the tissue. There was also evidence of autophagy and apoptosis in the tissue. This was correlated with increased BAL protein content, a marker of injury to the alveolar epithelial lining. SM exposure also resulted in increased expression of markers of inflammation including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), each of which has been implicated in pulmonary toxicity. Whereas COX-2, TNF{alpha} and iNOS were mainly localized in alveolar regions, MMP-9 was prominent in bronchial epithelium. In contrast, expression of the anti-oxidant hemeoxygenase, and the anti-inflammatory collectin, surfactant protein-D, decreased in the lung after SM exposure. These data demonstrate that SM-induced oxidative stress and injury are associated with the generation of cytotoxic inflammatory proteins which may contribute to the pathogenic response to this vesicant.

  12. Autophagy in pulmonary macrophages mediates lung inflammatory injury via NLRP3 inflammasome activation during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Gongjian; Dull, Randal O; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2014-07-15

    The inflammatory response is a primary mechanism in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process by which cells break down their own components. We explored the role of autophagy in the mechanisms of mechanical ventilation-induced lung inflammatory injury. Mice were subjected to low (7 ml/kg) or high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h. Bone marrow-derived macrophages transfected with a scrambled or autophagy-related protein 5 small interfering RNA were administered to alveolar macrophage-depleted mice via a jugular venous cannula 30 min before the start of the ventilation protocol. In some experiments, mice were ventilated in the absence and presence of autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (15 mg/kg ip) or trichostatin A (1 mg/kg ip). Mechanical ventilation with a high tidal volume caused rapid (within minutes) activation of autophagy in the lung. Conventional transmission electron microscopic examination of lung sections showed that mechanical ventilation-induced autophagy activation mainly occurred in lung macrophages. Autophagy activation in the lungs during mechanical ventilation was dramatically attenuated in alveolar macrophage-depleted mice. Selective silencing of autophagy-related protein 5 in lung macrophages abolished mechanical ventilation-induced nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation and lung inflammatory injury. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also significantly attenuated the inflammatory responses caused by lung hyperinflation. The activation of autophagy in macrophages mediates early lung inflammation during mechanical ventilation via NLRP3 inflammasome signaling. Inhibition of autophagy activation in lung macrophages may therefore provide a novel and promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury.

  13. Advanced age exacerbates the pulmonary inflammatory response after lipopolysaccharide exposure.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Christian R; Hirano, Stefanie; Cutro, Brent T; Birjandi, Shirin; Baila, Horea; Nomellini, Vanessa; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2007-01-01

    The aged population is at a higher risk of mortality as a result of complications of injury or infection, such as acute lung injury. The objective of this study was to analyze pulmonary inflammatory responses in young and aged mice after administration of lipopolysaccharide. Prospective, controlled laboratory study. Animal resource facilities and research laboratory. Young (2-3 months old) and aged (18-20 months old) female BALB/c mice. Animals received intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Control mice received saline alone. After 24 hrs, mice were killed. Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration was assessed histologically and by myeloperoxidase activity. Pulmonary levels of the CXC chemokines, monocyte inflammatory protein-2 and KC, and cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta, were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lungs of aged mice given lipopolysaccharide showed a six-fold higher neutrophil infiltration and three-fold higher level of myeloperoxidase activity than lungs of young mice given lipopolysaccharide. Pulmonary levels of monocyte inflammatory protein-2 and KC were significantly higher in the lungs of aged mice given lipopolysaccharide, compared with younger mice. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta in the lung were analyzed as well. After lipopolysaccharide treatment, there was no difference in the level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in lungs of young and aged animals, but interleukin-1beta was two-fold higher in the lungs of the aged group. These data suggest that at this time point, interleukin-1beta may contribute to the higher production of CXC chemokines observed in lungs of aged mice vs. young mice receiving lipopolysaccharide. The hyperreactive systemic inflammatory response seen in aged individuals after lipopolysaccharide administration is accompanied by an exacerbated pulmonary inflammatory response, which may contribute to the higher mortality

  14. Organic Extracts from African Dust Storms Stimulate Oxidative Stress and Induce Inflammatory Responses in human lung cells through Nrf2 but not NF-kB

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cotto, Rosa I.; Ortiz-Martínez, Mario G.; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio D.

    2015-01-01

    The health impact of the global African dust event (ADE) phenomenon in the Caribbean has been vaguely investigated. Heavy metals in ADE and Non-ADE extracts were evaluated for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant capacity by cells using, deferoxamine mesylate (DF) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Results show that ADE particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) induces ROS and stimulates oxidative stress. Pre-treatment with DF reduces ROS in ADE and Non-ADE extracts and in lung cells demonstrating that heavy metals are of utmost importance. Glutathione-S-transferase and Heme Oxygenase 1 mRNA levels are induced with ADE PM and reduced by DF and NAC. ADE extracts induced Nrf2 activity and IL-8 mRNA levels significantly more than Non-ADE. NF-κB activity was not detected in any sample. Trace elements and organic constituents in ADE PM2.5 enrich the local environment load, inducing ROS formation and activating antioxidant-signaling pathways increasing pro-inflammatory mediator expressions in lung cells. PMID:25769104

  15. Protease-activated receptors and prostaglandins in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Terence; Henry, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family of G protein-coupled receptors. Signalling through PARs typically involves the cleavage of an extracellular region of the receptor by endogenous or exogenous proteases, which reveals a tethered ligand sequence capable of auto-activating the receptor. A considerable body of evidence has emerged over the past 20 years supporting a prominent role for PARs in a variety of human physiological and pathophysiological processes, and thus substantial attention has been directed towards developing drug-like molecules that activate or block PARs via non-proteolytic pathways. PARs are widely expressed within the respiratory tract, and their activation appears to exert significant modulatory influences on the level of bronchomotor tone, as well as on the inflammatory processes associated with a range of respiratory tract disorders. Nevertheless, there is debate as to whether the principal response to PAR activation is an augmentation or attenuation of airways inflammation. In this context, an important action of PAR activators may be to promote the generation and release of prostanoids, such as prostglandin E2, which have well-established anti-inflammatory effects in the lung. In this review, we primarily focus on the relationship between PARs, prostaglandins and inflammatory processes in the lung, and highlight their potential role in selected respiratory tract disorders, including pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article is part of a themed issue on Mediators and Receptors in the Resolution of Inflammation. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19845685

  16. Inflammatory response and extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph; Van Aken, Hugo; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation (EC) frequently develop a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Surgical trauma, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, endotoxaemia and blood contact to nonendothelial circuit compounds promote the activation of coagulation pathways, complement factors and a cellular immune response. This review discusses the multiple pathways leading to endothelial cell activation, neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. All these factors may induce cellular damage and subsequent organ injury. Multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery with EC is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. In addition to the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction after EC, this review deals with different therapeutic interventions aiming to alleviate the inflammatory response and consequently multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Swine influenza H1N1 virus induces acute inflammatory immune responses in pig lungs: a potential animal model for human H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Varun; Krakowka, Steven; Manickam, Cordelia; Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lee, Chang-Won

    2010-11-01

    Pigs are capable of generating reassortant influenza viruses of pandemic potential, as both the avian and mammalian influenza viruses can infect pig epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The source of the current influenza pandemic is H1N1 influenza A virus, possibly of swine origin. This study was conducted to understand better the pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza virus and associated host mucosal immune responses during acute infection in humans. Therefore, we chose a H1N1 swine influenza virus, Sw/OH/24366/07 (SwIV), which has a history of transmission to humans. Clinically, inoculated pigs had nasal discharge and fever and shed virus through nasal secretions. Like pandemic H1N1, SwIV also replicated extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and lung lesions were typical of H1N1 infection. We detected innate, proinflammatory, Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, as well as SwIV-specific IgA antibody in lungs of the virus-inoculated pigs. Production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes was also detected. Higher frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, dendritic cells, activated T cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in SwIV-infected pig lungs. Concomitantly, higher frequencies of the immunosuppressive T regulatory cells were also detected in the virus-infected pig lungs. The findings of this study have relevance to pathogenesis of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in humans; thus, pigs may serve as a useful animal model to design and test effective mucosal vaccines and therapeutics against influenza virus.

  18. Inflammatory Response and Barrier Dysfunction by Different e-Cigarette Flavoring Chemicals Identified by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in e-Liquids and e-Vapors on Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gerloff, Janice; Sundar, Isaac K; Freter, Robert; Sekera, Emily R; Friedman, Alan E; Robinson, Risa; Pagano, Todd; Rahman, Irfan

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that electronic cigarette (e-cig) flavors can be harmful to lung tissue by imposing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. The potential inflammatory response by lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts exposed to e-cig flavoring chemicals in addition to other risk-anticipated flavor enhancers inhaled by e-cig users is not known. The goal of this study was to evaluate the release of the proinflammatory cytokine (interleukin-8 [IL-8]) and epithelial barrier function in response to different e-cig flavoring chemicals identified in various e-cig e-liquid flavorings and vapors by chemical characterization using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Flavorings, such as acetoin (butter), diacetyl, pentanedione, maltol (malt), ortho-vanillin (vanilla), coumarin, and cinnamaldehyde in comparison with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), were used in this study. Human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2B), human mucoepidermoid carcinoma epithelial cells (H292), and human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) were treated with each flavoring chemical for 24 hours. The cells and conditioned media were then collected and analyzed for toxicity (viability %), lung epithelial barrier function, and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 release. Cell viability was not significantly affected by any of the flavoring chemicals tested at a concentration of 10 μM to 1 mM. Acetoin and diacetyl treatment induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells. Acetoin- and pentanedione-treated HFL-1 cells produced a differential, but significant response for IL-8 release compared to controls and TNFα. Flavorings, such as ortho-vanillin and maltol, induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells, but not in H292 cells. Of all the flavoring chemicals tested, acetoin and maltol were more potent inducers of IL-8 release than TNFα in Beas2B and HFL-1 cells. Flavoring chemicals rapidly impaired epithelial barrier function in human bronchial epithelial cells (16-HBE) as measured by electric cell surface

  19. Inflammatory Response and Barrier Dysfunction by Different e-Cigarette Flavoring Chemicals Identified by Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry in e-Liquids and e-Vapors on Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gerloff, Janice; Sundar, Isaac K.; Freter, Robert; Sekera, Emily R.; Friedman, Alan E.; Robinson, Risa; Pagano, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies suggest that electronic cigarette (e-cig) flavors can be harmful to lung tissue by imposing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. The potential inflammatory response by lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts exposed to e-cig flavoring chemicals in addition to other risk-anticipated flavor enhancers inhaled by e-cig users is not known. The goal of this study was to evaluate the release of the proinflammatory cytokine (interleukin-8 [IL-8]) and epithelial barrier function in response to different e-cig flavoring chemicals identified in various e-cig e-liquid flavorings and vapors by chemical characterization using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. Flavorings, such as acetoin (butter), diacetyl, pentanedione, maltol (malt), ortho-vanillin (vanilla), coumarin, and cinnamaldehyde in comparison with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), were used in this study. Human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2B), human mucoepidermoid carcinoma epithelial cells (H292), and human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) were treated with each flavoring chemical for 24 hours. The cells and conditioned media were then collected and analyzed for toxicity (viability %), lung epithelial barrier function, and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 release. Cell viability was not significantly affected by any of the flavoring chemicals tested at a concentration of 10 μM to 1 mM. Acetoin and diacetyl treatment induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells. Acetoin- and pentanedione-treated HFL-1 cells produced a differential, but significant response for IL-8 release compared to controls and TNFα. Flavorings, such as ortho-vanillin and maltol, induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells, but not in H292 cells. Of all the flavoring chemicals tested, acetoin and maltol were more potent inducers of IL-8 release than TNFα in Beas2B and HFL-1 cells. Flavoring chemicals rapidly impaired epithelial barrier function in human bronchial epithelial cells (16-HBE) as measured by electric cell

  20. Modulatory potential of resveratrol during lung inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Vargas, José Eduardo; Souto, André Arigony; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio Condessa; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Porto, Bárbara Nery

    2016-11-01

    Neutrophils are the first cells to achieve the sites of infection or inflammation in the lungs. The massive accumulation of these cells is associated with acute and chronic lung injury. Therefore, they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many lung diseases through the release of reactive oxygen intermediates, proteolytic enzymes and Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). The excessive and continuous release of NETs, fibers composed by decondensed chromatin coated with neutrophil proteins, are associated to the impairment of lung function in different pathological settings. Flavonoids inhibit the respiratory burst of neutrophils in mammals. However, one of these flavonoids, resveratrol has a particular chemical property. It reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I) form with concomitant formation of reactive oxygen species, which can produce DNA breakage as reported in several in vitro models. We hypothesize that direct resveratrol administration in lungs can cleave DNA in NETs, improving lung function during acute airway infections or chronic inflammatory lung diseases. If the hypothesis is correct, the control of NET formation can be used to reduce the inflammatory environment in lung after neutrophil stimuli. Additionally, the production of proinflammatory cytokines by neutrophils could be also diminished by resveratrol administration. In this sense, this flavonoid provides a multifaceted opportunity for treatment of lung diseases with strong or chronic neutrophil activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflammatory Response in Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kanak, Mazhar A.; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C.; Levy, Marlon F.

    2014-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement therapy for patients with brittle type 1 diabetes as well as refractory chronic pancreatitis. Despite the vast advancements made in this field, challenges still remain in achieving high frequency and long-term successful transplant outcomes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of inflammation in islet transplantation and development of strategies to prevent damage to islets from inflammation. The inflammatory response associated with islets has been recognized as the primary cause of early damage to islets and graft loss after transplantation. Details on cell signaling pathways in islets triggered by cytokines and harmful inflammatory events during pancreas procurement, pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet infusion are presented. Robust control of pre- and peritransplant islet inflammation could improve posttransplant islet survival and in turn enhance the benefits of islet cell transplantation for patients who are insulin dependent. We discuss several potent anti-inflammatory strategies that show promise for improving islet engraftment. Further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response will provide the basis for developing potent therapeutic strategies for enhancing the quality and success of islet transplantation. PMID:24883060

  2. Lung contusion: inflammatory mechanisms and interaction with other injuries.

    PubMed

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Notter, Robert H; Davidson, Bruce A; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Kunkel, Steven L; Knight, Paul R

    2009-08-01

    This article reviews current animal models and laboratory studies investigating the pathophysiology of lung contusion (LC), a common and severe condition in patients with blunt thoracic trauma. Emphasis is on studies elucidating cells, mediators, receptors, and processes important in the innate pulmonary inflammatory response that contribute to LC injury. Surfactant dysfunction in the pathogenesis of LC is also discussed, as is the potential role of epithelial cell or neutrophil apoptosis. Studies examining combination injuries where LC is exacerbated by secondary insults such as gastric aspiration in trauma patients are also noted. The need for continuing mechanism-based research to further clarify the pathophysiology of LC injury, and to define and test potential therapeutic interventions targeting specific aspects of inflammation or surfactant dysfunction to improve clinical outcomes in patients with LC, is also emphasized.

  3. Lung Contusion: Inflammatory Mechanisms and Interaction with Other Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Notter, Robert H.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Helinski, Jadwiga D.; Kunkel, Steven L.; Knight, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews current animal models and laboratory studies investigating the pathophysiology of lung contusion (LC), a common and severe condition in patients with blunt thoracic trauma. Emphasis is on studies elucidating cells, mediators, receptors and processes important in the innate pulmonary inflammatory response that contribute to LC injury. Surfactant dysfunction in the pathogenesis of LC is also discussed, as is the potential role of epithelial cell or neutrophil apoptosis. Studies examining combination injuries where LC is exacerbated by secondary insults like gastric aspiration in trauma patients are also noted. The need for continuing mechanism-based research to further clarify the pathophysiology of LC injury, and to define and test potential therapeutic interventions targeting specific aspects of inflammation or surfactant dysfunction to improve clinical outcomes in patients with LC, is also emphasized. PMID:19174738

  4. The bacterial microbiota in inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Huffnagle, Gary B; Dickson, Robert P

    2015-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920s, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Role of COX-2 in the Inflammatory and Fibrotic Response in the Lung Following Exposure to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayers, Brian C.

    Exposure to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) has been demonstrated to exacerbate airway inflammation and fibrosis in allergen-challenged mouse model. These data have led to concern that individuals with asthma could represent a susceptible population to adverse health effects following exposure to MWCNT, and possibly other engineered nanoparticles. Asthma pathogenesis is caused by the interaction of a complex genetic predisposition and environmental exposures. Because chronic airway inflammation is common to all asthma phenotypes, it is logical to investigate genes that are involved in inflammatory pathways in order to understand the genetic basis of asthma. The metabolism of arachidonic acid by cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is the rate-determining step in the synthesis of prostanoids, which are biologically active lipids that are important modulators of inflammation. Based on the role of COX enzymes in inflammatory pathways, we sought to investigate how COX enzymes are involved in the inflammatory response following MWCNT exposure in asthmatic airways. We report that MWCNT significantly exacerbated allergen-induced airway inflammation and mucus cell metaplasia in COX-2 deficient mice compared to wild type mice. In addition, MWCNTs significantly enhanced allergen-induced cytokines involved in Th2 (IL-13, IL-5), Th1 (CXCL10), and Th17 (IL-17A) inflammatory responses in COX-2 deficient mice but not in WT mice. We conclude that exacerbation of allergen-induced airway inflammation and mucus cell metaplasia by MWCNTs is enhanced by deficiency in COX-2 and associated with activation of a mixed Th1/Th2/Th17 immune response. Based on our observation that COX-2 deficient mice developed a mixed Th immune response following MWCNT exposure, we sought to evaluate how cytokines associated with different Th immune responses alter COX expression following MWCNT exposure. For this study, a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) was used because MWCNT were largely sequestered

  6. Innate Immune Responses to Nanoparticle Exposure in the Lung.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elizabeth A; Sayers, Brian C; Glista-Baker, Ellen E; Shipkowski, Kelly A; Taylor, Alexia J; Bonner, James C

    2014-01-01

    The nanotechnology revolution offers enormous societal and economic benefits for innovation in the fields of engineering, electronics, and medicine. Nevertheless, evidence from rodent studies show that biopersistent engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) stimulate immune, inflammatory, and fibroproliferative responses in the lung, suggesting possible risks for lung diseases or systemic immune disorders as a consequence of occupational, environmental, or consumer exposure. Due to their nanoscale dimensions and increased surface area per unit mass, ENMs have a much greater potential to reach the distal regions of the lung and generate ROS. High aspect ratio ENMs (e.g., nanotubes, nanofibers) activate inflammasomes in macrophages, triggering IL-1β release and neutrophilic infiltration into the lungs. Moreover, some ENMs alter allergen-induced eosinophilic inflammation by immunostimulation, immunosuppression, or modulating the balance between Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells, thereby influencing the nature of the inflammatory response. ENMs also migrate from the lungs across epithelial, endothelial, or mesothelial barriers to stimulate or suppress systemic immune responses.

  7. Dexmedetomidine attenuates inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice by activating cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoguo; Wang, Yueping; Wang, Yaoqi; Ning, Qiaoqing; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Chunzhi; Zhao, Wenxiang; Jing, Guangjian; Wang, Qianqian

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine (Dex) is a highly selective α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that is widely used for sedation in intensive care units and in clinical anesthesia. Dex has also been shown to possess anti-inflammatory benefits. However, the underlying mechanism by which Dex relieves the inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the protective effects and possible mechanism of Dex on the sepsis-induced lung inflammatory response in mice. Sepsis was induced in mice models through the intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The preemptive administration of Dex substantially abated sepsis-induced pulmonary edema, pulmonary histopathological changes, and NF-κB p65 activity. The production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) at both the mRNA and protein levels was also reduced. Moreover, these effects were significantly blocked by the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) antagonist α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt). α-Bgt aggravated pulmonary edema and pulmonary histopathological changes, as well as increased NF-κB p65 activity and TNF-α and IL-6 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The overall results demonstrate that Dex inhibits the LPS-induced inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice partly through the α7nAChR-dependent cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

  8. Beta-cryptoxanthin protection against cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory responses in the lung is due to the action of its own molecule

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Higher intake of the dietary xanthophyll, beta-cryptoxanthin (BCX), has been associated with a lower risk of lung cancer death in smokers. We have previously shown that BCX feeding was effective in reducing both cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung inflammation in ferrets and carcinogen-induced lung tu...

  9. 2-Chloroadenosine (2-CADO) treatment modulates the pro-inflammatory immune response to prevent acute lung inflammation in BALB/c mice suffering from Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-06-01

    Acute lung inflammation (ALI) is a life-threatening pathology and can develop during the course of several clinical conditions such as pneumonia, acid aspiration or sepsis. Adenosine plays a significant role in controlling acute inflammation via binding to A(2A) receptors on inflammatory cells, i.e. neutrophils or macrophages. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of 2-chloroadenosine (2-CADO), alone or in combination with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced acute lung infection in mice. Acute lung infection in mice was induced by directly instilling the selected dose (10(4) colony-forming units/mL) of bacteria intranasally. Histopathological examination of the lungs was performed to reveal neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. In addition to the major pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin (IL)-1alpha, levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were also determined. Intranasal instillation of bacteria caused profound neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli as well as a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (i.e. TNFalpha and IL-1alpha). However, intravenous administration of 2-CADO 10 microg/kg/day, alone or in combination with an antibiotic (i.e. AMC), significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. A significant decrease in TNFalpha and IL-1alpha along with elevation of IL-10 levels in the lung homogenate of mice with acute lung infection was observed upon treatment with 2-CADO alone, with no significant decrease in bacterial counts. Moreover, in combination with AMC, 2-CADO exhibited its immunomodulatory action in acute lung infection and prevented ALI, whilst an antibacterial action was exhibited by AMC. 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. [Fundamentals of chronic inflammatory lung diseases (asthma, COPD, fibrosis)].

    PubMed

    Roth, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Since three decades the prevalence of chronic inflammatory lung diseases (asthma, COPD, fibrosis) are worldwide increasing. In Switzerland about 5 % of the population develops asthma, while in other countries it affects up to 20 % (Maori: New Zealand). Today, asthma is the most frequent cause from absence from school and work, and significantly reduces life quality of the patients and their families. COPD, or the smoker's lung, is the 4th most frequent cause of death worldwide and in the Western society affects mainly cigarette smokers and ex-smokers, while in developing countries it is a diseases linked to open fire cocking with most patients being middle aged women. In both diseases only the symptoms can be controlled by muscle relaxing and anti-inflammatory drugs, but there is no cure available. The third chronic inflammatory lung disease is fibrosis which is increasing with the aging population. As indicated by the terminology "chronic inflammatory lung disease" it is widely assumed that the major cause of these diseases is chronic inflammation occurring in different segments of the lung. This hypothesis is now challenged as increasing evidence from clinical and experimental studies that suggest a much different pathogenesis. There is evidence that the inflammation may come second and tissue structural changes are already pre-set during embryogenesis and may become the major driver for the development of chronic inflammatory lung diseases later in life. The mechanism of this pre-disposition is largely unknown and the difficult to perform investigations have only started in recent years. This review aims to provide an overview of key studies published in the past 2 years on clinical and experimental research.

  11. Inflammatory Responses in Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2017-01-01

    Brain infarction causes tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of the cerebral vessels and recent work has shown that post stroke inflammation contributes significantly to the development of ischemic pathology. Because secondary damage by brain inflammation may have a longer therapeutic time window compared to the rescue of primary damage following arterial occlusion, controlling inflammation would be an obvious therapeutic target. A substantial amount of experimentall progress in this area has been made in recent years. However, it is difficult to elucidate the precise mechanisms of the inflammatory responses following ischemic stroke because inflammation is a complex series of interactions between inflammatory cells and molecules, all of which could be either detrimental or beneficial. We review recent advances in neuroinflammation and the modulation of inflammatory signaling pathways in brain ischemia. Potential targets for treatment of ischemic stroke will also be covered. The roles of the immune system and brain damage versus repair will help to clarify how immune modulation may treat stroke. PMID:25666795

  12. Proteases and oxidant stress control organic dust induction of inflammatory gene expression in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Kartiga; Gottipati, Koteswara R; Berhane, Kiflu; Samten, Buka; Pendurthi, Usha; Boggaram, Vijay

    2016-10-22

    Persistant inflammatory responses to infectious agents and other components in organic dust underlie lung injury and development of respiratory diseases. Organic dust components responsible for eliciting inflammation and the mechanisms by which they cause lung inflammation are not fully understood. We studied the mechanisms by which protease activities in poultry dust extracts and intracellular oxidant stress induce inflammatory gene expression in A549 and Beas2B lung epithelial cells. The effects of dust extracts on inflammatory gene expression were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), enzyme linked immunosorbent (ELISA) and western blot assays. Oxidant stress was probed by dihydroethidium (DHE) labeling, and immunostaining for 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Effects on interleukin-8 (IL-8) promoter regulation were determined by transient transfection assay. Dust extracts contained trypsin and elastase activities, and activated protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 and -2. Serine protease inhibitors and PAR-1 or PAR-2 knockdown suppressed inflammatory gene induction. Dust extract induction of IL-8 gene expression was associated with increased DHE-fluorescence and 4-HNE staining, and antioxidants suppressed inflammatory gene induction. Protease inhibitors and antioxidants suppressed protein kinase C and NF-κB activation and induction of IL-8 promoter activity in cells exposed to dust extract. Our studies demonstrate that proteases and intracellular oxidants control organic dust induction of inflammatory gene expression in lung epithelial cells. Targeting proteases and oxidant stress may serve as novel approaches for the treatment of organic dust induced lung diseases. This is the first report on the involvement of oxidant stress in the induction of inflammatory gene expression by organic dust.

  13. Extracellular cyclophilins contribute to the regulation of inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kamalpreet; Gwinn, William M; Bower, Molly A; Watson, Alan; Okwumabua, Ifeanyi; MacDonald, H Robson; Bukrinsky, Michael I; Constant, Stephanie L

    2005-07-01

    The main regulators of leukocyte trafficking during inflammatory responses are chemokines. However, another class of recently identified chemotactic agents is extracellular cyclophilins, the proteins mostly known as receptors for the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A. Cyclophilins can induce leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro and have been detected at elevated levels in inflamed tissues, suggesting that they might contribute to inflammatory responses. We recently identified CD147 as the main signaling receptor for cyclophilin A. In the current study we examined the contribution of cyclophilin-CD147 interactions to inflammatory responses in vivo using a mouse model of acute lung injury. Blocking cyclophilin-CD147 interactions by targeting CD147 (using anti-CD147 Ab) or cyclophilin (using nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporine A analog) reduced tissue neutrophilia by up to 50%, with a concurrent decrease in tissue pathology. These findings are the first to demonstrate the significant contribution of cyclophilins to inflammatory responses and provide a potentially novel approach for reducing inflammation-mediated diseases.

  14. Lung response to coarse PM: Bioassay in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wegesser, Teresa C.; Last, Jerold A.

    2008-07-15

    Particulate matter (PM) elicits inflammatory and toxic responses in the lung specific to its constituents, which can vary by region, time, and particle size. To identify the mechanism of toxicity in PM collected in a rural area in the San Joaquin Valley of Central California, we studied coarse particles of 2.5-10 {mu}m diameter (PM{sub 2.5}-PM{sub 10}). Potential pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of PM{sub 2.5}-PM{sub 10} in the lung were investigated using intratracheally instilled mice. We determined total and differential cell profiles and inflammatory chemokines in lung lavage fluid, and biomarkers of toxicity resulting from coarse PM exposure. Responses of the mice were readily observed with total doses of 25-50 {mu}g of PM per mouse. Changes in pro-inflammatory cellular profiles and chemokines showed both dose and time responses; peak responses were observed 24 h after PM instillation, with recovery as early as 48 h. Furthermore, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2) profiles following PM exposures were correlated to levels of measured macrophages and neutrophils recovered from lung lavage fluid of PM-treated animals. Our data suggest that pro-inflammatory effects observed from coarse PM collected during the summer months from California's hot and dry Central Valley are driven largely by the insoluble components of the PM mixture, and are not caused by endotoxin.

  15. Role of size and surface area for pro-inflammatory responses to silica nanoparticles in epithelial lung cells: importance of exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Skuland, T; Ovrevik, J; Låg, M; Refsnes, M

    2014-03-01

    The present study compared non-crystalline silica particles of nano (50nm)- and submicro (500nm)-size (Si50 and Si500) for the potential to induce cytokine responses in bronchial epithelial lung cells (BEAS-2B). The cell cultures were exposed to equal mass and surface area concentrations of the two particles in different exposure media; LHC-9 and DMEM:F12. The state of agglomeration was different in the two media; with marked agglomeration in LHC-9 and nearly no agglomeration in DMEM:F12. On a mass basis, Si50 was more potent than Si500 in inducing cytokine responses in both exposure media. In contrast, upon exposure to similar surface area concentrations, Si500 was more potent than Si50 in DMEM:F12. This might be due to different agglomeration/sedimentation properties of Si50 versus Si500 in the two media. However, influence of differences in particle reactivity or particle uptake cannot be excluded. The data indicated no qualitative changes in the cytokine gene-expression patterns induced by the two particles, suggesting effects through similar mechanisms. These aspects might be of importance for interpretation of in vitro studies of nanomaterials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship of Acute Lung Inflammatory Injury to Fas/FasL System

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Thomas A.; Guo, Ren-Feng; Neff, Simona B.; Sarma, J. Vidya; Speyer, Cecilia L.; Gao, Hongwei; Bernacki, Kurt D.; Huber-Lang, Markus; McGuire, Stephanie; Hoesel, L. Marco; Riedemann, Niels C.; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Zetoune, Firas S.; Ward, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that apoptosis plays a significant role in tissue damage during acute lung injury. To evaluate the role of the apoptosis mediators Fas and FasL in acute lung injury, Fas (lpr)- or FasL (gld)-deficient and wild-type mice were challenged with intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes. Lung injury parameters (125I-albumin leak, accumulation of myeloperoxidase, and wet lung weights) were measured and found to be consistently reduced in both lpr and gld mice. In wild-type mice, lung injury was associated with a marked increase in Fas protein in lung. Inflamed lungs of wild-type mice showed striking evidence of activated caspase-3, which was much diminished in inflamed lungs from lpr mice. Intratracheal administration of a monoclonal Fas-activating antibody (Jo2) in wild-type mice induced MIP-2 and KC production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and a murine alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S) showed significantly increased MIP-2 production after incubation with this antibody. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid content of MIP-2 and KC was substantially reduced in lpr mice after lung injury when compared to levels in wild-type mice. These data suggest that the Fas/FasL system regulates the acute lung inflammatory response by positively affecting CXC-chemokine production, ultimately leading to enhanced neutrophil influx and tissue damage. PMID:15743781

  17. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: Identification of cell-type specific inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Hoth, J. Jason; Wells, Jonathan D.; Yoza, Barbara K.; McCall, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the inflammatory response to lung injury. In this study, we used chimeric mice generated by adoptive bone marrow (BM) transfer between TLR2−/− or TLR4−/− and wild-type (WT) mice. We found that in the lung, both BM-derived and non-myeloid cells contribute to TLR-dependent inflammatory responses after injury in a cell type specific manner. We also show a novel TLR2 dependent injury mechanism that is associated with enhanced airway epithelial cell apoptosis and increased pulmonary FasL and Fas expression in the lungs from injured mice. Thus, in addition to cardiopulmonary physiological dysfunction, cell type specific TLR and their differential response to injury may provide novel specific targets for management of patients with pulmonary contusion. PMID:22293596

  18. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: identification of cell type-specific inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Hoth, J Jason; Wells, Jonathan D; Yoza, Barbara K; McCall, Charles E

    2012-04-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma, such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety of inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the inflammatory response to lung injury. In this study, we used chimeric mice generated by adoptive bone marrow transfer between TLR2 or TLR4 and wild-type mice. We found that, in the lung, both bone marrow-derived and nonmyeloid cells contribute to TLR-dependent inflammatory responses after injury in a cell type-specific manner. We also show a novel TLR2-dependent injury mechanism that is associated with enhanced airway epithelial cell apoptosis and increased pulmonary FasL and Fas expression in the lungs from injured mice. Thus, in addition to cardiopulmonary physiological dysfunction, cell type-specific TLR and their differential response to injury may provide novel specific targets for management of patients with pulmonary contusion.

  19. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Banat, G-Andre; Tretyn, Aleksandra; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Wilhelm, Jochen; Weigert, Andreas; Olesch, Catherine; Ebel, Katharina; Stiewe, Thorsten; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Savai, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+), cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+), T-helper cells (CD4+), B cells (CD20+), macrophages (CD68+), mast cells (CD117+), mononuclear cells (CD11c+), plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+), B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+) and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+) compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells) in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition. PMID:26413839

  20. The Absence of CpG in Plasmid DNA–Chitosan Polyplexes Enhances Transfection Efficiencies and Reduces Inflammatory Responses in Murine Lungs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan polyplexes containing plasmid DNA (pDNA) have significant potential for pulmonary gene delivery applications. However, prior to using chitosan/pDNA polyplexes (CSpp) in clinical applications, their potential cytotoxicity needs to be investigated. In this study, we formulated 200–400 nm CSpp with amine to phosphate (N/P) ratios that ranged from 1 to 100. We compared two types of plasmids within CSpp: pDNA that was free of CpG sequences (CpG(−)) and pDNA that contained CpG sequences (CpG(+)). Both forms of CSpp showed low cytotoxicity when cultured with A549 and HEK293 cell lines in vitro. CSpp(CpG(−)) generated higher luciferase expression both in vitro, for A549 cells, and in vivo, compared with CSpp(CpG(+)). In addition, CSpp(CpG(−)) elicited milder inflammatory responses in mice one day subsequent to nasal instillation, as determined by proinflammatory cytokine levels within the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Our findings suggest that to achieve optimal gene expression with minimal cytotoxicity, inflammation, and oxidative stress, the N/P ratios and CpG sequences in the pDNA of CSpp need to be considered. These findings will inform the preclinical safety assessments of CSpp in pulmonary gene delivery systems. PMID:24494979

  1. The inflammatory response in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A

    2013-03-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis and its accompanying systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and the events that lead to multiorgan failure and death are poorly understood. It is known that, in septic humans and rodents, the development of SIRS is associated with a loss of the redox balance, but SIRS can also develop in noninfectious states. In addition, a hyperinflammatory state develops, together with impaired innate immune functions of phagocytes, immunosuppression, and complement activation, collectively leading to septic shock and lethality. Here, we discuss recent insights into the signaling pathways in immune and phagocytic cells that underlie sepsis and SIRS and consider how these might be targeted for therapeutic interventions to reverse or attenuate pathways that lead to lethality during sepsis.

  2. The Inflammatory Response in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis and its accompanying systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and the events that lead to multiorgan failure and death are poorly understood. It is known that, in septic humans and rodents, the development of SIRS is associated with a loss of the redox balance, but SIRS can also develop in non-infectious states. In addition, a hyperinflammatory state develops, together with impaired innate immune functions of phagocytes, immunosuppression, and complement activation, collectively leading to septic shock and lethality. Here we discuss recent insights into the signaling pathways in immune and phagocytic cells that underlie sepsis and SIRS and consider how these might be targeted for therapeutic interventions to reverse or attenuate pathways that lead to lethality during sepsis. PMID:23036432

  3. The composition of cigarette smoke determines inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung in COPD mouse models.

    PubMed

    John, Gerrit; Kohse, Katrin; Orasche, Jürgen; Reda, Ahmed; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2014-02-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is caused by exposure to toxic gases and particles, most often CS (cigarette smoke), leading to emphysema, chronic bronchitis, mucus production and a subsequent decline in lung function. The disease pathogenesis is related to an abnormal CS-induced inflammatory response of the lungs. Similar to active (mainstream) smoking, second hand (sidestream) smoke exposure severely affects respiratory health. These processes can be studied in vivo in models of CS exposure of mice. We compared the acute inflammatory response of female C57BL/6 mice exposed to two concentrations [250 and 500 mg/m3 TPM (total particulate matter)] of sidestream and mainstream CS for 3 days and interpreted the biological effects based on physico-chemical differences in the gas and particulate phase composition of CS. BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) was obtained to perform differential cell counts and to measure cytokine release. Lung tissue was used to determine mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory genes and to assess tissue inflammation. A strong acute inflammatory response characterized by neutrophilic influx, increased cytokine secretion [KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α), MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein 2), MIP-1α and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1)], pro-inflammatory gene expression [KC, MIP-2 and MMP12 (matrix metalloproteinase 12)] and up-regulated GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) production was observed in the mainstream model. After sidestream exposure there was a dampened inflammatory reaction consisting only of macrophages and diminished GM-CSF levels, most likely caused by elevated CO concentrations. These results demonstrate that the composition of CS determines the dynamics of inflammatory cell recruitment in COPD mouse models. Different initial inflammatory processes might contribute to COPD pathogenesis in significantly varying ways, thereby

  4. The composition of cigarette smoke determines inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung in COPD mouse models

    PubMed Central

    John, Gerrit; Kohse, Katrin; Orasche, Jürgen; Reda, Ahmed; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2013-01-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is caused by exposure to toxic gases and particles, most often CS (cigarette smoke), leading to emphysema, chronic bronchitis, mucus production and a subsequent decline in lung function. The disease pathogenesis is related to an abnormal CS-induced inflammatory response of the lungs. Similar to active (mainstream) smoking, second hand (sidestream) smoke exposure severely affects respiratory health. These processes can be studied in vivo in models of CS exposure of mice. We compared the acute inflammatory response of female C57BL/6 mice exposed to two concentrations [250 and 500 mg/m3 TPM (total particulate matter)] of sidestream and mainstream CS for 3 days and interpreted the biological effects based on physico-chemical differences in the gas and particulate phase composition of CS. BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) was obtained to perform differential cell counts and to measure cytokine release. Lung tissue was used to determine mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory genes and to assess tissue inflammation. A strong acute inflammatory response characterized by neutrophilic influx, increased cytokine secretion [KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α), MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein 2), MIP-1α and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1)], pro-inflammatory gene expression [KC, MIP-2 and MMP12 (matrix metalloproteinase 12)] and up-regulated GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) production was observed in the mainstream model. After sidestream exposure there was a dampened inflammatory reaction consisting only of macrophages and diminished GM-CSF levels, most likely caused by elevated CO concentrations. These results demonstrate that the composition of CS determines the dynamics of inflammatory cell recruitment in COPD mouse models. Different initial inflammatory processes might contribute to COPD pathogenesis in significantly varying ways, thereby

  5. NET balancing: a problem in inflammatory lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Olivia Z.; Palaniyar, Nades

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are beneficial antimicrobial defense structures that can help fight against invading pathogens in the host. However, recent studies reveal that NETs exert adverse effects in a number of diseases including those of the lung. Many inflammatory lung diseases are characterized with a massive influx of neutrophils into the airways. Neutrophils contribute to the pathology of these diseases. To date, NETs have been identified in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF), acute lung injury (ALI), allergic asthma, and lungs infected with bacteria, virus, or fungi. These microbes and several host factors can stimulate NET formation, or NETosis. Different forms of NETosis have been identified and are dependent on varying types of stimuli. All of these pathways however appear to result in the formation of NETs that contain DNA, modified extracellular histones, proteases, and cytotoxic enzymes. Some of the NET components are immunogenic and damaging to host tissue. Innate immune collectins, such as pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D), bind NETs, and enhance the clearance of dying cells and DNA by alveolar macrophages. In many inflammatory lung diseases, bronchoalveolar SP-D levels are altered and its deficiency results in the accumulation of DNA in the lungs. Some of the other therapeutic molecules under consideration for treating NET-related diseases include DNases, antiproteases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) inhibitors, peptidylarginine deiminase-4 inhibitors, and anti-histone antibodies. NETs could provide important biological advantage for the host to fight against certain microbial infections. However, too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. Maintaining the right balance of NET formation and reducing the amount of NETs that accumulate in tissues are essential for harnessing the power of NETs with minimal damage to the hosts. PMID:23355837

  6. Carbon Monoxide Induces Cytoprotection in Rat Orthotopic Lung Transplantation via Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Apoptotic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ruiping; Kubo, Masatoshi; Morse, Danielle; Zhou, Zhihong; Zhang, Xuchen; Dauber, James H.; Fabisiak, James; Alber, Sean M.; Watkins, Simon C.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Ning, Wen; Oury, Tim D.; Lee, Patty J.; McCurry, Kenneth R.; Choi, Augustine M.K.

    2003-01-01

    Successful lung transplantation has been limited by the high incidence of acute graft rejection. There is mounting evidence that the stress response gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and/or its catalytic by-product carbon monoxide (CO) confers cytoprotection against tissue and cellular injury. This led us to hypothesize that CO may protect against lung transplant rejection via its anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects. Orthotopic left lung transplantation was performed in Lewis rat recipients from Brown-Norway rat donors. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were markedly induced in transplanted rat lungs compared to sham-operated control lungs. Transplanted lungs developed severe intraalveolar hemorrhage, marked infiltration of inflammatory cells, and intravascular coagulation. However, in the presence of CO exposure (500 ppm), the gross anatomy and histology of transplanted lungs showed marked preservation. Furthermore, transplanted lungs displayed increased apoptotic cell death compared with the transplanted lungs of CO-exposed recipients, as assessed by TUNEL and caspase-3 immunostaining. CO exposure inhibited the induction of IL-6 mRNA and protein expression in lung and serum, respectively. Gene array analysis revealed that CO also down-regulated other proinflammatory genes, including MIP-1α and MIF, and growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor, which were up-regulated by transplantation. These data suggest that the anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic properties of CO confer potent cytoprotection in a rat model of lung transplantation. PMID:12819027

  7. Normothermic Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in Brain-dead Donors Reduces Inflammatory Cytokines and Toll-like Receptor Expression.

    PubMed

    Shafaghi, Shadi; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Abbasi Dezfuli, Azizollah; Godarzi, Hoda; Sheikhy, Kambiz; Ansari Aval, Zahra; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Emami, Habib; Hosseini-Baharanchi, Fatemeh Sadat; Najafizadeh, Katayoun

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory responses and innate immunologic reactions play an important role in the respiratory system. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is considered a novel method in the evaluation and reconditioning of donor lungs prior to transplantation. However, EVLP's effect on inflammatory and metabolic markers of human lung tissue is unknown.  This study investigated how the performance of EVLP on brain-dead (BD) donor lungs affects the production and release of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-a), inflammatory cells and toll-like receptors (TLR) -2, 4. This study was conducted with an animal subject for qualification of EVLP team and then EVLP was performed on 4 human cases referred to Masih Daneshvari Hospital (Tehran,Iran), from May 2013 to July 2015. Two of these cases, who had acceptable lung function parameters, were enrolled in this study for immunologic investigations. Bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were taken before and after EVLP. Cytokines were quantitatively measured before lung retrieval, at the end of the lung removal, at the start of EVLP, and at the end of the each hour of EVLP. TLR expression was measured on the cells obtained by flow cytometry. TNF-a, IL-6 and IL-8 decreased in each stage of washing perfusate in both cases, and the level of cytokines in serum was in the normal range. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a decreasing expression of CD3, CD4/8, CD19, and CD16+56, as well as TLR-2 and TLR-4 in both cases. Intra-capillary pools of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-a) were determined to contribute to the lung injury during prolonged lung perfusion. This raises the possibility that EVLP donor lungs could be less immunogenic than standard lungs. However, to assess EVLP's effects on lung grafts and optimize recipient outcomes, further studies with a sufficient number of lungs are required.

  8. Interplay between Cellular and Molecular Inflammatory Mediators in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orozco-Morales, Mario; Soca-Chafre, Giovanny; Barrios-Bernal, Pedro; Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Arrieta, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a component of the tumor microenvironment and represents the 7th hallmark of cancer. Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Tumor infiltrating inflammatory cells mediate processes associated with progression, immune suppression, promotion of neoangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, remodeling of extracellular matrix, invasion and metastasis, and, lastly, the inhibition of vaccine-induced antitumor T cell response. Accumulating evidence indicates a critical role of myeloid cells in the pathophysiology of human cancers. In contrast to the well-characterized tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), the significance of granulocytes in cancer has only recently begun to emerge with the characterization of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs). Recent studies show the importance of CD47 in the interaction with macrophages inhibiting phagocytosis and promoting the migration of neutrophils, increasing inflammation which can lead to recurrence and progression in lung cancer. Currently, therapies are targeted towards blocking CD47 and enhancing macrophage-mediated phagocytosis. However, antibody-based therapies may have adverse effects that limit its use. PMID:26941482

  9. Lung Function and Inflammatory responses in healthy young adults exposed to 0.06 ppm Ozone for 6.6 hours

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Exposure to ozone causes a decrease in spirometric lung function and an increase in airway inflammation in healthy young adults at concentrations as low as 0.08 ppm close to the the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ground level ozone. Objectives: To test wheth...

  10. Lung Function and Inflammatory responses in healthy young adults exposed to 0.06 ppm Ozone for 6.6 hours

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Exposure to ozone causes a decrease in spirometric lung function and an increase in airway inflammation in healthy young adults at concentrations as low as 0.08 ppm close to the the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ground level ozone. Objectives: To test wheth...

