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Sample records for lung scavenger receptor

  1. Standardizing Scavenger Receptor Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    PrabhuDas, Mercy; Bowdish, Dawn; Drickamer, Kurt; Febbraio, Maria; Herz, Joachim; Kobzik, Lester; Krieger, Monty; Loike, John; Means, Terry K.; Moestrup, Soren K.; Post, Steven; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Silverstein, Samuel; Wang, Xiang-Yang; El Khoury, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of proteins that are structurally diverse and participate in a wide range of biological functions. These receptors are expressed predominantly by myeloid cells and recognize a variety of ligands, including endogenous and modified host-derived molecules and microbial pathogens. There are currently eight classes of scavenger receptors, many of which have multiple names, leading to inconsistencies and confusion in the literature. To address this problem, a workshop was organized by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health to help develop a clear definition of scavenger receptors and a standardized nomenclature based on that definition. Fifteen experts in the scavenger receptor field attended the workshop and, after extensive discussion, reached a consensus regarding the definition of scavenger receptors and a proposed scavenger receptor nomenclature. Scavenger receptors were defined as cell surface receptors that typically bind multiple ligands and promote the removal of non-self or altered-self targets. They often function by mechanisms that include endocytosis, phagocytosis, adhesion, and signaling that ultimately lead to the elimination of degraded or harmful substances. Based on this definition, nomenclature and classification of these receptors into 10 classes were proposed. The discussion and nomenclature recommendations described in this report only refer to mammalian scavenger receptors. The purpose of this article is to describe the proposed mammalian nomenclature and classification developed at the workshop and to solicit additional feedback from the broader research community. PMID:24563502

  2. Lung macrophage uptake of unopsonized environmental particulates: Role of scavenger-type receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kobzik, L.

    1995-07-01

    The receptors responsible for avid alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis of unopsonized environmental particulates have not been well defined. This study used flow cytometry to quantitate the effects of a panel of soluble ligands for macrophage adhesion receptors on AM binding of unopsonized environmental dusts (titanium dioxide, TiO{sub 2}; iron oxide, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}; {alpha}-quartz, SiO{sub 2}; diesel engine exhaust dust) or fluorescent latex beads. Polyanionic ligands of the macrophage scavenger receptor (SR) for acetylated-LDL caused marked inhibition of AM binding of the oxide particles and latex beads (e.g., TiO{sub 2} binding; polyinosinic acid (polyl), 10 {mu}g/ml: 70.2 {+-} 1.5% inhibition, mean {+-} SE, n = 11). In contrast, no inhibition was seen with the polyanions heparin and chondroitin sulfate (chond-S), or dextran, consistent with the known inhibitor profile of macrophage SRs for acetylated-LDL. AM uptake of latex or SiO{sub 2} beads instilled into lungs of hamsters was inhibited by administration of polyl but not chondroitin sulfate (AM beads per cell: control, 6.1 {+-} 0.7; polyl, 3.5 {+-} 0.2; chond-S, 5.1 {+-} 0.7, n {ge} 4, p < 0.05 for control vs polyl) indicating macrophage SRs operate in vivo as well as in vitro. In contrast, AM binding of the carbonaceous diesel dust particles was not inhibited by any ligand tested. AM uptake of unopsonized TiO{sub 2}, SR ligands or acetylated LDL caused no significant activation of AM respiratory burst or TNF production, consistent with past observations that opsonin-independent phagocytosis of inert particles by normal AMs is not accompanied by pro-inflammatory activation. These data implicate macrophage-type SRs in AM binding of charged environmental particles and indicate that distinct mechanisms mediate binding of carbonaceous dusts. 54 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, S; Murakami, M; Takata, K; Morino, Y

    1986-04-15

    This paper describes an unexpectedly broad ligand specificity of a scavenger receptor of sinusoidal liver cells that is responsible for endocytic uptake of formaldehyde-treated bovine serum albumin (f-Alb). Binding of 125I-f-Alb to the isolated cells was effectively inhibited by bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified with aliphatic aldehydes such as glycolaldehye, DL-glyceraldehyde, and propionaldehyde whereas albumin preparations modified by aromatic aldehydes such as pyridoxal, pyridoxal phosphate, salicylaldehyde, and benzaldehyde did not affect this binding process. Binding of 125I-glycolaldehyde-treated BSA to the cells exhibited a saturation kinetics with an apparent Kd = 3.3 micrograms of the ligand/ml. This binding process was inhibited by unlabeled f-Alb as well as by the antibody raised against the f-Alb receptor. Indeed, 125I-glycolaldehyde-treated BSA underwent a rapid plasma clearance (t1/2 approximately 2 min) which was markedly retarded by unlabeled f-Alb. Upon treatment by these aldehydes, other proteins such as ovalbumin, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and hemoglobin were also converted to active ligands for the f-Alb receptor, while no ligand activity was generated with gamma-globulin and RNase A. These results clearly show that the f-Alb receptor, originally described as being specific for f-Alb, exhibits a broad ligand specificity in terms of both aldehydes and proteins and, hence, should be described as a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins.

  4. Implications of scavenger receptors in the safe development of nanotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Bai, Wei; Brown, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are being utilized in a variety of biomedical applications including drug delivery, diagnostics, and therapeutic targeting. These applications are made possible due to the unique physicochemical properties that are exhibited at the nanoscale. To ensure safe development of NMs for clinical use, it is necessary to understand their interactions with cells and specifically cell surface receptors, which will facilitate either their toxicity and/or clinical function. Recently our research and others have investigated the role of scavenger receptors in mediating NM-cell interactions and responses. Scavenger receptors are expressed by a variety of cell types that are first to encounter NMs during clinical use such as macrophages and endothelial cells. Scavenger receptors are recognized to facilitate uptake of a wide variety of ligands ranging from foreign substances to endogenous lipids/proteins. While interaction of NMs with scavenger receptors may allow therapeutic targeting in some instances, it also presents a challenge for the stealth delivery of NMs and avoidance of the scavenging capability of this class of receptors. Due to their role in facilitating immune responses, scavenger receptor-mediated inflammation is also of concern following NM delivery. The research highlighted in this brief review intends to summarize our current understanding regarding the consequences of NM-scavenger receptor interactions. PMID:26005702

  5. Scavenger Receptors: Emerging Roles in Cancer Biology and Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofei; Guo, Chunqing; Fisher, Paul B.; Subjeck, John R.; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of evolutionally conserved protein molecules that are structurally and functionally diverse. Although scavenger receptors were originally identified based on their capacity to scavenge modified lipoproteins, these molecules have been shown to recognize and bind to a broad spectrum of ligands, including modified and unmodified host-derived molecules or microbial components. As a major subset of innate pattern recognition receptors, scavenger receptors are mainly expressed on myeloid cells and function in a wide range of biological processes, such as endocytosis, adhesion, lipid transport, antigen presentation, and pathogen clearance. In addition to playing a crucial role in maintenance of host homeostasis, scavenger receptors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, e.g., atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, or metabolic disorders. Emerging evidence has begun to reveal these receptor molecules as important regulators of tumor behavior and host immune responses to cancer. This review summarizes our current understanding on the newly identified, distinct functions of scavenger receptors in cancer biology and immunology. The potential of scavenger receptors as diagnostic biomarkers and novel targets for therapeutic interventions to treat malignancies is also highlighted. PMID:26216637

  6. Scavenger receptor class B type I: a multifunctional receptor.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Sticozzi, Claudia; Lim, Yunsook; Pecorelli, Alessandra

    2011-07-01

    The scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) plays an important role in meditating the uptake of HDL-derived cholesterol and cholesteryl ester in the liver and steroidogenic tissues. In addition to being ubiquitous, SR-B1 is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor in many tissues, though the mechanism by which SR-B1 does this is unclear. Other than its role as an HDL receptor, SR-B1 is also involved in pathogen recognition; its expression can be modulated by lipopolysaccharide and oxidative stress; and it plays a significant role in the uptake of lipid soluble vitamins, such as vitamin E and carotenoids. In this short review, we have summarized the biological aspects to which SR-B1 has been thus far associated.

  7. Scavenger Receptor Structure and Function in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Zani, Izma; Stephen, Sam L.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Russell, David; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) are a ‘superfamily’ of membrane-bound receptors that were initially thought to bind and internalize modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL), though it is currently known to bind to a variety of ligands including endogenous proteins and pathogens. New family of SRs and their properties have been identified in recent years, and have now been classified into 10 eukaryote families, defined as Classes A-J. These receptors are classified according to their sequences, although in each class they are further classified based in the variations of the sequence. Their ability to bind a range of ligands is reflected on the biological functions such as clearance of modified lipoproteins and pathogens. SR members regulate pathophysiological states including atherosclerosis, pathogen infections, immune surveillance, and cancer. Here, we review our current understanding of SR structure and function implicated in health and disease. PMID:26010753

  8. Lipoproteins modulate expression of the macrophage scavenger receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Han, J.; Nicholson, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors (MSR) bind and internalize oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL), a modified lipoprotein that is thought to be the proximal source of lipids that accumulate within cells of atherosclerotic lesions. The role of lipoproteins in modulating MSR expression are undetermined. We studied the effect of lipoproteins, native and modified LDL (acetylated LDL (AcLDL) and OxLDL) on the expression of the MSR in RAW cells, a murine macrophage cell line. Exposure to lipoproteins resulted in a marked induction of MSR mRNA expression (12- to 17-fold) with OxLDL and AcLDL having the greatest effects. Maximum induction occurred 1 hour after treatment with OxLDL and LDL. AcLDL induced a fourfold increase at 1 hour followed by a return to baseline and peak expression (sixfold) at 14 hours. Scavenger receptor function, as measured by 125I-AcLDL binding, was only modestly increased in response to lipoproteins. Incubation of macrophages with a cholesterol acceptor particle resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in MSR mRNA expression, which paralleled cholesterol loss from the cells. OxLDL did not affect MSR mRNA stability, implying that MSR mRNA was transcriptionally regulated by lipoproteins. Finally, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from mice following intraperitoneal injection of lipoproteins. Macrophage expression of MSR mRNA was significantly (16-fold) increased by LDL, AcLDL, or OxLDL relative to mice infused with phosphate-buffered saline. This demonstration that exposure to lipoproteins increases expression of the macrophage scavenger receptor implies that lipoproteins can further contribute to foam cell development in atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9626069

  9. CBLB502, an agonist of Toll-like receptor 5, has antioxidant and scavenging free radicals activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiguang; Ge, Changhui; Yang, Liu; Wang, Ruixue; Lu, Yiming; Gao, Yan; Li, Zhihui; Wu, Yonghong; Zheng, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial protein flagellin is the known agonist of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). It has been reported that CBLB502, a novel agonist of TLR5 derived from Salmonella flagellin, could reduce radiation toxicity in mouse and primate models, protect mice from dermatitis and oral mucositis caused by radiation, inhibit acute renal ischemic failure, and inhibit the growth of A549 lung cancer cell. The property of CBLB502 is able to bind to TLR5 and activates NF-κB signaling. In this study, we investigated the antioxidant potential and free radicals scavenging properties of CBLB502 in vitro. Interestingly, we found that CBLB502 has a direct and distinct antioxidant capacity and can efficiently scavenge a variety of free radicals, including superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, and ABTS cation (ABTS(+)). Through wave scanning and kinetic evaluation of scavenging ABTS(+), we found that the ABTS(+) scavenging process of CBLB502 is relatively slow, and the ABTS(+) scavenging activity of CBLB502 has a consistently kinetics characteristics. In conclusion, our results suggested that CBLB502 has antioxidant and scavenging free radicals activities in vitro. It is implied that CBLB502 might partially promote the beneficial protective effect through its scavenging free radicals.

  10. Dietary homocysteine promotes atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inducing scavenger receptors expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels have been recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, the causative mechanisms have not been delineated. Scavenger receptors such as scavenger receptor-AI/II (SR-A), CD36, and lectin-like oxidized LDL ...

  11. Scavenger Receptors and Their Potential as Therapeutic Targets in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Sam L.; Freestone, Katie; Dunn, Sarah; Twigg, Michael W.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Walker, John H.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2010-01-01

    Scavenger receptors act as membrane-bound and soluble proteins that bind to macromolecular complexes and pathogens. This diverse supergroup of proteins mediates binding to modified lipoprotein particles which regulate the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic plaques. In vascular tissues, scavenger receptors are implicated in regulating intracellular signaling, lipid accumulation, foam cell development, and cellular apoptosis or necrosis linked to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. One approach is using gene therapy to modulate scavenger receptor function in atherosclerosis. Ectopic expression of membrane-bound scavenger receptors using viral vectors can modify lipid profiles and reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis. Alternatively, expression of soluble scavenger receptors can also block plaque initiation and progression. Inhibition of scavenger receptor expression using a combined gene therapy and RNA interference strategy also holds promise for long-term therapy. Here we review our current understanding of the gene delivery by viral vectors to cells and tissues in gene therapy strategies and its application to the modulation of scavenger receptor function in atherosclerosis. PMID:20981357

  12. Cytokine decoy and scavenger receptors as key regulators of immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bonecchi, Raffaella; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Riva, Federica

    2016-11-01

    IL-1R2 was the first decoy receptor to be described. Subsequently receptors which act as pure decoys or scavengers or trigger dampening of cytokine signaling have been described for cytokines and chemokines. Here we review the current understanding of the mode of action and significance in pathology of the chemokine atypical receptor ACKR2, the IL-1 decoy receptor IL-1R2 and the atypical IL-1 receptor family IL-1R8. Decoy and scavenger receptors with no or atypical signaling have emerged as a general strategy conserved in evolution to tune the action of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. PMID:27498604

  13. Activated Scavenger Receptor A Promotes Glial Internalization of Aβ

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei-wei; Wang, Shao-wei; Xu, Peng-xin; Yu, Xiao-lin; Liu, Rui-tian

    2014-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates have a pivotal role in pathological processing of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The clearance of Aβ monomer or aggregates is a causal strategy for AD treatment. Microglia and astrocytes are the main macrophages that exert critical neuroprotective roles in the brain. They may effectively clear the toxic accumulation of Aβ at the initial stage of AD, however, their functions are attenuated because of glial overactivation. In this study, we first showed that heptapeptide XD4 activates the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) on the glia by increasing the binding of Aβ to SR-A, thereby promoting glial phagocytosis of Aβ oligomer in microglia and astrocytes and triggering intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. Moreover, XD4 enhances the internalization of Aβ monomers to microglia and astrocytes through macropinocytosis or SR-A-mediated phagocytosis. Furthermore, XD4 significantly inhibits Aβ oligomer-induced cytotoxicity to glial cells and decreases the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, in vitro and in vivo. Our findings may provide a novel strategy for AD treatment by activating SR-A. PMID:24718459

  14. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Prolonged survival of scavenger receptor class A-deficient mice from pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Tvinnereim, Amy; Hunter, Robert L.; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study tested the hypothesis that the scavenger receptor SR-A modulates granuloma formation in response to pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). To test this hypothesis, we monitored survival and histopathology in WT and SR-A-deficient mice following aerosol infection with MTB Rv. SR-A-deficient (SR-A−/−) mice infected with MTB survived significantly longer than WT mice; the mean survival of SR-A−/− mice exceeded 430 days compared to 230 days for WT mice. Early granuloma formation was not impaired in SR-A−/− mice. The extended survival of SR-A−/− mice was associated with 13- and 3-fold higher number of CD4+ lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells in SR-A−/− lungs compared to WT mice 280 after infection. The histopathology of chronically infected SR-A−/− lungs, however, was marked by abundant cholesterol clefts in parenchymal lesions containing infection in multinucleated giant cells. The present study indicates SR-A as a candidate gene of the innate immune system influencing the chronic phase of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:22088322

  16. Human macrophage scavenger receptors: primary structure, expression, and localization in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, A; Naito, M; Itakura, H; Ikemoto, S; Asaoka, H; Hayakawa, I; Kanamori, H; Aburatani, H; Takaku, F; Suzuki, H

    1990-01-01

    Two types of cDNAs for human macrophage scavenger receptors were cloned from a cDNA library derived from the phorbol ester-treated human monocytic cell line THP-1. The type I and type II human scavenger receptors encoded by these cDNAs are homologous (73% and 71% amino acid identity) to their previously characterized bovine counterparts and consist of six domains: cytoplasmic (I), membrane-spanning (II), spacer (III), alpha-helical coiled-coil (IV), collagen-like (V), and a type-specific C-terminal (VI). The receptor gene is located on human chromosome 8. The human receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells mediated endocytosis of modified low density lipoproteins. Two mRNAs, 4.0 and 3.2 kilobases, have been detected in human liver, placenta, and brain. Immunohistochemical studies using an anti-peptide antibody which recognizes human scavenger receptors indicated the presence of the scavenger receptors in the macrophages of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting the involvement of scavenger receptors in atherogenesis. Images PMID:2251254

  17. Scavenging ROS dramatically increase NMDA receptor whole-cell currents in painted turtle cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Dukoff, David James; Hogg, David William; Hawrysh, Peter John; Buck, Leslie Thomas

    2014-09-15

    Oxygen deprivation triggers excitotoxic cell death in mammal neurons through excessive calcium loading via over-activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. This does not occur in the western painted turtle, which overwinters for months without oxygen. Neurological damage is avoided through anoxia-mediated decreases in NMDA and AMPA receptor currents that are dependent upon a modest rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) originating from mitochondria. Anoxia also blocks mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which is another potential signaling mechanism to regulate glutamate receptors. To assess the effects of decreased intracellular [ROS] on NMDA and AMPA receptor currents, we scavenged ROS with N-2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Unlike anoxia, ROS scavengers increased NMDA receptor whole-cell currents by 100%, while hydrogen peroxide decreased currents. AMPA receptor currents and [Ca(2+)]i concentrations were unaffected by ROS manipulation. Because decreases in [ROS] increased NMDA receptor currents, we next asked whether mitochondrial Ca(2+) release prevents receptor potentiation during anoxia. Normoxic activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium (mKATP) channels with diazoxide decreased NMDA receptor currents and was unaffected by subsequent ROS scavenging. Diazoxide application following ROS scavenging did not rescue scavenger-mediated increases in NMDA receptor currents. Fluorescent measurement of [Ca(2+)]i and ROS levels demonstrated that [Ca(2+)]i increases before ROS decreases. We conclude that decreases in ROS concentration are not linked to anoxia-mediated decreases in NMDA/AMPA receptor currents but are rather associated with an increase in NMDA receptor currents that is prevented during anoxia by mitochondrial Ca(2+) release.

  18. Rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells express inducible macrophage scavenger receptor messenger RNA that is absent from endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, P E; Freeman, M W

    1992-01-01

    Scavenger receptors mediate uptake of modified low density lipoproteins by macrophages. The accumulation of lipids via this process is thought to lead to foam cell formation in developing atherosclerotic plaques. Smooth muscle cells, which can also be converted to foam cells in vivo, have not been shown to express the same scavenger receptor previously cloned in macrophages. We report the cloning of two cDNAs that encode type I and type II scavenger receptors isolated from rabbit smooth muscle cells. The deduced protein sequences of these isolates are highly homologous to the scavenger receptors previously isolated from macrophages. Treatment of smooth muscle cells with phorbol esters induced a marked increase in scavenger receptor mRNA and a fivefold increase in receptor degradation activity. Rabbit venous endothelial cells in primary culture and a bovine aortic endothelial cell line had no detectable scavenger receptor mRNA, despite having scavenger receptor degradation activity. The latter finding suggests that endothelial cells may possess a scavenger receptor which is structurally distinct from that found in macrophages and smooth muscle cells. The isolation of cDNAs encoding the rabbit scavenger receptor should prove useful for in vitro and in vivo studies that employ the rabbit as a model of human atherosclerosis. Images PMID:1401078

  19. Identification of the lectin-like receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein in human macrophages and its potential role as a scavenger receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, H; Kondratenko, N; Green, S; Steinberg, D; Quehenberger, O

    1998-01-01

    A new receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL), lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), has recently been cloned from bovine endothelial cells and human lung. A limited tissue-distribution study suggested that the protein was mainly produced by the vascular endothelium. In the present study we demonstrate that LOX-1 is also expressed in macrophages, where it may function as a scavenger receptor. LOX-1 was not detected in undifferentiated THP-1 cells or in freshly isolated human blood monocytes. However, mature human monocyte-derived macrophages and differentiated THP-1 cells showed high levels of LOX-1 transcripts. Consistent with these results, immunofluorescence staining and FACS analysis demonstrated that LOX-1 protein is expressed on the plasma membrane of macrophages. Western-blot analysis of membranes from macrophages (but not those from monocytes) identified a single band, with an apparent molecular mass of about 40 kDa, that displayed oxidized LDL-binding activity. These results suggest that differentiation induces the expression of LOX-1 in macrophages, where it may play a role as a scavenger receptor and/or a receptor for oxidized LDL. PMID:9693095

  20. Functional genomics of the human HDL receptor scavenger receptor BI: An old dog with new tricks

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Alexandra C.; Sahoo, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The athero-protective role of scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is primarily attributed to its ability to selectively transfer cholesteryl esters from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to the liver during reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). In this review, we highlight recent findings that reveal the impact of SR-BI on lipid levels and cardiovascular disease in humans. Moreover, additional responsibilities of SR-BI in modulating adrenal and platelet function, as well as female fertility in humans, are discussed. Recent findings Heterozygote carriers of P297S-, S112F- and T175A- mutant SR-BI receptors were identified in patients with high HDL-cholesterol levels. HDL from P297S-SR-BI carriers was unable to mediate macrophage cholesterol efflux, while hepatocytes expressing P297S-SR-BI were unable to mediate the selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters. S112F- and T175A-mutant receptors exhibited similar impaired cholesterol transport functions in vitro. Reduced SR-BI function in P297S carriers was also associated with decreased steroidogenesis and altered platelet function. Further, human population studies identified SCARB1 variants associated with female infertility. Summary Identification of SR-BI variants confirms the key role of this receptor in influencing lipid levels and RCT in humans. Deeper understanding of the contributions of SR-BI to steroidogenesis, platelet function and fertility is required in light of exploration of HDL-raising therapies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. PMID:23403740

  1. Analysis of relationship between oxidized phospholipid structure and interaction with the class B scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Detao; Sayre, Lawrence M; Podrez, Eugene A

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of specific oxidized phospholipids oxPCCD36 by scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-BI plays a critical role in several pathophysiological processes. The structural basis for the recognition of oxPCCD36 by CD36 and SR-BI is poorly understood. We describe here the design and synthesis of a series of model oxidized phospholipids having various functional groups at sn-1, sn-2, and sn-3 positions. Synthetic methodologies and experimental details for the preparation of specific examples of model oxidized phospholipids are presented. The correlation between their structure and their ability to serve as ligands for CD36 and SR-BI was determined using competitive binding assay on cells overexpressing scavenger receptors, direct binding assay to scavenger receptors expressed as GST-fusion proteins, and cholesterol ester synthesis assay using mouse peritoneal macrophages.

  2. Type I macrophage scavenger receptor contains α-helical and collagen-like coiled coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Freeman, Mason; Rohrer, Lucia; Zabrecky, James; Matsudaira, Paul; Krieger, Monty

    1990-02-01

    The macrophage scavenger receptor is a trimeric membrane glycoprotein with unusual ligand-binding properties which has been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. The trimeric structure of the bovine type I scavenger receptor, deduced by complementary DNA cloning, contains three extracellular C-terminal cysteine-rich domains connected to the transmembrane domain by a long fibrous stalk. This stalk structure, composed of an a-helical coiled coil and a collagen-like triple helix, has not previously been observed in an integral membrane protein.

  3. Regulation of platelet function by class B scavenger receptors in hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Zimman, Alejandro; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets constitutively express class B scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-BI, two closely related pattern recognition receptors best known for their roles in lipoprotein and lipid metabolism. The biological role of scavenger receptors in platelets is poorly understood. However, in vitro and in vivo data suggest that class B scavenger receptors modulate platelet function and contribute significantly to thrombosis by sensing pathological or physiological ligands, inducing prothrombotic signaling, and increasing platelet reactivity. Platelet CD36 recognizes a novel family of endogenous oxidized choline phospholipids that accumulate in plasma of hyperlipidemic mice and in plasma of subjects with low HDL levels. This interaction leads to the activation of specific signaling pathways and promotes platelet activation and thrombosis. Platelet SR-BI, on the other hand, plays a critical role in the induction of platelet hyper-reactivity and accelerated thrombosis in conditions associated with increased platelet cholesterol content. Intriguingly, oxidized HDL, aSR-BI ligand, can suppress platelet function. These recent findings demonstrate that platelet class B scavenger receptors play roles in thrombosis in dyslipidemia and may contribute to acute cardiovascular events in vivo in hypercholesterolemia. PMID:21071700

  4. Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) adducted proteins bind to scavenger receptor A in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Berger, John P; Simet, Samantha M; DeVasure, Jane M; Boten, Jessica A; Sweeter, Jenea M; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Sisson, Joseph H; Wyatt, Todd A

    2014-08-01

    Co-exposure to cigarette smoke and ethanol generates malondialdehyde and acetaldehyde, which can subsequently lead to the formation of aldehyde-adducted proteins. We have previously shown that exposure of bronchial epithelial cells to malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) adducted protein increases protein kinase C (PKC) activity and proinflammatory cytokine release. A specific ligand to scavenger receptor A (SRA), fucoidan, blocks this effect. We hypothesized that MAA-adducted protein binds to bronchial epithelial cells via SRA. Human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to MAA-adducted protein (either bovine serum albumin [BSA-MAA] or surfactant protein D [SPD-MAA]) and SRA examined using confocal microscopy, fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS), and immunoprecipitation. Differentiated mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTEC) cultured by air-liquid interface were assayed for MAA-stimulated PKC activity and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) release. Specific cell surface membrane dye co-localized with upregulated SRA after exposure to MAA for 3-7 min and subsided by 20 min. Likewise, MAA-adducted protein co-localized to SRA from 3 to 7 min with a subsequent internalization of MAA by 10 min. These results were confirmed using FACS analysis and revealed a reduced mean fluorescence of SRA after 3 min. Furthermore, increased amounts of MAA-adducted protein could be detected by Western blot in immunoprecipitated SRA samples after 3 min treatment with MAA. MAA stimulated PKCε-mediated KC release in wild type, but not SRA knockout mice. These data demonstrate that aldehyde-adducted proteins in the lungs rapidly bind to SRA and internalize this receptor prior to the MAA-adducted protein stimulation of PKC-dependent inflammatory cytokine release in airway epithelium.

  5. Endocytic uptake of advanced glycation end products by mouse liver sinusoidal endothelial cells is mediated by a scavenger receptor distinct from the macrophage scavenger receptor class A.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, K; Sano, H; Nagai, R; Suzuki, H; Kodama, T; Yoshida, M; Ueda, S; Smedsrød, B; Horiuchi, S

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies with peritoneal macrophages obtained from macrophage scavenger receptor class A (MSR-A) knock-out mice showed that the endocytic uptake of advanced glycation end products (AGE) by macrophages was mediated mainly by MSR-A. However, it is controversial whether the endocytic uptake of intravenously injected AGE proteins by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LECs) is similarly explained by receptor-mediated endocytosis via MSR-A. The present study was conducted to compare the capacity to endocytose AGE proteins in LECs and peritoneal macrophages obtained from MSR-A knock-out and littermate wild-type mice. The endocytic degradation capacity of MSR-A knock-out LECs for AGE-BSA was indistinguishable from that of wild-type LECs, whereas that of MSR-A knock-out peritoneal macrophages for AGE-BSA was decreased to 30% of that in wild-type cells. Similarly, the endocytic degradation of MSR-A knock-out LECs for acetylated low-density lipoprotein (acetyl-LDL) did not differ from that of wild-type LECs, whereas the endocytic degradation of acetyl-LDL by MSR-A knock-out peritoneal macrophages was less than 20% of that in wild-type cells. Furthermore, formaldehyde-treated serum albumin (f-Alb), a ligand known to undergo scavenger-receptor-mediated endocytosis by LECs, was effectively taken up by MSR-A knock-out LECs at a capacity that did not differ from that of wild-type LECs. Moreover, the endocytic uptake of AGE-BSA by LECs was effectively competed for by unlabelled f-Alb or acetyl-LDL. These results indicate that the scavenger-receptor ligands AGE proteins, acetyl-LDL and f-Alb are endocytosed by LECs through a non-MSR-A pathway. PMID:11062078

  6. Role for the class A macrophage scavenger receptor in the phagocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, N; Suzuki, H; Kurihara, Y; Kodama, T; Gordon, S

    1996-01-01

    Numerous immature thymocytes undergo apoptosis and are rapidly engulfed by phagocytic thymic macrophages. The macrophage surface receptors involved in apoptotic thymocyte recognition are unknown. We have examined the role of the class A macrophage scavenger receptor (SR-A) in the engulfment of apoptotic thymocytes. Uptake of steroid-treated apoptotic thymocytes by thymic and inflammatory-elicited SR-A positive macrophages is partially inhibited by an anti-SR-A mAb and more completely by a range of scavenger receptor ligands. Thymic macrophages from mice with targeted disruption of the SR-A gene show a 50% reduction in phagocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes in vitro. These data suggest that SR-A may play a role in the clearance of dying cells in the thymus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8901603

  7. Cancer stem cell-specific scavenger receptor CD36 drives glioblastoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Hale, James S.; Otvos, Balint; Sinyuk, Maksim; Alvarado, Alvaro G.; Hitomi, Masahiro; Stoltz, Kevin; Wu, Qiulian; Flavahan, William; Levison, Bruce; Johansen, Mette L.; Schmitt, David; Neltner, Janna M.; Huang, Ping; Ren, Bin; Sloan, Andrew E.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Gladson, Candece L.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Brown, J. Mark; McIntyre, Thomas; Hazen, Stanley L.; Horbinski, Craig; Rich, Jeremy N.; Lathia, Justin D.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) contains a self-renewing, tumorigenic cancer stem cell (CSC) population which contributes to tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance. While the tumor microenvironment is essential to CSC self-renewal, the mechanisms by which CSCs sense and respond to microenvironmental conditions are poorly understood. Scavenger receptors are a broad class of membrane receptors that are well characterized on immune cells and instrumental in sensing apoptotic cellular debris and modified lipids. Here we provide evidence that CSCs selectively utilize the scavenger receptor CD36 to promote their maintenance using patient-derived CSCs and in vivo xenograft models. We detected CD36 expression in GBM cells in addition to previously described cell types including endothelial cells, macrophages and microglia. CD36 was enriched in CSCs and was able to functionally distinguish self-renewing cells. CD36 was co-expressed with integrin alpha 6 and CD133, previously described CSC markers, and CD36 reduction resulted in concomitant loss of integrin alpha 6 expression, self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity. We confirmed that oxidized phospholipids, ligands of CD36, were present in GBM and found that the proliferation of CSCs, but not non-CSCs, increased with exposure to oxidized low-density lipoprotein. CD36 was an informative biomarker of malignancy and negatively correlated to patient prognosis. These results provide a paradigm for CSCs to thrive by the selective enhanced expression of scavenger receptors, providing survival and metabolic advantages. PMID:24737733

  8. Scavenger Receptor-A (CD204): A Two-Edged Sword in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Jim L.; Ozment, Tammy R.; Li, Chuanfu; Schweitzer, John B.; Williams, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptor A (SR-A), also known as the macrophage scavenger receptor and cluster of differentiation 204 (CD204), plays roles in lipid metabolism, atherogenesis, and a number of metabolic processes. However, recent evidence points to important roles for SR-A in inflammation, innate immunity, host defense, sepsis, and ischemic injury. Herein, we review the role of SR-A in inflammation, innate immunity, host defense, sepsis, cardiac and cerebral ischemic injury, Alzheimer’s disease, virus recognition and uptake, bone metabolism, and pulmonary injury. Interestingly, SR-A is reported to be host protective in some disease states, but there is also compelling evidence that SR-A plays a role in the pathophysiology of other diseases. These observations of both harmful and beneficial effects of SR-A are discussed here in the framework of inflammation, innate immunity, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:24941076

  9. Scavenger receptor function of mouse Fcγ receptor III contributes to progression of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E hyperlipidemic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinmei; Ng, Hang Pong; Lai, Yen-Chun; Craigo, Jodi K; Nagilla, Pruthvi S; Raghani, Pooja; Nagarajan, Shanmugam

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies showed loss of CD36 or scavenger receptor-AI/II (SR-A) does not ameliorate atherosclerosis in a hyperlipidemic mouse model, suggesting receptors other than CD36 and SR-A may also contribute to atherosclerosis. In this report, we show that apolipoprotein E (apoE)-CD16 double knockout (DKO; apoE-CD16 DKO) mice have reduced atherosclerotic lesions compared with apoE knockout mice. In vivo and in vitro foam cell analyses showed apoE-CD16 DKO macrophages accumulated less neutral lipids. Reduced foam cell formation in apoE-CD16 DKO mice is not due to change in expression of CD36, SR-A, and LOX-1. This led to a hypothesis that CD16 may have scavenger receptor activity. We presented evidence that a soluble form of recombinant mouse CD16 (sCD16) bound to malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDALDL), and this binding is blocked by molar excess of MDA- modified BSA and anti-MDA mAbs, suggesting CD16 specifically recognizes MDA epitopes. Interestingly, sCD16 inhibited MDALDL binding to macrophage cell line, as well as soluble forms of recombinant mouse CD36, SR-A, and LOX-1, indicating CD16 can cross-block MDALDL binding to other scavenger receptors. Anti-CD16 mAb inhibited immune complex binding to sCD16, whereas it partially inhibited MDALDL binding to sCD16, suggesting MDALDL binding site may be in close proximity to the immune complex binding site in CD16. Loss of CD16 expression resulted in reduced levels of MDALDL-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression. Finally, CD16-deficient macrophages showed reduced MDALDL-induced Syk phosphorylation. Collectively, our findings suggest scavenger receptor activity of CD16 may, in part, contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis.

  10. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-12-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis.

  11. Scavenger receptor B1 post-translational modifications in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sticozzi, Claudia; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Franco; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Ciccoli, Lucia; De Felice, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2013-07-11

    The modulation of the HDL receptor scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1) was evaluated in skin fibroblasts isolated from patients with Rett syndrome (RTT), a genetic form of infantile autism. Patients showed an altered plasma lipid profile, while their skin fibroblasts showed a dramatic reduction in SRB1 (immunogold, Western blot and immunohistochemistry). The decreased SRB1 levels were demonstrated to be the consequence of its binding with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE), a product of lipid peroxidation, and its increased ubiquitination. Our findings show for the first time a loss of SRB1 in RTT cells and its relationship with a chronic oxidative stress status.

  12. Scavenger receptors on sinusoidal liver endothelial cells are involved in the uptake of aldehyde-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Duryee, Michael J; Freeman, Thomas L; Willis, Monte S; Hunter, Carlos D; Hamilton, Bartlett C; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Tuma, Dean J; Klassen, Lynell W; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2005-11-01

    Scavenger receptors on sinusoidal liver endothelial cells (SECs) eliminate potentially harmful modified proteins circulating through the liver. It was shown recently that aldehyde-modified proteins bind to scavenger receptors and are associated with the development/progression of alcoholic liver diseases. For these studies, rat livers were perfused in situ with 125I-formaldehyde-bovine serum albumin (f-Alb) or 125I-malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde-bovine serum albumin (MAA-Alb) in the presence of known scavenger receptor ligands as inhibitors. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis and scavenger receptor Type A (SRA) knock-out mice were used to assess the role of these receptors in mediating immune responses. The degradation of 125I-f-Alb or 125I-MAA-Alb in whole livers and isolated SECs can be inhibited by known scavenger receptor ligands, including f-Alb, maleylated bovine albumin, and fucoidan. 125I-f-Alb could not be completely inhibited by MAA-Alb. In contrast, 125I-MAA-Alb was only partially inhibited with advanced glycosylated endproduct albumin. RT-PCR data show the presence of a number of scavenger receptors on SECs that may be responsible for the binding of MAA-modified proteins. SRA seems to be one of these receptors involved in the effects mediated by MAA-modified proteins. In a study using SRA knockout mice, it was shown that a decreased antibody response to MAA-Alb resulted. By RT-PCR, CD36, LOX-1, and SR-AI are the scavenger receptors most likely involved in the degradation of MAA-Alb.

  13. Scavenger receptors on sinusoidal liver endothelial cells are involved in the uptake of aldehyde-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Duryee, Michael J; Freeman, Thomas L; Willis, Monte S; Hunter, Carlos D; Hamilton, Bartlett C; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Tuma, Dean J; Klassen, Lynell W; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2005-11-01

    Scavenger receptors on sinusoidal liver endothelial cells (SECs) eliminate potentially harmful modified proteins circulating through the liver. It was shown recently that aldehyde-modified proteins bind to scavenger receptors and are associated with the development/progression of alcoholic liver diseases. For these studies, rat livers were perfused in situ with 125I-formaldehyde-bovine serum albumin (f-Alb) or 125I-malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde-bovine serum albumin (MAA-Alb) in the presence of known scavenger receptor ligands as inhibitors. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis and scavenger receptor Type A (SRA) knock-out mice were used to assess the role of these receptors in mediating immune responses. The degradation of 125I-f-Alb or 125I-MAA-Alb in whole livers and isolated SECs can be inhibited by known scavenger receptor ligands, including f-Alb, maleylated bovine albumin, and fucoidan. 125I-f-Alb could not be completely inhibited by MAA-Alb. In contrast, 125I-MAA-Alb was only partially inhibited with advanced glycosylated endproduct albumin. RT-PCR data show the presence of a number of scavenger receptors on SECs that may be responsible for the binding of MAA-modified proteins. SRA seems to be one of these receptors involved in the effects mediated by MAA-modified proteins. In a study using SRA knockout mice, it was shown that a decreased antibody response to MAA-Alb resulted. By RT-PCR, CD36, LOX-1, and SR-AI are the scavenger receptors most likely involved in the degradation of MAA-Alb. PMID:16105988

  14. Insights into cyclosporine A-induced atherosclerotic risk in transplant recipients: macrophage scavenger receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Mathis, A Scott; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Minko, Tamara; Friedman, Gary S; Gioia, Kevin; Serur, David S; Knipp, Gregory T

    2004-02-27

    Clinical monitoring of organ-transplant recipients suggests that administration of cyclosporine (CsA) may increase the risk of atherosclerosis when compared with the general population. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of the in vitro Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-1 human monocyte cell culture model for determining drug-related atherosclerotic potential in macrophages. The effect of CsA on the mRNA expression of macrophage scavenger receptor genes including CD36, CD68, scavenger receptor (SR)-A, SR-BII, and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1); the nuclear hormone receptors, including peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)gamma and liver-X-receptor (LXR)alpha; and the cholesterol efflux pump ABCA1 were investigated as markers of atherosclerotic progression. The THP-1 cells were cultured and differentiated into macrophages. The macrophages were then treated with CsA to assess gene expression. Time- (1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours) and dose- (concentrations [mg/L] corresponding to the trough [0.5], peak [1.25] and 4x peak [5]) dependency of CsA was assessed. The treated macrophage mRNA gene expression of CD36, CD68, and PPARgamma were up-regulated in the presence of CsA. Interestingly, SR-A, SR-BII, LOX-1, and LXRalpha expression appeared to be slightly down-regulated, and ABCA1 was relatively unchanged. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the protein expression of CD36 was unchanged or increased, PPARgamma was unchanged, and ABCA1 was unchanged or decreased at 4 and 8 hours. The results document CsA-induced mRNA and protein changes in receptors relevant to lipid-laden foam cell formation and demonstrate the utility of THP-1 macrophages for screening of atherosclerotic risk potential. PMID:15084924

  15. Insights into cyclosporine A-induced atherosclerotic risk in transplant recipients: macrophage scavenger receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Mathis, A Scott; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Minko, Tamara; Friedman, Gary S; Gioia, Kevin; Serur, David S; Knipp, Gregory T

    2004-02-27

    Clinical monitoring of organ-transplant recipients suggests that administration of cyclosporine (CsA) may increase the risk of atherosclerosis when compared with the general population. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of the in vitro Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-1 human monocyte cell culture model for determining drug-related atherosclerotic potential in macrophages. The effect of CsA on the mRNA expression of macrophage scavenger receptor genes including CD36, CD68, scavenger receptor (SR)-A, SR-BII, and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1); the nuclear hormone receptors, including peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)gamma and liver-X-receptor (LXR)alpha; and the cholesterol efflux pump ABCA1 were investigated as markers of atherosclerotic progression. The THP-1 cells were cultured and differentiated into macrophages. The macrophages were then treated with CsA to assess gene expression. Time- (1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours) and dose- (concentrations [mg/L] corresponding to the trough [0.5], peak [1.25] and 4x peak [5]) dependency of CsA was assessed. The treated macrophage mRNA gene expression of CD36, CD68, and PPARgamma were up-regulated in the presence of CsA. Interestingly, SR-A, SR-BII, LOX-1, and LXRalpha expression appeared to be slightly down-regulated, and ABCA1 was relatively unchanged. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the protein expression of CD36 was unchanged or increased, PPARgamma was unchanged, and ABCA1 was unchanged or decreased at 4 and 8 hours. The results document CsA-induced mRNA and protein changes in receptors relevant to lipid-laden foam cell formation and demonstrate the utility of THP-1 macrophages for screening of atherosclerotic risk potential.

  16. The scavenger receptor SCARF1 mediates apoptotic cell clearance and prevents autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Ortiz, Zaida G.; Pendergraft, William F.; Prasad, Amit; Byrne, Michael H.; Iram, Tal; Blanchette, Christopher J.; Luster, Andrew D.; Hacohen, Nir; Khoury, Joseph El; Means, Terry K.

    2013-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells is critical for control of tissue homeostasis however the full range of receptor(s) on phagocytes responsible for recognition of apoptotic cells remains to be identified. Here we show that dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages and endothelial cells use scavenger receptor type F family member 1 (SCARF1) to recognize and engulf apoptotic cells via C1q. Loss of SCARF1 impairs uptake of apoptotic cells. Consequently, in SCARF1-deficient mice, dying cells accumulate in tissues leading to a lupus-like disease with the spontaneous generation of autoantibodies to DNA-containing antigens, immune cell activation, dermatitis and nephritis. The discovery of SCARF1 interactions with C1q and apoptotic cells provides insights into molecular mechanisms involved in maintenance of tolerance and prevention of autoimmune disease. PMID:23892722

  17. Induction of interleukin-1 production by ligands binding to the scavenger receptor in human monocytes and the THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Palkama, T

    1991-01-01

    Foam cell formation via lipid accumulation through the scavenger receptor in human monocyte/macrophages is believed to be one of the earliest events in atherogenesis. In this study we demonstrate that stimulation of the scavenger receptor activates monocytes to produce interleukin-1 (IL-1). Polyinosinic acid (poly I) and fucoidan, both ligands known to bind to the scavenger receptor, induced IL-1 beta production in human monocytes. Polycytidylic acid, a structurally related compound to poly I, which does not bind to the scavenger receptor, was used as a negative control and had virtually no effect on IL-1 production. THP-1 cells, which normally do not express scavenger receptors, were almost unresponsive to poly I and fucoidan. PMA priming, which has been reported to up-regulate scavenger receptor expression in THP-1 cells, significantly enhanced IL-1 production by fucoidan and poly I. IL-1 produced by scavenger receptor stimulation was shown to be secreted extracellularly, and biologically active. Scavenger receptor-mediated IL-1 production was inhibited by H7, a protein kinase C inhibitor, and enhanced by IBMX, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP degradation, suggesting a synergistic effect of protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-mediated signal transduction pathways in scavenger receptor-mediated IL-1 production. Due to the potentially deleterious effects of IL-1 on the vessel wall, IL-1 produced by ligand binding to the scavenger receptor in human monocytes may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Images Figure 3 PMID:1663075

  18. Increased uptake of alpha-hydroxy aldehyde-modified low density lipoprotein by macrophage scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, M; Heinecke, J W; Chait, A

    2000-07-01

    Reactive aldehydes can be formed during the oxidation of lipids, glucose, and amino acids and during the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified with malondialdehyde are taken up by scavenger receptors on macrophages. In the current studies we determined whether alpha-hydroxy aldehydes also modify LDL to a form recognized by macrophage scavenger receptors. LDL modified by incubation with glycolaldehyde, glyceraldehyde, erythrose, arabinose, or glucose (alpha-hydroxy aldehydes that possess two, three, four, five, and six carbon atoms, respectively) exhibited decreased free amino groups and increased mobility on agarose gel electrophoresis. The lower the molecular weight of the aldehyde used for LDL modification, the more rapid and extensive was the derivatization of free amino groups. Approximately 50-75% of free lysine groups in LDL were modified after incubation with glyceraldehyde, glycolaldehyde, or erythrose for 24-48 h. Less extensive reductions in free amino groups were observed when LDL was incubated with arabinose or glucose, even at high concentration for up to 5 days. LDL modified with glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde labeled with (125)I was degraded more extensively by human monocyte-derived macrophages than was (125)I-labeled native LDL. Conversely, LDL modified with (125)I-labeled erythrose, arabinose, or glucose was degraded less rapidly than (125)I-labeled native LDL. Competition for the degradation of LDL modified with (125)I-labeled glyceraldehyde was nearly complete with acetyl-, glycolaldehyde-, and glyceraldehyde-modified LDL, fucoidin, and advanced glycation end product-modified bovine serum albumin, and absent with unlabeled native LDL. These results suggest that short-chain alpha-hydroxy aldehydes react with amino groups on LDL to yield moieties that are important determinants of recognition by macrophage scavenger receptors.