  11. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Inhibitor Is a Novel Therapeutic Candidate in Murine Models of Inflammatory Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Quijada, Hector; Sammani, Saad; Siegler, Jessica; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Deaton, Ryan; Saadat, Laleh; Zaidi, Rafe S.; Messana, Joe; Gann, Peter H.; Machado, Roberto F.; Camp, Sara M.; Wang, Ting

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified the intracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (iNAMPT, aka pre–B-cell colony enhancing factor) as a candidate gene promoting acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) with circulating nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase potently inducing NF-κB signaling in lung endothelium. iNAMPT also synthesizes intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (iNAD) in response to extracellular oxidative stress, contributing to the inhibition of apoptosis via ill-defined mechanisms. We now further define the role of iNAMPT activity in the pathogenesis of ARDS/VILI using the selective iNAMPT inhibitor FK-866. C57/B6 mice were exposed to VILI (40 ml/kg, 4 h) or LPS (1.5 mg/kg, 18 h) after osmotic pump delivery of FK-866 (100 mg/kg/d, intraperitoneally). Assessment of total bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) levels, cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α), lung iNAD levels, and injury scores revealed that FK-866–mediated iNAMPT inhibition successfully reduced lung tissue iNAD levels, BAL injury indices, inflammatory cell infiltration, and lung injury scores in LPS- and VILI-exposed mice. FK-866 further increased lung PMN apoptosis, as reflected by caspase-3 activation in BAL PMNs. These findings support iNAMPT inhibition via FK-866 as a novel therapeutic agent for ARDS via enhanced apoptosis in inflammatory PMNs. PMID:24588101

  12. Nutritional modulation of the inflammatory bowel response.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Varnalidis, Ioannis; Paraskevas, George; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis represent distinct phenotypic forms of inflammatory bowel disease and continue to be a common cause of morbidity. The corticosteroids and the immunomodulatory drugs, which are the basis of treatment for the inflammatory bowel diseases, do not assure always satisfactory outcomes. Nutrition has been used in order to modify the inflammatory response of various chronic inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, the intestinal microflora and the intestinal mucosal disorders play a crucial role. Also, the release of reactive oxygen species is a significant factor of initiation and preservation of the inflammatory reaction in these diseases. The advantages of the nutritional treatment derive from the sequestration of intraluminal agents which may promote the inflammatory bowel response or, alternatively, nutrition is able to modify the immune response, reducing the uncontrolled inflammatory reaction. Furthermore, nutrition can enhance the mucosal barrier function and consists a significant source of antioxidants. This review focuses on certain nutritional components that modulate the inflammatory response of the bowel and aims to present a rational thesis regarding the use of nutritional agents in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. Compartmentalization of the inflammatory response in sepsis and SIRS.

    PubMed

    Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Annane, Djillali

    2006-01-01

    Sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) are associated with an exacerbated production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators that are mainly produced within tissues. Although a systemic process, the pathophysiological events differ from organ to organ, and from organ to peripheral blood, leading to the concept of compartmentalization. The nature of the insult (e.g. burn, hemorrhage, trauma, peritonitis), the cellular composition of each compartment (e.g. nature of phagocytes, nature of endothelial cells), and its micro-environment (e.g. local presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor [GM-CSF] in the lungs, low levels of arginine in the liver, release of endotoxin from the gut), and leukocyte recruitment, have a great influence on local inflammation and on tissue injury. High levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (e.g. interleukin-1 [IL-1], tumor necrosis factor [TNF], gamma interferon [IFN-gamma], high mobility group protein-1 [HMGB1], macrophage migration inhibitory factor [MIF]) produced locally and released into the blood stream initiate remote organ injury as a consequence of an organ cross-talk. The inflammatory response within the tissues is greatly influenced by the local delivery of neuromediators by the cholinergic and sympathetic neurons. Acetylcholine and epinephrine contribute with IL-10 and other mediators to the anti-inflammatory compensatory response initiated to dampen the inflammatory process. Unfortunately, this regulatory response leads to an altered immune status of leukocytes that can increase the susceptibility to further infection. Again, the nature of the insult, the nature of the leukocytes, the presence of circulating microbial components, and the nature of the triggering agent employed to trigger cells, greatly influence the immune status of the leukocytes that may differ from one compartment to another. While anti-inflammatory mediators predominate within the blood stream to avoid igniting new

  14. Functional and inflammatory alterations in the lung following exposure of rats to nitrogen mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel, Kinal J.; Shen, Jianliang; Reimer, David; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard is a vesicant that causes damage to the respiratory tract. In these studies, we characterized the acute effects of nitrogen mustard on lung structure, inflammatory mediator expression, and pulmonary function, with the goal of identifying mediators potentially involved in toxicity. Treatment of rats (male Wistar, 200-225 g) with nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine hydrochloride, i.t., 0.25 mg/kg) resulted in marked histological changes in the respiratory tract, including necrotizing bronchiolitis, thickening of alveolar septa, and inflammation which was evident within 24 h. This was associated with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, confirming injury to alveolar epithelial regions of the lung. Nitrogen mustard administration also resulted in increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, pro-inflammatory proteins implicated in lung injury, in alveolar macrophages and alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Expression of connective tissue growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9, mediators regulating extracellular matrix turnover was also increased, suggesting that pathways leading to chronic lung disease are initiated early in the pathogenic process. Following nitrogen mustard exposure, alterations in lung mechanics and function were also observed. These included decreases in baseline static compliance, end-tidal volume and airway resistance, and a pronounced loss of methacholine responsiveness in resistance, tissue damping and elastance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that nitrogen mustard induces rapid structural and inflammatory changes in the lung which are associated with altered lung functioning. Understanding the nature of the injury induced by nitrogen mustard and related analogs may aid in the development of efficacious therapies for treatment of pulmonary injury resulting from exposure to vesicants.

  15. Functional and inflammatory alterations in the lung following exposure of rats to nitrogen mustard

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel, Kinal J.; Shen, Jianliang; Reimer, David; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard is a vesicant that causes damage to the respiratory tract. In these studies, we characterized the acute effects of nitrogen mustard on lung structure, inflammatory mediator expression, and pulmonary function, with the goal of identifying mediators potentially involved in toxicity. Treatment of rats (male Wistar, 200–225 g) with nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine hydrochloride, i.t., 0.25 mg/kg) resulted in marked histological changes in the respiratory tract, including necrotizing bronchiolitis, thickening of alveolar septa, and inflammation which was evident within 24 h. This was associated with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, confirming injury to alveolar epithelial regions of the lung. Nitrogen mustard administration also resulted in increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, pro-inflammatory proteins implicated in lung injury, in alveolar macrophages and alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Expression of connective tissue growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9, mediators regulating extracellular matrix turnover was also increased, suggesting that pathways leading to chronic lung disease are initiated early in the pathogenic process. Following nitrogen mustard exposure, alterations in lung mechanics and function were also observed. These included decreases in baseline static compliance, end-tidal volume and airway resistance, and a pronounced loss of methacholine responsiveness in resistance, tissue damping and elastance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that nitrogen mustard induces rapid structural and inflammatory changes in the lung which are associated with altered lung functioning. Understanding the nature of the injury induced by nitrogen mustard and related analogs may aid in the development of efficacious therapies for treatment of pulmonary injury resulting from exposure to vesicants. PMID:20883710

  16. Inflammatory bowel diseases, chronic liver diseases and the lung.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Bartolome, Sonja D; Huchon, Gérard; Krowka, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    This review is devoted to the distinct associations of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and chronic liver disorders with chronic airway diseases, namely chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchial asthma, and other chronic respiratory disorders in the adult population. While there is strong evidence for the association of chronic airway diseases with IBD, the data are much weaker for the interplay between lung and liver multimorbidities. The association of IBD, encompassing Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, with pulmonary disorders is underlined by their heterogeneous respiratory manifestations and impact on chronic airway diseases. The potential relationship between the two most prevalent liver-induced pulmonary vascular entities, i.e. portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome, and also between liver disease and other chronic respiratory diseases is also approached. Abnormal lung function tests in liver diseases are described and the role of increased serum bilirubin levels on chronic respiratory problems are considered. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  17. Operative wound implantation of inflammatory sarcomatoid carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Hata, Atsushi; Sekine, Yasuo; Koh, Eitetsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-09-01

    We describe a patient with iatrogenic chest wall implantation of inflammatory sarcomatoid carcinoma. A 43-year-old man underwent right partial lung resection for hemopneumothorax, with large bullae and an alveolar accumulation of histiocytes found on pathology. Three months later, a subcutaneous tumor appeared at a thoracoscopic port site. Needle aspiration of this tumor suggested a malignant neoplasm; therefore, a right upper lobectomy and chest wall resection were performed, and a pathologic diagnosis of sarcomatoid carcinoma was made. Pathologic reexamination of the original sample suggested that the tumor has been implanted in the patient's chest wall at the time of the first operation.

  18. Inflammatory lung disease a potential risk factor for onset of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: results from a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Helmers, Sevim Barbasso; Jiang, Xia; Pettersson, David; Wikman, Anna-Lis; Axelman, Pia; Lundberg, Åsa; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Alfredsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between inflammatory lung disease and the risk of developing idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Methods A population-based case–control study was conducted. Adult myositis cases, identified from the Swedish inpatient registry (diagnosed between 1995 and 1997), and randomly selected controls matched to cases on the date of birth, gender and residency, were asked to fill out a questionnaire with questions on lifestyle, environmental exposures and health. Eventually, 100 cases and 402 controls responded to the questionnaire and were included in the analyses. Exposure was defined as self-reported preceding inflammatory lung diseases (pneumonia, tuberculosis or sarcoidosis). The association between the exposure and risk of developing myositis was evaluated by calculating OR together with 95% CIs in logistic regressions. Results 42 (42%) cases and 112 (28%) controls reported preceding inflammatory lung disease. Median duration between inflammatory lung disease and first symptom of myositis was 30 years. We observed a significant association between self-reported history of lung disease at study inclusion and diagnosis of myositis (crude OR=1.8 (1.1 to 2.9); smoking adjusted OR=1.9 (1.2 to 3.1)). We further identified a modestly increased, yet non-significant, association between preceding inflammatory lung disease (prior to index year) and diagnosis of myositis (smoking adjusted OR=1.6 (0.9 to 2.8)). The association was more pronounced among the cases of myositis with concurrent interstitial lung disease (OR=3.8 (1.0 to 14.5)). Conclusions Patients with preceding inflammatory lung disease tend to have an increased risk of developing myositis compared to those without. The effect was more pronounced among patients with myositis with concurrent interstitial lung disease. Thus inflammatory lung disease may constitute a risk factor for myositis. PMID:28123774

  19. Predictive modeling and inflammatory biomarkers in rats with lung contusion and gastric aspiration.

    PubMed

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Davidson, Bruce A; Hutson, Alan D; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Nodzo, Scott R; Notter, Robert H; Knight, Paul R

    2009-12-01

    This study uses statistical predictive modeling and hierarchical cluster analyses to examine inflammatory mediators and cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) as putative biomarkers in rats with blunt trauma lung contusion (LC), gastric aspiration (combined acid and small gastric food particles, CASP), or a combination of the two. Specific parameters assessed in the innate pulmonary inflammatory response were leukocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in BAL; whole lung myeloperoxidase activity; and a series of cytokines or chemokines present in BAL at 5 or 24 hours after injury: tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, interferon-gamma, IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Rats with LC, CASP, LC + CASP all had severe lung injury compared with uninjured controls based on decreased arterial oxygenation or increased BAL albumin at 5 or 24 hours postinsult. However, the injury groups had distinct overall patterns of inflammation that allowed them to be discriminated accurately by hierarchical cluster analysis (29 of 30 and 35 of 37 rats were correctly classified in hierarchical clusters at 5 and 24 hours, respectively). Moreover, predictive analyses based on an extension of standard receiver-operator characteristic methodology discriminated individual animals and groups with similar high accuracy based on a maximum of two inflammatory parameters per group (29 of 30 and 36 of 37 rats were correctly classified at 5 hours and 24 hours, respectively). These results support the possibility that inflammatory biomarker profiles could be developed in the future to improve the diagnosis and management of trauma patients with unwitnessed (occult) gastric aspiration who have an increased risk of clinical acute lung injury or the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  20. Predictive Modeling and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Rats with Lung Contusion and Gastric Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Davidson, Bruce A.; Hutson, Alan D.; Helinski, Jadwiga D.; Nodzo, Scott R.; Notter, Robert H.; Knight, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    This study uses statistical predictive modeling and hierarchical cluster analyses to examine inflammatory mediators and cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) as putative biomarkers in rats with blunt trauma lung contusion (LC), gastric aspiration (combined acid and small gastric food particles, CASP), or a combination of the two. Specific parameters assessed in the innate pulmonary inflammatory response were leukocytes, macrophages and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in BAL, whole lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and a series of cytokines/chemokines present in BAL at 5 or 24 hr post-injury: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Rats with LC, CASP, LC+CASP all had severe lung injury compared to uninjured controls based on decreased arterial oxygenation and/or increased BAL albumin at 5 or 24 hr post-insult. However, the injury groups had distinct overall patterns of inflammation that allowed them to be discriminated accurately by hierarchical cluster analysis (29/30 and 35/37 rats were correctly classified in hierarchical clusters at 5 and 24 hr, respectively). Moreover, predictive analyses based on an extension of standard receiver operator characteristic (ROC) methodology discriminated individual animals and groups with similar high accuracy based on a maximum of two inflammatory parameters per group (29/30 and 36/37 rats were correctly classified at 5 hr and 24 hr, respectively). These results support the possibility that inflammatory biomarker profiles could be developed in the future to improve the diagnosis and management of trauma patients with unwitnessed (occult) gastric aspiration who have an increased risk of clinical acute lung injury (ALI) or the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). PMID:20009665

  1. Anti-proline-glycine-proline or antielastin autoantibodies are not evident in chronic inflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Greene, Catherine M; Low, Teck Boon; O'Neill, Shane J; McElvaney, Noel G

    2010-01-01

    In patients with chronic inflammatory lung disease, pulmonary proteases can generate neoantigens from elastin and collagen with the potential to fuel autoreactive immune responses. Antielastin peptide antibodies have been implicated in the pathogenesis of tobacco-smoke-induced emphysema. Collagen-derived peptides may also play a role. To determine whether autoantibodies directed against elastin- and collagen-derived peptides are present in plasma from three groups of patients with chronic inflammatory lung disease compared with a nonsmoking healthy control group and to identify whether autoimmune responses to these peptides may be an important component of the disease process in these patients. A total of 124 patients or healthy control subjects were recruited for the study (Z-A1AT deficiency, n = 20; cystic fibrosis, n = 40; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, n = 31; healthy control, n = 33). C-reactive protein, IL-32, and antinuclear antibodies were quantified. Antielastin and anti-N-acetylated-proline-glycine-proline autoantibodies were measured by reverse ELISA. All patients were deemed stable and noninfective on the basis of the absence of clinical or radiographic evidence of recent infection. There were no significant differences in the levels of autoantibodies or IL-32 in the patients groups compared with the healthy control subjects. Antielastin or anti-N-acetylated proline-glycine-proline autoantibodies are not evident in chronic inflammatory lung disease.

  2. Inflammatory responses to influenza vaccination at the extremes of age.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jacqueline U; Zhong, Ziyun; Groves, Helen T; Tregoning, John S

    2017-08-01

    Age affects the immune response to vaccination, with individuals at the extremes of age responding poorly. The initial inflammatory response to antigenic materials shapes the subsequent adaptive response and so understanding is required about the effect of age on the profile of acute inflammatory mediators. In this study we measured the local and systemic inflammatory response after influenza vaccination or infection in neonatal, young adult and aged mice. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with inactivated influenza vaccine with and without the adjuvant MF59 and then challenged with H1N1 influenza. Age was the major factor affecting the inflammatory profile after vaccination: neonatal mice had more interleukin-1α (IL-1α), C-reactive protein (CRP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF), young adults more tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF), and elderly mice more interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), IL-2RA and interferon-γ-induced protein 10 (IP10). Notably the addition of MF59 induced IL-5, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), Keratinocyte Chemotractant (KC) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1) in all ages of animals and levels of these cytokines correlated with antibody responses. Age also had an impact on the efficacy of vaccination: neonatal and young adult mice were protected against challenge, but aged mice were not. There were striking differences in the localization of the cytokine response depending on the route of exposure: vaccination led to a high serum response whereas intranasal infection led to a low serum response but a high lung response. In conclusion, we demonstrate that age affects the inflammatory response to both influenza vaccination and infection. These age-induced differences need to be considered when developing vaccination strategies for different age groups. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory reaction in acute lung injury via regulating inflammation and redox status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianfeng; Liu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yingxun; Ma, Chunhua

    2015-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) represents a clinical syndrome that results from complex responses of the lung to a multitude of direct and indirect insults. This study aims to evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol (EUL) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory reaction in ALI. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (0.5 mg/kg), and EUL (5, and 10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 1h prior to LPS administration. After 6h, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were collected. The findings suggest that the protective mechanism of EUL may be attributed partly to decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines through the regulating inflammation and redox status. The results support that use of EUL is beneficial in the treatment of ALI.

  4. Ethanol, ethyl and sodium pyruvate decrease the inflammatory responses of human lung epithelial cells via Akt and NF-κB in vitro but have a low impact on hepatocellular cells.

    PubMed

    Relja, B; Omid, N; Wagner, N; Mörs, K; Werner, I; Juengel, E; Perl, M; Marzi, I

    2016-02-01

    mechanisms involve reduced phosphorylation of Akt and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65. We noted that as with EtP, EtOH reduced the inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells under acute inflammatory conditions. However, due to the low impact which EtP and EtOH had on the hepatocellular cells, our data suggest that both substances exerted different effects depending on the cellular entity. The possible underlying mechanisms involved the downregulation of Akt and the transcription factor NF-κB, but further research on this subject is required.

  5. The effect of ozone on inflammatory cell infiltration and airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheis, A.J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory cells may contribute to the development of exaggerated bronchoconstrictor responses since a persistent link has been noted between pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. In these studies guinea pigs were exposed to 2.0 ppm ozone for 4 hours, then immediately sacrificed or allowed to breathe filtered air for up to 14 days. Following ozone exposure there was an immediate massive neutrophil infiltration into the lung. Neutrophils in lung digest dropped to control values within 3-12 hours post-ozone but remained elevated in BAL fluid for 3 days. There was probable eosinophil degranulation within the first 24 hours post-ozone. Guinea pigs were hyperresponsive to vigal stimulation through 3 days post-ozone. Although they were also hyperresponsive to ACh, responses to MCh were unchanged. Neuronal M[sub 2] receptors were dysfunctional through 3 days post-ozone. There was resolution of inflammation, airway responsiveness, and neuronal M[sub 2] receptor function by 14 days post-exposure. This investigation has (1) confirmed an immediate lung inflammation following acute ozone exposure; (2) established that cells in BAL give a distorted reflection of inflammatory events in lung digest; (3) demonstrated that ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness is at least partially due to efferent cholinergic mechanisms without functional changes of muscarinic receptors on airway smooth muscle; (4) shown that ACh may not be an appropriate agent to test ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness; and (5) demonstrated that inhibitory neuronal M[sub 2] receptors are dysfunctional following ozone exposure. There was close linkage between these events, suggesting that they may be causally related. This investigation proposes a specific mechanism, dysfunction of neuronal M[sub 2] receptors, by which inflammatory cells could cause airway hyperresponsiveness following acute ozone exposure.

  6. Potential of anti-inflammatory treatment for cystic fibrosis lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L; Von Kessel, Kelsey A; Young, Robert; Nichols, David P

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-shortening genetic disorder in Caucasians. With improved diagnosis and treatment, survival has steadily increased. Unfortunately, the overwhelming majority of patients still die from respiratory failure caused by structural damage resulting from airway obstruction, recurrent infection, and inflammation. Here, we discuss the role of inflammation and the development of anti-inflammatory therapies to treat CF lung disease. The inflammatory host response is the least addressed component of CF airway disease at this time. Current challenges in both preclinical and clinical investigation make the identification of suitable anti-inflammatory drugs more difficult. Despite this, many researchers are making significant progress toward this goal and the CF research community has reason to believe that new therapies will emerge from these efforts. PMID:22096358

  7. The innate immune function of airway epithelial cells in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Pieter S.; McCray, Paul B.; Bals, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The airway epithelium is now considered central to the orchestration of pulmonary inflammatory and immune responses, and is also key to tissue remodelling. It acts as a first barrier in the defence against a wide range of inhaled challenges, and is critically involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses to these challenges. Recent progress in our understanding of the developmental regulation of this tissue, the differentiation pathways, recognition of pathogens and antimicrobial responses is now exploited to help understand how epithelial cell function and dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory lung diseases. In the review, advances in our knowledge of the biology of airway epithelium, as well as its role and (dys)function in asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis, are discussed. PMID:25700381

  8. Noninvasive assessment of localized inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Weng, Hong; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases are associated with the accumulation of activated inflammatory cells, particularly polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), which release reactive oxygen species (ROS) to eradicate foreign bodies and microorganisms. To assess the location and extent of localized inflammatory responses, L-012, a highly-sensitive chemiluminescence probe, was employed to non-invasively monitor the production of ROS. We find that L-012-associated chemiluminescence imaging can be used to identify and to quantify the extent of inflammatory responses. Furthermore, regardless of differences among animal models, there is a good linear relationship between chemiluminescence intensity and PMN numbers surrounding inflamed tissue. Depletion of PMN substantially diminished L-012-associated chemiluminescence in vivo. Finally, L-012-associated chemiluminescence imaging was found to be a powerful tool for assessing implant-mediated inflammatory responses by measuring chemiluminescent intensities at the implantation sites. These results support the use of L-012 for monitoring the kinetics of inflammatory responses in vivo via the detection and quantification of ROS production. PMID:22080048

  9. Extracellular Cyclophilins Contribute to the Regulation of Inflammatory Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kamalpreet; Gwinn, William M.; Bower, Molly A.; Watson, Alan; Okwumabua, Ifeanyi; MacDonald, H. Robson; Bukrinsky, Michael I.; Constant, Stephanie L.

    2010-01-01

    The main regulators of leukocyte trafficking during inflammatory responses are chemokines. However, another class of recently identified chemotactic agents is extracellular cyclophilins, the proteins mostly known as receptors for the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A. Cyclophilins can induce leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro and have been detected at elevated levels in inflamed tissues, suggesting that they might contribute to inflammatory responses. We recently identified CD147 as the main signaling receptor for cyclophilin A. In the current study we examined the contribution of cyclophilin-CD147 interactions to inflammatory responses in vivo using a mouse model of acute lung injury. Blocking cyclophilin-CD147 interactions by targeting CD147 (using anti-CD147 Ab) or cyclophilin (using nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporine A analog) reduced tissue neutrophilia by up to 50%, with a concurrent decrease in tissue pathology. These findings are the first to demonstrate the significant contribution of cyclophilins to inflammatory responses and provide a potentially novel approach for reducing inflammation-mediated diseases. PMID:15972687

  10. Preferential expansion of pro-inflammatory Tregs in human non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Joseph D.; Blatner, Nichole R.; Haghi, Leila; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Meyerson, Shari L.; Heiferman, Michael J.; Heiferman, Jeffrey R.; Gounari, Fotini; Bentrem, David J.; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the USA. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) normally function to temper immune responses and decrease inflammation. Previous research has demonstrated different subsets of Tregs with contrasting anti- or pro-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to determine Treg subset distributions and characteristics present in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Peripheral blood was collected from healthy controls (HC) and NSCLC patients preceding surgical resection, and mononuclear cells were isolated, stained, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Tregs were defined by expression of CD4 and CD25 and classified into CD45RA+Foxp3int (naïve, Fr. I) or CD45RA−Foxp3hi (activated Fr. II). Activated conventional T cells were CD4+CD45RA−Foxp3int (Fr. III). Results Samples from 23 HC and 26 NSCLC patients were collected. Tregs isolated from patients with NSCLC were found to have enhanced suppressive function on naive T cells. Cancer patients had significantly increased frequencies of activated Tregs (fraction II: FrII), 17.5 versus 3.2 % (P < 0.001). FrII Tregs demonstrated increased RORγt and IL17 expression and decreased IL10 expression compared to Tregs from HC, indicating pro-inflammatory characteristics. Conclusions This study demonstrates that a novel subset of Tregs with pro-inflammatory characteristics preferentially expand in NSCLC patients. This Treg subset appears identical to previously reported pro-inflammatory Tregs in human colon cancer patients and in mouse models of polyposis. We expect the pro-inflammatory Tregs in lung cancer to contribute to the immune pathogenesis of disease and propose that targeting this Treg subset may have protective benefits in NSCLC. PMID:26047578

  11. Eriodictyol, a plant flavonoid, attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury through its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, GUANG-FA; GUO, HONG-JUAN; HUANG, YAN; WU, CHUN-TING; ZHANG, XIANG-FENG

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by excessive inflammatory responses and oxidative injury in the lung tissue. It has been suggested that anti-inflammatory or antioxidative agents could have therapeutic effects in ALI, and eriodictyol has been reported to exhibit antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of eriodictyol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in a mouse model. The mice were divided into four groups: Phosphate-buffered saline-treated healthy control, LPS-induced ALI, vehicle-treated ALI (LPS + vehicle) and eriodictyol-treated ALI (LPS + eriodictyol). Eriodictyol (30 mg/kg) was administered orally once, 2 days before the induction of ALI. The data showed that eriodictyol pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced ALI through its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity. Furthermore, the eriodictyol pretreatment activated the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in the ALI mouse model, which attenuated the oxidative injury and inhibited the inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. In combination, the results of the present study demonstrated that eriodictyol could alleviate the LPS-induced lung injury in mice by regulating the Nrf2 pathway and inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting that eriodictyol could be used as a potential drug for the treatment of LPS-induced lung injury. PMID:26668626

  12. Targeting PPAR receptors in the airway for the treatment of inflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Belvisi, Maria G; Mitchell, Jane A

    2009-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARgamma regulates several metabolic pathways by binding to sequence-specific PPAR response elements in the promoter region of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and glucose metabolism. However, more recently PPARgamma, PPARalpha and PPARbeta/delta agonists have been demonstrated to exhibit anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties thus opening up new avenues for research. The actions of PPARgamma and PPARalpha activation are thought to be due to their ability to down regulate pro-inflammatory gene expression and inflammatory cell functions, and as such makes them an attractive target for novel drug intervention. Interestingly, PPARbeta/delta has been shown to be involved in wound healing, angiogenesis, lipid metabolism and thrombosis. In this review we will focus on the data describing the beneficial effects of these ligands in the airway and in the pulmonary vasculature and in vivo in animal models of allergic and occupational asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. A clinical trial is underway to examine the effect of rosiglitazone in asthma patients and the outcome of this trial is awaited with much anticipation. In conclusion, PPARs are novel targets for lung disease and continued work with these ligands may result in a potential new treatment for chronic inflammatory lung diseases.

  13. The Role of Inflammasome in Inflammatory Macrophage in Mycobacterium Avium Complex-lung Disease and Mycobacterium Abscessus-lung Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-27

    To Investigate the Inflammasome Response of Inflammatory and Resting Macrophage; To Compare the Difference of Inflammasome Response of Inflammatory Macrophage; To Study the Diagnostic Aid From Immunological Markers in Inflammasome Response

  14. CXCR3 May Help Regulate the Inflammatory Response in Acute Lung Injury via a Pathway Modulated by IL-10 Secreted by CD8 + CD122+ Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Li; Wu, Wei; Lu, Zhibing; Zhu, Gangyan; Liu, Juan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of CXCR3 and IL-10 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). ALI was induced by LPS injection (10 mg/kg) via the tail vein in C57BL/6 mice. Mice were sacrificed after 2 or 12 h to examine the levels of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and histopathologic assessments. At 12 h after LPS injection, mice exhibited more severe lung infiltration by CD8+ T cell and less infiltration by CD8+CD122+ regulatory T cells than at 2 h after LPS challenge or in the control (mice not exposed to LPS). At 12 h, IFN-γ, CXCR3, and CXCL10 were significantly higher in the lungs. IL-10 in the lungs was significantly lower. CXCR3 may help to recruit CD8+ T cells and promotes IFN-γ and CXCL10 release. Such effects could be inhibited by IL-10 secreted by CD8+CD122+ regulatory T cells.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory in acute lung injury by suppressing COX-2 and NF-kB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Yu-Tao; Xiao, Lu; Zhu, Lingpeng; Wang, Qiujuan; Yan, Tianhua

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory in acute lung injury. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice and the possible mechanisms involved in this protection were investigated. Pretreatment with apigenin prior to the administration of intratracheal LPS significantly induced a decrease in lung wet weight/dry weight ratio in total leukocyte number and neutrophil percent in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and in IL-6 and IL-1β, the tumor neurosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the BALF. These results showed that anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin against the LPS-induced ALI may be due to its ability of primary inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) gene expression of lung. The results presented here suggest that the protective mechanism of apigenin may be attributed partly to decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines through the inhibition of COX-2 and NF-kB activation. The results support that use of apigenin is beneficial in the treatment of ALI.

  16. Endothelial Response to Glucocorticoids in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zielińska, Karolina A.; Van Moortel, Laura; Opdenakker, Ghislain; De Bosscher, Karolien; Van den Steen, Philippe E.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelium plays a crucial role in inflammation. A balanced control of inflammation requires the action of glucocorticoids (GCs), steroidal hormones with potent cell-specific anti-inflammatory properties. Besides the classic anti-inflammatory effects of GCs on leukocytes, recent studies confirm that endothelial cells also represent an important target for GCs. GCs regulate different aspects of endothelial physiology including expression of adhesion molecules, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity. However, the regulation of endothelial GC sensitivity remains incompletely understood. In this review, we specifically examine the endothelial response to GCs in various inflammatory diseases ranging from multiple sclerosis, stroke, sepsis, and vasculitis to atherosclerosis. Shedding more light on the cross talk between GCs and endothelium will help to improve existing therapeutic strategies and develop new therapies better tailored to the needs of patients. PMID:28018358

  17. Particulate oil shale inhalation and pulmonary inflammatory response in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.S.; Holland, L.M.; Halleck, M.S.; Martinez, E.; Saunders, G.

    1983-01-01

    This experiment detrimetal that long-term inhalation of shale dusts by rats elicits a limited inflammatory response in the lung less profound than that observed in animals exposed to equivalent levels of quartz alone. This observation suggests that organic and inorganic constituents of shale may provide a protective effect. The implications for fibrogenic disease are two-fold: (1) inhalation of oil shale dusts appeared to be less detriemtal than the inhalation of quartz along, and (2) there was no apparent synergistic action of quartz and the complex of organic materials present in shale. Animals exposed to shale dusts failed to develop any significant lung lesions, while all of the animals exposed to quartz developed granulomas and some frank fibrosis.

  18. Multiphoton microscopy and microspectroscopy for diagnostics of inflammatory and neoplastic lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Flanders, James; Southard, Teresa L.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2012-03-01

    Limitations of current medical procedures for detecting early lung cancers inspire the need for new diagnostic imaging modalities for the direct microscopic visualization of lung nodules. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides for subcellular resolution imaging of intrinsic fluorescence from unprocessed tissue with minimal optical attenuation and photodamage. We demonstrate that MPM detects morphological and spectral features of lung tissue and differentiates between normal, inflammatory and neoplastic lung. Ex vivo MPM imaging of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence was performed on mouse and canine neoplastic, inflammatory and tumor-free lung sites. Results showed that MPM detected microanatomical differences between tumor-free and neoplastic lung tissue similar to standard histopathology but without the need for tissue processing. Furthermore, inflammatory sites displayed a distinct red-shifted fluorescence compared to neoplasms in both mouse and canine lung, and adenocarcinomas displayed a less pronounced fluorescence emission in the 500 to 550 nm region compared to adenomas in mouse models of lung cancer. These spectral distinctions were also confirmed by two-photon excited fluorescence microspectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of applying MPM imaging of intrinsic fluorescence for the differentiation of lung neoplasms, inflammatory and tumor-free lung, which motivates the application of multiphoton endoscopy for the in situ imaging of lung nodules.

  19. Expression changes of inflammatory factors in the rat lung of decompression sickness induced by fast buoyancy ascent escape.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Tao; Fang, Yi-Qun; You, Pu; Bao, Xiao-Chen; Yuan, Heng-Rong; Ma, Jun; Wang, Fang-Fang; Li, Kai-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Fast buoyancy ascent escape is one of the major naval submarine escape maneuvers. Decompression sickness (DCS) is the major bottleneck to increase the depth of fast buoyancy ascent escape. Rapid decompression induces the release of inflammatory mediators and results in tissue inflammation cascades and a protective anti-inflammatory response. In our previous study, we found that DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape could induce acute lung injury (ALI) and the expression changes of the proinflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in rat lung tissue. In order to study the expression change characteristics of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 in the rat lung of DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape, we detected the rat lung mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 at 0.5 hour after DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape (fast escape group), compared with the normal control group (control group) and diving DCS (decompression group). We observed that DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape could increase the mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and the protein levels of TNF-α, IL-10 in rat lung tissue. At the same time, we found that the protein level of IL-13 was also downregulated in rat lung tissue. TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-13 may be involved in the process of the rat lung injury of DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape. In conclusion, the expression changes of inflammatory factors in the rat lung of DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape were probably different from that in the rat lung of diving DCS, which indicated that the pathological mechanism of DCS caused by simulated fast buoyancy ascent escape might be different from that of diving DCS.

  20. Natural Products: Insights into Leishmaniasis Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Igor A.; Mazotto, Ana Maria; Cardoso, Verônica; Alves, Renan L.; Amaral, Ana Claudia F.; Silva, Jefferson Rocha de Andrade; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Vermelho, Alane B.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that affects several populations worldwide, against which there are no vaccines available and the chemotherapy is highly toxic. Depending on the species causing the infection, the disease is characterized by commitment of tissues, including the skin, mucous membranes, and internal organs. Despite the relevance of host inflammatory mediators on parasite burden control, Leishmania and host immune cells interaction may generate an exacerbated proinflammatory response that plays an important role in the development of leishmaniasis clinical manifestations. Plant-derived natural products have been recognized as bioactive agents with several properties, including anti-protozoal and anti-inflammatory activities. The present review focuses on the antileishmanial activity of plant-derived natural products that are able to modulate the inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. The capability of crude extracts and some isolated substances in promoting an anti-inflammatory response during Leishmania infection may be used as part of an effective strategy to fight the disease. PMID:26538837

  1. Application of 'omics technologies to biomarker discovery in inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Wheelock, Craig E; Goss, Victoria M; Balgoma, David; Nicholas, Ben; Brandsma, Joost; Skipp, Paul J; Snowden, Stuart; Burg, Dominic; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Horvath, Ildiko; Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Ahmed, Hassan; Ballereau, Stéphane; Rossios, Christos; Chung, Kian Fan; Montuschi, Paolo; Fowler, Stephen J; Adcock, Ian M; Postle, Anthony D; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Rowe, Anthony; Sterk, Peter J; Auffray, Charles; Djukanovic, Ratko

    2013-09-01

    Inflammatory lung diseases are highly complex in respect of pathogenesis and relationships between inflammation, clinical disease and response to treatment. Sophisticated large-scale analytical methods to quantify gene expression (transcriptomics), proteins (proteomics), lipids (lipidomics) and metabolites (metabolomics) in the lungs, blood and urine are now available to identify biomarkers that define disease in terms of combined clinical, physiological and patho-biological abnormalities. The aspiration is that these approaches will improve diagnosis, i.e. define pathological phenotypes, and facilitate the monitoring of disease and therapy, and also, unravel underlying molecular pathways. Biomarker studies can either select predefined biomarker(s) measured by specific methods or apply an "unbiased" approach involving detection platforms that are indiscriminate in focus. This article reviews the technologies presently available to study biomarkers of lung disease within the 'omics field. The contributions of the individual 'omics analytical platforms to the field of respiratory diseases are summarised, with the goal of providing background on their respective abilities to contribute to systems medicine-based studies of lung disease.

  2. Inflammatory lipid mediator generation elicited by viable hemolysin- forming Escherichia coli in lung vasculature

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli hemolysin, a transmembrane pore-forming exotoxin, is considered an important virulence factor for E. coli-related extraintestinal infections and sepsis. The possible significance of hemolysin liberation for induction of inflammatory lipid mediators was investigated in isolated rabbit lungs infused with viable bacteria (concentration range, 10(4)-10(7)/ml). Hemolysin-secreting E. coli (E. coli-Hly+), but not an E. coli strain that releases an inactive form of the exotoxin, induced marked lung leukotriene (LT) generation with predominance of cysteinyl LTs. Eicosanoid synthesis was not inhibited in the presence of plasma with toxin-neutralizing capacity. Pre- application of 2 x 10(8) human granulocytes, which sequestered in the lung microvasculature, caused a severalfold increase in leukotriene generation in response to E. coli-Hly+ challenge both in the absence and presence of plasma. Data are presented indicating neutrophil- endothelial cell cooperation in arachidonic acid lipoxygenase metabolism as an underlying mechanism. We conclude that liberation of hemolysin from viable E. coli induces marked lipid mediator generation in lung vasculature, which is potentiated in the presence of neutrophil sequestration and may contribute to microcirculatory disturbances during the course of severe infections. PMID:2120384

  3. Basophils, cytokines, and the allergic inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    DuBuske, L M

    1996-01-01

    Immediate allergic response has long been recognized to be related to the activation of mast cells by antigen. The role of the mast cells as producers of cytokines, however, has only more recently been extensively studied. The effect of TH2 lymphocytes in the inflammatory process is now well recognized in animal models. The central role of cytokines in the allergic inflammatory response is currently an area of intense clinical investigation. Cytokines influence production, migration, and activation of basophils. A wide array of cytokines is produced by mast cells upon initiation of the immediate allergic response. These cytokines influence a number of other different cells including basophils and eosinophils, and also activate lymphocytes, thus perpetuating allergic inflammation.

  4. Mouse lung slices: An ex vivo model for the evaluation of antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; An, Liwei; Liu, Ge; Li, Xiaoyu; Tang, Wei; Chen, Xulin

    2015-08-01

    The influenza A virus is notoriously known for its ability to cause recurrent epidemics and global pandemics. Antiviral therapy is effective when treatment is initiated within 48h of symptom onset, and delaying treatment beyond this time frame is associated with decreased efficacy. Research on anti-inflammatory therapy to ameliorate influenza-induced inflammation is currently underway and seems important to the impact on the clinical outcome. Both antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently needed. Current methods for evaluating the efficacy of anti-influenza drugs rely mostly on transformed cells and animals. Transformed cell models are distantly related to physiological and pathological conditions. Although animals are the best choices for preclinical drug testing, they are not time- or cost-efficient. In this study, we established an ex vivo model using mouse lung slices to evaluate both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection. Both influenza virus PR8 (H1N1) and A/Human/Hubei/3/2005 (H3N2) can replicate efficiently in mouse lung slices and trigger significant cytokine and chemokine responses. The induction of selected cytokines and chemokines were found to have a positive correlation between ex vivo and in vivo experiments, suggesting that the ex vivo cultured lung slices may closely resemble the lung functionally in an in vivo configuration when challenged by influenza virus. Furthermore, a set of agents with known antiviral and/or anti-inflammatory activities were tested to validate the ex vivo model. Our results suggested that mouse lung slices provide a robust, convenient and cost-efficient model for the assessment of both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection in one assay. This ex vivo model may predict the efficacy of drug candidates' antiviral and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo.

  5. Regulation of inflammation by PPARs: a future approach to treat lung inflammatory diseases?

    PubMed

    Becker, Julien; Delayre-Orthez, Carine; Frossard, Nelly; Pons, Françoise

    2006-10-01

    Lung inflammatory diseases, such as acute lung injury (ALI), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung fibrosis, represent a major health problem worldwide. Although glucocorticoids are the most potent anti-inflammatory drug in asthma, they exhibit major side effects and have poor activity in lung inflammatory disorders such as ALI or COPD. Therefore, there is growing need for the development of alternative or new therapies to treat inflammation in the lung. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), including the three isotypes PPARalpha, PPARbeta (or PPARdelta) and PPARgamma, are transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARs, and in particular PPARalpha and PPARgamma, are well known for their critical role in the regulation of energy homeostasis by controlling expression of a variety of genes involved in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Synthetic ligands of the two receptor isotypes, the fibrates and the thiazolidinediones, are clinically used to treat dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Recently however, PPARalpha and PPARgamma have been shown to exert a potent anti-inflammatory activity, mainly through their ability to downregulate pro-inflammatory gene expression and inflammatory cell functions. The present article reviews the current knowledge of the role of PPARalpha and PPARgamma in controlling inflammation, and presents different findings suggesting that PPARalpha and PPARgamma activators may be helpful in the treatment of lung inflammatory diseases.

  6. Lung carcinogenesis from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and contribution of signal transducers and lung stem cells in the inflammatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yasuo; Hata, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are closely related. The annual incidence of lung cancer arising from COPD has been reported to be 0.8-1.7 %. Treatment of lung cancer from COPD is very difficult due to low cardiopulmonary function, rapid tumor growth, and resistance to molecularly targeted therapies. Chronic inflammation caused by toxic gases can induce COPD and lung cancer. Carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment occurs during cycles of tissue injury and repair. Cellular damage can induce induction of necrotic cell death and loss of tissue integrity. Quiescent normal stem cells or differentiated progenitor cells are introduced to repair injured tissues. However, inflammatory mediators may promote the growth of bronchioalveolar stem cells, and activation of NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) play crucial roles in the development of lung cancer from COPD. Many of the protumorgenic effects of NF-κB and STAT3 activation in immune cells are mediated through paracrine signaling. NF-κB and STAT3 also contribute to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. To improve lung cancer treatment outcomes, lung cancer from COPD must be overcome. In this article, we review the characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment. We also propose the necessity of identifying the mechanisms underlying progression of COPD to lung cancer, and comment on the clinical implications with respect to lung cancer prevention, screening, and therapy.

  7. Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage induces distant inflammatory lung injury in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Arruza, Luis; Pazos, M Ruth; Mohammed, Nagat; Escribano, Natalia; Lafuente, Hector; Santos, Martín; Alvarez-Díaz, Francisco J; Martínez-Orgado, Jose

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to investigate whether neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury induces inflammatory lung damage. Thus, hypoxic (HYP, FiO2 10% for 30 min), ischemic (ISC, bilateral carotid flow interruption for 30 min), or HI event was performed in 1-2-d-old piglets. Dynamic compliance (Cdyn), oxygenation index (OI), and extravascular lung water (EVLW) were monitored for 6 h. Then, histologic damage was assessed in brain and lung (lung injury severity score). Total protein content (TPC) was determined in broncoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and IL-1β concentration was measured in lung and brain tissues and blood. Piglets without hypoxia or ischemia served as controls (SHM). HI-induced brain damage was associated with decreased Cdyn, increased OI and EVLW, and histologic lung damage (interstitial leukocyte infiltration, congestive hyperemia, and interstitial edema). BALF TPC was increased, suggesting inflammatory damage. In agreement, tissue IL-1β concentration increased in the brain and lung, in correspondence with increased IL-1β serum concentration. Neither HYP nor ISC alone led to brain or lung damage. HI brain damage in newborn piglets led to inflammatory lung damage, suggesting an additional mechanism accounting for the development of lung dysfunction after neonatal HI encephalopathy.

  8. Targeting PPAR receptors in the airway for the treatment of inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Belvisi, Maria G; Mitchell, Jane A

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARγ regulates several metabolic pathways by binding to sequence-specific PPAR response elements in the promoter region of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and glucose metabolism. However, more recently PPARγ, PPARα and PPARβ/δ agonists have been demonstrated to exhibit anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties thus opening up new avenues for research. The actions of PPARγ and PPARα activation are thought to be due to their ability to down regulate pro-inflammatory gene expression and inflammatory cell functions, and as such makes them an attractive target for novel drug intervention. Interestingly, PPARβ/δ has been shown to be involved in wound healing, angiogenesis, lipid metabolism and thrombosis. In this review we will focus on the data describing the beneficial effects of these ligands in the airway and in the pulmonary vasculature and in vivo in animal models of allergic and occupational asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. A clinical trial is underway to examine the effect of rosiglitazone in asthma patients and the outcome of this trial is awaited with much anticipation. In conclusion, PPARs are novel targets for lung disease and continued work with these ligands may result in a potential new treatment for chronic inflammatory lung diseases. This article is part of a themed issue on Mediators and Receptors in the Resolution of Inflammation. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19703165

  9. Inflammatory monocytes hinder antiviral B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Kuka, Mirela; Di Lucia, Pietro; de Oya, Nereida Jimenez; De Giovanni, Marco; Fioravanti, Jessica; Cristofani, Claudia; Maganuco, Carmela G.; Fallet, Benedict; Ganzer, Lucia; Sironi, Laura; Mainetti, Marta; Ostuni, Renato; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Philip D.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Guidotti, Luca G.; Iannacone, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are critical for protection against viral infections. However, several viruses, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), avoid the induction of early protective antibody responses by poorly understood mechanisms. Here we analyzed the spatiotemporal dynamics of B cell activation to show that, upon subcutaneous infection, LCMV-specific B cells readily relocate to the interfollicular and T cell areas of the draining lymph node where they extensively interact with CD11b+Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes. These myeloid cells were recruited to lymph nodes draining LCMV infection sites in a type I interferon-, CCR2-dependent fashion and they suppressed antiviral B cell responses by virtue of their ability to produce nitric oxide. Depletion of inflammatory monocytes, inhibition of their lymph node recruitment or impairment of their nitric oxide-producing ability enhanced LCMV-specific B cell survival and led to robust neutralizing antibody production. In conclusion, our results identify inflammatory monocytes as critical gatekeepers that prevent antiviral B cell responses and suggest that certain viruses take advantage of these cells to prolong their persistence within the host. PMID:27868108

  10. Analyzing inflammatory response as excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yde, Pernille; Høgh Jensen, Mogens; Trusina, Ala

    2011-11-01

    The regulatory system of the transcription factor NF-κB plays a great role in many cell functions, including inflammatory response. Interestingly, the NF-κB system is known to up-regulate production of its own triggering signal—namely, inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-1, and IL-6. In this paper we investigate a previously presented model of the NF-κB, which includes both spatial effects and the positive feedback from cytokines. The model exhibits the properties of an excitable medium and has the ability to propagate waves of high cytokine concentration. These waves represent an optimal way of sending an inflammatory signal through the tissue as they create a chemotactic signal able to recruit neutrophils to the site of infection. The simple model displays three qualitatively different states; low stimuli leads to no or very little response. Intermediate stimuli leads to reoccurring waves of high cytokine concentration. Finally, high stimuli leads to a sustained high cytokine concentration, a scenario which is toxic for the tissue cells and corresponds to chronic inflammation. Due to the few variables of the simple model, we are able to perform a phase-space analysis leading to a detailed understanding of the functional form of the model and its limitations. The spatial effects of the model contribute to the robustness of the cytokine wave formation and propagation.

  11. Electronic cigarette exposure triggers neutrophil inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Higham, Andrew; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Dewhurst, Jennifer A; Trivedi, Drupad K; Fowler, Stephen J; Goodacre, Royston; Singh, Dave

    2016-05-17

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) is increasing and there is widespread perception that e-cigs are safe. E-cigs contain harmful chemicals; more research is needed to evaluate the safety of e-cig use. Our aim was to investigate the effects of e-cigs on the inflammatory response of human neutrophils. Neutrophils were exposed to e-cig vapour extract (ECVE) and the expression of CD11b and CD66b was measured by flow cytometry and MMP-9 and CXCL8 by ELISA. We also measured the activity of neutrophil elastase (NE) and MMP-9, along with the activation of inflammatory signalling pathways. Finally we analysed the biochemical composition of ECVE by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. ECVE caused an increase in the expression of CD11b and CD66b, and increased the release of MMP-9 and CXCL8. Furthermore, there was an increase in NE and MMP-9 activity and an increase in p38 MAPK activation. We also identified several harmful chemicals in ECVE, including known carcinogens. ECVE causes a pro-inflammatory response from human neutrophils. This raises concerns over the safety of e-cig use.

  12. Kinetics of lung lesion development and pro-inflammatory cytokine response in pigs with vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease induced by challenge with pandemic (2009) A/H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Gauger, P C; Vincent, A L; Loving, C L; Henningson, J N; Lager, K M; Janke, B H; Kehrli, M E; Roth, J A

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this report was to characterize the enhanced clinical disease and lung lesions observed in pigs vaccinated with inactivated H1N2 swine δ-cluster influenza A virus and challenged with pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 human influenza virus. Eighty-four, 6-week-old, cross-bred pigs were randomly allocated into 3 groups of 28 pigs to represent vaccinated/challenged (V/C), non-vaccinated/challenged (NV/C), and non-vaccinated/non-challenged (NV/NC) control groups. Pigs were intratracheally inoculated with pH1N1 and euthanized at 1, 2, 5, and 21 days post inoculation (dpi). Macroscopically, V/C pigs demonstrated greater percentages of pneumonia compared to NV/C pigs. Histologically, V/C pigs demonstrated severe bronchointerstitial pneumonia with necrotizing bronchiolitis accompanied by interlobular and alveolar edema and hemorrhage at 1 and 2 dpi. The magnitude of peribronchiolar lymphocytic cuffing was greater in V/C pigs by 5 dpi. Microscopic lung lesion scores were significantly higher in the V/C pigs at 2 and 5 dpi compared to NV/C and NV/NC pigs. Elevated TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at all time points in V/C pigs compared to NV/C pigs. These data suggest H1 inactivated vaccines followed by heterologous challenge resulted in potentiated clinical signs and enhanced pulmonary lesions and correlated with an elevated proinflammatory cytokine response in the lung. The lung alterations and host immune response are consistent with the vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) clinical outcome observed reproducibly in this swine model.

  13. CD11b immunophenotyping identifies inflammatory profiles in the mouse and human lungs.

    PubMed

    Duan, M; Steinfort, D P; Smallwood, D; Hew, M; Chen, W; Ernst, M; Irving, L B; Anderson, G P; Hibbs, M L

    2016-03-01

    The development of easily accessible tools for human immunophenotyping to classify patients into discrete disease endotypes is advancing personalized therapy. However, no systematic approach has been developed for the study of inflammatory lung diseases with often complex and highly heterogeneous disease etiologies. We have devised an internally standardized flow cytometry approach that can identify parallel inflammatory alveolar macrophage phenotypes in both the mouse and human lungs. In mice, lung innate immune cell alterations during endotoxin challenge, influenza virus infection, and in two genetic models of chronic obstructive lung disease could be segregated based on the presence or absence of CD11b alveolar macrophage upregulation and lung eosinophilia. Additionally, heightened alveolar macrophage CD11b expression was a novel feature of acute lung exacerbations in the SHIP-1(-/-) model of chronic obstructive lung disease, and anti-CD11b antibody administration selectively blocked inflammatory CD11b(pos) but not homeostatic CD11b(neg) alveolar macrophages in vivo. The identification of analogous profiles in respiratory disease patients highlights this approach as a translational avenue for lung disease endotyping and suggests that heterogeneous innate immune cell phenotypes are an underappreciated component of the human lung disease microenvironment.

  14. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  15. Emphysema induced by elastase enhances acute inflammatory pulmonary response to intraperitoneal LPS in rats.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Lídia Maria Carneiro; Reboredo, Maycon Moura; Lucinda, Leda Marília Fonseca; Fazza, Thaís Fernanda; Rabelo, Maria Aparecida Esteves; Fonseca, Adenilson Souza; de Paoli, Flavia; Pinheiro, Bruno Valle

    2016-12-01

    Abnormalities in lungs caused by emphysema might alter their response to sepsis and the occurrence of acute lung injury (ALI). This study compared the extension of ALI in response to intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection in Wistar rats with and without emphysema induced by elastase. Adult male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups: control, emphysema without sepsis, normal lung with sepsis and emphysema with sepsis. Sepsis was induced, and 24 h later the rats were euthanised. The following analysis was performed: blood gas measurements, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung permeability and histology. Animals that received LPS showed significant increase in a lung injury scoring system, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and IL-6, TNF-α and CXCL2 mRNA expression in lung tissue. Animals with emphysema and sepsis showed increased alveolocapillary membrane permeability, demonstrated by higher BAL/serum albumin ratio. In conclusion, the presence of emphysema induced by elastase increases the inflammatory response in the lungs to a systemic stimulus, represented in this model by the intraperitoneal injection of LPS. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2016 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  16. Chorioamnionitis-induced fetal gut injury is mediated by direct gut exposure of inflammatory mediators or by lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Tim G A M; Kramer, Boris W; Thuijls, Geertje; Kemp, Matthew W; Saito, Masatoshi; Willems, Monique G M; Senthamarai-Kannan, Paranthaman; Newnham, John P; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G

    2014-03-01

    Intra-amniotic exposure to proinflammatory agonists causes chorioamnionitis and fetal gut inflammation. Fetal gut inflammation is associated with mucosal injury and impaired gut development. We tested whether this detrimental inflammatory response of the fetal gut results from a direct local (gut derived) or an indirect inflammatory response mediated by the chorioamnion/skin or lung, since these organs are also in direct contact with the amniotic fluid. The gastrointestinal tract was isolated from the respiratory tract and the amnion/skin epithelia by fetal surgery in time-mated ewes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline (controls) was selectively infused in the gastrointestinal tract, trachea, or amniotic compartment at 2 or 6 days before preterm delivery at 124 days gestation (term 150 days). Gastrointestinal and intratracheal LPS exposure caused distinct inflammatory responses in the fetal gut. Inflammatory responses could be distinguished by the influx of leukocytes (MPO(+), CD3(+), and FoxP3(+) cells), tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ expression and differential upregulation of mRNA levels for Toll-like receptor 1, 2, 4, and 6. Fetal gut inflammation after direct intestinal LPS exposure resulted in severe loss of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and increased mitosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Inflammation of the fetal gut after selective LPS instillation in the lungs caused only mild disruption of ZO-1, loss in epithelial cell integrity, and impaired epithelial differentiation. LPS exposure of the amnion/skin epithelia did not result in gut inflammation or morphological, structural, and functional changes. Our results indicate that the detrimental consequences of chorioamnionitis on fetal gut development are the combined result of local gut and lung-mediated inflammatory responses.

  17. Chorioamnionitis-induced fetal gut injury is mediated by direct gut exposure of inflammatory mediators or by lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wolfs, Tim G. A. M.; Kramer, Boris W.; Thuijls, Geertje; Kemp, Matthew W.; Saito, Masatoshi; Willems, Monique G. M.; Senthamarai-Kannan, Paranthaman; Newnham, John P.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Intra-amniotic exposure to proinflammatory agonists causes chorioamnionitis and fetal gut inflammation. Fetal gut inflammation is associated with mucosal injury and impaired gut development. We tested whether this detrimental inflammatory response of the fetal gut results from a direct local (gut derived) or an indirect inflammatory response mediated by the chorioamnion/skin or lung, since these organs are also in direct contact with the amniotic fluid. The gastrointestinal tract was isolated from the respiratory tract and the amnion/skin epithelia by fetal surgery in time-mated ewes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline (controls) was selectively infused in the gastrointestinal tract, trachea, or amniotic compartment at 2 or 6 days before preterm delivery at 124 days gestation (term 150 days). Gastrointestinal and intratracheal LPS exposure caused distinct inflammatory responses in the fetal gut. Inflammatory responses could be distinguished by the influx of leukocytes (MPO+, CD3+, and FoxP3+ cells), tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ expression and differential upregulation of mRNA levels for Toll-like receptor 1, 2, 4, and 6. Fetal gut inflammation after direct intestinal LPS exposure resulted in severe loss of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and increased mitosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Inflammation of the fetal gut after selective LPS instillation in the lungs caused only mild disruption of ZO-1, loss in epithelial cell integrity, and impaired epithelial differentiation. LPS exposure of the amnion/skin epithelia did not result in gut inflammation or morphological, structural, and functional changes. Our results indicate that the detrimental consequences of chorioamnionitis on fetal gut development are the combined result of local gut and lung-mediated inflammatory responses. PMID:24458021

  18. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the lung: a rare cause of atelectasis in children.

    PubMed

    Dhouib, Amira; Barrazzone, Constance; Reverdin, Alexandra; Anooshiravani, Mehrak; Hanquinet, Sylviane

    2013-03-01

    Although rare, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is the most common primary lung mass in children. We report the case of an 11-year-old boy investigated for persistent cough and dyspnea with complete left lung atelectasis mimicking pneumonia. CT and MRI showed an endobronchial mass of the left main bronchus. The boy underwent endoscopic resection of the tumor and histology was in favor of an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the lung. This diagnosis should be suspected in children with recurrent pneumonia. The prognosis is good after complete resection.

  19. The nervous system of airways and its remodeling in inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Audrit, Katrin Julia; Delventhal, Lucas; Aydin, Öznur; Nassenstein, Christina

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory lung diseases are associated with bronchospasm, cough, dyspnea and airway hyperreactivity. The majority of these symptoms cannot be primarily explained by immune cell infiltration. Evidence has been provided that vagal efferent and afferent neurons play a pivotal role in this regard. Their functions can be altered by inflammatory mediators that induce long-lasting changes in vagal nerve activity and gene expression in both peripheral and central neurons, providing new targets for treatment of pulmonary inflammatory diseases.

  20. The anti-inflammatory effects of PGE2 on human lung macrophages are mediated by the EP4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sharonjit K; Yao, Yiwen; Kay, Linda J; Bewley, Martin A; Marriott, Helen M; Peachell, Peter T

    2016-11-01

    PGE2 inhibits cytokine generation from human lung macrophages. However, the EP receptor that mediates this beneficial anti-inflammatory effect of PGE2 has not been defined. The aim of this study was to identify the EP receptor by which PGE2 inhibits cytokine generation from human lung macrophages. This was determined by using recently developed EP receptor ligands. The effects of PGE2 and EP-selective agonists on LPS-induced generation of TNF-α and IL-6 from macrophages were evaluated. The effects of EP2 -selective (PF-04852946, PF-04418948) and EP4 -selective (L-161,982, CJ-042794) receptor antagonists on PGE2 responses were studied. The expression of EP receptor subtypes by human lung macrophages was determined by RT-PCR. PGE2 inhibited LPS-induced and Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced cytokine generation from human lung macrophages. Analysis of mRNA levels indicated that macrophages expressed EP2 and EP4 receptors. L-902,688 (EP4 receptor-selective agonist) was considerably more potent than butaprost (EP2 receptor-selective agonist) as an inhibitor of TNF-α generation from macrophages. EP2 receptor-selective antagonists had marginal effects on the PGE2 inhibition of TNF-α generation, whereas EP4 receptor-selective antagonists caused rightward shifts in the PGE2 concentration-response curves. These studies demonstrate that the EP4 receptor is the principal receptor that mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of PGE2 on human lung macrophages. This suggests that EP4 receptor agonists could be effective anti-inflammatory agents in human lung disease. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. B-1 cells temper endotoxemic inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Barbeiro, Denise Frediani; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Faintuch, Joel; Ariga, Suely K Kubo; Mariano, Mario; Popi, Ana Flávia; de Souza, Heraldo Possolo; Velasco, Irineu Tadeu; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2011-03-01

    Sepsis syndrome is caused by inappropriate immune activation due to bacteria and bacterial components released during infection. This syndrome is the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Specialized B-lymphocytes located in the peritoneal and pleural cavities are known as B-1 cells. These cells produce IgM and IL-10, both of which are potent regulators of cell-mediated immunity. It has been suggested that B-1 cells modulate the systemic inflammatory response in sepsis. In this study, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments in order to investigate a putative role of B-1 cells in a murine model of LPS-induced sepsis. Macrophages and B-1 cells were studied in monocultures and in co-cultures. The B-1 cells produced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in response to LPS. In the B-1 cell-macrophage co-cultures, production of proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite) was lower than in the macrophage monocultures, whereas that of IL-10 was higher in the co-cultures. Co-culture of B-1 IL-10(-/-) cells and macrophages did not reduce the production of the proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite). After LPS injection, the mortality rate was higher among Balb/Xid mice, which are B-1 cell deficient, than among wild-type mice (65.0% vs. 0.0%). The Balb/Xid mice also presented a proinflammatory profile of TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite, as well as lower levels of IL-10. In the early phase of LPS stimulation, B-1 cells modulate the macrophage inflammatory response, and the main molecular pathway of that modulation is based on IL-10-mediated intracellular signaling.

  2. The Arginine Decarboxylase Pathways of Host and Pathogen Interact to Impact Inflammatory Pathways in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Dalluge, Joseph J.; Welchlin, Cole W.; Hughes, John; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Laguna, Theresa A.; Williams, Bryan J.

    2014-01-01

    The arginine decarboxylase pathway, which converts arginine to agmatine, is present in both humans and most bacterial pathogens. In humans agmatine is a neurotransmitter with affinities towards α2-adrenoreceptors, serotonin receptors, and may inhibit nitric oxide synthase. In bacteria agmatine serves as a precursor to polyamine synthesis and was recently shown to enhance biofilm development in some strains of the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We determined agmatine is at the center of a competing metabolism in the human lung during airways infections and is influenced by the metabolic phenotypes of the infecting pathogens. Ultra performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection was used to measure agmatine in human sputum samples from patients with cystic fibrosis, spent supernatant from clinical sputum isolates, and from bronchoalvelolar lavage fluid from mice infected with P. aeruginosa agmatine mutants. Agmatine in human sputum peaks during illness, decreased with treatment and is positively correlated with inflammatory cytokines. Analysis of the agmatine metabolic phenotype in clinical sputum isolates revealed most deplete agmatine when grown in its presence; however a minority appeared to generate large amounts of agmatine presumably driving sputum agmatine to high levels. Agmatine exposure to inflammatory cells and in mice demonstrated its role as a direct immune activator with effects on TNF-α production, likely through NF-κB activation. P. aeruginosa mutants for agmatine detection and metabolism were constructed and show the real-time evolution of host-derived agmatine in the airways during acute lung infection. These experiments also demonstrated pathogen agmatine production can upregulate the inflammatory response. As some clinical isolates have adapted to hypersecrete agmatine, these combined data would suggest agmatine is a novel target for immune modulation in the host-pathogen dynamic. PMID:25350753

  3. Therapeutic Potential of Medicinal Plants and Their Constituents on Lung Inflammatory Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Pyo; Lim, Hyun; Kwon, Yong Soo

    2017-01-01

    Acute bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are essentially lung inflammatory disorders. Various plant extracts and their constituents showed therapeutic effects on several animal models of lung inflammation. These include coumarins, flavonoids, phenolics, iridoids, monoterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenoids. Some of them exerted inhibitory action mainly by inhibiting the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and nuclear transcription factor-κB activation. Especially, many flavonoid derivatives distinctly showed effectiveness on lung inflammation. In this review, the experimental data for plant extracts and their constituents showing therapeutic effectiveness on animal models of lung inflammation are summarized. PMID:27956716

  4. Pathologic response of the lung to irritant gases

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, F.R.; Runnels, L.J.; Conrad, D.A.; Teclaw, R.F.; Thacker, H.L. )

    1990-12-01

    The pathologic response of the lung to irritant gases ranges from the acute exudative phase through the subacute proliferative phase to the chronic fibrosing phase. These responses are based on damage to the Type I cells, and possibly endothelial cells, and the subsequent proliferative and repair processes in the surviving animals. Responses to high dose exposures appear at the microscopic level as exudation of protein rich fluids into alveoli (alveolar edema) and subsequent death due to anoxia. Physiologically, this could be described as a mismatch of ventilation with perfusion, resulting in impaired gas exchange. Animals surviving this acute exudative phase resolve the alveolar edema to fibrin, and Type II cells become hypertrophic and hyperplastic in the process of replacing the damaged Type I cells. The acute and subacute responses also elicit inflammatory changes in the interstitium of the lung that may progress to fibrosis in the chronic stage of a survivable exposure. Diagnostic cases in livestock involving irritant gases reflect similar toxic injuries to the lung.

  5. Recent Treatment of Interstitial Lung Disease with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kawasumi, Hidenaga; Gono, Takahisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a prognostic factor for poor outcome in polymyositis (PM)/dermatomyositis (DM). The appropriate management of ILD is very important to improve the prognosis of patients with PM/DM. ILD activity and severity depend on the disease subtype. Therefore, clinicians should determine therapeutic strategies according to the disease subtype in each patient with PM/DM. Anti–melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 antibody and hyperferritinemia predict the development and severity of rapidly progressive (RP) ILD, particularly in East Asian patients. Combination therapy with corticosteroids, intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse, and calcineurin inhibitors should be administered in RP-ILD. In contrast, patients with anti–aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) show better responses to corticosteroids alone. However, ILDs with anti-ARS often display disease recurrence or become refractory to corticosteroid monotherapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that the administration of tacrolimus or rituximab in addition to corticosteroids may be considered in ILD patients with anti-ARS. Large-scale, multicenter randomized clinical trials should be conducted in the future to confirm that the aforementioned agents exhibit efficacy in ILD patients with PM/DM. The pathophysiology of ILD with PM/DM should also be elucidated in greater detail to develop effective therapeutic strategies for patients with ILD in PM/DM. PMID:26279636

  6. Ovalbumin Sensitization Changes the Inflammatory Response to Subsequent Parainfluenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Adamko, Darryl J.; Yost, Bethany L.; Gleich, Gerald J.; Fryer, Allison D.; Jacoby, David B.

    1999-01-01

    Asthma exacerbations, many of which are virus induced, are associated with airway eosinophilia. This may reflect altered inflammatory response to viruses in atopic individuals. Inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptors (M2Rs) on the airway parasympathetic nerves limit acetylcholine release. Both viral infection and inhalational antigen challenge cause M2R dysfunction, leading to airway hyperresponsiveness. In antigen-challenged, but not virus-infected guinea pigs, M2R dysfunction is due to blockade of the receptors by the endogenous antagonist eosinophil major basic protein (MBP). We hypothesized that sensitization to a nonviral antigen before viral infection alters the inflammatory response to viral infection, so that M2R dysfunction and hyperreactivity are eosinophil mediated. Guinea pigs were sensitized to ovalbumin intraperitoneally, and 3 wk later were infected with parainfluenza. In sensitized, but not in nonsensitized animals, virus-induced hyperresponsiveness and M2R dysfunction were blocked by depletion of eosinophils with antibody to interleukin (IL)-5 or treatment with antibody to MBP. An additional and unexpected finding was that sensitization to ovalbumin caused a marked (80%) reduction in the viral content of the lungs. This was reversed by the antibody to IL-5, implicating a role for eosinophils in viral immunity. PMID:10562321

  7. Scorpion Venom and the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Petricevich, Vera L.

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion venoms consist of a complex of several toxins that exhibit a wide range of biological properties and actions, as well as chemical compositions, toxicity, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. These venoms are associated with high morbility and mortality, especially among children. Victims of envenoming by a scorpion suffer a variety of pathologies, involving mainly both sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation as well as central manifestations such as irritability, hyperthermia, vomiting, profuse salivation, tremor, and convulsion. The clinical signs and symptoms observed in humans and experimental animals are related with an excessive systemic host inflammatory response to stings and stings, respectively. Although the pathophysiology of envenomation is complex and not yet fully understood, venom and immune responses are known to trigger the release of inflammatory mediators that are largely mediated by cytokines. In models of severe systemic inflammation produced by injection of high doses of venom or venoms products, the increase in production of proinflammatory cytokines significantly contributes to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction and death. The cytokines initiate a cascade of events that lead to illness behaviors such as fever, anorexia, and also physiological events in the host such as activation of vasodilatation, hypotension, and increased of vessel permeability. PMID:20300540

  8. PDT-induced inflammatory and host responses.

    PubMed

    Firczuk, Małgorzata; Nowis, Dominika; Gołąb, Jakub

    2011-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used in the management of neoplastic and nonmalignant diseases. Its unique mechanisms of action include direct cytotoxic effects exerted towards tumor cells, destruction of tumor and peritumoral vasculature and induction of local acute inflammatory reaction. The latter develops in response to (1) damage to tumor and stromal cells that leads to the release of cell death-associated molecular patterns (CDAMs) or damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), (2) early vascular changes that include increased vascular permeability, vascular occlusion, and release of vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators, (3) activation of alternative pathway of complement leading to generation of potent chemotactic factors, and (4) induction of signaling cascades and transcription factors that trigger secretion of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases, or adhesion molecules. The majority of studies indicate that induction of local inflammatory response contributes to the antitumor effects of PDT and facilitates development of systemic immunity. However, the degree of PDT-induced inflammation and its subsequent contribution to its antitumor efficacy depend on multiple parameters, such as chemical nature, concentration and subcellular localization of the photosensitizers, the spectral characteristics of the light source, light fluence and fluence rate, oxygenation level, and tumor type. Identification of detailed molecular mechanisms and development of therapeutic approaches modulating PDT-induced inflammation will be necessary to tailor this treatment to particular clinical conditions.

  9. Inflammatory responses to infection: the Dutch contribution.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Martijn A; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2014-12-01

    At any given moment, our body is under attack by a large variety of pathogens, which aim to enter and use our body to propagate and disseminate. The extensive cellular and molecular complexity of our immune system enables us to efficiently eliminate invading pathogens or at least develop a condition in which propagation of the microorganism is reduced to a minimum. Yet, the evolutionary pressure on pathogens to circumvent our immune defense mechanisms is immense, which continuously leads to the development of novel pathogenic strains that challenge the health of mankind. Understanding this battle between pathogen and the immune system has been a fruitful area of immunological research over the last century and will continue to do so for many years. In this review, which has been written on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Dutch Society for Immunology, we provide an overview of the major contributions that Dutch immunologists and infection biologists have made in the last decades on the inflammatory response to viral, bacterial, fungal or parasitic infections. We focus on those studies that have addressed both the host and the pathogen, as these are most interesting from an immunological point of view. Although it is not possible to completely cover this comprehensive research field, this review does provide an interesting overview of Dutch research on inflammatory responses to infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Lung Immune Response to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (Lung Immunity to NTHi).

    PubMed

    King, Paul T; Sharma, Roleen

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is divided into typeable or nontypeable strains based on the presence or absence of a polysaccharide capsule. The typeable strains (such as type b) are an important cause of systemic infection, whilst the nontypeable strains (designated as NTHi) are predominantly respiratory mucosal pathogens. NTHi is present as part of the normal microbiome in the nasopharynx, from where it may spread down to the lower respiratory tract. In this context it is no longer a commensal and becomes an important respiratory pathogen associated with a range of common conditions including bronchitis, bronchiectasis, pneumonia, and particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. NTHi induces a strong inflammatory response in the respiratory tract with activation of immune responses, which often fail to clear the bacteria from the lung. This results in recurrent/persistent infection and chronic inflammation with consequent lung pathology. This review will summarise the current literature about the lung immune response to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, a topic that has important implications for patient management.

  11. Perinatal antibiotic-induced shifts in gut microbiota have differential effects on inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Russell, Shannon L; Gold, Matthew J; Reynolds, Lisa A; Willing, Benjamin P; Dimitriu, Pedro; Thorson, Lisa; Redpath, Stephen A; Perona-Wright, Georgia; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Mohn, William W; Finlay, B Brett; McNagny, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    Resident gut microbiota are now recognized as potent modifiers of host immune responses in various scenarios. Recently, we demonstrated that perinatal exposure to vancomycin, but not streptomycin, profoundly alters gut microbiota and enhances susceptibility to a TH2 model of allergic asthma. Here we sought to further clarify the etiology of these changes by determining whether perinatal antibiotic treatment has a similar effect on the TH1/TH17-mediated lung disease, hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis was induced in C57BL/6 wild-type or recombination-activating gene 1-deficient mice treated perinatally with vancomycin or streptomycin by repeated intranasal administration of Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula antigen. Disease severity was assessed by measuring lung inflammation, pathology, cytokine responses, and serum antibodies. Microbial community analyses were performed on stool samples via 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing and correlations between disease severity and specific bacterial taxa were identified. Surprisingly, in contrast to our findings in an allergic asthma model, we found that the severity of hypersensitivity pneumonitis was unaffected by vancomycin, but increased dramatically after streptomycin treatment. This likely reflects an effect on the adaptive, rather than innate, immune response because the effects of streptomycin were not observed during the early phases of disease and were abrogated in recombination-activating gene 1-deficient mice. Interestingly, Bacteroidetes dominated the intestinal microbiota of streptomycin-treated animals, while vancomycin promoted the expansion of the Firmicutes. Perinatal antibiotics exert highly selective effects on resident gut flora, which, in turn, lead to very specific alterations in susceptibility to TH2- or TH1/TH17-driven lung inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cytokine & chemokine response in the lungs, pleural fluid and serum in thoracic surgery using one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thoracic surgery mandates usually a one-lung ventilation (OLV) strategy with the collapse of the operated lung and ventilation of the non-operated lung. These procedures trigger a substantial inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to analyze the cytokine and chemokine reaction in both lungs, pleural space and blood in patients undergoing lung resection with OLV with special interest in the chemokine growth-regulated peptide alpha (GROα) which is the human equivalent to the rat cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1). Methods Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of both the collapsed, operated and the ventilated, non-operated lung, respectively, pleural space drainage fluid and blood was collected and the concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1RA and GROα were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 15 patients. Results Substantial inter-individual differences in the BAL fluid between patients in cytokine and chemokine levels occurred. In the pleural fluid and the blood these inter-individual differences were less pronounced. Both sides of the lung were affected and showed a significant increase in IL-6 and IL-1RA concentrations over time but not in GROα concentrations. Except for IL-6, which increased more in the collapsed, operated lung, no difference between the collapsed, operated and the ventilated, non-operated lung occurred. In the blood, IL-6 and IL-1RA increased early, already at the end of surgery. GROα was not detectable. In the pleural fluid, both cytokine and chemokine concentrations increased by day one. The increase was significantly higher in the pleural fluid compared to the blood. Conclusion The inflammatory response of cytokines affects both the collapsed, operated and the ventilated, non-operated lungs. The difference in extent of response underlines the complexity of the inflammatory processes during OLV. In contrast to the cytokines, the chemokine GROα concentrations did not react in the

  13. Investigations on the inflammatory and genotoxic lung effects of two types of titanium dioxide: untreated and surface treated.

    PubMed

    Rehn, B; Seiler, F; Rehn, S; Bruch, J; Maier, M

    2003-06-01

    TiO(2) is considered to be toxicologically inert, at least under nonoverload conditions. To study if there are differences in lung effects of surface treated or untreated TiO(2) we investigated the inflammatory and genotoxic lung effects of two types of commercially available TiO(2) at low doses relevant to the working environment. Rats were exposed by instillation to a single dose of 0.15, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.2 mg of TiO(2) P25 (untreated, hydrophilic surface) or TiO(2) T805 (silanized, hydrophobic surface) particles, suspended in 0.2 ml of physiological saline supplemented with 0.25% lecithin. As control, animals were instilled with the vehicle medium only or with a single dose of 0.6 mg quartz DQ12. At days 3, 21, and 90 after instillation bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and inflammatory signs such as cells, protein, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, fibronectin, and surfactant phospholipids were determined. Additionally, 8 microm frozen sections of the left lobe of the lung were cut and stored at -80 degrees C. The sections were used for immunohistochemical detection of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) by a polyclonal antibody in the DNA of individual lung cells. In the quartz-exposed animals a strong progression in the lung inflammatory response was observed. Ninety days after exposure a significant increase in the amount of 8-oxoGua in DNA of lung cells was detected. In contrast, animals exposed to TiO(2) P25 or TiO(2) T805 showed no signs of inflammation. The amount of 8-oxoGua as a marker of DNA damage was at the level of control. The results indicate that both types of TiO(2) are inert at applicated doses.

  14. The sickle cell mouse lung: pro-inflammatory and primed for allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Andemariam, Biree; Adami, Alexander J.; McNamara, Jeffrey T.; Secor, Eric R.; Guernsey, Linda A.; Thrall, Roger S.

    2015-01-01

    Co-morbid asthma in sickle cell disease (SCD) confers higher rates of vaso-occlusive pain and mortality, yet the physiological link between these two distinct diseases remains puzzling. We utilized a mouse model of SCD to study pulmonary immunology and physiology before and after the induction of allergic airway disease (AAD). SCD mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and aluminum hydroxide by the intraperitoneal (IP) route followed by daily, nose-only OVA-aerosol challenge to induce AAD. The lungs of naive SCD mice showed signs of inflammatory and immune processes: (1) histologic and cytochemical evidence of airway inflammation as compared to naïve wildtype mice; (2) bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) contained increased total lymphocytes, %CD8+ T cells, G-CSF, IL-5, IL-7, and CXCL1, and (3) lung tissue and hilar lymph node (HLN) had increased CD4+, CD8+, and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Further, SCD mice at AAD demonstrated significant changes compared to the naïve state: (1) BAL with increased %CD4+ T cells and Tregs, lower %CD8+ T cells, and decreased IFNγ, CXCL10, CCL2, and IL-17, (2) serum with increased OVA-specific IgE, IL-6, and IL-13, and decreased IL-1α and CXCL10, (3) no increase in Tregs in the lung tissue or HLN, and (4) hypo-responsiveness to methacholine challenge. In conclusion, SCD mice have an altered immunologic pulmonary milieu and physiologic responsiveness. These findings suggest that the clinical phenotype of AAD in SCD mice differs from that of wildtype mice and suggests that individuals with SCD may also have a unique, divergent phenotype perhaps amenable to a different therapeutic approach. PMID:25843670

  15. [A rare tumor of the lung in childhood--inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor].

    PubMed

    Zganjer, Mirko; Nikolić, Igor; Cizmić, Ante; Mesić, Marko; Zupancić, Bozidar

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare benign neoplasm, mainly involving the lungs of the children. It represents 0.7% of all lung tumors. It was first described by Brunn in 1939.2 Diagnosis is very difficult and often only possible after resection of the tumor. We would like to present a case of pulmonary IMT in a 13-year-old girl who presented with symptoms like cough, shortness of breath, and chest discomfort. Chest X ray and computed tomography revealed the presence of a right lower lobe lung mass. Its clinical and radiological findings were diverse and non specific. The mass was removed in toto, histopathology confirmed the inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the lung. Intraoperative and postoperative courses were uneventful. The patient has been without any signs of relapse 2 years after the surgery.

  16. Transport induced inflammatory responses in horses.

    PubMed

    Wessely-Szponder, J; Bełkot, Z; Bobowiec, R; Kosior-Korzecka, U; Wójcik, M

    2015-01-01

    Deleterious response to road transport is an important problem in equine practice. It determines different physiological, immunological and metabolic changes which lead to increased susceptibility to several disorders such as pneumonia, diarrhea, colics, laminitis, injuries and rhabdomyolisis. The aim of our study was to look for possible relationships between transportation of female young and older horses over a long and short distance and an inflammatory state reflected by an increase of acute phase protein concentration, oxidative stress and muscle injury. The study was conducted on 24 cold-blooded female horses divided into four groups. Six fillies aged 6-18 months and six mares aged 10-12 years were transported over the distance of about 550 km, six fillies aged 6-18 months and six mares aged 10-12 years were transported over the distance of about 50 km. Plasma and serum were obtained from blood samples taken before transportation (T0), immediately after transportation (T1) and at an abattoir during slaughter (T2). In these samples fibrinogen, MDA, AST and CK were assessed. Fibrinogen increased in all studied groups especially in fillies after long distance transportation, where it reached 205±7.07 mg/dl before transportation, 625±35.35 mg/dl after transportation, and 790±14.14 mg/dl during slaughter. MDA concentrations rose after transportation and reached the maximal level during slaughter. CK activity was more elevated after short transportation in younger horses, whereas initial activity of AST was higher in older horses. We estimated that intensified responses from acute phase, oxidative stress and muscle injury parameters indicated an inflammatory state.

  17. Inflammatory response in transapical transaortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Goetzenich, A; Roehl, A; Spillner, J; Haushofer, M; Dohmen, G; Tewarie, L; Moza, A

    2011-12-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation (TA-AVI) has become a fast growing alternative to conventional aortic valve replacement (cAVR) particularly for patients burdened with serious comorbidities. We investigated whether the inflammatory response triggered by TA-AVI reflects the less invasive nature of this procedure. In this prospective observational study 25 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR; 15 cAVR and 10 TA-AVI) were included. Serial plasma cytokine concentrations (IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10) were measured by commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits at six different time points before, during, and after surgery. Plasma levels of all three cytokines increased during and after both procedures and returned to baseline before the patient's discharge. Peak values of IL-6 were 258 ± 113 pg/mL in AVR patients versus 111 ± 101 pg/mL in TA-AVI patients and were reached 12 hours after surgery. For IL-8, peak values were 51 ± 29 pg/mL 1 hour after surgery in AVR patients versus 15 ± 20 pg/mL on wound closure in TA-AVI patients. Plasma levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly reduced in the TA-AVI group as compared with cAVR. IL-10 is markedly activated in both groups yet its induction is more prominent in AVR patients with peak values of 51 ± 28 pg/mL for AVR versus 24 ± 18 pg/mL for TA-AVI on wound closure. TA-AVI compared with cAVR results in a significant reduction but not elimination of a systemic inflammatory response, which is attributable to cardiopulmonary bypass-dependent and bypass-independent factors. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Regulation of inflammatory responses by IL-17F.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuexian O; Chang, Seon Hee; Park, Heon; Nurieva, Roza; Shah, Bhavin; Acero, Luis; Wang, Yi-Hong; Schluns, Kimberly S; Broaddus, Russell R; Zhu, Zhou; Dong, Chen

    2008-05-12

    Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6, and Act1. In vivo, overexpression of IL-17F in lung epithelium led to infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and mucus hyperplasia, similar to observations made in IL-17 transgenic mice. To further understand the function of IL-17F, we generated and analyzed mice deficient in IL-17F or IL-17. IL-17, but not IL-17F, was required for the initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mice deficient in IL-17F, but not IL-17, had defective airway neutrophilia in response to allergen challenge. Moreover, in an asthma model, although IL-17 deficiency reduced T helper type 2 responses, IL-17F-deficient mice displayed enhanced type 2 cytokine production and eosinophil function. In addition, IL-17F deficiency resulted in reduced colitis caused by dextran sulfate sodium, whereas IL-17 knockout mice developed more severe disease. Our results thus demonstrate that IL-17F is an important regulator of inflammatory responses that seems to function differently than IL-17 in immune responses and diseases.

  19. Regulation of inflammatory responses by IL-17F

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuexian O.; Chang, Seon Hee; Park, Heon; Nurieva, Roza; Shah, Bhavin; Acero, Luis; Wang, Yi-Hong; Schluns, Kimberly S.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Zhu, Zhou; Dong, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6, and Act1. In vivo, overexpression of IL-17F in lung epithelium led to infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and mucus hyperplasia, similar to observations made in IL-17 transgenic mice. To further understand the function of IL-17F, we generated and analyzed mice deficient in IL-17F or IL-17. IL-17, but not IL-17F, was required for the initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mice deficient in IL-17F, but not IL-17, had defective airway neutrophilia in response to allergen challenge. Moreover, in an asthma model, although IL-17 deficiency reduced T helper type 2 responses, IL-17F–deficient mice displayed enhanced type 2 cytokine production and eosinophil function. In addition, IL-17F deficiency resulted in reduced colitis caused by dextran sulfate sodium, whereas IL-17 knockout mice developed more severe disease. Our results thus demonstrate that IL-17F is an important regulator of inflammatory responses that seems to function differently than IL-17 in immune responses and diseases. PMID:18411338

  20. Aerosolized bovine lactoferrin reduces neutrophils and pro-inflammatory cytokines in mouse models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Piera; Frioni, Alessandra; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; De Fino, Ida; Cutone, Antimo; Rosa, Luigi; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Berlutti, Francesca

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf), an iron-chelating glycoprotein of innate immunity, produced by exocrine glands and neutrophils in infection/inflammation sites, is one of the most abundant defence molecules in airway secretions. Lf, a pleiotropic molecule, exhibits antibacterial and anti-inflammatory functions. These properties may play a relevant role in airway infections characterized by exaggerated inflammatory response, as in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. To verify the Lf role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, we evaluated the efficacy of aerosolized bovine Lf (bLf) in mouse models of P. aeruginosa acute and chronic lung infections. C57BL/6NCrl mice were challenged with 10(6) CFUs of P. aeruginosa PAO1 (acute infection) or MDR-RP73 strain (chronic infection) by intra-tracheal administration. In both acute and chronic infections, aerosolized bLf resulted in nonsignificant reduction of bacterial load but significant decrease of the neutrophil recruitment and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Moreover, in chronic infection the bLf-treated mice recovered body weight faster and to a higher extent than the control mice. These findings add new insights into the benefits of bLf as a mediator of general health and its potential therapeutic applications.

  1. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the lung: a reactive lesion or a true neoplasm?

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Gvinianidze, Lasha; Woo, Wen Ling; Borg, Elaine; Lawrence, David

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) of the lung represents an extremely rare type of inflammatory pseudo tumor that appears most commonly in children and young individuals. There has been an ongoing controversy whether an IMT is a reactive lesion or a true neoplasm making the further management extremely challenging. Purpose of the paper is through a literature review to highlight the existence of this rare tumour along with its key features and the management options available. PMID:26101648

  2. Reversal of dependent lung collapse predicts response to lung recruitment in children with early acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gerhard K; Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Kheir, John N; Zurakowski, David; Walsh, Brian K; Adler, Andy; Arnold, John H

    2012-09-01

    To describe the resolution of regional atelectasis and the development of regional lung overdistension during a lung-recruitment protocol in children with acute lung injury. Prospective interventional trial. Pediatric intensive care unit. Ten children with early (<72 hrs) acute lung injury. Sustained inflation maneuver (positive airway pressure of 40 cm H2O for 40 secs), followed by a stepwise recruitment maneuver (escalating plateau pressures by 5 cm H2O every 15 mins) until physiologic lung recruitment, defined by PaO2 + PaCO2 ≥400 mm Hg, was achieved. Regional lung volumes and mechanics were measured using electrical impedance tomography. Patients that responded to the stepwise lung-recruitment maneuver had atelectasis in 54% of the dependent lung regions, while nonresponders had atelectasis in 10% of the dependent lung regions (p = .032). In the pressure step preceding physiologic lung recruitment, a significant reversal of atelectasis occurred in 17% of the dependent lung regions (p = .016). Stepwise recruitment overdistended 8% of the dependent lung regions in responders, but 58% of the same regions in nonresponders (p < .001). Lung compliance in dependent lung regions increased in responders, while compliance in nonresponders did not improve. In contrast to the stepwise recruitment maneuver, the sustained inflation did not produce significant changes in atelectasis or oxygenation: atelectasis was only reversed in 12% of the lung (p = .122), and there was only a modest improvement in oxygenation (27 ± 14 mm Hg, p = .088). Reversal of atelectasis in the most dependent lung region preceded improvements in gas exchange during a stepwise lung-recruitment strategy. Lung recruitment of dependent lung areas was accompanied by considerable overdistension of nondependent lung regions. Larger amounts of atelectasis in dependent lung areas were associated with a positive response to a stepwise lung-recruitment maneuver.

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease of the lung: The role of infliximab?

    PubMed

    Hayek, Adam J; Pfanner, Timothy P; White, Heath D

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary extra-intestinal manifestations (EIM) of inflammatory bowel disease are well described with a variable incidence. We present a case of Crohn's disease with pulmonary EIM including chronic bronchitis with non-resolving bilateral cavitary pulmonary nodules and mediastinal lymphadenopathy successfully treated with infliximab. Additionally, we present a case summary from a literature review on pulmonary EIM successfully treated with infliximab. Current treatment recommendations include an inhaled and/or systemic corticosteroid regimen which is largely based on case reports and expert opinion. We offer infliximab as an adjunctive therapy or alternative to corticosteroids for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease related pulmonary EIM.

  4. Quantitative analysis of the role of fiber length on phagocytosis and inflammatory response by alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Padmore, Trudy; Stark, Carahline; Turkevich, Leonid A.; Champion, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    Background In the lung, macrophages attempt to engulf inhaled high aspect ratio pathogenic materials, secreting inflammatory molecules in the process. The inability of macrophages to remove these materials leads to chronic inflammation and disease. How the biophysical and biochemical mechanisms of these effects are influenced by fiber length remains undetermined. This study evaluates the role of fiber length on phagocytosis and molecular inflammatory responses to non-cytotoxic fibers, enabling development of quantitative length-based models. Methods Murine alveolar macrophages were exposed to long and short populations of JM-100 glass fibers, produced by successive sedimentation and repeated crushing, respectively. Interactions between fibers and macrophages were observed using time-lapse video microscopy, and quantified by flow cytometry. Inflammatory biomolecules (TNF-α, IL-1 α, COX-2, PGE2) were measured. Results Uptake of short fibers occurred more readily than for long, but long fibers were more potent stimulators of inflammatory molecules. Stimulation resulted in dose-dependent secretion of inflammatory biomolecules but no cytotoxicity or strong ROS production. Linear cytokine dose-response curves evaluated with length-dependent potency models, using measured fiber length distributions, resulted in identification of critical fiber lengths that cause frustrated phagocytosis and increased inflammatory biomolecule production. Conclusion Short fibers played a minor role in the inflammatory response compared to long fibers. The critical lengths at which frustrated phagocytosis occurs can be quantified by fitting dose-response curves to fiber distribution data. PMID:27784615

  5. Role of β-catenin-regulated CCN matricellular proteins in epithelial repair after inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Jazalle; Aschner, Yael; Briones, Natalie; Young, Scott K.; Lau, Lester F.; Kahn, Michael; Downey, Gregory P.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of the lung epithelium after injury is integral to the pathogenesis and outcomes of diverse inflammatory lung diseases. We previously reported that β-catenin signaling promotes epithelial repair after inflammatory injury, but the β-catenin target genes that mediate this effect are unknown. Herein, we examined which β-catenin transcriptional coactivators and target genes promote epithelial repair after inflammatory injury. Transmigration of human neutrophils across cultured monolayers of human lung epithelial cells resulted in a fall in transepithelial resistance and the formation of discrete areas of epithelial denudation (“microinjury”), which repaired via cell spreading by 96 h. In mice treated with intratracheal (i.t.) LPS or keratinocyte chemokine, neutrophil emigration was associated with increased permeability of the lung epithelium, as determined by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid albumin concentration, which decreased over 3–6 days. Activation of β-catenin/p300-dependent gene expression using the compound ICG-001 accelerated epithelial repair in vitro and in murine models. Neutrophil transmigration induced epithelial expression of the β-catenin/p300 target genes Wnt-induced secreted protein (WISP) 1 and cysteine-rich (Cyr) 61, as determined by real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunostaining. Purified neutrophil elastase induced WISP1 upregulation in lung epithelial cells, as determined by qPCR. WISP1 expression increased in murine lungs after i.t. LPS, as determined by ELISA of the BAL fluid and qPCR of whole lung extracts. Finally, recombinant WISP1 and Cyr61 accelerated repair, and Cyr61-neutralizing antibodies delayed repair of the injured epithelium in vitro. We conclude that β-catenin/p300-dependent expression of WISP1 and Cyr61 is critical for epithelial repair and represents a potential therapeutic target to promote epithelial repair after inflammatory injury. PMID:23316072

  6. Diagnostic and prognostic significance of inflammatory markers in lung cancer-associated pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Kotyza, Jaromir; Havel, David; Vrzalová, Jindra; Kulda, Vlastimil; Pesek, Milos

    2010-01-01

    Besides massive expression in inflammatory pleural effusions, inflammatory markers are also present in cancerinduced pleural effusions. Recent advances in cancer biology point to a role of inflammatory signaling in cancer and encourage reconsidering the diagnostic and prognostic value of inflammatory markers. Here an attempt was made to relate protein levels of inflammatory markers to underlying malignant processes in the pleural space. Pleural effusions from lung cancer patients (n=116) were subjected to a multifactorial analysis covering 13 inflammatory markers. The composition of tumor-associated effusions was compared with that of parainflammatory pleural effusions (n=30), transudates (n=18), and serum values, and evaluated in relation to cancer origin, histology, cytology, pleural involvement, treatment history, and survival time. Inflammatory markers were significantly expressed in pleural effusions of paraneoplastic origin when compared to transudates and most serum levels. Values in pleura-invading and metastatic tumor-associated effusions were typically higher than those of other tumors. Many markers correlated negatively with survival, most prominently IL-8 (r=-0.36, p=0.001) and VEGF (r=-0.35, p=0.001). It appears that most inflammatory markers are highly expressed in tumor-associated pleural effusions, reflecting to some extent tumor origin and localization. Despite the lower efficacy of inflammatory markers in the differentiation between exudative pleural effusions, some inflammatory markers may represent potential prognostic markers of malignant processes in the pleural space.