  19. Scavenger Receptors Mediate the Role of SUMO and Ftz-f1 in Drosophila Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Talamillo, Ana; Herboso, Leire; Pirone, Lucia; Pérez, Coralia; González, Monika; Sánchez, Jonatan; Mayor, Ugo; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S.; Sutherland, James D.; Barrio, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    SUMOylation participates in ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing the Drosophila SUMO homologue smt3 in the prothoracic gland leads to reduced lipid content, low ecdysone titers, and a block in the larval–pupal transition. Here we show that the SR-BI family of Scavenger Receptors mediates SUMO functions. Reduced levels of Snmp1 compromise lipid uptake in the prothoracic gland. In addition, overexpression of Snmp1 is able to recover lipid droplet levels in the smt3 knockdown prothoracic gland cells. Snmp1 expression depends on Ftz-f1 (an NR5A-type orphan nuclear receptor), the expression of which, in turn, depends on SUMO. Furthermore, we show by in vitro and in vivo experiments that Ftz-f1 is SUMOylated. RNAi–mediated knockdown of ftz-f1 phenocopies that of smt3 at the larval to pupal transition, thus Ftz-f1 is an interesting candidate to mediate some of the functions of SUMO at the onset of metamorphosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the role of SUMOylation, Ftz-f1, and the Scavenger Receptors in lipid capture and mobilization is conserved in other steroidogenic tissues such as the follicle cells of the ovary. smt3 knockdown, as well as ftz-f1 or Scavenger knockdown, depleted the lipid content of the follicle cells, which could be rescued by Snmp1 overexpression. Therefore, our data provide new insights into the regulation of metamorphosis via lipid homeostasis, showing that Drosophila Smt3, Ftz-f1, and SR-BIs are part of a general mechanism for uptake of lipids such as cholesterol, required during development in steroidogenic tissues. PMID:23637637

  20. Semaphorins and their receptors in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Potiron, Vincent A.; Roche, Joëlle; Drabkin, Harry A.

    2009-01-01

    Semaphorins are a large family of secreted, transmembrane and GPI-linked proteins initially characterized in the development of the nervous system and axonal guidance. Semaphorins are expressed in many tissues where they regulate normal development, organ morphogenesis, immunity and angiogenesis. They affect the cytoskeleton, actin filament organization, microtubules and cell adhesion. Semaphorin signaling is transduced by plexins, which in the case of most class-3 semaphorins requires high affinity neuropilin receptors. The neuropilins also function as receptors for VEGF and other growth factors, and their expression is often abnormal in tumors. In cancer, semaphorins have both tumor suppressor and tumor promoting functions. We review here the current status of semaphorins and their receptors in tumor development with a focus on lung cancer. PMID:18625544

  1. Vaccinia virus binds to the scavenger receptor MARCO on the surface of keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Daniel T; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Wang, Zhenping; di Nardo, Anna; Gallo, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Patients with altered skin immunity, such as individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD), can have a life-threatening disruption of the epidermis known as eczema vaccinatum after vaccinia virus (VV) infection of the skin. Here, we sought to better understand the mechanism(s) by which VV associates with keratinocytes. The class A scavenger receptor known as MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure) is expressed on human and mouse keratinocytes and found to be abundantly expressed in the skin of patients with AD. VV bound directly to MARCO, and overexpression of MARCO increased susceptibility to VV infection. Furthermore, ligands with affinity for MARCO, or excess soluble MARCO, competitively inhibited VV infection. These findings indicate that MARCO promotes VV infection and highlights potential new therapeutic strategies for prevention of VV infection in the skin.

  2. Scavenger receptor A gene regulatory elements target gene expression to macrophages and to foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Horvai, A; Palinski, W; Wu, H; Moulton, K S; Kalla, K; Glass, C K

    1995-01-01

    Transcription of the macrophage scavenger receptor A gene is markedly upregulated during monocyte to macrophage differentiation. In these studies, we demonstrate that 291 bp of the proximal scavenger receptor promoter, in concert with a 400-bp upstream enhancer element, is sufficient to direct macrophage-specific expression of a human growth hormone reporter in transgenic mice. These regulatory elements, which contain binding sites for PU.1, AP-1, and cooperating ets-domain transcription factors, are also sufficient to mediate regulation of transgene expression during the in vitro differentiation of bone marrow progenitor cells in response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Mutation of the PU.1 binding site within the scavenger receptor promoter severely impairs transgene expression, consistent with a crucial role of PU.1 in regulating the expression of the scavenger receptor gene. The ability of the scavenger receptor promoter and enhancer to target gene expression to macrophages in vivo, including foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions, suggests that these regulatory elements will be of general utility in the study of macrophage differentiation and function by permitting specific modifications of macrophage gene expression. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7777517

  3. Structure-Activity Relationship of PEGylated Polylysine Peptides as Scavenger Receptor Inhibitors for Non-Viral Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Baumhover, Nicholas J; Duskey, Jason T; Khargharia, Sanjib; White, Christopher W; Crowley, Samuel T; Allen, Rondine J; Rice, Kevin G

    2015-12-01

    PEGylated polylysine peptides of the general structure PEG30 kDa-Cys-Trp-LysN (N = 10 to 30) were used to form fully condensed plasmid DNA (pGL3) polyplexes at a ratio of 1 nmol of peptide per μg of DNA (ranging from N:P 3:1 to 10:1 depending on Lys repeat). Co-administration of 5 to 80 nmols of excess PEG-peptide with fully formed polyplexes inhibited the liver uptake of (125)I-pGL3-polyplexes. The percent inhibition was dependent on the PEG-peptide dose and was saturable, consistent with inhibition of scavenger receptors. The scavenger receptor inhibition potency of PEG-peptides was dependent on the length of the Lys repeat, which increased 10-fold when comparing PEG30 kDa-Cys-Trp-Lys10 (IC50 of 20.2 μM) with PEG30 kDa-Cys-Trp-Lys25 (IC50 of 2.1 μM). We hypothesize that PEG-peptides inhibit scavenger receptors by spontaneously forming small 40 to 60 nm albumin nanoparticles that bind to and saturate the receptor. Scavenger receptor inhibition delayed the metabolism of pGL3-polyplexes, resulting in efficient gene expression in liver hepatocytes following delayed hydrodynamic dosing. PEG-peptides represent a new class of scavenger inhibitors that will likely have broad utility in blocking unwanted liver uptake and metabolism of a variety of nanoparticles.

  4. Elevated polymorphism and divergence in the class C scavenger receptors of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Brian P

    2005-04-01

    Scavenger receptor proteins are involved in the cellular internalization of a broad variety of foreign material, including pathogenic bacteria during phagocytosis. I find here that nonsynonymous divergence in three class C scavenger receptors (Sr-C's) between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans and between each of these species and D. yakuba is approximately four times the typical genome average. These genes also exhibit unusually high levels of segregating nonsynonymous polymorphism in D. melanogaster and D. simulans populations. A fourth Sr-C is comparatively conserved. McDonald-Kreitman tests reveal a significant excess of replacement fixations between D. melanogaster and D. simulans in the Sr-C's, but tests of polymorphic site frequency spectra do not support models of directional selection. It is possible that the molecular functions of SR-C proteins are sufficiently robust to allow exceptionally high amino acid substitution rates without compromising organismal fitness. Alternatively, SR-Cs may evolve under diversifying selection, perhaps as a result of pressure from pathogens. Interestingly, Sr-CIII and Sr-CIV are polymorphic for premature stop codons. Sr-CIV is also polymorphic for an in-frame 101-codon deletion and for the absence of one intron.

  5. Scavenger receptor B protects shrimp from bacteria by enhancing phagocytosis and regulating expression of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wen-Jie; Li, Dian-Xiang; Xu, Yi-Hui; Xu, Sen; Li, Jing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2015-07-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) are involved in innate immunity through recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and in pathogenesis of diseases through interactions with damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). The roles of SRs in invertebrate innate immunity still need to be elucidated. Here we identify a class B scavenger receptor from kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus, designated MjSR-B1. The recombinant MjSR-B1 agglutinated bacteria in a calcium dependent manner and bound lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid. After knockdown of MjSR-B1, both the bacterial clearance and phagocytotic ability of M. japonicus against V. anguillarum and S. aureus were impaired, and several phagocytosis related genes were downregulated. The expression levels of antimicrobial peptides were also downregulated. Overexpression of MjSR-B1 led to enhanced bacterial clearance, phagocytosis rate and upregulation of phagocytosis-related and antimicrobial peptide genes. However, overexpression of mutant MjSR-B1ΔC, which lacks the carboxyl tail of MjSR-B1, had none of these effects. Our results indicate that MjSR-B1 can protect shrimp from bacteria by promoting phagocytosis and by enhancing the expression of antimicrobial peptides.

  6. A regulatory role for macrophage class A scavenger receptors in TLR4-mediated LPS responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunying; Wermeling, Fredrik; Sundqvist, Johanna; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Tryggvason, Karl; Pikkarainen, Timo; Karlsson, Mikael C I

    2010-05-01

    Recognition of microbial components by TLR, key sensors of infection, leads to induction of inflammatory responses. We found that, in vivo, TLR4 engagement by LPS induces up-regulation of the class A scavenger receptors (SR) macrophage receptor with a collagenous structure (MARCO) and SR-A, which occurs, at least in the case of MARCO, via both MyD88-dependent and -independent pathways. When challenging mice with a low dose of LPS followed by a high dose, class A SR-deficient mice showed a higher survival rate than WT mice. This was paired with increased production of IL-10 and anti-LPS Ab, as well as increased activation status of marginal zone B cells. However, the receptors were not crucial for survival when challenging mice i.p. with Neisseria meningitidis or Listeria monocytogenes, but they were found to contribute to microbial capture and clearance. This indicates physiological significance for the up-regulation of class A SR during early stages of bacterial infection. Thus, we believe that we have revealed a mechanism where SR regulate the activation status of the immune system and are involved in balancing a proper immune response to infection. This regulation could also be important in maintaining tolerance since these receptors have been shown to be involved in regulation of self-reactivity.

  7. The ligand activity of AGE-proteins to scavenger receptors is dependent on their rate of modification by AGEs.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ryoji; Mera, Katsumi; Nakajou, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Yukio; Iwao, Yasunori; Imai, Hiroki; Murata, Toshinori; Otagiri, Masaki

    2007-12-01

    The cellular interaction of proteins modified with advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) is believed to induce several different biological responses, which are involved in the development of diabetic vascular complications. We report here that the ratio of protein glycation is implicated in its ligand activity to scavenger receptors. Although highly-modified AGE-bovine serum albumin (high-AGE-BSA) was significantly recognized by human monocyte-derived macrophages and Chinese hamster ovary cells which overexpress such scavenger receptors as CD36, SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B type-I), and LOX-1 (Lectin-like Ox-LDL receptor-1), the mildly-modified-AGE-BSA (mild-AGE-BSA) did not show any ligand activity to these cells. Furthermore, when (111)In-labeled high- or mild-AGE-BSA were injected into the tail vein of mice, the high-AGE-BSA was rapidly cleared from the circulation whereas the clearance rate of the mild-AGE-BSA was very slow, similar to the native BSA. These results demonstrate the first evidence that the ligand activity of the AGE-proteins to the scavenger receptors and its pharmacokinetic properties depend on their rate of modification by AGEs, and we should carefully prepare the AGE-proteins in vitro to clarify the physiological significance of the interaction between the AGE-receptors and AGE-proteins.

  8. Uptake and metabolism of polymerized albumin by rat liver. Role of the scavenger receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.L.; Roll, F.J.; Jones, A.L.; Weisiger, R.A.

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus binds avidly to albumin polymers, which in turn may mediate viral attachment to liver cells. This hypothesis is critically dependent on prior results obtained using glutaraldehyde-polymerized human serum albumin as a model for naturally occurring albumin species. We used the perfused rat liver to characterize the uptake, cellular distribution, and metabolism of glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin. /sup 125/I-glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin was efficiently removed from the perfusate by the liver (29% extraction). However, few autoradiographic grains were located over hepatic parenchymal cells (6%). Instead, most glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin appeared to be removed by endothelial (59%) or Kupffer (31%) cells. Hepatic uptake was strongly inhibited by formaldehyde-treated monomeric albumin, a known ligand of the endothelial scavenger receptor for chemically modified proteins. After uptake, most glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin was rapidly degraded and released into the perfusate (74% within 60 min). This process was blocked by chloroquine and leupeptin, suggesting that it involves lysosomal acid hydrolases. We conclude that glutaraldehyde-polymerized albumin is efficiently cleared and degraded by the endothelial scavenger pathway. Glutaraldehyde-polymerized albumin therefore appears to be a poor model for predicting the hepatic handling of naturally occurring albumin species bound to hepatitis B virions. Even if viral particles were to follow this pathway, few would enter parenchymal hepatocytes.

  9. The Scavenger Receptor SREC-I Cooperates with Toll-Like Receptors to Trigger Inflammatory Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ayesha; Borges, Thiago J.; Lang, Benjamin J.; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor expressed by endothelial cell-I (SREC-I) is a class F scavenger receptor expressed by immune cells with a significant role in CD8+- and CD4+-mediated T cell immunity. This receptor can also modulate the function of toll-like receptors (TLRs), which play essential roles in innate immunity. Earlier, it was found that human monocyte/macrophage THP1 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages from mice exhibited increased responses to polyinosine–polycytidylic acid (poly I:C, PIC) and CpG (unmethylated) DNA and enhanced production of inflammatory cytokines with overexpressed SREC-I. Our data also showed that intracellular/endocytic TLR3 and TLR9 could directly interact with SREC-I in the presence of their respective ligands. We also observed that the internalized ligand along with TLR3/TLR9 colocalized in the endosome in macrophages and THP-1 cells overexpressing these receptors. In the absence of these ligands, there was no detectable colocalization between the SREC-I and endocytic TLRs. Earlier, it was shown that SREC-I stimulated double-stranded RNA/CpGDNA-mediated TLR3/TLR9 activation of the innate immune response by triggering signaling through the NF-κB, IRF3, and MAP kinase pathways leading to transcription of cytokine genes. We also established that SREC-I can associate with plasma membrane TLRs, such as TLR2 and TLR4. We demonstrated that SREC-I–TLR4 signals more efficiently from lipid microdomain in which lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can associate with SREC-I–TLR4 complex. We also proved that SREC-I is an alternate receptor for LPS capable of internalizing the complex and for endocytic TLR ligands as well. This binding activated endocytic TLR-mediated downstream cytokine production in THP1 cells and macrophages. Finally, SREC-I could also form complexes with TLR2 and induce the release of cytokines in the presence of bacterial, viral, and fungal ligands. PMID:27379091

  10. Lack of the scavenger receptor CD36 alters microglial phenotypes after neonatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Faustino, Joel; Woo, Moon-Sook; Derugin, Nikita; Vexler, Zinaida S

    2016-01-01

    The stage of brain development at the time of stroke has a major impact on the pathophysiological mechanisms of ischemic damage, including the neuroinflammatory response. Microglial cells have been shown to contribute to acute and sub-chronic injury in adult stroke models, whereas in neonatal rodents we showed that microglial cells serve as endogenous neuroprotectants early following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), limiting neuroinflammation and injury. In the neonate, microglial depletion or lack of the scavenger receptor CD36 exacerbates injury. In this study we asked if lack of CD36 affects microglial phenotypes after neonatal stroke. Using RT-PCR we characterized the patterns of gene expression in microglia isolated from injured regions following acute tMCAO in postnatal day 10 mice and showed that expression of several pro-inflammatory genes, including Toll-like receptors (TLR), remains largely unaffected in activated microglia in injured regions. Using multiple biochemical assays we demonstrated that lack of CD36 alters several functions of microglia in acutely injured neonatal brain: it further enhances accumulation of the chemokine MCP-1, affects the number of CD11b+/CD45+ cells, along with protein expression of its co-receptor, TLR2, but does not affect accumulation of superoxide in microglia or the cytokines TNFα and IL-1β in injured regions. PMID:26223273

  11. Divalent cation-independent macrophage adhesion inhibited by monoclonal antibody to murine scavenger receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Iain; Hughes, Derralynn; Gordon, Siamon

    1993-07-01

    MACROPHAGES interact with other cells and components of the extracellular environment by means of adhesion receptors1,2. Adhesion to artificial substrata in vitro facilitates isolation of macrophages3, and has been used to generate antibodies that inhibit their migration in vivo4,5. Unlike other cell types, macrophages attach to tissue culture plastic in the absence of divalent cations. Here we use an adhesion assay exploiting this property to isolate a rat monoclonal antibody, 2F8, which totally inhibits divalent cation-independent adhesion of murine macrophages to tissue culture plastic in the presence of fetal calf serum. Immunoprecipitation from macrophages and stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells revealed that the antigen recognized by monoclonal 2F8 is identical to murine macrophage scavenger receptor6,7. We propose a novel function for this molecule, previously described as an endocytic receptor, thus providing a mechanism for mononuclear phagocyte recruitment to and retention in ligand-rich tissues such as in atherosclerotic lesions.

  12. Pteromalus puparum venom impairs host cellular immune responses by decreasing expression of its scavenger receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qi; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Yangkeng; Stanley, David W; Chen, Xuexin; Hu, Cui; Ye, Gongyin

    2011-11-01

    Insect host/parasitoid interactions are co-evolved systems in which host defenses are balanced by parasitoid mechanisms to disable or hide from host immune effectors. Although there is a rich literature on these systems, parasitoid immune-disabling mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Here we report on a newly discovered immune-disabling mechanism in the Pieris rapae/Pteromalus puparum host/parasitoid system. Because venom injections and parasitization suppresses host phagocytosis, we turned attention to the P. rapae scavenger receptor (Pr-SR), posing the hypothesis that P. puparum venom suppresses expression of the host Pr-SR gene. To test our hypothesis, we cloned a full-length cDNA of the Pr-SR. Multiple sequences alignment showed the deduced amino acid sequence of Pr-SR is similar to scavenger receptors of other lepidopterans. Bacterial and bead injections induced Pr-SR mRNA and protein expression, which peaked at 4h post-bead injection. Venom injection inhibited Pr-SR expression. Pr-SR was specifically expressed in granulocytes compared to plasmatocytes. We localized the Pr-SR protein in cytoplasm and cellular membrane, with no evidence of secretion into host plasma. Double-strand RNA designed to Pr-SR mRNA silenced expression of Pr-SR and significantly impaired host phagocytosis and encapsulation reactions. Venom injections similarly silenced Pr-SR expression during the first 8h post-treatment, after which the silencing effects gradually abated. We infer from these findings that one mechanism of impairing P. rapae hemocytic immune reactions is by silencing expression of Pr-SR.

  13. Class A scavenger receptor promotes osteoclast differentiation via the enhanced expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK)

    SciTech Connect

    Takemura, Kenichi; Sakashita, Naomi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Lei, XiaoFeng; Ohnishi, Koji; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2010-01-22

    Osteoclasts originate from bone marrow monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, and their differentiation depends on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) ligand. Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is one of the principal functional molecules of macrophages, and its level of expression declines during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of SR-A in osteoclastogenesis, we examined pathological changes in femoral bone and the expression levels of osteoclastogenesis-related molecules in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. The femoral osseous density of SR-A{sup -/-} mice was higher than that of SR-A{sup +/+} mice, and the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly decreased. An in vitro differentiation assay revealed that the differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells is impaired in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. Elimination of SR-A did not alter the expression level of the M-CSF receptor, c-fms; however, the expression levels of RANK and RANK-related osteoclast-differentiation molecules such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) significantly decreased. Furthermore, acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL), an SR-A ligand, significantly increased the expression level of RANK and MITF during osteoclast differentiation. These data indicate that SR-A promotes osteoclastogenesis via augmentation of the expression level of RANK and its related molecules.

  14. Interferon alpha bioactivity critically depends on Scavenger receptor class B type I function.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Marcos; Fioravanti, Jessica; Aranda, Fernando; Paredes, Vladimir; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Méndez, Miriam; Nistal-Villan, Estanislao; Larrea, Esther; Gao, Qinshan; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Prieto, Jesus; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) binds pathogen-associated molecular patterns participating in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction but there is no information regarding potential interactions between SR-B1 and the interferon system. Herein, we report that SR-B1 ligands strongly regulate the transcriptional response to interferon α (IFNα) and enhance its antiviral and antitumor activity. This effect was mediated by the activation of TLR2 and TLR4 as it was annulled by the addition of anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies. In vivo, we maximized the antitumor activity of IFNα co-expressing in the liver a SR-B1 ligand and IFNα by adeno-associated viruses. This gene therapy strategy eradicated liver metastases from colon cancer with reduced toxicity. On the other hand, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SR-B1 blocks the clathrin-dependent interferon receptor recycling pathway with a concomitant reduction in IFNα signaling and bioactivity. This effect can be applied to enhance cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic viruses. Indeed, SR-B1 antagonists facilitate replication of oncolytic viruses amplifying their tumoricidal potential. In conclusion, SR-B1 agonists behave as IFNα enhancers while SR-B1 inhibitors dampen IFNα activity. These results demonstrate that SR-B1 is a suitable pharmacology target to enhance cancer immunotherapy based on IFNα and oncolytic viruses. PMID:27622065

  15. Interferon alpha bioactivity critically depends on Scavenger receptor class B type I function

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Marcos; Fioravanti, Jessica; Aranda, Fernando; Paredes, Vladimir; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Méndez, Miriam; Nistal-Villan, Estanislao; Larrea, Esther; Gao, Qinshan; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Prieto, Jesus; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) binds pathogen-associated molecular patterns participating in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction but there is no information regarding potential interactions between SR-B1 and the interferon system. Herein, we report that SR-B1 ligands strongly regulate the transcriptional response to interferon α (IFNα) and enhance its antiviral and antitumor activity. This effect was mediated by the activation of TLR2 and TLR4 as it was annulled by the addition of anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies. In vivo, we maximized the antitumor activity of IFNα co-expressing in the liver a SR-B1 ligand and IFNα by adeno-associated viruses. This gene therapy strategy eradicated liver metastases from colon cancer with reduced toxicity. On the other hand, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SR-B1 blocks the clathrin-dependent interferon receptor recycling pathway with a concomitant reduction in IFNα signaling and bioactivity. This effect can be applied to enhance cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic viruses. Indeed, SR-B1 antagonists facilitate replication of oncolytic viruses amplifying their tumoricidal potential. In conclusion, SR-B1 agonists behave as IFNα enhancers while SR-B1 inhibitors dampen IFNα activity. These results demonstrate that SR-B1 is a suitable pharmacology target to enhance cancer immunotherapy based on IFNα and oncolytic viruses. PMID:27622065

  16. Cellular Recognition and Trafficking of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles by Macrophage Scavenger Receptor A

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Galya; Chrisler, William B.; Cassens, Kaylyn J.; Tan, Ruimin; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Zangar, Richard C.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2011-09-01

    The internalization of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into cells is known to involve active transport mechanisms, yet the precise biological molecules involved are poorly understood. We demonstrate that the uptake of amorphous silica ENPs (92 nm) by macrophage cells is strongly inhibited by silencing expression of scavenger receptor A (SR-A). In addition, ENP uptake is augmented by introducing SR-A expression into human cells that are normally non-phagocytic. Confocal fluorescent microscopy analyses show that the majority of single or small clusters of silica ENPs co-localize intracellularly with SR-A and are internalized through a pathway characteristic of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. In contrast, larger silica NP agglomerates (>500 nm) are poorly co-localized with the receptor, suggesting independent trafficking or internalization pathways are involved. SR-A silencing also caused decreased cellular secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to silica ENPs. As SR-A is expressed in macrophages throughout the reticulo-endothelial system, this pathway is likely an important determinant of the biodistribution of, and cellular response to ENPs.

  17. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A.; Larach, Daniel B.; Hancock-Cerutti, William F.; Millar, John S.; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J. Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S.; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J.; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J.; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant). PMID:26965621

  18. Scavenger receptors of endothelial cells mediate the uptake and cellular pro-atherogenic effects of carbamylated LDL

    PubMed Central

    Apostolov, Eugene O.; Shah, Sudhir V.; Ray, Debarti; Basnakian, Alexei G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Carbamylated LDL (cLDL) has been recently shown to have robust pro-atherogenic effects upon human endothelial cells in vitro; suggesting cLDL may have a significant role in atherosclerosis in uremia. The current study was designed to determine, which receptors are used by cLDL and so may cause the pro-atherogenic effects. Methods and Results In ex vivo or in vitro models as well as in intact animals, administration of cLDL was associated with endothelial internalization of cLDL and subendothelial translocation (transcytosis). In vitro recombinant LOX-1 and SREC-1 receptors showed the greatest cLDL binding. However, pretreatment of the endothelial cells with specific inhibiting antibodies demonstrated that cLDL binds mainly to LOX-1 and CD36 receptors. The transcytosis was dependent on SR-A1, SREC-1 and CD36 receptors while LOX-1 receptor was not involved. The cytotoxicity was mediated by several studied scavenger receptors, but cLDL-induced monocyte adhesion depended only on LOX-1. The cLDL-induced synthesis of LOX-1 protein significantly contributed to both cytotoxicity and accelerated monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Conclusions Our data suggest that cLDL utilizes unique pattern of scavenger receptors. They show that LOX-1 receptor, and partially, CD36, SREC-1 and SR-A1 receptors are essential for the pro-atherogenic effects of cLDL on human endothelial cells. PMID:19696406

  19. Prevention of asbestos-induced cell death in rat lung fibroblasts and alveolar macrophages by scavengers of active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Shatos, M.A.; Doherty, J.M.; Marsh, J.P.; Mossman, B.T.

    1987-10-01

    The possible modulation of asbestos-related cell death using antioxidants in both target and effector cells of asbestosis was investigated. After exposure to crocidolite asbestos at a range of concentrations (2.5-25 ..mu..gcm/sup 2/ dish), the viability of a normal rat lung fibroblast line and freshly isolated alveolar macrophages (AM) was determined. In comparison to fibroblasts, AM were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of asbestos. Cytotoxic concentrations of asbestos then were added to both cell types in combination with the antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD), a scavenger of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -./), and catalase, an enzyme scavenging H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of the hydroxyl radical (OH/sup ./) and deferoxamine, an iron chelator, also were evaluated in similar studies. Results showed significant dosage-dependent reduction of asbestos-associated cell death with all agents. In contrast, asbestos-induced toxicity was not ameliorated after addition of chemically inactivated SOD and catalase or bovine serum albumin. Results above suggest asbestos-induced cell damage is mediated by active oxygen species. In this regard, the iron associated with the fiber andor its interaction with cell membranes might be critical in deriving a modified Haber-Weiss (Fenton-type) reaction resulting in production of OH/sup ./.

  20. Endocytic uptake of nonenzymatically glycosylated proteins is mediated by a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Takata, K; Horiuchi, S; Araki, N; Shiga, M; Saitoh, M; Morino, Y

    1988-10-15

    Long term incubation of proteins with glucose, named the Maillard reaction (Maillard, L. C. (1912) C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris) 154, 66-68), gives rise to advanced glycosylation end product (AGE) with fluorescence, color, as well as cross-linked properties. The receptor-mediated endocytosis of AGE-proteins by macrophages was reported (Vlassara, H., Brownlee, M., and Cerami, A. (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 82, 5588-5592). The present study on the binding of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) to rat peritoneal macrophages and sinusoidal liver cells demonstrated the presence of a saturable, high affinity receptor for AGE-BSA with Kd = 2.4 x 10(-7) M (macrophages) and 2.1 x 10(-7) M (sinusoidal cells). The cellular binding of AGE-BSA and its endocytic uptake by these cells were competitively inhibited by BSA preparations modified with aliphatic aldehydes such as formaldehyde or glycolaldehyde, ligands known to be specific for a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins (Horiuchi, S., Murakami, M., Takata, K., and Morino, Y. (1986). J. Biol. Chem. 261, 4962-4966). These ligands also had a profound in vivo effect on the plasma clearance of 125I-AGE-BSA as well as its hepatic uptake. Thus, endocytic uptake of AGE-proteins by macrophages appeared to be mediated by a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins. This provides evidence for the biological importance of the scavenger receptor in eliminating senescent macromolecules from the circulation.

  1. Housing Conditions Modulate the Severity of Mycoplasma pulmonis Infection in Mice Deficient in Class A Scavenger Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Umstead, Todd M; Hu, Sanmei; Dybvig, Kevin F; Cooper, Timothy K; Wilson, Ronald P; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmosis is a frequent causative microbial agent of community-acquired pneumonia and has been linked to exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The macrophage class A scavenger receptor (SRA) facilitates the clearance of noxious particles, oxidants, and infectious organisms by alveolar macrophages. We examined wildtype and SRA−/− mice, housed in either individually ventilated or static filter-top cages that were cycled with fresh bedding every 14 d, as a model of gene–environment interaction on the outcome of pulmonary Mycoplasma pulmonis infection. Intracage NH3 gas measurements were recorded daily prior to infection. Mice were intranasally infected with 1 × 107 cfu M. pulmonis UAB CT and evaluated at 3, 7, and 14 d after inoculation. Wildtype mice cleared 99.5% of pulmonary M. pulmonis by 3 d after infection but remained chronically infected through the study. SRA−/− mice were chronically infected with 40-fold higher mycoplasma numbers than were wildtype mice. M. pulmonis caused a chronic mixed inflammatory response that was accompanied with high levels of IL1β, KC, MCP1, and TNFα in SRA−/− mice, whereas pulmonary inflammation in WT mice was represented by a monocytosis with elevation of IL1β. Housing had a prominent influence on the severity and persistence of mycoplasmosis in SRA−/− mice. SRA-/- mice housed in static cages had an improved recovery and significant changes in surfactant proteins SPA and SPD compared with baseline levels. These results indicate that SRA is required to prevent chronic mycoplasma infection of the lung. Furthermore, environmental conditions may exacerbate chronic inflammation in M. pulmonis-infected SRA−/− mice. PMID:25527023

  2. Scavenger receptor BI: a multi-purpose player in cholesterol and steroid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Menno; Van Berkel, Theo-Jc; Van Eck, Miranda

    2010-12-21

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) is an important member of the scavenger receptor family of integral membrane glycoproteins. This review highlights studies in SR-BI knockout mice, which concern the role of SR-BI in cholesterol and steroid metabolism. SR-BI in hepatocytes is the sole molecule involved in selective uptake of cholesteryl esters from high-density lipoprotein (HDL). SR-BI plays a physiological role in binding and uptake of native apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins by hepatocytes, which identifies SR-BI as a multi-purpose player in lipid uptake from the blood circulation into hepatocytes in mice. In adrenocortical cells, SR-BI mediates the selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters, which is efficiently coupled to the synthesis of glucocorticoids (i.e. corticosterone). SR-BI knockout mice suffer from adrenal glucocorticoid insufficiency, which suggests that functional SR-BI protein is necessary for optimal adrenal steroidogenesis in mice. SR-BI in macrophages plays a dual role in cholesterol metabolism as it is able to take up cholesterol associated with HDL and apoB-containing lipoproteins and can possibly facilitate cholesterol efflux to HDL. Absence of SR-BI is associated with thrombocytopenia and altered thrombosis susceptibility, which suggests a novel role for SR-BI in regulating platelet number and function in mice. Transgenic expression of cholesteryl ester transfer protein in humanized SR-BI knockout mice normalizes hepatic delivery of HDL-cholesteryl esters. However, other pathologies associated with SR-BI deficiency, i.e. increased atherosclerosis susceptibility, adrenal glucocorticoid insufficiency, and impaired platelet function are not normalized, which suggests an important role for SR-BI in cholesterol and steroid metabolism in man. In conclusion, generation of SR-BI knockout mice has significantly contributed to our knowledge of the physiological role of SR-BI. Studies using these mice have identified SR-BI as a

  3. Uptake and catabolism of modified LDL in scavenger-receptor class A type I/II knock-out mice.

    PubMed Central

    Van Berkel, T J; Van Velzen, A; Kruijt, J K; Suzuki, H; Kodama, T

    1998-01-01

    The liver is the major organ responsible for the uptake of modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from the blood circulation, with endothelial and Kupffer cells as major cellular uptake sites. Scavenger-receptors, which include various classes, are held responsible for this uptake. Mice deficient in scavenger-receptor class A types I and II were created and the fate of acetylated LDL (Ac-LDL) in vivo and its interaction with liver endothelial, Kupffer and peritoneal macrophages was characterized. Surprisingly, the decay in vivo (t12 < 2 min), tissue distribution and liver uptake (at 5 min it was 77.4 +/- 4.6% of the injected dose) of Ac-LDL in the knock-out mice were not significantly different from control mice (t12 < 2 min and liver uptake 79.1 +/- 4.6% of the injected dose). A separation of mice liver cells into parenchymal, endothelial and Kupffer cells 10 min after injection of Ac-LDL indicated that in both control and knock-out mice the liver endothelial cells were responsible for more than 70% of the liver uptake. Both in control and knock-out mice, preinjection of polyinosinic acid (poly I, 200 microg) completely blocked the liver uptake, indicating that both in control and knock-out mice the scavenger-receptors are sensitive to poly I. Preinjection of suboptimal poly I concentrations (20 and 50 microg) provided evidence that the serum decay and liver uptake of Ac-LDL is more readily inhibited in the knock-out mice as compared with the control mice, indicating less efficient removal of Ac-LDL in vivo in the knock-out mice under these conditions. Studies in vitro with isolated liver endothelial and Kupffer cells from knock-out mice indicate that the cell association of Ac-LDL during 2 h at 37 degrees C is 50 and 53% of the control, respectively, whereas the degradation reaches values of 58 and 63%. For peritoneal macrophages from knock-out mice the cell association of Ac-LDL was identical to the control mice whereas the Ac-LDL degradation in cells from the

  4. Prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 regulation of scavenger receptor CD36 modulates microglial Aβ42 phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwu; Melief, Erica; Postupna, Nadia; Montine, Kathleen S; Keene, C Dirk; Montine, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies underline the potential relevance of microglial innate immune activation in Alzheimer disease. Primary mouse microglia that lack prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 (EP2) show decreased innate immune-mediated neurotoxicity and increased amyloid β (Aβ) peptide phagocytosis, features that were replicated in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that scavenger receptor CD36 is an effector of EP2-regulated Aβ phagocytosis. CD36 expression was 143-fold greater in mouse primary microglia than in primary astrocytes. Three different means of suppressing EP2 signaling increased and an agonist of EP2 decreased CD36 expression in primary wild-type microglia. Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3, TLR4, and TLR7, but not TLR2 or TLR9, reduced primary microglial CD36 transcription and cell surface CD36 protein and reduced Aβ42 phagocytosis as well. At each step, the effects of innate immune activation on CD36 were reversed by at least 50% by an EP2 antagonist, and this partial rescue of microglia Aβ42 phagocytosis was largely mediated by CD36 activity. Finally, we showed in hippocampus of wild-type mice that innate immune activation suppressed CD36 expression by an EP2-dependent mechanism. Taken together with results of others that found brain clearance of Aβ peptides and behavioral improvements mediated by CD36 in mice, regulation of CD36-mediated Aβ phagocytosis by suppression of EP2 signaling may provide a new approach to suppressing some aspects of Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

  5. A role for scavenger receptors in phagocytosis of protein-coated particles in rainbow trout head kidney macrophages.

    PubMed

    Frøystad, M K; Rode, M; Berg, T; Gjøen, T

    1998-01-01

    In macrophages of higher vertebrates, Fc receptors and receptors for complement and other serum factors, are generally known to enhance the phagocytic process. In lower vertebrates like salmonid fishes, none of these or other phagocytic receptors have been thoroughly characterized. The purpose of this study was to elucidate to what extent these and other receptors are involved in the process of phagocytosis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) head kidney macrophages. We used tosyl activated, paramagnetic dynabeads (2.8 microm in diameter), specifically coated with 125I labeled Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) IgM or bovine serum albumin (BSA) as phagocytic probes. The effect of complement opsonization was also investigated by incubating the beads in serum. Our results indicate that neither the Fc- nor the complement-receptor(s) were important for phagocytosis of these beads. Our data support the idea that scavenger receptors are involved in phagocytosis in rainbow trout head kidney macrophages, as the use of a competitive scavenger receptor ligand extensively decreased degradation of the labeled protein coat on the beads. PMID:9877435

  6. Scavenger receptor-mediated recognition of maleyl bovine plasma albumin and the demaleylated protein in human monocyte macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Haberland, M E; Fogelman, A M

    1985-01-01

    Maleyl bovine plasma albumin competed on an equimolar basis with malondialdehyde low density lipoprotein (LDL) in suppressing the lysosomal hydrolysis of 125I-labeled malondialdehyde LDL mediated by the scavenger receptor of human monocyte macrophages. Maleyl bovine plasma albumin, in which 94% of the amino groups were modified, exhibited an anodic mobility in agarose electrophoresis 1.7 times that of the native protein. Incubation of maleyl bovine plasma albumin at pH 3.5 regenerated the free amino groups and restored the protein to the same electrophoretic mobility as native albumin. The demaleylated protein suppressed 75% of the hydrolysis of 125I-labeled malondialdehyde LDL and greater than 80% of 125I-labeled maleyl bovine plasma albumin. The ability of the demaleylated protein to compete was abolished after treatment with guanidine hydrochloride. Although ligands recognized by the scavenger receptor typically are anionic, we propose that addition of new negative charge achieved by maleylation, rather than directly forming the receptor binding site(s), induces conformational changes in albumin as a prerequisite to expression of the recognition domain(s). The altered conformation of the modified protein apparently persists after removal of the maleyl groups. We conclude that the primary sequence of albumin, rather than addition of new negative charge, provides the recognition determinant(s) essential for interaction of maleyl bovine plasma albumin with the scavenger receptor. PMID:3857610

  7. Endothelial Expression of Scavenger Receptor Class B, Type I Protects against Development of Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vaisman, Boris L.; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G.; Freeman, Lita A.; Amar, Marcelo J.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Liu, Chengyu; Stonik, John A.; Sampson, Maureen L.; Pryor, Milton; Bocharov, Alexander V.; Eggerman, Thomas L.; Patterson, Amy P.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    The role of scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) in endothelial cells (EC) was examined in several novel transgenic mouse models expressing SR-BI in endothelium of mice with normal C57Bl6/N, apoE-KO, or Scarb1-KO backgrounds. Mice were also created expressing SR-BI exclusively in endothelium and liver. Endothelial expression of the Tie2-Scarb1 transgene had no significant effect on plasma lipoprotein levels in mice on a normal chow diet but on an atherogenic diet, significantly decreased plasma cholesterol levels, increased plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, and protected mice against atherosclerosis. In 8-month-old apoE-KO mice fed a normal chow diet, the Tie2-Scarb1 transgene decreased aortic lesions by 24%. Mice expressing SR-BI only in EC and liver had a 1.5 ± 0.1-fold increase in plasma cholesterol compared to mice synthesizing SR-BI only in liver. This elevation was due mostly to increased HDL-C. In EC culture studies, SR-BI was found to be present in both basolateral and apical membranes but greater cellular uptake of cholesterol from HDL was found in the basolateral compartment. In summary, enhanced expression of SR-BI in EC resulted in a less atherogenic lipoprotein profile and decreased atherosclerosis, suggesting a possible role for endothelial SR-BI in the flux of cholesterol across EC. PMID:26504816

  8. An investigation of scavenger receptor A mediated leukocyte binding to polyanionic and uncharged polymer hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Love, Ryan J; Patenaude, Mathew; Dorrington, Michael; Bowdish, Dawn M E; Hoare, Todd; Jones, Kim S

    2015-05-01

    Cell adhesion to biomaterials can be mediated in part by mechanisms aside from the traditionally recognized opsinization and integrin binding mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the role of scavenger receptor A (SR-A) in leukocyte binding to a series of well-controlled polyanionic and uncharged hydrogels based on a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) backbone. The hydrogels were injected in the peritoneal cavity of SR-A knockout (KO) and wild-type mice using a minimally invasive procedure and allowed to set in situ. After 24 h, the hydrogels were recovered and analyzed, the peritoneal cavity was lavaged, and cytokine concentrations were assessed by ELISA. The polyanionic hydrogels retrieved from the KO animals were found to be completely devoid of adherent leukocytes, which were present in other materials regardless of the mouse strain in which they were injected. Results from a subsequent in vitro cellular adhesion study with a RAW264.7 cell line failed to yield a similarly definitive role for SR-A in the cellular binding of a polyanionic hydrogel. Taken together, the results of this study show that SR-A mediates leukocyte adhesion to a polyanionic hydrogel in the peritoneal cavity, but other adhesion mechanisms contribute to cellular binding in vitro.

  9. Cooperation between hepatic cholesteryl ester hydrolase and scavenger receptor BI for hydrolysis of HDL-CE.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Quan; Bie, Jinghua; Wang, Jing; Ghosh, Siddhartha S; Ghosh, Shobha

    2013-11-01

    Liver is the sole organ responsible for the final elimination of cholesterol from the body either as biliary cholesterol or bile acids. High density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived cholesterol is the major source of biliary sterols and represents a mechanism for the removal of cholesterol from peripheral tissues including artery wall-associated macrophage foam cells. Via selective uptake through scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), HDL-cholesterol is thought to be directly secreted into bile, and HDL cholesteryl esters (HDL-CEs) enter the hepatic metabolic pool and need to be hydrolyzed prior to conversion to bile acids. However, the identity of hepatic CE hydrolase (CEH) as well as the role of SR-BI in bile acid synthesis remains elusive. In this study we examined the role of human hepatic CEH (CES1) in facilitating hydrolysis of SR-BI-delivered HDL-CEs. Over-expression of CEH led to increased hydrolysis of HDL-[³H]CE in primary hepatocytes and SR-BI expression was required for this process. Intracellular CEH associated with BODIPY-CE delivered by selective uptake via SR-BI. CEH and SR-BI expression enhanced the movement of [³H]label from HDL-[³H]CE to bile acids in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that SR-BI-delivered HDL-CEs are hydrolyzed by hepatic CEH and utilized for bile acid synthesis. PMID:23990661

  10. Hepatic Scavenger Receptor BI Protects Against Polymicrobial-induced Sepsis through Promoting LPS Clearance in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling; Zheng, Zhong; Ai, Junting; Huang, Bin; Li, Xiang-An

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies revealed that scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI or Scarb1) plays a critical protective role in sepsis. However, the mechanisms underlying this protection remain largely unknown. In this study, using Scarb1I179N mice, a mouse model specifically deficient in hepatic SR-BI, we report that hepatic SR-BI protects against cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis as shown by 75% fatality in Scarb1I179N mice, but only 21% fatality in C57BL/6J control mice. The increase in fatality in Scarb1I179N mice was associated with an exacerbated inflammatory cytokine production. Further study demonstrated that hepatic SR-BI exerts its protection against sepsis through its role in promoting LPS clearance without affecting the inflammatory response in macrophages, the glucocorticoid production in adrenal glands, the leukocyte recruitment to peritoneum or the bacterial clearance in liver. Our findings reveal hepatic SR-BI as a critical protective factor in sepsis and point out that promoting hepatic SR-BI-mediated LPS clearance may provide a therapeutic approach for sepsis. PMID:24719333

  11. Class A scavenger receptor deficiency augments angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lingling; Li, Xiaoyu; Fang, Ru; Wang, Zhuoyun; Xu, Yiming; Zhang, Hanwen; Bai, Hui; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xudong; Ben, Jingjing; Xu, Yong; Chen, Qi

    2014-08-01

    Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is a multifunctional molecule that participates in macrophage-mediated inflammation. Here we evaluated the role of SR-A in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertensive vascular remodeling. Chronic infusion of Ang II leads to an increased systolic blood pressure both in SR-A knockout (SR-A(-/-)) and wild type (SR-A(+/+)) mice with no significant difference between these two groups. SR-A(-/-) hypertensive mice, however, exhibited a marked augmentation of arterial wall thickening and vascular cell proliferation compared with SR-A(+/+) hypertensive mice. M1 macrophage markers were increased whereas M2 macrophage markers were decreased in vascular tissues of SR-A(-/-) mice. Co-culture experiments revealed that more pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α were produced by SR-A(-/-) peritoneal macrophages leading to a stronger proliferation of primary vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. In addition, SR-A(-/-) macrophages were more prone to lipopolysaccharide-induced M1 differentiation while resisting interleukin-4-induced M2 differentiation. Importantly, transplantation of SR-A(-/-) bone marrow into SR-A(+/+) mice significantly augmented Ang II-induced vascular remodeling. These results show that SR-A is critical for Ang II-induced vascular remodeling by regulating macrophage polarization. Therefore, SR-A may be a useful therapeutic target for the intervention of hypertensive vascular remodeling. PMID:24875449

  12. Identification of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Hexon Regions That Interact with Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Reeti; Reddy, Vijay S.; Nemerow, Glen R.; Barry, Michael A.

    2012-05-04

    Most of an intravenous dose of species C adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is destroyed by liver Kupffer cells. In contrast, another species C virus, Ad6, evades these cells to mediate more efficient liver gene delivery. Given that this difference in Kupffer cell interaction is mediated by the hypervariable (HVR) loops of the virus hexon protein, we genetically modified each of the seven HVRs of Ad5 with a cysteine residue to enable conditional blocking of these sites with polyethylene glycol (PEG). We show that these modifications do not affect in vitro virus transduction. In contrast, after intravenous injection, targeted PEGylation at HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 increased viral liver transduction up to 20-fold. Elimination or saturation of liver Kupffer cells did not significantly affect this increase in the liver transduction. In vitro, PEGylation blocked uptake of viruses via the Kupffer cell scavenger receptor SRA-II. These data suggest that HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 of Ad5 may be involved in Kupffer cell recognition and subsequent destruction. These data also demonstrate that this conditional genetic-chemical mutation strategy is a useful tool for investigating the interactions of viruses with host tissues.

  13. Human scavenger receptor class B type II (SR-BII) and cellular cholesterol efflux.

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, Jane V; Riddell, Dave R; Owen, James S

    2004-01-01

    Although studies in recombinant cells indicate that scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) can promote cholesterol efflux, investigations in transgenic mice overexpressing or deficient in SR-BI endorse its physiological function as selectively sequestering cholesteryl esters from high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). Less clear is the role of SR-BII, a splice variant of the SR-B gene that differs only in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain. Here, we identify several putative signalling motifs in the C-terminus of human SR-BII, which are absent from SR-BI, and hypothesize that these motifs interact with signalling molecules to mobilize stored cholesteryl esters and/or promote the efflux of intracellular free cholesterol. 'Pull-down' assays using a panel of tagged SH3 (Src homology 3) domains showed that cytoplasmic SR-BII, but not cytoplasmic SR-BI, bound the SH3 domain of phospholipase C-gamma1; this interaction was not, however, detected under more physiological conditions. Specific anti-peptide antisera identified SR-BII in human monocyte/macrophage THP-1 cells and, in recombinant cells, revealed receptor localization to caveolae, a plasma membrane microdomain that concentrates signal-transducer molecules and acts as a conduit for cholesterol flux between cells and lipoproteins. Consistent with its caveolar localization, expression of human SR-BII in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-SR-BII) was associated with increased HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux. Nevertheless, when CHO-SR-BII cells were pre-loaded with cholesteryl [(3)H]oleate and incubated with HDL, cholesteryl ester stores were not reduced compared with control cells. We conclude that although human SR-BII is expressed by macrophages, contains cytoplasmic signalling motifs and localizes to caveolae, its ability to stimulate cholesterol efflux does not reflect enhanced hydrolysis of stored cholesteryl esters. PMID:14570588

  14. High-Density Lipoproteins Rescue Diabetes-Impaired Angiogenesis via Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joanne T M; Prosser, Hamish C G; Dunn, Louise L; Vanags, Laura Z; Ridiandries, Anisyah; Tsatralis, Tania; Leece, Laura; Clayton, Zoë E; Yuen, Sui Ching G; Robertson, Stacy; Lam, Yuen Ting; Celermajer, David S; Ng, Martin K C; Bursill, Christina A

    2016-10-01

    Disordered neovascularization and impaired wound healing are important contributors to diabetic vascular complications. We recently showed that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) enhance ischemia-mediated neovascularization, and mounting evidence suggests HDL have antidiabetic properties. We therefore hypothesized that HDL rescue diabetes-impaired neovascularization. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice had reduced blood flow recovery and neovessel formation in a hindlimb ischemia model compared with nondiabetic mice. Reconstituted HDL (rHDL) infusions in diabetic mice restored blood flow recovery and capillary density to nondiabetic levels. Topical rHDL application rescued diabetes-impaired wound closure, wound angiogenesis, and capillary density. In vitro, rHDL increased key mediators involved in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stabilization, including the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway, Siah1, and Siah2, and suppressed the prolyl hydroxylases (PHD) 2 and PHD3. rHDL rescued high glucose-induced impairment of tubulogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A protein production, a finding associated with enhanced phosphorylation of proangiogenic mediators VEGF receptor 2 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Siah1/2 small interfering RNA knockdown confirmed the importance of HIF-1α stability in mediating rHDL action. Lentiviral short hairpin RNA knockdown of scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in vitro and SR-BI(-/-) diabetic mice in vivo attenuated rHDL rescue of diabetes-impaired angiogenesis, indicating a key role for SR-BI. These findings provide a greater understanding of the vascular biological effects of HDL, with potential therapeutic implications for diabetic vascular complications. PMID:27284113

  15. Suppression of TLR4-mediated inflammatory response by macrophage class A scavenger receptor (CD204)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Takemura, Kenichi; Lei, XiaoFeng; Nakagawa, Takenobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} We focused on the interaction between SR-A and TLR4 signaling in this study. {yields} SR-A deletion promoted NF{kappa}B activation in macrophages in septic model mouse. {yields} SR-A suppresses both MyD88-dependent and -independent TLR4 signaling in vitro. {yields} SR-A clears LPS binding to TLR4 which resulting in the suppression of TLR4 signals. -- Abstract: The class A scavenger receptor (SR-A, CD204), one of the principal receptors expressed on macrophages, has been found to regulate inflammatory response and attenuate septic endotoxemia. However, the detailed mechanism of this process has not yet been well characterized. To clarify the regulative mechanisms of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage activation by SR-A, we evaluated the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated signaling molecules in SR-A-deficient (SR-A{sup -/-}) macrophages. In a septic shock model, the blood levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-{beta} were significantly increased in SR-A{sup -/-} mice compared to wild-type mice, and elevated nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation was detected in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. SR-A deletion increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF{kappa}B in vitro. SR-A deletion also promoted the nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B and IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-3. In addition, a competitive binding assay with acetylated low-density lipoprotein, an SR-A-specific ligand, and anti-SR-A antibody induced significant activation of TLR4-mediated signaling molecules in wild-type macrophages but not in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. These results suggest that SR-A suppresses the macrophage activation by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 in a competitive manner and it plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the LPS-induced inflammatory response.

  16. Role of Macrophage Scavenger Receptors in Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Takuro; Naito, Makoto; Yamamoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Go; Gejyo, Fumitake; Mitsuyama, Masao; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko

    2001-01-01

    Type I and type II macrophage scavenger receptors (SR-A I/II) recognize a variety of polyanions including bacterial cell-wall products such as lipopolysaccharide, suggesting a role for SR-A I/II in immunity against bacterial infection. SR-A I/II-deficient (MSR-A−/−) mice were more susceptible to infection with listeriolysin-O (LLO)-producing Listeria monocytogenes. After infection, Kupffer cells in wild-type (MSR-A+/+) mice phagocytized larger numbers of Listeria than those in MSR-A−/− mice. The number and the diameter of hepatic granulomas were larger in MSR-A−/− mice than MSR-A+/+ mice. L. monocytogenes replicated at higher levels in the liver of MSR-A−/− mice compared with MSR-A+/+ mice, and macrophages from MSR-A−/− mice showed impaired ability to kill Listeria in vitro. However, macrophages from MSR-A+/+ and MSR-A−/− mice showed similar levels of listericidal activity against isogenic mutant L. monocytogenes with an inactivated LLO gene. The listerial phagocytic activities of MSR-A+/+ macrophages treated with an anti-SR-A I/II antibody (2F8) and MSR-A−/− macrophages were significantly impaired compared with untreated MSR-A+/+ macrophages, indicating that SR-A I/II function as a receptor for L. monocytogenes. Electron microscopy revealed that most L. monocytogenes had been eliminated from the lysosomes of MSR-A+/+ macrophages in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, L. monocytogenes rapidly lysed the phagosomal membrane and escaped to the cytosol in MSR-A−/− macrophages and in MSR-A+/+ macrophages treated with 2F8 before phagosome-lysosome fusion. These findings imply that SR-A I/II plays a crucial role in host defense against listerial infection not only by functioning as a receptor but also by mediating listericidal mechanisms through the regulation of LLO-dependent listerial escape from the macrophages. PMID:11141491

  17. Advanced glycation end products are eliminated by scavenger-receptor-mediated endocytosis in hepatic sinusoidal Kupffer and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Smedsrød, B; Melkko, J; Araki, N; Sano, H; Horiuchi, S

    1997-01-01

    Long-term incubation of proteins with glucose leads to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE). Physiological aspects of the catabolism of non-enzymically glycated proteins were studied in vivo and in vitro. AGE-modified BSA (AGE-BSA) was a mixture of high-Mr (cross-linked), monomeric and low-Mr (fragmented) AGE-BSA. After intravenous administration in rat, all three fractions of AGE-BSA accumulated extremely rapidly and almost exclusively in liver. Uptake in liver endothelial, Kupffer and parenchymal cells accounted for approx. 60%, 25% and 10-15% respectively of hepatic elimination. Both cross-linked and monomeric AGE-BSA were efficiently taken up and degraded in cultures of purified liver endothelial and Kupffer cells. Endocytosis of AGE-BSA by these cells was inhibited by several ligands for the scavenger receptor. Although 125I-Hb was not endocytosed in vitro, 125I-AGE-Hb was effectively endocytosed by a mechanism that was subject to inhibition by AGE-BSA. Endocytosis of N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen, a physiological ligand for the scavenger receptor, was effectively inhibited by AGE-Hb and AGE-BSA. We conclude that AGE-modification renders macromolecules susceptible for elimination via the scavenger receptor of both liver endothelial and Kupffer cells. PMID:9065778

  18. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. PMID:22988039

  19. Surfactant Protein A (SP-A)-mediated Clearance of Staphylococcus aureus Involves Binding of SP-A to the Staphylococcal Adhesin Eap and the Macrophage Receptors SP-A Receptor 210 and Scavenger Receptor Class A*

    PubMed Central

    Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Krupa, Agnieszka; Davis, Jeremy; Hasan, Misbah; Yang, Ching-Hui; Szeliga, Jacek; Herrmann, Mathias; Hussain, Muzafar; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Kobzik, Lester; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening pneumonia in hospitals and deadly superinfection during viral influenza. The current study investigated the role of surfactant protein A (SP-A) in opsonization and clearance of S. aureus. Previous studies showed that SP-A mediates phagocytosis via the SP-A receptor 210 (SP-R210). Here, we show that SP-R210 mediates binding and control of SP-A-opsonized S. aureus by macrophages. We determined that SP-A binds S. aureus through the extracellular adhesin Eap. Consequently, SP-A enhanced macrophage uptake of Eap-expressing (Eap+) but not Eap-deficient (Eap−) S. aureus. In a reciprocal fashion, SP-A failed to enhance uptake of Eap+ S. aureus in peritoneal Raw264.7 macrophages with a dominant negative mutation (SP-R210(DN)) blocking surface expression of SP-R210. Accordingly, WT mice cleared infection with Eap+ but succumbed to sublethal infection with Eap- S. aureus. However, SP-R210(DN) cells compensated by increasing non-opsonic phagocytosis of Eap+ S. aureus via the scavenger receptor scavenger receptor class A (SR-A), while non-opsonic uptake of Eap− S. aureus was impaired. Macrophages express two isoforms: SP-R210L and SP-R210S. The results show that WT alveolar macrophages are distinguished by expression of SP-R210L, whereas SR-A−/− alveolar macrophages are deficient in SP-R210L expressing only SP-R210S. Accordingly, SR-A−/− mice were highly susceptible to both Eap+ and Eap− S. aureus. The lungs of susceptible mice generated abnormal inflammatory responses that were associated with impaired killing and persistence of S. aureus infection in the lung. In conclusion, alveolar macrophage SP-R210L mediates recognition and killing of SP-A-opsonized S. aureus in vivo, coordinating inflammatory responses and resolution of S. aureus pneumonia through interaction with SR-A. PMID:21123169

  20. The dual role of scavenger receptor class A in development of diabetes in autoimmune NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Mami; Yasuda, Hisafumi; Hara, Kenta; Takahashi, Kazuma; Nagata, Masao; Yokono, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Human type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from the autoreactive destruction of pancreatic β cells by T cells. Antigen presenting cells including dendritic cells and macrophages are required to activate and suppress antigen-specific T cells. It has been suggested that antigen uptake from live cells by dendritic cells via scavenger receptor class A (SR-A) may be important. However, the role of SR-A in autoimmune disease is unknown. In this study, SR-A-/- nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice showed significant attenuation of insulitis, lower levels of insulin autoantibodies, and suppression of diabetes development compared with NOD mice. We also found that diabetes progression in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with low-dose polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) was significantly accelerated compared with that in disease-resistant NOD mice treated with low-dose poly(I:C). In addition, injection of high-dose poly(I: C) to mimic an acute RNA virus infection significantly accelerated diabetes development in young SR-A-/- NOD mice compared with untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. Pathogenic cells including CD4+CD25+ activated T cells were increased more in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with poly(I:C) than in untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggested that viral infection might accelerate diabetes development even in diabetes-resistant subjects. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that diabetes progression was suppressed in SR-A-/- NOD mice and that acceleration of diabetes development could be induced in young mice by poly(I:C) treatment even in SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggest that SR-A on antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells may play an unfavorable role in the steady state and a protective role in a mild infection. Our findings imply that SR-A may be an important target for improving therapeutic strategies for type 1 diabetes. PMID:25343451

  1. Scavenger Receptor C-Type Lectin Binds to the Leukocyte Cell Surface Glycan Lewis By a Novel Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, H.; Taylor, M.E.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-07-10

    The scavenger receptor C-type lectin (SRCL) is unique in the family of class A scavenger receptors, because in addition to binding sites for oxidized lipoproteins it also contains a C-type carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) that interacts with specific glycans. Both human and mouse SRCL are highly specific for the Lewis(x) trisaccharide, which is commonly found on the surfaces of leukocytes and some tumor cells. Structural analysis of the CRD of mouse SRCL in complex with Lewis(x) and mutagenesis show the basis for this specificity. The interaction between mouse SRCL and Lewis(x) is analogous to the way that selectins and DC-SIGN bind to related fucosylated glycans, but the mechanism of the interaction is novel, because it is based on a primary galactose-binding site similar to the binding site in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Crystals of the human receptor lacking bound calcium ions reveal an alternative conformation in which a glycan ligand would be released during receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  2. Response of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors during lung inflation.

    PubMed

    Pack, A I; DeLaney, R G

    1983-09-01

    Studies were conducted to establish the factors that determine the response of canine pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors (RAR) during lung inflation. Inflations of the lung were performed at several constant rates during which the activity of individual RAR was counted. At each rate of inflation tested multiple identical tests were performed. The volume of each test inflation was controlled. Data obtained in all tests at each flow rate were averaged to give the mean response of the receptor at that rate of inflation. These studies indicate the major response characteristics of RAR during lung inflation in conditions of relatively constant lung mechanics. First, at a constant rate of inflation, the activity of RAR augments increasingly as the lung is expanded. Second, their activity is influenced markedly by the rate of inflation. However, this sensitivity is nonlinear. Specifically, at low rates of inflation increases in flow rate produce more marked augmentation of RAR firing than do identical increases in flow at higher rates of inflation. The major difference between receptors is in their threshold; however, this too is a function of flow rate. With increasing flow rate the threshold, whether measured as the inflation volume or transpulmonary pressure at which receptors begin to fire, declines. The response of receptors, however, with thresholds over the entire range show the major features discussed above. The present results provide quantitative information which are necessary to begin to eludicate the transduction properties of this receptor type.

  3. Evolutionarily conserved recognition and innate immunity to fungal pathogens by the scavenger receptors SCARF1 and CD36

    PubMed Central

    Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Colvin, Richard A.; Seung, Edward; Puckett, Lindsay; Tai, Melissa F.; Stewart, Cameron R.; Pukkila-Worley, Read; Hickman, Suzanne E.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Hacohen, Nir; Luster, Andrew D.; El Khoury, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Receptors involved in innate immunity to fungal pathogens have not been fully elucidated. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans receptors CED-1 and C03F11.3, and their mammalian orthologues, the scavenger receptors SCARF1 and CD36, mediate host defense against two prototypic fungal pathogens, Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans. CED-1 and C03F11.1 mediated antimicrobial peptide production and were necessary for nematode survival after C. neoformans infection. SCARF1 and CD36 mediated cytokine production and were required for macrophage binding to C. neoformans, and control of the infection in mice. Binding of these pathogens to SCARF1 and CD36 was β-glucan dependent. Thus, CED-1/SCARF1 and C03F11.3/CD36 are β-glucan binding receptors and define an evolutionarily conserved pathway for the innate sensing of fungal pathogens. PMID:19237602

  4. Tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice: a key role for superoxide anion.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Nesrine S; Mahran, Laila G; Khattab, Mahmoud M

    2011-08-01

    Acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious clinical problem with high mortality. Oxidative stress was found to play a major role in mediating lung injury and antioxidants have been shown to be effective in attenuating acute lung injury. In this study, we determine the effects of tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury and the underlying mechanism. Acute lung injury was induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (1mg/kg) and mice were treated with tempol 30min before injection of LPS. One hour later, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected and subjected to estimation of total and differential cell counts as well as the proinflammatory cytokines; tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α), interleukin-1beta(IL-1β) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Lung tissue damage was confirmed by histopathological changes and by immunohistochemical analysis of myeloperoxidase (MPO). Moreover, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO) were investigated in the lung tissue. Pretreatment with tempol produced significant attenuation of LPS-induced lung injury as well as inhibition of LPS mediated increase in MPO immunostaining, MDA and NO levels in lung tissue. Elevated cytokines levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue homogenates of acute lung injury mice were significantly decreased after administration of tempol. These findings confirmed significant protection by tempol against LPS-induced acute lung injury and that superoxide anion scavenging appears to be a potential target for new potential therapy in pulmonary disorders.

  5. Transient receptor potential channels and regulation of lung endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This review highlights our current knowledge regarding expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels in lung endothelium and evidence for their involvement in regulation of lung endothelial permeability. Six mammalian TRP families have been identified and organized on the basis of sequence homology: TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPML (mucolipin), TRPP (polycystin), and TRPA (ankyrin). To date, only TRPC1/4, TRPC6, TRPV4, and TRPM2 have been extensively studied in lung endothelium. Calcium influx through each of these channels has been documented to increase lung endothelial permeability, although their channel-gating mechanisms, downstream signaling mechanisms, and impact on endothelial structure and barrier integrity differ. While other members of the TRPC, TRPV, and TRPM families may be expressed in lung endothelium, we have little or no evidence linking these to regulation of lung endothelial permeability. Further, neither the expression nor functional role(s) of any TRPML, TRPP, and TRPA family members has been studied in lung endothelium. In addition to this assessment organized by TRP channel family, we also discuss TRP channels and lung endothelial permeability from the perspective of lung endothelial heterogeneity, using outcomes of studies focused on TRPC1/4 and TRPV4 channels. The diversity within the TRP channel family and the relative paucity of information regarding roles of a number of these channels in lung endothelium make this field ripe for continued investigation. PMID:25006396

  6. Tanshinone IIA attenuates atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice through down-regulation of scavenger receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fu-Tian; Cao, Yuan; Wang, Tie-Qiao; Wang, Li-Jing; Guo, Jiao; Zhou, Xiao-Shi; Xu, Suo-Wen; Liu, Wei-Hua; Liu, Pei-Qing; Huang, He-Qing

    2011-01-10

    This study is designed to investigate the protection of tanshinone IIA (TSIIA) against atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice and to explore the mechanisms by focusing on the expressions of scavenger receptors, scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) and CD36. The in vivo study demonstrated that TSIIA (10-90mg/kg) inhibited the atherosclerotic lesions, down-regulated the CD68 protein expression in lesion and decreased the contents of cholesterol in aortas of ApoE(-/-) mice. In addition, TSIIA reduced the serum levels of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) and down-regulated the mRNA expression of CD36, SR-A and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in aortas. The in vitro study showed that TSIIA (0.1-10μM) decreased cholesterol level and DiI-oxLDL uptake in mouse peritoneal macrophages treated with oxLDL (50μg/ml). In addition, TSIIA down-regulated the mRNA and protein expression of CD36 but not that of SR-A in oxLDL treated macrophages. TSIIA also down-regulated the mRNA expression of PPARγ in oxLDL treated macrophages. Furthermore, TSIIA reduced the mRNA expression of CD36 in macrophages treated with PPARγ agonist 15d-PGJ(2) (2μM) or troglitazone (50μM), whereas both 15d-PGJ(2) (0.5-1.5μM) and troglitazone (5-20μM) dose-dependently abolished the down-regulation of CD36 expression by TSIIA in oxLDL treated macrophages. These results suggest that TSIIA attenuates the atherosclerotic lesion in ApoE(-/-) mice, which might be attributed to the properties of both anti-oxidation and down-regulation of scavenger receptors. Furthermore, antagonism of PPARγ might be involved in the down-regulation of CD36 by TSIIA.

  7. CSR, a scavenger receptor-like protein with a protective role against cellular damage causedby UV irradiation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Han, H J; Tokino, T; Nakamura, Y

    1998-06-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathogenic condition that causes cellular damage and, in a normally functioning cell, several transcription factors respond to this threat by modulating expression of genes whose products ameliorate the altered redox status in some way. We have isolated a novel macrophage scavenger receptor-like gene, CSR (cellular stress response), whose transcription in normal fibroblasts was significantly elevated by exposure to UV radiation or hydrogen peroxide, and pre-treatment with antioxidants prevented induction of CSR . Under conditions of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species were significantly depleted in CSR -overexpressing cells, indicating that the CSR product protects cells by scavenging oxidative molecules or harmful products of oxidation. Further investigations into the regulation and function of CSR should open a way to understanding the cellular response and the pathogenic processes caused by oxidative stress.

  8. Scavenger Receptor Class A Plays a Central Role in Mediating Mortality and the Development of the Pro-Inflammatory Phenotype in Polymicrobial Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ozment, Tammy R.; Ha, Tuanzhu; Breuel, Kevin F.; Ford, Tiffany R.; Ferguson, Donald A.; Kalbfleisch, John; Schweitzer, John B.; Kelley, Jim L.; Li, Chuanfu; Williams, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a frequent complication in critical illness. The mechanisms that are involved in initiation and propagation of the disease are not well understood. Scavenger receptor A (SRA) is a membrane receptor that binds multiple polyanions such as oxidized LDL and endotoxin. Recent studies suggest that SRA acts as a pattern recognition receptor in the innate immune response. The goal of the present study was to determine the role of SRA in polymicrobial sepsis. SRA deficient (SRA−/−) and C57BL/6JB/6J (WT) male mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce polymicrobial sepsis. NFκB activity, myeloperoxidase activity, and co-association of SRA with toll like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR2 was analyzed in the lungs. Spleens were analyzed for apoptosis. Serum cytokines and chemokines were assayed. Blood and peritoneal fluid were cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacterial burdens. Long term survival was significantly increased in SRA−/− septic mice (53.6% vs. 3.6%, p<0.05) when compared to WT mice. NFκB activity was 45.5% lower in the lungs of SRA−/− septic mice versus WT septic mice (p<0.05). Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-10 and monocyte chemoattractant protein −1 were significantly lower in septic SRA−/− mice when compared to septic WT mice (p<0.05). We found that SRA immuno-precipitated with TLR4, but not TLR2, in the lungs of WT septic mice. We also found that septic SRA−/− mice had lower bacterial burdens than WT septic mice. SRA deficiency had no effect on pulmonary neutrophil infiltration or splenocyte apoptosis during sepsis. We conclude that SRA plays a pivotal, and previously unknown, role in mediating the pathophysiology of sepsis/septic shock in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Mechanistically, SRA interacts with TLR4 to enhance the development of the pro-inflammatory phenotype and mediate the morbidity and mortality of sepsis/septic shock. PMID:23071440

  9. Influence of class B scavenger receptors on cholesterol flux across the brush border membrane and intestinal absorption.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, David V; Drover, Victor A; Knopfel, Martin; Dhanasekaran, Padmaja; Hauser, Helmut; Phillips, Michael C

    2009-11-01

    To learn more about how the step of cholesterol uptake into the brush border membrane (BBM) of enterocytes influences overall cholesterol absorption, we measured cholesterol absorption 4 and 24 h after administration of an intragastric bolus of radioactive cholesterol in mice with scavenger receptor class B, type 1 (SR-BI) and/or cluster determinant 36 (CD36) deleted. The cholesterol absorption efficiency is unaltered by deletion of either one or both of the receptors. In vitro determinations of the cholesterol uptake specific activity of the BBM from the mice reveal that the scavenger receptors facilitate cholesterol uptake into the proximal BBM. It follows that cholesterol uptake into the BBM is not normally rate-limiting for the cholesterol absorption process in vivo; a subsequent step, such as NPC1L1-mediated transfer from the BBM into the interior of the enterocyte, is rate-limiting. The absorption of dietary cholesterol after 4 h in mice lacking SR-BI and/or CD36 and fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet is delayed to more distal regions of the small intestine. This effect probably arises because ATP binding cassette half transporters G5 and G8-mediated back flux of cholesterol from the BBM to the lumen of the small intestine limits absorption and causes the local cholesterol uptake facilitated by SR-BI and CD36 to become rate-limiting under this dietary condition. PMID:19454765

  10. Activated Human Mast Cells Induce LOX-1-Specific Scavenger Receptor Expression in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Alanne-Kinnunen, Mervi; Lappalainen, Jani; Öörni, Katariina; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). Results Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1) mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1), which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell –induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages. Conclusions Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis. PMID:25250731

  11. Engagement of the scavenger receptor is not responsible for beta-amyloid stimulation of monocytes to a neurocytopathic state.

    PubMed

    Antic, A; Dzenko, K A; Pachter, J S

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine if scavenger receptors (SRs) play a role in amyloid beta (Abeta) stimulation of peripheral blood monocyte (PBM) neurotoxicity. Results indicate that Abeta does not block binding of the SR ligand DiI-acetylated low density lipoprotein to PBM, nor does another SR ligand, fucoidin, inhibit Abeta-PBM binding. Moreover, neither of three SR ligands alone stimulates neurotoxicity in PBM, nor antagonizes the ability of Abeta to activate PBM to a neurocytopathic state. Such findings suggest that Abeta's action is not dependent upon engagement of the SR ligand binding domain and raise doubts about the role of SR in Abeta neurotoxicity.

  12. Angiotensin receptor blockade attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung injury and rescues lung architecture in mice.

    PubMed

    Podowski, Megan; Calvi, Carla; Metzger, Shana; Misono, Kaori; Poonyagariyagorn, Hataya; Lopez-Mercado, Armando; Ku, Therese; Lauer, Thomas; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon; Berger, Alan; Cheadle, Christopher; Tuder, Rubin; Dietz, Harry C; Mitzner, Wayne; Wise, Robert; Neptune, Enid

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent smoking-related disease for which no disease-altering therapies currently exist. As dysregulated TGF-β signaling associates with lung pathology in patients with COPD and in animal models of lung injury induced by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke (CS), we postulated that inhibiting TGF-β signaling would protect against CS-induced lung injury. We first confirmed that TGF-β signaling was induced in the lungs of mice chronically exposed to CS as well as in COPD patient samples. Importantly, key pathological features of smoking-associated lung disease in patients, e.g., alveolar injury with overt emphysema and airway epithelial hyperplasia with fibrosis, accompanied CS-induced alveolar cell apoptosis caused by enhanced TGF-β signaling in CS-exposed mice. Systemic administration of a TGF-β-specific neutralizing antibody normalized TGF-β signaling and alveolar cell death, conferring improved lung architecture and lung mechanics in CS-exposed mice. Use of losartan, an angiotensin receptor type 1 blocker used widely in the clinic and known to antagonize TGF-β signaling, also improved oxidative stress, inflammation, metalloprotease activation and elastin remodeling. These data support our hypothesis that inhibition of TGF-β signaling through angiotensin receptor blockade can attenuate CS-induced lung injury in an established murine model. More importantly, our findings provide a preclinical platform for the development of other TGF-β-targeted therapies for patients with COPD.

  13. Scavenger receptor of human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and murine macrophages for nonenzymatically glycosylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Takata, K; Horiuchi, S; Araki, N; Shiga, M; Saitoh, M; Morino, Y

    1989-11-17

    Long-term incubation of proteins with glucose undergo a series of nonenzymatic reactions to form advanced glycosylation end product (AGE) with fluorescence and brown color. The receptor for AGE-proteins was demonstrated in murine macrophages (Vlassara et al. (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82. 5588). Our recent study with rat macrophages revealed that the receptor also recognized proteins modified with aliphatic aldehydes such as formaldehyde or glycolaldehyde, indicating its close identity to a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins (Takata, K. et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263. 14819). This notion was tested in the present study with human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1 cells), human monocyte macrophages and murine peritoneal macrophages. Endocytic uptake of AGE-proteins and aldehyde-modified proteins was inhibited in a cross-competitive fashion. The receptor activities of THP-1 cells for AGE-albumin and aldehyde-modified proteins were induced synchronously by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Furthermore, upon reduction by NaBH4 of the Schiff base formed between proteins and glucose or aldehydes, no ligand activity was generated. However, once the ligand activity was generated, NaBH4 was no longer effective for the ligand activity. Thus, a structure in common between AGE-proteins and aldehyde-modified proteins may be crucial for recognition by the human macrophage receptor.

  14. Neurotrophin receptor TrkB promotes lung adenocarcinoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sinkevicius, Kerstin W; Kriegel, Christina; Bellaria, Kelly J; Lee, Jaewon; Lau, Allison N; Leeman, Kristen T; Zhou, Pengcheng; Beede, Alexander M; Fillmore, Christine M; Caswell, Deborah; Barrios, Juliana; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sholl, Lynette M; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Bronson, Roderick T; Chirieac, Lucian R; Winslow, Monte M; Haigis, Marcia C; Kim, Carla F

    2014-07-15

    Lung cancer is notorious for its ability to metastasize, but the pathways regulating lung cancer metastasis are largely unknown. An in vitro system designed to discover factors critical for lung cancer cell migration identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which stimulates cell migration through activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB; also called NTRK2). Knockdown of TrkB in human lung cancer cell lines significantly decreased their migratory and metastatic ability in vitro and in vivo. In an autochthonous lung adenocarcinoma model driven by activated oncogenic Kras and p53 loss, TrkB deficiency significantly reduced metastasis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 directly regulated TrkB expression, and, in turn, TrkB activated Akt signaling in metastatic lung cancer cells. Finally, TrkB expression was correlated with metastasis in patient samples, and TrkB was detected more often in tumors that did not have Kras or epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. These studies demonstrate that TrkB is an important therapeutic target in metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:24982195

  15. The Scavenger Receptor SSc5D Physically Interacts with Bacteria through the SRCR-Containing N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bessa Pereira, Catarina; Bocková, Markéta; Santos, Rita F.; Santos, Ana Mafalda; Martins de Araújo, Mafalda; Oliveira, Liliana; Homola, Jiří; Carmo, Alexandre M.

    2016-01-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) family comprises a group of membrane-attached or secreted proteins that contain one or more modules/domains structurally similar to the membrane distal domain of type I macrophage scavenger receptor. Although no all-inclusive biological function has been ascribed to the SRCR family, some of these receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) of bacteria, fungi, or other microbes. SSc5D is a recently described soluble SRCR receptor produced by monocytes/macrophages and T lymphocytes, consisting of an N-terminal portion, which contains five SRCR modules, and a large C-terminal mucin-like domain. Toward establishing a global common role for SRCR domains, we interrogated whether the set of five SRCR domains of SSc5D displayed pattern recognition receptor (PRR) properties. For that purpose, we have expressed in a mammalian expression system the N-terminal SRCR-containing moiety of SSc5D (N-SSc5D), thus excluding the mucin-like domain likely by nature to bind microorganisms, and tested the capacity of the SRCR functional groups to physically interact with bacteria. Using conventional protein–bacteria binding assays, we showed that N-SSc5D had a superior capacity to bind to Escherichia coli strains RS218 and IHE3034 compared with that of the extracellular domains of the SRCR proteins CD5 and CD6 (sCD5 and sCD6, respectively), and similar E. coli-binding properties as Spα, a proven PRR of the SRCR family. We have further designed a more sensitive, real-time, and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based assay and examined the capacity of N-SSc5D, Spα, sCD5, and sCD6 to bind to different bacteria. We demonstrated that N-SSc5D compares with Spα in the capacity to bind to E. coli and Listeria monocytogenes, and further that it can distinguish between pathogenic E. coli RS218 and IHE3034 strains and the non-pathogenic laboratory E. coli strain BL21(DE3). Our work thus advocates the

  16. Comparative Genomics Suggests that the Fungal Pathogen Pneumocystis Is an Obligate Parasite Scavenging Amino Acids from Its Host's Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Philippe M.; Burdet, Frédéric X.; Cissé, Ousmane H.; Keller, Laurent; Taffé, Patrick; Sanglard, Dominique; Pagni, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungus causing severe pneumonia in immuno-compromised patients. Progress in understanding its pathogenicity and epidemiology has been hampered by the lack of a long-term in vitro culture method. Obligate parasitism of this pathogen has been suggested on the basis of various features but remains controversial. We analysed the 7.0 Mb draft genome sequence of the closely related species Pneumocystis carinii infecting rats, which is a well established experimental model of the disease. We predicted 8’085 (redundant) peptides and 14.9% of them were mapped onto the KEGG biochemical pathways. The proteome of the closely related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was used as a control for the annotation procedure (4’974 genes, 14.1% mapped). About two thirds of the mapped peptides of each organism (65.7% and 73.2%, respectively) corresponded to crucial enzymes for the basal metabolism and standard cellular processes. However, the proportion of P. carinii genes relative to those of S. pombe was significantly smaller for the “amino acid metabolism” category of pathways than for all other categories taken together (40 versus 114 against 278 versus 427, P<0.002). Importantly, we identified in P. carinii only 2 enzymes specifically dedicated to the synthesis of the 20 standard amino acids. By contrast all the 54 enzymes dedicated to this synthesis reported in the KEGG atlas for S. pombe were detected upon reannotation of S. pombe proteome (2 versus 54 against 278 versus 427, P<0.0001). This finding strongly suggests that species of the genus Pneumocystis are scavenging amino acids from their host's lung environment. Consequently, they would have no form able to live independently from another organism, and these parasites would be obligate in addition to being opportunistic. These findings have implications for the management of patients susceptible to P. jirovecii infection given that the only source of infection would be other humans. PMID

  17. Determination of in vitro free radical scavenging and antiproliferative effect of Pennisetum alopecuroides on cultured A549 human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Githa Elizabeth; Mathew, Bijo; Gokul, S.; Krishna, Rahul; Farisa, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pennisetum alopecuroides (Poaceae) is a grass predominantly distributed in tropics and sub tropics. It is used as a cattle feed in many regions. Aim: The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro free radical scavenging and antiproliferative activity of ethanol extract of P. alopecuroides (EEPA) on cultured A549 human lung cancer cell lines. Settings and Design: The anti-oxidant activity of ethanol extract was evaluated at dose level 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/ml. The in vitro antiproliferative activity was measured at doses of 10, 50, and 100 μg/ml. Materials and Methods: The free radical scavenging activity of the EEPA was determined by 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method and in vitro antiproliferative activity on A549 human lung cancer cells was conducted by using MTT assay method. Results: The phytochemical screening revealed that the P. alopecuroides contained alkaloids, tannins, saponins, and flavonoids as the major secondary metabolites. The IC50 value of DPPH scavenging activity was found to be 44.41 μg/ml and 31.02 μg/ml  for a mixture of EEPA and standard ascorbic acid, respectively. In vitro MTT assay showed that EEPA had anti-proliferation effects on A549 cells in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions: This is the 1st time a pharmacological exploration of P. alopecuroides grasses has been conducted. We have shown that P. alopecuroides exhibits good free radical scavenging and strong in vitro cytotoxic activities against human lung cancer cell lines. PMID:26120234

  18. Identification of a sequence in the matricellular protein SPARC that interacts with the scavenger receptor stabilin-1.

    PubMed

    Workman, Gail; Sage, E Helene

    2011-04-01

    SPARC (osteonectin/BM-40), a secreted matricellular protein that promotes cellular deadhesion and motility in wound healing, carcinogenesis, and inflammation, binds to the scavenger receptor stabilin-1 in alternatively activated macrophages and undergoes endocytosis and clearance from the extracellular space. Both SPARC and stabilin-1 are expressed by endothelial cells during inflammation, but their interaction in this context is unknown. We have identified a binding site on SPARC for stabilin-1 by a solid-state peptide array coupled with a modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes the identified binding site was also characterized that could be an inhibitor for the SPARC-stabilin-1 interaction in macrophages or endothelial cells.

  19. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sumi, Tadateru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation.

  20. Taste Receptor Signaling-- From Tongues to Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Kinnamon, Sue C.

    2013-01-01

    Taste buds are the transducing endorgans of gustation. Each taste bud comprises 50–100 elongated cells, which extend from the basal lamina to the surface of the tongue, where their apical microvilli encounter taste stimuli in the oral cavity. Salts and acids utilize apically located ion channels for transduction, while bitter, sweet and umami (glutamate) stimuli utilize G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and second messenger signaling mechanisms. This review will focus on GPCR signaling mechanisms. Two classes of taste GPCRs have been identified, the T1Rs for sweet and umami (glutamate) stimuli, and the T2Rs for bitter stimuli. These low affinity GPCRs all couple to the same downstream signaling effectors that include Gβγ activation of PLCβ2, IP3-mediated release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores, and Ca2+-dependent activation of the monovalent selective cation channel, TrpM5. These events lead to membrane depolarization, action potentials, and release of ATP as a transmitter to activate gustatory afferents. The Gα subunit, α-gustducin, activates a phosphodiesterase to decrease intracellular cAMP levels, although the precise targets of cAMP have not been identified. With the molecular identification of the taste GPCRs, it has become clear that taste signaling is not limited to taste buds, but occurs in many cell types of the airways. These include solitary chemosensory cells, ciliated epithelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. Bitter receptors are most abundantly expressed in the airways, where they respond to irritating chemicals and promote protective airway reflexes, utilizing the same downstream signaling effectors as taste cells. PMID:21481196

  1. Design and synthesis of novel 3-substituted-indole derivatives as selective H3 receptor antagonists and potent free radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li; Zhao, Liying; Hong, Lingjuan; Yang, Fenyan; Sheng, Rong; Chen, Jianzhong; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naimin; Hu, Yongzhou

    2013-10-01

    A series of novel 3-substituted-indole derivatives with a benzyl tertiary amino moiety were designed, synthesized and evaluated as H3 receptor antagonists and free radical scavengers for Alzheimer's disease therapy. Most of these synthesized compounds exhibited moderate to potent antagonistic activities in CREs driven luciferase assay. In particular, compound 2d demonstrated the most favorable H3 receptor antagonistic activity with the IC50 value of 0.049μM. Besides, it also displayed high binding affinity to H3 receptor (Ki=4.26±2.55nM) and high selectivity over other three histamine receptors. Moreover, 2d and other two 3-substituted indole derivatives 1d and 3d exerted potent ABTS radical cation scavenging capacities similar to melatonin. Above results illustrate that 2d is an interesting lead for extensive optimization to explore new drug candidate for AD therapy.

  2. Lowbush blueberries inhibit scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-A expression and attenuate foam cell formation in ApoE-deficient mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries have recently been reported to reduce atherosclerotic lesion progression in apoE deficient (apoE-/-) mice. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine whether blueberries altered scavenger receptors expression and foam cell fo...

  3. Scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis by sinusoidal cells in rat bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Endocytosis of serum albumin by sinusoidal endothelial cells in rat bone marrow was investigated initially at the ultrastructural level with subsequent biochemical investigation of the specificity mediating this event. Bovine serum albumin adsorbed to 20nm colloidal gold particles (AuBSA) was chosen as the electron microscopic probe. Morphological data strongly suggested that a receptor was involved in uptake of AuBSA. Confirmation of receptor involvement in the uptake of AuBSA by marrow sinusoidal endothelial cells was achieved utilizing an in situ isolated hind limb perfusion protocol in conjunction with unlabeled, radiolabeled, and radio-/colloidal gold labeled probes. The major findings of competition and saturation experiments were: (1) endocytosis of AuBSA was mediated by a receptor for modified/treated serum albumin; (2) endocytosis of formaldehyde-treated serum albumin was mediated by a binding site which may be the same or closely related to the site responsible for the uptake of AuBSA; and (3) endocytosis of native untreated albumin was not mediated by receptor and probably represents fluid-phase pinocitosis.

  4. Lipoprotein (a) upregulates ABCA1 in liver cells via scavenger receptor-B1 through its oxidized phospholipids[S

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Monika; Von Zychlinski-Kleffmann, Anne; Porteous, Carolyn M.; Jones, Gregory T.; Williams, Michael J. A.; McCormick, Sally P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] are a well-established risk factor for developing CVD. While Lp(a) levels are thought to be independent of other plasma lipoproteins, some trials have reported a positive association between Lp(a) and HDL. Whether Lp(a) has a direct effect on HDL is not known. Here we investigated to determine whether Lp(a) had any effect on the ABCA1 pathway of HDL production in liver cells. Incubation of HepG2 cells with Lp(a) upregulated the PPARγ protein by 1.7-fold and the liver X receptor α protein by 3-fold. This was accompanied by a 1.8-fold increase in ABCA1 protein and a 1.5-fold increase in cholesterol efflux onto apoA1. We showed that Lp(a) was internalized by HepG2 cells, however, the ABCA1 response to Lp(a) was mediated by the selective uptake of oxidized phospholipids (oxPLs) from Lp(a) via the scavenger receptor-B1 and not by Lp(a) internalization per se. We conclude that there is a biological connection between Lp(a) and HDL through the ability of Lp(a)’s oxPLs to upregulate HDL biosynthesis. PMID:25852127

  5. Zerumbone suppresses phorbol ester-induced expression of multiple scavenger receptor genes in THP-1 human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ai; Kaneko, Yuki; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2007-04-01

    Unregulated uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) via macrophage scavenger receptors (SRs), such as lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), is a key event in atherosclerosis. In the present study, we used differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model of the human small intestine to evaluate the suppressive effects of 16 traditional food items selected from Okinawa on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced LOX-1 mRNA expression in THP-1 human monocyte-like cells. Three Zingiberaceae plants, Curcuma aromatica Salisbury, Curcuma longa L., and Zingiber zerumbet Smith, markedly suppressed that expression. When added to the apical sides of Caco-2 monolayers, zerumbone, a sesquiterpene from Z. zerumbet Smith, was found to permeate into the basolateral medium as an intact structure in a time-dependent manner. alpha-Humulene, a structural analog of zerumbone lacking the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group, did not suppress LOX-1 mRNA expression, indicating that its electrophilic moiety might play pivotal roles in its activities. Further, zerumbone attenuated the expression of SR-A, SR-PSOX, and CD36, but not that of CD68 or CLA-1, leading to a blockade of DiI-acLDL uptake, while it also inhibited the transcriptional activities of activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB. Together, our results indicate that zerumbone is a potential phytochemical for regulating atherosclerosis with reasonable action mechanisms.

  6. Development and application of a nonradioactive binding assay of oxidized low-density lipoprotein to macrophage scavenger receptors

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Erica N.; Boullier, Agnès; Almazan, Felicidad; Binder, Christoph J.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Hartvigsen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherogenesis in part through excessive uptake of oxidized LDL (OxLDL) via scavenger receptors. Binding of OxLDL to macrophages has traditionally been assessed using radiolabeled OxLDL. To allow more efficient and convenient measurements, we developed a nonradioactive binding assay in which biotinylated OxLDL (Bt-OxLDL) is added to macrophages in 96-well microtiter culture plates under various conditions and the extent of binding is determined using solid phase chemiluminescent immunoassay techniques. As examples, we show that Bt-OxLDL displayed high and saturable binding to macrophages in contrast to Bt-LDL, which showed very low binding. In competition assays, unlabeled OxLDL and the anti-OxLDL monoclonal antibody E06 inhibited Bt-OxLDL binding to macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Specific binding of Bt-OxLDL to ApoE/SR-A/CD36 triple knockout macrophages was reduced by 80% as compared with binding to macrophages from ApoE knockout mice. Binding of Bt-OxLDL to CD36 transfected COS-7 cells showed enhanced saturable binding compared with mock-transfected cells. This assay avoids the use of radioactivity and uses small amounts of materials. It can be used to study binding of OxLDL to macrophages and factors that influence this binding. The techniques described should be readily adaptable to study of other ligands, receptors, and cell types. PMID:23997238

  7. Bovine gall-bladder mucin contains two distinct tandem repeating sequences: evidence for scavenger receptor cysteine-rich repeats.

    PubMed

    Nunes, D P; Keates, A C; Afdhal, N H; Offner, G D

    1995-08-15

    Gall-bladder mucin is a densely glycosylated macromolecule which is the primary secretory product of the gall-bladder epithelium. It has been shown to bind cholesterol and other biliary lipids and to promote cholesterol crystal nucleation in vitro. In order to understand the molecular basis for mucin-lipid interactions, bovine gall-bladder mucin cDNAs were identified by expression cloning and were isolated and sequenced. The nucleotide sequences of these cDNAs revealed two distinct tandem repeating domains. One of these domains contained a 20-amino acid tandem repeating sequence enriched in threonine, serine and proline. This sequence was similar to, but not identical with, the short tandem repeating sequences identified previously in other mammalian mucins. The other domain contained a 127-amino acid tandem repeating sequence enriched in cysteine and glycine. This repeat displayed considerable sequence similarity to a family of receptor- and ligand-binding proteins containing scavenger receptor cysteine-rich repeats. By analogy with other proteins containing these cysteine-rich repeats, it is possible that, in gall-bladder mucin, this domain serves as a binding site for hydrophobic ligands such as bilirubin, cholesterol and other biliary lipids.