  7. Cytokine and Chemokine Responses of Lung Exposed to Surrogate Viral and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Liberati, Teresa A; Trammell, Rita A; Randle, Michelle; Barrett, Sarah; Toth, Linda A

    2013-01-01

    The use of in vitro models of complex in vivo systems has yielded many insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie normal and pathologic physiology. However although the reduced complexity of these models is advantageous with regard to some research questions, the simplification may obscure or eliminate key influences that occur in vivo. We sought to examine this possibility with regard to the lung's response to infection, which may be inherent to resident lung cells or related to the systemic response to pulmonary infection. We used the inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, and B6.129S2-IL6tm1Kopf, which differ in their response to inflammatory and infectious challenges, to assess in vivo responses of lung to surrogate viral and bacterial infection and compared these with responses of cultured lung slices and human A549 cells. Pulmonary cytokine concentrations were measured both after in vivo inoculation of mice and in vitro exposure of lung slices and A549 cells to surrogate viral and bacterial infections. The data indicate similarities and differences in early lung responses to in vivo compared with in vitro exposure to these inflammatory substances. Therefore, resident cells in the lung appear to respond to some challenges in a strain-independent manner, whereas some stimuli may elicit recruitment of peripheral inflammatory cells that generate the subsequent response in a genotype-related manner. These results add to the body of information pointing to host genotype as a crucial factor in mediating the severity of microbial infections and demonstrate that some of these effects may not be apparent in vitro. PMID:23582418

  8. Chronic Inflammatory Disease, Lifestyle and Treatment Response

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-30

    Autoimmune Diseases; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Crohn Disease (CD); Colitis, Ulcerative (UC); Arthritis, Rheumatoid (RA); Spondylarthropathies; Arthritis, Psoriatic (PsA); Psoriasis; Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS); Uveitis

  9. [Autoantibodies in children with chronic inflammatory lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Markina, O A; Iastrebova, N E; Vaneeva, N P; Volkov, I K; Katosova, L K

    2001-01-01

    124 sera of children with chronic bronchitis, chronic pneumonia, bronchial asthma, exogenic allergic alveolitis, congenital developmental defects of the lungs and the syndrome of the situs inversus of organs were examined with a view to study the state of humoral immunity to tissues. The study was carried out by means of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of collagen, elastin, DNA (native and denaturated), membrane antigens of the lung, the liver, the small intestine and the large intestine. Among all groups of patients autoimmune disturbances, manifested by a rise in the level of autoantibodies of different specificity, were registered. The degree of manifestation of autoimmune disturbances depended on the kind of pathology. After treatment a decrease in the level of autoantibodies was registered in the examinees.

  10. 'Inflammatory breast cancer' due to metastatic adenocarcinoma of lung.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Jacob; Naik, Vinay; George, Gemy Maria

    2016-09-01

    A 67-year-old woman with a history of lung adenocarcinoma presented with 3 weeks of redness, pain, swelling and skin changes in her right breast. Her vital signs and physical examination were within physiological limits except for the right breast. She had extensive red streaks radiating from the right nipple with peau d'orange appearance of her overlying skin. Her breast was tender on examination and did not have any associated cervical or axillary lymphadenopathy. Her mammography revealed thickening of the skin, increased parenchymal markings and shrinkage the breast. Multiple skin biopsies demonstrated moderately differentiated lung adenocarcinoma with lymphovascular invasion. The patient made an informed decision to undergo radiotherapy following discussion with her oncologist and breast surgeon. She succumbed to her illness 2 months after the diagnosis of metastasis to her breast. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. Inflammatory and immune processes in the human lung in health and disease: evaluation by bronchoalveolar lavage.

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, G. W.; Gadek, J. E.; Kawanami, O.; Ferrans, V. J.; Crystal, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage is an invaluable means of accurately evaluating the inflammatory and immune processes of the human lung. Although lavage recovers only those cells and proteins present on the epithelial surface of the lower respiratory tract, comparison with open lung biopsies shows that these constituents are representative of the inflammatory and immune systems of the alveolar structures. With the use of these techniques, sufficient materials are obtained from normal individuals to allow characterization of not only the types of cells and proteins present but their functions as well. Such observations have been useful in defining the inflammatory and immune capabilities of the normal lung and provide a basis for the study of lung disease. Lavage methods have been used to characterize inflammatory and immune processes of the lower respiratory tract in destructive, infectious, neoplastic, and interstitial disorders. From the data already acquired, it is apparent that bronchoalveolar lavage will yield major insights into the pathogenesis, staging, and therapy decisions involved in these disorders. (Am J Pathol 97:149--206, 1979). Images Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 3 PMID:495693

  12. Association of nutrition parameters including bioelectrical impedance and systemic inflammatory response with quality of life and prognosis in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Lara, Karla; Turcott, Jenny G; Juárez, Eva; Guevara, Patricia; Núñez-Valencia, Carolina; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis F; Flores, Diana; Arrieta, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Early identification and treatment of nutritional deficiencies can lead to improved outcomes in the quality of life (QoL) and survival of patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Noninvasive techniques are needed to evaluate changes in body composition as part of determining nutritional status. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of nutritional parameters in health-related quality of life (HRQL) and survival in patients with advanced NSCLC. Chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced NSCLC with good performance status Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-2 were included prospectively in the study. We evaluated inflammatory parameters such as C-reactive protein, platelet/lymphocyte index, neutrophil/lymphocyte index, serum interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, and nutritional variables such as body mass index (BMI) and serum albumin levels. Bioelectrical impedance analysis including phase angle was obtained before cisplatin-based chemotherapy was started. HRQL was assessed by application of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ)-C30 and QLQ-LC13 instruments at baseline. Overall survival (OS) was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed with log-rank and Cox proportional hazard models. One hundred nineteen patients were included. Mean BMI was 24.8 ± 4.5 kg/m(2), average weight loss of patients was 8.4%, and median phase angle was 5.8°. Malnutrition measured by subjective global assessment (SGA), weight loss >10%, BMI >20 was associated with lower HRQL scales. Patients with ECOG 2, high content serum IL-6, lower phase angle, and malnutrition parameters showed lower OS; however, after multivariate analysis, only ECOG 2 [Hazard ratio (HR), 2.7; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.5-4.7; P = 0.001], phase angle ≤5.8° (HR = 3.02; 95% CI: 1.2-7.11; P = 0.011), and SGA (HR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.31-5.5; P = 0.005) were associated with poor survival. Patients

  13. A Comparison of the Inflammatory and Proteolytic Effects of Dung Biomass and Cigarette Smoke Exposure in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Divya; Geraghty, Patrick M.; Hardigan, Andrew A.; Foronjy, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Biomass is the energy source for cooking and heating for billions of people worldwide. Despite their prevalent use and their potential impact on global health, the effects of these fuels on lung biology and function remain poorly understood. Methods We exposed human small airway epithelial cells and C57BL/6 mice to dung biomass smoke or cigarette smoke to compare how these exposures impacted lung signaling and inflammatory and proteolytic responses that have been linked with disease pathogenesis. Results The in vitro exposure and siRNA studies demonstrated that biomass and cigarette smoke activated ERK to up regulate IL-8 and MMP-1 expression in human airway epithelial cells. In contrast to cigarette smoke, biomass also activated p38 and JNK within these lung cells and lowered the expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). Similarly, in the lungs of mice, both biomass and cigarette smoke exposure increased macrophages, activated ERK and p38 and up regulated MMP-9 and MMP-12 expression. The main differences seen in the exposure studies was that mice exposed to biomass exhibited more perivascular inflammation and had higher G-CSF and GM-CSF lavage fluid levels than mice exposed identically to cigarette smoke. Conclusion Biomass activates similar pathogenic processes seen in cigarette smoke exposure that are known to result in the disruption of lung structure. These findings provide biological evidence that public health interventions are needed to address the harm associated with the use of this fuel source. PMID:23285217

  14. Inflammatory response to nano- and microstructured hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Gemma; Espanol, Montserrat; Xia, Wei; Persson, Cecilia; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Ott, Marjam Karlsson

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation and activation of leukocytes upon contact with a biomaterial play a crucial role in the degree of inflammatory response, which may then determine the clinical failure or success of an implanted biomaterial. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether nano- and microstructured biomimetic hydroxyapatite substrates can influence the growth and activation of macrophage-like cells. Hydroxyapatite substrates with different crystal morphologies consisting of an entangled network of plate-like and needle-like crystals were evaluated. Macrophage proliferation was evaluated on the material surface (direct contact) and also in extracts i.e. media modified by the material (indirect contact). Additionally, the effect of supplementing the extracts with calcium ions and/or proteins was investigated. Macrophage activation on the substrates was evaluated by quantifying the release of reactive oxygen species and by morphological observations. The results showed that differences in the substrate's microstructure play a major role in the activation of macrophages as there was a higher release of reactive oxygen species after culturing the macrophages on plate-like crystals substrates compared to the almost non-existent release on needle-like substrates. However, the difference in macrophage proliferation was ascribed to different ionic exchanges and protein adsorption/retention from the substrates rather than to the texture of materials.

  15. Inflammatory Response to Nano- and Microstructured Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Mestres, Gemma; Espanol, Montserrat; Xia, Wei; Persson, Cecilia; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Ott, Marjam Karlsson

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation and activation of leukocytes upon contact with a biomaterial play a crucial role in the degree of inflammatory response, which may then determine the clinical failure or success of an implanted biomaterial. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether nano- and microstructured biomimetic hydroxyapatite substrates can influence the growth and activation of macrophage-like cells. Hydroxyapatite substrates with different crystal morphologies consisting of an entangled network of plate-like and needle-like crystals were evaluated. Macrophage proliferation was evaluated on the material surface (direct contact) and also in extracts i.e. media modified by the material (indirect contact). Additionally, the effect of supplementing the extracts with calcium ions and/or proteins was investigated. Macrophage activation on the substrates was evaluated by quantifying the release of reactive oxygen species and by morphological observations. The results showed that differences in the substrate’s microstructure play a major role in the activation of macrophages as there was a higher release of reactive oxygen species after culturing the macrophages on plate-like crystals substrates compared to the almost non-existent release on needle-like substrates. However, the difference in macrophage proliferation was ascribed to different ionic exchanges and protein adsorption/retention from the substrates rather than to the texture of materials. PMID:25837264

  16. Maresin 1 Mitigates Inflammatory Response and Protects Mice from Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruidong; Wang, Yaxin; Ma, Zhijun; Ma, Muyuan; Wang, Di; Xie, Gengchen; Yin, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, frequently caused by infection of bacteria, is considered as an uncontrollable systematic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS). Maresin 1 (Mar1) is a new proresolving mediator with potent anti-inflammatory effect in several animal models. However, its effect in sepsis is still not investigated. To address this question, we developed sepsis model in BALB/c mice by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) with or without Mar1 treatment. Our data showed that Mar1 markedly improved survival rate and decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in CLP mice such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Furthermore, Mar1 reduced serum level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enhanced the bacteria clearance in mice sepsis model. Moreover, Mar1 attenuated lung injury and decreased level of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), creatinine (Cre), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in serum in mice after CLP surgery. Treatment with Mar1 inhibited activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κb) pathway. In conclusion, Mar1 exhibited protective effect in sepsis by reducing LPS, bacteria burden in serum, inhibiting inflammation response, and improving vital organ function. The possible mechanism is partly involved in inhibition of NF-κb activation. PMID:28042205

  17. GITR agonist enhances vaccination responses in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li X; Davoodi, Michael; Srivastava, Minu K; Kachroo, Puja; Lee, Jay M; St John, Maie; Harris-White, Marni; Huang, Min; Strieter, Robert M; Dubinett, Steven; Sharma, Sherven

    2015-04-01

    An immune tolerant tumor microenvironment promotes immune evasion of lung cancer. Agents that antagonize immune tolerance will thus aid the fight against this devastating disease. Members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family modulate the magnitude, duration and phenotype of immune responsiveness to antigens. Among these, GITR expressed on immune cells functions as a key regulator in inflammatory and immune responses. Here, we evaluate the GITR agonistic antibody (DTA-1) as a mono-therapy and in combination with therapeutic vaccination in murine lung cancer models. We found that DTA-1 treatment of tumor-bearing mice increased: (i) the frequency and activation of intratumoral natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes, (ii) the antigen presenting cell (APC) activity in the tumor, and (iii) systemic T-cell specific tumor cell cytolysis. DTA-1 treatment enhanced tumor cell apoptosis as quantified by cleaved caspase-3 staining in the tumors. DTA-1 treatment increased expression of IFNγ, TNFα and IL-12 but reduced IL-10 levels in tumors. Furthermore, increased anti-angiogenic chemokines corresponding with decreased pro-angiogenic chemokine levels correlated with reduced expression of the endothelial cell marker Meca 32 in the tumors of DTA-1 treated mice. In accordance, there was reduced tumor growth (8-fold by weight) in the DTA-1 treatment group. NK cell depletion markedly inhibited the antitumor response elicited by DTA-1. DTA-1 combined with therapeutic vaccination caused tumor rejection in 38% of mice and a 20-fold reduction in tumor burden in the remaining mice relative to control. Mice that rejected tumors following therapy developed immunological memory against subsequent re-challenge. Our data demonstrates GITR agonist antibody activated NK cell and T lymphocyte activity, and enhanced therapeutic vaccination responses against lung cancer.

  18. Human resistin promotes neutrophil pro-inflammatory activation, neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and increases severity of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W.

    2014-01-01

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies have also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. In these studies, we examined if the human specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation as well as the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using resistin humanized mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN+/−/−), but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn+/−/−, compared to control Rtn−/−/− neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that is also implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin also enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced ALI, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased NET formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4 induced inflammatory responses, and may be a target for future therapies aimed at diminishing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations where neutrophils play a major role. PMID:24719460

  19. Functional Roles of Syk in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Young-Su; Son, Young-Jin; Ryou, Chongsuk; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a series of complex biological responses to protect the host from pathogen invasion. Chronic inflammation is considered a major cause of diseases, such as various types of inflammatory/autoimmune diseases and cancers. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) was initially found to be highly expressed in hematopoietic cells and has been known to play crucial roles in adaptive immune responses. However, recent studies have reported that Syk is also involved in other biological functions, especially in innate immune responses. Although Syk has been extensively studied in adaptive immune responses, numerous studies have recently presented evidence that Syk has critical functions in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and is closely related to innate immune response. This review describes the characteristics of Syk-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes the recent findings supporting the crucial roles of Syk in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and diseases, and discusses Syk-targeted drug development for the therapy of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25045209

  20. Unique Toll-Like Receptor 4 Activation by NAMPT/PBEF Induces NFκB Signaling and Inflammatory Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Sara M.; Ceco, Ermelinda; Evenoski, Carrie L.; Danilov, Sergei M.; Zhou, Tong; Chiang, Eddie T.; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Mapes, Brandon; Zhao, Jieling; Gursoy, Gamze; Brown, Mary E.; Adyshev, Djanybek M.; Siddiqui, Shahid S.; Quijada, Hector; Sammani, Saad; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Saadat, Laleh; Yousef, Mohammed; Wang, Ting; Liang, Jie; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-induced inflammatory lung injury (VILI) is mechanistically linked to increased NAMPT transcription and circulating levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase (NAMPT/PBEF). Although VILI severity is attenuated by reduced NAMPT/PBEF bioavailability, the precise contribution of NAMPT/PBEF and excessive mechanical stress to VILI pathobiology is unknown. We now report that NAMPT/PBEF induces lung NFκB transcriptional activities and inflammatory injury via direct ligation of Toll–like receptor 4 (TLR4). Computational analysis demonstrated that NAMPT/PBEF and MD-2, a TLR4-binding protein essential for LPS-induced TLR4 activation, share ~30% sequence identity and exhibit striking structural similarity in loop regions critical for MD-2-TLR4 binding. Unlike MD-2, whose TLR4 binding alone is insufficient to initiate TLR4 signaling, NAMPT/PBEF alone produces robust TLR4 activation, likely via a protruding region of NAMPT/PBEF (S402-N412) with structural similarity to LPS. The identification of this unique mode of TLR4 activation by NAMPT/PBEF advances the understanding of innate immunity responses as well as the untoward events associated with mechanical stress-induced lung inflammation. PMID:26272519

  1. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome after cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Cremer, J; Martin, M; Redl, H; Bahrami, S; Abraham, C; Graeter, T; Haverich, A; Schlag, G; Borst, H G

    1996-06-01

    A systemic inflammatory response after open heart operation may be responsible for hyperdynamic circulatory instability and organ dysfunction. To what extent mediator release is involved needs to be clarified. Ten patients with postoperative hyperdynamic circulatory dysregulation (group I) requiring application of alpha-constrictors and 10 patients with routine cardiac procedures and stable postoperative hemodynamic indices (group II) were analyzed for mediator release and metabolic and hemodynamic changes until the third postoperative day. Group I patients showed a significantly increased cardiac index and decreased systemic vascular resistance after bypass (cardiac index, group I: 5.2 +/- 1.2 L.min-1.m-2, group II: 2.5 +/- 1.6 L.min-1.m-2; systemic vascular resistance, group I: 495 +/- 204 dyne.s. cm-5, group II: 1,356 +/- 466 dyne.s.cm-5) and at 3 hours (cardiac index, group I: 4.4 +/- 0.8 L.min-1.m-2, group II: 2.9 +/- 0.6 L.min-1.m-2; systemic vascular resistance, group I: 567 +/- 211 dyne.s.cm-5, group II: 1,053 +/- 273 dyne.s.cm-5). Significantly higher serum levels of interleukin-6 were assessed in group I (postbypass, group I: 6,812 +/- 9,293 pg/mL, group II: 295 +/- 303 pg/mL; 3 hours, group I: 3,474 +/- 5,594 pg/mL, group II: 286 +/- 296 pg/mL). Concentrations of elastase, tumor necrosis factor, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor, and interleukin-8 were elevated in group I (not significant). Early postoperative levels of soluble E-selectin and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule were also higher in group I (not significant). Continuously increased levels of endotoxin could be detected in only 3 of 10 patients in group I. Severe lactic acidosis (> or = 5 mmol/L) occurred in group I only. Postoperative hyperdynamic instability after open heart operations appears to be associated with a certain pattern of mediator release. In particular, interleukin-6 appears to be involved in circulatory dysregulation and metabolic derangement.

  2. Cellular and molecular regulation of innate inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-01-01

    Innate sensing of pathogens by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) plays essential roles in the innate discrimination between self and non-self components, leading to the generation of innate immune defense and inflammatory responses. The initiation, activation and resolution of innate inflammatory response are mediated by a complex network of interactions among the numerous cellular and molecular components of immune and non-immune system. While a controlled and beneficial innate inflammatory response is critical for the elimination of pathogens and maintenance of tissue homeostasis, dysregulated or sustained inflammation leads to pathological conditions such as chronic infection, inflammatory autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss some of the recent advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the establishment and regulation of innate immunity and inflammatory responses. PMID:27818489

  3. Early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlan; Jian, Wenhua; Gao, Yi; Xie, Yanqing; Song, Yan; Zheng, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether aggressive medication strategies should be used for early COPD with or without lung hyperinflation. We aimed to explore the characteristics and bronchodilator responsiveness of early COPD patients (stages I and II) with/without lung hyperinflation. Methods Four hundred and six patients with COPD who performed both lung volume and bronchodilation tests were retrospectively analyzed. Residual volume to total lung capacity >120% of predicted values indicated lung hyperinflation. The characteristics and bronchodilator responsiveness were compared between the patients with and without lung hyperinflation across all stages of COPD. Results The percentages of patients with lung hyperinflation were 72.7% in the entire cohort, 19.4% in stage I, 68.5% in stage II, 95.3% in stage III, and 100.0% in stage IV. The patients with lung hyperinflation exhibited poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness of both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity than those without lung hyperinflation during early COPD (t=2.21–5.70, P=0.000–0.029), especially in stage I, while age, body mass index, smoking status, smoking history, and disease duration were similar between the two subgroups in the same stages. From stages I to IV of subgroups with lung hyperinflation, stage I patients had the best bronchodilator responsiveness. Use of bronchodilator responsiveness of forced vital capacity to detect the presence of lung hyperinflation in COPD patients showed relatively high sensitivities (69.5%–75.3%) and specificities (70.3%–75.7%). Conclusion We demonstrated the novel finding that early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation are associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness and established a simple method for detecting lung hyperinflation. PMID:27785008

  4. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects of β-adrenoceptor agonists on human lung macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sharonjit K; Marriott, Helen M; Suvarna, S Kim; Peachell, Peter T

    2016-12-15

    The principal mechanism by which bronchodilator β-adrenoceptor agonists act is to relax airways smooth muscle although they may also be anti-inflammatory. However, the extent of anti-inflammatory activity and the cell types affected by these agonists are uncertain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether β-adrenoceptor agonists prevent pro-inflammatory cytokine generation from activated human lung macrophages. Macrophages were isolated and purified from human lung. The cells were pre-treated with both short-acting (isoprenaline, salbutamol, terbutaline) and long-acting (formoterol, salmeterol, indacaterol) β-agonists before activation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce cytokine (TNFα, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) generation. The experiments showed that short-acting β-agonists were poor inhibitors of cytokine generation. Of the long-acting β-agonists studied, formoterol was also a weak inhibitor of cytokine generation whereas only indacaterol and salmeterol showed moderate inhibitory activity. Further experiments using the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI-118,551 suggested that the effects of indacaterol were likely to be mediated by β2-adrenoceptors whereas those of salmeterol were not. These findings were corroborated by functional desensitization studies in which the inhibitory effects of indacaterol appeared to be receptor-mediated whereas those of salmeterol were not. Taken together, the data indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of β-adrenoceptor agonists on human lung macrophages are modest.

  5. Effects of presurgical exercise training on systemic inflammatory markers among patients with malignant lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Eves, Neil D; Peddle, Carolyn J; Courneya, Kerry S; Haykowsky, Mark; Kumar, Vikaash; Winton, Timothy W; Reiman, Tony

    2009-04-01

    Systemic inflammation plays an important role in the initiation, promotion, and progression of lung carcinogenesis. The effects of interventions to lower inflammation have not been explored. Accordingly, we conducted a pilot study to explore the effects of exercise training on changes in biomarkers of systemic inflammation among patients with malignant lung lesions. Using a single-group design, 12 patients with suspected operable lung cancer were provided with structured exercise training until surgical resection. Participants underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing, 6 min walk testing, pulmonary function testing, and blood collection at baseline and immediately prior to surgical resection. Systemic inflammatory markers included intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, C-reactive protein, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The overall exercise adherence rate was 78%, with patients completing a mean of 30 +/- 25 sessions. Mean peak oxygen consumption increased 2.9 mL.kg-1.min-1 from baseline to presurgery (p = 0.016). Results indicate that exercise training resulted in a significant reduction in ICAM-1 (p = 0.041). Changes in other inflammatory markers did not reach statistical significance. Change in cardiorespiratory fitness was not associated with change in systemic inflammatory markers. This exploratory study provides an initial step for future studies to elucidate the potential role of exercise, as well as identify the underlying mechanisms of action, as a means of modulating the relationship between inflammation and cancer pathogenesis.

  6. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Hidetake; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Seno, Takahiro; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Kida, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Amane; Kukida, Yuji; Fujioka, Kazuki; Fujii, Wataru; Murakami, Ken; Kohno, Masataka; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a protein expressed by macrophages infiltrating the area around the coronary arteries of rats with an ectopic cardiac allograft. Some studies have shown that expression of AIF-1 increased in a mouse model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced acute colitis and in acute cellular rejection of human cardiac allografts. These results suggest that AIF-1 is related to acute inflammation. The current study used bleomycin-induced acute lung injury to analyze the expression of AIF-1 and to examine its function in acute lung injury. Results showed that AIF-1 was significantly expressed in lung macrophages and increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice with bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in comparison to control mice. Recombinant AIF-1 increased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α from RAW264.7 (a mouse macrophage cell line) and primary lung fibroblasts, and it also increased the production of KC (CXCL1) from lung fibroblasts. These results suggest that AIF-1 plays an important role in the mechanism underlying acute lung injury.

  7. [Regulation of inflammatory responses by endothelial cells--understanding the molecular mechanism(s) and its therapeutic application to sepsis].

    PubMed

    Okajima, Kenji

    2008-03-01

    Endothelial cells are activated by shear-stress and inflammatory mediators that are capable of activating sensory neurons. Activated endothelial cells increase the production of nitric oxide and prostaglandins, thereby regulating inflammatory responses induced by various insults. Dysfunction of sensory neurons and excess inflammatory mediators released from activated neutrophils damage endothelial cells, thereby increasing inflammatory responses such as an increase in tumor necrosis factor production. Pulmonary endothelial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of acute lung injury and shock, leading to multi-organ failure. Determination of soluble E-selectin in serum samples of patients with sepsis predicts the future development of acute lung injury. Therapeutic agents that are capable of stimulating sensory neurons or inhibiting leukocyte activation might be useful in the treatment of severe sepsis especially when these agents are administered in the early stage of severe sepsis.

  8. In vivo effect of surfactant on inflammatory cytokines during endotoxin-induced lung injury in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Neha; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a known inducer of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in humans and animals. In this study, ARDS was developed in rats by intratracheal instillation of LPS and the effect of two types of surfactant (natural vs. synthetic) was examined to determine their potential corrective roles in general, as well as to compare the two surfactants against one another in particular, in endotoxin-induced lung injury. Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into four groups, i.e., rats given: buffer controls; 055:B5 E. coli LPS only; LPS and then porcine surfactant (P-SF); or, LPS and then synthetic surfactant (S-SF). In vivo administration of LPS led to an increase in expression of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, interferon-γ, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in the lungs of rats. These effects were confirmed by immunofluorescence in lung tissue sections and/or by protein (Western immunoblot) and mRNA expression (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) analyses of tissue samples. Apart from IL-4, concentrations of each of these cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid recovered from the animals were significantly increased in the LPS-treated hosts. Instillation of either surfactant (70 h after the LPS) into the airways diminished the expression of each of the inducible-cytokines, with the porcine (natural) form seeming having the greater inhibitory effect. These data suggest that surfactant can play an important role in the treatment of endotoxin-induced lung injury and might possess robust anti-inflammatory effects. Further, it seems that both the natural and synthetic surfactants prevent inflammatory outcomes in the lungs by controlling cytokine(s) production by various inflammatory cells. Last, the studies here clearly indicated that in this aspect, natural surfactant appears to be more beneficial compared to synthetic surfactant.

  9. Chitin and Its Effects on Inflammatory and Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Elieh Ali Komi, Daniel; Sharma, Lokesh; Dela Cruz, Charles S

    2017-03-01

    Chitin, a potential allergy-promoting pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), is a linear polymer composed of N-acetylglucosamine residues which are linked by β-(1,4)-glycosidic bonds. Mammalians are potential hosts for chitin-containing protozoa, fungi, arthropods, and nematodes; however, mammalians themselves do not synthetize chitin and thus it is considered as a potential target for recognition by mammalian immune system. Chitin is sensed primarily in the lungs or gut where it activates a variety of innate (eosinophils, macrophages) and adaptive immune cells (IL-4/IL-13 expressing T helper type-2 lymphocytes). Chitin induces cytokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and alternative macrophage activation. Intranasal or intraperitoneal administration of chitin (varying in size, degree of acetylation and purity) to mice has been applied as a routine approach to investigate chitin's priming effects on innate and adaptive immunity. Structural chitin present in microorganisms is actively degraded by host true chitinases, including acidic mammalian chitinases and chitotriosidase into smaller fragments that can be sensed by mammalian receptors such as FIBCD1, NKR-P1, and RegIIIc. Immune recognition of chitin also involves pattern recognition receptors, mainly via TLR-2 and Dectin-1, to activate immune cells to induce cytokine production and creation of an immune network that results in inflammatory and allergic responses. In this review, we will focus on various immunological aspects of the interaction between chitin and host immune system such as sensing, interactions with immune cells, chitinases as chitin degrading enzymes, and immunologic applications of chitin.

  10. Role of Fiber Length on Phagocytosis & Inflammatory Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkevich, Leonid; Stark, Carahline; Champion, Julie

    2014-03-01

    Asbestos fibers have long been associated with lung cancer death. The inability of immune cells (e.g. macrophages) to effectively remove asbestos leads to chronic inflammation and disease. This study examines the role of fiber length on toxicity at the cellular level using model glass fibers. A major challenge is obtaining single diameter fibers but differing in length. Samples of 1 micron diameter fibers with different length distributions were prepared: short fibers (less than 15 microns) by aggressive crushing, and long fibers (longer than 15 microns) by successive sedimentation. Time-lapse video microscopy monitored the interaction of MH-S murine alveolar macrophages with the fibers: short fibers were easily internalized by the macrophages, but long fibers resisted internalization over many hours. Production of TNF- α (tumor necrosis factor alpha), a general inflammatory secreted cytokine, and Cox-2 (cyclo-oxygenase-2), an enzyme that produces radicals, each exhibited a dose-dependence that was greater for long than for short fibers. These results corroborate the importance of fiber length in both physical and biochemical cell response and support epidemiological observations of higher toxicity for longer fibers.

  11. The inflammatory response to miniaturised extracorporeal circulation: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Hunaid A; Whistance, Robert; Modi, Amit; Ohri, Sunil K

    2009-01-01

    Conventional cardiopulmonary bypass can trigger a systemic inflammatory response syndrome similar to sepsis. Aetiological factors include surgical trauma, reperfusion injury, and, most importantly, contact of the blood with the synthetic surfaces of the heart-lung machine. Recently, a new cardiopulmonary bypass system, mini-extracorporeal circulation (MECC), has been developed and has shown promising early results in terms of reducing this inflammatory response. It has no venous reservoir, a reduced priming volume, and less blood-synthetic interface. This review focuses on the inflammatory and clinical outcomes of using MECC and compares these to conventional cardio-pulmonary bypass (CCPB). MECC has been shown to reduce postoperative cytokines levels and other markers of inflammation. In addition, MECC reduces organ damage, postoperative complications and the need for blood transfusion. MECC is a safe and viable perfusion option and in certain circumstances it is superior to CCPB.

  12. Human amnion epithelial cells modulate the inflammatory response to ventilation in preterm lambs

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Jacqueline M.; McDonald, Courtney A.; Bischof, Robert J.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Lim, Rebecca; Wallace, Euan M.; Jenkin, Graham; Moss, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Ventilation of preterm neonates causes pulmonary inflammation that can contribute to lung injury, propagate systemically and result in long-term disease. Modulation of this initial response may reduce lung injury and its sequelae. We aimed to determine the effect of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) on immune activation and lung injury in preterm neonatal lambs. Preterm lambs received intratracheal hAECs (90x106) or vehicle, prior to 2 h of mechanical ventilation. Within 5 min of ventilation onset, lambs also received intravenous hAECs (90x106) or vehicle. Lung histology, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell phenotypes, and cytokine profiles were examined after 2 h of ventilation, and in unventilated controls. Histological indices of lung injury were higher than control, in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs but not in hAEC-treated ventilated lambs. Ventilation-induced pulmonary leukocyte recruitment was greater in hAEC-treated lambs than in vehicle-treated lambs. Lung IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expression was higher in vehicle- and hAEC-treated ventilated lambs than in controls but IL-8 mRNA levels were greater than control only in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs. Numbers of CD44+ and CD21+ lymphocytes and macrophages from the lungs were altered in vehicle- and hAEC-treated ventilated lambs. Numbers of CD8+ macrophages were lower in hAEC-treated ventilated lambs than in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs. Indices of systemic inflammation were not different between vehicle- and hAEC-treated lambs. Human amnion epithelial cells modulate the pulmonary inflammatory response to ventilation in preterm lambs, and reduce acute lung injury. Immunomodulatory effects of hAECs reduce lung injury in preterm neonates and may protect against longer-term respiratory disease. PMID:28346529

  13. Human amnion epithelial cells modulate the inflammatory response to ventilation in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Melville, Jacqueline M; McDonald, Courtney A; Bischof, Robert J; Polglase, Graeme R; Lim, Rebecca; Wallace, Euan M; Jenkin, Graham; Moss, Timothy J

    2017-01-01

    Ventilation of preterm neonates causes pulmonary inflammation that can contribute to lung injury, propagate systemically and result in long-term disease. Modulation of this initial response may reduce lung injury and its sequelae. We aimed to determine the effect of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) on immune activation and lung injury in preterm neonatal lambs. Preterm lambs received intratracheal hAECs (90x106) or vehicle, prior to 2 h of mechanical ventilation. Within 5 min of ventilation onset, lambs also received intravenous hAECs (90x106) or vehicle. Lung histology, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell phenotypes, and cytokine profiles were examined after 2 h of ventilation, and in unventilated controls. Histological indices of lung injury were higher than control, in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs but not in hAEC-treated ventilated lambs. Ventilation-induced pulmonary leukocyte recruitment was greater in hAEC-treated lambs than in vehicle-treated lambs. Lung IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expression was higher in vehicle- and hAEC-treated ventilated lambs than in controls but IL-8 mRNA levels were greater than control only in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs. Numbers of CD44+ and CD21+ lymphocytes and macrophages from the lungs were altered in vehicle- and hAEC-treated ventilated lambs. Numbers of CD8+ macrophages were lower in hAEC-treated ventilated lambs than in vehicle-treated ventilated lambs. Indices of systemic inflammation were not different between vehicle- and hAEC-treated lambs. Human amnion epithelial cells modulate the pulmonary inflammatory response to ventilation in preterm lambs, and reduce acute lung injury. Immunomodulatory effects of hAECs reduce lung injury in preterm neonates and may protect against longer-term respiratory disease.

  14. Commonly used air filters fail to eliminate secondhand smoke induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Muthumalage, Thivanka; Pritsos, Karen; Hunter, Kenneth; Pritsos, Chris

    2017-07-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) causes approximately 50,000 deaths per year. Despite all the health warnings, smoking is still allowed indoors in many states exposing both workers and patrons to SHS on a daily basis. The opponents of smoking bans suggest that present day air filtration systems remove the health hazards of exposure to SHS. In this study, using an acute SHS exposure model, we looked at the impact of commonly used air filters (MERV-8 pleated and MERV-8 pleated activated charcoal) on SHS by assessing the inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response in C57BL/6 mice. In order to assess the inflammatory response, we looked at the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) cytokine production by alveolar macrophages (AMs), and for the oxidative response, we quantified the products of lipid peroxidation and the total glutathione (tGSH) production in lung homogenates. Our results showed that SHS caused significant immune and oxidative stress responses. The tested filters resulted in only a modest alleviation of inflammatory and oxidative responses due to SHS exposure. Our data show that these air filters cannot eliminate the risk of SHS exposure and that a short-term exposure to SHS is sufficient to alter the inflammatory cytokine response and to initiate a complex oxidative stress response. Our results are consistent with the statement made by the Surgeon General's reports that there is no risk free level of exposure to SHS.

  15. Genome wide responses of murine lungs to dietary α-tocopherol

    PubMed Central

    Oommen, Saji; Vasu, Vihas T.; Leonard, Scott W.; Traber, Maret G.; Cross, Carroll E.; Gohil, Kishorchandra

    2009-01-01

    α-tocopherol (α-T) may affect biological processes by modulating mRNA concentrations. This study screened the responses of ~15,000 lung mRNAs to dietary α-T in mice. The lung was chosen as the target organ because it is subjected to cyclical variations in oxidant and inflammatory stressors and α-T has been implicated in their modulations. The analysis identified ~400 mRNAs sensitive to α-T status of lungs determined by dietary α-T. The female lung transcriptome appears to be more sensitive to the α-T status than that of the male lungs. Here, we focus on the induction of 13 cytoskeleton genes by dietary α-T because they were similarly induced in the male and the female lungs. Their inductions were confirmed by quantitative-real-time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Immunohistochemical analyses of three of the encoded proteins suggest that they are expressed in lung vasculature and alveolar regions. The data suggest that the lung α-T status may modulate cytoarchitecture of lungs. PMID:17164183

  16. Anti-inflammatory treatment in dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant in meconium-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, D; Drgova, A; Kopincova, J; Pullmann, R; Calkovska, A

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation, oxidation, lung edema, and other factors participate in surfactant dysfunction in meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Therefore, we hypothesized that anti-inflammatory treatment may reverse surfactant dysfunction in the MAS model. Oxygen-ventilated rabbits were given meconium intratracheally (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg; Mec) or saline (Sal). Thirty minutes later, meconium-instilled animals were treated by glucocorticoids budesonide (0.25 mg/kg, i.t.) and dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.), or phosphodiesterase inhibitors aminophylline (2 mg/kg, i.v.) and olprinone (0.2 mg/kg, i.v.), or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (10 mg/kg, i.v.). Healthy, non-ventilated animals served as controls (Con). At the end of experiments, left lung was lavaged and a differential leukocyte count in sediment was estimated. The supernatant of lavage fluid was adjusted to a concentration of 0.5 mg phospholipids/ml. Surfactant quality was evaluated by capillary surfactometer and expressed by initial pressure and the time of capillary patency. The right lung was used to determine lung edema by wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio. Total antioxidant status (TAS) in blood plasma was evaluated. W/D ratio increased and capillary patency time shortened significantly, whereas the initial pressure increased and TAS decreased insignificantly in Sal vs. Con groups. Meconium instillation potentiated edema formation and neutrophil influx into the lungs, reduced capillary patency and TAS, and decreased the surfactant quality compared with both Sal and Con groups (p > 0.05). Each of the anti-inflammatory agents reduced lung edema and neutrophil influx into the lung and partly reversed surfactant dysfunction in the MAS model, with a superior effect observed after glucocorticoids and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine.

  17. Eicosapentaenoic acid attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Han; Lin, An-Hsuan; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Peng, Ruo-Yun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes chronic lung inflammation that is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive pathways. Our previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke (CS) activates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling resulting in induction of lung inflammation. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a major type of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is present in significant amounts in marine-based fish and fish oil. EPA has been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo. However, whether EPA has similar beneficial effects against CS-induced lung inflammation remains unclear. Using a murine model, we show that subchronic CS exposure for 4 weeks caused pulmonary inflammatory infiltration (total cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), 11.0-fold increase), increased lung vascular permeability (protein level in BALF, 3.1-fold increase), elevated levels of chemokines (11.4–38.2-fold increase) and malondialdehyde (an oxidative stress biomarker; 2.0-fold increase) in the lungs, as well as lung inflammation; all of these CS-induced events were suppressed by daily supplementation with EPA. Using human bronchial epithelial cells, we further show that CS extract (CSE) sequentially activated NADPH oxidase (NADPH oxidase activity, 1.9-fold increase), increased intracellular levels of ROS (3.0-fold increase), activated both MAPKs and NF-κB, and induced interleukin-8 (IL-8; 8.2-fold increase); all these CSE-induced events were inhibited by pretreatment with EPA. Our findings suggest a novel role for EPA in alleviating the oxidative stress and lung inflammation induced by subchronic CS exposure in vivo and in suppressing the CSE-induced IL-8 in vitro via its antioxidant function and by inhibiting MAPKs/NF-κB signaling. PMID:25452730

  18. Alleviation of severe inflammatory responses in LPS-exposed mice by Schisantherin A.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Ci, Xinxin; Li, Yang; Liu, Chaoying; Wen, Zhongmei; Jie, Jing; Peng, Liping

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate our hypothesis starting that Schisantherin A (SchA), which exerts significant anti-inflammatory effects in vitro, could reduce the pulmonary inflammatory response in an acute lung injury (ALI) model. ALI was induced in mice by exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 20 mg/kg), and the inflammatory mediator production, neutrophil infiltration, and histopathological changes were evaluated. SchA at a dose of 100 mg/kg significantly improved survival rate of mice injected with LPS. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the histopathological changes due to the injury were significantly inhibited when SchA was administered before or after LPS insult, and the infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages in lung tissues induced by LPS were suppressed by SchA. Additionally, pretreatment with SchA notably blocked the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Taken together, SchA showed obvious anti-inflammatory effects in an LPS-induced ALI model via blockage of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Thus, SchA may be an innovative therapy for inflammatory diseases.

  19. Inflammation in lung after acute myocardial infarction is induced by dendritic cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Hu, L J; Ren, W Y; Shen, Q J; Ji, H Y; Zhu, L

    2017-01-01

    The present study was performed to describe the changes of lung tissues in mice with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and also explain the cell mechanism involved in inflammation in lung. AMI was established by left coronary ligation in mice. Then mice were divided into three groups: control group, MW1 group (sampling after surgery for one week) and MW2 group (sampling after surgery for two weeks). Afterwards, measurement of lung weight and lung histology, cell sorting in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and detection of several adhesive molecules, inflammatory molecules as well as enzyme associated with inflammation were performed. Moreover, dendritic cells (DCs) were isolated from bone marrow of C57B/L6 mice. After incubating with necrotic myocardium, the expression of antigen presenting molecules, co-stimulatory molecules and inflammatory molecules were detected by flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry in DCs. We also detected T-cell proliferation after incubating with necrotic myocardium-treated DCs. AMI induced pathological changes of lung tissue and increased inflammatory cell amount in BAL fluid. AMI also increased the expression of several inflammatory factors, adhesive molecules and enzymes associated with inflammation. CD11c and TLR9, which are DC surface markers, showed a significantly increased expression in mice with AMI. Additionally, necrotic myocardium significantly increased the expression of co-stimulatory factors including CD83 and CD80, inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ and NF-κB in DCs. Furthermore, DCs treated with necrotic myocardium also significantly promoted T-cell proliferation. AMI induced inflammation in lung and these pathological changes were mediated by DC-associated immune response.

  20. Nodular inflammatory foci are sites of T cell priming and control of murine cytomegalovirus infection in the neonatal lung.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Felix R; Heller, Katrin; Halle, Stephan; Keyser, Kirsten A; Busche, Andreas; Marquardt, Anja; Wagner, Karen; Boelter, Jasmin; Bischoff, Yvonne; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Arens, Ramon; Messerle, Martin; Förster, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Neonates, including mice and humans, are highly susceptible to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. However, many aspects of neonatal CMV infections such as viral cell tropism, spatio-temporal distribution of the pathogen as well as genesis of antiviral immunity are unknown. With the use of reporter mutants of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) we identified the lung as a primary target of mucosal infection in neonatal mice. Comparative analysis of neonatal and adult mice revealed a delayed control of virus replication in the neonatal lung mucosa explaining the pronounced systemic infection and disease in neonates. This phenomenon was supplemented by a delayed expansion of CD8(+) T cell clones recognizing the viral protein M45 in neonates. We detected viral infection at the single-cell level and observed myeloid cells forming "nodular inflammatory foci" (NIF) in the neonatal lung. Co-localization of infected cells within NIFs was associated with their disruption and clearance of the infection. By 2-photon microscopy, we characterized how neonatal antigen-presenting cells (APC) interacted with T cells and induced mature adaptive immune responses within such NIFs. We thus define NIFs of the neonatal lung as niches for prolonged MCMV replication and T cell priming but also as sites of infection control.

  1. Nodular Inflammatory Foci Are Sites of T Cell Priming and Control of Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection in the Neonatal Lung

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Felix R.; Heller, Katrin; Halle, Stephan; Keyser, Kirsten A.; Busche, Andreas; Marquardt, Anja; Wagner, Karen; Boelter, Jasmin; Bischoff, Yvonne; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Arens, Ramon; Messerle, Martin; Förster, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Neonates, including mice and humans, are highly susceptible to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. However, many aspects of neonatal CMV infections such as viral cell tropism, spatio-temporal distribution of the pathogen as well as genesis of antiviral immunity are unknown. With the use of reporter mutants of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) we identified the lung as a primary target of mucosal infection in neonatal mice. Comparative analysis of neonatal and adult mice revealed a delayed control of virus replication in the neonatal lung mucosa explaining the pronounced systemic infection and disease in neonates. This phenomenon was supplemented by a delayed expansion of CD8+ T cell clones recognizing the viral protein M45 in neonates. We detected viral infection at the single-cell level and observed myeloid cells forming “nodular inflammatory foci” (NIF) in the neonatal lung. Co-localization of infected cells within NIFs was associated with their disruption and clearance of the infection. By 2-photon microscopy, we characterized how neonatal antigen-presenting cells (APC) interacted with T cells and induced mature adaptive immune responses within such NIFs. We thus define NIFs of the neonatal lung as niches for prolonged MCMV replication and T cell priming but also as sites of infection control. PMID:24348257

  2. Carbon dioxide is largely responsible for the acute inflammatory effects of tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Laurent; Guais, Adeline; Chaumet-Riffaud, Philippe; Grévillot, Georges; Sasco, Annie J; Molina, Thierry Jo; Mohammad, Abolhassani

    2010-06-01

    Tobacco smoking is responsible for a vast array of diseases, particularly chronic bronchitis and lung cancer. It is still unclear which constituent(s) of the smoke is responsible for its toxicity. The authors decided to focus on carbon dioxide, since its level of concentration in mainstream cigarette smoke is about 200 times higher than in the atmosphere. The authors previously demonstrated that inhalation of carbon dioxide concentrations above 5% has a deleterious effect on lungs. In this study, the authors assessed the inflammatory potential of carbon dioxide contained in cigarette smoke. Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke containing a high or reduced CO(2) level by filtration through a potassium hydroxyde solution. The inflammatory response was evaluated by histological analysis, protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A) and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion measurements. The data show that the toxicity of cigarette smoke may be largely due to its high level of CO(2). Pulmonary injuries consequent to tobacco smoke inhalation observed by histology were greatly diminished when CO(2) was removed. Cigarette smoke exposure causes an inflammatory response characterized by PP2A and NF-kappaB activation followed by proinflammatory cytokine secretion. This inflammatory response was reduced when the cigarette smoke was filtered through a potassium hydroxide column, and reestablished when CO(2) was injected downstream from the filtration column.Given that there is an extensive literature linking a chronic inflammatory response to the major smoking-related diseases, these data suggest that carbon dioxide may play a key role in the causation of these diseases by tobacco smoking.

  3. Nebulized Recombinant Human Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor Attenuates Coagulation and Exerts Modest Anti-inflammatory Effects in Rat Models of Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; Hofstra, Jorrit J; Brands, Xanthe; Levi, Marcel M; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Zaat, Sebastiaan A J; Van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom; Schultz, Marcus J

    2017-04-01

    Critically ill patients are at a constant risk of direct (e.g., by pneumonia) or indirect lung injury (e.g., by sepsis). Excessive alveolar fibrin deposition is a prominent feature of lung injury, undermining pulmonary integrity and function. We examined the effect of local administration of recombinant human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (rh-TFPI), a natural anticoagulant, in two well-established models of lung injury in rats. Rats received intratracheal instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, causing direct lung injury, or they received an intravenous injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), causing indirect lung injury. Rats were randomized to local treatment with rh-TFPI or placebo through repeated nebulization. Challenge with P. aeruginosa or LPS was associated with increased coagulation and decreased fibrinolysis in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma. Rh-TFPI levels in BALF increased after nebulization, whereas plasma rh-TFPI levels remained low and systemic TFPI activity was not affected. Nebulization of rh-TFPI attenuated pulmonary and systemic coagulation in both models, without affecting fibrinolysis. Nebulization of rh-TFPI modestly reduced the inflammatory response and bacterial growth of P. aeruginosa in the alveolar compartment. Local treatment with rh-TFPI does not alter systemic TFPI activity; however, it attenuates both pulmonary and systemic coagulopathy. Furthermore, nebulized rh-TFPI modestly reduces the pulmonary inflammatory response and allows increased bacterial clearance in rats with direct lung injury caused by P. aeruginosa.

  4. Kinetics of lung lesion development and pro-inflammatory cytokine response in pigs with vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease induced by challenge with pandemic (2009) A/H1N1 influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this report was to characterize the enhanced clinical disease and lung lesions observed in pigs vaccinated with inactivated H1N2 swine delta-cluster influenza A virus and challenged with pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 human influenza virus. Eighty-four, six-week-old, crossbred pigs were rand...

  5. Altered mucosal immune response after acute lung injury in a murine model of Ataxia Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare but devastating and progressive disorder characterized by cerebellar dysfunction, lymphoreticular malignancies and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. In A-T, disease of the respiratory system causes significant morbidity and is a frequent cause of death. Methods We used a self-limited murine model of hydrochloric acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI) to determine the inflammatory answer due to mucosal injury in Atm (A-T mutated)- deficient mice (Atm-/-). Results ATM deficiency increased peak lung inflammation as demonstrated by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils and lymphocytes and increased levels of BALF pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-6, TNF). Furthermore, bronchial epithelial damage after ALI was increased in Atm-/- mice. ATM deficiency increased airway resistance and tissue compliance before ALI was performed. Conclusions Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a key role in inflammatory response after airway mucosal injury. PMID:24884546

  6. Altered mucosal immune response after acute lung injury in a murine model of Ataxia Telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Eickmeier, Olaf; Kim, Su Youn; Herrmann, Eva; Döring, Constanze; Duecker, Ruth; Voss, Sandra; Wehner, Sibylle; Hölscher, Christoph; Pietzner, Julia; Zielen, Stefan; Schubert, Ralf

    2014-05-29

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare but devastating and progressive disorder characterized by cerebellar dysfunction, lymphoreticular malignancies and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. In A-T, disease of the respiratory system causes significant morbidity and is a frequent cause of death. We used a self-limited murine model of hydrochloric acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI) to determine the inflammatory answer due to mucosal injury in Atm (A-T mutated)- deficient mice (Atm(-/-)). ATM deficiency increased peak lung inflammation as demonstrated by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils and lymphocytes and increased levels of BALF pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-6, TNF). Furthermore, bronchial epithelial damage after ALI was increased in Atm(-/-) mice. ATM deficiency increased airway resistance and tissue compliance before ALI was performed. Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a key role in inflammatory response after airway mucosal injury.

  7. Baicalin from Scutellaria baicalensis blocks respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and reduces inflammatory cell infiltration and lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hengfei; Ren, Ke; Lv, Baojie; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Ying; Tan, Ren Xiang; Li, Erguang

    2016-01-01

    The roots of Scutellaria baicalensis has been used as a remedy for inflammatory and infective diseases for thousands of years. We evaluated the antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, the leading cause of childhood infection and hospitalization. By fractionation and chromatographic analysis, we determined that baicalin was responsible for the antiviral activity of S. baicalensis against RSV infection. The concentration for 50% inhibition (IC50) of RSV infection was determined at 19.9 ± 1.8 μM, while the 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) was measured at 370 ± 10 μM. We then used a mouse model of RSV infection to further demonstrate baicalin antiviral effect. RSV infection caused significant lung injury and proinflammatory response, including CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte infiltration. Baicalin treatment resulted in reduction of T lymphocyte infiltration and gene expression of proinflammatory factors, while the treatment moderately reduced RSV titers recovered from the lung tissues. T lymphocyte infiltration and cytotoxic T lymphocyte modulated tissue damage has been identified critical factors of RSV disease. The study therefore demonstrates that baicalin subjugates RSV disease through antiviral and anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:27767097

  8. Pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major accidental trauma.

    PubMed

    Brøchner, Anne Craveiro; Toft, Palle

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major trauma and the timing of final reconstructive surgery. An unsystematic review of the medical literature was performed and articles pertaining to the inflammatory response to trauma were obtained. The literature selected was based on the preference and clinical expertise of authors. The inflammatory response consists of hormonal metabolic and immunological components and the extent correlates with the magnitude of the tissue injury. After trauma and uncomplicated surgery a delicate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators is observed. Trauma patients are, however, often exposed, not only to the trauma, but to several events in the form of initial surgery and later final reconstructive surgery. In this case immune paralysis associated with increased risk of infection might develop. The inflammatory response is normalized 3 weeks following trauma. It has been proposed that the final reconstructive surgery should be postponed until the inflammatory response is normalized. This statement is however not based on clinical trials. Postponement of final reconstructive surgery until the inflammatory is normalized should be based on prospective randomized trials.

  9. Pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major accidental trauma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to describe the pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major trauma and the timing of final reconstructive surgery. Methods An unsystematic review of the medical literature was performed and articles pertaining to the inflammatory response to trauma were obtained. The literature selected was based on the preference and clinical expertise of authors. Discussion The inflammatory response consists of hormonal metabolic and immunological components and the extent correlates with the magnitude of the tissue injury. After trauma and uncomplicated surgery a delicate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators is observed. Trauma patients are, however, often exposed, not only to the trauma, but to several events in the form of initial surgery and later final reconstructive surgery. In this case immune paralysis associated with increased risk of infection might develop. The inflammatory response is normalized 3 weeks following trauma. It has been proposed that the final reconstructive surgery should be postponed until the inflammatory response is normalized. This statement is however not based on clinical trials. Conclusion Postponement of final reconstructive surgery until the inflammatory is normalized should be based on prospective randomized trials. PMID:19754938

  10. Fei-Liu-Ping ointment inhibits lung cancer growth and invasion by suppressing tumor inflammatory microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy are the primary therapeutic methods for lung cancer with the use of combination therapies gaining popularity. The frequency and duration of treatment, as well as, managing lung cancer by targeting multiple aspects of cancer biology is often limited by toxicity to the patient. There are many naturally occurring anticancer agents that have a high degree of efficacy and low toxicity, offering a viable and safe approach for the treatment of lung cancer. The herbs traditionally used in Chinese medicine for anticancer treatment offer great potential to enhance the efficacy of conventional therapy. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic effects of Fei-Liu-Ping (FLP) ointment in treating lung cancer; a known anticancer Chinese herbal based formula. Methods In this study, A549 human lung carcinoma cell line and Lewis lung carcinoma xenograft mouse model were used. In addition, we utilized an in vitro co-culture system to simulate the tumor microenvironment in order to evaluate the molecular mechanisms of FLP treatment. Results FLP treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth in the Lewis lung xenograft by 40 percent, compared to that of cyclophosphamide (CTX) of 62.02 percent. Moreover, combining FLP and CTX inhibited tumor growth by 83.23 percent. Upon evaluation, we found that FLP treatment reduced the concentration of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. In addition, we also found an improvement in E-cadherin expression and inhibition of N-cadherin and MMP9. We found similar findings in vitro when we co-cultured A549 cells with macrophages. FLP treatment inhibited A549 cell growth, invasion and metastasis, in part, through the regulation of NF-κB and altering the expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, MMP2 and MMP9. Conclusions FLP exerts anti-inflammatory properties in the tumor microenvironment, which may

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Adrenomedullin on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Carrageenan in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Talero; Rosanna, Di Paola; Emanuela, Mazzon; Esposito, Emanuela; Virginia, Motilva; Salvatore, Cuzzocrea

    2012-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52 amino acid peptide that has shown predominant anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we evaluated the possible therapeutic effect of this peptide in an experimental model of acute inflammation, the carrageenan- (CAR-) induced pleurisy. Pleurisy was induced by injection of CAR into the pleural cavity of mice. AM (200 ng/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal route 1 h after CAR, and the animals were sacrificed 4 h after that. AM treatment attenuated the recruitment of leucocytes in the lung tissue and the generation and/or the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the intercellular cell adhesion molecules. Moreover, AM inhibited the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), thereby abating the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and prevented the oxidative and nitroxidative lung tissue injury, as shown by the reduction of nitrotyrosine, malondialdehyde (MDA), and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) levels. Finally, we demonstrated that these anti-inflammatory effects of AM were associated with the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. All these parameters were markedly increased by intrapleural CAR in the absence of any treatment. We report that treatment with AM significantly reduces the development of acute lung injury by downregulating a broad spectrum of inflammatory factors. PMID:22685374

  12. The Sources of Inflammatory Mediators in the Lung after Silica Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. Murali Krishna; Porter, Dale W.; Meighan, Terence; Castranova, Vince

    2004-01-01

    The expression of 10 genes implicated in regulation of the inflammatory processes in the lung was studied after exposure of alveolar macrophages (AMs) to silica in vitro or in vivo. Exposure of AMs to silica in vitro up-regulated the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of three genes [interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2)] without a concomitant increase in the protein levels. AMs isolated after intratracheal instillation of silica up-regulated mRNA levels of four additional genes [granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-1β, IL-10, and inducible nitric oxide synthase]. IL-6, MCP-1, and MIP-2 protein levels were elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Fibroblasts under basal culture conditions express much higher levels of IL-6 and GM-CSF compared with AMs. Coculture of AMs and alveolar type II cells, or coculture of AMs and lung fibroblasts, in contact cultures or Transwell chambers, revealed no synergistic effect. Therefore, such interaction does not explain the effects seen in vivo. Identification of the intercellular communication in vivo is still unresolved. However, fibroblasts appear to be an important source of inflammatory mediators in the lung. PMID:15579413

  13. A surprising role for uric acid: the inflammatory malaria response.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Ty, Maureen; Orengo, Jamie M; van de Hoef, Diana; Rodriguez, Ana

    2014-02-01

    Malaria, which is caused by Plasmodium parasite erythrocyte infection, is a highly inflammatory disease with characteristic periodic fevers caused by the synchronous rupture of infected erythrocytes to release daughter parasites. Despite the importance of inflammation in the pathology and mortality induced by malaria, the parasite-derived factors inducing the inflammatory response are still not well characterized. Uric acid is emerging as a central inflammatory molecule in malaria. Not only is uric acid found in the precipitated form in infected erythrocytes, but high concentrations of hypoxanthine, a precursor for uric acid, also accumulate in infected erythrocytes. Both are released upon infected erythrocyte rupture into the circulation where hypoxanthine would be converted into uric acid and precipitated uric acid would encounter immune cells. Uric acid is an important contributor to inflammatory cytokine secretion, dendritic cell and T cell responses induced by Plasmodium, suggesting uric acid as a novel molecular target for anti-inflammatory therapies in malaria.

  14. Pivotal Advance: Invariant NKT cells reduce accumulation of inflammatory monocytes in the lungs and decrease immune-pathology during severe influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kok, Wai Ling; Denney, Laura; Benam, Kambez; Cole, Suzanne; Clelland, Colin; McMichael, Andrew J; Ho, Ling-Pei

    2012-03-01

    Little is known of how a strong immune response in the lungs is regulated to minimize tissue injury during severe influenza A virus (IAV) infection. Here, using a model of lethal, high-pathogenicity IAV infection, we first show that Ly6C(hi)Ly6G(-) inflammatory monocytes, and not neutrophils, are the main infiltrate in lungs of WT mice. Mice devoid of iNKT cells (Jα18(-/-) mice) have increased levels of inflammatory monocytes, which correlated with increased lung injury and mortality (but not viral load). Activation of iNKT cells correlated with reduction of MCP-1 levels and improved outcome. iNKT cells were able to selectively lyse infected, MCP-1-producing monocytes in vitro, in a CD1d-dependent process. Our study provides a detailed profile and kinetics of innate immune cells in the lungs during severe IAV infection, highlighting inflammatory monocytes as the major infiltrate and identifying a role for iNKT cells in control of these cells and lung immune-pathology.

  15. Lung response after subchronic glass fiber intratracheal instillation: an experimental study on rats.

    PubMed

    Domokos-Hancu, Bianca; Man, Milena Adina; Liana, Hancu; Pop, Carmen Monica

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the effects on the lung after subchronic glass fiber intratracheal instillation study on rats. We evaluated the toxicological effects on the lung: persistent inflammatory reaction, cell proliferation, and pulmonary fibrosis on histopathological examination. We performed a glass fiber intratracheal instillation study on total 32 Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups: three test groups exposed to different doses of glass fiber and one control group. One week after the end of the exposure period, all animals were euthanized. The histopathological examination of the lung performed in this study followed both distribution of the lesions through the multilevel biopsies that were taken and the inflammatory profile using both hematoxilin-eozin and Sirius red staining. The inflammatory lesions described for the first group were minimal/slight (grade I) and the total score was between 0 and 10 points (mean value = 3). For the second group, the inflammatory lesions were moderate/marked (grade II) with discrete collagen proliferation and discrete fibrosis and the total score ranged between 11 and 20 points (mean value = 11,250). For the third group, the described inflammatory lesions were massive with total score ranging between 21 and 30 points with collagen deposition, pulmonary and pleural fibrosis, and lung emphysema (mean value = 21,750) and no lesion in control group (with statistically significant difference P ≤ .001). This study of fiber glass intratracheal instillation of three different doses demonstrates that exposure to fiber glass is responsible for the development of persistent inflammatory response and a large range of hystopathological lesions which correlate to the administered dose.

  16. The absence of microbiota delays the inflammatory response to Cryptococcus gattii.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marliete Carvalho; Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; Ribeiro, Maira Juliana Andrade; Freitas, Gustavo José Cota de; Bastos, Rafael Wesley; Ferreira, Gabriella Freitas; Miranda, Aline Silva; Arifa, Raquel Duque Nascimento; Santos, Patrícia Campi; Martins, Flaviano Dos Santos; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Teixeira, Antonio Lúcio; Souza, Danielle G; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2016-06-01

    The inflammatory response plays a crucial role in infectious diseases, and the intestinal microbiota is linked to maturation of the immune system. However, the association between microbiota and the response against fungal infections has not been elucidated. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of microbiota on Cryptococcus gattii infection. Germ-free (GF), conventional (CV), conventionalized (CVN-mice that received feces from conventional animals), and LPS-stimulated mice were infected with C. gattii. GF mice were more susceptible to infection, showing lower survival, higher fungal burden in the lungs and brain, increased behavioral changes, reduced levels of IFN-γ, IL-1β and IL-17, and lower NFκBp65 phosphorylation compared to CV mice. Low expression of inflammatory cytokines was associated with smaller yeast cells and polysaccharide capsules (the main virulence factor of C. gattii) in the lungs, and less tissue damage. Furthermore, macrophages from GF mice showed reduced ability to engulf, produce ROS, and kill C. gattii. Restoration of microbiota (CVN mice) or LPS administration made GF mice more responsive to infection, which was associated with increased survival and higher levels of inflammatory mediators. This study is the first to demonstrate the influence of microbiota in the host response against C. gattii.

  17. Conventional mechanical ventilation of healthy lungs induced pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Brégeon, Fabienne; Roch, Antoine; Delpierre, Stéphane; Ghigo, Eric; Autillo-Touati, Amapola; Kajikawa, Osamu; Martin, Thomas R; Pugin, Jérôme; Portugal, Henry; Auffray, Jean-Pierre; Jammes, Yves

    2002-08-30

    We investigated the potential inflammatory reaction induced by mechanical ventilation (MV) using 10 ml/kg tidal volume and no positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in control (C, n = 8), spontaneously breathing (SB, n = 12) and mechanically ventilated (MV, n = 12) rabbits with normal lungs. After 6 h (MV and SB groups) or immediately (C group), lungs were removed for measurement of wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio and for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Pulmonary mechanics were also studied. MV animals developed a modest but significant (P < 0.01) impairment of arterial blood oxygenation and had higher W/D lung weight ratio than C ones. In MV group, BAL macrophage count was greater (P < 0.05) than in SB one. MV induced an upregulation of MCP-1, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta gene transcription (mRNAs), without significant elevation of the corresponding protein cytokines in the BAL supernatant, except for MCP-1 (P < 0.05). These data suggest that MV, even using moderate tidal volume, elicits a pro-inflammatory stimulus to the lungs.

  18. Parkinson’s disease and enhanced inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovska, Iva; Wagner, Brandon M

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the first and second most prevalent motor and neurodegenerative disease, respectively. The clinical symptoms of PD result from a loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. However, the molecular cause of DA neuron loss remains elusive. Mounting evidence implicates enhanced inflammatory response in the development and progression of PD pathology. This review examines current research connecting PD and inflammatory response. PMID:25769314

  19. Dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acid-containing fish oil suppresses F2-isoprostanes but enhances inflammatory cytokine response in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huiyong; Liu, Wei; Goleniewska, Kasia; Porter, Ned A; Morrow, Jason D; Peebles, R Stokes

    2009-09-01

    Epidemiological and clinical evidence has suggested that increased dietary intake of fish oil containing omega-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may be associated with a reduced risk of asthma. However, interventional studies on these effects have been equivocal and controversial. Free radical oxidation products of lipids and cyclooxygenases-derived prostaglandins are believed to play an important role in asthma, and fish oil supplementation may modulate the levels of these critical lipid mediators. We employed a murine model of allergic inflammation produced by sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) to study the effects of fish oil supplementation on airway inflammation. Our studies demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids were dose dependently incorporated into mouse lung tissue after dietary supplementation. We examined the oxidative stress status by measuring the levels of isoprostanes (IsoPs), the gold standard for oxidative stress in vivo. OVA challenge caused significant increase of F(2)-IsoPs in mouse lung, suggesting an elevated level of oxidative stress. Compared to the control group, fish oil supplementation led to a significant reduction of F(2)-IsoP (from arachidonic acid) with a concomitant increase of F(3)-IsoPs (from EPA) and F(4)-IsoPs (from DHA). Surprisingly, however, fish oil supplementation enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokine IL-5 and IL-13. Furthermore, fish oil supplementation suppressed the production of pulmonary protective PGE(2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) while the level of urinary metabolites of the PGE(2) was increased. Our data suggest that augmented lung inflammation after fish oil supplementation may be due to the reduction of PGE(2) production in the lung and these dichotomous results bring into question the role of fish oil supplementation in the treatment of asthma.

  20. Lipid isolated from a Leishmania donovani strain reduces Escherichia coli induced sepsis in mice through inhibition of inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Bose, Dipayan; Banerjee, Somenath; Pal, Prajnamoy; Jha, Tarun; Das Saha, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is the reflection of systemic immune response that manifests in the sequential inflammatory process in presence of infection. This may occur as a result of gram-negative bacterial sepsis including Escherichia coli infection that gives rise to excessive production of inflammatory mediators and causes severe tissue injuries. We have reported earlier that the lipid of attenuated Leishmania donovani suppresses the inflammatory responses in arthritis patients. Using heat killed E. coli stimulated macrophages, we have now investigated the effect of leishmanial total lipid (LTL) isolated from Leishmania donovani (MHO/IN/1978/UR6) for amelioration of the inflammatory mediators and transcriptional factor with suppression of TLR4-CD14 expression. To evaluate the in vivo effect, E. coli induced murine sepsis model was used focusing on the changes in different parameter(s) of lung injury caused by sepsis, namely, edema, vascular permeability, and pathophysiology, and the status of different cytokine-chemokine(s) and adhesion molecule(s). Due to the effect of LTL, E. coli induced inflammatory cytokine-chemokine(s) levels were significantly reduced in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid simultaneously. LTL also improved the lung injury and suppressed the cell adhesion molecules in lung tissue. These findings indicate that LTL may prove to be a potential anti-inflammatory agent and provide protection against gram-negative bacterial sepsis with pulmonary impairment.

  1. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide regulates inflammatory response by activating the ERK pathway in polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huili; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Bhatia, Madhav

    2008-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) up-regulates inflammatory response in several inflammatory diseases. However, to date, little is known about the molecular mechanism by which H(2)S provokes the inflammatory response in sepsis. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathway underlying the proinflammatory role of H(2)S in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis. Male Swiss mice were subjected to CLP and treated with dl-propargylglycine (PAG; 50 mg/kg i.p., an inhibitor of H(2)S formation), NaHS (10 mg/kg, i.p., an H(2)S donor), or saline. PAG was administered 1 h before CLP, whereas NaHS was given at the time of CLP. CLP-induced sepsis resulted in a time-dependent increase in the synthesis of endogenous H(2)S. Maximum phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and degradation of IkappaBalpha in lung and liver were observed 4 h after CLP. Inhibition of H(2)S formation by PAG significantly reduced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in lung and liver 4 h after CLP, coupled with decreased degradation of IkappaBalpha and activation of NF-kappaB. In contrast, injection of NaHS significantly enhanced the activation of ERK1/2 in lung and liver, therefore leading to a further rise in tissue NF-kappaB activity. As a result, pretreatment with PAG significantly reduced the production of cytokines and chemokines in sepsis, whereas exogenous H(2)S greatly increased it. In addition, pretreatment with PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK kinase (MEK-1), significantly prevented NaHS from aggravating systemic inflammation in sepsis. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that H(2)S may regulate systemic inflammatory response in sepsis via ERK pathway.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell derived secretome and extracellular vesicles for acute lung injury and other inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-Gang; Gudapati, Varun; Lim, Hyungsun; Lee, Jae W

    2016-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a major cause of respiratory failure in critically ill patients. Despite extensive research into its pathophysiology, mortality remains high. No effective pharmacotherapy exists. Based largely on numerous preclinical studies, administration of mesenchymal stem or stromal cell (MSC) as a therapeutic for acute lung injury holds great promise, and clinical trials are currently underway. However, concern for the use of stem cells, specifically the risk of iatrogenic tumor formation, remains unresolved. Accumulating evidence now suggest that novel cell-free therapies including MSC-derived conditioned medium and extracellular vesicles released from MSCs might constitute compelling alternatives. The current review summarizes the preclinical studies testing MSC conditioned medium and/or MSC extracellular vesicles as treatment for acute lung injury and other inflammatory lung diseases. While certain logistical obstacles limit the clinical applications of MSC conditioned medium such as the volume required for treatment, the therapeutic application of MSC extracellular vesicles remains promising, primarily due to ability of extracellular vesicles to maintain the functional phenotype of the parent cell. However, utilization of MSC extracellular vesicles will require large-scale production and standardization concerning identification, characterization and quantification.

  3. Fetal inflammatory response and brain injury in the preterm newborn.

    PubMed

    Malaeb, Shadi; Dammann, Olaf

    2009-09-01

    Preterm birth can be caused by intrauterine infection and maternal/fetal inflammatory responses. Maternal inflammation (chorioamnionitis) is often followed by a systemic fetal inflammatory response characterized by elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the fetal circulation. The inflammation signal is likely transmitted across the blood-brain barrier and initiates a neuroinflammatory response. Microglial activation has a central role in this process and triggers excitotoxic, inflammatory, and oxidative damage in the developing brain. Neuroinflammation can persist over a period of time and sensitize the brain to subinjurious insults in early and chronic phases but may offer relative tolerance in the intermediate period through activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory, protective, and repair mechanisms. Neuroinflammatory injury not only destroys what exists but also changes what develops.

  4. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (CD35) in bronchoalveolar lavage of inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, J; Sadallah, S; Schifferli, J A; Villard, J; Nicod, L P

    1998-01-01

    Complement receptor type 1 (CR1) (CD35; C3b/C4b receptor) is a transmembrane protein of many haematopoietic cells. Once cleaved, soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) exerts opposite effects as a powerful inhibitor of complement. This study addressed both the question of whether sCR1 was found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of normals and patients with various inflammatory disease, and its possible origin. In this retrospective study covering specimen and clinical data of 124 patients with acute and chronic inflammatory lung pathologies, BAL supernatants were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique for sCR1. Correlations were made between the sCR1 levels obtained and the constituents of BAL. Human alveolar macrophages were cultivated in order to determine their secretory capacity of sCR1. Alveolar macrophages from normal subjects were shown to release sCR1 in vitro. In addition, sCR1 was present in BAL of normal controls and was significantly increased in acute inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), bacterial and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, as well as in chronic inflammatory diseases such as interstitial lung fibrosis and sarcoidosis. In BAL of ARDS, bacterial, and P. carinii pneumonia, there was a good correlation between sCR1 and the absolute neutrophil counts. In sarcoidosis, a correlation was found with BAL lymphocyte counts. Serum sCR1 was not increased in patients compared to controls. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) is found in the bronchoalveolar lavage in health as well as in acute and chronic inflammatory disease. Alveolar macrophages are capable of releasing sCR1 in vitro and may be the main physiological source of sCR1 in the alveoli. The good correlation between sCR1 and the absolute neutrophil or lymphocyte numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage of inflammatory diseases suggests a predominant role of leucocytes for the release of sCR1 in such conditions. The release of this

  5. Inflammatory response to trauma: Implications for coagulation and resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Albert; Pittet, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of this review Recent studies have changed our understanding of the timing and interactions of the inflammatory processes and coagulation cascade following severe trauma. This review highlights this information and correlates its impact on the current clinical approach for fluid resuscitation and treatment of coagulopathy for trauma patients. Recent findings Severe trauma is associated with a failure of multiple biologic emergency response systems that includes imbalanced inflammatory response, acute coagulopathy of trauma (ACOT), and endovascular glycocalyx degradation with microcirculatory compromise. These abnormalities are all inter-linked and related. Recent observations show that after severe trauma: 1) pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses are concomitant, not sequential and 2) resolution of the inflammatory response is an active process, not a passive one. Understanding these interrelated processes is considered extremely important for the development of future therapies for severe trauma in humans. Summary Traumatic injuries continue to be a significant cause of mortality worldwide. Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of end-organ failure, and modulation of the inflammatory response has important clinical implications regarding fluid resuscitation and treatment of coagulopathy. PMID:24419158

  6. Effects of urinary protease inhibitor on inflammatory response during on-pump coronary revascularisation. Effect of ulinastatin on inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Bingyang, J; Jinping, L; Mingzheng, L; Guyan, W; Zhengyi, F

    2007-08-01

    Cardiac surgery in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) provokes a vigorous inflammatory response with substantial clinical implications. Once the inflammatory response is triggered by CPB, leukocytes and platelets are activated by multiple stimuli. The administration of a urinary trypsin inhibitor (ulinastatin) during CPB is hypothesized to reduce cytokine release and platelet activation and to decrease pulmonary injury. We performed a prospective randomized study to investigate the influence of high-dose ulinastatin on cytokines and platelet activation and on respiratory function during and after CPB. In this pilot, prospective, randomized and double-blinded study, 30 first-time three-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD) patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) were randomly divided into 2 groups: U group (n=15) received a total dose of 1000000 U ulinastatin and C group (n=15) received placebo. Blood samples were withdrawn from the central vein to measure polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase (PMNE), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), before induction, 30 min following clamping (T2), reperfusion 3 h (T3), reperfusion 6 h (T4) and reperfusion 12 h (T5). Whole blood samples were taken for CD62P immediately before induction (as baseline), at the end of CPB (before protamine administration), 1 h after heparin neutralization by protamine and 24 h after the operation. In addition, alveolo-arterial oxygen difference (A-aDO(2)) in pulmonary gas exchange function was calculated by obtaining arterial blood gas samples before and after CPB. There were no differences in preoperative parameters between the groups. After CPB, the levels of PMNE, TNF-alfa, IL-6 and IL-8 increased in both groups over baseline values (P<0.01). The levels of PMNE, TNF-alfa, IL-6 and IL-8 in U group were significantly lower than those in C group (P<0.05). No significant differences in CD62p expression between the 2 groups

  7. Prediagnostic serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers are correlated with future development of lung and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Brieze R; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Pak, Jamie S; Brennan, Paul; Khademi, Hooman; Genden, Eric M; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-09-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that prediagnostic serum levels of 20 cancer-associated inflammatory biomarkers correlate directly with future development of head and neck, esophageal, and lung cancers in a high-risk prospective cohort. This is a nested case-control pilot study of subjects enrolled in the Golestan Cohort Study, an ongoing epidemiologic project assessing cancer trends in Golestan, Iran. We measured a panel of 20 21 cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory molecules using Luminex technology in serum samples collected 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis in 78 aerodigestive cancer cases and 81 controls. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon rank sum test, odds ratios, receiver operating characteristic areas of discrimination, and multivariate analysis. Biomarkers were profoundly and globally elevated in future esophageal and lung cancer patients compared to controls. Odds ratios were significant for association between several biomarkers and future development of esophageal cancer, including interleukin-1Rα (IL-1Ra; 35.9), interferon α2 (IFN-a2; 34.0), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2; 17.4), and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 17.4). The same pattern was observed among future lung cancer cases for G-CSF (27.7), GM-CSF (13.3), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a; 8.6). By contrast, the majority of biomarkers studied showed no significant correlation with future head and neck cancer development. This study provides the first direct evidence that multiple inflammatory biomarkers are coordinately elevated in future lung and esophageal cancer patients 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Apigenin on LPS-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Mediators and AP-1 Factors in Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajeshwari H; Babu, R L; Naveen Kumar, M; Kiran Kumar, K M; Hegde, Shubha M; Nagesh, Rashmi; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Sharma, S Chidananda

    2016-02-01

    Apigenin is one of the plant flavonoids present in fruits and vegetables, acting as an important nutraceutical component. It is recognized as a potential antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory molecule. In the present study, the mechanism of anti-inflammatory action of apigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and activator protein-1 (AP-1) factors in human lung A549 cells was investigated. The anti-inflammatory activity of apigenin on LPS-induced inflammation was determined by analyzing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and different AP-1 factors. Apigenin significantly inhibited the LPS-induced expression of iNOS, COX-2, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α), and AP-1 proteins (c-Jun, c-Fos, and JunB) including nitric oxide production. Study confirms the anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory mediators and AP-1 factors involved in the inflammation and its importance in the treatment of lung inflammatory diseases.

  9. Pro-inflammatory alterations and status of blood plasma iron in a model of blast-induced lung trauma.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, N V; McFaul, S J; Januszkiewicz, A; Atkins, J L

    2005-01-01

    Impact of blast shock waves (SW) with the body wall produces blast lung injuries characterized by bilateral traumatic hemorrhages. Such injuries often have no external signs, are difficult to diagnose, and therefore, are frequently underestimated. Predictive assessment of acute respiratory distress syndrome outcome in SW-related accidents should be based on experimental data from appropriate animal models. Blood plasma transferrin is a major carrier of blood iron essential for proliferative "emergency" response of hematopoietic and immune systems as well as injured tissue in major trauma. Iron-transferrin complexes (Fe3+ TRF) can be quantitatively analyzed in blood and tissue samples with low-temperature EPR techniques. We hypothesized that use of EPR techniques in combination with assays for pro-inflammatory cytokines and granulocytes in the peripheral blood and BAL would reveal a pattern of systemic sequestration of (Fe3+)TRF that could be useful for development of biomarkers of the systemic inflammatory response to lung injury. With this goal we (i) analyzed time-dependent dynamics of (Fe3+)TRF in the peripheral blood of rats after impacts of SW generated in a laboratory shock-tube and (ii) assayed the fluctuation of granulocyte (PMN) counts and expression of CD11b adhesion molecules on the surface of PMNs during the first 24 h after SW induced injury. Sham-treated animals were used as control. Exposure to SW led to a significant decrease in the amount of blood (Fe3+)TRF that correlated with the extent of lung injury and developed gradually during the first 24 h. Thus, sequestration of (Fe3+)TRF occurred as early as 3 h post-exposure. At that time, the steady state concentration of (Fe3+)TRF in blood samples decreased from 19.7+/-0.6 microM in controls to 7.5+/-1.3 microM in exposed animals. The levels of (Fe3+)TRF remained decreased throughout the entire study period. PMN counts increased 5-fold and 3.5-fold over controls respectively, at 3 and 6 h postexposure

  10. Defect in early lung defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in DBA/2 mice is associated with acute inflammatory lung injury and reduced bactericidal activity in naïve macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kari R.; Napper, Jennifer M.; Denvir, James; Sollars, Vincent E.; Yu, Hongwei D.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious respiratory disease in the immune compromised host. Using an aerosol infection model, eleven inbred mouse strains (129/Sv, A/J, BALB/c, C3H/HeN, C57BL/6, DBA/2, FVB, B10.D2/oSnJ, B10.D2/nSnJ, AKR/J and SWR/J) were tested for increased susceptibility to P. aeruginosa lung colonizations. DBA/2 was the only mouse strain that had increased bacterial counts in the lung within 6h post infection. This deficiency incited a marked inflammatory response with reduced bacterial lung clearance and a mortality rate of 96.7%. DBA/2 displayed progressive deterioration of lung pathology with extensive alveolar exudate and edema formation at 48-72h post infection. The neutrophil-specific myeloperoxidase activity remained elevated throughout infection, suggesting that the increased leukocyte infiltrations into alveoli caused acute inflammatory lung injury. DBA/2 lacks the hemolytic complement; however, three additional mouse strains (AKR/J, SWR/J and A/J) with the same defect effectively cleared the infection, indicating other host factors are involved in the defense. Bone marrow derived macrophages of DBA/2 showed an initial increase in phagocytosis, while their bactericidal activity was reduced compared to that of C57BL/6 macrophages. Comparison of pulmonary cytokine profiles of DBA/2 vs. C57BL/6 or C3H/HeN indicated DBA/2 had a similar increase in TNFα, KC, and IL-1a as C3H/HeN but showed specific induction of IL-17, MCP-1, and VEGF. Together, DBA/2 mice have a defect in the initial lung defense against P. aeruginosa colonization, which causes the host to produce a greater, but damaging, inflammatory response. Such a response may originate from the reduced antimicrobial activity of DBA/2 macrophages. PMID:17379707

  11. Curcumin protects against cytotoxic and inflammatory effects of quartz particles but causes oxidative DNA damage in a rat lung epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hui; Berlo, Damien van; Shi Tingming; Speit, Guenter; Knaapen, Ad M.; Borm, Paul J.A.; Albrecht, Catrin; Schins, Roel P.F.

    2008-02-15

    Chronic inhalation of high concentrations of respirable quartz particles has been implicated in various lung diseases including lung fibrosis and cancer. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress is considered a major mechanism of quartz toxicity. Curcumin, a yellow pigment from Curcuma longa, has been considered as nutraceutical because of its strong anti-inflammatory, antitumour and antioxidant properties. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether curcumin can protect lung epithelial cells from the cytotoxic, genotoxic and inflammatory effects associated with quartz (DQ12) exposure. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements using the spin-trap DMPO demonstrated that curcumin reduces hydrogen peroxide-dependent hydroxyl-radical formation by quartz. Curcumin was also found to reduce quartz-induced cytotoxicity and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA expression in RLE-6TN rat lung epithelial cells (RLE). Curcumin also inhibited the release of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) from RLE cells as observed upon treatment with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1{beta}) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF{alpha}). However, curcumin failed to protect the RLE cells from oxidative DNA damage induced by quartz, as shown by formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG)-modified comet assay and by immunocytochemistry for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. In contrast, curcumin was found to be a strong inducer of oxidative DNA damage itself at non-cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory concentrations. In line with this, curcumin also enhanced the mRNA expression of the oxidative stress response gene heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1). Curcumin also caused oxidative DNA damage in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages and A549 human lung epithelial cells. Taken together, these observations indicate that one should be cautious in considering the potential use of curcumin in the prevention or treatment of lung diseases associated with quartz exposure.

  12. Curcumin protects against cytotoxic and inflammatory effects of quartz particles but causes oxidative DNA damage in a rat lung epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; van Berlo, Damien; Shi, Tingming; Speit, Günter; Knaapen, Ad M; Borm, Paul J A; Albrecht, Catrin; Schins, Roel P F

    2008-02-15

    Chronic inhalation of high concentrations of respirable quartz particles has been implicated in various lung diseases including lung fibrosis and cancer. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress is considered a major mechanism of quartz toxicity. Curcumin, a yellow pigment from Curcuma longa, has been considered as nutraceutical because of its strong anti-inflammatory, antitumour and antioxidant properties. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether curcumin can protect lung epithelial cells from the cytotoxic, genotoxic and inflammatory effects associated with quartz (DQ12) exposure. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements using the spin-trap DMPO demonstrated that curcumin reduces hydrogen peroxide-dependent hydroxyl-radical formation by quartz. Curcumin was also found to reduce quartz-induced cytotoxicity and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA expression in RLE-6TN rat lung epithelial cells (RLE). Curcumin also inhibited the release of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) from RLE cells as observed upon treatment with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). However, curcumin failed to protect the RLE cells from oxidative DNA damage induced by quartz, as shown by formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG)-modified comet assay and by immunocytochemistry for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. In contrast, curcumin was found to be a strong inducer of oxidative DNA damage itself at non-cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory concentrations. In line with this, curcumin also enhanced the mRNA expression of the oxidative stress response gene heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1). Curcumin also caused oxidative DNA damage in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages and A549 human lung epithelial cells. Taken together, these observations indicate that one should be cautious in considering the potential use of curcumin in the prevention or treatment of lung diseases associated with quartz exposure.

  13. Senescence-associated inflammatory responses: aging and cancer perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lasry, Audrey; Ben-Neriah, Yinon

    2015-04-01

    Senescent cells, albeit not proliferating, are metabolically and transcriptionally active, thereby capable of affecting their microenvironment, notably via the production of inflammatory mediators. These mediators maintain and propagate the senescence process to neighboring cells, and then recruit immune cells for clearing senescent cells. Among the inflammatory cues are molecules with pronounced tumor-controlling properties, both growth and invasion factors and inhibitory factors, working directly or via recruited immune cells. These senescence-inflammatory effects also prevail within tumors, mediated by the senescent tumor cells and the senescent tumor stroma. Here, we review the course and impact of senescence-associated inflammatory responses in aging and cancer. We propose that controlling senescence-associated inflammation by targeting specific inflammatory mediators may have a beneficial therapeutic effect in treatment of cancer and aging-related diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-23 is elevated in lung cancer, particularly small cell type

    PubMed Central

    Cam, Caner; Muftuoglu, Tuba; Bigi, Oguz; Emirzeoglu, Levent; Celik, Serkan; Ozgun, Alpaslan; Tuncel, Tolga; Top, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 play roles in inflammation and autoimmunity. The function of the IL-17/IL-23 pathway has not been completely evaluated in cancer patients. We aimed to investigate serum IL-17 and IL-23 levels and their relationship with clinicopathological and biochemical parameters in lung cancer patients. Material and methods Forty-five lung cancer patients and 46 healthy volunteers were included in the study. IL-17 and IL-23 measurements were made with the ELISA method. The ages of patients (53–84 years) and healthy subjects (42–82 years) were similar. Results Serum IL-23 levels were higher in lung cancer patients than in healthy subjects (491.27 ±1263.38 pg/ml vs. 240.51 ±233.18 pg/ml; p = 0.032). IL-23 values were higher in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients than in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (1325.30 ±2478.06 pg/ml vs. 229.15 ±103.22 pg/ml; p = 0.043). Serum IL-17 levels were lower in the patients, but the difference was not statistically significant (135.94 ±52.36 pg/ml vs. 171.33 ±133.51 pg/ml; p = 0.124). Presence of comorbid disease (diabetes mellitus, hypertension or chronic obstructive lung disease) did not have any effect on the levels of IL-17 or IL-23. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate values were positively correlated with cytokine levels, but serum albumin levels were negatively correlated. Conclusions Serum IL-23 levels are elevated in lung cancer patients, particularly those with SCLC. IL-17 and IL-23 values are correlated with inflammatory markers in the patients. PMID:27647985

  15. Using the one-lung method to link p38 to pro-inflammatory gene expression during overventilation in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Siegl, Stephanie; Uhlig, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), including the role of MAP kinases, are frequently studied in different mouse strains. A useful model for such studies is the isolated perfused mouse lung. As a further development we present the one-lung method that permits to continue perfusion and ventilation of the right lung after removal of the left lung. This method was used to compare the effect of high pressure ventilation (HPV) on pro-inflammatory signaling events in two widely used mouse strains (C57BL/6, BALB/c) and to further define the role of p38 in VILI. Lungs were perfused and ventilated for 30 min under control conditions before they were randomized to low (8 cm H(2)O) or high (25 cm H(2)O) pressure ventilation (HPV) for 210 min, with the left lung being removed after 180 min. In the left lung we measured the phosphorylation of p38, JNK, ERK and Akt kinase, and in the right lung gene expression and protein concentrations of Il1b, Il6, Tnf, Cxcl1, Cxcl2, and Areg. Lung mechanics and kinase activation were similar in both mouse strains. HPV increased all genes (except Tnf in BALB/c) and all mediators in both strains. The gene expression of mRNA for Il1b, Il6, Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 was higher in BALB/c mice. Backward regression of the kinase data at t = 180 min with the gene and protein expression data at t = 240 min suggested that p38 controls HPV-induced gene expression, but not protein production. This hypothesis was confirmed in experiments with the p38-kinase inhibitor SB203580. The one-lung method is useful for mechanistic studies in the lungs. While C57BL/6 show diminished pro-inflammatory responses during HPV, lung mechanics and mechanotransduction processes appear to be similar in both mouse strains. Finally, the one-lung method allowed us to link p38 to gene expression during VILI.

  16. Carvacrol attenuates mechanical hypernociception and inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Adriana G; Xavier, Maria A; de Santana, Marília T; Camargo, Enilton A; Santos, Cliomar A; Brito, Fabíola A; Barreto, Emiliano O; Cavalcanti, Sócrates C H; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Oliveira, Rita C M; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2012-03-01

    Carvacrol is a phenolic monoterpene present in the essential oil of the family Lamiaceae, as in the genera Origanum and Thymus. We previously reported that carvacrol is effective as an analgesic compound in various nociceptive models, probably by inhibition of peripheral mediators that could be related with its strong antioxidant effect observed in vitro. In this study, the anti-hypernociceptive activity of carvacrol was tested in mice through models of mechanical hypernociception induced by carrageenan, and the involvement of important mediators of its signaling cascade, as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and dopamine, were assessed. We also investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of carvacrol on the model of carrageenan-induced pleurisy and mouse paw edema, and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitrite production in murine macrophages was observed. Systemic pretreatment with carvacrol (50 or 100 mg/kg; i.p.) inhibited the development of mechanical hypernociception and edema induced by carrageenan and TNF-α; however, no effect was observed on hypernociception induced by PGE(2) and dopamine. Besides this, carvacrol significantly decreased TNF-α levels in pleural lavage and suppressed the recruitment of leukocytes without altering the morphological profile of these cells. Carvacrol (1, 10, and 100 μg/mL) also significantly reduced (p < 0.001) the LPS-induced nitrite production in vitro and did not produce citotoxicity in the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro. The spontaneous locomotor activity of mice was not affected by carvacrol. This study adds information about the beneficial effects of carvacrol on mechanical hypernociception and inflammation. It also indicates that this monoterpene might be potentially interesting in the development of novel tools for management and/or treatment of painful conditions, including those related to inflammatory and prooxidant states.