  8. Nuclear Receptor Expression and Function in Human Lung Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihye; Sato, Mitsuo; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Larsen, Jill E.; Minna, John D.; Cha, Jeong-Heon; Jeong, Yangsik

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is caused by combinations of diverse genetic mutations. Here, to understand the relevance of nuclear receptors (NRs) in the oncogene-associated lung cancer pathogenesis, we investigated the expression profile of the entire 48 NR members by using QPCR analysis in a panel of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) that included precancerous and tumorigenic HBECs harboring oncogenic K-rasV12 and/or p53 alterations. The analysis of the profile revealed that oncogenic alterations accompanied transcriptional changes in the expression of 19 NRs in precancerous HBECs and 15 NRs according to the malignant progression of HBECs. Amongst these, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a NR chosen as a proof-of-principle study, showed increased expression in precancerous HBECs, which was surprisingly reversed when these HBECs acquired full in vivo tumorigenicity. Notably, PPARγ activation by thiazolidinedione (TZD) treatment reversed the increased expression of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) in precancerous HBECs. In fully tumorigenic HBECs with inducible expression of PPARγ, TZD treatments inhibited tumor cell growth, clonogenecity, and cell migration in a PPARγ-sumoylation dependent manner. Mechanistically, the sumoylation of liganded-PPARγ decreased COX2 expression and increased 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression. This suggests that ligand-mediated sumoylation of PPARγ plays an important role in lung cancer pathogenesis by modulating prostaglandin metabolism. PMID:26244663

  9. Plant Carbohydrate Scavenging through TonB-Dependent Receptors: A Feature Shared by Phytopathogenic and Aquatic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Alice; Lautier, Martine; Guynet, Catherine; Denancé, Nicolas; Vasse, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs) are outer membrane proteins mainly known for the active transport of iron siderophore complexes in Gram-negative bacteria. Analysis of the genome of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), predicts 72 TBDRs. Such an overrepresentation is common in Xanthomonas species but is limited to only a small number of bacteria. Here, we show that one Xcc TBDR transports sucrose with a very high affinity, suggesting that it might be a sucrose scavenger. This TBDR acts with an inner membrane transporter, an amylosucrase and a regulator to utilize sucrose, thus defining a new type of carbohydrate utilization locus, named CUT locus, involving a TBDR for the transport of substrate across the outer membrane. This sucrose CUT locus is required for full pathogenicity on Arabidopsis, showing its importance for the adaptation to host plants. A systematic analysis of Xcc TBDR genes and a genome context survey suggested that several Xcc TBDRs belong to other CUT loci involved in the utilization of various plant carbohydrates. Interestingly, several Xcc TBDRs and CUT loci are conserved in aquatic bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus, Colwellia psychrerythraea, Saccharophagus degradans, Shewanella spp., Sphingomonas spp. or Pseudoalteromonas spp., which share the ability to degrade a wide variety of complex carbohydrates and display TBDR overrepresentation. We therefore propose that TBDR overrepresentation and the presence of CUT loci designate the ability to scavenge carbohydrates. Thus CUT loci, which seem to participate to the adaptation of phytopathogenic bacteria to their host plants, might also play a very important role in the biogeochemical cycling of plant-derived nutrients in marine environments. Moreover, the TBDRs and CUT loci identified in this study are clearly different from those characterized in the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which allow glycan foraging, suggesting a convergent

  10. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Landscape in Lung Cancer: Therapeutical Implications.

    PubMed

    Quintanal-Villalonga, A; Paz-Ares, Luis; Ferrer, Irene; Molina-Pinelo, S

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease responsible for the most cases of cancer-related deaths. The majority of patients are clinically diagnosed at advanced stages, with a poor survival rate. For this reason, the identification of oncodrivers and novel biomarkers is decisive for the future clinical management of this pathology. The rise of high throughput technologies popularly referred to as "omics" has accelerated the discovery of new biomarkers and drivers for this pathology. Within them, tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) have proven to be of importance as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive tools and, due to their molecular nature, as therapeutic targets. Along this review, the role of TKRs in the different lung cancer histologies, research on improvement of anti-TKR therapy, and the current approaches to manage anti-TKR resistance will be discussed. PMID:27528792

  11. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Landscape in Lung Cancer: Therapeutical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Quintanal-Villalonga, A.; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease responsible for the most cases of cancer-related deaths. The majority of patients are clinically diagnosed at advanced stages, with a poor survival rate. For this reason, the identification of oncodrivers and novel biomarkers is decisive for the future clinical management of this pathology. The rise of high throughput technologies popularly referred to as “omics” has accelerated the discovery of new biomarkers and drivers for this pathology. Within them, tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) have proven to be of importance as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive tools and, due to their molecular nature, as therapeutic targets. Along this review, the role of TKRs in the different lung cancer histologies, research on improvement of anti-TKR therapy, and the current approaches to manage anti-TKR resistance will be discussed. PMID:27528792

  12. Molecular Recognition and Scavenging of Arsenate from Aqueous Solution Using Dimetallic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, Chris D; Weiss, Dominik J; Shivalingam, Arun; White, Andrew J P; Salaün, Pascal; Vilar, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    A series of copper(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) dimetallic complexes were prepared and their affinities towards arsenate investigated. Indicator displacement assays (IDAs) were carried out to establish the complexes with best affinities towards arsenate. A di-zinc complex (3) was selected and its arsenate-binding abilities investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The X-ray crystal structure of this metallo-receptor bound to arsenate is also reported, which allowed us to establish the binding mode between 3 and this oxyanion. Immobilising 3 onto HypoGel resin yielded a novel adsorbent (Zn–HypoGel) with high affinity for arsenate. Adsorption of arsenate from competitive solutions and natural groundwater was greater than that of the commercially used iron oxide Bayoxide E33. Zn–HypoGel could be efficiently and simply regenerated by washing with sodium acetate solution. PMID:25338508

  13. CD36 is not involved in scavenger receptor-mediated endocytic uptake of glycolaldehyde- and methylglyoxal-modified proteins by liver endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajou, Keisuke; Horiuchi, Seikoh; Sakai, Masakazu; Hirata, Kenshiro; Tanaka, Makiko; Takeya, Motohiro; Kai, Toshiya; Otagiri, Masaki

    2005-05-01

    Circulating proteins modified by advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are mainly taken up by liver endothelial cells (LECs) via scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis. Endocytic uptake of chemically modified proteins by macrophages and macrophage-derived cells is mediated by class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) and CD36. In a previous study using SR-A knockout mice, we demonstrated that SR-A is not involved in endocytic uptake of AGE proteins by LECs [Matsumoto et al. (2000) Biochem. J. 352, 233-240]. The present study was conducted to determine the contribution of CD36 to this process. Glycolaldehyde-modified BSA (GA-BSA) and methylglyoxal-modified BSA (MG-BSA) were used as AGE proteins. 125I-GA-BSA and 125I-MG-BSA underwent endocytic degradation by these cells at 37 degrees C, and this process was inhibited by several ligands for the scavenger receptors. However, this endocytic uptake of 125I-GA-BSA by LECs was not inhibited by a neutralizing anti-CD36 antibody. Similarly, hepatic uptake of (111)In-GA-BSA after its intravenous injection was not significantly attenuated by co-administration of the anti-CD36 antibody. These results clarify that CD36 does not play a significant role in elimination of GA-BSA and MG-BSA from the circulation, suggesting that the receptor involved in endocytic uptake of circulating AGE proteins by LEC is not SR-A or CD36.

  14. Scavenger receptor function of mouse FcγRIII contributes to progression of atherosclerosis in apoE hyperlipidemic mice1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinmei; Ng, Hang Pong; Lai, Yen-Chun; Craigo, Jodi K.; Nagilla, Pruthvi S.; Raghani, Pooja; Nagarajan, Shanmugam

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed loss of CD36 or scavenger receptor-AI/II (SR-A) does not ameliorate atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mouse model, suggesting receptors other than CD36 and SR-A may also contribute to atherosclerosis. In this report, we show that apoE-CD16 double knockout mice (apoE-CD16 DKO) have reduced atherosclerotic lesions compared with apoE KO mice. In vivo and in vitro foam cells analyses showed apoE-CD16 DKO macrophages accumulated less neutral lipids. Reduced foam cell formation in apoE-CD16 DKO mice is not due to change in expression of CD36, SR-A and LOX-1. This led to a hypothesis that CD16 may have scavenger receptor activity. We presented evidence that a soluble form of recombinant mouse CD16 (sCD16) bound to malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDALDL), and this binding is blocked by molar excess of MDA-BSA and anti-MDA mAbs, suggesting CD16 specifically recognizes MDA epitopes. Interestingly, sCD16 inhibited MDALDL binding to macrophage cell line as well as sCD36, sSR-A and sLOX-1, indicating CD16 can cross-block MDALDL binding to other scavenger receptors. Anti-CD16 mAb inhibited IC binding to sCD16, while partially inhibited MDALDL binding to sCD16, suggesting MDALDL binding site may be in close proximity to the IC binding site in CD16. Loss of CD16 expression resulted in reduced levels of MDALDL induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Finally, CD16 deficient macrophages showed reduced MDALDL-induced Syk phosphorylation. Collectively our findings suggest scavenger receptor activity of CD16 may in part contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25038257

  15. Human cytomegalovirus increases modified low density lipoprotein uptake and scavenger receptor mRNA expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y F; Guetta, E; Yu, Z X; Finkel, T; Epstein, S E

    1996-01-01

    Evidence suggests a possible role for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the development of arteriosclerosis. One of the earliest events in plaque formation is the accumulation of lipid-laden foam cells, derived from macrophages and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The lipid accumulation that occurs depends upon the uptake of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), a process in which the scavenger receptor (SR) has been postulated to play an important role. We therefore examined the effects of HCMV on this process. We demonstrate that HCMV infection of human SMCs increases modified LDL uptake and stimulates class A SR gene (SR-A) mRNA expression. In addition, infection of rat SMCs with HCMV, which causes immediate early gene expression (IE72/IE84), but no early or late HCMV gene products and no cytopathic effects, also increases SMC uptake of Ox-LDL and acetylated LDL, with either effect blocked by an excess of either cold Ox-LDL or acetylated-LDL, and by fucoidin, an SR competitor. Cotransfection of an IE72, but not an IE84, expression plasmid and a plasmid containing a Class A SR promoter/reporter gene construct enhances SR promoter activity. Since increased Ox-LDL uptake is believed to play an important role in arteriosclerosis, these results provide a link between HCMV infection and arteriosclerotic plaque formation. PMID:8903333

  16. Targeting the Hemoglobin Scavenger receptor CD163 in Macrophages Highly Increases the Anti-inflammatory Potency of Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Graversen, Jonas H; Svendsen, Pia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Dal, Jakob; Anton, Gabriele; Etzerodt, Anders; Petersen, Mikkel D; Christensen, Peter A; Møller, Holger J; Moestrup, Søren K

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids are potent anti-inflammatory drugs but serious side effects such as bone mobilization, muscle mass loss, immunosuppression, and metabolic alterations make glucocorticoid therapy a difficult balance. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids relies largely on the suppressed release of tumor-necrosis factor-α and other cytokines by macrophages at the sites of inflammation. We have now developed a new biodegradable anti-CD163 antibody-drug conjugate that specifically targets the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone to the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 in macrophages. The conjugate, that in average contains four dexamethasone molecules per antibody, exhibits retained high functional affinity for CD163. In vitro studies in rat macrophages and in vivo studies of Lewis rats showed a strong anti-inflammatory effect of the conjugate measured as reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced secretion of tumor-necrosis factor-α. The in vivo potency of conjugated dexamethasone was about 50-fold that of nonconjugated dexamethasone. In contrast to a strong systemic effect of nonconjugated dexamethasone, the equipotent dose of the conjugate had no such effect, measured as thymus lymphocytes apoptosis, body weight loss, and suppression of endogenous cortisol levels. In conclusion, the study shows antibody-drug conjugates as a future approach in anti-inflammatory macrophage-directed therapy. Furthermore, the data demonstrate CD163 as an excellent macrophage target for anti-inflammatory drug delivery. PMID:22643864

  17. Liver growth factor induces testicular regeneration in EDS-treated rats and increases protein levels of class B scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Lobo, M V T; Arenas, M I; Huerta, L; Sacristán, S; Pérez-Crespo, M; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Díaz-Gil, J J; Lasunción, M A; Martín-Hidalgo, A

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of liver growth factor (LGF) on the regeneration process of rat testes after chemical castration induced by ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) by analyzing some of the most relevant proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism, such as hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), scavenger receptor SR-BI, and other components of the SR family that could contribute to the recovery of steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. Sixty male rats were randomized to nontreated (controls) and LGF-treated, EDS-treated, and EDS + LGF-treated groups. Testes were obtained on days 10 (T1), 21 (T2), and 35 (T3) after EDS treatment, embedded in paraffin, and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. LGF improved the recovery of the seminiferous epithelia, the appearance of the mature pattern of Leydig cell interstitial distribution, and the expression of mature SR-BI. Moreover, LGF treatment resulted in partial recovery of HSL expression in Leydig cells and spermatogonia. No changes in serum testosterone were observed in control or LGF-treated rats, but in EDS-castrated animals LGF treatment induced a progressive increase in serum testosterone levels and 3β-HSD expression. Based on the pivotal role of SR-BI in the uptake of cholesteryl esters from HDL, it is suggested that the observed effects of LGF would facilitate the provision of cholesterol for sperm cell growth and Leydig cell recovery.

  18. Genome wide identification of scavenger receptors class A in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and their expression following Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuaisheng; Jiang, Yanliang; Zhang, Songhao; Dong, Chuanju; Jiang, Likun; Peng, Wenzhu; Mu, Xidong; Sun, Xiaowen; Xu, Peng

    2016-07-01

    Scavenger receptors class A (SCARAs) is a subgroup of diverse families of pattern recognition receptors that bind a range of ligands, and play important roles in innate immune processes through pathogens detection, adhesion, endocytosis, and phagocytosis. However, most studies of SCARAs have focused on mammals, and much less is known of SCARAs in fish species. In this study, we identified 7 SCARAs across the common carp genome, which were classified into four subclasses according to comparative genomic analysis including sequence similarities analysis, gene structure and functional domain prediction. Further phylogenetic and syntenic analysis supported their annotation and orthologies. Through examining gene copy number of SCARA genes across several vertebrates, SCARA2, SCARA3 and SCARA4 were found have undergone gene duplication. The expression patterns of SCARAs in common carp were examined during early developmental stages, in healthy tissues, and after Aeromonas hydrophila infection. Most SCARA genes were ubiquitously expressed during common carp early developmental stages, and presented diverse patterns in various healthy tissues, with relatively high expression levels in spleen, liver, intestine, gill and brain, indicating their critical roles likely in maintaining homeostasis and host immune response activities. After A. hydrophila infection, most SCARA genes were up-regulated at 4 h post infection in mucosal tissue intestine, while generally up-regulated at 12 h post infection in spleen, suggesting a tissue-specific pattern of regulation. Taken together, all these results suggested that SCARA genes played important roles in host immune response to A. hydrophila infection in common carp, and provided important genomic resources for future studies on fish disease management. PMID:27041666

  19. Identification of Neisseria meningitidis Nonlipopolysaccharide Ligands for Class A Macrophage Scavenger Receptor by Using a Novel Assay‡

    PubMed Central

    Peiser, Leanne; Makepeace, Katherine; Plüddemann, Annette; Savino, Silvana; Wright, J. Claire; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Moxon, E. Richard; Gordon, Siamon

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages (Mφ) may play an important role in the pathogenesis of invasive meningococcal infection. Previously, we have shown that the class A Mφ scavenger receptor (SR-A) is a major nonopsonic receptor for Neisseria meningitidis on Mφ. SR-A contributes to host defense by binding proinflammatory polyanionic ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and by the uptake and killing of live organisms. SR-A-deficient mouse Mφ display a substantial reduction in the number of meningococci ingested compared to wild-type Mφ, and SR-A is required for meningococcal phagocytosis but not for the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Although soluble lipid A and lipidIVA are reported as ligands for SR-A, we demonstrated that LPS and LPS expression were not essential for the uptake of whole meningococci. In the present study, we set out to discover protein ligand(s) for SR-A in N. meningitidis lysates and outer membrane vesicles. Using various microbial mutant strains, we determined that molecules comprising the membrane capsule and pili, as well as the abundant surface Opa proteins were not essential for SR-A recognition. We developed a binding assay to detect SR-A ligands and identified three candidate proteins expressed on intact organisms, namely, NMB1220, NMB0278, and NMB0667. Soluble forms of these ligands were shown to block the binding of meningococci to CHO cells stably transfected with SR-A. Furthermore, NMB1220 was endocytosed by SR-A on Mφ and prevented internalization of soluble acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Thus, we have identified novel, unmodified protein ligands for SR-A that are able to inhibit meningococcal interactions with macrophages in vitro. PMID:16926412

  20. Class A Scavenger Receptor Exacerbates Osteoclastogenesis by an Interleukin-6-Mediated Mechanism through ERK and JNK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuyu; Ni, Yuanyuan; Ben, Jingjing; Xia, Yang; Zhou, Tingting; Wang, Dongyue; Ni, Jieli; Bai, Hui; Wang, Lin; Ma, Junqing; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts originate from bone marrow monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, which are important for bone health. Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is a multifunctional molecule that functions during differentiation of monocyte into macrophages and osteoclasts. To further characterize the role of SR-A in osteoclasts, we used the murine tooth movement model (TM) and the murine anterior cruciate ligament transection model of osteoarthritis (ACLT OA). In these two models the bones involved are of different origin and have different properties. Bone resorption was decreased in SR-A-/- mice compared to SR-A+/+ mice. Further evaluation showed that the number of multinucleated osteoclasts in SR-A-/- mice, compared to SR-A+/+ mice, was significantly decreased both in vivo and in vitro. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) produced by osteoclasts were reduced in SR-A-/- mice compared to SR-A+/+ mice. In the in vitro marrow-derived osteoclast formation assay and in both mouse models, osteoclastogenesis was restored to normal in SR-A-/- mice by administration of recombinant murine IL-6. Moreover, neutralization of IL-6 reduced the number of osteoclasts formed in SR-A+/+ mice of TM model. Both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), but not p38, signaling pathways were downregulated in receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated SR-A-/- osteoclasts. Importantly, when treated with either ERK or JNK inhibitor, the numbers of osteoclasts generated from RANKL-induced bone marrow derived-macrophages of SR-A+/+ mice, and their IL-6 production, were significantly decreased. This suggests that SR-A activates the ERK and JNK signaling pathways, and promotes production of IL-6 by osteoclasts to further stimulate osteoclast formation. PMID:27766031

  1. Age related changes in steroid receptors on cultured lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barile, F.A.; Bienkowski, R.S.

    1986-03-05

    The number of high affinity glucocorticoid receptors (Ro) on human fetal lung fibroblasts decreases as the cells age in vitro, and it has been suggested that these cell systems may be useful models of age-related changes in vivo. They examined the relation between change in Ro with in vitro aging and donor age. Confluent monolayers of lung fibroblasts at various population doubling levels (PDL), were incubated with (/sup 3/H)-dexamethasone ((/sup 3/H)Dex) either alone or with excess (.01 mM) Dex. Specific binding was calculated as the difference between radioactivity in cells incubated with and without unlabeled Dex; Scatchard plots were used to analyze the data. Ro, measured as fmol (/sup 3/H)Dex/10/sup 6/ cells, for two lines of human fetal cells (HFL-1 and MRC-5) decreased with increasing age in vitro. However, human newborn (CRL-1485) and adult (CCL-201) cells and fetal rabbit cells (FAB-290), showed increases in Ro with continuous passage. For each cell line, the affinity constant (K/sub d/) did not change significantly with passage. They conclude that the direction of changes in steroid receptor levels on cells aging in vitro is influenced by donor age and species. Caution should be used in applying results obtained from model systems to aging organisms.

  2. The study of histamine H1- and H2-receptors in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kondratenko, T Y; Zacharova, I V; Katukov VYu; Kuzina, N V; Severin, E S; Kornilova, Z Ch; Perelman, M I

    1993-11-01

    Data on human lung histamine H1- and H2-receptors in cancer and chronic inflammatory processes are reported. It has been found that the number of histamine H1-receptors significantly increases both in cancer and chronic pneumonia and does not practically change in tuberculosis lung parenchyma. The binding parameters of histamine H2-receptors both in cancer and inflammatory processes were similar to those obtained for the normal tissue. The important role of parenchymal histamine H1-receptors in the neuromodulation of airways in human lung adenocarcinoma is discussed.

  3. Expression and regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 in the rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yalei; Meng, Chenling; Wei, Quanwei; Shi, Fangxiong; Mao, Dagan

    2015-04-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) preferentially mediates the selective uptake of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol ester and the delivery of cholesterol for steroidogenesis. Although multiple analyses have investigated the function of SR-B1 in the liver, adrenal and ovary, its expression in rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle is lacking. In the present study, real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to investigate SR-B1 expression in the rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle. The results demonstrated that ovarian SR-B1 expression was in a stage-dependent manner, continuously increased from proestrus and kept elevated during metoestrus, while uterine SR-B1 expression decreased from proestrus to diestrus. To determine whether ovarian and uterine SR-B1 expression were affected by sex steroid hormones, immature rats were treated with 17 β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), or their antagonists from postnatal days 24-26. Results showed that the levels of SR-B1 mRNA and protein were significantly up-regulated by E2 in both the ovary and uterus. IHC results showed that SR-B1 was primarily localized in the oocytes, theca internal cells (T-I) of follicles, interstitial cells (IC) as well as corpus luteum (CL), but not granulosa cells (GC) in the ovary during the estrous cycle. Uterine SR-B1 was highly expressed in the endometrial luminal epithelial cells (LEC) and glandular epithelial cells (GEC) as well as in the circular muscle (CM) cells, and weak staining in stromal cells (SC) through estrous cycle. Taken together, SR-B1 expression in the ovary and uterus across the estrous cycle demonstrate that SR-B1 may be involved in uterine function, follicular development as well as luteal function.

  4. Pentosan polysulfate regulates scavenger receptor-mediated, but not fluid-phase, endocytosis in immortalized cerebral endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Deli, M A; Abrahám, C S; Takahata, H; Katamine, S; Niwa, M

    2000-12-01

    1. Effects of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) and the structurally related sulfated polyanions dextran sulfate, fucoidan, and heparin on the scavenger receptor-mediated and fluidphase endocytosis in GP8 immortalized rat brain endothelial cells were investigated. 2. Using 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarboxyamine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-AcLDL), we found a binding site with high affinity and low binding capacity, and another one with low affinity and high binding capacity. Increasing ligand concentrations could not saturate DiI-AcLDL uptake. DiI-AcLDL uptake, but not binding, was sensitive to pretreatment with filipin, an inhibitor of caveola formation. 3. PPS (20-200 microg/ml) significantly reduced the binding of DiI-AcLDL after coincubation for 3 hr, though this effect was less expressed after 18 hr. Among other polyanions, only fucoidan decreased the DiI-AcLDL binding after 3 hr, whereas dextran sulfate significantly increased it after 18 hr. PPS treatment induced an increase in DiI-AcLDL uptake, whereas other polysulfated compounds caused a significant reduction. 4. Fluid-phase endocytosis determined by the accumulation of Lucifer yellow was concentration and time dependent in GP8 cells. Coincubation with PPS or other sulfated polyanions could not significantly alter the rate of Lucifer yellow uptake. 5. In conclusion. PPS decreased the binding and increased the uptake of DiI-AcLDL in cerebral endothelial cells, an effect not mimicked by the other polyanions investigated.

  5. Molecular determinants of enterovirus 71 viral entry: cleft around GLN-172 on VP1 protein interacts with variable region on scavenge receptor B 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Song, Zilin; Qi, Yonghe; Feng, Xiaofeng; Xu, Naiqing; Sun, Yinyan; Wu, Xing; Yao, Xin; Mao, Qunyin; Li, Xiuling; Dong, Wenjuan; Wan, Xiaobo; Huang, Niu; Shen, Xinliang; Liang, Zhenglun; Li, Wenhui

    2012-02-24

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major pathogens that cause hand, foot, and mouth disease outbreaks in young children in the Asia-Pacific region in recent years. Human scavenger receptor class B 2 (SCARB2) is the main cellular receptor for EV71 on target cells. The requirements of the EV71-SCARB2 interaction have not been fully characterized, and it has not been determined whether SCARB2 serves as an uncoating receptor for EV71. Here we compared the efficiency of the receptor from different species including human, horseshoe bat, mouse, and hamster and demonstrated that the residues between 144 and 151 are critical for SCARB2 binding to viral capsid protein VP1 of EV71 and seven residues from the human receptor could convert murine SCARB2, an otherwise inefficient receptor, to an efficient receptor for EV71 viral infection. We also identified that EV71 binds to SCARB2 via a canyon of VP1 around residue Gln-172. Soluble SCARB2 could convert the EV71 virions from 160 S to 135 S particles, indicating that SCARB2 is an uncoating receptor of the virus. The uncoating efficiency of SCARB2 significantly increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.6). These studies elucidated the viral capsid and receptor determinants of enterovirus 71 infection and revealed a possible target for antiviral interventions.

  6. Recognition of oxidized low density lipoprotein by the scavenger receptor of macrophages results from derivatization of apolipoprotein B by products of fatty acid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, U P; Lougheed, M; Kwan, W C; Dirks, M

    1989-09-15

    Uptake of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins by macrophages in the arterial intima is believed to be an important step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. There are a number of possible mechanisms by which macrophages might accumulate cholesterol, and one that has attracted much interest recently involves the uptake of oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (LDL) via a specific cell surface receptor, termed the scavenger or acetyl-LDL receptor. Previous studies have shown that chemical derivatization of LDL with reagents that result in neutralization of the charge of lysine amino groups also allows recognition by this receptor. As well, it has been shown that oxidation of LDL is accompanied by a decrease in free lysine groups and binding of lipid products to apolipoprotein B. The present studies were done to further characterize the receptor-binding domain on oxidized LDL. It was found that LDL could be modified by incubation with water-soluble products derived from autoxidized unsaturated fatty acids under conditions that inhibited oxidation of the LDL itself. The LDL modified in this way had increased electrophoretic mobility but showed no evidence of the oxidative damage that typifies LDL oxidized by exposure to metal ions. Furthermore, the oxidation product-modified LDL was rapidly degraded by cultured macrophages through the scavenger receptor pathway. Bovine albumin modified by oxidation products also showed greatly accelerated degradation by macrophages. When analyzed by reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography, the reactive oxidation products appeared less polar than fatty acids or simple medium-chain aldehydes. When treated with the carbonyl reagent 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, the reactive fractions yielded derivatives, some of which were identified by mass spectrometry as hydrazones of nonenal, heptenal, pentenal, and crotonaldehyde. A series of 2-unsaturated aldehydes (acrolein to 2-nonenal) were all found to modify LDL, but none of

  7. Harnessing the nuclear receptor PPARγ to inhibit the growth of lung adenocarcinoma by rewiring metabolic circuitries.

    PubMed

    Yenerall, Paul; Kittler, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Altered metabolism and nuclear receptor activity have been reported in various cancer types. Here, we discuss our recent finding that the metabolic state of lung adenocarcinoma cells expressing the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) can be modulated by thiazolidinediones, culminating in accumulation of reactive oxygen species and decreased proliferation. PMID:27308443

  8. Airway and lung remodelling in chronic pulmonary obstructive disease: a role for muscarinic receptor antagonists?

    PubMed

    Roth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lung tissue remodelling in chronic inflammatory lung diseases has long been regarded as a follow-up event to inflammation. Recent studies have indicated that, although airway and lung tissue remodelling is often independent of inflammation, it precedes or causes inflammation. None of the available therapies has a significant effect on airway and lung tissue remodelling in asthma, bronchiectasis, fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The goal of stopping or reversing lung tissue remodelling is difficult, as the term summarizes the net effect of independent events, including (1) cell proliferation, (2) cell volume increase, (3) cell migration, (4) modified deposition and metabolism of specific extracellular matrix components, and (5) local action of infiltrated inflammatory cells. The extracellular matrix of the lung has a very high turnover, and thus small changes may accumulate to significant structural pathologies, which seem to be irreversible. The most important question is 'why are pathological changes of the lung structure irreversible and resistant to drugs?' Many drugs have the potential to reduce remodelling mechanisms in vitro but fail in clinical trials. New evidence suggests that muscarinic receptor inhibitors have the potential to improve lung function through modifying tissue remodelling. However, the role of muscarinic receptors in lung remodelling, especially their supportive role for other remodelling driving factors, needs to be further investigated. The focus of this review is the role of muscarinic receptors in lung tissue remodelling as it has been reported in the human lung.

  9. Autotaxin-LPA receptor axis in the pathogenesis of lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xiangpeng; Wei, Xiaojie; Lu, Shaolin; He, Peijian

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small lipid which mediates a variety of cellular functions via the activation of LPA receptors. LPA is generated from lysophosphatidylcholine by the extracellular enzyme, autotaxin (ATX). Elevated ATX expression, LPA production and their signaling pathways have been reported in multiple pathological conditions of lung tissue, including inflammation, fibrosis and cancer. Emerging evidence has highlighted the importance of ATX and LPA receptors in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. Here, we briefly review the current knowledge of different roles of the ATX-LPA receptor axis in lung diseases focusing on inflammation, fibrosis and cancer. PMID:26770305

  10. Scavenger receptor-independent stimulation of cholesterol esterification in macrophages by low density lipoprotein extracted from human aortic intima.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, U P; Lougheed, M

    1992-05-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that suggests that modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the artery wall may contribute to atherogenesis. A number of physiologically plausible modifications have been studied in vitro, including oxidation, aggregation, formation of complexes with glycosaminoglycans, and generation of LDL-immune complexes. Several studies of the properties of LDL extracted from the aortic intima have been published, but these indicate disagreement about both the nature and the extent of modification of LDL in the artery wall. The objectives of the present study were to determine the nature and extent of modification of LDL extracted from both normal and diseased human aortic intimas and to correlate this with the rate of LDL uptake in cultured cells. Analyses were performed on LDLs isolated from aortic intimas obtained at autopsy or at the time of organ harvest from 33 subjects. LDL from normal intima showed no clear evidence of oxidation but had slightly increased electrophoretic mobility compared with native plasma LDL, whereas LDL from plaques or fatty streaks exhibited variable but usually modest signs of oxidative change. Aortic LDL was more rapidly degraded by cultured macrophages than was plasma LDL and resulted in a greater stimulation of cholesterol esterification. The degree of stimulation of cholesterol esterification was correlated with the extent of modification of LDL as reflected by the degree of apolipoprotein B fragmentation. However, in all aortic LDLs the extent of oxidative change, as assessed by electrophoretic mobility or other physical parameters, was less than that required for scavenger receptor-mediated uptake. In all cases where sufficient amounts of LDL were recovered to permit degradation experiments, the uptake of aortic LDL was nonsaturable and could not be inhibited by polyinosinic acid or acetylated LDL. Chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B showed that most LDLs isolated from plaque contained a fraction

  11. New Insight into Atherosclerosis in Hemodialysis Patients: Overexpression of Scavenger Receptor and Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Miki; Ando, Minoru; Iwamoto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    Background Scavenger receptors (SRs) play a pivotal role in atherogenesis. The mechanism of atherosclerosis, which is specific to hemodialysis (HD) patients, was studied on the basis of SR gene expressions. Methods The gene expressions of SR type A (SR-A) and CD36 were studied in peripheral monocytes by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Data were compared between HD (n = 30) and age-matched control subjects (n = 10). Serum levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to test its role in SR expression. The statistical differences and associations between two continuous variables were assessed using the Mann-Whitney U test and Pearson's correlation coefficient, respectively. Results The relative quantities of SR mRNAs were significantly greater in HD patients than in controls [median (interquartile range): SR-A, 1.67 (0.96-2.76) vs. 0.90 (0.60-1.04), p = 0.0060; CD36, 1.09 (0.88-1.74) vs. 0.74 (0.64-0.99), p = 0.0255]. The serum concentration of M-CSF was significantly higher in HD patients than in controls [1, 121 (999-1,342) vs. 176 (155-202) pg/ml, p < 0.0001]. In addition, the relative quantity of M-CSF mRNA was significantly greater in HD patients than in controls [0.79 (0.42-1.53) vs. 0.42 (0.28-0.66), p = 0.0392]. The serum M-CSF levels were positively correlated with both the relative quantity of SR-A mRNA (r2 = 0.1681, p = 0.0086) and that of CD36 mRNA (r2 = 0.1202, p = 0.0284) in all subjects (n = 40). Conclusion HD patients are predisposed to atherosclerosis as a consequence of their enhanced monocyte SR expressions. SRs and M-CSF are potential therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis in this high-risk population. PMID:27721822

  12. Combined therapeutic potential of nuclear receptors with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wairagu, Peninah M.; Park, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jihye; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Jung, Soon-Hee; Yong, Suk-Joong; Jeong, Yangsik

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • The 48 NR genes and 48 biological anti-cancer targets are profiled in paired-cells. • Growth inhibition by NR ligands or TKIs is target receptor level-dependent. • T0901317 with gefitinib/PHA665752 shows additive growth inhibition in lung cells. - Abstract: Cancer heterogeneity is a big hurdle in achieving complete cancer treatment, which has led to the emergence of combinational therapy. In this study, we investigated the potential use of nuclear receptor (NR) ligands for combinational therapy with other anti-cancer drugs. We first profiled all 48 NRs and 48 biological anti-cancer targets in four pairs of lung cell lines, where each pair was obtained from the same patient. Two sets of cell lines were normal and the corresponding tumor cell lines while the other two sets consisted of primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines. Analysis of the expression profile revealed 11 NRs and 15 cancer targets from the two pairs of normal versus tumor cell lines, and 9 NRs and 9 cancer targets from the primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines had distinct expression patterns in each category. Finally, the evaluation of nuclear receptor ligand T0901317 for liver X receptor (LXR) demonstrated its combined therapeutic potential with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The combined treatment of cMET inhibitor PHA665752 or EGFR inhibitor gefitinib with T0901317 showed additive growth inhibition in both H2073 and H1993 cells. Mechanistically, the combined treatment suppressed cell cycle progression by inhibiting cyclinD1 and cyclinB expression. Taken together, this study provides insight into the potential use of NR ligands in combined therapeutics with other biological anti-cancer drugs.

  13. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  14. Association of rs5888 SNP in the scavenger receptor class B type 1 gene and serum lipid levels

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of rs5888 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SCARB1) gene and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 598 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 585 subjects of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotypes of the SCARB1 rs5888 SNP were determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein (Apo) AI were lower but ApoB was higher in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.05-0.001). The frequencies of C and T alleles were 78.3% and 21.7% in Bai Ku Yao, and 73.7% and 26.3% in Han (P < 0.01); respectively. The frequencies of CC, CT and TT genotypes were 60.0%, 36.6% and 3.4% in Bai Ku Yao, and 54.2%, 39.0% and 6.8% in Han (P < 0.01); respectively. The subjects with TT genotype in both ethnic groups had lower HDL-C and ApoAI levels than the subjects with CC or CT genotype (P < 0.05 for all). Subgroup analyses showed that the subjects with TT genotype in Bai Ku Yao had lower HDL-C and ApoAI levels in males than the subjects with CC or CT genotype (P < 0.05 for all), and the T allele carriers had higher TC, LDL-C and ApoB levels in females than the T allele noncarriers (P < 0.05 for all). The participants with TT genotype in Han also had a lower tendency of HDL-C and ApoAI levels in males than the participants with CC or CT genotype, but the difference did not reach statistically significant (P = 0.063 and P = 0.086; respectively). The association of serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels and genotypes was confirmed by

  15. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD )

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  16. The physiological expression of scavenger receptor SR-B1 in canine endometrial and placental epithelial cells and its potential involvement in pathogenesis of pyometra.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, C; Becher-Deichsel, A; Hlavaty, J; Mair, G; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Pyometra, the purulent inflammation of the uterus, is a common uterine disease of bitches that has potentially life-threatening consequences. The opportunistic bacterial infection of the uterus often progresses into the serious systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In a previous study, we characterized epithelial foam cells in the canine endometrial surface occurring in metestrus, and we regularly observed pronounced epithelial foam-cell formations in pyometra-affected uteri. Therefore, it was assumed that the mechanism behind lipid droplet accumulation in surface epithelial cells might even increase bacterial binding capacity and promote pyometra development. Lipid droplet accumulation in epithelial cells is accomplished via specialized lipid receptors called scavenger receptors (SR). Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is an important receptor for lipid accumulation in diverse cell types, but it is also a strong binding partner for bacteria, and thereby enhances bacterial adhesion and clinical signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In the present study, after the isolation of metestrous surface epithelial cells from canine uteri by laser capture microdissection, SR-B1 was identified at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and also at the protein level by means of immunohistochemistry. In pyometra-affected uteri, SR-B1 mRNA expression was higher than that in the healthy control samples, and SR-B1 protein was expressed in the surface and crypt epithelial cells. Furthermore, to understand the physiological role of SR-B1 expression in the metestrus surface epithelial cells, we investigated its expression in the epithelial cells of the glandular chambers of canine placenta in different stages of gestation because these cells are also characterized by lipid droplet accumulation. SR-B1 was present in the placental epithelial cells of the glandular chambers from 25 to 30 and 45 to 50 days of gestation

  17. Deletion of scavenger receptor A gene in mice resulted in protection from septic shock and modulation of TLR4 signaling in isolated peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Robert; Cauvi, David M; Hawisher, Dennis; Song, Donghuan; Niño, Diego F; Coimbra, Raul; Bickler, Stephen; De Maio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptor A (Sra), also known as macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (Msr1), is a surface glycoprotein preferentially present in macrophages that plays a primary role in innate immunity. Previous studies have shown that Sra is a modifier gene for the response to bacterial LPS in mice at the level of IL-10 production, in particular. In the present study, we found that Sra(−/−) mice are more resistant to septic shock induced by cecal ligation and puncture than wild-type C57BL/6 J (B6) mice. In addition, Sra(−/−) mice displayed initial elevated high density lipoprotein (HDL) circulating levels. Naïve peritoneal macrophages (PMϕs) were isolated from Sra(−/−) mice to understand the possible protective mechanism. Incubation of these cells with LPS was found to modulate TLR4 signaling, leading to a reduction in IL-10 and IL-6 mRNA levels, but not TNF-α expression, at low concentrations of LPS in comparison with PMϕs isolated from B6 mice. No differences were found in LPS binding between PMϕs derived from Sra(−/−) or B6 mice. The lack of Sra binding to LPS was confirmed after transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with the Sra gene. The contribution of Sra to the outcome of sepsis may be a combination of changes in TLR4 signaling pathway and elevated levels of HDL in circulation, but also LPS toxicity. PMID:22751446

  18. Nicotine alters lung branching morphogenesis through the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakool, Cherry; Roser-Page, Susanne; Rivera, Hilda N; Roman, Jesse

    2007-09-01

    There is abundant epidemiological data linking prenatal environmental tobacco smoke with childhood asthma and wheezing, but the underlying molecular and physiological mechanisms that occur in utero to explain this link remain unelucidated. Several studies suggest that nicotine, which traverses the placenta, is a causative agent. Therefore, we studied the effects of nicotine on lung branching morphogenesis using embryonic murine lung explants. We found that the expression of alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which mediate many of the biological effects of nicotine, is highest in pseudoglandular stage lungs compared with lungs at later stages. We then studied the effects of nicotine in the explant model and found that nicotine stimulated lung branching in a dose-dependent fashion. alpha-Bungarotoxin, an antagonist of alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, blocked the stimulatory effect of nicotine, whereas GTS-21, a specific agonist, stimulated branching, thereby mimicking the effects of nicotine. Explants deficient in alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors did not respond to nicotine. Nicotine also stimulated the growth of the explant. Altogether, these studies suggest that nicotine stimulates lung branching morphogenesis through alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and may contribute to dysanaptic lung growth, which in turn may predispose the host to airway disease in the postnatal period.

  19. Association of advanced glycation end products with A549 cells, a human pulmonary epithelial cell line, is mediated by a receptor distinct from the scavenger receptor family and RAGE.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Nahoko; Fukuhara-Takaki, Kaori; Jono, Tadashi; Nakajou, Keisuke; Eto, Nobuaki; Horiuchi, Seikoh; Takeya, Motohiro; Nagai, Ryoji

    2006-05-01

    Cellular interactions with advanced glycation end products (AGE)-modified proteins are known to induce several biological responses, not only endocytic uptake and degradation, but also the induction of cytokines and growth factors, combined responses that may be linked to the development of diabetic vascular complications. In this study we demonstrate that A549 cells, a human pulmonary epithelial cell line, possess a specific binding site for AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) (K(d) = 27.8 nM), and additionally for EN-RAGE (extracellular newly identified RAGE binding protein) (K(d) = 118 nM). Western blot and RT-PCR analysis showed that RAGE (receptor for AGE) is highly expressed on A549 cells, while the expression of other known AGE-receptors such as galectin-3 and SR-A (class A scavenger receptor), are below the level of detection. The binding of (125)I-AGE-BSA to these cells is inhibited by unlabeled AGE-BSA, but not by EN-RAGE. In contrast, the binding of (125)I-EN-RAGE is significantly inhibited by unlabeled EN-RAGE and soluble RAGE, but not by AGE-BSA. Our results indicate that A549 cells possess at least two binding sites, one specific for EN-RAGE and the other specific for AGE-BSA. The latter receptor on A549 cells is distinct from the scavenger receptor family and RAGE.

  20. Cells exposed to sublethal oxidative stress selectively attract monocytes/macrophages via scavenger receptors and MyD88-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Geiger-Maor, Anat; Levi, Inbar; Even-Ram, Sharona; Smith, Yoav; Bowdish, Dawn M; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Rachmilewitz, Jacob

    2012-02-01

    The innate immune system responds to endogenous molecules released during cellular stress or those that have undergone modifications normally absent in healthy tissue. These structures are detected by pattern-recognition receptors, alerting the immune system to "danger." In this study, we looked for early signals that direct immune cells to cells undergoing stress before irreversible damage takes place. To avoid detecting signals emanating from apoptotic or necrotic cells we exposed fibroblasts to sublethal oxidative stress. Our results indicate that both nonenzymatic chemical reactions and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2-mediated enzymatic activity released signals from fibroblasts that selectively attracted CD14(+) monocytes but not T, NK, and NKT cells or granulocytes. Splenocytes from MyD88(-/-) mice did not migrate, and treatment with an inhibitory peptide that blocks MyD88 dimerization abrogated human monocyte migration. Monocyte migration was accompanied by downmodulation of CD14 expression and by the phosphorylation of IL-1R-associated kinase 1, a well-known MyD88-dependent signaling molecule. The scavenger receptor inhibitors, dextran sulfate and fucoidan, attenuated monocyte migration toward stressed cells and IL-1R-associated kinase 1 phosphorylation. Surprisingly, although monocyte migration was MyD88 dependent, it was not accompanied by inflammatory cytokine secretion. Taken together, these results establish a novel link between scavenger receptors and MyD88 that together function as sensors of oxidation-associated molecular patterns and induce monocyte motility. Furthermore, the data indicate that MyD88 independently regulates monocyte activation and motility.

  1. Evidence for impaired retinoic acid receptor-thyroid hormone receptor AF-2 cofactor activity in human lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moghal, N; Neel, B G

    1995-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is required for normal airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. One of the earliest events following the exposure of bronchial epithelial cells to RA is the strong induction of RA receptor beta (RAR beta) mRNA. Previous work established that many lung cancer cell lines and primary tumors display abnormal RAR beta mRNA expression, most often absence or weak expression of the RAR beta 2 isoform, even after RA treatment. Restoration of RAR beta 2 into RAR beta-negative lung cancer cell lines has been reported to inhibit tumorigenicity. Since RAR beta 2 inactivation may contribute to lung cancer, we have investigated the molecular mechanism of defective RAR beta 2 expression. Nuclear run-on assays and transient transfections with RAR beta 2 promoter constructs indicate the presence of trans-acting transcriptional defects in most lung cancer cell lines, which map to the RA response element (RARE). These defects cannot be complemented by RAR-retinoid X receptor cotransfection and can be separated into two types: (i) one affecting transcription from direct repeat RAREs, but not palindromic RAREs, and (ii) another affecting transcription from both types of RARE. Studies using chimeras between RAR alpha, TR alpha, and other transcription factors suggest the existence of novel RAR-thyroid hormone receptor AF-2-specific cofactors, which are necessary for high levels of transcription. Furthermore, these factors may be frequently inactivated in human lung cancer. PMID:7791800

  2. Effect of Hyperoxia on Retinoid Metabolism and Retinoid Receptor Expression in the Lungs of Newborn Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsing-Jin; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2015-01-01

    Background Preterm newborns that receive oxygen therapy often develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is abnormal lung development characterized by impaired alveologenesis. Oxygen-mediated injury is thought to disrupt normal lung growth and development. However, the mechanism of hyperoxia-induced BPD has not been extensively investigated. We established a neonatal mouse model to investigate the effects of normobaric hyperoxia on retinoid metabolism and retinoid receptor expression. Methods Newborn mice were exposed to hyperoxic or normoxic conditions for 15 days. The concentration of retinol and retinyl palmitate in the lung was measured by HPLC to gauge retinoid metabolism. Retinoid receptor mRNA levels were assessed by real-time PCR. Proliferation and retinoid receptor expression in A549 cells were assessed in the presence and absence of exogenous vitamin A. Results Hyperoxia significantly reduced the body and lung weight of neonatal mice. Hyperoxia also downregulated expression of RARα, RARγ, and RXRγ in the lungs of neonatal mice. In vitro, hyperoxia inhibited proliferation and expression of retinoid receptors in A549 cells. Conclusion Hyperoxia disrupted retinoid receptor expression in neonatal mice. PMID:26509921

  3. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-deficient mice demonstrate reduced hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Florquin, Sandrine; de Beer, Regina; Pater, Jennie M; Verstege, Marleen I; Meijers, Joost C M; van der Poll, Tom

    2009-06-01

    Patients with respiratory failure often require supplemental oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation. Although both supportive measures are necessary to guarantee adequate oxygen uptake, they can also cause or worsen lung inflammation and injury. Hyperoxia-induced lung injury is characterized by neutrophil infiltration into the lungs. The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been deemed important for leukocyte trafficking. To determine the expression and function of neutrophil uPAR during hyperoxia-induced lung injury, uPAR expression was determined on pulmonary neutrophils of mice exposed to hyperoxia. Hyperoxia exposure (O2>80%) for 4 days elicited a pulmonary inflammatory response as reflected by a profound rise in the number of neutrophils that were recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung cell suspensions, as well as increased bronchoalveolar keratinocyte-derived chemokine, interleukin-6, total protein, and alkaline phosphatase levels. In addition, hyperoxia induced the migration of uPAR-positive granulocytes into lungs from wild-type mice compared with healthy control mice (exposed to room air). uPAR deficiency was associated with diminished neutrophil influx into both lung tissues and bronchoalveolar spaces, which was accompanied by a strong reduction in lung injury. Furthermore, in uPAR(-/-) mice, activation of coagulation was diminished. These data suggest that uPAR plays a detrimental role in hyperoxia-induced lung injury and that uPAR deficiency is associated with diminished neutrophil influx into both lung tissues and bronchoalveolar spaces, accompanied by decreased pulmonary injury. PMID:19435793

  4. Hydrogen scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, David W.; Salazar, Kenneth V.; Trkula, Mitchell; Sandoval, Cynthia W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a codeposition process for fabricating hydrogen scavengers. First, a .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is prepared by reacting an allylic transition metal halide with an organic ligand complexed with an alkali metal; and then, in a second step, a vapor of the .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is combined with the vapor of an acetylenic compound, irradiated with UV light, and codeposited on a substrate.

  5. Lung adenocarcinomas induced in mice by mutant EGF receptors found in human lung cancers respond to a tyrosine kinase inhibitor or to down-regulation of the receptors.

    PubMed

    Politi, Katerina; Zakowski, Maureen F; Fan, Pang-Dian; Schonfeld, Emily A; Pao, William; Varmus, Harold E

    2006-06-01

    Somatic mutations in exons encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are found in human lung adenocarcinomas and are associated with sensitivity to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib and erlotinib. Nearly 90% of the EGFR mutations are either short, in-frame deletions in exon 19 or point mutations that result in substitution of arginine for leucine at amino acid 858 (L858R). To study further the role of these mutations in the initiation and maintenance of lung cancer, we have developed transgenic mice that express an exon 19 deletion mutant (EGFR(DeltaL747-S752)) or the L858R mutant (EGFR(L858R)) in type II pneumocytes under the control of doxycycline. Expression of either EGFR mutant leads to the development of lung adenocarcinomas. Two weeks after induction with doxycycline, mice that express the EGFR(L858R) allele show diffuse lung cancer highly reminiscent of human bronchioloalveolar carcinoma and later develop interspersed multifocal adenocarcinomas. In contrast, mice expressing EGFR(DeltaL747-S752) develop multifocal tumors embedded in normal lung parenchyma with a longer latency. With mice carrying either EGFR allele, withdrawal of doxycycline (to reduce expression of the transgene) or treatment with erlotinib (to inhibit kinase activity) causes rapid tumor regression, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology, demonstrating that mutant EGFR is required for tumor maintenance. These models may be useful for developing improved therapies for patients with lung cancers bearing EGFR mutations.

  6. Glufosinate aerogenic exposure induces glutamate and IL-1 receptor dependent lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Isabelle; Perche, Olivier; Pâris, Arnaud; Richard, Olivier; Gombault, Aurélie; Herzine, Ameziane; Pichon, Jacques; Huaux, Francois; Mortaud, Stéphane; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline

    2016-11-01

    Glufosinate-ammonium (GLA), the active component of an herbicide, is known to cause neurotoxicity. GLA shares structural analogy with glutamate. It is a powerful inhibitor of glutamine synthetase (GS) and may bind to glutamate receptors. Since these potentials targets of GLA are present in lung and immune cells, we asked whether airway exposure to GLA may cause lung inflammation in mice. A single GLA exposure (1 mg/kg) induced seizures and inflammatory cell recruitment in the broncho-alveolar space, and increased myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), interstitial inflammation and disruption of alveolar septae within 6-24 h. Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was increased and lung inflammation depended on IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1). We demonstrate that glutamate receptor pathway is central, since the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inhibitor MK-801 prevented GLA-induced lung inflammation. Chronic exposure (0.2 mg/kg 3× per week for 4 weeks) caused moderate lung inflammation and enhanced airway hyperreactivity with significant increased airway resistance. In conclusion, GLA aerosol exposure causes glutamate signalling and IL-1R-dependent pulmonary inflammation with airway hyperreactivity in mice.

  7. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphA5 Is a Functional Molecular Target in Human Lung Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. Finally, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications. PMID:25623065

  8. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.

  9. CB2 receptor activation ameliorates the proinflammatory activity in acute lung injury induced by paraquat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenning; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Hongyu; Zheng, Qiang; Xiao, Li; Zhao, Min

    2014-01-01

    Paraquat, a widely used herbicide, is well known to exhibit oxidative stress and lung injury. In the present study, we investigated the possible underlying mechanisms of cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) activation to ameliorate the proinflammatory activity induced by PQ in rats. JWH133, a CB2 agonist, was administered by intraperitoneal injection 1 h prior to PQ exposure. After PQ exposure for 4, 8, 24, and 72 h, the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected to determine levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, and the arterial blood samples were collected for detection of PaO2 level. At 72 h after PQ exposure, lung tissues were collected to determine the lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, myeloperoxidase activity, lung histopathology, the protein expression level of CB2, MAPKs (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK1/2), and NF-κBp65. After rats were pretreated with JWH133, PQ-induced lung edema and lung histopathological changes were significantly attenuated. PQ-induced TNF-α and IL-1β secretion in BALF, increases of PaO2 in arterial blood, and MPO levels in the lung tissue were significantly reduced. JWH133 could efficiently activate CB2, while inhibiting MAPKs and NF-κB activation. The results suggested that activating CB2 receptor exerted protective activity against PQ-induced ALI, and it potentially contributed to the suppression of the activation of MAPKs and NF-κB pathways. PMID:24963491

  10. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-3 enhances cell migration in rat lung tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mai; Okabe, Kyoko; Yamawaki, Yasuna; Teranishi, Miki; Honoki, Kanya; Mori, Toshio; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of the Lpar3 expression due to aberrant DNA methylation occurred in rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 inhibited cell migration of rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 may act as a negative regulator of rat lung tumor cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) indicates several biological effects, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. LPA interacts with G protein-coupled transmembrane LPA receptors. In our previous report, we detected that loss of the LPA receptor-1 (Lpar1) expression is due to its aberrant DNA methylation in rat tumor cell lines. In this study, to assess an involvement of the other LPA receptor, Lpar3, in the pathogenesis of rat lung tumor cells, we measured the expression levels of the Lpar3 gene and its DNA methylation status by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bisulfite sequencing analyses, respectively. RLCNR lung adenocarcinoma cells showed reduced expression of the Lpar3, compared with normal lung tissues. In the 5' upstream region of the Lpar3, normal lung tissues were unmethylated. By contrast, RLCNR cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expressions of the Lpar3. Based on these results, we generated the Lpar3-expressing RLCNR-a3 cells and measured the cell migration ability. Interestingly, the cell migration of RLCNR-a3 cells was significantly lower than that of RLCNR cells. This study suggests that loss of the Lpar3 due to aberrant DNA methylation may be involved in the progression of rat lung tumor cells.

  11. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Matthew L.; Sharma, Ashish K.; Zhao, Yunge; Charles, Eric J.; Huerter, Mary E.; Johnston, William F.; Kron, Irving L.; Lynch, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Outcomes for lung transplantation are the worst of any solid organ, and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) limits both short- and long-term outcomes. Presently no therapeutic agents are available to prevent IRI. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) modulates immune function through binding to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5). Although S1P has been shown to attenuate lung IRI, the S1P receptors responsible for protection have not been defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that protection from lung IRI is primarily mediated through S1PR1 activation. Mice were treated with either vehicle, FTY720 (a nonselective S1P receptor agonist), or VPC01091 (a selective S1PR1 agonist and S1PR3 antagonist) before left lung IR. Function, vascular permeability, cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration, and myeloperoxidase levels were measured in lungs. After IR, both FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly improved lung function (reduced pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary compliance) vs. vehicle control. In addition, FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly reduced vascular permeability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, IL-12/IL-23 p40, CC chemokine ligand-2, and TNF-α), myeloperoxidase levels, and neutrophil infiltration compared with control. No significant differences were observed between VPC01091 and FTY720 treatment groups. VPC01091 did not significantly affect elevated invariant natural killer T cell infiltration after IR, and administration of an S1PR1 antagonist reversed VPC01091-mediated protection after IR. In conclusion, VPC01091 and FTY720 provide comparable protection from lung injury and dysfunction after IR. These findings suggest that S1P-mediated protection from IRI is mediated by S1PR1 activation, independent of S1PR3, and that selective S1PR1 agonists may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent lung IRI. PMID:25910934

  12. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew L; Sharma, Ashish K; Zhao, Yunge; Charles, Eric J; Huerter, Mary E; Johnston, William F; Kron, Irving L; Lynch, Kevin R; Laubach, Victor E

    2015-06-15

    Outcomes for lung transplantation are the worst of any solid organ, and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) limits both short- and long-term outcomes. Presently no therapeutic agents are available to prevent IRI. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) modulates immune function through binding to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5). Although S1P has been shown to attenuate lung IRI, the S1P receptors responsible for protection have not been defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that protection from lung IRI is primarily mediated through S1PR1 activation. Mice were treated with either vehicle, FTY720 (a nonselective S1P receptor agonist), or VPC01091 (a selective S1PR1 agonist and S1PR3 antagonist) before left lung IR. Function, vascular permeability, cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration, and myeloperoxidase levels were measured in lungs. After IR, both FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly improved lung function (reduced pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary compliance) vs. vehicle control. In addition, FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly reduced vascular permeability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, IL-12/IL-23 p40, CC chemokine ligand-2, and TNF-α), myeloperoxidase levels, and neutrophil infiltration compared with control. No significant differences were observed between VPC01091 and FTY720 treatment groups. VPC01091 did not significantly affect elevated invariant natural killer T cell infiltration after IR, and administration of an S1PR1 antagonist reversed VPC01091-mediated protection after IR. In conclusion, VPC01091 and FTY720 provide comparable protection from lung injury and dysfunction after IR. These findings suggest that S1P-mediated protection from IRI is mediated by S1PR1 activation, independent of S1PR3, and that selective S1PR1 agonists may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent lung IRI. PMID:25910934

  13. Expression, purification and reconstitution of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of scavenger receptor BI into detergent micelles for NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Jensen, Davin R; Peterson, Francis C; Volkman, Brian F; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-03-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), the high density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, is important for the delivery of HDL-cholesteryl esters to the liver for excretion via bile formation. The focus on therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing cholesterol levels highlights the critical need to understand the structural features of SR-BI that drive cholesterol removal. Yet, in the absence of a high-resolution structure of SR-BI, our understanding of how SR-BI interacts with HDL is limited. In this study, we have optimized the NMR solution conditions for the structural analysis of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of SR-BI that harbors putative domains required for receptor oligomerization. An isotopically-labeled SR-BI peptide encompassing residues 405-475 was bacterially-expressed and purified. [U-(15)N]-SR-BI(405-475) was incorporated into different detergent micelles and assessed by (1)H-(15)N-HSQC in order to determine which detergent micelle best maintained SR-BI(405-475) in a folded, native conformation for subsequent NMR analyses. We also determined the optimal detergent concentration used in micelles, as well as temperature, solution buffer and pH conditions. Based on (1)H-(15)N-HSQC peak dispersion, intensity, and uniformity, we determined that [U-(15)N]-SR-BI(405-475) should be incorporated into 5% detergent micelles consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phospho-[1'-rac-glycerol] (LPPG) and data collected at 40°C in a non-buffered solution at pH 6.8. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of SR-BI(405-475) to form dimers upon chemical crosslinking. These studies represent the first steps in obtaining high-resolution structural information by NMR for the HDL receptor that plays a critical role in regulating whole body cholesterol removal.

  14. Oxidized or acetylated low density lipoproteins are rapidly cleared by the liver in mice with disruption of the scavenger receptor class A type I/II gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, W; Lougheed, M; Suzuki, H; Buchan, A; Kodama, T; Steinbrecher, U P

    1997-01-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) and acetyl LDL are recognized by the scavenger receptor class A type I/II (SR-AI/II) on macrophages and liver endothelial cells. Several investigators have suggested that there are additional receptors specific for oxidized LDL, but characterization of these alternate receptors for oxidized LDL and evaluation of their quantitative importance in uptake of oxidized LDL has been difficult because of overlapping ligand specificity with SR-AI/II. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of SR-AI/II in the removal of modified LDL from the bloodstream in vivo. The clearance rate of oxidized LDL from plasma in normal mice was very rapid, and > 90% of injected dose was removed from the blood within 5 min. Clearance rates of oxidized LDL were equally high in SR-AI/II knockout mice, indicating that this receptor is not required for removal of oxidized LDL from plasma. Surprisingly, there was no difference in the clearance rate of acetyl LDL in wild-type and SR-AI/II knockout animals. The plasma clearance of radioiodinated acetyl LDL was almost fully blocked by a 50-fold excess of unlabeled acetyl LDL, but the latter only inhibited oxidized LDL clearance by approximately 5%. Both modified LDLs were cleared mostly by the liver, and there was no difference in the tissue distribution of modified LDL in control and knockout mice. Studies in isolated nonparenchymal liver cells showed that Kupffer cells accounted for most of the uptake of oxidized LDL. Extensively oxidized LDL and LDL modified by exposure to fatty acid peroxidation products were efficient competitors for the uptake of labeled oxidized LDL by SR-AI/II-deficient Kupffer cells, while acetyl LDL and malondialdehyde-modified LDL were relatively poor competitors. PMID:9218499

  15. Expression, purification and reconstitution of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of scavenger receptor BI into detergent micelles for NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Jensen, Davin R; Peterson, Francis C; Volkman, Brian F; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-03-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), the high density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, is important for the delivery of HDL-cholesteryl esters to the liver for excretion via bile formation. The focus on therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing cholesterol levels highlights the critical need to understand the structural features of SR-BI that drive cholesterol removal. Yet, in the absence of a high-resolution structure of SR-BI, our understanding of how SR-BI interacts with HDL is limited. In this study, we have optimized the NMR solution conditions for the structural analysis of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of SR-BI that harbors putative domains required for receptor oligomerization. An isotopically-labeled SR-BI peptide encompassing residues 405-475 was bacterially-expressed and purified. [U-(15)N]-SR-BI(405-475) was incorporated into different detergent micelles and assessed by (1)H-(15)N-HSQC in order to determine which detergent micelle best maintained SR-BI(405-475) in a folded, native conformation for subsequent NMR analyses. We also determined the optimal detergent concentration used in micelles, as well as temperature, solution buffer and pH conditions. Based on (1)H-(15)N-HSQC peak dispersion, intensity, and uniformity, we determined that [U-(15)N]-SR-BI(405-475) should be incorporated into 5% detergent micelles consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phospho-[1'-rac-glycerol] (LPPG) and data collected at 40°C in a non-buffered solution at pH 6.8. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of SR-BI(405-475) to form dimers upon chemical crosslinking. These studies represent the first steps in obtaining high-resolution structural information by NMR for the HDL receptor that plays a critical role in regulating whole body cholesterol removal. PMID:25461971

  16. Neuronal Acetylcholine Nicotinic Receptors as New Targets for Lung Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Mucchietto, Vanessa; Crespi, Arianna; Fasoli, Francesca; Clementi, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Smoking accounts for approximately 70% of the cases of non- small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 90% of the cases of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), although some patients develop lung cancer without a history of smoking. Nicotine is the most active addictive component of tobacco smoke. It does not initiate tumorigenesis in humans and rodents, but it alters the pathophysiology of lung cells by inducing the secretion of growth factors, neurotransmitters and cytokines, and promotes tumour growth and metastases by inducing cell cycle progression, migration, invasion, angiogenesis and the evasion of apoptosis. Most of these effects are a result of nicotine binding and activation of cell-surface neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and downstream intracellular signalling cascades, and many are blocked by nAChR subtype-selective antagonists. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms of nAChR subunits that influence nicotine dependence and lung cancer. This review describes the molecular basis of nAChR structural and functional diversity in normal and cancer lung cells, and the genetic alterations facilitating smoking-induced lung cancers. It also summarises current knowledge concerning the intracellular pathways activated by nicotine and other compounds present in tobacco smoke. PMID:26845123

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future. PMID:27362942

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  19. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor regulates human fetal lung development via CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Sarah C.; Wilkinson, William J.; Tseng, Hsiu-Er; Finney, Brenda; Monk, Bethan; Dibble, Holly; Quilliam, Samantha; Warburton, David; Galietta, Luis J.; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Optimal fetal lung growth requires anion-driven fluid secretion into the lumen of the developing organ. The fetus is hypercalcemic compared to the mother and here we show that in the developing human lung this hypercalcaemia acts on the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, CaSR, to promote fluid-driven lung expansion through activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR. Several chloride channels including TMEM16, bestrophin, CFTR, CLCN2 and CLCA1, are also expressed in the developing human fetal lung at gestational stages when CaSR expression is maximal. Measurements of Cl−-driven fluid secretion in organ explant cultures show that pharmacological CaSR activation by calcimimetics stimulates lung fluid secretion through CFTR, an effect which in humans, but not mice, was also mimicked by fetal hypercalcemic conditions, demonstrating that the physiological relevance of such a mechanism appears to be species-specific. Calcimimetics promote CFTR opening by activating adenylate cyclase and we show that Ca2+-stimulated type I adenylate cyclase is expressed in the developing human lung. Together, these observations suggest that physiological fetal hypercalcemia, acting on the CaSR, promotes human fetal lung development via cAMP-dependent opening of CFTR. Disturbances in this process would be expected to permanently impact lung structure and might predispose to certain postnatal respiratory diseases. PMID:26911344

  20. Regulation of bradykinin receptor gene expression in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Phagoo, S B; Yaqoob, M; Herrera-Martinez, E; McIntyre, P; Jones, C; Burgess, G M

    2000-06-01

    In WI-38 human fibroblasts, interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) increased bradykinin B(1) receptor mRNA, which peaked between 2 and 4 h, remaining elevated for 20 h. Binding of the bradykinin B(1) receptor selective ligand [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin, also increased, peaking at 4 h and remaining elevated for 20 h. The B(max) value for [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin rose from 280+/-102 fmol/mg (n=3) to 701+/-147 fmol/mg (n=3), but the K(D) value remained unaltered (control, 1.04+/-0.33 nM (n=3); interleukin-1 beta, 0.88+/-0.41 nM (n=3)). The interleukin-1 beta-induced [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin binding sites were functional receptors, as bradykinin B(1) receptor agonist-induced responses increased in treated cells. Bradykinin B(2) receptor mRNA and [3H]bradykinin binding were upregulated by interleukin-1 beta, but not TNF-alpha. The effect of interleukin-1 beta on bradykinin B(2) receptors was smaller than for bradykinin B(1) receptors. Cycloheximide prevented interleukin-1 beta-mediated increases in B(1) and B(2) binding, but not mRNA suggesting that de novo synthesis of a transcriptional activator was unnecessary.

  1. Molecular Imaging of Folate Receptor β–Positive Macrophages during Acute Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Yull, Fiona E.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Gleaves, Linda A.; Tanjore, Harikrishna; Young, Lisa R.; Peterson, Todd E.; Manning, H. Charles; Prince, Lawrence S.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of markers that identify activated macrophages could advance understanding of inflammatory lung diseases and facilitate development of novel methodologies for monitoring disease activity. We investigated whether folate receptor β (FRβ) expression could be used to identify and quantify activated macrophages in the lungs during acute inflammation induced by Escherichia coli LPS. We found that FRβ expression was markedly increased in lung macrophages at 48 hours after intratracheal LPS. In vivo molecular imaging with a fluorescent probe (cyanine 5 polyethylene glycol folate) showed that the fluorescence signal over the chest peaked at 48 hours after intratracheal LPS and was markedly attenuated after depletion of macrophages. Using flow cytometry, we identified the cells responsible for uptake of cyanine 5–conjugated folate as FRβ+ interstitial macrophages and pulmonary monocytes, which coexpressed markers associated with an M1 proinflammatory macrophage phenotype. These findings were confirmed using a second model of acute lung inflammation generated by inducible transgenic expression of an NF-κB activator in airway epithelium. Using CC chemokine receptor 2–deficient mice, we found that FRβ+ macrophage/monocyte recruitment was dependent on the monocyte chemotactic protein-1/CC chemokine receptor 2 pathway. Together, our results demonstrate that folate-based molecular imaging can be used as a noninvasive approach to detect classically activated monocytes/macrophages recruited to the lungs during acute inflammation. PMID:25375039

  2. The role of endocytosis in the uptake and intracellular trafficking of PepFect14-nucleic acid nanocomplexes via class A scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Juks, Carmen; Padari, Kärt; Margus, Helerin; Kriiska, Asko; Etverk, Indrek; Arukuusk, Piret; Koppel, Kaida; Ezzat, Kariem; Langel, Ülo; Pooga, Margus

    2015-12-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are efficient tools to deliver various bioactive cargos into cells, but their exact functioning mechanism is still debated. Recently, we showed that a delivery peptide PepFect14 condenses oligonucleotides (ON) into negatively charged nanocomplexes that are taken up by cells via class A scavenger receptors (SR-As). Here we unraveled the uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PF14-ON nanocomplexes in HeLa cells. Macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis are responsible for the intracellular functionality of nucleic acids packed into nanocomplexes. However, only a negligible fraction of the complexes were trafficked to endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus - the common destinations of caveolar endocytosis. Neither were the PF14-SCO nanocomplexes routed to endo-lysosomal pathway, and they stayed in vesicles with slightly acidic pH, which were not marked with LysoSensor. "Naked" ON, in contrary, was rapidly targeted to acidic vesicles and lysosomes. The transmission electron microscopy analysis of interactions between SR-As and PF14-ON nanocomplexes on ultrastructural level revealed that nanocomplexes localized on the plasma membrane in close proximity to SR-As and their colocalization is retained in cells, suggesting that PF14-ON complexes associate with targeted receptors.

  3. Pathways for Modulating Exosome Lipids Identified By High-Density Lipoprotein-Like Nanoparticle Binding to Scavenger Receptor Type B-1

    PubMed Central

    Angeloni, Nicholas L.; McMahon, Kaylin M.; Swaminathan, Suchitra; Plebanek, Michael P.; Osman, Iman; Volpert, Olga V.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are produced by cells to mediate intercellular communication, and have been shown to perpetuate diseases, including cancer. New tools are needed to understand exosome biology, detect exosomes from specific cell types in complex biological media, and to modify exosomes. Our data demonstrate a cellular pathway whereby membrane-bound scavenger receptor type B-1 (SR-B1) in parent cells becomes incorporated into exosomes. We tailored synthetic HDL-like nanoparticles (HDL NP), high-affinity ligands for SR-B1, to carry a fluorescently labeled phospholipid. Data show SR-B1-dependent transfer of the fluorescent phospholipid from HDL NPs to exosomes. Modified exosomes are stable in serum and can be directly detected using flow cytometry. As proof-of-concept, human serum exosomes were found to express SR-B1, and HDL NPs can be used to label and isolate them. Ultimately, we discovered a natural cellular pathway and nanoparticle-receptor pair that enables exosome modulation, detection, and isolation. PMID:26964503

  4. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, suppresses phorbol ester-induced expression of multiple scavenger receptor genes in THP-1 human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ai; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2006-05-29

    Unregulated uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) via macrophage scavenger receptors (SRs) such as lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a key event in atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the effects of five selected food phytochemicals on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced LOX-1 mRNA expression in THP-1 human monocyte-like cells. Nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxylated flavone, markedly reduced it in dose- and time-dependent manners. It also suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, and c-Jun (Ser-63), thereby inhibiting the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1. Further nobiletin attenuated expression of SR-A, SR-PSOX, CD36, and CD68, but not CLA-1, mRNA, leading to the blockade of DiI-acLDL uptake. Together, our results suggest that nobiletin is a promising phytochemical for regulating atherosclerosis with reasonable action mechanisms.

  5. Chronic psychosocial stress in male mice causes an up-regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 protein in the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Füchsl, Andrea M; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Reber, Stefan O

    2013-07-01

    Mice exposed to chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days) show an exaggerated adrenal corticosterone response to an acute heterotypic stressor (elevated platform (EPF), 5 min) despite no difference from EPF-exposed single-housed control (SHC) mice in corticotropin (ACTH) secretion. In the present study, we asked the question whether this CSC-induced increase in adrenal capability to produce and secrete corticosterone is paralleled by an enhanced adrenal availability and/or mobilization capacity of the corticosterone precursor molecule cholesterol. Employing oil-red staining and western blot analysis we revealed comparable relative density of cortical lipid droplets and relative protein expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) between CSC and SHC mice. However, relative protein expression of the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI) was increased following CSC exposure. Moreover, analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) revealed increased LDL-C levels in CSC mice. Together with the pronounced increase in adrenal weight, evidently mediated by hyperplasia of adrenocortical cells, these data strongly indicate an enhanced adrenal availability of and capacity to mobilize cholesterol in chronic psychosocially-stressed mice, contributing to their increased in vivo corticosterone response during acute heterotypic stressor exposure.

  6. Invasion of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates into lung epithelial cells involves glycolipid receptors.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Tracy; Callaghan, Máire; McClean, Siobhán

    2010-12-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of opportunistic cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens that invade lung epithelial cells. The mechanisms of invasion are poorly understood, in particular, the receptors utilised by this bacterium in the invasion process have not been identified. The aim of this study was to investigate the epithelial receptors involved in the invasion of Bcc isolates. We confirmed that invasion into two lung epithelial cell lines (16HBE14o- and CFBE41o-) which have a non-CF and CF phenotype, respectively, is receptor mediated and showed that pre-treatment of these epithelial cell lines with α- or β-galactosidase reduced invasion of isolates of two species of Bcc, Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia. In contrast, removal of mucin had no significant effect. Biotinylated Bcc strains were shown to bind to purified glycolipids separated by thin layer chromatography, albeit different patterns of binding were associated with different strains. Invasion of CF lung epithelial cells (CFBE41o-) by all three Bcc strains examined was significantly reduced by treatment of cells with inhibitors of glycolipid biosynthesis. Although the specific glycolipid involved in each case has not been elucidated, it is apparent that invasion of lung epithelial cells is mediated via binding to glycosphingolipid receptors.

  7. Involvement of growth factors and their receptors in radon-induced rat lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.C.; Dagle, G.E.; Cross, F.T.

    1992-12-31

    In this paper we examine the role of growth factors (GF) and their receptors (GFR) in radon-induced rat lung tumors. Inhalation exposure of radon and its daughters induced lung tumors in rats, but the molecule/cellular mechanisms are not known. Recent evidence suggests that GF/GFR play a critical role in the growth and development of lung cancer in humans and animals. We have developed immunocytochemical methods for identifying sites of production and action of GF/GFR at the cellular level; for example, the avidin-biotin horseradish peroxidase technique. In radon-induced rat epidermoid carcinomas, epidermal growth factor (EGF), EGF-receptors (EGF-R), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-{alpha}), and bombesin were found to be abnormally expressed. These abnormal expressions, mainly associated with epidermoid carcinomas of the lung, were not found in any other lung tumor types. Our data suggest that EGF, EGF-R, TGF-{alpha}, and bombesin are involved in radon oncogenesis in rat lungs, especially in epidermoid carcinomas, possibly through the autocrine/paracrine pathway.

  8. 5-HT Receptor Antagonism Attenuates the Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury After Rabbit Lung Preservation.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Ramírez, J L; Alquicira-Mireles, J; Morales-Hernández, P E; Vargas, M H; Villalba-Caloca, J; Segura-Medina, P

    2015-01-01

    The success of lung transplantation is threatened by the appearance of ischemia-reperfusion injury, which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) is known to produce microvascular leakage in the systemic circulation, but its possible role in ischemia-reperfusion injury after lung preservation has not been reported. In this work we measured the release of 5-HT during a 24-hour rabbit lung preservation, and the effect of methiothepin (antagonist of the majority of 5-HT receptors) and SB204741 (antagonist of 5-HT2B/2C receptors) on the modified capillary filtration coefficient (mKf,c) was evaluated at the end of this period. Our results showed that the highest release rate of 5-HT occurred during the first 15 minutes after the lung harvesting and progressively decreased in the following time intervals. The baseline mKf,c greatly increased after 24 hours of lung preservation, and this increment was partially reduced by methiothepin and even more by SB204741. We concluded that 5-HT may play an important role in the ischemia-reperfusion process after lung preservation.

  9. Induction of COX-2 protein expression by vanadate in A549 human lung carcinoma cell line through EGF receptor and p38 MAPK-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, P.-S.; Mak, O.-T.; Huang, H.-J. . E-mail: haojen@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2006-01-13

    Vanadate is a transition metal widely distributed in the environment. It has been reported that vanadate associated with air pollution particles can modify DNA synthesis, causing cell growth arrest, and apoptosis. Moreover, vanadium exposure was also found to cause the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, and prostaglandin E{sub 2}. Here, we found that exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma cells to vanadate led to extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal protein kinases (JNKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) activation, and COX-2 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, but not PD098059 and SP600125, specific inhibitor of MKK1 and selective inhibitor of JNK, respectively, suppressed COX-2 expression. Furthermore, the epithelial growth factor (EGF) receptor specific inhibitor (PD153035) reduced vanadate-induced COX-2 expression. However, scavenging of vanadate-induced reactive oxygen species by catalase, a specific H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibitor, or DPI, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, resulted in no inhibition on COX-2 expression. Together, we suggested that EGF receptor and p38 MAPK signaling pathway may be involved in vanadate-induced COX-2 protein expression in A549 human lung carcinoma cell line.

  10. Gefitinib in the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation

    PubMed Central

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the main cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, with most patients present with advanced disease and poor long-term prognosis. The aim of lung cancer treatment is to slow down the progression of the disease, to relieve the patients from the lung cancer symptoms and whenever possible, to increase the overall survival. The discovery of small molecule targeting tyrosine kinase of epidermal growth factor receptor opens a new way in the management of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This review will discuss several Phase II and III trials evaluated the clinical efficacy of gefitinib as monotherapy in pretreated patients with advanced NSCLC, as well as both monotherapy and combined with chemotherapy in chemotherapy-naive patients. PMID:27433059

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor localized to exosome membranes as a possible biomarker for lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, T; Kamada, H; Kanasaki, S; Maeda, Y; Nagano, K; Abe, Y; Inoue, M; Yoshioka, Y; Tsutsumi, Y; Katayama, S; Inoue, M; Tsunoda, S

    2013-12-01

    Detection of drug-target proteins and biomarkers that are expressed in cancer tissue has significant potential for both diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, current immuno-histochemical and cytogenetic analyses of biopsy specimens for pre-operational diagnosis are highly invasive and often difficult to apply to lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible utility of determining epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression on exosomal membranes using a targeted ELISA with an anti-CD81 antibody as a capture antibody for lung cancer diagnosis. While soluble EGFR (sEGFR) levels in plasma were not remarkably different between lung cancer patients and normal controls, significantly higher exosomal EGFR expression levels were observed in 5/9 cancer cases compared to normal controls. These results suggest that measurement of exosomal protein levels could be useful for in vitro diagnosis, and that exosomal EGFR is a possible biomarker for characterization of lung cancer.

  12. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; et al

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lungmore » cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.« less

  13. The role of adenosine receptors in regulating production of tumour necrosis factor-α and chemokines by human lung macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Buenestado, A; Delyle, S Grassin; Arnould, I; Besnard, F; Naline, E; Blouquit-Laye, S; Chapelier, A; Bellamy, JF; Devillier, P

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adenosine is a major endogenous regulator of macrophage function, and activates four specific adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B and A3). Here, we have assessed in human lung macrophages the modulation of the expression of adenosine receptor mRNA by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the relative contributions of the different adenosine receptors to LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and chemokines. Experimental approach: Lung macrophages isolated from resected lungs were stimulated with LPS and treated with adenosine receptor agonists or/and antagonists. Adenosine receptor expression was assessed with qRT-PCR. Cytokines were measured in lung macrophage supernatants with elisa. Key results: LPS increased (about 400-fold) mRNA for A2A adenosine receptors, decreased mRNA for A1 and A2B, but had no effect on A3 adenosine receptor mRNA. The adenosine receptor agonist NECA inhibited TNF-α production concentration dependently, whereas the A1 receptor agonist, CCPA, and the A3 receptor agonist, AB-MECA, inhibited TNF-α production only at concentrations affecting A2A receptors. NECA also inhibited the production of CCL chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5) and CXCL chemokines (CXCL9 and CXCL10), but not that of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CXCL5. Reversal of NECA-induced inhibition of TNF-α and chemokine production by the selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist ZM 241385, but not the A2B receptor antagonist, MRS 1754, or the A3 receptor antagonist, MRS 1220, indicated involvement of A2A receptors. Conclusions and implications: LPS up-regulated A2A adenosine receptor gene transcription, and this receptor subtype mediated inhibition of the LPS-induced production of TNF-α and of a subset of chemokines in human lung macrophages. PMID:20136829

  14. Cross-talk between lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and tropomyosin receptor kinase A promotes lung epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Nan, Ling; Wei, Jianxin; Jacko, Anastasia M; Culley, Miranda K; Zhao, Jing; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Ma, Haichun; Zhao, Yutong

    2016-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lysophospholipid, which plays a crucial role in the regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. LPA exerts its biological effects mainly through binding to cell-surface LPA receptors (LPA1-6), which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and GPCRs modulates GPCRs-mediated signaling. Tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) is a RTK, which mediates nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced biological functions including cell migration in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we show LPA1 transactivation of TrkA in murine lung epithelial cells (MLE12). LPA induced tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkA in both time- and dose-dependent manners. Down-regulation of LPA1 by siRNA transfection attenuated LPA-induced phosphorylation of TrkA, suggesting a cross-talk between LPA1 and TrkA. To investigate the molecular regulation of the cross-talk, we focused on the interaction between LPA1 and TrkA. We found that LPA induced interaction between LPA1 and TrkA. The LPA1/TrkA complex was localized on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. The C-terminus of LPA1 was identified as the binding site for TrkA. Inhibition of TrkA attenuated LPA-induced phosphorylation of TrkA and LPA1 internalization, as well as lung epithelial cell migration. These studies provide a molecular mechanism for the transactivation of TrkA by LPA, and suggest that the cross-talk between LPA1 and TrkA regulates LPA-induced receptor internalization and lung epithelial cell migration. PMID:26597701

  15. Dihydrotestosterone decreases beta-adrenergic receptor binding in the fetal rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Moawad, A H; River, L P; River, J M

    1988-07-01

    Tritium-labeled dihydroalprenolol was used to quantify the beta-adrenergic receptor sites in day 30 fetal rabbit lung tissue. Each of the fetuses of New Zealand White rabbits on day 28 of gestation was injected with dihydrotestosterone (2.0 micrograms) in one horn of the uterus and 10% ethanol in normal saline (the solvent) in the contralateral one. The animals were sacrificed 48 hours later and the fetal lung tissue was assayed. Dihydrotestosterone decreased the beta-adrenergic receptor site number in the treatment group compared with the control group (86 versus 111 fmol/mg protein, p less than 0.05 by paired t-test). In the presence of dihydrotestosterone, beta-adrenergic receptor binding is inhibited in the preterm fetal rabbit. This effect may be implicated in the beta-adrenergic mediation of phospholipid synthesis and/or release by fetal alveolar cells.

  16. VEGF receptor expression decreases during lung development in congenital diaphragmatic hernia induced by nitrofen

    PubMed Central

    Sbragia, L.; Nassr, A.C.C.; Gonçalves, F.L.L.; Schmidt, A.F.; Zuliani, C.C.; Garcia, P.V.; Gallindo, R.M.; Pereira, L.A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in pulmonary vessels have been described in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and may contribute to the development of pulmonary hypoplasia and hypertension; however, how the expression of VEGF receptors changes during fetal lung development in CDH is not understood. The aim of this study was to compare morphological evolution with expression of VEGF receptors, VEGFR1 (Flt-1) and VEGFR2 (Flk-1), in pseudoglandular, canalicular, and saccular stages of lung development in normal rat fetuses and in fetuses with CDH. Pregnant rats were divided into four groups (n=20 fetuses each) of four different gestational days (GD) 18.5, 19.5, 20.5, 21.5: external control (EC), exposed to olive oil (OO), exposed to 100 mg nitrofen, by gavage, without CDH (N-), and exposed to nitrofen with CDH (CDH) on GD 9.5 (term=22 days). The morphological variables studied were: body weight (BW), total lung weight (TLW), left lung weight, TLW/BW ratio, total lung volume, and left lung volume. The histometric variables studied were: left lung parenchymal area density and left lung parenchymal volume. VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression were determined by Western blotting. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance with the Tukey-Kramer post hoc test. CDH frequency was 37% (80/216). All the morphological and histometric variables were reduced in the N- and CDH groups compared with the controls, and reductions were more pronounced in the CDH group (P<0.05) and more evident on GD 20.5 and GD 21.5. Similar results were observed for VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression. We conclude that N- and CDH fetuses showed primary pulmonary hypoplasia, with a decrease in VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression. PMID:24519134

  17. VEGF receptor expression decreases during lung development in congenital diaphragmatic hernia induced by nitrofen.

    PubMed

    Sbragia, L; Nassr, A C C; Gonçalves, F L L; Schmidt, A F; Zuliani, C C; Garcia, P V; Gallindo, R M; Pereira, L A V

    2014-02-01

    Changes in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in pulmonary vessels have been described in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and may contribute to the development of pulmonary hypoplasia and hypertension; however, how the expression of VEGF receptors changes during fetal lung development in CDH is not understood. The aim of this study was to compare morphological evolution with expression of VEGF receptors, VEGFR1 (Flt-1) and VEGFR2 (Flk-1), in pseudoglandular, canalicular, and saccular stages of lung development in normal rat fetuses and in fetuses with CDH. Pregnant rats were divided into four groups (n=20 fetuses each) of four different gestational days (GD) 18.5, 19.5, 20.5, 21.5: external control (EC), exposed to olive oil (OO), exposed to 100 mg nitrofen, by gavage, without CDH (N-), and exposed to nitrofen with CDH (CDH) on GD 9.5 (term=22 days). The morphological variables studied were: body weight (BW), total lung weight (TLW), left lung weight, TLW/BW ratio, total lung volume, and left lung volume. The histometric variables studied were: left lung parenchymal area density and left lung parenchymal volume. VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression were determined by Western blotting. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance with the Tukey-Kramer post hoc test. CDH frequency was 37% (80/216). All the morphological and histometric variables were reduced in the N- and CDH groups compared with the controls, and reductions were more pronounced in the CDH group (P<0.05) and more evident on GD 20.5 and GD 21.5. Similar results were observed for VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression. We conclude that N- and CDH fetuses showed primary pulmonary hypoplasia, with a decrease in VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression.

  18. PET/CT and MR imaging biomarker of lipid-rich plaques using [64Cu]-labeled scavenger receptor (CD68-Fc).

    PubMed

    Bigalke, Boris; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Andia, Marcelo E; Cooper, Margaret S; Schuster, Andreas; Wurster, Thomas; Onthank, David; Münch, Götz; Blower, Philip; Gawaz, Meinrad; Nagel, Eike; Botnar, Rene M

    2014-11-15

    Continued uptake of modified low-density lipoproteins (LDL) by the scavenger receptor, CD68, of activated macrophages is a crucial process in the development of atherosclerotic plaques and leads to the formation of foam cells. Eight-weeks-old male Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice (n = 6) were fed a high-fat diet for 12 weeks. C57BL/6J wildtype (WT) mice served as controls (n = 6). Positron emission tomography (PET) with an acquisition time of 1800 s (NanoPET/CT scanner; Mediso, Hungary & Bioscan, USA) was carried out 24h after intravenous tail vein administration of 50 µl (64)Cu-CD68-Fc (~20-30 µg labeled protein/mouse containing approximately 10-12 MBq (64)Cu-CD68-Fc per mouse). Three days after PET/CT, all mice received an intravenous administration of 0.2 mmol/kg body weight of a gadolinium-based elastin-binding contrast agent to assess plaque burden and vessel wall remodeling. Two hours after injection, mice were imaged in a 3T clinical MR scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, NL) using a dedicated single loop surface coil (23 mm). Enhanced (64)Cu-CD68-Fc uptake was found in the aortic arches of ApoE(-/-) compared to WT mice (ApoE(-/-) mice:10.5 ± 1.5 Bq/cm(3) vs. WT mice: 2.1 ± 0.3 Bq/cm(3); P = 0.002). Higher gadolinium-based elastin-binding contrast agent uptake was also detected in the aortic arch of ApoE(-/-) compared to WT mice using R(1) maps (R(1) = 1.47 ± 0.06 s(-1) vs. 0.92 ± 0.05 s(-1); P <0.001). Radiolabeled scavenger receptor ((64)Cu-CD68-Fc) may help to target foam cell rich plaques with high content of oxidized LDL. This novel imaging biomarker tool may have potential to identify unstable plaques and for risk stratification. PMID:25499394

  19. Age-associated inflammation and Toll-like receptor dysfunction prime the lungs for pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa, Ernesto; Boyd, Angela R.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Aging is associated with increased inflammation and risk for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Streptococcus pneumoniae co-opts the NFkB-regulated proteins Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) and Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr) to attach and invade cells. We sought to determine if aging and chronic inflammation was associated with increased pIgR & PAFr in the lungs and increased susceptibility to S. pneumoniae. Methods Lung protein and mRNA levels were quantitated using Western blot and quantitative PCR. NFkB activation was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cytokine levels were measured by cytometric bead analysis. To model chronic inflammation mice were implanted with osmotic pumps that delivered tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. Results Aged mice and those infused with TNFα had increased levels of pIgR & PAFr in their lungs and were more susceptible to S. pneumoniae. During pneumonia, aged mice had reduced levels of pIgR & PAFr and less NFkB activation despite greater bacterial burden. We determined that aged mice had decreased amounts of lung Toll-like receptors (TLR)-1, 2, and 4 and reduced capacity to respond to S. pneumoniae with pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Conclusions Aged mice, and potentially elderly humans, are more susceptible to pneumonia because of a priming effect of chronic inflammation and TLR dysfunction. PMID:19586419

  20. EGF receptor mutations in lung cancer: from humans to mice and maybe back to humans.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2006-06-01

    Deletions in exon 19 and nucleotide substitutions in exon 21 are the most common mutations of the EGFR (ErbB1) in NSCLC. These mutations endow the receptor with constitutive kinase activity. Most tumors expressing these mutants respond well to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, suggesting that they are dependent on mutant EGFR signaling. Two groups developed transgenic mice in which expression of these mutants is temporally induced in mouse lung. Mice expressing EGFR mutants develop bronchioloalveolar cancer and lung adenocarcinoma, which are highly sensitive to EGFR inhibitors. These mouse models provide important opportunities for studying the biology of NSCLC and the refinement of anti-EGFR therapies.