  17. The inflammatory response to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO): a review of the pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Millar, Jonathan E; Fanning, Jonathon P; McDonald, Charles I; McAuley, Daniel F; Fraser, John F

    2016-11-28

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a technology capable of providing short-term mechanical support to the heart, lungs or both. Over the last decade, the number of centres offering ECMO has grown rapidly. At the same time, the indications for its use have also been broadened. In part, this trend has been supported by advances in circuit design and in cannulation techniques. Despite the widespread adoption of extracorporeal life support techniques, the use of ECMO remains associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A complication witnessed during ECMO is the inflammatory response to extracorporeal circulation. This reaction shares similarities with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and has been well-documented in relation to cardiopulmonary bypass. The exposure of a patient's blood to the non-endothelialised surface of the ECMO circuit results in the widespread activation of the innate immune system; if unchecked this may result in inflammation and organ injury. Here, we review the pathophysiology of the inflammatory response to ECMO, highlighting the complex interactions between arms of the innate immune response, the endothelium and coagulation. An understanding of the processes involved may guide the design of therapies and strategies aimed at ameliorating inflammation during ECMO. Likewise, an appreciation of the potentially deleterious inflammatory effects of ECMO may assist those weighing the risks and benefits of therapy.

  18. The Nicotinic Receptor Alpha7 Impacts the Mouse Lung Response to LPS through Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Enioutina, Elena Y.; Myers, Elizabeth J.; Tvrdik, Petr; Hoidal, John R.; Rogers, Scott W.; Gahring, Lorise C.

    2015-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 (α7) is expressed by neuronal and non-neuronal cells throughout the body. We examined the mechanisms of the lung inflammatory response to intranasal (i.n.) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) regulated by α7. This was done in mice using homologous recombination to introduce a point mutation in the α7 receptor that replaces the glutamate residue 260 that lines the pore with alanine (α7E260A), which has been implicated in controlling the exceptional calcium ion conductance of this receptor. The α7E260A mice exhibit normal inflammatory cell recruitment to the blood in response to i.n. LPS administration. This differs from the α7knock-out (α7KO) in which upstream signaling to initiate the recruitment to the blood following i.n. LPS is significantly impaired. While hematopoietic cells are recruited to the bloodstream in the α7E260A mouse, they fail to be recruited efficiently into both the interstitium and alveolar spaces of the lung. Bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that the responsiveness of both CD45+ and CD45- cells of the α7E260A mouse are impaired. The expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine RNAs including TNFα, IL-1α, Ccl2 and Cxcl10 are decreased in the α7E260A mouse. However, there is a substantial increase in IL-13 expression by CD45- lung interstitial cells in the α7E260A mouse. Our results support the conclusion that α7 functional pleiotropy contributes to modulating the tissue response to an inflammatory insult through impacting upon a variety of mechanisms reflecting the individual cell composition of the lung. PMID:25803612

  19. Translation Control: A Multifaceted Regulator of Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Barsanjit; Li, Xiaoxia; Barik, Sailen

    2010-01-01

    A robust innate immune response is essential to the protection of all vertebrates from infection, but it often comes with the price tag of acute inflammation. If unchecked, a runaway inflammatory response can cause significant tissue damage, resulting in myriad disorders, such as dermatitis, toxicshock, cardiovascular disease, acute pelvic and arthritic inflammatory diseases, and various infections. To prevent such pathologies, cells have evolved mechanisms to rapidly and specifically shut off these beneficial inflammatory activities before they become detrimental. Our review of recent literature, including our own work, reveals that the most dominant and common mechanism is translational silencing, in which specific regulatory proteins or complexes are recruited to cis-acting RNA structures in the untranslated regions of single or multiple mRNAs that code for the inflammatory protein(s). Enhancement of the silencing function may constitute a novel pharmacological approach to prevent immunity-related inflammation. PMID:20304832

  20. Pleural fluid analysis of lung cancer vs benign inflammatory disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, R; Best, L A; Savulescu, D; Gavish, M; Nagler, R M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Correct diagnosis of pleural effusion (PE) as either benign or malignant is crucial, although conventional cytological evaluation is of limited diagnostic accuracy, with relatively low sensitivity rates. Methods: We identified biological markers accurately detected in a simple PE examination. We analysed data from 19 patients diagnosed with lung cancer (nine adeno-Ca, five non-small-cell Ca (not specified), four squamous-cell Ca, one large-cell Ca) and 22 patients with benign inflammatory pathologies: secondary to trauma, pneumonia or TB. Results: Pleural effusion concentrations of seven analysed biological markers were significantly lower in lung cancer patients than in benign inflammatory patients, especially in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-3 and CycD1 (lower by 65% (P<0.000003), 40% (P<0.0007) and 34% (P<0.0001), respectively), and in Ki67, ImAnOx, carbonyls and p27. High rates of sensitivity and specificity values were found for MMP-9, MMP-3 and CycD1: 80 and 100% 87 and 73% and 87 and 82%, respectively. Conclusion: Although our results are of significant merit in both the clinical and pathogenetic aspects of lung cancer, further research aimed at defining the best combination for marker analysis is warranted. The relative simplicity in analysing these markers in any routine hospital laboratory may result in its acceptance as a new diagnostic tool. PMID:20216542

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase reduces inflammatory responses and cellular senescence in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-Yu; Li, Yang-Yang; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jun; Yao, Hong-Wei

    2017-04-04

    Current drug therapy fails to reduce lung destruction of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has emerged as an important integrator of signals that control energy balance and lipid metabolism. However, there are no studies regarding the role of AMPK in reducing inflammatory responses and cellular senescence during the development of emphysema. Therefore, we hypothesize that AMPK reduces inflammatroy responses, senescence, and lung injury. To test this hypothesis, human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) were treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in the presence of a specific AMPK activator (AICAR, 1 mM) and inhibitor (Compound C, 5 μM). Elastase injection was performed to induce mouse emphysema, and these mice were treated with a specific AMPK activator metformin as well as Compound C. AICAR reduced, whereas Compound C increased CSE-induced increase in IL-8 and IL-6 release and expression of genes involved in cellular senescence. Knockdown of AMPKα1/α2 increased expression of pro-senescent genes (e.g., p16, p21, and p66shc) in BEAS-2B cells. Prophylactic administration of an AMPK activator metformin (50 and 250 mg/kg) reduced while Compound C (4 and 20 mg/kg) aggravated elastase-induced airspace enlargement, inflammatory responses and cellular senescence in mice. This is in agreement with therapeutic effect of metformin (50 mg/kg) on airspace enlargement. Furthermore, metformin prophylactically protected against but Compound C further reduced mitochondrial proteins SOD2 and SIRT3 in emphysematous lungs. In conclusion, AMPK reduces abnormal inflammatory responses and cellular senescence, which implicates as a potential therapeutic target for COPD/emphysema.

  2. Acute inflammatory response secondary to intrapleural administration of two types of talc.

    PubMed

    Rossi, V F; Vargas, F S; Marchi, E; Acencio, M M P; Genofre, E H; Capelozzi, V L; Antonangelo, L

    2010-02-01

    Intrapleural instillation of talc has been used in the treatment of recurrent pleural effusions but can, in rare instances, result in respiratory failure. Side-effects seem to be related to composition, size and inflammatory power of talc particles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory response to intrapleural injection of talc containing small particles (ST) or talc containing particles of mixed size (MT). 100 rabbits received intrapleural talc, 50 with ST (median 6.41 mum) and 50 with MT (median 21.15 mum); the control group was composed of 35 rabbits. Cells, lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor were evaluated in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage at 6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Lung histology and the presence of talc were also analysed. Statistics were performed using ANOVA and an unpaired t-test. Most of the parameters showed greater levels in the animals injected with talc than in the controls, suggesting a systemic and pulmonary response. Higher serum levels of CRP and IL-8 were observed in the animals injected with ST. Talc particles were observed in both lungs with no differences between groups. Lung cell infiltrate was more evident in the ST group. In conclusion, talc with larger particles should be the preferred choice in clinical practice in order to induce safer pleurodesis.

  3. Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikova, Lyudmila V.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhang, Minghuang; Yang, Huan; Botchkina, Galina I.; Watkins, Linda R.; Wang, Haichao; Abumrad, Naji; Eaton, John W.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2000-05-01

    Vertebrates achieve internal homeostasis during infection or injury by balancing the activities of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), produced by all gram-negative bacteria, activates macrophages to release cytokines that are potentially lethal. The central nervous system regulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin through humoral mechanisms. Activation of afferent vagus nerve fibres by endotoxin or cytokines stimulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal anti-inflammatory responses. However, comparatively little is known about the role of efferent vagus nerve signalling in modulating inflammation. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized, parasympathetic anti-inflammatory pathway by which the brain modulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin. Acetylcholine, the principle vagal neurotransmitter, significantly attenuated the release of cytokines (tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-18), but not the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human macrophage cultures. Direct electrical stimulation of the peripheral vagus nerve in vivo during lethal endotoxaemia in rats inhibited TNF synthesis in liver, attenuated peak serum TNF amounts, and prevented the development of shock.

  4. Effects of ventilation strategy on distribution of lung inflammatory cell activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Leukocyte infiltration is central to the development of acute lung injury, but it is not known how mechanical ventilation strategy alters the distribution or activation of inflammatory cells. We explored how protective (vs. injurious) ventilation alters the magnitude and distribution of lung leukocyte activation following systemic endotoxin administration. Methods Anesthetized sheep received intravenous endotoxin (10 ng/kg/min) followed by 2 h of either injurious or protective mechanical ventilation (n = 6 per group). We used positron emission tomography to obtain images of regional perfusion and shunting with infused 13N[nitrogen]-saline and images of neutrophilic inflammation with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). The Sokoloff model was used to quantify 18F-FDG uptake (Ki), as well as its components: the phosphorylation rate (k3, a surrogate of hexokinase activity) and the distribution volume of 18F-FDG (Fe) as a fraction of lung volume (Ki = Fe × k3). Regional gas fractions (fgas) were assessed by examining transmission scans. Results Before endotoxin administration, protective (vs. injurious) ventilation was associated with a higher ratio of partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) (351 ± 117 vs. 255 ± 74 mmHg; P < 0.01) and higher whole-lung fgas (0.71 ± 0.12 vs. 0.48 ± 0.08; P = 0.004), as well as, in dependent regions, lower shunt fractions. Following 2 h of endotoxemia, PaO2/FiO2 ratios decreased in both groups, but more so with injurious ventilation, which also increased the shunt fraction in dependent lung. Protective ventilation resulted in less nonaerated lung (20-fold; P < 0.01) and more normally aerated lung (14-fold; P < 0.01). Ki was lower during protective (vs. injurious) ventilation, especially in dependent lung regions (0.0075 ± 0.0043/min vs. 0.0157 ± 0.0072/min; P < 0.01). 18F-FDG phosphorylation rate (k3) was twofold higher with injurious ventilation and accounted for most of

  5. Comparison of the systemic and pulmonary inflammatory response to endotoxin of neutropenic and non-neutropenic rats

    PubMed Central

    Heidemann, Sabrina M; Glibetic, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Background Neutrophil infiltration commonly occurs in acute lung injury and may be partly responsible for the inflammatory response. However, acute lung injury still occurs in the neutropenic host. The objectives of this study are to determine if inflammation and acute lung injury are worse in neutropenic versus the normal host after endotoxemia. Methods Rats were divided into four groups: 1) control, 2) neutropenic, 3) endotoxemic and 4) endotoxemic and neutropenic. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2) were measured in the blood, lung lavage and for mRNA in the lung. Arterial blood gases were measured to determine the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient which reflects on lung injury. Results In endotoxemia, the neutropenic rats had lower plasma TNF-α (116 ± 73 vs. 202 ± 31 pg/ml) and higher plasma MIP-2 (26.8 + 11.9 vs. 15.6 + 6.9 ng/ml) when compared to non-neutropenic rats. The endotoxemic, neutropenic rats had worse lung injury than the endotoxemic, non-neutropenic rats as shown by increase in the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (24 ± 5 vs. 12 ± 9 torr). However, lavage concentrations of TNF-α and MIP-2 were similar in both groups. Conclusion Neutrophils may regulate TNF-α and MIP-2 production in endotoxemia. The elevation in plasma MIP-2 in the endotoxemic, neutropenic rat may be secondary to the lack of a neutrophil response to inhibit production or release of MIP-2. In endotoxemia, the severe lung injury observed in neutropenic rats does not depend on TNF-α or MIP-2 produced in the lung. PMID:17397554

  6. Ultrafine particles affect the balance of endogenous pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in the lung: in-vitro and in-vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to ultrafine particles exerts diverse harmful effects including aggravation of pulmonary diseases like asthma. Recently we demonstrated in a mouse model for allergic airway inflammation that particle-derived oxidative stress plays a crucial role during augmentation of allergen-induced lung inflammation by ultrafine carbon particle (UfCP) inhalation. The mechanisms how particle inhalation might change the inflammatory balance in the lungs, leading to accelerated inflammatory reactions, remain unclear. Lipid mediators, known to be immediately generated in response to tissue injury, might be strong candidates for priming this particle-triggered change of the inflammatory balance. Methods We hypothesize that inhalation of UfCP may disturb the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in: i) a model for acute allergic pulmonary inflammation, exposing mice for 24 h before allergen challenge to UfCP inhalation (51.7 nm, 507 μg/m3), and ii) an in-vitro model with primary rat alveolar macrophages (AM) incubated with UfCP (10 μg/1 x 106 cells/ml) for 1 h. Lungs and AM were analysed for pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators, namely leukotriene B4 (LTB4), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 15(S)-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (15(S)-HETE), lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and oxidative stress marker 8-isoprostane by enzyme immunoassays and immunohistochemistry. Results In non-sensitized mice UfCP exposure induced a light non-significant increase of all lipid mediators. Similarly but significantly in rat AM all lipid mediators were induced already within 1 h of UfCP stimulation. Also sensitized and challenge mice exposed to filtered air showed a partially significant increase in all lipid mediators. In sensitized and challenged mice UfCP exposure induced highest significant levels of all lipid mediators in the lungs together with the peak of allergic airway inflammation on day 7 after UfCP inhalation. The levels of LTB4, 8-isoprostane and PGE2 were significantly

  7. Effect of re-expansion after short-period lung collapse on pulmonary capillary permeability and pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in isolated rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, T; Ishibe, Y; Okazaki, N; Miura, K; Liu, R; Nagai, S; Minami, Y

    2004-04-01

    Re-expansion pulmonary oedema is a rare complication caused by rapid re-expansion of a chronically collapsed lung. Several cases of pulmonary oedema associated with one-lung ventilation (OLV) have been reported recently. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary oedema fluid are suggested to play important roles in its development. Activation of cytokines after re-expansion of collapsed lung during OLV has not been thoroughly investigated. Here we investigated the effects of re-expansion of the collapsed lung on pulmonary oedema formation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Lungs isolated from female white Japanese rabbits were perfused and divided into a basal (BAS) group (n=7, baseline measurement alone), a control (CONT) group (n=9, ventilated without lung collapse for 120 min) and an atelectasis (ATEL) group (n=9, lung collapsed for 55 min followed by re-expansion and ventilation for 65 min). Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and the coefficient of filtration (Kfc) were measured at baseline and 60 and 120 min. At the end of perfusion, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma protein ratio (B/P), wet/dry lung weight ratio (W/D) and mRNA expressions of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were determined. TNF-alpha and IL-1beta mRNA were significantly up-regulated in lungs of the ATEL group compared with BAS and CONT, though no significant differences were noted in PVR, Kfc, B/P and W/D within and between groups. MPO increased at 120 min in CONT and ATEL groups. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were up-regulated upon re-expansion and ventilation after short-period lung collapse, though no changes were noted in pulmonary capillary permeability.

  8. Architecture and inflammatory cell composition of the feline lung with special consideration of eosinophil counts.

    PubMed

    Shibly, S; Klang, A; Galler, A; Schwendenwein, I; Christian, M; Guija, A; Tichy, A; Hirt, R A

    2014-05-01

    An increase in the number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) is a hallmark of feline asthma; however, a wide range in the percentage of eosinophils in BALF has been documented in healthy cats. In this study, BALF and lung tissue were collected from 15 cats without respiratory disease, BALF was taken from 15 cats with asthma and lung tissue was collected from six different asthmatic cats. Total nucleated cell count (TNCC) and inflammatory cell percentages were measured in BALF and lung tissue was evaluated microscopically. Asthmatic cats had a significantly higher eosinophil count in lung tissue, but BALF TNCC did not differ significantly between groups. Cats without respiratory signs had significantly more numerous macrophages and lymphocytes in BALF than asthmatics, but significantly lower percentages of eosinophils (4.2 ± 7.8% versus 49.4 ± 20.6%, P <0.001). In healthy feline airways a BALF eosinophil percentage of <5% can be expected. Dominant microscopical findings in feline asthma include high eosinophil counts, airway remodelling and inflammation. There is good correlation between the findings in BALF and tissue in feline asthma.

  9. Inflammatory cytokines and non-small cell lung cancer in a CT-scan screening cohort: Background review of the literature.

    PubMed

    DeCotiis, Christopher; Hu, Yingjie; Greenberg, Alissa K; Huie, Maryann; Tsay, Jun-Chieh J; Pass, Harvey; Goldberg, Judith D; Rom, William N

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are at the intersection of tumor cell biology and host immune response. Peripheral cytokine expression levels may reflect the microscopic tumor milieu, and specific cytokines play an integral role in tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis. High-throughput cytokine analysis may identify panels for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) diagnosis and identify individuals at high-risk for lung cancer with indeterminate lung nodules 8-20 mm in size. Thirteen serum cytokines from the NYU Lung Cancer Biomarker Center cohort with early-stage NSCLC were analyzed using bead-based immunoassay technology. In the NYU cohort, a one unit increase in interferon-γ increased risk of lung cancer by 3% (OR = 1.03, 95% CI, 1.02-1.05) and a one unit increase in TNF-α decreased the risk of lung cancer by 53% (OR = 0.47, 95% Cl, 0.31-0.71) when both cytokines were included in a logistic regression model with adjustments for age and pack-years of smoking. The resulting AUC for the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.88; the sensitivity and specificity at the optimal cutpoint were 78.9% and 90.3%, respectively. Cytokines have limited value in the early diagnosis of early-stage NSCLC. Our review of the literature suggests that although inflammation is important for the development of NSCLC, that cytokines are increased in more advanced lung cancer than when the diagnosis occurs at presentation.

  10. IL-17A attracts inflammatory cells in murine lung infection with P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wonnenberg, Bodo; Jungnickel, Christopher; Honecker, Anja; Wolf, Lisa; Voss, Meike; Bischoff, Markus; Tschernig, Thomas; Herr, Christian; Bals, Robert; Beisswenger, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    IL-17A-dependent immunity is of importance in the protection against extracellular bacterial pathogens. However, IL-17A is also suggested to mediate the pathogenesis of lung diseases, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here, we studied the role of IL-17A in a mouse model of acute pneumonia. IL-17A mediated the expression of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) and the recruitment of inflammatory cells in mice infected with a sub-lethal dose of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. IL-17A deficiency protected mice from lethal P. aeruginosa lung infection. A sub-lethal infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae resulted in increased bacterial burden associated with increased pulmonary inflammation. Thus, the type of infectious bacteria seemed to influence the way in which IL-17A functions during pulmonary infection. Reducing pulmonary inflammation by targeting IL-17A may be a therapeutic option in acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia.

  11. Type 2 Deiodinase and Host Responses of Sepsis and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shwu-Fan; Xie, Lishi; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Sammani, Saad; Wade, Michael S.; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Siegler, Jessica; Wang, Ting; Infusino, Giovanni; Kittles, Rick A.; Flores, Carlos; Zhou, Tong; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Villar, Jesus; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Dudek, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    The role of thyroid hormone metabolism in clinical outcomes of the critically ill remains unclear. Using preclinical models of acute lung injury (ALI), we assessed the gene and protein expression of type 2 deiodinase (DIO2), a key driver for synthesis of biologically active triiodothyronine, and addressed potential association of DIO2 genetic variants with ALI in a multiethnic cohort. DIO2 gene and protein expression levels in murine lung were validated by microarrays and immunoblotting. Lung injury was assessed by levels of bronchoalveolar lavage protein and leukocytes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped and ALI susceptibility association assessed. Significant increases in both DIO2 gene and D2 protein expression were observed in lung tissues from murine ALI models (LPS- and ventilator-induced lung injury), with expression directly increasing with the extent of lung injury. Mice with reduced levels of DIO2 expression (by silencing RNA) demonstrated reduced thyroxine levels in plasma and increased lung injury (increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and leukocytes), suggesting a protective role for DIO2 in ALI. The G (Ala) allele of the Thr92Ala coding single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs225014) was protective in severe sepsis and severe sepsis–associated ALI after adjustments for age, sex, and genetic ancestry in a logistic regression model in European Americans. Our studies indicate that DIO2 is a novel ALI candidate gene, the nonsynonymous Thr92Ala coding variant of which confers ALI protection. Increased DIO2 expression may dampen the ALI inflammatory response, thereby strengthening the premise that thyroid hormone metabolism is intimately linked to the integrated response to inflammatory injury in critically ill patients. PMID:21685153

  12. Hydrodynamic Regulation of Monocyte Inflammatory Response to an Intracellular Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Evani, Shankar J.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Mareedu, Naresh; Montgomery, Robbie K.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic bacterial infections elicit inflammatory response that promotes acute or chronic complications such as sepsis, arthritis or atherosclerosis. Of interest, cells in circulation experience hydrodynamic shear forces, which have been shown to be a potent regulator of cellular function in the vasculature and play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have examined the effect of shear forces due to blood flow in modulating the inflammatory response of cells to infection. Using an in vitro model, we analyzed the effects of physiological levels of shear stress on the inflammatory response of monocytes infected with chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen which causes bronchitis and is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We found that chlamydial infection alters the morphology of monocytes and trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6. We also found that the exposure of chlamydia-infected monocytes to short durations of arterial shear stress significantly enhances the secretion of cytokines in a time-dependent manner and the expression of surface adhesion molecule ICAM-1. As a functional consequence, infection and shear stress increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under flow and in the activation and aggregation of platelets. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress enhances the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection, suggesting that mechanical forces may contribute to disease pathophysiology. These results provide a novel perspective on our understanding of systemic infection and inflammation. PMID:21249123

  13. Fibrin(ogen) mediates acute inflammatory responses to biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Although "biocompatible" polymeric elastomers are generally nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and chemically inert, implants made of these materials may trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Early interactions between implants and inflammatory cells are probably mediated by a layer of host proteins on the material surface. To evaluate the importance of this protein layer, we studied acute inflammatory responses of mice to samples of polyester terephthalate film (PET) that were implanted intraperitoneally for short periods. Material preincubated with albumin is "passivated," accumulating very few adherent neutrophils or macrophages, whereas uncoated or plasma- coated PET attracts large numbers of phagocytes. Neither IgG adsorption nor surface complement activation is necessary for this acute inflammation; phagocyte accumulation on uncoated implants is normal in hypogammaglobulinemic mice and in severely hypocomplementemic mice. Rather, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to be critical: (a) PET coated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma attracts as few phagocytes as does albumin-coated material; (b) in contrast, PET preincubated with serum or hypofibrinogenemic plasma containing physiologic amounts of fibrinogen elicits "normal" phagocyte recruitment; (c) most importantly, hypofibrinogenemic mice do not mount an inflammatory response to implanted PET unless the material is coated with fibrinogen or the animals are injected with fibrinogen before implantation. Thus, spontaneous adsorption of fibrinogen appears to initiate the acute inflammatory response to an implanted polymer, suggesting an interesting nexus between two major iatrogenic effects of biomaterials: clotting and inflammation. PMID:8245787

  14. Homocysteine in dogs with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Patterson, B E; Barr, J W; Fosgate, G T; Berghoff, N; Steiner, J M; Suchodolski, J S; Black, D M

    2013-12-01

    To compare serum concentrations of homocysteine in healthy dogs and those fitting the criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome and to compare these values to commonly measured B-vitamins. Study dogs were classified into non-infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome or sepsis groups and blood was drawn on Day 1 of the patient's hospitalisation for measurement of serum homocysteine, folate and cobalamin concentrations. Homocysteine concentration was measured in 51 clinically healthy dogs to serve as the control group. A statistically significant difference was found between the homocysteine concentrations of the healthy group when compared to non-infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis groups. Homocysteine values were not correlated with folate, cobalamin or APPLEfast severity scores. Homocysteine concentrations were significantly lower in sick dogs when compared to the control group, which is dissimilar to the human population. The clinical significance of homocysteine changes in critically ill dogs is currently unknown. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  15. The innate immune response in fetal lung mesenchymal cells targets VEGFR2 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Medal, Rachel M; Im, Amanda M; Yamamoto, Yasutoshi; Lakhdari, Omar; Blackwell, Timothy S; Hoffman, Hal M; Sahoo, Debashis; Prince, Lawrence S

    2017-06-01

    In preterm infants, soluble inflammatory mediators target lung mesenchymal cells, disrupting airway and alveolar morphogenesis. However, how mesenchymal cells respond directly to microbial stimuli remains poorly characterized. Our objective was to measure the genome-wide innate immune response in fetal lung mesenchymal cells exposed to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). With the use of Affymetrix MoGene 1.0st arrays, we showed that LPS induced expression of unique innate immune transcripts heavily weighted toward CC and CXC family chemokines. The transcriptional response was different between cells from E11, E15, and E18 mouse lungs. In all cells tested, LPS inhibited expression of a small core group of genes including the VEGF receptor Vegfr2 Although best characterized in vascular endothelial populations, we demonstrated here that fetal mouse lung mesenchymal cells express Vegfr2 and respond to VEGF-A stimulation. In mesenchymal cells, VEGF-A increased cell migration, activated the ERK/AKT pathway, and promoted FOXO3A nuclear exclusion. With the use of an experimental coculture model of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, we also showed that VEGFR2 inhibition prevented formation of three-dimensional structures. Both LPS and tyrosine kinase inhibition reduced three-dimensional structure formation. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for inflammation-mediated defects in lung development involving reduced VEGF signaling in lung mesenchyme. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Dietary inflammatory index is related to asthma risk, lung function and systemic inflammation in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lisa G; Shivappa, Nitin; Berthon, Bronwyn S; Gibson, Peter G; Hebert, James R

    2014-01-01

    Background Asthma prevalence has increased in recent years and evidence suggests that diet may be a contributing factor. Increased use of processed foods has led to a decrease in diet quality, which may be creating a pro-inflammatory environment, thereby leading to the development and/or progression of various chronic inflammatory diseases and conditions. Recently, the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) has been developed and validated to assess the inflammatory potential of individual diets. Objective This study aimed to examine the DII in subjects with asthma compared to healthy controls and to relate the DII to asthma risk, lung function and systemic inflammation. Methods Subjects with asthma (n=99) and healthy controls (n=61) were recruited. Blood was collected and spirometry was performed. The DII was calculated from food frequency questionnaires administered to study subjects. Results The mean DII score for the asthmatics was higher than the DII score for healthy controls (−1.40 versus −1.86, p=0.04), indicating their diets were more pro-inflammatory. For every 1 unit increase in DII score the odds of having asthma increased by 70% (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.14; p=0.040). FEV1 was significantly associated with DII score (β=−3.44, 95% CI: −6.50,−0.39; p=0.020), indicating that for every 1 unit increase in DII score, FEV1 decreased by 3.44 times. Furthermore, plasma IL-6 concentrations were positively associated with DII score (β=0.13, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.21;p=0.002). Conclusion and clinical relevance As assessed using the DII score, the usual diet consumed by asthmatics in this study was pro-inflammatory relative to the diet consumed by the healthy controls. The DII score was associated with increased systemic inflammation and lower lung function. Hence, consumption of pro-inflammatory foods may contribute to worse asthma status and targeting an improvement in DII in asthmatics, as an indicator of suitable dietary intake, might be a useful strategy for

  17. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases.

  18. Suppression of inflammatory responses by labdane-type diterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Girón, Natalia; Través, Paqui G; Rodríguez, Benjamín; López-Fontal, Raquel; Boscá, Lisardo; Hortelano, Sonsoles; de las Heras, Beatriz

    2008-04-15

    A series of 11 labdane-type diterpenoids (1-11) with various patterns of substitution were tested for potential anti-inflammatory activity. Of these compounds, 4 and 11 were selected to evaluate their influence on targets relevant to the regulation of the inflammatory response. These diterpenoids reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages, with IC50 in the range 1-10 microM. Inhibition of these inflammatory mediators was related to inhibition of the expression of nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the transcriptional level, as determined by western-blot and RT-PCR. Examination of the effects of these diterpenoids on nuclear factor kappaB signaling showed that both compounds inhibit the phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha and IkappaBbeta, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-kappaB p65 subunit. Inhibition of IKK activity was also observed. These derivatives displayed significant anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, suppressing mouse ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and inhibiting myeloperoxidase activity, an index of neutrophil infiltration. The anti-inflammatory effects of these labdane diterpenoids, together with their low cell toxicity, suggest potential therapeutic applications in the regulation of the inflammatory response.

  19. Supression of inflammatory responses by labdane-type diterpenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Giron, Natalia; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Lopez-Fontal, Raquel; Bosca, Lisardo; Hortelano, Sonsoles Heras, Beatriz de las

    2008-04-15

    A series of 11 labdane-type diterpenoids (1-11) with various patterns of substitution were tested for potential anti-inflammatory activity. Of these compounds, 4 and 11 were selected to evaluate their influence on targets relevant to the regulation of the inflammatory response. These diterpenoids reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages, with IC50 in the range 1-10 {mu}M. Inhibition of these inflammatory mediators was related to inhibition of the expression of nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the transcriptional level, as determined by western-blot and RT-PCR. Examination of the effects of these diterpenoids on nuclear factor {kappa}B signaling showed that both compounds inhibit the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and I{kappa}B{beta}, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. Inhibition of IKK activity was also observed. These derivatives displayed significant anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, suppressing mouse ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and inhibiting myeloperoxidase activity, an index of neutrophil infiltration. The anti-inflammatory effects of these labdane diterpenoids, together with their low cell toxicity, suggest potential therapeutic applications in the regulation of the inflammatory response.

  20. Immune and inflammatory response in pigs during acute influenza caused by H1N1 swine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Kwit, Krzysztof; Czyżewska, Ewelina; Dors, Arkadiusz; Rachubik, Jarosław; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2014-10-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute respiratory disease of pigs, caused by swine influenza virus (SIV). Little is known about the inflammatory response in the lung during acute SI and its correlation with clinical signs or lung pathology. Moreover, until now there has been a limited amount of data available on the relationship between the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the lungs and the serum concentration of acute-phase proteins (APPs) in SIV-infected pigs. In the present study, the porcine inflammatory and immune responses during acute influenza caused by H1N1 SIV (SwH1N1) were studied. Nine pigs were infected intratracheally, and five served as controls. Antibodies against SIV were measured by haemagglutination inhibition assay, and the influenza-virus-specific T-cell response was measured using a proliferation assay. C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), and pig major acute-phase protein (Pig-MAP) the concentrations in serum and concentration of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ in lung tissues were measured using commercial ELISAs.

  1. Dysregulated Type I Interferon and Inflammatory Monocyte-Macrophage Responses Cause Lethal Pneumonia in SARS-CoV-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fehr, Anthony R; Vijay, Rahul; Mack, Matthias; Zhao, Jincun; Meyerholz, David K; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-02-10

    Highly pathogenic human respiratory coronaviruses cause acute lethal disease characterized by exuberant inflammatory responses and lung damage. However, the factors leading to lung pathology are not well understood. Using mice infected with SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)-CoV, we show that robust virus replication accompanied by delayed type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling orchestrates inflammatory responses and lung immunopathology with diminished survival. IFN-I remains detectable until after virus titers peak, but early IFN-I administration ameliorates immunopathology. This delayed IFN-I signaling promotes the accumulation of pathogenic inflammatory monocyte-macrophages (IMMs), resulting in elevated lung cytokine/chemokine levels, vascular leakage, and impaired virus-specific T cell responses. Genetic ablation of the IFN-αβ receptor (IFNAR) or IMM depletion protects mice from lethal infection, without affecting viral load. These results demonstrate that IFN-I and IMM promote lethal SARS-CoV infection and identify IFN-I and IMMs as potential therapeutic targets in patients infected with pathogenic coronavirus and perhaps other respiratory viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The TNF Family Molecules LIGHT and Lymphotoxin αβ Induce a Distinct Steroid-Resistant Inflammatory Phenotype in Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Ricardo da Silva; Madge, Lisa; Soroosh, Pejman; Tocker, Joel; Croft, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lung epithelial cells are considered important sources of inflammatory molecules and extracellular matrix proteins that contribute to diseases such as asthma. Understanding the factors that stimulate epithelial cells may lead to new insights into controlling lung inflammation. This study sought to investigate the responsiveness of human lung epithelial cells to the TNF family molecules LIGHT and lymphotoxin αβ (LTαβ). Bronchial and alveolar epithelial cell lines, and primary human bronchial epithelial cells, were stimulated with LIGHT and LTαβ, and expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis/remodeling, were measured. LTβR, the receptor shared by LIGHT and LTαβ, was constitutively expressed on all epithelial cells. Correspondingly, LIGHT and LTαβ strongly induced a limited but highly distinct set of inflammatory genes in all epithelial cells tested, namely the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1; the chemokines CCL5, CCL20, CXCL1, CXCL3, CXCL5 and CXCL11; the cytokines IL-6, activin A, and GM-CSF; and metalloproteinases MMP-9 and ADAM-8. Importantly, induction of the majority of these inflammatory molecules was insensitive to the suppressive effects of the corticosteroid budesonide. LIGHT and LTαβ also moderately downregulated E-cadherin, a protein associated with maintaining epithelial integrity, but did not significantly drive production of extracellular matrix proteins or alpha-smooth muscle actin. Thus, LIGHT and LTαβ induce a distinct steroid-resistant inflammatory signature in airway epithelial cells via constitutively expressed LTβR. These findings support our prior murine studies that suggested the receptors for LIGHT and LTαβ contribute to development of lung inflammation characteristic of asthma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26209626

  3. Apoptotic neutrophils augment the inflammatory response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Henrik; Andersson, Blanka; Eklund, Daniel; Ngoh, Eyler; Persson, Alexander; Svensson, Kristoffer; Lerm, Maria; Blomgran, Robert; Stendahl, Olle

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages in the lung are the primary cells being infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) during the initial manifestation of tuberculosis. Since the adaptive immune response to Mtb is delayed, innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils mount the early immune protection against this intracellular pathogen. Neutrophils are short-lived cells and removal of apoptotic cells by resident macrophages is a key event in the resolution of inflammation and tissue repair. Since anti-inflammatory activity is not compatible with effective immunity to intracellular pathogens, we therefore investigated how uptake of apoptotic neutrophils modulates the function of Mtb-activated human macrophages. We show that Mtb infection exerts a potent proinflammatory activation of human macrophages with enhanced gene activation and release of proinflammatory cytokines and that this response was augmented by apoptotic neutrophils. The enhanced macrophage response is linked to apoptotic neutrophil-driven activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent IL-1β signalling. We also demonstrate that apoptotic neutrophils not only modulate the inflammatory response, but also enhance the capacity of infected macrophages to control intracellular growth of virulent Mtb. Taken together, these results suggest a novel role for apoptotic neutrophils in the modulation of the macrophage-dependent inflammatory response contributing to the early control of Mtb infection.

  4. Proinflammatory Responses of Heme in Alveolar Macrophages: Repercussion in Lung Hemorrhagic Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Rafael L.; Canetti, Cláudio; Serezani, Carlos H.; Fierro, Iolanda M.; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and experimental observations have supported the notion that free heme released during hemorrhagic and hemolytic episodes may have a major role in lung inflammation. With alveolar macrophages (AM) being the main line of defense in lung environments, the influence of free heme on AM activity and function was investigated. We observed that heme in a concentration range found during hemolytic episodes (3–30 μM) elicits AM to present a proinflammatory profile, stimulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation and inducing IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion. ROS production is NADPH oxidase-dependent, being inhibited by DPI and apocynin, and involves p47 subunit phosphorylation. Furthermore, heme induces NF-κB nuclear translocation, iNOS, and also HO-1 expression. Moreover, AM stimulated with free heme show enhanced phagocytic and bactericidal activities. Taken together, the data support a dual role for heme in the inflammatory response associated with lung hemorrhage, acting as a proinflammatory molecule that can either act as both an adjuvant of the innate immunity and as an amplifier of the inflammatory response, leading tissue injury. The understanding of heme effects on pulmonary inflammatory processes can lead to the development of new strategies to ameliorate tissue damage associated with hemorrhagic episodes. PMID:23690673

  5. Proinflammatory responses of heme in alveolar macrophages: repercussion in lung hemorrhagic episodes.

    PubMed

    Simões, Rafael L; Arruda, Maria Augusta; Canetti, Cláudio; Serezani, Carlos H; Fierro, Iolanda M; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and experimental observations have supported the notion that free heme released during hemorrhagic and hemolytic episodes may have a major role in lung inflammation. With alveolar macrophages (AM) being the main line of defense in lung environments, the influence of free heme on AM activity and function was investigated. We observed that heme in a concentration range found during hemolytic episodes (3-30 μM) elicits AM to present a proinflammatory profile, stimulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation and inducing IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion. ROS production is NADPH oxidase-dependent, being inhibited by DPI and apocynin, and involves p47 subunit phosphorylation. Furthermore, heme induces NF- κB nuclear translocation, iNOS, and also HO-1 expression. Moreover, AM stimulated with free heme show enhanced phagocytic and bactericidal activities. Taken together, the data support a dual role for heme in the inflammatory response associated with lung hemorrhage, acting as a proinflammatory molecule that can either act as both an adjuvant of the innate immunity and as an amplifier of the inflammatory response, leading tissue injury. The understanding of heme effects on pulmonary inflammatory processes can lead to the development of new strategies to ameliorate tissue damage associated with hemorrhagic episodes.

  6. Tocopherol Supplementation Reduces NO Production and Pulmonary Inflammatory Response to Bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jin Dong; Golden, Thea; Guo, Chang-Jiang; Tu, Shui Ping; Scott, Pamela; Lee, Mao-Jung; Yang, Chung S.; Gow, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Bleomycin causes acute lung injury through production of reactive species and initiation of inflammation. Previous work has shown alteration to the production of reactive oxygen species results in attenuation of injury. Vitamin E, in particular, γ-tocopherol, isoform, has the potential to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This study examines the utility of dietary supplementation with tocopherols in reducing bleomycin-mediated acute lung injury. Male C57BL6/J mice were intratracheally instilled with PBS or 2 units/kg bleomycin. Animals were analyzed 3 and 8 days post instillation at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels. Results showed successful delivery of tocopherols to the lung via dietary supplementation. Also, increases in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species due to bleomycin are normalized in those mice fed tocopherol diet. Injury was not prevented but inflammation progression was altered, in particular macrophage activation and function. Inflammatory scores based on histology demonstrate limited progression of inflammation in those mice treated with bleomycin and fed tocopherol diet compared to control diet. Upregulation of enzymes and cytokines involved in pro-inflammation were limited by tocopherol supplementation. Day 3 functional changes in elastance in response to bleomycin are prevented, however, 8 days post injury the effect of the tocopherol diet is lost. The effect of tocopherol supplementation upon the inflammatory process is demonstrated by a shift in the phenotype of macrophage activation. The effect of these changes on resolution and the progression of pulmonary fibrosis has yet to be elucidated. PMID:23669183

  7. Tocopherol supplementation reduces NO production and pulmonary inflammatory response to bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jin Dong; Golden, Thea; Guo, Chang-Jiang; Tu, Shui Ping; Scott, Pamela; Lee, Mao-Jung; Yang, Chung S; Gow, Andrew J

    2013-11-01

    Bleomycin causes acute lung injury through production of reactive species and initiation of inflammation. Previous work has shown alteration to the production of reactive oxygen species results in attenuation of injury. Vitamin E, in particular, γ-tocopherol, isoform, has the potential to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This study examines the utility of dietary supplementation with tocopherols in reducing bleomycin-mediated acute lung injury. Male C57BL6/J mice were intratracheally instilled with PBS or 2 units/kg bleomycin. Animals were analyzed 3 and 8 days post instillation at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels. Results showed successful delivery of tocopherols to the lung via dietary supplementation. Also, increases in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species due to bleomycin are normalized in those mice fed tocopherol diet. Injury was not prevented but inflammation progression was altered, in particular macrophage activation and function. Inflammatory scores based on histology demonstrate limited progression of inflammation in those mice treated with bleomycin and fed tocopherol diet compared to control diet. Upregulation of enzymes and cytokines involved in pro-inflammation were limited by tocopherol supplementation. Day 3 functional changes in elastance in response to bleomycin are prevented, however, 8 days post injury the effect of the tocopherol diet is lost. The effect of tocopherol supplementation upon the inflammatory process is demonstrated by a shift in the phenotype of macrophage activation. The effect of these changes on resolution and the progression of pulmonary fibrosis has yet to be elucidated. 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  8. Toll-like receptor 4-dependent responses to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Hoth, J Jason; Wells, Jonathan D; Brownlee, Noel A; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Meredith, J Wayne; McCall, Charles E; Yoza, Barbara K

    2009-04-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We previously demonstrated that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. We hypothesized that the TLR-4, in an MyD88-dependent manner, may also participate in the response to lung injury. To investigate this, we used a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans and evaluated postinjury lung function, pulmonary neutrophil recruitment, and the systemic innate immune response. Comparisons were made between wild-type mice and mice deficient in TLR-4 or MyD88. We found TLR-4-dependent responses to pulmonary contusion that include hypoxemia, edema, and neutrophil infiltration. Increased expression of IL-6 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 in the bronchoalveolar lavage and serum was also dependent on TLR-4 activation. We further demonstrated that these responses to pulmonary contusion were dependent on MyD88, an adapter protein in the signal transduction pathway mediated by TLRs. These results show that TLRs have a primary role in the response to acute lung injury. Lung inflammation and systemic innate immune responses are dependent on TLR activation by pulmonary contusion.

  9. Toll-like receptor 4 dependent responses to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion

    PubMed Central

    Hoth, J. Jason; Wells, Jonathan D.; Brownlee, Noel A.; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M.; Meredith, J. Wayne; McCall, Charles E.; Yoza, Barbara K.

    2010-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We previously demonstrated that toll-like receptor 2 participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. We hypothesized that the toll-like receptor 4, in a MyD88-dependent manner, may also participate in the response to lung injury. To investigate this, we used a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans and evaluated post injury lung function, pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and the systemic innate immune response. Comparisons were made between wild type mice and mice deficient in toll like receptor 4 or MyD88. We found toll-like receptor 4 dependent responses to pulmonary contusion that include hypoxemia, edema, and neutrophil infiltration. Increased expression of interleukin 6 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand-1 in the bronchoalveolar lavage and serum was also dependent on TLR4 activation. We further demonstrated that these responses to pulmonary contusion were dependent on MyD88, an adapter protein in the signal transduction pathway mediated by toll-like receptors. These results show that toll-like receptors have a primary role in the response to acute lung injury. Lung inflammation and systemic innate immune responses are dependent on toll-like receptor activation by pulmonary contusion. PMID:18665044

  10. The immune and inflammatory response to orf virus.

    PubMed

    Haig, D M; McInnes, C; Deane, D; Reid, H; Mercer, A

    1997-06-01

    Orf virus is a zoonotic, epitheliotropic DNA parapox virus that principally infects sheep and goats. The fact that the virus can repeatedly reinfect sheep has provoked an interest in the underlying cellular, virological and molecular mechanisms for its apparent escape from the host protective immune response. The local immune and inflammatory response in skin and the cell phenotype and cytokine response in lymph analysed around a single lymph node are characteristic of an anti-viral response. An unusual feature is the dense accumulation of MHC Class II+ dendritic cells in the skin lesion. The function of these cells is not known. Orf virus virulence genes and activities have been identified that may interfere with the development of the host protective immune and inflammatory response.