  1. Semaphorin 4A enhances lung fibrosis through activation of Akt via PlexinD1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hai-Ying; Gao, Wei; Chong, Fa-Rong; Liu, Hong-Yan; Zhang, J I

    2015-12-01

    Semaphorin 4A plays a regulatory role in immune function and angiogenesis. However, its specific involvement in controlling lung fibrosis, a process that is closely related to angiogenesis and inflammation is still poorly understood. In the present study, we show that treatment of Sema4A on normal lung fibroblasts induces expression of proteins that contribute to a contractile phenotype, including alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), ezrin, moesin, and paxillin. We confirm that Sema4A enhances the ability of lung fibroblasts to contract collagen gel. Sema4A treatment led to resistance to apoptosis in normal lung fibroblasts. Relative to normal lung fibroblasts, fibroblasts cultured from scars of patients with the fibrotic disease Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) showed elevated Sema4A secretion, enhanced alpha-SMA, ezrin, moesin, and paxillin expression, and high ability to induce collagen gel contraction. Using neutralizing antibody against Sema4A receptor, PlexinD1, we found that endogenous Sema4A signalling in SSc fibroblast was through PlexinD1 receptor. We then identified the signalling mechanism through which Sema4A-PlexinD1 promotes the ability of normal fibroblasts to contract a collagen gel matrix. Western blot analysis showed that Sema4A activated the Akt pathway in lung fibroblasts, and the specific inhibitor of Akt pathway, Akt inhibitor III, blocked the ability of Sema4A to promote the ability of lung fibroblasts to contract a collagen gel matrix. Thus, blocking Sema4APlexinD1- Akt cascades might be beneficial in reducing pulmonary fibrosis.

  2. 4-hydroxynonenal contributes to macrophage foam cell formation through increased expression of class A scavenger receptor at the level of translation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Mi R; Im, Dong S; Lee, Seung J; Woo, Joong W; Hong, Ki W; Bae, Sun S; Kim, Chi D

    2008-07-15

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is known to be atherogenic, but its mechanism of action in atherogenesis is not clear. Therefore, this study investigated the role of HNE in macrophage foam cell formation and the underlying mechanism involved in HNE-induced expression of scavenger receptors (SRs). In the aortic sinus of ApoE-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet, multiple plaque lesions were accompanied by increased accumulation of HNE adducts in the enhanced Mac-2 stained area. In an in vitro study, HNE exposure to J774A.1 macrophages led to increased expression of class A SR (SR-A) and CD36 at the protein level with a concomitant increase in endocytic uptake of oxLDL. In contrast to CD36 protein expression, which was associated with an increase in mRNA expression, the HNE-enhanced SR-A protein expression was neither accompanied by its mRNA expression nor affected by actinomycin D. HNE enhanced the incorporation rates of (35)S-Met/Cys into SR-A, and HNE-induced SR-A protein expression was effectively attenuated by translation inhibitors such as cycloheximide and rapamycin. Taken together, these data suggest that HNE contributes to macrophage foam cell formation through increased synthesis of SR-A at the level of mRNA translation, consequently leading to the progression of atherosclerosis.

  3. Benzo-fused lactams from a diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) library as inhibitors of scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI)-mediated lipid uptake.

    PubMed

    Dockendorff, Chris; Faloon, Patrick W; Pu, Jun; Yu, Miao; Johnston, Stephen; Bennion, Melissa; Penman, Marsha; Nieland, Thomas J F; Dandapani, Sivaraman; Perez, José R; Munoz, Benito; Palmer, Michelle A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Krieger, Monty

    2015-01-01

    We report a new series of 8-membered benzo-fused lactams that inhibit cellular lipid uptake from HDL particles mediated by Scavenger Receptor, Class B, Type I (SR-BI). The series was identified via a high-throughput screen of the National Institutes of Health Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (NIH MLSMR), measuring the transfer of the fluorescent lipid DiI from HDL particles to CHO cells overexpressing SR-BI. The series is part of a previously reported diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) library prepared via a build-couple-pair approach. Detailed structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were performed with a selection of the original library, as well as additional analogs prepared via solution phase synthesis. These studies demonstrate that the orientation of the substituents on the aliphatic ring have a critical effect on activity. Additionally, a lipophilic group is required at the western end of the molecule, and a northern hydroxyl group and a southern sulfonamide substituent also proved to be optimal. Compound 2p was found to possess a superior combination of potency (av IC50=0.10μM) and solubility (79μM in PBS), and it was designated as probe ML312. PMID:25900219

  4. Effects of soy pinitol on the pro-inflammatory cytokines and scavenger receptors in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-treated THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Won-Ha; Kwon, Eun-Young; Kang, Mi Ae; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Park, Yong Bok; Jeon, Seon-Min

    2007-12-01

    Pinitol, a methylated form of D-chiro-inositol, acts as a insulin mediator. We investigated the effects of soy pinitol on the factors involved in foam cell formation using differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Pinitol slightly inhibited the lipid-laden foam cell formation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in a dose-dependent manner. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 releases were significantly reduced by pinitol treatment (0.05-0.5 mM), whereas interleukin-1beta and interleukin-8 secretions were significantly reduced in low-dose pinitol (0.05 or 0.1 mM) and 0.5 mM pinitol-treated cells, respectively, compared to no pinitol-treated cells. Gene expressions of CD36 and CD68 were significantly down-regulated by 0.05-0.5 mM pinitol compared to the oxLDL-treated control cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 gene expression was significantly decreased in 0.05-0.5 mM pinitol-treated cells compared to the no pinitol-treated macrophages. We conclude that pinitol has some inhibitory effects on foam cell formation by reducing lipid accumulation, secretion, and expression of some cytokines and macrophage scavenger receptor expression via its insulin-like action.

  5. Activated prostaglandin D2 receptors on macrophages enhance neutrophil recruitment into the lung

    PubMed Central

    Jandl, Katharina; Stacher, Elvira; Bálint, Zoltán; Sturm, Eva Maria; Maric, Jovana; Peinhaupt, Miriam; Luschnig, Petra; Aringer, Ida; Fauland, Alexander; Konya, Viktoria; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Wheelock, Craig E.; Kratky, Dagmar; Olschewski, Andrea; Marsche, Gunther; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is an early-phase mediator in inflammation, but its action and the roles of the 2 D-type prostanoid receptors (DPs) DP1 and DP2 (also called chemoattractant receptor–homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells) in regulating macrophages have not been elucidated to date. Objective We investigated the role of PGD2 receptors on primary human macrophages, as well as primary murine lung macrophages, and their ability to influence neutrophil action in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro studies, including migration, Ca2+ flux, and cytokine secretion, were conducted with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils and freshly isolated murine alveolar and pulmonary interstitial macrophages. In vivo pulmonary inflammation was assessed in male BALB/c mice. Results Activation of DP1, DP2, or both receptors on human macrophages induced strong intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytokine release, and migration of macrophages. In a murine model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, activation of each PGD2 receptor resulted in aggravated airway neutrophilia, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine contents, and decreased lung compliance. Selective depletion of alveolar macrophages abolished the PGD2-enhanced inflammatory response. Activation of PGD2 receptors on human macrophages enhanced the migratory capacity and prolonged the survival of neutrophils in vitro. In human lung tissue specimens both DP1 and DP2 receptors were located on alveolar macrophages along with hematopoietic PGD synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme of PGD2 synthesis. Conclusion For the first time, our results show that PGD2 markedly augments disease activity through its ability to enhance the proinflammatory actions of macrophages and subsequent neutrophil activation. PMID:26792210

  6. Lung injury after hemorrhage is age-dependent: role of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ

    PubMed Central

    Zingarelli, Basilia; Hake, Paul W.; O’Connor, Michael; Burroughs, Timothy J.; Wong, Hector R.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The incidence of multiple organ failure in pediatric trauma victims is lower than in the adult population. However, the molecular mechanisms are not yet defined. We investigated whether the pathophysiologic characteristics of hemorrhage-induced lung injury may be age-dependent and may be regulated by the peroxisome proliferator activator receptor γ (PPARγ). Design Prospective, laboratory investigation that used an established rodent model of hemorrhagic shock. Setting University hospital laboratory. Subjects Young (n=67; 3–5 months old) and mature (n=66; 11–13 months old) male rats. Interventions Hemorrhagic shock was induced in young and mature rats by withdrawing blood to a mean arterial blood pressure of 50 mmHg. After 3 hrs, rats were rapidly resuscitated by infusing the shed blood and sacrificed 3 hrs thereafter. Measurements and Main Results In young rats, lung injury was characterized by accumulation of red cells and neutrophils at the end of the resuscitation period; at Western blot analysis, lung expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was increased. In contrast, the severity of lung injury was more pronounced in mature rats. Lung myeloperoxidase activity and expression of constitutive and inducible ICAM-1 was significantly higher in mature rats when compared to young rats. Mature rats also had higher plasma levels of cytokines and chemokines when compared to young rats. This heightened inflammation was associated with higher degree of activation of nuclear factor-κB and down-regulation of PPARγ and heat shock factor-1 in the lung of mature rats when compared to young rats. Treatment with the PPARγ ligand, the cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, ameliorated lung injury in young, but not in mature animals. Conclusions Lung injury after severe hemorrhage is age-dependent and may be secondary to a diverse regulation of PPARγ. PMID:19384226

  7. Detection of Sendai virus receptor, the ganglioside GDla, in target tissue (mouse lung)

    SciTech Connect

    Markwell, M.A.K.; Sato, E.

    1986-05-01

    Previously the authors had shown that the gangliosides GDla, GTlb, and GQlb derived from brain function as receptors for the paramyxovirus Sendai virus by their ability to induce infection when incubated with receptor-deficient cells. Analyses of MDBK, HeLa, and MDCK cells in culture demonstrated that these putative receptors were present in host cells in the quantities required for infection. The primary site of infection for Sendai virus in the whole animal is the respiratory tract, culminating in the lung. Therefore, the ganglioside content of this target organ was analyzed to determine the endogenous receptor population available to Sendai virus. The total ganglioside fraction of lung was resolved into individual species by HPTLC. Gangliosides of the gangliotetraose series were identified by the specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled tetanus and cholera toxins before and after exposure with sialidase. In this manner one of the major resorcinol-positive bands was identified as GDla. Evidence of the more complex ganglioside receptors for Sendai virus was also seen.

  8. Erlotinib resistance in mouse models of epidermal growth factor receptor-induced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Katerina; Fan, Pang-Dian; Shen, Ronglai; Zakowski, Maureen; Varmus, Harold

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Seventy-five percent of lung adenocarcinomas with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations respond to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib; however, drug-resistant tumors eventually emerge. In 60% of cases, resistant tumors carry a secondary mutation in EGFR (T790M), amplification of MET, or both. Here, we describe the establishment of erlotinib resistance in lung tumors, which were induced by mutant EGFR, in transgenic mice after multiple cycles of drug treatment; we detect the T790M mutation in five out of 24 tumors or Met amplification in one out of 11 tumors in these mice. This preclinical mouse model, therefore, recapitulates the molecular changes responsible for resistance to TKIs in human tumors and holds promise for the discovery of additional mechanisms of drug resistance in lung cancer. PMID:20007486

  9. Erlotinib resistance in mouse models of epidermal growth factor receptor-induced lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Politi, Katerina; Fan, Pang-Dian; Shen, Ronglai; Zakowski, Maureen; Varmus, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of lung adenocarcinomas with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations respond to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib; however, drug-resistant tumors eventually emerge. In 60% of cases, resistant tumors carry a secondary mutation in EGFR (T790M), amplification of MET, or both. Here, we describe the establishment of erlotinib resistance in lung tumors, which were induced by mutant EGFR, in transgenic mice after multiple cycles of drug treatment; we detect the T790M mutation in five out of 24 tumors or Met amplification in one out of 11 tumors in these mice. This preclinical mouse model, therefore, recapitulates the molecular changes responsible for resistance to TKIs in human tumors and holds promise for the discovery of additional mechanisms of drug resistance in lung cancer.

  10. Toll-like receptor and tumour necrosis factor dependent endotoxin-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Togbe, Dieudonnée; Schnyder-Candrian, Silvia; Schnyder, Bruno; Doz, Emilie; Noulin, Nicolas; Janot, Laure; Secher, Thomas; Gasse, Pamela; Lima, Carla; Coelho, Fernando Rodrigues; Vasseur, Virginie; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernhard; Couillin, Isabelle; Moser, Rene

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies on endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute inflammatory response in the lung are reviewed. The acute airway inflammatory response to inhaled endotoxin is mediated through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and CD14 signalling as mice deficient for TLR4 or CD14 are unresponsive to endotoxin. Acute bronchoconstriction, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-12 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) production, protein leak and neutrophil recruitment in the lung are abrogated in mice deficient for the adaptor molecules myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP), but independent of TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-beta (TRIF). In particular, LPS-induced TNF is required for bronchoconstriction, but dispensable for inflammatory cell recruitment. Lipopolysaccharide induces activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Inhibition of pulmonary MAPK activity abrogates LPS-induced TNF production, bronchoconstriction, neutrophil recruitment into the lungs and broncho-alveolar space. In conclusion, TLR4-mediated, bronchoconstriction and acute inflammatory lung pathology to inhaled endotoxin are dependent on TLR4/CD14/MD2 expression using the adapter proteins TIRAP and MyD88, while TRIF, IL-1R1 or IL-18R signalling pathways are dispensable. Further downstream in this axis of signalling, TNF blockade reduces only acute bronchoconstriction, while MAPK inhibition abrogates completely endotoxin-induced inflammation. PMID:18039275

  11. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D.; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A.; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A2BR or treatment with the A2BR antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A2BR attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A2BR activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A2BR antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.—Karmouty-Quintana, H., Zhong, H., Acero, L., Weng, T., Melicoff, E., West, J. D., Hemnes, A., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackwell, T. S., Xia, Y., Johnston, R. A., Zeng, D., Belardinelli, L., Blackburn, M. R. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease. PMID:22415303

  12. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-dependent lung adenocarcinoma with a human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yongjun; Ren, Xiaodi; Smith, Craig; Guo, Qianxu; Malabunga, Maria; Guernah, Ilhem; Zhang, Yiwei; Shen, Juqun; Sun, Haijun; Chehab, Nabil; Loizos, Nick; Ludwig, Dale L.; Ornitz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) have been identified in multiple types of human cancer and in congenital birth defects. In human lung cancer, fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), a high-affinity ligand for FGFR3, is overexpressed in 10% of primary resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens. Furthermore, in a mouse model where FGF9 can be induced in lung epithelial cells, epithelial proliferation and ensuing tumorigenesis is dependent on FGFR3. To develop new customized therapies for cancers that are dependent on FGFR3 activation, we have used this mouse model to evaluate a human monoclonal antibody (D11) with specificity for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of FGFR3, that recognizes both human and mouse forms of the receptor. Here, we show that D11 effectively inhibits signaling through FGFR3 in vitro, inhibits the growth of FGFR3-dependent FGF9-induced lung adenocarcinoma in mice, and reduces tumor-associated morbidity. Given the potency of FGF9 in this mouse model and the absolute requirement for signaling through FGFR3, this study validates the D11 antibody as a potentially useful and effective reagent for treating human cancers or other pathologies that are dependent on activation of FGFR3. PMID:27056048

  13. The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is a discriminator of macrophage function in the inflamed lung

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas J; Fujino, Naoya; Cook, Peter C; Svedberg, Freya R; MacDonald, Andrew S; Maciewicz, Rose A; Singh, Dave; Hussell, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Much of the biology surrounding macrophage functional specificity has arisen through examining inflammation-induced polarising signals, but this also occurs in homeostasis, requiring tissue-specific environmental triggers that influence macrophage phenotype and function. The TAM receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (Tyro3, Axl and MerTK) mediates the non-inflammatory removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes through the bridging phosphatidylserine-binding molecules Gas6 or Protein S. We show that one such TAM receptor (Axl) is exclusively expressed on mouse airway macrophages, but not interstitial macrophages and other lung leukocytes, under homeostatic conditions and is constitutively ligated to Gas6. Axl expression is potently induced by GM-CSF expressed in the healthy and inflamed airway, and by type I interferon or TLR3 stimulation on human and mouse macrophages, indicating potential involvement of Axl in apoptotic cell removal under inflammatory conditions. Indeed, an absence of Axl does not cause sterile inflammation in health, but leads to exaggerated lung inflammatory disease upon influenza infection. These data imply that Axl allows specific identification of airway macrophages, and that its expression is critical for macrophage functional compartmentalisation in the airspaces or lung interstitium. We propose that this may be a critical feature to prevent excessive inflammation due to secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells that have not been cleared by efferocytosis. PMID:25603826

  14. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  15. Implications of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Activation in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Andarini, Sita; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Syahruddin, Elisna; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) has been intensively investigated in many preclinical studies using cell lines and animal models, and the results have provided important knowledge to help improve the understanding of cancer biology. IGF1R is highly expressed in patients with lung cancer, and high levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), the main ligand for IGF1R, increases the risk of developing lung malignancy in the future. Several phase I clinical trials have supported the potential use of an IGF1R-targeted strategy for cancer, including lung cancer. However, the negative results from phase III studies need further attention, especially in selecting patients with specific molecular signatures, who will gain benefits from IGF1R inhibitors with minimal side effects. This review will discuss the basic concept of IGF1R in lung cancer biology, such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction and cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance, and also the clinical implications of IGF1R for lung cancer patients, such as prognostic value and cancer therapy resistance. PMID:27418865

  16. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI.

  17. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI. PMID:26222277

  18. Modified high-density lipoprotein modulates aldosterone release through scavenger receptors via extra cellular signal-regulated kinase and Janus kinase-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sarama; Graessler, Juergen; Schwarz, Peter E H; Goettsch, Claudia; Bornstein, Stefan R; Kopprasch, Steffi

    2012-07-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) manifest significant abnormalities in lipoprotein structure and function. The deleterious impact of oxidative and glycoxidative modifications on HDL-mediated atheroprotective, antiinflammatory, and antioxidative phenomena has been well established. However, the biological effects of modified HDL on adrenal steroidogenesis-which could reveal a pathophysiological link to the overactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and its adverse cardiovascular consequences often observed in T2D-are not well delineated. We studied the role of modified HDL on aldosterone release from adrenocortical carcinoma cells (NCI-H295R). In vitro modifications of native HDL were performed in the presence of glucose for glycoxidized HDL (glycoxHDL) and sodium hypochlorite for oxidized HDL. Angiotensin II (AngII)-sensitized H295R cells were treated with lipoproteins for 24 h, and supernatant was used to measure aldosterone release. Both native and modified HDL augmented the steroid release from AngII-sensitized cells, with glycoxHDL having the greatest impact. Both the modified forms of HDL induced a significant increase in scavenger receptor expression and employed protein kinase C as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase as downstream effectors of aldosterone release. Native HDL and modified HDL required Janus kinase-2 for combating increased demand in steroidogenesis. Therefore, our data support the hypothesis that diabetes-induced modification of HDL may promote adrenocortical aldosterone secretion via different signal transduction pathways. This significant influence on multiple signaling mechanisms could be targeted for future research to implement novel therapeutic trials.

  19. Heat shock protein-27 attenuates foam cell formation and atherogenesis by down-regulating scavenger receptor-A expression via NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Raizman, Joshua E; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Seibert, Tara; Hibbert, Benjamin; Cuerrier, Charles M; Salari, Samira; Zhao, Xiaoling; Hu, Tieqiang; Shi, Chunhua; Ma, Xiaoli; Simard, Trevor; Caravaggio, Justin; Rayner, Katey; Bowdish, Dawn; Moore, Kathryn; O'Brien, Edward R

    2013-12-01

    Previously, we showed an inverse correlation between HSP27 serum levels and experimental atherogenesis in ApoE(-/-) mice that over-express HSP27 and speculated that the apparent binding of HSP27 to scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) was of mechanistic importance in attenuating foam cell formation. However, the nature and importance of the interplay between HSP27 and SR-A in atheroprotection remained unclear. Treatment of THP-1 macrophages with recombinant HSP27 (rHSP27) inhibited acLDL binding (-34%; p<0.005) and uptake (-38%, p<0.05). rHSP27 reduced SR-A mRNA (-39%, p=0.02), total protein (-56%, p=0.01) and cell surface (-53%, p<0.001) expression. The reduction in SR-A expression by rHSP27 was associated with a 4-fold increase in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling (p<0.001 versus control), while an inhibitor of NF-κB signaling, BAY11-7082, attenuated the negative effects of rHSP27 on both SR-A expression and lipid uptake. To determine if SR-A is required for HSP27 mediated atheroprotection in vivo, ApoE(-/-) and ApoE(-/-) SR-A(-/-) mice fed with a high fat diet were treated for 3weeks with rHSP25. Compared to controls, rHSP25 therapy reduced aortic en face and aortic sinus atherosclerotic lesion size in ApoE(-/-) mice by 39% and 36% (p<0.05), respectively, but not in ApoE(-/-)SR-A(-/-) mice. In conclusion, rHSP27 diminishes SR-A expression, resulting in attenuated foam cell formation in vitro. Regulation of SR-A by HSP27 may involve the participation of NF-κB signaling. Lastly, SR-A is required for HSP27-mediated atheroprotection in vivo. PMID:23939398

  20. Increased DNA methylation of scavenger receptor class B type I contributes to inhibitory effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol uptake and steroidogenesis in fetal adrenals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dong-Mei; He, Zheng; Ma, Liang-Peng; Wang, Lin-Long; Ping, Jie; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Steroid hormones synthesized from cholesterol in the fetal adrenal are crucial for fetal development. We have observed the inhibited fetal adrenal corticosterone synthesis and increased intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rate in rats under prenatal caffeine ingestion. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol supply in fetal adrenal steroidogenesis in rats and explore the underlying epigenetic mechanisms. Pregnant Wistar rats were treated with 60 mg/kg · d caffeine from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD17. Histological changes of fetal adrenals and increased IUGR rates were observed in the caffeine group. There were significantly decreased steroid hormone contents and cholesterol supply in caffeine-treated fetal adrenals. Data from the gene expression array suggested that prenatal caffeine ingestion caused increased expression of genes related to DNA methylation and decreased expression of genes related to cholesterol uptake. The following conjoint analysis of DNA methylation array with these differentially expressed genes suggested that scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) may play an important role in caffeine-induced cholesterol supply deficiency. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical detection certified the inhibitory effects of caffeine on both mRNA expression and protein expression of SR-BI in the fetal adrenal. And the increased DNA methylation frequency in the proximal promoter of SR-BI was confirmed by bisulfite-sequencing PCR. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine ingestion can induce DNA hypermethylation of the SR-BI promoter in the rat fetal adrenal. These effects may lead to decreased SR-BI expression and cholesterol uptake, which inhibits steroidogenesis in the fetal adrenal.

  1. Role of hepatic lipase and scavenger receptor BI in clearing phospholipid/free cholesterol-rich lipoproteins in PLTP-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Koichi; Qin, Shucun; Vieu, Claude; Collet, Xavier; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2002-07-11

    Phospholipid transfer protein knock-out (PLTP0) mice have defective transfer of phospholipids (PL) from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) into high-density lipoproteins (HDL). In this study, we examined the role of diet, hepatic lipase (HL) and scavenger receptor BI (SRBI) in determining the accumulation of excess PL and free cholesterol (FC, "surface remnants") in plasma of PLTP0 mice. PL and FC accumulated in the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-LDL region of PLTP0 mice on a highly saturated, coconut oil-based diet, but not on chow or milk-fat based Western diets. Accumulation of PL and FC was dramatically increased in PLTP0/HL0 mice, compared to PLTP0 mice, but only on the coconut oil diet. Turnover studies indicated that the coconut oil diet was associated with delayed catabolism of PL of PL/FC-rich particles. Incubation of these particles with primary hepatocytes in the presence of SRBI neutralizing antibody indicated that SRBI was primarily responsible for removal of FC and PL on the Western diet. In hepatocytes of coconut oil-fed mice, removal of FC and PL from these particles by SRBI was markedly reduced, even though SRBI protein expression levels were unchanged. These studies indicate that HL and SRBI both have major role in the clearance of PL and FC of surface remnants in PLTP0 mice. SRBI appears to be dysfunctional in coconut oil diet-fed animals, possibly related to changes in hepatocyte membrane fatty acid composition. PMID:12117557

  2. Increased DNA methylation of scavenger receptor class B type I contributes to inhibitory effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol uptake and steroidogenesis in fetal adrenals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong-Mei; He, Zheng; Ma, Liang-Peng; Wang, Lin-Long; Ping, Jie; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Steroid hormones synthesized from cholesterol in the fetal adrenal are crucial for fetal development. We have observed the inhibited fetal adrenal corticosterone synthesis and increased intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rate in rats under prenatal caffeine ingestion. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol supply in fetal adrenal steroidogenesis in rats and explore the underlying epigenetic mechanisms. Pregnant Wistar rats were treated with 60 mg/kg·d caffeine from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD17. Histological changes of fetal adrenals and increased IUGR rates were observed in the caffeine group. There were significantly decreased steroid hormone contents and cholesterol supply in caffeine-treated fetal adrenals. Data from the gene expression array suggested that prenatal caffeine ingestion caused increased expression of genes related to DNA methylation and decreased expression of genes related to cholesterol uptake. The following conjoint analysis of DNA methylation array with these differentially expressed genes suggested that scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) may play an important role in caffeine-induced cholesterol supply deficiency. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical detection certified the inhibitory effects of caffeine on both mRNA expression and protein expression of SR-BI in the fetal adrenal. And the increased DNA methylation frequency in the proximal promoter of SR-BI was confirmed by bisulfite-sequencing PCR. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine ingestion can induce DNA hypermethylation of the SR-BI promoter in the rat fetal adrenal. These effects may lead to decreased SR-BI expression and cholesterol uptake, which inhibits steroidogenesis in the fetal adrenal. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits steroid hormone production in the fetal adrenal. • Prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits cholesterol uptake in the fetal adrenal. • Prenatal caffeine

  3. Heat shock protein-27 attenuates foam cell formation and atherogenesis by down-regulating scavenger receptor-A expression via NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Raizman, Joshua E; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Seibert, Tara; Hibbert, Benjamin; Cuerrier, Charles M; Salari, Samira; Zhao, Xiaoling; Hu, Tieqiang; Shi, Chunhua; Ma, Xiaoli; Simard, Trevor; Caravaggio, Justin; Rayner, Katey; Bowdish, Dawn; Moore, Kathryn; O'Brien, Edward R

    2013-12-01

    Previously, we showed an inverse correlation between HSP27 serum levels and experimental atherogenesis in ApoE(-/-) mice that over-express HSP27 and speculated that the apparent binding of HSP27 to scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) was of mechanistic importance in attenuating foam cell formation. However, the nature and importance of the interplay between HSP27 and SR-A in atheroprotection remained unclear. Treatment of THP-1 macrophages with recombinant HSP27 (rHSP27) inhibited acLDL binding (-34%; p<0.005) and uptake (-38%, p<0.05). rHSP27 reduced SR-A mRNA (-39%, p=0.02), total protein (-56%, p=0.01) and cell surface (-53%, p<0.001) expression. The reduction in SR-A expression by rHSP27 was associated with a 4-fold increase in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling (p<0.001 versus control), while an inhibitor of NF-κB signaling, BAY11-7082, attenuated the negative effects of rHSP27 on both SR-A expression and lipid uptake. To determine if SR-A is required for HSP27 mediated atheroprotection in vivo, ApoE(-/-) and ApoE(-/-) SR-A(-/-) mice fed with a high fat diet were treated for 3weeks with rHSP25. Compared to controls, rHSP25 therapy reduced aortic en face and aortic sinus atherosclerotic lesion size in ApoE(-/-) mice by 39% and 36% (p<0.05), respectively, but not in ApoE(-/-)SR-A(-/-) mice. In conclusion, rHSP27 diminishes SR-A expression, resulting in attenuated foam cell formation in vitro. Regulation of SR-A by HSP27 may involve the participation of NF-κB signaling. Lastly, SR-A is required for HSP27-mediated atheroprotection in vivo.

  4. Cell-specific expression of the macrophage scavenger receptor gene is dependent on PU.1 and a composite AP-1/ets motif.

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, K S; Semple, K; Wu, H; Glass, C K

    1994-01-01

    The type I and II scavenger receptors (SRs) are highly restricted to cells of monocyte origin and become maximally expressed during the process of monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. In this report, we present evidence that SR genomic sequences from -245 to +46 bp relative to the major transcriptional start site were sufficient to confer preferential expression of a reporter gene to cells of monocyte and macrophage origin. This profile of expression resulted from the combinatorial actions of multiple positive and negative regulatory elements. Positive transcriptional control was primarily determined by two elements, located 181 and 46 bp upstream of the major transcriptional start site. Transcriptional control via the -181 element was mediated by PU.1/Spi-1, a macrophage and B-cell-specific transcription factor that is a member of the ets domain gene family. Intriguingly, the -181 element represented a relatively low-affinity binding site for Spi-B, a closely related member of the ets domain family that has been shown to bind with relatively high affinity to other PU.1/Spi-1 binding sites. These observations support the idea that PU.1/Spi-1 and Spi-B regulate overlapping but nonidentical sets of genes. The -46 element represented a composite binding site for a distinct set of ets domain proteins that were preferentially expressed in monocyte and macrophage cell lines and that formed ternary complexes with members of the AP-1 gene family. In concert, these observations suggest a model for how interactions between cell-specific and more generally expressed transcription factors function to dictate the appropriate temporal and cell-specific patterns of SR expression during the process of macrophage differentiation. Images PMID:8007948

  5. Low density lipoprotein receptor-independent hepatic uptake of a synthetic, cholesterol-scavenging lipoprotein: implications for the treatment of receptor-deficient atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Rahman, I.U.; Donnelly, T.M.; Parker, T.S.; Weinrauch, M.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The metabolism of infused /sup 111/In-labeled phospholipid liposomes was examined in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, which lack low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and in normal control rabbits. The half-times (t/sub 1/2/) for clearance of /sup 111/In and excess phospholipid from plasma were 20.8 +/- 0.9 hr and 20.3 +/- 4.6 hr in WHHL and 20.0 +/- 0.8 hr and 19.6 +/- 2.2 hr in the normal rabbits. By 6 hr postinfusion, the plasma concentration of unesterified cholesterol increased by 2.2 +/- 0.23 mmol/liter in WHHL and 2.1 +/- 0.04 mmol/liter in normal rabbits, presumably reflecting mobilization of tissue sores. Disappearance of excess plasma cholesterol was > 90% complete in both groups of rabbits by 70 hr postinfusion. By quantitative ..gamma.. camera imaging, hepatic trapping of /sup 111/In-labeled liposomes over time was indistinguishable between the two groups. At autopsy, the liver was the major organ of clearance. Aortic uptake of /sup 111/In was < 0.02%. Thus, mobilization of cholesterol and hepatic uptake of phospholipid liposomes do not require LDL receptors. Because phospholipid infusions produce rapid substantial regression of atherosclerosis in genetically normal animals, the results suggest that phospholipid liposomes or triglyceride phospholipid emulsions (e.g., Intralipid) might reduce atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and in humans with familial hypercholesterolemia.

  6. Effects of leptin and leptin receptor gene polymorphisms on lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Meftun; Kara, Nurten; Karakus, Nevin; Tural, Sengul; Elbistan, Mehmet

    2014-10-01

    Leptin (LEP), an adipocyte-derived cytokine, has been reported to participate in carcinogenesis. Elevated levels of systemic and pulmonary LEP are associated with diseases related to lung injury and lung cancer. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the LEP and leptin receptor (LEPR) gene polymorphisms are associated with lung cancer in a cohort of Turkish population. One hundred and sixty-two lung cancer patients and 130 healthy controls were included in the study. The genotypes of LEP gene -2548G > A and LEPR gene Q223R polymorphisms were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The genotype frequencies of LEP -2548G > A polymorphism showed statistically significant differences between lung cancer patients and controls (p = 0.007). GA + AA genotypes and A allele of LEP -2548G > A polymorphism was found to be susceptibility factors for lung cancer (p = 0.003, odds ratio (OR) 2.32, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.32-4.10; p = 0.003, OR 1.65, 95 % CI 1.18-2.29, respectively). The genotype and allele frequencies of LEPR Q223R polymorphism did not show any statistically significant differences between lung cancer patients and controls (p = 0.782 and p = 0.762, respectively). Although AA-QQ and AA-QR combined genotypes of LEP -2548G > A-LEPR Q223R loci were significantly higher in lung cancer patients (p = 0.020 and p = 0.047, respectively), GG-QQ, GG-QR, and AA-RR combined genotypes were significantly higher in control group. As a result, susceptibility effects of LEP -2548G > A polymorphism alone or in combination with LEPR Q223R polymorphism on lung cancer were observed. Further studies are necessary to prove the association of LEP and LEPR gene polymorphisms with lung cancer.

  7. Blockade of lysophosphatidic acid receptors LPAR1/3 ameliorates lung fibrosis induced by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Lu; Xue, Jian-Xin; Li, Xin; Liu, De-Song; Ge, Yan; Ni, Pei-Yan; Deng, Lin; Lu, You; Jiang, Wei

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels and its receptors LPAR1/3 transcripts were elevated during the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis. {yields} Lung fibrosis was obviously alleviated in mice treated with the dual LPAR1/3 antagonist, VPC12249. {yields} VPC12249 administration effectively inhibited radiation-induced fibroblast accumulation in vivo, and suppressed LPA-induced fibroblast proliferation in vitro. {yields} LPA-LPAR1/3 signaling regulated TGF{beta}1 and CTGF expressions in radiation-challenged lungs, but only influenced CTGF expression in cultured fibroblasts. {yields} LPA-LPAR1/3 signaling induced fibroblast proliferation through a CTGF-dependent pathway, rather than through TGF{beta}1 activation. -- Abstract: Lung fibrosis is a common and serious complication of radiation therapy for lung cancer, for which there are no efficient treatments. Emerging evidence indicates that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its receptors (LPARs) are involved in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. Here, we reported that thoracic radiation with 16 Gy in mice induced development of radiation lung fibrosis (RLF) accompanied by obvious increases in LPA release and LPAR1 and LPAR3 (LPAR1/3) transcripts. RLF was significantly alleviated in mice treated with the dual LPAR1/3 antagonist, VPC12249. VPC12249 administration effectively prolonged animal survival, restored lung structure, inhibited fibroblast accumulation and reduced collagen deposition. Moreover, profibrotic cytokines in radiation-challenged lungs obviously decreased following administration of VPC12249, including transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In vitro, LPA induced both fibroblast proliferation and CTGF expression in a dose-dependent manner, and both were suppressed by blockade of LPAR1/3. The pro-proliferative activity of LPA on fibroblasts was inhibited by siRNA directed against CTGF. Together, our data suggest that the LPA-LPAR1

  8. A human embryonic lung fibroblast with a high density of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    André, C; Marullo, S; Convents, A; Lü, B Z; Guillet, J G; Hoebeke, J; Strosberg, D A

    1988-01-15

    Binding studies with the radiolabeled muscarinic antagonists dexetimide, quinuclidinyl benzilate and N-methylscopolamine showed that the human embryonic lung fibroblast CCL137 possesses approximately 2 X 10(5) muscarinic receptors/cell, i.e. 2.1 pmol/mg membrane protein. These receptors showed a marked stereoselectivity towards dexetimide and levetimide and only low affinity for another antagonist, pirenzepine. The muscarinic agonist carbamylcholine inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase and induced phosphatidylinositide turnover in the intact cells. Both effects were inhibited by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Affinity labeling with tritiated propylbenzylcholine mustard revealed a protein of 72 kDa. Finally, down-regulation of the membrane receptors following prolonged treatment with the agonist carbamylcholine was assessed by means of the hydrophilic antagonist N-methylscopolamine. PMID:2828056

  9. Effect of dexamethasone and oxygen exposure on neonatal rat lung retinoic acid receptor proteins.

    PubMed

    McMenamy, K R; Anderson, M J; Zachman, R D

    1994-10-01

    Retinol deficiency in animal models results in histopathologic airway changes that appear similar to those found in human premature infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Dexamethasone (DEX), a steroid now often used in the treatment of BPD, might potentially affect lung vitamin A homeostasis since it alters serum and liver retinoid stores in certain models. Our objective was to determine the effect of DEX on neonatal rat lung retinoid status and the binding of retinoic acid (RA) to cytosolic and nuclear receptor proteins. We examined this effect both in room air and when the animals breathed 95% oxygen (O2). Twenty-four 1-day-old rat pups received either 1 microgram/g DEX subcutaneously, an equal volume of normal saline (NS) subcutaneously at 0 (start experiment time), 24, and 48 hours, or no injection at all, and were sacrificed at 72 hours. Twelve rats in each treatment group were housed in room air and 12 in each group were exposed to > 95% O2 for the 3 day period. Lung and liver were analyzed for retinyl palmitate (RP). Nuclear retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) were measured by specific binding assays. DEX decreased liver RP by 33-55% and rat pup lung RP by over 60%; it also decreased lung RAR binding (mean dpm/microgram protein +/- SEM) in both room air and oxygen groups: Air (11.2 +/- 1.0) vs. Air/DEX (4.6 +/- 1.3, n = 6; P < 0.01), and O2 (18.2 +/- 0.6) vs. O2/DEX (3.2 +/- 0.6, n = 6; P < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7838622

  10. Progesterone and estrogen receptor expression and activity in human non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marquez-Garban, Diana C.; Mah, Vei; Alavi, Mohammad; Maresh, Erin L.; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Bagryanova, Lora; Horvath, Steve; Chia, David; Garon, Edward; Goodglick, Lee; Pietras, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality in male and female patients in the US. Although it is clear that tobacco smoking is a major cause of lung cancer, about half of all women with lung cancer worldwide are never-smokers. Despite a declining smoking population, the incidence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the predominant form of lung cancer, has reached epidemic proportions particularly in women. Emerging data suggest that factors other than tobacco, namely endogenous and exogenous female sex hormones, have a role in stimulating NSCLC progression. Aromatase, a key enzyme for estrogen biosynthesis, is expressed in NSCLC. Clinical data show that women with high levels of tumor aromatase (and high intratumoral estrogen) have worse survival than those with low aromatase. The present and previous studies also reveal significant expression and activity of estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ) in both extranuclear and nuclear sites in most NSCLC. We now report further on the expression of progesterone receptor (PR) transcripts and protein in NSCLC. PR transcripts were significantly lower in cancerous as compared to non-malignant tissue. Using immunohistochemistry, expression of PR was observed in the nucleus and/or extranuclear compartments in the majority of human tumor specimens examined. Combinations of estrogen and progestins administered in vitro cooperate in promoting tumor secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and, consequently, support tumor-associated angiogenesis. Further, dual treatment with estradiol and progestin increased the numbers of putative tumor stem/progenitor cells. Thus, ER- and/or PR-targeted therapies may offer new approaches to manage NSCLC. PMID:21600232

  11. Low density lipoprotein receptor-independent hepatic uptake of a synthetic, cholesterol-scavenging lipoprotein: implications for the treatment of receptor-deficient atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K J; Vallabhajosula, S; Rahman, I U; Donnelly, T M; Parker, T S; Weinrauch, M; Goldsmith, S J

    1988-01-01

    The metabolism of infused 111In-labeled phospholipid liposomes was examined in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, which lack low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and in normal control rabbits. The half-times (t1/2) for clearance of 111In and excess phospholipid from plasma were 20.8 +/- 0.9 hr and 20.3 +/- 4.6 hr in WHHL and 20.0 +/- 0.8 hr and 19.6 +/- 2.2 hr in the normal rabbits (means +/- SEM; n = 4). By 6 hr postinfusion, the plasma concentration of unesterified cholesterol increased by 2.2 +/- 0.23 mmol/liter in WHHL and 2.1 +/- 0.04 mmol/liter in normal rabbits, presumably reflecting mobilization of tissue stores. Disappearance of excess plasma cholesterol was greater than 90% complete in both groups of rabbits by 70 hr postinfusion. By quantitative gamma camera imaging, hepatic trapping of 111In-labeled liposomes over time was indistinguishable between the two groups. At autopsy, the liver was the major organ of clearance, acquiring 22.0% +/- 1.7% (WHHL) and 16.8% +/- 1.0% (normal of total 111In. Aortic uptake of 111In was less than 0.02%. Thus, mobilization of cholesterol and hepatic uptake of phospholipid liposomes do not require LDL receptors. Because phospholipid infusions produce rapid substantial regression of atherosclerosis in genetically normal animals, our results suggest that phospholipid liposomes or triglyceride phospholipid emulsions (e.g., Intralipid) might reduce atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and in humans with familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:3422421

  12. The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor causes acquired resistance to erlotinib in lung cancer cells with the wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Katsuaki; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy often provides a dramatic response in lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations. In addition, moderate clinical efficacy of the EGFR-TKI, erlotinib, has been shown in lung cancer patients with the wild-type EGFR. Numerous molecular mechanisms that cause acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs have been identified in lung cancers with the EGFR mutations; however, few have been reported in lung cancers with the wild-type EGFR. We used H358 lung adenocarcinoma cells lacking EGFR mutations that showed modest sensitivity to erlotinib. The H358 cells acquired resistance to erlotinib via chronic exposure to the drug. The H358 erlotinib-resistant (ER) cells do not have a secondary EGFR mutation, neither MET gene amplification nor PTEN downregulation; these have been identified in lung cancers with the EGFR mutations. From comprehensive screening of receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation, we observed increased phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) in H358ER cells compared with parental H358 cells. H358ER cells responded to combined therapy with erlotinib and NVP-AEW541, an IGF1R-TKI. Our results indicate that IGF1R activation is a molecular mechanism that confers acquired resistance to erlotinib in lung cancers with the wild-type EGFR.