  11. Polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate aerosol particles induce pulmonary inflammatory and fibrotic responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Ryong; Lee, Kyuhong; Park, Chang We; Song, Jeong Ah; Shin, Da Young; Park, Yong Joo; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2016-03-01

    Polyhexamethylene guanidine (PHMG) phosphate was used as a disinfectant for the prevention of microorganism growth in humidifiers, without recognizing that a change of exposure route might cause significant health effects. Epidemiological studies reported that the use of humidifier disinfectant containing PHMG-phosphate can provoke pulmonary fibrosis. However, the pulmonary toxicity of PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles is unknown yet. This study aimed to elucidate the toxicological relationship between PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles and pulmonary fibrosis. An in vivo nose-only exposure system and an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) co-culture model were applied to confirm whether PHMG-phosphate induces inflammatory and fibrotic responses in the respiratory tract. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles for 3 weeks and recovered for 3 weeks in a nose-only exposure chamber. In addition, three human lung cells (Calu-3, differentiated THP-1 and HMC-1 cells) were cultured at ALI condition for 12 days and were treated with PHMG-phosphate at set concentrations and times. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, airway barrier injuries and inflammatory and fibrotic responses were evaluated in vivo and in vitro. The rats exposed to PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles in nanometer size showed pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis including inflammatory cytokines and fibronectin mRNA increase, as well as histopathological changes. In addition, PHMG-phosphate triggered the ROS generation, airway barrier injuries and inflammatory responses in a bronchial ALI co-culture model. Those results demonstrated that PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles cause pulmonary inflammatory and fibrotic responses. All features of fibrogenesis by PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles closely resembled the pathology of fibrosis that was reported in epidemiological studies. Finally, we expected that PHMG-phosphate infiltrated into the lungs in the form of

  12. Effect of exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on airway inflammatory response in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Li, Chonglei; Liu, Wei; Jin, Yihe

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the main substances causing multiple chemical sensitivity reactions in human. The effects of single VOCs exposure on airway inflammatory responses in mice lung have been reported. Previous studies have demonstrated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in lung inflammation induced by single VOCs inhalation. However, effects of VOCs exposure on NO signaling and neurological signaling pathways in airway remain less clear. We exposed male Kunming mice to filtered air (0) and four types of VOCs mixture (formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and xylene) treated air. Group 1 is 1.0, 1.1, 2.0 and 2.0 mg/m(3), group 2 is 3.0, 3.3, 6.0 and 6.0 mg/m(3), group 3 is 5.0, 5.5, 10.0 and 10.0 mg/m(3), group 4 is 10.0, 11.0, 20.0 and 20.0 mg/m(3), which respectively corresponded to 10, 30, 50 and 100 times of indoor air quality standard in China 2 hr per day, 5 days per week, for 2 weeks in the whole body exposure chamber. One day following VOCs exposure, we collected lung, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from each mouse and examined oxidative stress markers, cellular infiltration and production of cytokines, neurotrophin and substance P. We found that VOCs exposure influenced significantly NOS activity, GSH, or IL-6 concentration. The number of total cells, macrophages and eosinophils increased significantly in group 4. In addition, the production of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and substance P were significantly decreased. In contrast, neurotrophin-3 production in BALF was significantly increased in group 3 and 4. Our findings suggest that NO signaling pathways may induce airway inflammatory in short term VOCs exposure mice and the airway inflammatory response may be modulated by neurological signaling.

  13. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  14. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  15. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-05

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  16. Excessive inflammatory response of cystic fibrosis mice to bronchopulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Heeckeren, A; Walenga, R; Konstan, M W; Bonfield, T; Davis, P B; Ferkol, T

    1997-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), defective function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells and submucosal glands results in chronic pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pulmonary infection incites an intense host inflammatory response, causing progressive suppurative pulmonary disease. Mouse models of CF, however, fail to develop pulmonary disease spontaneously. We examined the effects of bronchopulmonary infection on mice homozygous for the S489X mutation of the CFTR gene using an animal model of chronic Pseudomonas endobronchial infection. Slurries of sterile agarose beads or beads containing a clinical isolate of mucoid P. aeruginosa were instilled in the right lung of normal or CF mice. The mortality of CF mice inoculated with Pseudomonas-laden beads was significantly higher than that of normal animals: 82% of infected CF mice, but only 23% of normal mice, died within 10 d of infection (P = 0.023). The concentration of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-alpha, murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and KC/N51, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in CF mice 3 d after infection and before any mortality, was markedly elevated compared with normal mice. This inflammatory response also correlated with weight loss observed in both CF and normal littermates after inoculation. Thus, this model may permit examination of the relationship of bacterial infections, inflammation, and the cellular and genetic defects in CF. PMID:9389746

  17. The effect of dexmedetomidine on inflammatory response of septic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianxing; Wang, Zhipeng; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Guobin; Li, Hongying

    2015-05-01

    Some studies have demonstrated dexmedetomidine has anti-inflammatory effect on septic rats. However, the mechanism of how dexmedetomidine exerts these effects is still remained unknown. This study was designed to investigate the mechanism of how dexmedetomidine inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators in cecal ligation and puncturinduced septic rats. 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups: sham-operated (sham) group, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) group, dexmedetomidine 5 μg/kg (DEX5) group, dexmedetomidine 10 μg/kg (DEX10) group,dexmedetomidine + yohimbine (DEX10 + Yoh) group and yohimibine group (Yoh). Blood, bronchoalveolarlavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues in each group were collected at six hours after dexmedetomidine or yohimbine treatment,. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in BALF and plasma were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Toll-like receptor-4(TLR4) and myeloid differerntiation factor(MyD88) expression were measuredby quantitative PCR, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation were determined by western blott. Compared with CLP group, dexmedetomidine significantly decreased not only the production of TNF-α and IL-6 both in plasma and BALF, but also inhibited the expression of TLR4 and MyD88 in mRNA level and the activation of ERK1/2 and NF-κB in the lung tissues of CLP-induced septic rats. All these effects could not be reversed by yohimibine. Dexmedetomidine treatment can effectively reduce the generation of inflammatory mediators in the plasma and BALF of CLP-induced septic rats. These effects of dexmedetomidine rely on TLR4/MyD88/MAPK/ NF-κB signaling pathway and are independent of α2-adrenoceptor.

  18. Pertussis Toxin Exacerbates and Prolongs Airway Inflammatory Responses during Bordetella pertussis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Carey E.; Sun, Yezhou

    2012-01-01

    Throughout infection, pathogenic bacteria induce dramatic changes in host transcriptional repertoires. An understanding of how bacterial factors influence host reprogramming will provide insight into disease pathogenesis. In the human respiratory pathogen Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, pertussis toxin (PT) is a key virulence factor that promotes colonization, suppresses innate immune responses during early infection, and causes systemic disease symptoms. To determine the full extent of PT-associated gene regulation in the airways through the peak of infection, we measured global transcriptional profiles in the lungs of BALB/c mice infected with wild-type (WT) or PT-deficient (ΔPT) B. pertussis. ΔPT bacteria were inoculated at a dose equivalent to the WT dose and at a high dose (ΔPThigh) to distinguish effects caused by higher bacterial loads achieved in WT infection from effects associated with PT. The results demonstrated that PT was associated with a significant upregulation of immune and inflammatory response genes as well as several other genes implicated in airway pathology. In contrast to the early, transient responses observed for ΔPThigh infection, WT infection induced a prolonged expression of inflammatory genes and increased the extent and duration of lung histopathology. In addition, the administration of purified PT to ΔPThigh-infected mice 1 day after bacterial inoculation exacerbated and prolonged inflammatory responses and airway pathology. These data indicate that PT not only is associated with exacerbated host airway responses during peak B. pertussis infection but also may inhibit host mechanisms of attenuating and resolving inflammation in the airways, suggesting possible links between PT and pertussis disease symptoms. PMID:23027529

  19. Pertussis toxin exacerbates and prolongs airway inflammatory responses during Bordetella pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Carey E; Sun, Yezhou; Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2012-12-01

    Throughout infection, pathogenic bacteria induce dramatic changes in host transcriptional repertoires. An understanding of how bacterial factors influence host reprogramming will provide insight into disease pathogenesis. In the human respiratory pathogen Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, pertussis toxin (PT) is a key virulence factor that promotes colonization, suppresses innate immune responses during early infection, and causes systemic disease symptoms. To determine the full extent of PT-associated gene regulation in the airways through the peak of infection, we measured global transcriptional profiles in the lungs of BALB/c mice infected with wild-type (WT) or PT-deficient (ΔPT) B. pertussis. ΔPT bacteria were inoculated at a dose equivalent to the WT dose and at a high dose (ΔPT(high)) to distinguish effects caused by higher bacterial loads achieved in WT infection from effects associated with PT. The results demonstrated that PT was associated with a significant upregulation of immune and inflammatory response genes as well as several other genes implicated in airway pathology. In contrast to the early, transient responses observed for ΔPT(high) infection, WT infection induced a prolonged expression of inflammatory genes and increased the extent and duration of lung histopathology. In addition, the administration of purified PT to ΔPT(high)-infected mice 1 day after bacterial inoculation exacerbated and prolonged inflammatory responses and airway pathology. These data indicate that PT not only is associated with exacerbated host airway responses during peak B. pertussis infection but also may inhibit host mechanisms of attenuating and resolving inflammation in the airways, suggesting possible links between PT and pertussis disease symptoms.

  20. Syk-Mediated Suppression of Inflammatory Responses by Cordyceps bassiana.

    PubMed

    Yang, Woo Seok; Nam, Gyeong Sug; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2017-01-01

    The fruit body of artificially cultivated Cordyceps bassiana has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Although it has been suggested that the fruit body has neutraceutic and pharmaceutic biomaterial potential, the exact anti-inflammatory molecular mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated the immunopharmacologic activity of Cordyceps bassiana under in vitro conditions and investigated its anti-inflammatory mechanism. Water extract (Cm-WE) of the fruit body of artificially cultivated Cordyceps bassiana without polysaccharide fractions reduced the expression of the proinflammatory genes cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, interleukin (IL)-12, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and promoted the expression of the anti-inflammatory gene IL-10 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, this fraction suppressed proliferation and interferon (IFN)-[Formula: see text] production in splenic T lymphocytes. Cm-WE blocked the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-[Formula: see text]B and activator protein (AP)-1 and their upstream inflammatory signaling cascades, including Syk, MEK, and JNK. Using kinase assays, Syk was identified as the target enzyme most strongly inhibited by Cm-WE. These results strongly suggest that Cm-WE suppresses inflammatory responses by inhibiting Syk kinase activity, with potential implications for novel neutraceutic and pharmaceutic biomaterials.

  1. Inflammatory and apoptotic alterations in serum and injured tissue after experimental polytrauma in mice: distinct early response compared with single trauma or "double-hit" injury.

    PubMed

    Weckbach, Sebastian; Hohmann, Christoph; Braumueller, Sonja; Denk, Stephanie; Klohs, Bettina; Stahel, Philip F; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Perl, Mario

    2013-02-01

    The exact alterations of the immune system after polytrauma leading to sepsis and multiple-organ failure are poorly understood. Thus, the early local and systemic inflammatory and apoptotic response was characterized in a new polytrauma model and compared with the alterations seen after single or combined injuries. Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice were subjected to either blunt bilateral chest trauma (Tx), closed head injury, right femur fracture including contralateral soft tissue injury, or a combination of injuries (PTx). After 2 hours or 6 hours, animals were sacrificed, and the systemic as well as the local pulmonary immune response (bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL]/plasma cytokines, lung myeloperoxidase [MPO] activity, and alveolocapillary barrier dysfunction) were evaluated along with lung/brain apoptosis (lung caspase 3 Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMN] Annexin V). Hemoglobin, PO2 saturation, and pH did not differ between the experimental groups. Local BAL cytokines/chemokines were significantly increased in almost all groups, which included Tx. There was no further enhancement of this local inflammatory response in the lungs in case of PTx. At 2 hours, all groups except sham and closed head injury alone revealed an increased activity of lung MPO. However, 6 hours after injury, lung MPO remained increased only in the PTx group. Increased BAL protein levels were found, reflecting enhanced lung leakage in all groups with Tx 6 hours after trauma. Only after PTx was neutrophil apoptosis significantly decreased, whereas lung caspase 3 and plasma interleukin 6/keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) were substantially increased. The combination of different injuries leads to an earlier systemic inflammatory response when compared with the single insults. Interestingly, only after PTx but not after single or double hits was lung apoptosis increased, and PMN apoptosis was decreased along with a prolonged presence of neutrophils in the

  2. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) reduces macrophage inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Saar; Aviram, Michael; Fuhrman, Bianca

    2013-06-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) was suggested to play an anti-inflammatory role. In the present study we questioned whether PON1 has a direct impact on macrophage inflammatory responses, and the possible functional implications of such effects. Ex-vivo studies were performed with bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) harvested from C57BL/6 and human-PON1 transgenic (PON1-Tg) mice, and for the in vitro studies the J774.A1 macrophage-like cell line was used. Pro-inflammatory (M1) activation was induced by LPS and INFγ. The spontaneous and M1-induced TNFα and IL-6 secretion were significantly reduced in BMDM derived from PON1-Tg vs. C57BL/6 mice. In vitro, PON1 dose-dependently attenuated both the spontaneous and M1-induced TNFα and IL-6 secretion, and contributed to the anti-inflammatory activity of HDL. Functionally, PON1 attenuated M1-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), phagocytosis, and necrotic macrophage death. PON1 anti-inflammatory activity was mediated, at least in part, via binding to SR-BI, but was independent of the enzyme catalytic activity or of cholesterol efflux stimulation, and did not involve binding to ABCA1. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that PON1 directly suppresses macrophage pro-inflammatory responses. These findings suggest that PON1 decreases sustained pro-inflammatory reactions, which subsequently can attenuate plaque progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy for lung disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lands, Larry C; Stanojevic, Sanja

    2016-04-07

    Progressive lung damage causes most deaths in cystic fibrosis. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (such as ibuprofen) may prevent progressive pulmonary deterioration and morbidity in cystic fibrosis. To assess the effectiveness of treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, hand searches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We contacted manufacturers of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.Latest search of the Group's Trials Register: 04 February 2016. Randomized controlled trials comparing oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, at any dose for at least two months, to placebo in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion the review and their potential risk of bias. The searches identified 10 trials; four are included (287 participants aged five to 39 years; maximum follow up of four years) and one is currently awaiting classification pending publication of the full trial report. Three trials compared ibuprofen to placebo (two from the same centre with some of the same participants); one trial assessed piroxicam versus placebo.The three ibuprofen trials were deemed to have good or adequate methodological quality, but used various outcomes and summary measures. Reviewers considered measures of lung function, nutritional status, radiological assessment of pulmonary involvement, intravenous antibiotic usage, hospital admissions, survival and adverse effects. Combined data from the two largest ibuprofen trials showed a significantly lower annual rate of decline for lung function, percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second mean difference 1.32 (95% confidence interval 0.21 to 2.42); forced vital capacity mean difference 1.27 (95% confidence interval 0.26 to 2.28); forced expiratory

  4. Beauveria attenuates asthma by inhibiting inflammatory response and inducing lymphocytic cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingying; Zhou, Xianmei; Zhu, Jiping

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of beauveria (BEA) in asthma. We investigated the cytotoxic effect of BEA on the proliferation of inflammatory cells and secretion of inflammatory mediators both in-vitro and in-vivo. In in-vitro studies, BEA inhibited lymphocytic cell proliferation and the proliferation of lymphocytic cells induced by Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). We used ELISA to test the effects of BEA on the secretion of inflammatory factors including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Flow cytometry was used to evaluate the influence of BEA on cell apoptosis. The effect of BEA on the cell numbers of eosinophils, lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils and other cells in mouse bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was also evaluated. The expression of apoptosis related molecules Bax, Caspase-3 and Bcl-2 was examined by Western blotting analysis. Our results indicated that BEA played a protective role in asthma. BEA inhibited lymphocytic cell proliferation and secretion of inflammatory mediators. BEA promoted cell apoptosis, stimulated the expression of Bax and Caspase-3 and inhibited Bcl-2 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. In in-vivo experiments, BEA reduced the cell number of eosinophils, lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils and other cells in mouse BALF. BEA inhibited secretion of inflammatory mediators, stimulated expression of Bax and Caspase-3, and inhibited expression of Bcl-2 in mouse lung tissue dose-dependently. All together, our results indicated that BEA could attenuate asthma by inhibiting inflammatory response and induce apoptosis of inflammatory cells. PMID:27801673

  5. COMPARTMENTALIZATION OF THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO INHALED GRAIN DUST

    EPA Science Inventory


    Interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and the secreted form of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA) are involved in the inflammatory response to inhaled grain dust. Previously, we found considerable production of these cytokines in the lower...

  6. COMPARTMENTALIZATION OF THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO INHALED GRAIN DUST

    EPA Science Inventory


    Interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and the secreted form of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA) are involved in the inflammatory response to inhaled grain dust. Previously, we found considerable production of these cytokines in the lower...

  7. The consequences for human reproduction of a robust inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Ness, Roberta B

    2004-12-01

    Innate and adaptive immune responsiveness is variable within the population. Since robust immune reactions are critical to the survival of humans, the existence of immune variability in the population suggests the existence of competing, alternative phenotypes. Although women with powerful immune responsiveness may be more likely to survive to reproduce, their reproductive experiences may be less successful than women who are not as responsive. Normal pregnancy elicits a maternal inflammatory reaction. This can be understood on the basis of maternal-fetal conflict theory: inflammation is a component of the maternal attempt to limit excessive fetal demands. However, an overly aggressive inflammatory reaction has been shown to relate to a variety of adverse reproductive outcomes. Reviewed here are several examples, including the fallopian tube damage that results from pelvic inflammatory disease, the upregulated inflammatory response among women who develop preeclampsia, an association between immune hyperresponsiveness and premature delivery, and the relationship between autoimmune diseases and multiple adverse pregnancy outcomes. The hypothesis that immune hyperresponsiveness limits reproductive capacity suggests many avenues for research.

  8. The Pathogenesis of ACLF: The Inflammatory Response and Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Although systemic inflammation is a hallmark of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), its role in the development of this syndrome is poorly understood. Here the author first summarizes the general principles of the inflammatory response. Inflammation can be triggered by exogenous or endogenous inducers. Important exogenous inducers include bacterial products such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and virulence factors. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns elicit inflammation through structural feature recognition (using innate pattern-recognition receptors [PRRs]), whereas virulence factors generally trigger inflammation via functional feature recognition. Endogenous inducers are called danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and include molecules released by necrotic cells and products of extracellular matrix breakdown. Danger-associated molecular patterns use different PRRs. The purpose of the inflammatory response may differ according to the type of stimulus: The aim of infection-induced inflammation is to decrease pathogen burden, whereas the DAMP-induced inflammation aims to promote tissue repair. An excessive inflammatory response can induce collateral tissue damage (a process called immunopathology). However immunopathology may not be the only mechanism of tissue damage; for example, organ failure can develop because of failed disease tolerance. In this review, the author also discusses how general principles of the inflammatory response can help us to understand the development of ACLF in different contexts: bacterial infection, severe alcoholic hepatitis, and cases in which there is no identifiable trigger.

  9. Pro-inflammatory phenotype of COPD fibroblasts not compatible with repair in COPD lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Lian; Qu, Jie-ming; Bai, Chun-xue; Merrilees, Mervyn J; Black, Peter N

    2012-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by loss of elastic fibres from small airways and alveolar walls, with the decrease in elastin increasing with disease severity. It is unclear why there is a lack of repair of elastic fibres. We have examined fibroblasts cultured from lung tissue from subjects with or without COPD to determine if the secretory profile explains lack of tissue repair. In this study, fibroblasts were cultured from lung parenchyma of patients with mild COPD [Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 1, n= 5], moderate to severe COPD (GOLD 2-3, n= 12) and controls (non-COPD, n= 5). Measurements were made of proliferation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase-1, mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-8, MMP-1, tropoelastin and versican, and protein levels for IL-6, IL-8, PGE(2,) tropoelastin, insoluble elastin, and versican. GOLD 2-3 fibroblasts proliferated more slowly (P < 0.01), had higher levels of senescence-associated β-galactosidase-1 (P < 0.001) than controls and showed significant increases in mRNA and/or protein for IL-6 (P < 0.05), IL-8 (P < 0.01), MMP-1 (P < 0.05), PGE(2) (P < 0.05), versican (P < 0.05) and tropoelastin (P < 0.05). mRNA expression and/or protein levels of tropoelastin (P < 0.01), versican (P < 0.05), IL-6 (P < 0.05) and IL-8 (P < 0.05) were negatively correlated with FEV1% of predicted. Insoluble elastin was not increased. In summary, fibroblasts from moderate to severe COPD subjects display a secretory phenotype with up-regulation of inflammatory molecules including the matrix proteoglycan versican, and increased soluble, but not insoluble, elastin. Versican inhibits assembly of tropoelastin into insoluble elastin and we conclude that the pro-inflammatory phenotype of COPD fibroblasts is not compatible with repair of elastic fibres.

  10. Radiogenomics predicting tumor responses to radiotherapy in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit K; Bell, Marcus H; Nirodi, Chaitanya S; Story, Michael D; Minna, John D

    2010-07-01

    The recently developed ability to interrogate genome-wide data arrays has provided invaluable insights into the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer. These data have also provided information for developing targeted therapy in lung cancer patients based on the identification of cancer-specific vulnerabilities and set the stage for molecular biomarkers that provide information on clinical outcome and response to treatment. In addition, there are now large panels of lung cancer cell lines, both non-small-cell lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer, that have distinct chemotherapy and radiation response phenotypes. We anticipate that the integration of molecular data with therapy response data will allow for the generation of biomarker signatures that predict response to therapy. These signatures will need to be validated in clinical studies, at first retrospective analyses and then prospective clinical trials, to show that the use of these biomarkers can aid in predicting patient outcomes (eg, in the case of radiation therapy for local control and survival). This review highlights recent advances in molecular profiling of tumor responses to radiotherapy and identifies challenges and opportunities in developing molecular biomarker signatures for predicting radiation response for individual patients with lung cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiogenomics- predicting tumor responses to radiotherapy in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amit K.; Bell, Marcus H.; Nirodi, Chaitanya S.; Story, Michael D.; Minna, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The recently developed ability to interrogate genome wide data arrays has provided invaluable insights into the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer. These data have also provided information for developing targeted therapy in lung cancer patients based upon identification of cancer specific vulnerabilities and set the stage for molecular biomarkers that provide information on clinical outcome and response to treatment. In addition, there are now large panels of lung cancer cell lines, both non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC), which have distinct chemotherapy and radiation response phenotypes. We anticipate that the integration of molecular data with therapy response data will allow for the generation of biomarker signatures that predict response to therapy. These signatures will need to be validated in clinical studies, at first retrospective analyses and then prospective clinical trials to show that the use of these biomarkers can aid in predicting patient outcomes (e.g. in the case of radiation therapy for local control and survival). This review highlights recent advances in molecular profiling of tumor responses to radiotherapy and identifies challenges and opportunities in developing molecular biomarker signatures for predicting radiation response for individual patients with lung cancer. PMID:20685577

  12. Immune Responses to Intestinal Microbes in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jonathan J

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are characterized by chronic, T-cell-mediated inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract that can cause significant, lifelong morbidity. Data from both human and animal studies indicate that IBDs are likely caused by dysregulated immune responses to resident intestinal microbes. Certain products from mycobacteria, fungi, and Clostridia stimulate increased effector T cell responses during intestinal inflammation, whereas other bacterial products from Clostridia and Bacteroides promote anti-inflammatory regulatory T cell responses. Antibody responses to bacterial and fungal components may help predict the severity of IBDs. While most currently approved treatments for IBDs generally suppress the patient's immune system, our growing understanding of microbial influences in IBDs will likely lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and therapies that target the intestinal microbiota.

  13. Use of lung-preserving surgery in left inflammatory bronchial occlusion and distal atelectasis: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaowu; Deng, Yu; Chen, Wenshu; Li, Weina; Cai, Yixin; Xu, Qinzi; Fu, Shengling; Fu, Xiangning; Ni, Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Lung-preserving surgery was proved to be effective and safe to treat patients with benign bronchial strictures. However, this surgical treatment has been rarely reported in patients with complete occlusion in the left main bronchus. The aim of this study was to assess the value of this procedure and report our experience in the treatment of these patients with left atelectasis caused by inflammatory bronchial occlusion. We reviewed and analysed the medical records of 8 patients who had undergone left main bronchus sleeve resection for symptomatic left atelectasis caused by inflammatory bronchial occlusion from May 2007 to April 2011. Eight patients (3 men and 5 women) with a medical history of active pulmonary tuberculosis were involved in this study. The median age was 23 years. Parenchyma-sparing left main bronchus resection was performed in 4 patients, 1 of whom received partial wedge resection in the lingual lobe. Left main bronchus sleeve resection plus superior lobectomy was performed in 2 patients and left main bronchus sleeve resection plus left inferior lobectomy in 2 patients, 1 of whom received additional partial wedge resection of the lingual lobe. The procedure was completed successfully in all 8 patients without postoperative deaths. The mean follow-up time was 49.3 months, ranging from 23 to 69 months. No major complications, including stenosis and atelectasis, were observed during the follow-up period. The symptoms of pulmonary atelectasis disappeared and pulmonary ventilation function improved significantly. In symptomatic patients with left atelectasis caused by inflammatory bronchial occlusion, lung-preserving surgery is an effective and safe surgical treatment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. Antileukotriene Reverts the Early Effects of Inflammatory Response of Distal Parenchyma in Experimental Chronic Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gobbato, Nathália Brandão; de Souza, Flávia Castro Ribas; Fumagalli, Stella Bruna Napolitano; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenório Quirino dos Santos; Prado, Carla Máximo; Martins, Milton Arruda; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo; Leick, Edna Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Aims. Compare the effects of montelukast or dexamethasone in distal lung parenchyma and airway walls of guinea pigs (GP) with chronic allergic inflammation. Methods. GP have inhaled ovalbumin (OVA group-2x/week/4weeks). After the 4th inhalation, GP were treated with montelukast or dexamethasone. After 72 hours of the 7th inhalation, GP were anesthetised, and lungs were removed and submitted to histopathological evaluation. Results. Montelukast and dexamethasone treatments reduced the number of eosinophils in airway wall and distal lung parenchyma compared to OVA group (P < 0.05). On distal parenchyma, both treatments were effective in reducing RANTES, NF-κB, and fibronectin positive cells compared to OVA group (P < 0.001). Montelukast was more effective in reducing eotaxin positive cells on distal parenchyma compared to dexamethasone treatment (P < 0.001), while there was a more expressive reduction of IGF-I positive cells in OVA-D group (P < 0.001). On airway walls, montelukast and dexamethasone were effective in reducing IGF-I, RANTES, and fibronectin positive cells compared to OVA group (P < 0.05). Dexamethasone was more effective in reducing the number of eotaxin and NF-κB positive cells than Montelukast (P < 0.05). Conclusions. In this animal model, both treatments were effective in modulating allergic inflammation and remodeling distal lung parenchyma and airway wall, contributing to a better control of the inflammatory response. PMID:24151607

  15. Treatment with BX471, a CC chemokine receptor 1 antagonist, attenuates systemic inflammatory response during sepsis.

    PubMed

    He, Min; Horuk, Richard; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Bhatia, Madhav

    2007-04-01

    Sepsis is a complex clinical syndrome resulting from a harmful host inflammatory response to infection. Chemokines and their receptors play a key role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. BX471 is a potent nonpeptide CC chemokine receptor-1 (CCR1) antagonist in both human and mouse. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with BX471 on cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis in the mouse and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. In sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture, treatment with BX471 significantly protected mice against lung and liver injury by attenuating MPO activity, an indicator of neutrophil recruitment in lungs and livers and attenuating lung and liver morphological changes in histological sections. Blocking CCR1 by BX471 also downregulated ICAM-1, P-selectin, and E-selectin expression at mRNA and protein levels in lungs and livers compared with placebo-treated groups. These findings suggest that blockage of CCR1 by specific antagonist may represent a promising strategy to prevent disease progression in sepsis.

  16. THP-1-derived macrophages render lung epithelial cells hypo-responsive to Legionella pneumophila - a systems biology study.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christine; Lai, Xin; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Jung, Anna Lena; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Herkt, Christina Elena; Janga, Harshavadhan; Zscheppang, Katja; Stielow, Christina; Schulte, Leon; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Vera, Julio; Schmeck, Bernd

    2017-09-20

    Immune response in the lung has to protect the huge alveolar surface against pathogens while securing the delicate lung structure. Macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells constitute the first line of defense and together orchestrate the initial steps of host defense. In this study, we analysed the influence of macrophages on type II alveolar epithelial cells during Legionella pneumophila-infection by a systems biology approach combining experimental work and mathematical modelling. We found that L. pneumophila-infected THP-1-derived macrophages provoke a pro-inflammatory activation of neighboring lung epithelial cells, but in addition render them hypo-responsive to direct infection with the same pathogen. We generated a kinetic mathematical model of macrophage activation and identified a paracrine mechanism of macrophage-secreted IL-1β inducing a prolonged IRAK-1 degradation in lung epithelial cells. This intercellular crosstalk may help to avoid an overwhelming inflammatory response by preventing excessive local secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and thereby negatively regulating the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection. This suggests an important but ambivalent immunomodulatory role of macrophages in lung infection.

  17. Colchicine-responsive protracted gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Fumiaki; Migita, Kiyoshi; Haramura, Tomoko; Sumiyoshi, Remi; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2014-05-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is a severe but self-limiting arthritis caused by inflammatory responses to urate crystals. Oral colchicines are effective for initial stages or prophylaxis, but generally, colchicines are ineffective for established gouty arthritis. We describe an unusual case of gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions, including high fever and polymyalgia. Refractory polyarthritis and high fever were eradicated by colchicine treatment. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation in exon 2 of the MEFV gene (E148Q). This case underscores the possibility that MEFV gene mutations may modify the phenotype of gouty arthritis.

  18. [Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and endothelial cell injury].

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi

    2004-12-01

    During recent years, evidences have been accumulated demonstrating bidirectional crosstalk between coagulation and inflammation. This review outlines the influences that coagulation and inflammation exert on each other to the endothelium and how these systems induce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Then we discussed the implications of leucocyte-endothelial activation to endothelial cell injury followed by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in patients with sustained SIRS. Last we demonstrated an important role of inflammatory circulation disturbance induced by endothelial cell injury for the pathogenesis of MODS in SIRS and sepsis.

  19. Purinergic signaling in inflammatory cells: P2 receptor expression, functional effects, and modulation of inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Fenila; Pérez Novo, Claudina; Bachert, Claus; Van Crombruggen, Koen

    2013-09-01

    Extracellular ATP and related nucleotides promote a wide range of pathophysiological responses via activation of cell surface purinergic P2 receptors. Almost every cell type expresses P2 receptors and/or exhibit regulated release of ATP. In this review, we focus on the purinergic receptor distribution in inflammatory cells and their implication in diverse immune responses by providing an overview of the current knowledge in the literature related to purinergic signaling in neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, lymphocytes, eosinophils, and mast cells. The pathophysiological role of purinergic signaling in these cells include among others calcium mobilization, actin polymerization, chemotaxis, release of mediators, cell maturation, cytotoxicity, and cell death. We finally discuss the therapeutic potential of P2 receptor subtype selective drugs in inflammatory conditions.

  20. Endogenous lung surfactant inspired pH responsive nanovesicle aerosols: pulmonary compatible and site-specific drug delivery in lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Nitin; Shirsath, Nitesh; Singh, Ankur; Joshi, Kalpana S; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-11-18

    Concerns related to pulmonary toxicity and non-specificity of nanoparticles have limited their clinical applications for aerosol delivery of chemotherapeutics in lung cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary surfactant mimetic nanoparticles that offer pH responsive release specifically in tumor may be a possible solution to overcome these issues. We therefore developed lung surfactant mimetic and pH responsive lipid nanovesicles for aerosol delivery of paclitaxel in metastatic lung cancer. 100-200 nm sized nanovesicles showed improved fusogenicity and cytosolic drug release, specifically with cancer cells, thereby resulting in improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in B16F10 murine melanoma cells and cytocompatibility with normal lung fibroblasts (MRC 5). The nanovesicles showed airway patency similar to that of endogenous pulmonary surfactant and did not elicit inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages. Their aerosol administration while significantly improving the biodistribution of paclitaxel in comparison to Taxol (i.v.), also showed significantly higher metastastes inhibition (~75%) in comparison to that of i.v. Taxol and i.v. Abraxane. No signs of interstitial pulmonary fiborisis, chronic inflammation and any other pulmonary toxicity were observed with nanovesicle formulation. Overall, these nanovesicles may be a potential platform to efficiently deliver hydrophobic drugs as aerosol in metastatic lung cancer and other lung diseases, without causing pulmonary toxicity.

  1. Endogenous lung surfactant inspired pH responsive nanovesicle aerosols: Pulmonary compatible and site-specific drug delivery in lung metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nitin; Shirsath, Nitesh; Singh, Ankur; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-11-01

    Concerns related to pulmonary toxicity and non-specificity of nanoparticles have limited their clinical applications for aerosol delivery of chemotherapeutics in lung cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary surfactant mimetic nanoparticles that offer pH responsive release specifically in tumor may be a possible solution to overcome these issues. We therefore developed lung surfactant mimetic and pH responsive lipid nanovesicles for aerosol delivery of paclitaxel in metastatic lung cancer. 100-200 nm sized nanovesicles showed improved fusogenicity and cytosolic drug release, specifically with cancer cells, thereby resulting in improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in B16F10 murine melanoma cells and cytocompatibility with normal lung fibroblasts (MRC 5). The nanovesicles showed airway patency similar to that of endogenous pulmonary surfactant and did not elicit inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages. Their aerosol administration while significantly improving the biodistribution of paclitaxel in comparison to Taxol (i.v.), also showed significantly higher metastastes inhibition (~75%) in comparison to that of i.v. Taxol and i.v. Abraxane. No signs of interstitial pulmonary fiborisis, chronic inflammation and any other pulmonary toxicity were observed with nanovesicle formulation. Overall, these nanovesicles may be a potential platform to efficiently deliver hydrophobic drugs as aerosol in metastatic lung cancer and other lung diseases, without causing pulmonary toxicity.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of mangiferin on sepsis-induced lung injury in mice via up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xia; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Rong; Ye, Mengliang; Yin, Xinru; Wan, Jingyuan

    2013-06-01

    Sepsis, a serious unbalanced hyperinflammatory condition, is a tremendous burden for healthcare systems, with a high mortality and limited treatment. Increasing evidences indicated that some active components derived from natural foods have potent anti-inflammatory properties. Here we show that mangiferin (MF), a natural glucosyl xanthone found in both mango and papaya, attenuates cecal ligation and puncture-induced mortality and acute lung injury (ALI), as indicated by reduced systemic and pulmonary inflammatory responses. Moreover, pretreatment with MF inhibits sepsis-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells signaling, resulting in inhibiting production of proinflammatory mediators. Notably, MF dose-dependently up-regulates the expression and activity of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in the lung of septic mice. Further, these beneficial effects of MF on the septic lung injury were eliminated by ZnPP IX, a specific HO-1 inhibitor. Our results suggest that MF attenuates sepsis by up-regulation of HO-1 that protects against sepsis-induced ALI through inhibiting inflammatory signaling and proinflammatory mediators. Thereby, MF may be effective in treating sepsis with ALI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro and in vivo evidence for an inflammatory role of the calcium channel TRPV4 in lung epithelium: Potential involvement in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Henry, Clémence O; Dalloneau, Emilie; Pérez-Berezo, Maria-Teresa; Plata, Cristina; Wu, Yongzheng; Guillon, Antoine; Morello, Eric; Aimar, Rose-France; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Esnard, Frédéric; Coraux, Christelle; Börnchen, Christian; Kiefmann, Rainer; Vandier, Christophe; Touqui, Lhousseine; Valverde, Miguel A; Cenac, Nicolas; Si-Tahar, Mustapha

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease associated with chronic severe lung inflammation, leading to premature death. To develop innovative anti-inflammatory treatments, we need to characterize new cellular and molecular components contributing to the mechanisms of lung inflammation. Here, we focused on the potential role of "transient receptor potential vanilloid-4" (TRPV4), a nonselective calcium channel. We used both in vitro and in vivo approaches to demonstrate that TRPV4 expressed in airway epithelial cells triggers the secretion of major proinflammatory mediators such as chemokines and biologically active lipids, as well as a neutrophil recruitment in lung tissues. We characterized the contribution of cytosolic phospholipase A2, MAPKs, and NF-κB in TRPV4-dependent signaling. We also showed that 5,6-, 8,9-, 11,12-, and 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, i.e., four natural lipid-based TRPV4 agonists, are present in expectorations of CF patients. Also, TRPV4-induced calcium mobilization and inflammatory responses were enhanced in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-deficient cellular and animal models, suggesting that TRPV4 is a promising target for the development of new anti-inflammatory treatments for diseases such as CF. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinase-8 Inactivates Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1α to Reduce Acute Lung Inflammation and Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Pablo A.; Knolle, Martin D.; Cala, Luisa F.; Zhuang, Yuehong; Owen, Caroline A.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the role of matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) in acute lung injury (ALI), we delivered LPS or bleomycin by the intratracheal route to MMP-8−/− mice versus WT mice or subjected the mice to hyperoxia (95% O2) and measured lung inflammation and injury at intervals. MMP-8−/− mice with ALI had greater increases in lung PMN and macrophage counts, measures of alveolar capillary barrier injury, lung elastance, and mortality than WT mice with ALI. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from LPS-treated MMP-8−/− mice had more macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) than BALF from LPS-treated WT mice, but similar levels of other pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. MIP-1α−/− mice with ALI had less acute lung inflammation and injury than WT mice with ALI, confirming that MIP-1α promotes acute lung inflammation and injury in mice. Genetically deleting MIP-1α in MMP-8−/− mice abrogated the increased lung inflammation and injury and mortality in MMP-8−/− mice with ALI. Soluble MMP-8 cleaved and inactivated MIP-1α in vitro, but membrane-bound MMP-8 on activated PMNs had greater MIP-1α-degrading activity than soluble MMP-8. High levels of membrane-bound MMP-8 were detected on lung PMNs from LPS-treated WT mice, but soluble, active MMP-8 was not detected in BALF samples. Thus, MMP-8 has novel roles in restraining lung inflammation and in limiting alveolar capillary barrier injury during ALI in mice by inactivating MIP-1α. In addition, membrane-bound MMP-8 on activated lung PMNs is likely to be the key bioactive form of the enzyme that limits lung inflammation and alveolar capillary barrier injury during ALI. PMID:20042585

  6. Inflammatory Monocytes Facilitate Adaptive CD4 T Cell Responses during Respiratory Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Tobias M.; Rivera, Amariliz; Lipuma, Lauren; Gallegos, Alena; Shi, Chao; Mack, Mathias; Pamer, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Aspergillus fumigatus, a ubiquitous fungus, causes invasive disease in immunocompromised humans. Although monocytes and antigen-specific CD4 T cells contribute to defense against inhaled fungal spores, how these cells interact during infection remains undefined. Investigating the role of inflammatory monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during fungal infection, we find that A. fumigatus infection induces an influx of chemokine receptor CCR2- and Ly6C-expressing inflammatory monocytes into lungs and draining lymph nodes. Depletion of CCR2+ cells reduced A. fumigatus conidial transport from lungs to draining lymph nodes, abolished CD4 T cell priming following respiratory challenge, and impaired pulmonary fungal clearance. In contrast, depletion of CCR2+Ly6Chi monocytes during systemic fungal infection did not prevent CD4 T cell priming in the spleen. Our findings demonstrate that pulmonary CD4 T cell responses to inhaled spores require CCR2+Ly6Chi monocytes and their derivatives, revealing a compartmentally restricted function for these cells in adaptive respiratory immune responses. PMID:19917501

  7. Comprehensive DNA Adduct Analysis Reveals Pulmonary Inflammatory Response Contributes to Genotoxic Action of Magnetite Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Kousuke; Kato, Tatsuya; Kato, Mamoru; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Totsuka, Yukari

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized-magnetite (MGT) is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields; however, its toxicological properties are not well documented. In our previous report, MGT showed genotoxicity in both in vitro and in vivo assay systems, and it was suggested that inflammatory responses exist behind the genotoxicity. To further clarify mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity, a comprehensive DNA adduct (DNA adductome) analysis was conducted using DNA samples derived from the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. In total, 30 and 42 types of DNA adducts were detected in the vehicle control and MGT-treated groups, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) against a subset of DNA adducts was applied and several adducts, which are deduced to be formed by inflammation or oxidative stress, as the case of etheno-deoxycytidine (εdC), revealed higher contributions to MGT exposure. By quantitative-LC-MS/MS analysis, εdC levels were significantly higher in MGT-treated mice than those of the vehicle control. Taken together with our previous data, it is suggested that inflammatory responses might be involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice. PMID:25658799

  8. Dissemination of Orientia tsutsugamushi and Inflammatory Responses in a Murine Model of Scrub Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Kolbaum, Julia; Gharaibeh, Mohammad; Neumann, Melanie; Glatzel, Markus; Fleischer, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Central aspects in the pathogenesis of scrub typhus, an infection caused by Orientia (O.) tsutsugamushi, have remained obscure. Its organ and cellular tropism are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze the kinetics of bacterial dissemination and associated inflammatory responses in infected tissues in an experimental scrub typhus mouse model, following infection with the human pathogenic strain Karp. We provide a thorough analysis of O. tsutsugamushi infection in inbred Balb/c mice using footpad inoculation, which is close to the natural way of infection. By a novel, highly sensitive qPCR targeting the multi copy traD genes, we quantitatively monitored the spread of O. tsutsugamushi Karp from the skin inoculation site via the regional lymph node to the internal target organs. The highest bacterial loads were measured in the lung. Using confocal imaging, we also detected O. tsutsugamushi at the single cell level in the lung and found a predominant macrophage rather than endothelial localization. Immunohistochemical analysis of infiltrates in lung and brain revealed differently composed lesions with specific localizations: iNOS-expressing macrophages were frequent in infiltrative parenchymal noduli, but uncommon in perivascular lesions within these organs. Quantitative analysis of the macrophage response by immunohistochemistry in liver, heart, lung and brain demonstrated an early onset of macrophage activation in the liver. Serum levels of interferon (IFN)-γ were increased during the acute infection, and we showed that IFN-γ contributed to iNOS-dependent bacterial growth control. Our data show that upon inoculation to the skin, O. tsutsugamushi spreads systemically to a large number of organs and gives rise to organ-specific inflammation patterns. The findings suggest an essential role for the lung in the pathogenesis of scrub typhus. The model will allow detailed studies on host-pathogen interaction and provide further insight into the

  9. Toll-like receptor 2 participates in the response to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Hoth, J Jason; Hudson, William P; Brownlee, Noel A; Yoza, Barbara K; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Meredith, J Wayne; McCall, Charles E

    2007-10-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We report that Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. To show this, we use a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans based on histologic, morphologic, and biochemical criteria of acute lung injury. The inflammatory response to pulmonary contusion in our mouse model is characterized by pulmonary edema, neutrophil transepithelial migration, and increased expression of the innate immunity proinflammatory cytokines IL 1beta and IL 6, the adhesion intracellular adhesion molecule 1, and chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1. Compared with wild-type animals, contused Tlr2(-/-) mice have significantly reduced pulmonary edema and neutrophilia. These findings are associated with decreased levels of circulating chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1. In contrast, systemic IL 6 levels remain elevated in the TLR2-deficient phenotype. These results show that TLR2 has a primary role in the neutrophil response to acute lung injury. We suggest that an unidentified noninfectious ligand generated by pulmonary contusion acts via TLR2 to generate inflammatory responses.

  10. Targeting apoptotic signalling pathway and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression as therapeutic intervention in TPE induced lung damage.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kishore; Krishnamoorthy, Bhavani; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Balakrishnan, Arun

    2003-01-01

    Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE) is an occult manifestation of filariasis, brought about by helminth parasites Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi. Treatment of patients suffering from TPE involves the administration of diethyl carbamazine and Ivermectin. Although the drugs are able to block acute inflammation, they are not able to alleviate chronic basal inflammation. We have attempted to examine the disease by targeting two important components; namely filarial parasitic sheath proteins (FPP) induced apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine response in human laryngeal carcinoma cells of epithelial origin (HEp-2) cells an epithelial cell line. Earlier studies by us have shown that FPP exposure induced apoptosis in these cells. In this study with hydrocortisone, calpain inhibitor (ALLN) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatments we demonstrate that apoptosis is inhibited as shown by [3H] thymidine incorporation studies, propidium iodide staining and Annexin V staining. Hydrocortisone at a dose, which inhibits cell death also down regulated, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings give us insights into the multifaceted approach one may adopt to target critical signalling molecules using appropriate inhibitors, which could eventually be used to reduce lung damage in TPE.

  11. The monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor JZL184 decreases inflammatory response in skeletal muscle contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Miao; Tian, Zhi-Ling; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Lin-Lin; Li, Shan-Shan; Liu, Min; Li, Jiao-Yong; Zhang, Meng-Zhou; Guan, Da-Wei

    2015-08-15

    Muscle wound healing process is a typical inflammation-evoked event. The monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor (4-nitrophenyl)4-[bis(1,3-benzodioxol -5-yl)-hydroxymethyl]piperidine-1-carboxylate (JZL184) has been previously reported to reduce inflammation in colitis and acute lung injury in mice, which provide a new strategy for primary care of skeletal muscle injury. We investigated the effect of JZL184 on inflammation in rat muscle contusion model, and found decreased neutrophil and macrophage infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. With extension of post-traumatic interval, myofiber regeneration was significantly hindered with increased collagen types I and ІІІ mRNAfibroblast infiltration as well as promoted fibrosis. Furthermore, 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-morpholin-4-ylpyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM281, a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist) and [6-iodo-2-methyl-1-(2-morpholin-4-ylethyl)indol-3-yl]-(4-methoxyphenyl)methanone (AM630, a selective cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist) treatment alleviated the anti-inflammatory effect of JZL184. Our findings demonstrate that JZL184 is able to inhibit the inflammatory response and interfere with contused muscle healing, in which the anti-inflammatory action may be mediated through cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Arterial stiffness and inflammatory response to psychophysiological stress.