  13. Leukotriene B4 receptor type 2 protects against pneumolysin-dependent acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shigematsu, Misako; Koga, Tomoaki; Ishimori, Ayako; Saeki, Kazuko; Ishii, Yumiko; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Ohba, Mai; Jo-Watanabe, Airi; Okuno, Toshiaki; Harada, Norihiro; Harayama, Takeshi; Shindou, Hideo; Li, Jian-Dong; Murakami, Makoto; Hoka, Sumio; Yokomizo, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    Although pneumococcal infection is a serious problem worldwide and has a high mortality rate, the molecular mechanisms underlying the lethality caused by pneumococcus remain elusive. Here, we show that BLT2, a G protein-coupled receptor for leukotriene B4 and 12(S)-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (12-HHT), protects mice from lung injury caused by a pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin (PLY). Intratracheal injection of PLY caused lethal acute lung injury (ALI) in BLT2-deficient mice, with evident vascular leakage and bronchoconstriction. Large amounts of cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs), classically known as a slow reactive substance of anaphylaxis, were detected in PLY-treated lungs. PLY-dependent vascular leakage, bronchoconstriction, and death were markedly ameliorated by treatment with a CysLT1 receptor antagonist. Upon stimulation by PLY, mast cells produced cysLTs that activated CysLT1 expressed in vascular endothelial cells and bronchial smooth muscle cells, leading to lethal vascular leakage and bronchoconstriction. Treatment of mice with aspirin or loxoprofen inhibited the production of 12-HHT and increased the sensitivity toward PLY, which was also ameliorated by the CysLT1 antagonist. Thus, the present study identifies the molecular mechanism underlying PLY-dependent ALI and suggests the possible use of CysLT1 antagonists as a therapeutic tool to protect against ALI caused by pneumococcal infection. PMID:27703200

  14. NK cell activating receptor ligand expression in lymphangioleiomyomatosis is associated with lung function decline

    PubMed Central

    Osterburg, Andrew R.; Nelson, Rebecca L.; Yaniv, Benyamin Z.; Foot, Rachel; Donica, Walter R.F.; Nashu, Madison A.; Liu, Huan; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Moss, Joel; McCormack, Francis X.; Borchers, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung disease of women that leads to progressive cyst formation and accelerated loss of pulmonary function. Neoplastic smooth muscle cells from an unknown source metastasize to the lung and drive destructive remodeling. Given the role of NK cells in immune surveillance, we postulated that NK cell activating receptors and their cognate ligands are involved in LAM pathogenesis. We found that ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor UL-16 binding protein 2 (ULBP2) and ULBP3 are localized in cystic LAM lesions and pulmonary nodules. We found elevated soluble serum ULBP2 (mean = 575 pg/ml ± 142) in 50 of 100 subjects and ULBP3 in 30 of 100 (mean = 8,300 pg/ml ± 1,515) subjects. LAM patients had fewer circulating NKG2D+ NK cells and decreased NKG2D surface expression. Lung function decline was associated with soluble NKG2D ligand (sNKG2DL) detection. The greatest rate of decline forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, –124 ± 30 ml/year) in the 48 months after enrollment (NHLBI LAM Registry) occurred in patients expressing both ULBP2 and ULBP3, whereas patients with undetectable sNKG2DL levels had the lowest rate of FEV1 decline (–32.7 ± 10 ml/year). These data suggest a role for NK cells, sNKG2DL, and the innate immune system in LAM pathogenesis. PMID:27734028

  15. Antagonism of chemokine receptor CXCR3 inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis to lungs.

    PubMed

    Pradelli, Emmanuelle; Karimdjee-Soilihi, Babou; Michiels, Jean-François; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Millet, Marie-Ange; Vandenbos, Fanny; Sullivan, Timothy J; Collins, Tassie L; Johnson, Michael G; Medina, Julio C; Kleinerman, Eugenie S; Schmid-Alliana, Annie; Schmid-Antomarchi, Heidy

    2009-12-01

    Metastasis continues to be the leading cause of mortality for patients with cancer. Several years ago, it became clear that chemokines and their receptors could control the tumor progress. CXCR3 has now been identified in many cancers including osteosarcoma and CXCR3 ligands were expressed by lungs that are the primary sites to which this tumor metastasize. This study tested the hypothesis that disruption of the CXCR3/CXCR3 ligands complexes could lead to a decrease in lungs metastasis. The experimental design involved the use of the CXCR3 antagonist, AMG487 and 2 murine models of osteosarcoma lung metastases. After tail vein injection of osteosarcoma cells, mice that were systematically treated with AMG487 according to preventive or curative protocols had a significant reduction in metastatic disease. Treatment of osteosarcoma cells in vitro with AMG487 led to decreased migration, decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity, decreased proliferation/survival and increased caspase-independent death. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that CXCR3 and their ligands intervene in the initial dissemination of the osteosarcoma cells to the lungs and stimulate the growth and expansion of the metastatic foci in later stages. Moreover, these studies indicate that targeting CXCR3 may specifically inhibit tumor metastasis without adversely affecting antitumoral host response. PMID:19544560

  16. Antagonism of chemokine receptor CXCR3 inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis to lungs

    PubMed Central

    Pradelli, Emmanuelle; Karimdjee-Soilihi, Babou; Michiels, Jean-François; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Millet, Marie-Ange; Vandenbos, Fanny; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Collins, Tassie L.; Johnson, Michael G.; Medina, Julio C.; Kleinerman, Eugenie S.; Schmid-Alliana, Annie; Schmid-Antomarchi, Heidy

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis continues to be the leading cause of mortality for patients with cancer. Several years ago, it became clear that chemokines and their receptors could control the tumor progress. CXCR3 has now been identified in many cancers including osteosarcoma and CXCR3 ligands were expressed by lungs that are the primary sites to which this tumor metastasize. This study tested the hypothesis that disruption of the CXCR3/CXCR3 ligands complexes could lead to a decrease in lungs metastasis. The experimental design involved the use of the CXCR3 antagonist, AMG487 and 2 murine models of osteosarcoma lung metastases. After tail vein injection of osteosarcoma cells, mice that were systematically treated with AMG487 according to preventive or curative protocols had a significant reduction in metastatic disease. Treatment of osteosarcoma cells in vitro with AMG487 led to decreased migration, decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity, decreased proliferation/survival and increased caspase-independent death. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that CXCR3 and their ligands intervene in the initial dissemination of the osteosarcoma cells to the lungs and stimulate the growth and expansion of the metastatic foci in later stages. Moreover, these studies indicate that targeting CXCR3 may specifically inhibit tumor metastasis without adversely affecting antitumoral host response. PMID:19544560

  17. The Scientist Scavenger Hunt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morphew, Valerie N.; Key, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Using a well-planned scavenger hunt, students' awareness of the significance of minorities and women in science is enhanced. Provides a sample scavenger hunt and resource list as well as activities for extension. (ZWH)

  18. Investigating the role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors in bacterial lung infection.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, Mary; Kulkarni, Ritwij; Zemans, Rachel L; Downey, Gregory P; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2014-06-15

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are a persistent and pervasive public health problem worldwide. Pneumonia and other LRTIs will be among the leading causes of death in adults, and pneumonia is the single largest cause of death in children. LRTIs are also an important cause of acute lung injury and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Because innate immunity is the first line of defense against pathogens, understanding the role of innate immunity in the pulmonary system is of paramount importance. Pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) that recognize microbial-associated molecular patterns are an integral component of the innate immune system and are located in both cell membranes and cytosol. Toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) are the major sensors at the forefront of pathogen recognition. Although Toll-like receptors have been extensively studied in host immunity, NLRs have diverse and important roles in immune and inflammatory responses, ranging from antimicrobial properties to adaptive immune responses. The lung contains NLR-expressing immune cells such as leukocytes and nonimmune cells such as epithelial cells that are in constant and close contact with invading microbes. This pulmonary perspective addresses our current understanding of the structure and function of NLR family members, highlighting advances and gaps in knowledge, with a specific focus on immune responses in the respiratory tract during bacterial infection. Further advances in exploring cellular and molecular responses to bacterial pathogens are critical to develop improved strategies to treat and prevent devastating infectious diseases of the lung. PMID:24707903

  19. MicroRNAs 125a and 455 Repress Lipoprotein-Supported Steroidogenesis by Targeting Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I in Steroidogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhigang; Shen, Wen-Jun; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2012-01-01

    We sought to identify and characterize microRNA (miRNAs) that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and SR-BI-linked selective high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesteryl ester (CE) transport and steroidogenesis. Four miRNAs (miRNA-125a, miRNA-125b, miRNA-145, and miRNA-455) with a potential to regulate SR-BI were identified in silico and validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blot analysis, and SR-BI 3′ untranslated region (UTR) reporter assays. In vitro treatment of primary rat granulosa cells and MLTC-1 cells with cyclic AMP (cAMP) or in vivo treatment of rat adrenals with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) decreased the expression of miRNA-125a, miRNA-125b, and miRNA-455 and reciprocally increased SR-BI expression. Using luciferase constructs containing the 3′ untranslated region of SR-BI combined with miRNA overexpression and mutagenesis, we have provided evidence that steroidogenic SR-BI is a direct target of miRNA-125a and miRNA-455. Moreover, the transfection of Leydig tumor cells with precursor miRNA 125a (pre-miRNA-125a) or pre-miRNA-455 resulted in the suppression of SR-BI at both the transcript and protein levels and reduced selective HDL CE uptake and HDL-stimulated progesterone production. Transfection of liver Hepa 1-6 cells with pre-miRNA-125a significantly reduced SR-BI expression and its selective transport function. In contrast, overexpression of miRNA-145 did not affect SR-BI expression or selective HDL CE uptake mediated by SR-BI in steroidogenic cell lines. These data suggest that a trophic hormone and cAMP inversely regulate the expression of SR-BI and miRNA-125a and miRNA-455 in steroidogenic tissues/cells and that both miRNA-125a and miRNA-455, by targeting steroidogenic SR-BI, negatively regulate selective HDL CE uptake and HDL CE-supported steroid hormone production. PMID:23045399

  20. Modulation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis by pegylated hyaluronidase and dopamine receptor antagonist in mice.

    PubMed

    Skurikhin, Evgenii Germanovich; Pershina, Olga Victorovna; Reztsova, Alena Mikhaylovna; Ermakova, Natalia Nikolaevna; Khmelevskaya, Ekaterina Sergeevna; Krupin, Vycheslav Andreevich; Stepanova, Inna Ernestovna; Artamonov, Andrew Vladimirovich; Bekarev, Andrew Alexandrovich; Madonov, Pavel Gennadjevich; Dygai, Alexander Mikhaylovich

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are groups of enzymes that degrade hyaluronic acid (HA). To stop enzymatic hydrolysis we modified testicular hyaluronidase (HYAL) by activated polyethylene oxide with the help of electron-beam synthesis. As a result we received pegylated hyaluronidase (pegHYAL). Spiperone is a selective D2 dopamine receptor antagonist. It was demonstrated on the model of a single bleomycin damage of alveolar epithelium that during the inflammatory phase monotherapy by pegHYAL or spiperone reduced the populations of hematopoietic stem /progenitor cells in the lung parenchyma. PegHYAL also reduced the levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the serum and lungs, while spiperone reduced the level of the serum IL-1β. Polytherapy by spiperone and pegHYAL caused the increase of the quantity of hematopoietic stem/ progenitor cells in the lungs. Such an influx of blood cell precursors was observed on the background of considerable fall level of TGF-β and the increase level of TNF-α in the serum and lungs. These results show pegHYAL reduced the bleomycin-induced fibrosis reaction (production and accumulation of collagen) in the lung parenchyma. This effect was observed at a single and repetitive bleomycin damage of alveolar epithelium, the antifibrotic activity of pegHYAL surpassing the activity of testicular HYAL. The antifibrotic effect of pegHYAL is enhanced by an additional instillation of spiperone. Therapy by pegHYAL causes the flow of CD31‒ CD34‒ CD45‒ CD44+ CD73+ CD90+ CD106+-cells into the fibrous lungs. These cells are incapable of differentiating into fibroblast cells. Spiperone instillation separately or together with pegHYAL reduced the MSC-like cells considerably. These data enable us to assume, that pegHYAL is a new and promising instrument both for preventive and therapy of toxic pneumofibrosis. The blockage of D2 dopamine receptors with the following change of hyaluronan matrix can be

  1. Modulation of Bleomycin-Induced Lung Fibrosis by Pegylated Hyaluronidase and Dopamine Receptor Antagonist in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pershina, Olga Victorovna; Reztsova, Alena Mikhaylovna; Ermakova, Natalia Nikolaevna; Khmelevskaya, Ekaterina Sergeevna; Krupin, Vycheslav Andreevich; Stepanova, Inna Ernestovna; Artamonov, Andrew Vladimirovich; Bekarev, Andrew Alexandrovich; Madonov, Pavel Gennadjevich

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are groups of enzymes that degrade hyaluronic acid (HA). To stop enzymatic hydrolysis we modified testicular hyaluronidase (HYAL) by activated polyethylene oxide with the help of electron-beam synthesis. As a result we received pegylated hyaluronidase (pegHYAL). Spiperone is a selective D2 dopamine receptor antagonist. It was demonstrated on the model of a single bleomycin damage of alveolar epithelium that during the inflammatory phase monotherapy by pegHYAL or spiperone reduced the populations of hematopoietic stem /progenitor cells in the lung parenchyma. PegHYAL also reduced the levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the serum and lungs, while spiperone reduced the level of the serum IL-1β. Polytherapy by spiperone and pegHYAL caused the increase of the quantity of hematopoietic stem/ progenitor cells in the lungs. Such an influx of blood cell precursors was observed on the background of considerable fall level of TGF-β and the increase level of TNF-α in the serum and lungs. These results show pegHYAL reduced the bleomycin-induced fibrosis reaction (production and accumulation of collagen) in the lung parenchyma. This effect was observed at a single and repetitive bleomycin damage of alveolar epithelium, the antifibrotic activity of pegHYAL surpassing the activity of testicular HYAL. The antifibrotic effect of pegHYAL is enhanced by an additional instillation of spiperone. Therapy by pegHYAL causes the flow of CD31‒CD34‒CD45‒CD44+CD73+CD90+CD106+-cells into the fibrous lungs. These cells are incapable of differentiating into fibroblast cells. Spiperone instillation separately or together with pegHYAL reduced the MSC-like cells considerably. These data enable us to assume, that pegHYAL is a new and promising instrument both for preventive and therapy of toxic pneumofibrosis. The blockage of D2 dopamine receptors with the following change of hyaluronan matrix can be considered

  2. Scavenging for the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Sue; Strubbe, Mary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the goals and planning of a scavenger hunt which was designed to increase enthusiasm in students and promote active learning. States that a scavenger hunt instills a sense of community pride in students and that the community cooperation fosters a positive relationship with the school. Provides a sample scavenger hunt checklist. (GEA)

  3. Inhibition of lung tumorigenesis by metformin is associated with decreased plasma IGF-I and diminished receptor tyrosine kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Brendan J.; Dallos, Matthew; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B.; Memmott, Regan M.; Hollander, M. Christine; Gills, Joell J.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is the most commonly prescribed drug for type II diabetes and is associated with decreased cancer risk. Previously, we showed that metformin prevented tobacco carcinogen (NNK)-induced lung tumorigenesis in a non-diabetic mouse model, which was associated with decreased IGF-I/insulin receptor signaling but not activation of AMPK in lung tissues, as well as decreased circulating levels of IGF-1 and insulin. Here, we used liver-IGF-1-deficient (LID) mice to determine the importance of IGF-1 in NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis and chemoprevention by metformin. LID mice had decreased lung tumor multiplicity and burden compared to WT mice. Metformin further decreased lung tumorigenesis in LID mice without affecting IGF-1 levels, suggesting that metformin can act through IGF-1-independent mechanisms. In lung tissues, metformin decreased phosphorylation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) as well as levels of GTP-bound Ras independently of AMPK. Metformin also diminished plasma levels of several cognate ligands for these RTKs. Tissue distribution studies using [14C]-metformin showed that uptake of metformin was high in liver but 4 fold lower in lungs, suggesting that the suppression of RTK activation by metformin occurs predominantly via systemic, indirect effects. Systemic inhibition of circulating growth factors and local RTK signaling are new AMPK-independent mechanisms of action of metformin that could underlie its ability to prevent tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. PMID:23771523

  4. Expression of retinoic acid receptor genes in fetal and newborn rat lung.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Thet, L A; Zachman, R D

    1994-04-01

    Lung differentiation and development are affected by vitamin A and its metabolites. One mechanism through which retinoids might exert their effects is through nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RAR). The gene expression profile of the RAR family (alpha, beta, gamma) has previously been determined in both the developing mouse embryo to 14.5 days gestation, and in the adult lung. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of the RAR genes during the period of gestation that results in the formation of the saccular lung stage. Total RNA was extracted from fetal lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats at gestational days 17, 19, 20, 21, and 22, and from 12-hour-old newborns for Northern hybridization. Two transcripts of RAR alpha mRNA (3.7 and 2.7 kb) were found at each time point. At day 17, the 2.7 kb RAR alpha mRNA was increased two-fold or more than at any other time studied. At days 19-22 the levels of the 3.7 kb RAR alpha species were also lower than day 17 and newborn levels. One RAR beta mRNA transcript (3.4 kb), present at all time points, was significantly higher in the newborn than on days 17-22. Expression of RAR gamma mRNA could only be demonstrated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We speculate that the higher RAR alpha species at day 17 indicates a role for RAR alpha in the maintenance of the columnar epithelial cells of the glandular phase of lung development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8208594

  5. Deficiency of phospholipase A2 receptor exacerbates ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Shun; Mishina, Hideto; Watanabe, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Fujioka, Daisuke; Takahashi, Soichiro; Suzuki, Koji; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Obata, Jun-Ei; Kawabata, Kenichi; Yokota, Yasunori; Murakami, Makoto; Hanasaki, Kohji; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2013-08-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) plays a critical role in the genesis of lung inflammation through proinflammatory eicosanoids. A previous in vitro experiment showed a possible role of cell surface receptor for sPLA2 (PLA2R) in the clearance of extracellular sPLA2. PLA2R and groups IB and X sPLA2 are expressed in the lung. This study examined a pathogenic role of PLA2R in airway inflammation using PLA2R-deficient (PLA2R(-/-)) mice. Airway inflammation was induced by immunosensitization with OVA. Compared with wild-type (PLA2R(+/+)) mice, PLA2R(-/-) mice had a significantly greater infiltration of inflammatory cells around the airways, higher levels of groups IB and X sPLA2, eicosanoids, and Th2 cytokines, and higher numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after OVA treatment. In PLA2R(-/-) mice, intratracheally instilled [(125)I]-labeled sPLA2-IB was cleared much more slowly from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with PLA2R(+/+) mice. The degradation of the instilled [(125)I]-labeled sPLA2-IB, as assessed by trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after instillation, was lower in PLA2R(-/-) mice than in PLA2R(+/+) mice. In conclusion, PLA2R deficiency increased sPLA2-IB and -X levels in the lung through their impaired clearance from the lung, leading to exaggeration of lung inflammation induced by OVA treatment in a murine model.

  6. [Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR): therapeutic target in the treatment of lung adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Schwab, Richárd; Peták, István; Pintér, Ferenc; Szabó, Edit; Kánya, Melinda; Tamási, Anna; Várkondi, Edit; Almási, Andrea; Szokolóczi, Orsolya; Pápay, Judit; Moldvay, Judit; Kéri, György; Kopper, László

    2005-11-13

    Revolution in biotechnology made possible to identify those gene errors, which via their encoded proteins (mostly kinase enzymes) are key players in tumor development, growth and progression, and could be considered as molecular targets in tumor diagnosis and therapy. Activity of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), an outstanding representative of the regulatory cell surface receptors, can be inhibited by drugs proved for clinical use. In the past year many groups observed that those lung adenocarcinoma cells, which contain activating mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR show remarkable sensitivity to anti-EGFR compounds. The basis of the effective therapy is the identification of the mutations. The clinical advantage of EGFR is an example from the coming age of tumor chemotherapy, when the presence of molecular targets will guide the therapeutic choice.

  7. Hypervariable region 1 deletion and required adaptive envelope mutations confer decreased dependency on scavenger receptor class B type I and low-density lipoprotein receptor for hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Prentoe, Jannick; Serre, Stéphanie B N; Ramirez, Santseharay; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gottwein, Judith M; Bukh, Jens

    2014-02-01

    Hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of envelope protein 2 (E2) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) serves important yet undefined roles in the viral life cycle. We previously showed that the viability of HVR1-deleted JFH1-based recombinants with Core-NS2 of H77 (H77(ΔHVR1), genotype 1a) and S52 (S52(ΔHVR1), genotype 3a) in Huh7.5 cells was rescued by E2 substitutions N476D/S733F and an E1 substitution, A369V, respectively; HVR1-deleted J6 (J6(ΔHVR1), genotype 2a) was fully viable. In single-cycle production assays, where HCV RNA was transfected into entry-deficient Huh7-derived S29 cells with low CD81 expression, we found no effect of HVR1 deletion on replication or particle release for H77 and S52. HCV pseudoparticle assays in Huh7.5 cells showed that HVR1 deletion decreased entry by 20- to 100-fold for H77, J6, and S52; N476D/S733F restored entry for H77(ΔHVR1), while A369V further impaired S52(ΔHVR1) entry. We investigated receptor usage by antibody blocking and receptor silencing in Huh7.5 cells, followed by inoculation of parental and HVR1-deleted HCV recombinants. Compared to parental viruses, scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) dependency was decreased for H77(ΔHVR1/N476D/S733F), H77(N476D/S733F), S52(ΔHVR1/A369V), and S52(A369V), but not for J6(ΔHVR1). Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) dependency was decreased for HVR1-deleted viruses, but not for H77(N476D/S733F) and S52(A369V). Soluble LDLr neutralization revealed strong inhibition of parental HCV but limited effect against HVR1-deleted viruses. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-specific HCV neutralization was similar for H77, J6, and S52 viruses with and without HVR1. In conclusion, HVR1 and HVR1-related adaptive envelope mutations appeared to be involved in LDLr and SR-BI dependency, respectively. Also, LDLr served ApoE-independent but HVR1-dependent functions in HCV entry. PMID:24257605

  8. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  9. Mutations of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene during progression of lung tumors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Takanori; Obo, Yumi; Furukawa, Mami; Hotta, Mayuko; Yamasaki, Ayako; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2009-01-16

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. In this study, mutations of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 (LPA1) gene were investigated to clarify the possible molecular mechanisms underlying the development of lung tumors induced by N-nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (BHP) in rats. Male Wistar rats, 6 weeks of age, were given 2000 ppm BHP in their drinking water for 12 weeks and then maintained without further treatment until sacrifice at 25 weeks. Genomic DNAs were extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues and exons 2-4 were examined for mutations, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. No LPA1 mutations were detected in 15 hyperplasias, but 2 out of 12 adenomas (16.7%) and 7 out of 17 adenocarcinomas (41.2%). These results suggest that mutations of LPA1 gene may be involved in the acquisition of growth advantage from adenomas to adenocarcinomas in lung carcinogenesis induced in rats by BHP.

  10. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackwell, Timothy S; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R

    2012-06-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A(2B)R) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A(2B)R or treatment with the A(2B)R antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A(2B)R attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A(2B)R activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A(2B)R antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.

  11. Characterization of endothelin receptors in the peripheral lung tissues of horses unaffected and affected with recurrent airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Polikepahad, Sumanth; Haque, Masudul; Francis, Joseph; Moore, Rustin M.; Venugopal, Changaram S.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine and compare the expression of endothelin (ET) receptors in the peripheral lungs of healthy horses and those affected with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemical techniques. Two groups of horses (7 healthy and 7 RAO-affected) were selected from a pool of horses destined for euthanasia. The grouping of horses was based on the history, clinical scoring, and pulmonary function testing. After euthanasia, gross postmortem evaluation of the lungs was conducted, and lung samples were collected and either stored at −80°C or fixed in zinc-formalin for 12 h. The RT-PCR was performed by using specific primers for ETA and ETB receptors, and β-actin. To determine the relative gene expression real-time PCR was performed. To detect ET receptor protein expression, Western blotting and immunohistochemical studies were performed using polyclonal antibodies against ETA and ETB receptors and β-actin. The ET receptor expression was determined by performing either densitometric analyses or scoring of immunostaining. Statistical analyses were performed to detect differences in receptor expression within and between the 2 groups. The results indicated that ET receptor expression, particularly ETB receptors, was significantly greater in the peripheral lungs of RAO-affected horses than in those of healthy horses. Clinical trials using ET receptor antagonists, particularly ETB antagonists might help in developing a therapeutic strategy to treat this career-ending disease. PMID:18783023

  12. Somatostatin receptor expression in small cell lung cancer as a prognostic marker and a target for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Hänscheid, Heribert; Wild, Vanessa; Pelzer, Theo; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A.; Droll, Sabine; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K.; Lückerath, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Despite initial responsiveness to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) commonly relapses within months. Although neuroendocrine characteristics may be difficult to demonstrate in individual cases, a relevant expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) on the cell surface has been described. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of SSTR-expression in advanced SCLC. We further examined pre-requisites for successful peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). 21 patients with extensive stage SCLC were enrolled. All patients underwent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68Ga-DOTATATE to select patients for SSTR-directed therapy. PET scans were visually and semi-quantitatively assessed and compared to SSTR2a and SSTR5 expression in biopsy samples. Peak standardized uptake values (SUVpeak) of tumors as well as tumor-to-liver ratios were correlated to progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In 4/21 patients all SCLC lesions were PET-positive. 6/21 subjects were rated “intermediate” with the majority of lesions positive, the remaining 11/21 patients were PET-negative. PET-positivity correlated well with histologic SSTR2a, but not with SSTR5 expression. Neither PET-positivity nor SUVpeak were predictors of PFS or OS. In 4 patients with intensive SSTR2a-receptor expression, PRRT was performed with one partial response and one stable disease, respectively. SSTR-expression as detected by 68Ga-DOTATATE-PET and/or histology is not predictive of PFS or OS in patients with advanced SCLC. However, in patients exhibiting sufficient tracer uptake, PRRT might be a treatment option given its low toxicity and the absence of effective alternatives. PMID:26936994

  13. p53 protein, EGF receptor, and anti-p53 antibodies in serum from patients with occupationally derived lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J; Presek, P; Braun, A; Bauer, P; Konietzko, N; Wiesner, B; Woitowitz, H J

    1999-08-01

    The oncogene product epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R), the tumour suppressor gene product p53 and anti-p53 antibodies are detectable in the serum of certain cancer patients. Increased levels of some of these products were reported in lung cancer patients after occupational asbestos exposure and after exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or vinylchloride. In the first step, this study investigated the possible diagnostic value of serum EGF-R, p53-protein and anti-p53 antibodies, measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in lung tumour patients. In addition to being investigated on a molecular epidemiological basis, these parameters were examined as biomarkers of carcinogenesis, especially with regard to asbestos incorporation effects or of radon-induced lung cancers. Also, a possible effect of cigarette smoking and age dependence were studied. A total of 116 male patients with lung or pleural tumours were examined. The histological classification was four small-cell cancers, six large-cell cancers, 32 adenocarcinomas, 47 squamous carcinomas, 12 mixed lung carcinomas, five diffuse malignant mesotheliomas and ten lung metastasis of extrapulmonary tumours. Twenty-two lung cancers and all mesotheliomas were related to asbestos, 22 lung cancers were related to ionizing radiation and 61 patients had cigarette smoke-related lung cancer. Besides these patients 50 male patients with non-malignant lung or pleural diseases were included; of the latter eight subjects suffered from asbestosis. Controls were 129 male subjects without any lung disease. No significantly elevated or decreased serum values for p53 protein, EGF-R, or anti-p53 antibodies as a function of histological tumour type, age, or degree and type of exposure (asbestos, smoking, ionizing radiation) could be found. The utility of p53-protein, EGF-R and anti-p53 antibodies as routine biomarkers for screening occupationally derived lung cancers is limited.

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects lung adenocarcinoma cells against cigarette sidestream smoke particulates-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Huang, Su-Chin; Lin, Chun-Ju; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann

    2012-03-15

    Environmental cigarette smoke has been suggested to promote lung adenocarcinoma progression through aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-signaled metabolism. However, whether AhR facilitates metabolic activation or detoxification in exposed adenocarcinoma cells remains ambiguous. To address this question, we have modified the expression level of AhR in two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and examined their response to an extract of cigarette sidestream smoke particulates (CSSP). We found that overexpression of AhR in the CL1-5 cell line reduced CSSP-induced ROS production and oxidative DNA damage, whereas knockdown of AhR expression increased ROS level in CSSP-exposed H1355 cells. Oxidative stress sensor Nrf2 and its target gene NQO1 were insensitive to AhR expression level and CSSP treatment in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, induction of AhR expression concurrently increased mRNA expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes CYP1B1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 in a ligand-independent manner. It appeared that AhR accelerated xenobiotic clearing and diminished associated oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of a set of phase I and II metabolizing genes. However, the AhR-signaled protection could not shield cells from constant oxidative stress. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of CSSP induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via the p53–p21–Rb1 signaling pathway. Despite no effect on DNA repair rate, AhR facilitated the recovery of cells from growth arrest when CSSP exposure ended. AhR-overexpressing lung adenocarcinoma cells exhibited an increased anchorage-dependent and independent proliferation when recovery from exposure. In summary, our data demonstrated that AhR protected lung adenocarcinoma cells against CSSP-induced oxidative stress and promoted post-exposure clonogenicity. -- Highlights: ► AhR expression level influences cigarette sidestream smoke-induced ROS production. ► AhR reduces oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of

  15. Bacterial Fucose-Rich Polysaccharide Stabilizes MAPK-Mediated Nrf2/Keap1 Signaling by Directly Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis of Human Lung Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and 1H/13C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  16. Bacterial fucose-rich polysaccharide stabilizes MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling by directly scavenging reactive oxygen species during hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sengupta, Suman; Biswas, Subir; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼ 42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and (1)H/(13)C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities.

  17. Enhanced dimerization drives ligand-independent activity of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Christopher C.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Karedla, Narain; Steinkamp, Mara P.; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Hlavacek, William S.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/erbB1/Her1) are often associated with tumorigenesis. In particular, a number of EGFR mutants that demonstrate ligand-independent signaling are common in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including kinase domain mutations L858R (also called L834R) and exon 19 deletions (e.g., ΔL747-P753insS), which collectively make up nearly 90% of mutations in NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms by which these mutations confer constitutive activity remain unresolved. Using multiple subdiffraction-limit imaging modalities, we reveal the altered receptor structure and interaction kinetics of NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants. We applied two-color single quantum dot tracking to quantify receptor dimerization kinetics on living cells and show that, in contrast to wild-type EGFR, mutants are capable of forming stable, ligand-independent dimers. Two-color superresolution localization microscopy confirmed ligand-independent aggregation of EGFR mutants. Live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the L858R kinase mutation alters ectodomain structure such that unliganded mutant EGFR adopts an extended, dimerization-competent conformation. Finally, mutation of the putative dimerization arm confirmed a critical role for ectodomain engagement in ligand-independent signaling. These data support a model in which dysregulated activity of NSCLC-associated kinase mutants is driven by coordinated interactions involving both the kinase and extracellular domains that lead to enhanced dimerization. PMID:26337388

  18. Activation of the protein-tyrosine kinase associated with the bombesin receptor complex in small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudino, G; Cirillo, D; Naldini, L; Rossino, P; Comoglio, P M

    1988-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that bombesin-like peptides produced by small cell lung carcinomas may sustain deregulated proliferation through an autocrine mechanism. We have shown that the neuropeptide bombesin leads to the activation of a protein-tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates a 115-kDa protein (p115) associated with the bombesin receptor complex in mouse Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. We now report that phosphotyrosine antibodies recognize a 115-kDa protein, phosphorylated on tyrosine, in four human small cell lung carcinoma cell lines producing bombesin but not in a nonproducer "variant" line. p115 from detergent-treated small cell lung carcinoma cells binds to bombesin-Sepharose and can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in the presence of radiolabeled ATP and Mn2+. As for the p115 immunoprecipitated from mouse fibroblast, the small cell lung carcinoma p115 can be phosphorylated in an immunocomplex kinase assay. However, the latter does not require the presence of exogenous bombesin for activity. Binding data, obtained by using radiolabeled ligand, suggest receptor occupancy in the cell lines producing bombesin. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that proliferation in some human small cell lung carcinoma lines is under autocrine control, regulated through activation of bombesin receptors. Images PMID:2451242

  19. In vitro and in vivo Analysis of the Binding of the C Terminus of the HDL Receptor Scavenger Receptor Class B type I (SR-BI) to the PDZ1 Domain of its Cytoplasmic Adaptor Protein PDZK1

    SciTech Connect

    O Kocher; G Birrane; K Tsukamoto; S Fenske; A Yesilaltay; R Pal; K Daniels; J Ladias; M Krieger

    2011-12-31

    The PDZ1 domain of the four PDZ domain-containing protein PDZK1 has been reported to bind the C terminus of the HDL receptor scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), and to control hepatic SR-BI expression and function. We generated wild-type (WT) and mutant murine PDZ1 domains, the mutants bearing single amino acid substitutions in their carboxylate binding loop (Lys(14)-Xaa(4)-Asn(19)-Tyr-Gly-Phe-Phe-Leu(24)), and measured their binding affinity for a 7-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of SR-BI ((503)VLQEAKL(509)). The Y20A and G21Y substitutions abrogated all binding activity. Surprisingly, binding affinities (K(d)) of the K14A and F22A mutants were 3.2 and 4.0 ?M, respectively, similar to 2.6 ?M measured for the WT PDZ1. To understand these findings, we determined the high resolution structure of WT PDZ1 bound to a 5-residue sequence from the C-terminal SR-BI ((505)QEAKL(509)) using x-ray crystallography. In addition, we incorporated the K14A and Y20A substitutions into full-length PDZK1 liver-specific transgenes and expressed them in WT and PDZK1 knock-out mice. In WT mice, the transgenes did not alter endogenous hepatic SR-BI protein expression (intracellular distribution or amount) or lipoprotein metabolism (total plasma cholesterol, lipoprotein size distribution). In PDZK1 knock-out mice, as expected, the K14A mutant behaved like wild-type PDZK1 and completely corrected their hepatic SR-BI and plasma lipoprotein abnormalities. Unexpectedly, the 10-20-fold overexpressed Y20A mutant also substantially, but not completely, corrected these abnormalities. The results suggest that there may be an additional site(s) within PDZK1 that bind(s) SR-BI and mediate(s) productive SR-BI-PDZK1 interaction previously attributed exclusively to the canonical binding of the C-terminal SR-BI to PDZ1.

  20. Activation of lung toll-like receptors does not exacerbate sickness responses to lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Walker, Adam K; Hsieh, Jennifer; Luu, Katherine V; Radwan, Aiat A; Valverde, Gabriella R; Dickey, Burton F; Tuvim, Michael J; Dantzer, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Pneumonia represents a leading cause of death. Recently, a novel treatment strategy for pneumonia has involved enhancing the host pulmonary innate immune response by pre-exposure to aerosolized toll-like receptor (TLR)9 and TLR2/6 agonists, known as O/P. O/P inhalation in mice has been demonstrated to stimulate innate lung immunity, and thus increase survival against subsequent pneumonia infection while producing barely detectable increases in systemic cytokines. Here, we examined the safety of O/P treatment when used in mice that are inflamed systemically. Swiss-Webster mice were treated with two doses of aerosolized O/P (1× or 8×) vs phosphate buffered saline (PBS) either immediately before intraperitoneal injection of 0.1mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PBS (equivolume) or 2h after. Sickness responses (reduced body weight, food intake, activity and social interaction) were examined at 2 and 5.5h post-treatment. Immediately following behavioral testing, mice were euthanized, perfused with PBS, and brains, spleens, livers and lungs snap frozen for assessment of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs. While O/P treatment alone increased lung IL-1β, IFNγ and TNF-α, no such effects were observed in the brain, spleen or liver. Furthermore, there was no evidence that O/P treatment administered before or after LPS had any synergizing effect to potentiate the cytokine response to LPS in any compartment measured. Supportive of these findings were the measures of sickness behaviors that did not show any increased sickness response in O/P-treated mice exposed to LPS, suggestive that the cytokine signal produced in the lungs from O/P inhalation did not propagate to the brain and synergize with LPS-induced neuroinflammation. These findings support the safety of the use of O/P inhalation as a preventative measure against pneumonia and demonstrate a unique ability of the lungs to compartmentalize pulmonary inflammation and limit propagation of the cytokine signal to the brain.

  1. Effect of gestational age and retinol (vitamin A) deficiency on fetal rat lung nuclear retinoic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    McMenamy, K R; Zachman, R D

    1993-03-01

    Retinol, or one of its metabolites such as retinoic acid (RA), is an important factor in the differentiation and maintenance of integrity of lung epithelium. Retinol deficiency in rats induces morphologic changes in respiratory tract epithelial cells that are histologically similar to those found in human premature infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The exact mechanism of retinoid action in cellular growth and differentiation is not understood, but recently investigators have focused on mechanisms mediated by nuclear RA receptors (RAR). The role of these RAR as regulators of retinoid function is being studied in adult animal tissues and malignant cell lines, but little is known about RAR in developing fetal lung tissue. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of gestational age and vitamin A deficiency on fetal rat lung nuclear RAR. RAR were also assayed in vitamin A control and vitamin A-deficient adult rat lung. A competitive binding assay and size exclusion HPLC separation were used to quantitate total RAR-specific binding. Binding analysis revealed a single class of receptor binding sites with high affinity (kd approximately 10(-9) M) for RA and RAR saturation at 2-5 nM RA. Specific binding of lung RAR in rat fetuses at 18 d gestation was two to three times greater than in fetuses at 20-21 d gestation, newborn pups, or adults. Western blot analysis revealed a predominance of RAR-beta receptors in fetal lung. Lungs from vitamin A-deficient fetuses demonstrated up-regulation of nuclear RAR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8384711

  2. Toll-like receptor 4 promotes fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, X X; Jiang, D Y; Huang, X X; Guo, S L; Yuan, W; Dai, H P

    2015-12-21

    The specific role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis of mice, a model of human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, has not been characterized. We injected bleomycin intratracheally into TLR4 knockout (TLR4(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) mice. Twenty-one days after injection, mice were sacrificed and their lungs were harvested for pathological, hydroxyproline, mRNA expression, and collagen I analyses. Body weight changes and mortality were observed. Light microscopy showed that lung fibrosis was minimal in TLR4(-/-) compared to that in WT mice on day 21 after bleomycin instillation. The Ashcroft score was significantly lower in TLR4(-/-) than in WT mice (3.667 ± 0.730 vs 4.945 ± 0.880, P < 0.05). Hydroxyproline content was significantly lower in TLR4(-/-) than in WT mice on day 21 after bleomycin injection (0.281 ± 0.022 vs 0.371 ± 0.047, P < 0.05). Compared to WT mice, bleomycin-treated TLR4(-/-) mice expressed significantly lower type I collagen mRNA levels (mesenchymal marker; 11.069 ± 2.627 vs 4.589 ± 1.440, P < 0.05). Collagen I was significantly lower in TLR4(-/-) than in WT mice (0.838 ± 0.352 vs 2.427 ± 0.551, P < 0.05). Bleomycin-treated TLR4(-/-) mice had a significantly lower mortality rate on day 21 than WT mice (33 vs 75%, P < 0.05). Body weight reduction was lower in TLR4(-/-) mice than in WT mice; this difference was not statistically significant (-3.735 ± 5.276 vs -6.698 ± 3.218, P > 0.05). Thus, bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is TLR4-dependent and TLR4 promoted fibrosis in bleomycin-challenged mice.

  3. Endogenous ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor regulate lung dendritic cell function.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Thomas H; Williams, Marc A; Pollock, Stephen J; McCarthy, Claire E; Lacy, Shannon H; Phipps, Richard P; Sime, Patricia J

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that has been extensively studied as a regulator of toxicant metabolism. However, recent evidence indicates that the AhR also plays an important role in immunity. We hypothesized that the AhR is a novel, immune regulator of T helper type 2 (Th2) -mediated allergic airway disease. Here, we report that AhR-deficient mice develop increased allergic responses to the model allergen ovalbumin (OVA), which are driven in part by increased dendritic cell (DC) functional activation. AhR knockout (AhR(-/-) ) mice sensitized and challenged with OVA develop an increased inflammatory response in the lung compared with wild-type controls, with greater numbers of inflammatory eosinophils and neutrophils, greater T-cell proliferation, greater production of Th2 cytokines, and higher levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1. Lung DCs from AhR(-/-) mice stimulated antigen-specific proliferation and Th2 cytokine production by naive T cells in vitro. Additionally, AhR(-/-) DCs produced higher levels of tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, which promote Th2 differentiation, and expressed higher cell surface levels of stimulatory MHC Class II and CD86 molecules. Overall, loss of the AhR was associated with enhanced T-cell activation by pulmonary DCs and heightened pro-inflammatory allergic responses. This suggests that endogenous AhR ligands are involved in the normal regulation of Th2-mediated immunity in the lung via a DC-dependent mechanism. Therefore, the AhR may represent an important target for therapeutic intervention in allergic airways inflammation.

  4. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression in human airway correlates with lung function.

    PubMed

    Lam, David Chi-Leung; Luo, Susan Yang; Fu, Kin-Hang; Lui, Macy Mei-Sze; Chan, Koon-Ho; Wistuba, Ignacio Ivans; Gao, Boning; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Ip, Mary Sau-Man; Minna, John Dorrance

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine and its derivatives, by binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on bronchial epithelial cells, can regulate cellular signaling and inflammatory processes. Delineation of nAChR subtypes and their responses to nicotine stimulation in bronchial epithelium may provide information for therapeutic targeting in smoking-related inflammation in the airway. Expression of nAChR subunit genes in 60 bronchial epithelial biopsies and immunohistochemical staining for the subcellular locations of nAChR subunit expression were evaluated. Seven human bronchial epithelial cell lines (HBECs) were exposed to nicotine in vitro for their response in nAChR subunit gene expression to nicotine exposure and removal. The relative normalized amount of expression of nAChR α4, α5, and α7 and immunohistochemical staining intensity of nAChR α4, α5, and β3 expression showed significant correlation with lung function parameters. Nicotine stimulation in HBECs resulted in transient increase in the levels of nAChR α5 and α6 but more sustained increase in nAChR α7 expression. nAChR expression in bronchial epithelium was found to correlate with lung function. Nicotine exposure in HBECs resulted in both short and longer term responses in nAChR subunit gene expression. These results gave insight into the potential of targeting nAChRs for therapy in smoking-related inflammation in the airway. PMID:26608528

  5. High-affinity receptors for bombesin-like peptides in normal guinea pig lung membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, E.; Trifilieff, A.; Landry, Y.; Gies, J.P. )

    1991-01-01

    The binding of the radiolabeled bombesin analogue ({sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4})bombesin to guinea-pig lung membranes was investigated. Binding of ({sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4})bombesin was specific, saturable, reversible and linearly related to the protein concentration. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding data at 25C indicated the presence of a single class of non-interacting binding sites for bombesin (B{sub max} = 7.7 fmol/mg protein). The value of the equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub D} = 90 pM) agrees with a high-affinity binding site. Bombesin and structurally related peptides such as ({sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4})bombesin, neuromedin B and neuromedin C inhibited the binding of ({sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4})bombesin in an order of potencies as follows: ({sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4})bombesin {gt} bombesin {ge} neuromedin C {much gt} neuromedin B. These results indicate that guinea-pig lung membranes possess a single class of bombesin receptors with a high affinity for bombesin and a lower one for neuromedin B.

  6. 67-Kilodalton laminin receptor expression correlates with worse prognostic indicators in non-small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Fontanini, G; Vignati, S; Chiné, S; Lucchi, M; Mussi, A; Angeletti, C A; Ménard, S; Castronovo, V; Bevilacqua, G

    1997-02-01

    Tumor samples obtained from 72 patients resected for non-small cell lung cancer were stained immunohistochemically using an immunoperoxidase method and the MLuC5 monoclonal antibody specific for the 67-kDa laminin receptor. Sixty-one of 72 patients (84.7%) displayed a MLuC5-positive reaction, which was usually localized in both the inner surface of the plasmatic membranes and the cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. When we compared the laminin receptor expression with clinicopathological and biological parameters such as histotype, grading, T status, N status, ploidy, proliferative activity, vessel invasion, and p53 protein accumulation, the following results were observed: (a) the mean expression of the receptor was higher in the group of patients with metastatic nodal involvement than in those with uninvolved lymph nodes (P = 0.02); (b) a high Ki-67 score (>13% of positive cells) was observed in tumors with a higher mean value of laminin receptor (P = 0.004); (c) the tumors harboring neoplastic emboli in their vessels showed a higher laminin receptor immunoreactivity (P = 0.02); and (d) a borderline association was found between the high mean value of laminin receptor immunopositivity and p53 accumulation in neoplastic cell nuclei (P = 0.05). Our observations indicate that detection of high tissue levels of 67-kDa laminin receptor is associated with an invasive phenotype in non-small cell lung cancer and may provide further information in the biological characterization of this type of cancer.

  7. Botanical Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker-Livingston, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Why not combine the use of technology with the excitement of a scavenger hunt that moves middle-level students out into the "wilds" of their school campus to classify plants? In the lesson plan described here, students embark on a botanical scavenger hunt and then document their findings using a digital camera. This project was designed to allow…

  8. Capsaicin Induces Apoptosis in Human Small Cell Lung Cancer via the TRPV6 Receptor and the Calpain Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jamie K.; Brown, Kathleen C.; Dom, Aaron M.; Witte, Theodore R.; Thornhill, Brent A.; Crabtree, Clayton M.; Perry, Haley E.; Brown, J. Michael; Ball, John G.; Creel, Rebecca G.; Damron, C. Luke; Rollyson, William D.; Stevenson, Cathryn D.; Hardman, W. Elaine; Valentovic, Monica A.; Carpenter, A. Betts; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, displays potent anti-neoplastic activity in a wide array of human cancer cells. The present manuscript examines the signaling pathways underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in vitro and in vivo. Studies in neuronal cells show that capsaicin exerts its biological activity via the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) superfamily of cation-channel receptors. The TRPV family is comprised of six members (TRPV1-6). Capsaicin is an agonist of the TRPV1 receptor. We observed that capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human SCLC cells was mediated via the TRPV receptor family; however it was independent of TRPV1. Surprisingly, the apoptotic activity of capsaicin required the TRPV6 receptor. Depletion of TRPV6 receptor by siRNA methodology abolished the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in SCLC cells. Immunostaining and ELISA showed that TRPV6 receptor was robustly expressed on human SCLC tissues (from patients) and SCLC cell lines but almost absent in normal lung tissues. This correlates with our results that capsaicin induced very little apoptosis in normal lung epithelial cells. The proapoptotic activity of was mediated by the intracellular calcium and calpain pathway. The treatment of human SCLC cells with capsaicin induced increased the activity of calpain 1 and 2 by three-fold relative to untreated SCLC cells. Such calpain activation, in response to capsaicin, was downstream of the TRPV6 receptor. Taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human SCLCs. PMID:24878626

  9. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in human small cell lung cancer via the TRPV6 receptor and the calpain pathway.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jamie K; Brown, Kathleen C; Dom, Aaron M; Witte, Theodore R; Thornhill, Brent A; Crabtree, Clayton M; Perry, Haley E; Brown, J Michael; Ball, John G; Creel, Rebecca G; Damron, C Luke; Rollyson, William D; Stevenson, Cathryn D; Hardman, W Elaine; Valentovic, Monica A; Carpenter, A Betts; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2014-08-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, displays potent anti-neoplastic activity in a wide array of human cancer cells. The present manuscript examines the signaling pathways underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in vitro and in vivo. Studies in neuronal cells show that capsaicin exerts its biological activity via the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) superfamily of cation-channel receptors. The TRPV family is comprised of six members (TRPV1-6). Capsaicin is a known agonist of the TRPV1 receptor. We observed that capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human SCLC cells was mediated via the TRPV receptor family; however it was independent of TRPV1. Surprisingly, the apoptotic activity of capsaicin required the TRPV6 receptor. Depletion of TRPV6 receptor by siRNA methodology abolished the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in SCLC cells. Immunostaining and ELISA showed that TRPV6 receptor was robustly expressed on human SCLC tissues (from patients) and SCLC cell lines but almost absent in normal lung tissues. This correlates with our results that capsaicin induced very little apoptosis in normal lung epithelial cells. The pro-apoptotic activity of capsaicin was mediated by the intracellular calcium and calpain pathway. The treatment of human SCLC cells with capsaicin increased the activity of calpain 1 and 2 by threefold relative to untreated SCLC cells. Such calpain activation, in response to capsaicin, was downstream of the TRPV6 receptor. Taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human SCLCs. PMID:24878626

  10. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in human small cell lung cancer via the TRPV6 receptor and the calpain pathway.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jamie K; Brown, Kathleen C; Dom, Aaron M; Witte, Theodore R; Thornhill, Brent A; Crabtree, Clayton M; Perry, Haley E; Brown, J Michael; Ball, John G; Creel, Rebecca G; Damron, C Luke; Rollyson, William D; Stevenson, Cathryn D; Hardman, W Elaine; Valentovic, Monica A; Carpenter, A Betts; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2014-08-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, displays potent anti-neoplastic activity in a wide array of human cancer cells. The present manuscript examines the signaling pathways underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in vitro and in vivo. Studies in neuronal cells show that capsaicin exerts its biological activity via the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) superfamily of cation-channel receptors. The TRPV family is comprised of six members (TRPV1-6). Capsaicin is a known agonist of the TRPV1 receptor. We observed that capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human SCLC cells was mediated via the TRPV receptor family; however it was independent of TRPV1. Surprisingly, the apoptotic activity of capsaicin required the TRPV6 receptor. Depletion of TRPV6 receptor by siRNA methodology abolished the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in SCLC cells. Immunostaining and ELISA showed that TRPV6 receptor was robustly expressed on human SCLC tissues (from patients) and SCLC cell lines but almost absent in normal lung tissues. This correlates with our results that capsaicin induced very little apoptosis in normal lung epithelial cells. The pro-apoptotic activity of capsaicin was mediated by the intracellular calcium and calpain pathway. The treatment of human SCLC cells with capsaicin increased the activity of calpain 1 and 2 by threefold relative to untreated SCLC cells. Such calpain activation, in response to capsaicin, was downstream of the TRPV6 receptor. Taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human SCLCs.