    PubMed

    Ellins, Elizabeth; Halcox, Julian; Donald, Ann; Field, Bryony; Brydon, Lena; Deanfield, John; Steptoe, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    The processes through which psychological stress influences cardiovascular disease are poorly understood, but may involve activation of hemodynamic, neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses. We assessed the relationship between carotid arterial stiffness and inflammatory responses to acute psychophysiologic stress. Participants were 155 healthy men and women aged 55.3, SD 2.7 years. Blood samples for the assessment of plasma fibrinogen, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and interleukin (IL) 6 were drawn at baseline, immediately following standardized behavioral tasks, and 45 min later. Carotid artery stiffness was measured ultrasonically three years later, and blood pressure and heart rate responses were recorded. The tasks induced substantial increases in blood pressure and heart rate, together with increased fibrinogen, TNFalpha and IL-6 concentration. Carotid stiffness was positively associated with body mass, waist/hip ratio, blood pressure, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein, and inversely with high density lipoprotein and grade of employment. Baseline levels of inflammatory variables were not related to carotid artery stiffness. But carotid stiffness was greater in participants with larger fibrinogen (p=0.037) and TNFalpha (p=0.036) responses to psychophysiological stress. These effects were independent of age, gender, grade of employment, smoking, body mass, waist/hip ratio, systolic and diastolic pressure, high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein. There were no associations between carotid stiffness and stress responses in IL-6, blood pressure, or heart rate. We conclude that individual differences in inflammatory responses to psychophysiological stress are independently related to structural changes in artery walls that reflect increased cardiovascular disease risk.

  13. Targeted anti-inflammatory therapeutics in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Andrew L.; Caramori, Gaetano; Chung, Kian F.; Adcock, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway, although the drivers and site of the inflammation differ between diseases. Asthmatics with a neutrophilic airway inflammation are associated with a poor response to corticosteroids, whereas asthmatics with eosinophilic inflammation respond better to corticosteroids. Biologicals targeting the Th2-eosinophil nexus such as anti–interleukin (IL)-4, anti–IL-5, and anti–IL-13 are ineffective in asthma as a whole but are more effective if patients are selected using cellular (eg, eosinophils) or molecular (eg, periostin) biomarkers. This highlights the key role of individual inflammatory mediators in driving the inflammatory response and for accurate disease phenotyping to allow greater understanding of disease and development of patient-oriented antiasthma therapies. In contrast to asthmatic patients, corticosteroids are relatively ineffective in COPD patients. Despite stratification of COPD patients, the results of targeted therapy have proved disappointing with the exception of recent studies using CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonists. Currently, several other novel mediator-targeted drugs are undergoing clinical trials. As with asthma specifically targeted treatments may be of most benefit in specific COPD patient endotypes. The use of novel inflammatory mediator-targeted therapeutic agents in selected patients with asthma or COPD and the detection of markers of responsiveness or nonresponsiveness will allow a link between clinical phenotypes and pathophysiological mechanisms to be delineated reaching the goal of endotyping patients. PMID:26334389

  14. Targeted anti-inflammatory therapeutics in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Durham, Andrew L; Caramori, Gaetano; Chung, Kian F; Adcock, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway, although the drivers and site of the inflammation differ between diseases. Asthmatics with a neutrophilic airway inflammation are associated with a poor response to corticosteroids, whereas asthmatics with eosinophilic inflammation respond better to corticosteroids. Biologicals targeting the Th2-eosinophil nexus such as anti-interleukin (IL)-4, anti-IL-5, and anti-IL-13 are ineffective in asthma as a whole but are more effective if patients are selected using cellular (eg, eosinophils) or molecular (eg, periostin) biomarkers. This highlights the key role of individual inflammatory mediators in driving the inflammatory response and for accurate disease phenotyping to allow greater understanding of disease and development of patient-oriented antiasthma therapies. In contrast to asthmatic patients, corticosteroids are relatively ineffective in COPD patients. Despite stratification of COPD patients, the results of targeted therapy have proved disappointing with the exception of recent studies using CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonists. Currently, several other novel mediator-targeted drugs are undergoing clinical trials. As with asthma specifically targeted treatments may be of most benefit in specific COPD patient endotypes. The use of novel inflammatory mediator-targeted therapeutic agents in selected patients with asthma or COPD and the detection of markers of responsiveness or nonresponsiveness will allow a link between clinical phenotypes and pathophysiological mechanisms to be delineated reaching the goal of endotyping patients.

  15. Inflammatory and immune responses in the arterial media.

    PubMed

    Tellides, George; Pober, Jordan S

    2015-01-16

    Inflammatory arterial diseases differentially affect the compartments of the vessel wall. The intima and adventitia are commonly involved by the disease process, with luminal and microvascular endothelial cells playing a critical role in the recruitment and activation of leukocytes. In contrast, the avascular media is often spared by immune-mediated disorders. Surprisingly, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the predominant and often exclusive cell type of the media, are capable of robust proinflammatory responses to diverse stressors. The multiple cytokines and chemokines produced within the media can profoundly affect macrophage and T cell function, thus amplifying and shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. On the other hand, VSMCs and the extracellular matrix that they produce also display significant anti-inflammatory properties. The balance between the pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of VSMCs and their extracellular matrix versus the strength of the inciting immunologic events determines the pattern of medial pathology. Limitations on the extent of medial infiltration and injury, defined as medial immunoprivilege, are typically seen in arteriosclerotic diseases, such as atherosclerosis and transplant vasculopathy. Conversely, breakdown of medial immunoprivilege that manifests as more intense leukocytic infiltrates, loss of VSMCs, and destruction of the extracellular matrix architecture is a general feature of certain aneurysmal diseases and vasculitides. In this review, we consider the inflammatory and immune functions of VSMCs and how they may lead to medial immunoprivilege or medial inflammation in arterial diseases. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Oncostatin M in the anti-inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, A; Wallace, P

    2001-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OM) is a pleiotropic cytokine of the interleukin 6 family, whose in vivo properties and physiological function remain in dispute and poorly defined. These in vivo studies strongly suggest that OM is anabolic, promoting wound healing and bone formation, and anti-inflammatory. In models of inflammation OM is produced late in the cytokine response and protects from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced toxicities, promoting the re-establishment of homoeostasis by cooperating with proinflammatory cytokines and acute phase molecules to alter and attenuate the inflammatory response. Administration of OM inhibited bacterial LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor α and septic lethality in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with these findings, in animal models of chronic inflammatory disease OM potently suppressed inflammation and tissue destruction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. T cell function and antibody production were not impaired by OM treatment. Taken together, these data indicate that the activities of this cytokine in vivo are anti-inflammatory without concordant immunosuppression.

 PMID:11890661

  17. BMPRII influences the response of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells to inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Vengethasamy, Leanda; Hautefort, Aurélie; Tielemans, Birger; Belge, Catharina; Perros, Frédéric; Verleden, Stijn; Fadel, Elie; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Delcroix, Marion; Quarck, Rozenn

    2016-11-01

    Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR2) gene have been observed in 70 % of patients with heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) and in 11-40 % with idiopathic PAH (IPAH). However, carriers of a BMPR2 mutation have only 20 % risk of developing PAH. Since inflammatory mediators are increased and predict survival in PAH, they could act as a second hit inducing the development of pulmonary hypertension in BMPR2 mutation carriers. Our specific aim was to determine whether inflammatory mediators could contribute to pulmonary vascular cell dysfunction in PAH patients with and without a BMPR2 mutation. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMEC) and arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) were isolated from lung parenchyma of transplanted PAH patients, carriers of a BMPR2 mutation or not, and from lobectomy patients or lung donors. The effects of CRP and TNFα on mitogenic activity, adhesiveness capacity, and expression of adhesion molecules were investigated in PMECs and PASMCs. PMECs from BMPR2 mutation carriers induced an increase in PASMC mitogenic activity; moreover, endothelin-1 secretion by PMECs from carriers was higher than by PMECs from non-carriers. Recruitment of monocytes by PMECs isolated from carriers was higher compared to PMECs from non-carriers and from controls, with an elevated ICAM-1 expression. CRP increased adhesion of monocytes to PMECs in carriers and non-carriers, and TNFα only in carriers. PMEC from BMPR2 mutation carriers have enhanced adhesiveness for monocytes in response to inflammatory mediators, suggesting that BMPR2 mutation could generate susceptibility to an inflammatory insult in PAH.

  18. Pro-inflammatory responses of human bronchial epithelial cells to acute nitrogen dioxide exposure.

    PubMed

    Ayyagari, Vijayalakshmi N; Januszkiewicz, Adolph; Nath, Jayasree

    2004-04-15

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental oxidant, known to be associated with lung epithelial injury. In the present study, cellular pro-inflammatory responses following exposure to a brief high concentration of NO2 (45 ppm) were assessed, using normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells as an in vitro model of inhalation injury. Generation and release of pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), IL-8, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-1beta were assessed at different time intervals following NO2 exposure. Effects of a pre-existing inflammatory condition was tested by treating the NHBE cells with different inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-gamma, IL-8, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, either alone or in combination, before exposing them to NO2. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed oxidant-induced formation of 3-nitrotyrosine in the NO2-exposed cells. A marked increase in the levels of nitrite (as an index of NO) and IL-8 were observed in the NO2-exposed cells, which were further enhanced in the presence of the cytokines. Effects of various NO inhibitors combined, with immunofluorescence and Western blotting data, indicated partial contribution of the nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) toward the observed increase in nitrite levels. Furthermore, a significant increase in IL-1beta and TNF-alpha generation was observed in the NO2-exposed cells. Although NO2 exposure alone did induce slight cytotoxicity (<12%), but presence of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma resulted in an increased cell death (28-36%). These results suggest a synergistic role of inflammatory mediators, particularly of NO and IL-8, in NO2-mediated early cellular changes. Our results also demonstrate an increased sensitivity of the cytokine-treated NHBE cells toward NO2, which may have significant functional implications in vivo.

  19. Endothelial FoxM1 Mediates Bone Marrow Progenitor Cell-Induced Vascular Repair and Resolution of Inflammation following Inflammatory Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yidan D.; Huang, Xiaojia; Yi, Fan; Dai, Zhiyu; Qian, Zhijian; Tiruppathi, Chinnaswamy; Tran, Khiem; Zhao, You-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cell treatment is a potential novel therapeutic approach for acute respiratory distress syndrome. Given the extremely low rate of cell engraftment, it is believed that these cells exert their beneficial effects via paracrine mechanisms. However, the endogenous mediator(s) in the pulmonary vasculature remains unclear. Employing the mouse model with endothelial cell (EC)-restricted disruption of FoxM1 (FoxM1 CKO), here we show that endothelial expression of the reparative transcriptional factor FoxM1 is required for the protective effects of bone marrow progenitor cells (BMPC) against LPS-induced inflammatory lung injury and mortality. BMPC treatment resulted in rapid induction of FoxM1 expression in WT but not FoxM1 CKO lungs. BMPC-induced inhibition of lung vascular injury, resolution of lung inflammation, and survival, as seen in WT mice, were abrogated in FoxM1 CKO mice following LPS challenge. Mechanistically, BMPC treatment failed to induce lung EC proliferation in FoxM1 CKO mice, which was associated with impaired expression of FoxM1 target genes essential for cell cycle progression. We also observed that BMPC treatment enhanced endothelial barrier function in WT, but not in FoxM1-deficient EC monolayers. Restoration of β-catenin expression in FoxM1-deficient ECs normalized endothelial barrier enhancement in response to BMPC treatment. These data demonstrate the requisite role of endothelial FoxM1 in the mechanism of BMPC-induced vascular repair to restore vascular integrity and accelerate resolution of inflammation, thereby promoting survival following inflammatory lung injury. PMID:24578354

  20. Assessment of lung tumor response by perfusion CT.

    PubMed

    Coche, E

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion CT permits evaluation of lung cancer angiogenesis and response to therapy by demonstrating alterations in lung tumor vascularity. It is advocated that perfusion CT performed shortly after initiating therapy may provide a better evaluation of physiological changes rather than the conventional size assessment obtained with RECIST. The radiation dose,the volume of contrast medium delivered to the patient and the reproducibility of blood flow parameters remain an issue for this type of investigation.

  1. Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R.; Lin, Yong; Wilder, Julie; Belinsky, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Our main research objective was to determine the biological bases for low-dose, radiation-induced adaptive responses in the lung, and use the knowledge gained to produce an improved risk model for radiation-induced lung cancer that accounts for activated natural protection, genetic influences, and the role of epigenetic regulation (epiregulation). Currently, low-dose radiation risk assessment is based on the linear-no-threshold hypothesis, which now is known to be unsupported by a large volume of data.

  2. Biocompatibility, Inflammatory Response, and Recannalization Characteristics of Nonradioactive Resin Microspheres: Histological Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Jose I.; Martino, Alba de; Luis, Esther de; Diaz-Dorronsoro, Lourdes; Alonso-Burgos, Alberto; Martinez de la Cuesta, Antonio; Sangro, Bruno; Garcia de Jalon, Jose A.

    2009-07-15

    Intra-arterial radiotherapy with yttrium-90 microspheres (radioembolization) is a therapeutic procedure exclusively applied to the liver that allows the direct delivery of high-dose radiation to liver tumors, by means of endovascular catheters, selectively placed within the tumor vasculature. The aim of the study was to describe the distribution of spheres within the precapillaries, inflammatory response, and recannalization characteristics after embolization with nonradioactive resin microspheres in the kidney and liver. We performed a partial embolization of the liver and kidney vessels in nine white pigs. The left renal and left hepatic arteries were catheterized and filled with nonradioactive resin microspheres. Embolization was defined as the initiation of near-stasis of blood flow, rather than total occlusion of the vessels. The hepatic circulation was not isolated so that the effects of reflux of microspheres into stomach could be observed. Animals were sacrificed at 48 h, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks, and tissue samples from the kidney, liver, lung, and stomach evaluated. Microscopic evaluation revealed clusters of 10-30 microspheres (15-30 {mu}m in diameter) in the small vessels of the kidney (the arciform arteries, vasa recti, and glomerular afferent vessels) and liver. Aggregates were associated with focal ischemia and mild vascular wall damage. Occlusion of the small vessels was associated with a mild perivascular inflammatory reaction. After filling of the left hepatic artery with microspheres, there was some evidence of arteriovenous shunting into the lungs, and one case of cholecystitis and one case of marked gastritis and ulceration at the site of arterial occlusion due to the presence of clusters of microspheres. Beyond 48 h, microspheres were progressively integrated into the vascular wall by phagocytosis and the lumen recannalized. Eight-week evaluation found that the perivascular inflammatory reaction was mild. Liver cell damage, bile duct injury, and

  3. Biomarkers and Autoantibodies of Interstitial Lung Disease with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Yoshifuji, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Various autoantibodies are seen in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Among myositis-specific antibodies, anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and anti-melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5) antibodies are associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Anti-MDA5 antibodies are associated with dermatomyositis (DM) or clinically amyopathic DM complicated with rapidly progressive ILD. In anti-MDA5-positive patients, a random ground-glass attenuation pattern is a characteristic finding of ILD in chest high-resolution computed tomography. Conversely, anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies are not associated with rapidly progressive ILD but with chronic ILD. DM or clinically amyopathic DM patients with anti-MDA5, and characteristic high-resolution computed tomography findings are highly likely to have devastating ILD and need aggressive treatment. PMID:27081322

  4. Benfotiamine Attenuates Inflammatory Response in LPS Stimulated BV-2 Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Laketa, Danijela; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Milenkovic, Ivan; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), recognized as key elements in the regulation of neural homeostasis and the response to injury and repair. As excessive activation of microglia may lead to neurodegeneration, therapeutic strategies targeting its inhibition were shown to improve treatment of most neurodegenerative diseases. Benfotiamine is a synthetic vitamin B1 (thiamine) derivate exerting potentially anti-inflammatory effects. Despite the encouraging results regarding benfotiamine potential to alleviate diabetic microangiopathy, neuropathy and other oxidative stress-induced pathological conditions, its activities and cellular mechanisms during microglial activation have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of benfotiamine were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine BV-2 microglia. We determined that benfotiamine remodels activated microglia to acquire the shape that is characteristic of non-stimulated BV-2 cells. In addition, benfotiamine significantly decreased production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO; cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), tumor necrosis factor alpha α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), whereas it increased anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) production in LPS stimulated BV-2 microglia. Moreover, benfotiamine suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and protein kinase B Akt/PKB. Treatment with specific inhibitors revealed that benfotiamine-mediated suppression of NO production was via JNK1/2 and Akt pathway, while the cytokine suppression includes ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Akt pathways. Finally, the potentially protective effect is mediated by the suppression of translocation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in the nucleus. Therefore, benfotiamine may

  5. Innate type 2 response to Alternaria extract enhances ryegrass-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Kyoo; Lund, Sean; Baum, Rachel; Rosenthal, Peter; Khorram, Naseem; Doherty, Taylor A

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to the fungal allergen Alternaria alternata as well as ryegrass pollen has been implicated in severe asthma symptoms during thunderstorms. We have previously shown that Alternaria extract induces innate type 2 lung inflammation in mice. We hypothesized that the innate eosinophilic response to Alternaria extract may enhance lung inflammation induced by ryegrass. Mice were sensitized to ryegrass allergen and administered a single challenge with A. alternata extract before or after final ryegrass challenges. Levels of eosinophils, neutrophils, Th2 cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) as well as inflammation and mucus were assessed. Mice receiving ryegrass sensitization and challenge developed an eosinophilic lung response. A single challenge with Alternaria extract given 3 days before or 3 days after ryegrass challenges resulted in increased eosinophils, peribronchial inflammation and mucus production in the airways compared with ryegrass-only challenges. Type 2 ILC2 and Th2 cell recruitment to the airways was increased after Alternaria extract exposure in ryegrass-challenged mice. Innate immune challenges with Alternaria extract induced BAL eosinophilia, Th2 cell recruitment as well as ILC2 expansion and proliferation. A single exposure to Alternaria extract in ryegrass-sensitized and -challenged mice enhances the type 2 lung inflammatory response, including airway eosinophilia, peribronchial infiltrate, and mucus production, possibly through Th2 cell recruitment and ILC2 expansion. If translated to humans, exposure to both grass pollen and Alternaria may be a potential cause of thunderstorm-related asthma.

  6. Innate Type-2 Response to Alternaria Extract Enhances Ryegrass-induced Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Kyoo; Lund, Sean; Baum, Rachel; Rosenthal, Peter; Khorram, Naseem; Doherty, Taylor A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to the fungal allergen Alternaria alternata as well as ryegrass pollen has been implicated in severe asthma symptoms during thunderstorms. We have previously shown that Alternaria extract induces innate type 2 lung inflammation in mice. We hypothesized that the innate eosinophilic response to Alternaria extract may enhance lung inflammation induced by ryegrass. Methods Mice were sensitized to ryegrass allergen and administered a single challenge with Alternaria alternata extract before or after final ryegrass challenges. Levels of BAL eosinophils, neutrophils, Th2 cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), IL-5 and IL-13 as well as inflammation and mucus were assessed. Results Mice receiving ryegrass sensitization and challenge developed an eosinophilic lung response. A single challenge with Alternaria extract given 3 days before or 3 days after ryegrass challenges resulted in increased eosinophils, peribronchial inflammation and mucus production in the airway compared with ryegrass only challenges. Type 2 innate lymphoid cell (ILC2) and Th2 cell recruitment to the airway was increased after Alternaria extract exposure in ryegrass challenged mice. Innate challenges with Alternaria extract induced BAL eosinophilia, Th2 cell recruitment as well as ILC2 expansion and proliferation. Conclusions A single exposure of Alternaria extract in ryegrass sensitized and challenged mice enhances the type-2 lung inflammatory response including airway eosinophilia, peribronchial infiltrate, and mucus production possibly through Th2 cell recruitment and ILC2 expansion. If translated to humans, exposures to both grass pollen and Alternaria may be a potential cause of thunderstorm-related asthma. PMID:24296722

  7. PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS ENHANCE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES IN HUMAN LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemistry of hazardous air pollutants has been studied for many years, yet little is known about how these chemicals, once interacted with urban atmospheres, affect healthy and susceptible individuals. During this study, environmental irradiation chambers (also called smog ch...

  8. PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS ENHANCE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES IN HUMAN LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemistry of hazardous air pollutants has been studied for many years, yet little is known about how these chemicals, once interacted with urban atmospheres, affect healthy and susceptible individuals. During this study, environmental irradiation chambers (also called smog ch...

  9. Suppression of IRG-1 Reduces Inflammatory Cell Infiltration and Lung Injury in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection by Reducing Production of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ke; Lv, Yuanzi; Zhuo, Yujie; Chen, Changmai; Shi, Hengfei; Guo, Lin; Yang, Guang; Hou, Yayi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a common cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants and children. RSV is a negative-sense, single-strand RNA (ssRNA) virus that mainly infects airway epithelial cells. Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is a major factor for pulmonary inflammation and tissue damage of RSV disease. We investigated immune-responsive gene-1 (IRG1) expression during RSV infection, since IRG1 has been shown to mediate innate immune response to intracellular bacterial pathogens by modulating ROS and itaconic acid production. We found that RSV infection induced IRG1 expression in human A549 cells and in the lung tissues of RSV-infected mice. RSV infection or IRG1 overexpression promoted ROS production. Accordingly, knockdown of IRG1 induction blocked RSV-induced ROS production and proinflammatory cytokine gene expression. Finally, we showed that suppression of IRG1 induction reduced immune cell infiltration and prevented lung injury in RSV-infected mice. These results therefore link IRG1 induction to ROS production and immune lung injury after RSV infection. IMPORTANCE RSV infection is among the most common causes of childhood diseases. Recent studies identify ROS production as a factor contributing to RSV disease. We investigated the cause of ROS production and identified IRG1 as a critical factor linking ROS production to immune lung injury after RSV infection. We found that IRG1 was induced in A549 alveolar epithelial cells and in mouse lungs after RSV infection. Importantly, suppression of IRG1 induction reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and lung injury in mice. This study links IRG1 induction to oxidative damage and RSV disease. It also uncovers a potential therapeutic target in reducing RSV-caused lung injury. PMID:27252532

  10. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2–eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2–eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  11. Additive anti-inflammatory effect of formoterol and budesonide on human lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Spoelstra, F; Postma, D; Hovenga, H; Noordhoek, J; Kauffman, H

    2002-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that treatment with a long acting ß2 agonist in addition to a glucocorticoid is beneficial in the treatment of asthma. In asthma inflammatory cells, particularly eosinophils, migrate into the pulmonary tissue and airway lumen by means of adhesion molecules expressed on resident tissue cells—that is, fibroblasts—and become activated by cytokines and adhesive interactions. A study was undertaken to determine whether an interaction exists between the long acting ß2 agonist formoterol and the glucocorticoid budesonide on inhibition of adhesion molecule expression, as well as chemo/cytokine production by human lung fibroblasts. Methods: Lung fibroblasts were preincubated with therapeutically relevant drug concentrations of 10-8 M to 10-10 M. Cells were stimulated with interleukin (IL)-1ß (1 or 10 U/ml) for 8 hours and supernatants were collected for measurement of GM-CSF and IL-8 concentrations. The cells were fixed and subjected to a cell surface ELISA technique to measure the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Results: Formoterol exerted an additive effect on the inhibition of IL-1ß stimulated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 upregulation and GM-CSF production by budesonide in concentrations of 10-9 M and above (p<0.05). IL-8 production was not influenced by formoterol. Conclusion: Formoterol exerts an additive effect on the anti-inflammatory properties of budesonide. In vitro data support the finding that the combination of budesonide and formoterol in asthma treatment strengthens the beneficial effect of either drug alone. PMID:11867828

  12. Oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy for lung disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lands, Larry C; Stanojevic, Sanja

    2013-06-13

    Progressive lung damage causes most deaths in cystic fibrosis (CF). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may prevent progressive pulmonary deterioration and morbidity in CF. To assess the effectiveness of treatment with NSAIDs in CF. We searched the Cochrane CF and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, hand searches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We contacted manufacturers of NSAIDs.Latest search of the Group's Trials Register: 15 May 2013. Randomized controlled trials comparing oral NSAIDs, at any dose for at least two months, to placebo in people with CF. Two authors independently assessed trials for the review. The searches identified eight trials; five are included (334 participants aged five to 39 years; maximum follow up of four years). Three trials compared ibuprofen to placebo (two from the same centre with some of the same participants); one trial assessed piroxicam versus placebo, a fifth trial compared cycloxygenase-2 inhibitor nimesulide and clarithromycin. The three ibuprofen trials were deemed to have good or adequate methodological quality, but used various outcomes and summary measures. Reviewers considered measures of lung function, nutritional status, radiological assessment of pulmonary involvement, intravenous antibiotic usage, hospital admissions, survival and adverse effects. Combined data from the two largest ibuprofen trials showed a significantly lower annual rate of decline for lung function, % predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) mean difference (MD) 1.32 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21 to 2.42); forced vital capacity (FVC) MD 1.27 (95% CI 0.26 to 2.28); forced expiratory flow (25-75%) MD 1.80 (95% CI 0.15 to 3.45). The post-hoc analysis of data from two trials split by age showed a statistically significant slower rate of annual decline of % predicted FEV1 and FVC in the ibuprofen group

  13. Associations between periodontitis and systemic inflammatory diseases: response to treatment.

    PubMed

    El-Shinnawi, Una; Soory, Mena

    2013-09-01

    There is a significant prevalence of subjects with periodontitis presenting with other inflammatory conditions such as coronary heart disease, insulin resistance and arthritis. This pattern of disease presentation underscores the importance of inflammatory loading from chronic diseases, in driving their pathogeneses in a multidirectional manner. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and other agents play an important role in this process; for example, a single nucleotide polymorphism of the TNF-α gene is associated with significant periodontal attachment loss in patients with coronary heart disease. Changes in gene expression associated with inflammation and lipid metabolism in response to oral infection with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) have been demonstrated in mouse models, independent of the demonstration of atherosclerotic lesions. Insulin resistance is considered to be a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition, associated with altered glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, central obesity and coronary heart disease. It is accompanied by elevated levels of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α also relevant to the progression of periodontitis. There is evidence that uncontrolled periodontal disease contributes to maintenance of systemic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with increased risk of periodontitis in subjects with RA. The periodontal pathogen Pg is significant in contributing to citrullination of proteins resulting in immune dysregulation and autoimmune responses, seen in RA. However, they are both multifactorial chronic diseases with complex etiopathogeneses that affect their presentation. Consistent but weak associations are seen for surrogate markers of periodontitis such as tooth loss, with multiple systemic conditions. Effective treatment of periodontitis would be important in reducing systemic inflammatory loading from chronic local inflammation and in achieving systemic health. Lack of a consistent cause and effect relationship

  14. Post-mating inflammatory responses of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Katila, T

    2012-08-01

    This review attempts to summarize the current knowledge on uterine inflammatory response after mating in horses, pigs and cattle. Post-mating endometritis has been extensively studied in horses as it has been considered to cause infertility. The inflammation is known to occur also in cattle, but it has not been investigated to a similar extent. There are a number of publications about mechanisms of post-mating uterine inflammation in pigs, which seem to resemble those in horses. The major focus of this review is the horse, but relevant literature is presented also on swine and cattle. Spermatozoa, seminal plasma and semen extenders play roles in the induction of inflammation. In addition, sperm numbers, concentration and viability, as well as the site of semen deposition may modulate the inflammatory response. Cytokines, polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and mononuclear cells represent the uterine inflammatory response to mating. Inflammation is the first line of defence against invasion and eliminates excess spermatozoa and bacteria. Semen deposition elicits a massive PMN invasion, followed by phagocytosis of sperm aided by the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. Exposure of the female genital tract to semen is important also for endometrial receptivity and pre-implantation embryo development. Seminal plasma (SP) and inflammation elicit transient immune tolerance to antigens present in semen. SP contains immune-regulatory molecules that activate and control immune responses to antigens by stimulating expression of cytokines and growth factors and by initiating tissue remodelling. SP also regulates ovarian function. Effective elimination of excess sperm and inflammatory by-products and subsequent rapid return of the endometrium to the normal state is a prerequisite for pregnancy. Uterine backflow, driven by myometrial contractions and requiring a patent cervix, is an important physical tool in uterine drainage.

  15. The role of Peroxiredoxin 4 in inflammatory response and aging

    PubMed Central

    Klichko, Vladimir I.; Orr, William C.; Radyuk, Svetlana N.

    2015-01-01

    In prior studies, we determined that moderate overexpression of the Drosophila endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized peroxiredoxin (Prx), dPrx4, reduced oxidative damage and conferred beneficial effects on lifespan, while high level expression increased the incidence of tissue-specific apoptosis and dramatically shortened longevity. The detrimental pro-apoptotic and life-shortening effects were attributed to aberrant localization of dPrx4 and the apparent ER stress elicited by dPrx4 overexpression. In addition, activation of both the NF-κB- and JAK/STAT- mediated stress responses was detected, although it wasn’t clear whether these served as functional alarm signals. Here we extend these findings to show that activation of the NF-κB -dependent immunity-related/inflammatory genes, associated with lifespan shortening effects, is dependent on the activity of a Drosophila NF-κB ortholog, Relish. In the absence of Relish, the pro-inflammatory effects typically elicited by dPrx4 overexpression were not detected. The absence of Relish not only prevented hyperactivation of the immunity-related genes but also significantly rescued the severe shortening of lifespan normally observed in dPrx4 over-expressors. Overactivation of the immune/inflammatory responses was also lessened by JAK/STAT signaling. In addition we found that cellular immune/pro-inflammatory responses provoked by the oxidant paraquat but not bacteria are mediated via dPrx4 activity in the ER, as up-regulation of the immune-related genes was eliminated in flies underexpressing dPrx4 whereas immune responses triggered by bacteria were unaffected. Finally, efforts to reveal critical tissues where dPrx4 modulates longevity showed that broad targeting of dPrx4 to neuronal tissue had strong beneficial effects, while targeting expression to the fat body had deleterious effects. PMID:26689888

  16. Citrate modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced monocyte inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, M J; McDonough, K L; Pituch, J J; Christopherson, P L; Cornell, T T; Selewski, D T; Shanley, T P; Blatt, N B

    2015-01-01

    Citrate, a central component of cellular metabolism, is a widely used anti-coagulant due to its ability to chelate calcium. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-citrate lyase, which metabolizes citrate, has been shown to be essential for inflammation, but the ability of exogenous citrate to impact inflammatory signalling cascades remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that citrate would modulate inflammatory responses as both a cellular metabolite and calcium chelator, and tested this hypothesis by determining how clinically relevant levels of citrate modulate monocyte proinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a human acute monocytic leukaemia cell line (THP-1). In normal medium (0·4 mM calcium), citrate inhibited LPS-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8 transcripts, whereas in medium supplemented with calcium (1·4 mM), TNF-α and IL-8 levels increased and appeared independent of calcium chelation. Using an IL-8–luciferase plasmid construct, the same increased response was observed in the activation of the IL-8 promoter region, suggesting transcriptional regulation. Tricarballylic acid, an inhibitor of ATP-citrate lyase, blocked the ability of citrate to augment TNF-α, linking citrate's augmentation effect with its metabolism by ATP-citrate lyase. In the presence of citrate, increased histone acetylation was observed in the TNF-α and IL-8 promoter regions of THP-1 cells. We observed that citrate can both augment and inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production via modulation of inflammatory gene transactivation. These findings suggest that citrate anti-coagulation may alter immune function through complex interactions with the inflammatory response. PMID:25619261

  17. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Erika M.; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. Results: GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Innovation: Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions: Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351–363. PMID:27758118

  18. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  19. Impaired Clearance and Enhanced Pulmonary Inflammatory/Fibrotic Response to Carbon Nanotubes in Myeloperoxidase-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Feng, Wei Hong; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley R.; Mercer, Robert R.; St. Croix, Claudette M.; Lang, Megan A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Konduru, Nagarjun V.; Allen, Brett L.; Conroy, Jennifer; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Mohamed, Bashir M.; Meade, Aidan D.; Volkov, Yuri; Star, Alexander; Fadeel, Bengt; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of biomedical applications of carbonaceous nanomaterials is hampered by their biopersistence and pro-inflammatory action in vivo. Here, we used myeloperoxidase knockout B6.129X1-MPO (MPO k/o) mice and showed that oxidation and clearance of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) from the lungs of these animals after pharyngeal aspiration was markedly less effective whereas the inflammatory response was more robust than in wild-type C57Bl/6 mice. Our results provide direct evidence for the participation of MPO – one of the key-orchestrators of inflammatory response – in the in vivo pulmonary oxidative biodegradation of SWCNT and suggest new ways to control the biopersistence of nanomaterials through genetic or pharmacological manipulations. PMID:22479306

  20. Isorhamnetin ameliorates LPS-induced inflammatory response through downregulation of NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Chi, Gefu; Shen, Bingyu; Tian, Ye; Feng, Haihua

    2016-08-01

    Isorhamnetin, a flavonoid mainly found in Hippophae fhamnoides L. fruit, has been known for its antioxidant activity and its ability to regulate immune response. In this study, we investigated whether isorhamnetin exerts potent antiinflammatory effects in RAW264.7 cell and mouse model stimulated by LPS. The cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) levels were determined. In the mouse model of acute lung injury, the phosphorylation of NF-κB proteins was analyzed and inhibitor of NF-κB signaling (PDTC) was used on mice. Our results showed that isorhamnetin markedly decreased TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations and suppressed the activation of NF-κB signaling. Meanwhile, isorhamnetin reduced the amount of inflammatory cells, the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, protein leakage, and myeloperoxidase activity. Interference with specific inhibitor revealed that isorhamnetin-mediated suppression of cytokines and protein was via NF-κB signaling. So, it suggests that isorhamnetin might be a potential therapeutic agent for preventing inflammatory diseases.

  1. The cellular inflammatory response in human spinal cords after injury.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jennifer C; Norenberg, Michael D; Ramsay, David A; Dekaban, Gregory A; Marcillo, Alexander E; Saenz, Alvaro D; Pasquale-Styles, Melissa; Dietrich, W Dalton; Weaver, Lynne C

    2006-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) provokes an inflammatory response that generates substantial secondary damage within the cord but also may contribute to its repair. Anti-inflammatory treatment of human SCI and its timing must be based on knowledge of the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the time after injury when they appear and then decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. Using post-mortem spinal cords, we evaluated the time course and distribution of pathological change, infiltrating neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes, and microglial activation in injured spinal cords from patients who were 'dead at the scene' or who survived for intervals up to 1 year after SCI. SCI caused zones of pathological change, including areas of inflammation and necrosis in the acute cases, and cystic cavities with longer survival (Zone 1), mantles of less severe change, including axonal swellings, inflammation and Wallerian degeneration (Zone 2) and histologically intact areas (Zone 3). Zone 1 areas increased in size with time after injury whereas the overall injury (size of the Zones 1 and 2 combined) remained relatively constant from the time (1-3 days) when damage was first visible. The distribution of inflammatory cells correlated well with the location of Zone 1, and sometimes of Zone 2. Neutrophils, visualized by their expression of human neutrophil alpha-defensins (defensin), entered the spinal cord by haemorrhage or extravasation, were most numerous 1-3 days after SCI, and were detectable for up to 10 days after SCI. Significant numbers of activated CD68-immunoreactive ramified microglia and a few monocytes/macrophages were in injured tissue within 1-3 days of SCI. Activated microglia, a few monocytes/macrophages and numerous phagocytic macrophages were present for weeks to months after SCI. A few CD8(+) lymphocytes were in the injured cords throughout the sampling intervals. Expression by the inflammatory cells of the oxidative

  2. Effect of lung transplantation on heart rate response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Hilary F; Gonzalez-Costello, Jose; Thirapatarapong, Wilawan; Jorde, Ulrich P; Bartels, Matthew N

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate if patients have a change in percent of predicted heart rate reserve used at peak exercise (%HRR) after lung transplantation, even at matching workloads. Lung disease of obstructive, restrictive, and mixed types may be associated with an autonomic imbalance. Lung transplantation may improve the effects of pulmonary disease on cardiac function. However, the effect of lung transplantation on heart rate responses during exercise has not been investigated in detail. Retrospective review of patients who underwent lung transplantation. Pre and post transplant cardiopulmonary exercise tests were reviewed. The %HRR significantly improved by a median of 37% (p < 0.001) following lung transplantation. When matching workloads were analyzed, the %HRR also decreased from a median of 36% to 24% (p < 0.001). Corresponding to an increase in peak exercise capacity, percentage of heart rate reserve used improves significantly after lung transplantation, even at matching workloads, indicating a likely improvement in autonomic modulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanobiology in Lung Epithelial Cells: Measurements, Perturbations, and Responses

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Christopher M.; Roan, Esra; Navajas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells of the lung are located at the interface between the environment and the organism and serve many important functions including barrier protection, fluid balance, clearance of particulate, initiation of immune responses, mucus and surfactant production, and repair following injury. Because of the complex structure of the lung and its cyclic deformation during the respiratory cycle, epithelial cells are exposed to continuously varying levels of mechanical stresses. While normal lung function is maintained under these conditions, changes in mechanical stresses can have profound effects on the function of epithelial cells and therefore the function of the organ. In this review, we will describe the types of stresses and strains in the lungs, how these are transmitted, and how these may vary in human disease or animal models. Many approaches have been developed to better understand how cells sense and respond to mechanical stresses, and we will discuss these approaches and how they have been used to study lung epithelial cells in culture. Understanding how cells sense and respond to changes in mechanical stresses will contribute to our understanding of the role of lung epithelial cells during normal function and development and how their function may change in diseases such as acute lung injury, asthma, emphysema, and fibrosis. PMID:23728969

  4. Dexamethasone down-regulates the inflammatory mediators but fails to reduce the tissue injury in the lung of acute pancreatitis rat models.

    PubMed

    Yubero, Sara; Manso, Manuel A; Ramudo, Laura; Vicente, Secundino; De Dios, Isabel

    2012-08-01

    Pulmonary complications are frequent in the course of acute pancreatitis. We investigate the effects of dexamethasone on lung injury in mild and severe AP. Mild and severe acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction and infusion of 3.5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct, respectively. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) was given by intramuscular injection 1 h after acute pancreatitis. Plasma amylase activity was measured to evaluate the pancreas damage. Lungs were harvested for analysing mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC), P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (as index of neutrophil infiltration) and histological examination. Dexamethasone reduced the hyperamylasemia and hindered the pulmonary upregulation of MCP-1, CINC, P-selectin and ICAM-1, in both mild and severe acute pancreatitis. Despite this, dexamethasone treatment failed to reduce MPO activity and histological alterations developed in lungs during acute pancreatitis, either in bile-pancreatic duct obstruction or sodium taurocholate model. We conclude that pulmonary local factors different from inflammatory mediators contribute to leukocyte recruitment, so that although dexamethasone down-regulated the lung expression of chemokines and adhesion molecules during acute pancreatitis it was not able to prevent leukocyte infiltration, which could be responsible for maintaining the lung injury in either mild or severe acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Downregulation of Mcl-1 has anti-inflammatory pro-resolution effects and enhances bacterial clearance from the lung.

    PubMed

    Lucas, C D; Dorward, D A; Tait, M A; Fox, S; Marwick, J A; Allen, K C; Robb, C T; Hirani, N; Haslett, C; Duffin, R; Rossi, A G

    2014-07-01

    Phagocytes not only coordinate acute inflammation and host defense at mucosal sites, but also contribute to tissue damage. Respiratory infection causes a globally significant disease burden and frequently progresses to acute respiratory distress syndrome, a devastating inflammatory condition characterized by neutrophil recruitment and accumulation of protein-rich edema fluid causing impaired lung function. We hypothesized that targeting the intracellular protein myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) by a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (AT7519) or a flavone (wogonin) would accelerate neutrophil apoptosis and resolution of established inflammation, but without detriment to bacterial clearance. Mcl-1 loss induced human neutrophil apoptosis, but did not induce macrophage apoptosis nor impair phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. Neutrophil-dominant inflammation was modelled in mice by either endotoxin or bacteria (Escherichia coli). Downregulating inflammatory cell Mcl-1 had anti-inflammatory, pro-resolution effects, shortening the resolution interval (Ri) from 19 to 7 h and improved organ dysfunction with enhanced alveolar-capillary barrier integrity. Conversely, attenuating drug-induced Mcl-1 downregulation inhibited neutrophil apoptosis and delayed resolution of endotoxin-mediated lung inflammation. Importantly, manipulating lung inflammatory cell Mcl-1 also accelerated resolution of bacterial infection (Ri; 50 to 16 h) concurrent with enhanced bacterial clearance. Therefore, manipulating inflammatory cell Mcl-1 accelerates inflammation resolution without detriment to host defense against bacteria, and represents a target for treating infection-associated inflammation.

  6. Mechanisms of lung neutrophil activation after hemorrhage or endotoxemia: roles of reactive oxygen intermediates, NF-kappa B, and cyclic AMP response element binding protein.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Abraham, E

    1999-07-15

    Acute inflammatory lung injury occurs frequently in the setting of severe infection or blood loss. Accumulation of activated neutrophils in the lungs and increased pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine levels are major characteristics of acute lung injury. In the present experiments, we examined mechanisms leading to neutrophil accumulation and activation in the lungs after endotoxemia or hemorrhage. Levels of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 mRNA were increased in lung neutrophils from endotoxemic or hemorrhaged mice compared with those present in lung neutrophils from control mice or in peripheral blood neutrophils from endotoxemic, hemorrhaged, or control mice. The transcriptional regulatory factors NF-kappa B and cAMP response element binding protein were activated in lung but not blood neutrophils after hemorrhage or endotoxemia. Xanthine oxidase inhibition, achieved by feeding allopurinol or tungsten-containing diets, did not affect neutrophil trafficking to the lungs after hemorrhage or endotoxemia. Xanthine oxidase inhibition did prevent hemorrhage- but not endotoxemia-induced increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression among lung neutrophils. Hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-associated activation of NF-kappa B in lung neutrophils was not affected by inhibition of xanthine oxidase. cAMP response element binding protein activation was increased after hemorrhage, but not endotoxemia, in mice fed xanthine oxidase-inhibiting diets. Our results indicate that xanthine oxidase modulates cAMP response element binding protein activation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in lung neutrophils after hemorrhage, but not endotoxemia. These findings suggest that the mechanisms leading to acute inflammatory lung injury after hemorrhage differ from those associated with endotoxemia.

  7. Palmitate promotes inflammatory responses and cellular senescence in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Marina; Vinge, Leif Erik; Alfsnes, Katrine; Olsen, Maria Belland; Eide, Lars; Kaasbøll, Ole Jørgen; Attramadal, Håvard; Torp, May-Kristin; Fosshaug, Linn E; Rashidi, Azita; Lien, Egil; Finsen, Alexandra Vanessa; Sandanger, Øystein; Aukrust, Pål; Ranheim, Trine; Yndestad, Arne

    2017-02-01

    Palmitate triggers inflammatory responses in several cell types, but its effects on cardiac fibroblasts are at present unknown. The aims of the study were to (1) assess the potential of palmitate to promote inflammatory signaling in cardiac fibroblasts through TLR4 and the NLRP3 inflammasome and (2) characterize the cellular phenotype of cardiac fibroblasts exposed to palmitate. We examined whether palmitate induces inflammatory responses in cardiac fibroblasts from WT, NLRP3(-/-) and ASC(-/-)mice (C57BL/6 background). Exposure to palmitate caused production of TNF, IL-6 and CXCL2 via TLR4 activation. NLRP3 inflammasomes are activated in a two-step manner. Whereas palmitate did not prime the NLRP3 inflammasome, it induced activation in LPS-primed cardiac fibroblasts as indicated by IL-1β, IL-18 production and NLRP3-ASC co-localization. Palmitate-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in LPS-primed cardiac fibroblasts was associated with reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction. The cardiac fibroblast phenotype caused by palmitate, in an LPS and NLRP3 independent manner, was characterized by decreased cellular proliferation, contractility, collagen and MMP-2 expression, as well as increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, and consistent with a state of cellular senescence. This study establishes that in vitro palmitate exposure of cardiac fibroblasts provides inflammatory responses via TLR4 and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Palmitate also modulates cardiac fibroblast functionality, in a NLRP3 independent manner, resulting in a phenotype related to cellular senescence. These effects of palmitate could be of importance for myocardial dysfunction in obese and diabetic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diethylcarbamazine attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice by apoptosis of inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Ingrid Tavares; Ribeiro, Edlene Lima; Gomes, Fabiana Oliveira Dos Santos; Donato, Mariana Aragão Matos; Silva, Amanda Karolina Soares; Oliveira, Amanda Costa O de; Araújo, Shyrlene Meiry da Rocha; Barbosa, Karla Patrícia Sousa; Santos, Laise Aline Martins; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2017-02-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by extensive neutrophil infiltration, and apoptosis delay considered part of the pathogenesis of the condition. Despite great advances in treatment strategies, few effective therapies are known for ALI. Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) is used against lymphatic filariasis, a number of studies have described its anti-inflammatory activities and pro-apoptotic effect. These properties have been associated with nuclear factor kappa-B inactivation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of DEC on ALI induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. DEC effect was evaluated by histological and ultrastructural analysis, immunohistochemistry and western blot (WB). Also TUNEL assays were performed and as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels and nitric oxide (NO) were measured. The results demonstrate that LPS induced histological and ultrastructural changes with tissue damage, intense cell infiltration and pulmonary edema, and also increased levels of MPO and NO. DEC reversed these effects, confirming its anti-inflammatory action. DEC pro-apoptotic activity was also evaluated. The expression of TUNEL-positive cells and caspase-3 was increased in DEC treated group. Furthermore, immunohistochemical and WB analysis showed that DEC increased the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins in both the intrinsic (Bax, cytochrome c and caspase-9) and the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis (Fas, FADD and caspase-8). Additionally, DEC reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Our results suggest that DEC attenuates ALI through the prevention of inflammatory cells accumulation by stimulating apoptosis. DEC accelerates the resolution of inflammation and may be a potential pharmacological treatment for ALI. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Inflammatory Biomarkers as Differential Predictors of Antidepressant Response

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

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