  11. REACTOR FUEL SCAVENGING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1962-04-10

    A process for removing fission products from reactor liquid fuel without interfering with the reactor's normal operation or causing a significant change in its fuel composition is described. The process consists of mixing a liquid scavenger alloy composed of about 44 at.% plutoniunm, 33 at.% lanthanum, and 23 at.% nickel or cobalt with a plutonium alloy reactor fuel containing about 3 at.% lanthanum; removing a portion of the fuel and scavenger alloy from the reactor core and replacing it with an equal amount of the fresh scavenger alloy; transferring the portion to a quiescent zone where the scavenger and the plutonium fuel form two distinct liquid layers with the fission products being dissolved in the lanthanum-rich scavenger layer; and the clean plutonium-rich fuel layer being returned to the reactor core. (AEC)

  12. Clarifying CB2 receptor-dependent and independent effects of THC on human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sarafian, Theodore Montes, Cindy; Harui, Airi; Beedanagari, Sudheer R.; Kiertscher, Sylvia; Stripecke, Renata; Hossepian, Derik; Kitchen, Christina; Kern, Rita; Belperio, John; Roth, Michael D.

    2008-09-15

    Marijuana smoking is associated with a number of abnormal findings in the lungs of habitual smokers. Previous studies revealed that {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) caused mitochondrial injury in primary lung epithelial cells and in the cell line, A549 [Sarafian, T. A., Kouyoumjian, S., Khoshaghideh, F., Tashkin, D. P., and Roth, M. D. (2003). Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol disrupts mitochondrial function and cell energetics. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 284, L298-306; Sarafian, T., Habib, N., Mao, J. T., Tsu, I. H., Yamamoto, M. L., Hsu, E., Tashkin, D. P., and Roth, M. D. (2005). Gene expression changes in human small airway epithelial cells exposed to Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Toxicol Lett 158, 95-107]. The role of cannabinoid receptors in this injury was unclear, as was the potential impact on cell function. In order to investigate these questions, A549 cells were engineered to over-express the type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) using a self-inactivating lentiviral vector. This transduction resulted in a 60-fold increase in CB2R mRNA relative to cells transduced with a control vector. Transduced cell lines were used to study the effects of THC on chemotactic activity and mitochondrial function. Chemotaxis in response to a 10% serum gradient was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner by exposure to THC. CB2R-transduced cells exhibited less intrinsic chemotactic activity (p < 0.05) and were 80- to 100-fold more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of THC. Studies using SR144528, a selective CB2R antagonist, verified that these effects were mediated by the CB2R. Marijuana smoke extract, but not smoke extracts from tobacco or placebo marijuana cigarettes, reproduced these effects (p < 0.05). THC decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential ({psi}{sub m}) in both control and CB2R-transduced cells. However, these decreases did not play a significant role in chemotaxis inhibition since cyclosporine A, which protected against ATP loss

  13. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by the A sub 2 adenosine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gilfillan, A.M.; Gobran, L.I.; Rooney, S.A. )

    1987-05-01

    The authors previously reported that adenosine (A) stimulates secretion of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major component of surfactant, in type II pneumocytes. To determine how this effect is mediated we examined the effect of P{sub 1} purinoceptor agonists -N{sup 6}-phenylisoprpyl-A (PIA), 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxyamido-A (NECA), 2-chloro-A (CA) - and antagonists - theophylline (T) and 8-phenyltheophylline (8PT) - on PC secretion and cAMP levels in type II cells isolated from the adult rat. The cells were preincubated with {sup 3}H-choline for 20 h, transferred to fresh medium and incubated {plus minus} test agents for 1.5 h after which {sup 3}H-PC in the cells and medium was measured. A and its analogs stimulated PC secretion in a dose-dependent manner. At the optimal concentration (A, 1 mM; analogs, 0.01 mM) secretion was stimulated approx. 2-fold from a basal rate of 0.08-1.02% of total PC in the medium after 1.5 h. The potency order was NECA>CA=L-PIA>A>D-PIA. The EC{sub 50} for NECA was 8.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M. The effect of NECA was significantly inhibited by 8PT (0.01 mM) and T (0.05 mM). NECA, A and L-PIA increased cellular cAMP levels 34, 12 and 8 fold, respectively, from a basal level of 0.23-0.28 pmol/10{sup 6} cells. These data suggest that the A{sub 2} subtype of the P{sub 1} receptor mediates the effect of A. In newborn rabbits, lung lavage PC increased form 24.1 {plus minus} 1.6 ug P/g lung dry wt at 0 h to 62.6 {plus minus} 7.7 after breathing for 3 h (n=13). 8PT (15 mg/kg, i.m.) at 0 h decreased the PC content at 3 h by 29% to 44.4 {plus minus} 5.1 ug/g. This suggests a functional role for the P{sub 1} receptor in lung surfactant secretion.

  14. Role of estrogen in lung cancer based on the estrogen receptor-epithelial mesenchymal transduction signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-zhen; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Li-juan; Wang, Zhong-qi; Wu, Zhong-hua; Yang, Xiao-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim Estrogen is reported to promote the occurrence and development of several human cancers. Increasing evidence shows that most human lung tumors exert estrogen receptor expression. In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of estrogen effect in lung cancer through estrogen receptor-epithelial–mesechymal-transition signaling pathways for the first time. Materials and methods A total of 36 inbred C57BL/6 mice (18 male and 18 female) were injected subcutaneously with human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, Lewis. After the lung tumor model was established, mice with lung adenocarcinoma were randomly divided into three groups for each sex (n=6), such as vehicle group, estrogen group, and estrogen plus tamoxifen group. The six groups of mice were sacrificed after 21 days of drug treatment. Tumor tissue was stripped and weighed, and tumor inhibition rate was calculated based on average tumor weight. Protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of estrogen receptor α (ERα), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K), AKT, E-cadherin, and vimentin were detected in both tumor tissue and lung tissue by using immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results 1) For male mice: in the estrogen group, estrogen treatment significantly increased ERα protein and mRNA expressions in tumor tissue and protein expression of PI3K, AKT, and vimentin in both tumor tissue and lung tissue compared with the vehicle-treated group. Besides, mRNA expression of E-cadherin was significantly reduced in estrogen-treated tumor tissues than that in vehicle-treated tissues. In the estrogen plus tamoxifen group, protein and mRNA expressions of ERα and AKT were dramatically reduced by tamoxifen treatment in tumor tissue compared with the estrogen group; mRNA expression of E-cadherin was increased in tumor tissue; protein expression of vimentin and PI3K were downregulated in tumor tissue; protein

  15. Antenatal endotoxin disrupts lung vitamin D receptor and 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase expression in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Erica; Seedorf, Gregory J; Ryan, Sharon; Gien, Jason; Cramer, Scott D; Abman, Steven H

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin D [vit D; 1,25-(OH)2D] treatment improves survival and lung alveolar and vascular growth in an experimental model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) after antenatal exposure to endotoxin (ETX). However, little is known about lung-specific 1,25-(OH)2D3 regulation during development, especially regarding maturational changes in lung-specific expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), 1α-hydroxylase (1α-OHase), and CYP24A1 during late gestation and the effects of antenatal ETX exposure on 1,25-(OH)2D3 metabolism in the lung. We hypothesized that vit D regulatory proteins undergo maturation regulation in the late fetal and early neonatal lung and that prenatal exposure to ETX impairs lung growth partly through abnormal endogenous vit D metabolism. Normal fetal rat lungs were harvested between embryonic day 15 and postnatal day 14. Lung homogenates were assayed for VDR, 1α-OHase, and CYP24A1 protein contents by Western blot analysis. Fetal rats were injected on embryonic day 20 with intra-amniotic ETX, ETX + 1,25-(OH)2D3, or saline and delivered 2 days later. Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from fetal sheep were assessed for VDR, 1α-OHase, and CYP24A1 expression after treatment with 25-(OH)D3, 1,25-(OH)2D3, ETX, ETX + 25-(OH)D3, or ETX + 1,25-(OH)2D3. We found that lung VDR, 1α-OHase, and CYP2741 protein expression dramatically increase immediately before birth (P < 0.01 vs. early fetal values). Antenatal ETX increases CYP24A1 expression (P < 0.05) and decreases VDR and 1α-OHase expression at birth (P < 0.001), but these changes are prevented with concurrent vit D treatment (P < 0.001). ETX-induced reduction of fetal PAEC growth and tube formation and lung 1α-OHase expression are prevented by vit D treatment (P < 0.001). We conclude that lung VDR, 1α-OHase, and CYP24A1 protein content markedly increase before birth and that antenatal ETX disrupts lung vit D metabolism through downregulation of VDR and increased vit D catabolic enzyme

  16. Receptor tyrosine kinase expression of circulating tumor cells in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Klameth, Lukas; Hochmair, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis and is found disseminated at first presentation in the majority of cases. The cell biological mechanisms underlying metastasis and drug resistance are not clear. SCLC is characterized by high numbers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and we were able to expand several CTC lines ex vivo and to relate chitinase-3-like-1/YKL-40 (CHI3L1) as marker. Availability of expanded SCLC CTC cells allowed for a screening of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) expressed. The metastatic CHI3L1-negative SCLC cell line SCLC26A, established from a pleural effusion was used for comparison. The CTC cell line BHGc10 was found to exhibit increased expression of RYK, AXL, Tie-1, Dtk, ROR1/2, several ephrins (Eph) and FGF/EGF receptors compared to SCLC26A. All of these RTKs have been associated with cell motility, invasion and poor prognosis in diverse cancer entities without knowledge of their association with CTCs. The identification of RYK, AXL and ROR1/2 as pseudokinases, lacking activity, seems to be related to the observed failure of RTK inhibitors in SCLC. These kinases are involved in the noncanonical WNT pathway and their expression in SCLC CTCs represents a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. PMID:26328272

  17. Acanthamoeba infection in lungs of mice expressed by toll-like receptors (TLR2 and TLR4).

    PubMed

    Derda, Monika; Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Hadaś, Edward; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Wandurska-Nowak, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the innate immune responses to a variety of pathogens including parasites. TLRs are among the most highly conserved in the evolution of the receptor family, localized mainly on cells of the immune system and on other cells such as lung cells. The aim of this study was to determine for the first time the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the lung of Acanthamoeba spp. infected mice using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. The Acanthamoeba spp. were isolated from a patient with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) (strain Ac 55) and from environmental samples of water from Malta Lake (Poznań, Poland - strain Ac 43). We observed a significantly increased level of expression of TLR2 as well as TLR4 mRNA from 2 to 30 days post Acanthamoeba infection (dpi) in the lungs of mice infected with Ac55 (KP120880) and Ac43 (KP120879) strains. According to our observations, increased TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the pneumocytes, interstitial cells and epithelial cells of the bronchial tree may suggest an important role of these receptors in protective immunity against Acanthamoeba infection in the lung. Moreover, increased levels of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression in infected Acanthamoeba mice may suggest the involvement of these TLRs in the recognition of this amoeba pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). PMID:26940205

  18. Membrane dipeptidase is the receptor for a lung-targeting peptide identified by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Rajotte, D; Ruoslahti, E

    1999-04-23

    In vivo phage display is a powerful method to study organ- and tissue-specific vascular addresses. Using this approach, peptides capable of tissue-specific homing can be identified by performing a selection for that trait in vivo. We recently showed that the CGFECVRQCPERC (termed GFE-1) peptide can selectively bind to mouse lung vasculature after an intravenous injection. Our aim in the present study was to identify the receptor for this lung-homing peptide. By using affinity chromatography, we isolated a 55-kDa lung cell-surface protein that selectively binds to the GFE-1 peptide. Protein sequencing established the identity of the receptor as membrane dipeptidase (MDP), a cell-surface zinc metalloprotease involved in the metabolism of glutathione, leukotriene D4, and certain beta-lactam antibiotics. Phage particles displaying the GFE-1 peptide selectively bind to COS-1 cells transfected with the murine MDP cDNA. Moreover, the synthetic GFE-1 peptide could inhibit MDP activity. By establishing MDP as the receptor for the GFE-1 peptide, our results suggest potential applications for both MDP and the GFE-1 peptide in delivery of compounds to the lungs. This work also demonstrates that cell-surface proteases can be involved in tissue-specific homing.

  19. Acanthamoeba infection in lungs of mice expressed by toll-like receptors (TLR2 and TLR4).

    PubMed

    Derda, Monika; Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Hadaś, Edward; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Wandurska-Nowak, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the innate immune responses to a variety of pathogens including parasites. TLRs are among the most highly conserved in the evolution of the receptor family, localized mainly on cells of the immune system and on other cells such as lung cells. The aim of this study was to determine for the first time the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the lung of Acanthamoeba spp. infected mice using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. The Acanthamoeba spp. were isolated from a patient with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) (strain Ac 55) and from environmental samples of water from Malta Lake (Poznań, Poland - strain Ac 43). We observed a significantly increased level of expression of TLR2 as well as TLR4 mRNA from 2 to 30 days post Acanthamoeba infection (dpi) in the lungs of mice infected with Ac55 (KP120880) and Ac43 (KP120879) strains. According to our observations, increased TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the pneumocytes, interstitial cells and epithelial cells of the bronchial tree may suggest an important role of these receptors in protective immunity against Acanthamoeba infection in the lung. Moreover, increased levels of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression in infected Acanthamoeba mice may suggest the involvement of these TLRs in the recognition of this amoeba pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP).

  20. Neonatal Fc Receptor Regulation of Lung Immunoglobulin and CD103+ Dendritic Cells Confers Transient Susceptibility to Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Laura; Reece, Stephen T.; Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Hahnke, Karin; Oberbeck-Mueller, Dagmar; Dorhoi, Anca

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) extends the systemic half-life of IgG antibodies by chaperoning bound Fc away from lysosomal degradation inside stromal and hematopoietic cells. FcRn also transports IgG across mucosal barriers into the lumen, and yet little is known about how FcRn modulates immunity in the lung during homeostasis or infection. We infected wild-type (WT) and FcRn-deficient (fcgrt−/−) mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Mycobacterium tuberculosis to investigate whether recycling and transport of IgG via FcRn influences innate and adaptive immunity in the lung in response to bacterial infection. We found that FcRn expression maintains homeostatic IgG levels in lung and leads to preferential secretion of low-affinity IgG ligands into the lumen. Fcgrt−/− animals exhibited no evidence of developmental impairment of innate immunity in the lung and were able to efficiently recruit neutrophils in a model of acute bacterial pneumonia. Although local humoral immunity in lung increased independently of the presence of FcRn during tuberculosis, there was nonetheless a strong impact of FcRn deficiency on local adaptive immunity. We show that the quantity and quality of IgG in airways, as well as the abundance of dendritic cells in the lung, are maintained by FcRn. FcRn ablation transiently enhanced local T cell immunity and neutrophil recruitment during tuberculosis, leading to a lower bacterial burden in lung. This novel understanding of tissue-specific modulation of mucosal IgG isotypes in the lung by FcRn sheds light on the role of mucosal IgG in immune responses in the lung during homeostasis and bacterial disease. PMID:27481246

  1. Identification of oxidative stress and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling as a key pathway of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yumiko; Kuba, Keiji; Neely, G Greg; Yaghubian-Malhami, Rubina; Perkmann, Thomas; van Loo, Geert; Ermolaeva, Maria; Veldhuizen, Ruud; Leung, Y H Connie; Wang, Hongliang; Liu, Haolin; Sun, Yang; Pasparakis, Manolis; Kopf, Manfred; Mech, Christin; Bavari, Sina; Peiris, J S Malik; Slutsky, Arthur S; Akira, Shizuo; Hultqvist, Malin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Nicholls, John; Jiang, Chengyu; Binder, Christoph J; Penninger, Josef M

    2008-04-18

    Multiple lung pathogens such as chemical agents, H5N1 avian flu, or SARS cause high lethality due to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here we report that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mutant mice display natural resistance to acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI). We show that TLR4-TRIF-TRAF6 signaling is a key disease pathway that controls the severity of ALI. The oxidized phospholipid (OxPL) OxPAPC was identified to induce lung injury and cytokine production by lung macrophages via TLR4-TRIF. We observed OxPL production in the lungs of humans and animals infected with SARS, Anthrax, or H5N1. Pulmonary challenge with an inactivated H5N1 avian influenza virus rapidly induces ALI and OxPL formation in mice. Loss of TLR4 or TRIF expression protects mice from H5N1-induced ALI. Moreover, deletion of ncf1, which controls ROS production, improves the severity of H5N1-mediated ALI. Our data identify oxidative stress and innate immunity as key lung injury pathways that control the severity of ALI.

  2. Epigenetic and Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Glutathione Peroxidase 3 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Byung Chull; Jung, Nak-Kyun; Park, Chun Young; Oh, In-Jae; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Park, Jae-Il; Lee, Seung-won

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), an antioxidant enzyme, acts as a modulator of redox signaling, has immunomodulatory function, and catalyzes the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPx3 has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. Although hyper-methylation of the GPx3 promoter has been shown to down-regulate its expression, other mechanisms by which GPx3 expression is regulated have not been reported. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanisms of GPx3 regulation. GPx3 gene analysis predicted the presence of ten glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) on the GPx3 gene. This result prompted us to investigate whether GPx3 expression is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is implicated in tumor response to chemotherapy. The corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) was used to examine the possible relationship between GR and GPx3 expression. Dex significantly induced GPx3 expression in H1299, H1650, and H1975 cell lines, which exhibit low levels of GPx3 expression under normal conditions. The results of EMSA and ChIP-PCR suggest that GR binds directly to GRE 6 and 7, both of which are located near the GPx3 promoter. Assessment of GPx3 transcription efficiency using a luciferase reporter system showed that blocking formation of the GR-GRE complexes reduced luciferase activity by 7–8-fold. Suppression of GR expression by siRNA transfection also induced down-regulation of GPx3. These data indicate that GPx3 expression can be regulated independently via epigenetic or GR-mediated mechanisms in lung cancer cells, and suggest that GPx3 could potentiate glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling in lung cancer cells. PMID:27484907

  3. Regulation of IL-4 Receptor Signaling by STUB1 in Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qin; Sha, Youbao; Bhattacharya, Abhisek; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Bonilla, Diana; Jyothula, Soma S. S. K.; Pandit, Lavannya; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: IL-4Rα, the common receptor component for IL-4 and IL-13, plays a critical role in IL-4– and IL-13–mediated signaling pathways that regulate airway inflammation and remodeling. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying IL-4Rα turnover and its signal termination remain elusive. Objectives: To evaluate the role of STUB1 (STIP1 homology and U-Box containing protein 1) in regulating IL-4R signaling in airway inflammation. Methods: The roles of STUB1 in IL-4Rα degradation and its signaling were investigated by immunoblot, immunoprecipitation, and flow cytometry. The involvement of STUB1 in airway inflammation was determined in vivo by measuring lung inflammatory cells infiltration, mucus production, serum lgE levels, and alveolar macrophage M2 activation in STUB1−/− mice. STUB1 expression was evaluated in airway epithelium of patients with asthma and lung tissues of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Measurements and Main Results: STUB1 interacted with IL-4Rα and targeted it for ubiquitination-mediated proteasomal degradation, terminating IL-4 or IL-13 signaling. STUB1 knockout cells showed increased levels of IL-4Rα and sustained STAT6 activation, whereas STUB1 overexpression reduced IL-4Rα levels. Mice deficient in STUB1 had spontaneous airway inflammation, alternative M2 activation of alveolar macrophage, and increased serum IgE. STUB1 levels were increased in airways of subjects with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting that up-regulation of STUB1 might be an important feedback mechanism to dampen IL-4R signaling in airway inflammation. Conclusions: Our study identified a previously uncharacterized role for STUB1 in regulating IL-4R signaling, which might provide a new strategy for attenuating airway inflammation. PMID:24251647

  4. Epigenetic and Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Glutathione Peroxidase 3 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    An, Byung Chull; Jung, Nak-Kyun; Park, Chun Young; Oh, In-Jae; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Park, Jae-Il; Lee, Seung-Won

    2016-08-31

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), an antioxidant enzyme, acts as a modulator of redox signaling, has immunomodulatory function, and catalyzes the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPx3 has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. Although hyper-methylation of the GPx3 promoter has been shown to down-regulate its expression, other mechanisms by which GPx3 expression is regulated have not been reported. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanisms of GPx3 regulation. GPx3 gene analysis predicted the presence of ten glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) on the GPx3 gene. This result prompted us to investigate whether GPx3 expression is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is implicated in tumor response to chemotherapy. The corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) was used to examine the possible relationship between GR and GPx3 expression. Dex significantly induced GPx3 expression in H1299, H1650, and H1975 cell lines, which exhibit low levels of GPx3 expression under normal conditions. The results of EMSA and ChIP-PCR suggest that GR binds directly to GRE 6 and 7, both of which are located near the GPx3 promoter. Assessment of GPx3 transcription efficiency using a luciferase reporter system showed that blocking formation of the GR-GRE complexes reduced luciferase activity by 7-8-fold. Suppression of GR expression by siRNA transfection also induced down-regulation of GPx3. These data indicate that GPx3 expression can be regulated independently via epigenetic or GR-mediated mechanisms in lung cancer cells, and suggest that GPx3 could potentiate glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling in lung cancer cells. PMID:27484907

  5. Lung cancer risk assessment at receptor site of a waste-to-energy plant.

    PubMed

    Scungio, Mauro; Buonanno, Giorgio; Stabile, Luca; Ficco, Giorgio

    2016-10-01

    The toxicity of particulate matter emitted from waste-to-energy plants, is associated to the compounds attached to the particles, several of which have been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in the Group 1 carcinogens. In this paper a modified risk-assessment model, deriving from an existing one, was applied to estimate the lung cancer risk related to both ultrafine and coarse particles emitted from an incinerator whose people living nearby are exposed to. To this end, the measured values of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), heavy metals (As, Cd, Ni) and PCDD/Fs (Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans) emitted from an incinerator placed in Italy were used to calculate the Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk (ELCR) at the stack of the plant. The estimated ELCR was then used as input data in a numerical CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model that solves the mass, momentum, turbulence and species transport equations to study the influence of wind speed and chimney height on the ELCR at receptor sites. Furthermore, combining meteorological data (wind speed and direction), and hypothesizing different exposure scenarios on the basis of time-activity patterns of people living nearby the plant, specific risk maps were obtained by evaluating ELCR around the incinerator. Results show that with the increasing of wind speed, the ELCR value downwind at the plant decreases and its point of maximum risk becomes closer to the stack. On the other hand, increasing the stack height decreases the ELCR, moving away from the stack the point of maximum risk. Finally, the risk maps for people living or working nearby the plant have highlighted that the excess risk of lung cancer due to the presence of the incinerator is below the WHO target (1×10(-5)). PMID:27462027

  6. Lung cancer risk assessment at receptor site of a waste-to-energy plant.

    PubMed

    Scungio, Mauro; Buonanno, Giorgio; Stabile, Luca; Ficco, Giorgio

    2016-10-01

    The toxicity of particulate matter emitted from waste-to-energy plants, is associated to the compounds attached to the particles, several of which have been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in the Group 1 carcinogens. In this paper a modified risk-assessment model, deriving from an existing one, was applied to estimate the lung cancer risk related to both ultrafine and coarse particles emitted from an incinerator whose people living nearby are exposed to. To this end, the measured values of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), heavy metals (As, Cd, Ni) and PCDD/Fs (Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans) emitted from an incinerator placed in Italy were used to calculate the Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk (ELCR) at the stack of the plant. The estimated ELCR was then used as input data in a numerical CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model that solves the mass, momentum, turbulence and species transport equations to study the influence of wind speed and chimney height on the ELCR at receptor sites. Furthermore, combining meteorological data (wind speed and direction), and hypothesizing different exposure scenarios on the basis of time-activity patterns of people living nearby the plant, specific risk maps were obtained by evaluating ELCR around the incinerator. Results show that with the increasing of wind speed, the ELCR value downwind at the plant decreases and its point of maximum risk becomes closer to the stack. On the other hand, increasing the stack height decreases the ELCR, moving away from the stack the point of maximum risk. Finally, the risk maps for people living or working nearby the plant have highlighted that the excess risk of lung cancer due to the presence of the incinerator is below the WHO target (1×10(-5)).

  7. Improvement in lung diffusion by endothelin A receptor blockade at high altitude.

    PubMed

    de Bisschop, Claire; Martinot, Jean-Benoit; Leurquin-Sterk, Gil; Faoro, Vitalie; Guénard, Hervé; Naeije, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Lung diffusing capacity has been reported variably in high-altitude newcomers and may be in relation to different pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Twenty-two healthy volunteers were investigated at sea level and at 5,050 m before and after random double-blind intake of the endothelin A receptor blocker sitaxsentan (100 mg/day) vs. a placebo during 1 wk. PVR was estimated by Doppler echocardiography, and exercise capacity by maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2 max)). The diffusing capacities for nitric oxide (DL(NO)) and carbon monoxide (DL(CO)) were measured using a single-breath method before and 30 min after maximal exercise. The membrane component of DL(CO) (Dm) and capillary volume (Vc) was calculated with corrections for hemoglobin, alveolar volume, and barometric pressure. Altitude exposure was associated with unchanged DL(CO), DL(NO), and Dm but a slight decrease in Vc. Exercise at altitude decreased DL(NO) and Dm. Sitaxsentan intake improved Vo(2 max) together with an increase in resting and postexercise DL(NO) and Dm. Sitaxsentan-induced decrease in PVR was inversely correlated to DL(NO). Both DL(CO) and DL(NO) were correlated to Vo(2 max) at sea level (r = 0.41-0.42, P < 0.1) and more so at altitude (r = 0.56-0.59, P < 0.05). Pharmacological pulmonary vasodilation improves the membrane component of lung diffusion in high-altitude newcomers, which may contribute to exercise capacity.

  8. Effect of IL-2-Bax, a novel interleukin-2-receptor-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin lung injury1

    PubMed Central

    Segel, Michael J; Aqeilan, Rami; Zilka, Keren; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya; Wallach-Dayan, Shulamit B; Conner, Michael W; Christensen, Thomas G; Breuer, Raphael

    2005-01-01

    The role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis is not clear, but the weight of the evidence supports a pro-fibrotic effect for lymphocytes. The high-affinity interleukin-2 receptor (haIL-2R) is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T lymphocytes. This selective expression of haIL-2R provides the basis for therapeutic strategies that target IL-2R-expressing cells. We hypothesized that elimination of activated lymphocytes by IL-2R-targeted chimeric proteins might ameliorate lung fibrosis. We investigated the effects of IL-2-Bax, a novel apoptosis-inducing IL-2R-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. Treatment groups included (i) a single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin and twice-daily intraperitoneal injections of IL-2-Bax; (ii) intratracheal bleomycin and intraperitoneal IL-2-PE664Glu, an older-generation chimeric protein; (iii) intratracheal bleomycin/intraperitoneal PBS; (iv) intratracheal saline/intraperitoneal PBS. Lung injury was evaluated 14 days after intratracheal instillation by cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, semi-quantitative and quantitative histomorphological measurements and by biochemical analysis of lung hydroxyproline. Bleomycin induced a BAL lymphocytosis that was significantly attenuated by IL-2-Bax and IL-2-PE664Glu. However, morphometric parameters and lung hydroxyproline were unaffected by the chimeric proteins. These results show that IL-2-Bax reduces the lymphocytic infiltration of the lungs in response to bleomycin, but this effect is not accompanied by a decrease in lung fibrosis. PMID:16191100

  9. Yersinia pestis activates both IL-1β and IL-1 receptor antagonist to modulate lung inflammation during pneumonic plague.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, Vijay; Pechous, Roger D; Stasulli, Nikolas M; Eichelberger, Kara R; Miao, Edward A; Goldman, William E

    2015-03-01

    Pneumonic plague is the most rapid and lethal form of Yersinia pestis infection. Increasing evidence suggests that Y. pestis employs multiple levels of innate immune evasion and/or suppression to produce an early "pre-inflammatory" phase of pulmonary infection, after which the disease is highly inflammatory in the lung and 100% fatal. In this study, we show that IL-1β/IL-18 cytokine activation occurs early after bacteria enter the lung, and this activation eventually contributes to pulmonary inflammation and pathology during the later stages of infection. However, the inflammatory effects of IL-1β/IL-1-receptor ligation are not observed during this first stage of pneumonic plague. We show that Y. pestis also activates the induction of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), and this activation likely contributes to the ability of Y. pestis to establish the initial pre-inflammatory phase of disease.

  10. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  11. Chitinase 3-like-1 and its receptors in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome-associated lung disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; He, Chuan Hua; Herzog, Erica L; Peng, Xueyan; Lee, Chang-Min; Nguyen, Tung H; Gulati, Mridu; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Gahl, William A; Slade, Martin L; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A

    2015-08-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) comprises a group of inherited disorders caused by mutations that alter the function of lysosome-related organelles. Pulmonary fibrosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with subtypes HPS-1 and HPS-4, which both result from defects in biogenesis of lysosome-related organelle complex 3 (BLOC-3). The prototypic chitinase-like protein chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1) plays a protective role in the lung by ameliorating cell death and stimulating fibroproliferative repair. Here, we demonstrated that circulating CHI3L1 levels are higher in HPS patients with pulmonary fibrosis compared with those who remain fibrosis free, and that these levels associate with disease severity. Using murine HPS models, we also determined that these animals have a defect in the ability of CHI3L1 to inhibit epithelial apoptosis but exhibit exaggerated CHI3L1-driven fibroproliferation, which together promote HPS fibrosis. These divergent responses resulted from differences in the trafficking and effector functions of two CHI3L1 receptors. Specifically, the enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis was due to abnormal localization of IL-13Rα2 as a consequence of dysfunctional BLOC-3-dependent membrane trafficking. In contrast, the fibrosis was due to interactions between CHI3L1 and the receptor CRTH2, which trafficked normally in BLOC-3 mutant HPS. These data demonstrate that CHI3L1-dependent pathways exacerbate pulmonary fibrosis and suggest CHI3L1 as a potential biomarker for pulmonary fibrosis progression and severity in HPS. PMID:26121745

  12. Targeting of the prostacyclin specific IP1 receptor in lungs with molecular conjugates comprising prostaglandin I2 analogues.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Johannes; Aneja, Manish K; Hasenpusch, Günther; Yüksekdag, Gülnihal; Kummerlöwe, Grit; Luy, Burkhard; Romer, Tina; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Rudolph, Carsten

    2010-04-01

    Molecular conjugates comprising targeting ligands hold great promise for site-specific gene delivery to distant tumors and individual organs including the lung. Here we show that prostaglandin I2 analogues can be used to improve gene transfer efficiency of polyethylenimine (PEI) gene vectors on bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells in vitro and lungs of mice in vivo. Prostacyclin (IP1) receptor expression was confirmed in pulmonary epithelial cell lines by western blot. Iloprost (ILO) and treprostinil (TRP), two prostaglandin I2 analogues, were conjugated to fluorescein-labeled BSA (FLUO-BSA) and compared for IP1 receptor binding/uptake in different lung cell lines. Binding of FLUO-BSA-ILO was 2-4-fold higher than for FLUO-BSA-TRP and could be specifically inhibited by free ILO and IP1 receptor antagonist CAY10449. Internalization of FLUO-BSA-ILO was confirmed by confocal microscopy. Molecular conjugates of PEI and ILO (PEI-g-ILO) were synthesized with increasing coupling degree (F(ILO) (ILO:PEI) = 2, 5, 8, 16) and analyzed for DNA binding, particle formation and transfection efficiency. At optimized conditions (N/P 4, F(ILO) = 5), gene expression using PEI-g-ILO was significantly up to 46-fold higher than for PEI gene vectors and specifically inhibited by CAY10449. Gene expression in the lungs of mice after aerosol delivery was 14-fold higher with PEI-g-ILO F(ILO) = 5 than for PEI. We suggest that targeting of IP1 receptor using ILO represents a promising approach to improve pulmonary gene transfer.

  13. Targeting of the prostacyclin specific IP1 receptor in lungs with molecular conjugates comprising prostaglandin I2 analogues.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Johannes; Aneja, Manish K; Hasenpusch, Günther; Yüksekdag, Gülnihal; Kummerlöwe, Grit; Luy, Burkhard; Romer, Tina; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Rudolph, Carsten

    2010-04-01

    Molecular conjugates comprising targeting ligands hold great promise for site-specific gene delivery to distant tumors and individual organs including the lung. Here we show that prostaglandin I2 analogues can be used to improve gene transfer efficiency of polyethylenimine (PEI) gene vectors on bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells in vitro and lungs of mice in vivo. Prostacyclin (IP1) receptor expression was confirmed in pulmonary epithelial cell lines by western blot. Iloprost (ILO) and treprostinil (TRP), two prostaglandin I2 analogues, were conjugated to fluorescein-labeled BSA (FLUO-BSA) and compared for IP1 receptor binding/uptake in different lung cell lines. Binding of FLUO-BSA-ILO was 2-4-fold higher than for FLUO-BSA-TRP and could be specifically inhibited by free ILO and IP1 receptor antagonist CAY10449. Internalization of FLUO-BSA-ILO was confirmed by confocal microscopy. Molecular conjugates of PEI and ILO (PEI-g-ILO) were synthesized with increasing coupling degree (F(ILO) (ILO:PEI) = 2, 5, 8, 16) and analyzed for DNA binding, particle formation and transfection efficiency. At optimized conditions (N/P 4, F(ILO) = 5), gene expression using PEI-g-ILO was significantly up to 46-fold higher than for PEI gene vectors and specifically inhibited by CAY10449. Gene expression in the lungs of mice after aerosol delivery was 14-fold higher with PEI-g-ILO F(ILO) = 5 than for PEI. We suggest that targeting of IP1 receptor using ILO represents a promising approach to improve pulmonary gene transfer. PMID:20045181

  14. IL-6 Receptor Is a Possible Target against Growth of Metastasized Lung Tumor Cells in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Mami; Yamakawa, Yukiko; Matsunaga, Naoya; Naoe, Satoko; Jodoi, Taishi; Yamafuji, Megumi; Akimoto, Nozomi; Teramoto, Norihiro; Fujita, Kyota; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Iguchi, Haruo

    2013-01-01

    In the animal model of brain metastasis using human lung squamous cell carcinoma-derived cells (HARA-B) inoculated into the left ventricle of the heart of nude mice, metastasized tumor cells and brain resident cells interact with each other. Among them, tumor cells and astrocytes have been reported to stimulate each other, releasing soluble factors from both sides, subsequently promoting tumor growth significantly. Among the receptors for soluble factors released from astrocytes, only IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) on tumor cells was up-regulated during the activation with astrocytes. Application of monoclonal antibody against human IL-6R (tocilizumab) to the activated HARA-B cells, the growth of HARA-B cells stimulated by the conditioned medium of HARA-B/astrocytes was significantly inhibited. Injecting tocilizumab to animal models of brain metastasis starting at three weeks of inoculation of HARA-B cells, two times a week for three weeks, significantly inhibited the size of the metastasized tumor foci. The up-regulated expression of IL-6R on metastasized lung tumor cells was also observed in the tissue from postmortem patients. These results suggest that IL-6R on metastasized lung tumor cells would be a therapeutic target to inhibit the growth of the metastasized lung tumor cells in the brain. PMID:23271367

  15. Lung Injury and Lung Cancer Caused by Cigarette Smoke-Induced Oxidative Stress: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities Involving the Ceramide-Generating Machinery and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Filosto, Simone; Chung, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are frequently caused by tobacco smoking. However, these diseases present opposite phenotypes involving redox signaling at the cellular level. While COPD is characterized by excessive airway epithelial cell death and lung injury, lung cancer is caused by uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation. Notably, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that lung cancer incidence is significantly higher in patients who have preexisting emphysema/lung injury. However, the molecular link and common cell signaling events underlying lung injury diseases and lung cancer are poorly understood. This review focuses on studies of molecular mechanism(s) underlying smoking-related lung injury (COPD) and lung cancer. Specifically, the role of the ceramide-generating machinery during cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress leading to both apoptosis and proliferation of lung epithelial cells is emphasized. Over recent years, it has been established that ceramide is a sphingolipid playing a major role in lung epithelia structure/function leading to lung injury in chronic pulmonary diseases. However, new and unexpected findings draw attention to its potential role in lung development, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. To address this dichotomy in detail, evidence is presented regarding several protein targets, including Src, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and neutral sphingomyelinase 2, the major sphingomyelinase that controls ceramide generation during oxidative stress. Furthermore, their roles are presented not only in apoptosis and lung injury but also in enhancing cell proliferation, lung cancer development, and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for treating lung cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2149–2174. PMID:24684526

  16. Toll-like receptor 4-dependent responses to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Hoth, J Jason; Wells, Jonathan D; Brownlee, Noel A; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Meredith, J Wayne; McCall, Charles E; Yoza, Barbara K

    2009-04-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We previously demonstrated that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. We hypothesized that the TLR-4, in an MyD88-dependent manner, may also participate in the response to lung injury. To investigate this, we used a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans and evaluated postinjury lung function, pulmonary neutrophil recruitment, and the systemic innate immune response. Comparisons were made between wild-type mice and mice deficient in TLR-4 or MyD88. We found TLR-4-dependent responses to pulmonary contusion that include hypoxemia, edema, and neutrophil infiltration. Increased expression of IL-6 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 in the bronchoalveolar lavage and serum was also dependent on TLR-4 activation. We further demonstrated that these responses to pulmonary contusion were dependent on MyD88, an adapter protein in the signal transduction pathway mediated by TLRs. These results show that TLRs have a primary role in the response to acute lung injury. Lung inflammation and systemic innate immune responses are dependent on TLR activation by pulmonary contusion.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in adenocarcinoma lung in a North Indian population: Prevalence and relation with different clinical variables

    PubMed Central

    Kasana, Basharat Ahmad; Dar, Waseem Raja; Aziz, Sheikh Aijaz; Lone, Abdul Rashid; Sofi, Najeeb Ullah; Dar, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Latief, Muzamil; Arshad, Faheem; Hussain, Moomin; Hussain, Mir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Adenocarcinoma is taking over squamous cell lung cancer as the predominant histological subtype. Several cytotoxic drugs are available for the treatment of lung cancer, but side effects limit their use. Recently, targeted therapies for cancers have come into clinical practice. Aims and Objectives: To determine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in adenocarcinoma lung in a North Indian population and its relation with different clinical variables. Materials and Methods: A total of 57 patients who met inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Relevant history, clinical examination and investigations were done. EGFR mutation was done in all patients. Results: A total of twenty patients tested positive for EGFR mutation. EGFR was more frequently detected in female patients (53.8%), while as only 19.4% of the male patients expressed EGFR mutation, which was statistically very significant (P = 0.007). EGFR mutation was more frequently detected in nonsmokers (52%) as compared to smokers (21.9%) which also was statistically significant (P value of 0.018). EGFR mutation was more common in Stage III and IV adenocarcinomas (48%) as compared to Stage I and II (21.4%) which was statistically significant (P value 0.034). Conclusion: EGFR mutation should be routinely done in all patients of adenocarcinoma lung particularly non-smoker females with Stage III and IV disease. PMID:27688613

  18. Miliary never-smoking adenocarcinoma of the lung: strong association with epidermal growth factor receptor exon 19 deletion.

    PubMed

    Laack, Eckart; Simon, Ronald; Regier, Marc; Andritzky, Birte; Tennstedt, Pierre; Habermann, Christian; Verth, Christoph Zur; Thöm, Ina; Grob, Tobias; Sauter, Guido; Bokemeyer, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Miliary pattern of pulmonary metastases is a rarity in patients with lung cancer. We report five cases of patients with a never-smoking adenocarcinoma of the lung with such a pattern of metastases. In the tumor cells of all five patients, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation gene sequencing identified a deletion in exon 19 of the EGFR gene, and all five patients had a dramatic response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. No echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation was detected. We believe that the miliary never-soking adenocarcinoma of the lung is a distinct clinically relevant subgroup of the never-smoking non-small cell lung cancer. Physician should recognize this subgroup of patients with lung cancer when facing a picture of miliary pulmonary metastases in chest x-ray or computed tomography scan in patients with a history of never smoking and consider upfront therapy with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:21178715

  19. The effect of albumin on podocytes: The role of the fatty acid moiety and the potential role of CD36 scavenger receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pawluczyk, I.Z.A.; Pervez, A.; Ghaderi Najafabadi, M.; Saleem, M.A.; Topham, P.S.

    2014-08-15

    Evidence is emerging that podocytes are able to endocytose proteins such as albumin using kinetics consistent with a receptor-mediated process. To date the role of the fatty acid moiety on albumin uptake kinetics has not been delineated and the receptor responsible for uptake is yet to be identified. Albumin uptake studies were carried out on cultured human podocytes exposed to FITC-labelled human serum albumin either carrying fatty acids (HSA{sub +FA}) or depleted of them (HSA{sub −FA}). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of FITC-HSA{sub +FA} over 60 min was 5 times greater than that of FITC-HSA{sub −FA}. 24 h exposure of podocytes to albumin up-regulated nephrin expression and induced the activation of caspase-3. These effects were more pronounced in response to HSA{sub −FA.} Individually, anti-CD36 antibodies had no effect upon endocytosis of FITC-HSA. However, a cocktail of 2 antibodies reduced uptake by nearly 50%. Albumin endocytosis was enhanced in the presence of the CD36 specific inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO) while knock-down of CD36 using CD36siRNA had no effect on uptake. These data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by podocytes is regulated by the fatty acid moiety, although, some of the detrimental effects are induced independently of it. CD36 does not play a direct role in the uptake of albumin. - Highlights: • The fatty acid moiety is essential for receptor mediated endocytosis of albumin. • Fatty acid depleted albumin is more pathogenic to podocytes. • CD36 is not directly involved in albumin uptake by podocytes.

  20. Heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex demonstrated by the selective antagonist AF-DX 116

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Seaver, N.A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the majority of muscarinic receptors in rabbit peripheral lung homogenates bind pirenzepine with high affinity (putative M1 subtype). In experiments of AF-DX 116 inhibiting (TH)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (TH)pirenzepine, the authors found similar inhibitory constants for AF-DX 116 binding in rat heart and rabbit peripheral lung that were 4-fold smaller (i.e. of higher affinity) than the inhibitory constant for rat cerebral cortex. This results demonstrates heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex. 20 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  1. Toll-like receptor 4 knockout ameliorates neuroinflammation due to lung-brain interaction in mechanically ventilated mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Chen, Chang; Zhang, Zongze; Zou, Yufeng; Peng, Mian; Wang, Yanlin

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a crucial receptor in the innate immune system, and increasing evidence supports its role in inflammation, stress, and tissue injury, including injury to the lung and brain. We aimed to investigate the effects of TLR4 on neuroinflammation due to the lung-brain interaction in mechanically ventilated mice. Male wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 and TLR4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were divided into three groups: (1) control group (C): spontaneous breathing; (2) anesthesia group (A): spontaneous breathing under anesthesia; and (3) mechanical ventilation group (MV): 6h of MV under anesthesia. The behavioral responses of mice were tested with fear conditioning tests. The histological changes in the lung and brain were assessed using hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The level of TLR4 mRNA in tissue was measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the TLR4 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus were measured by double immunofluorescence. MV mice exhibited impaired cognition, and this impairment was less severe in TLR4 KO mice than in WT mice. In WT mice, MV increased TLR4 mRNA expression in the lung and brain. MV induced mild lung injury, which was prevented in TLR4 KO mice. MV mice exhibited increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, increased microglia and astrocyte activation. Microgliosis was alleviated in TLR4 KO mice. MV mice exhibited increased TLR4 immunoreactivity, which was expressed in microglia and astrocytes. These results demonstrate that TLR4 is involved in neuroinflammation due to the lung-brain interaction and that TLR4 KO ameliorates neuroinflammation due to lung-brain interaction after prolonged MV. In addition, Administration of a TLR4 antagonist (100μg/mice) to WT mice also significantly attenuated neuroinflammation of lung-brain interaction due to prolonged MV. TLR4 antagonism

  2. Early growth response-1 suppresses epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated airway hyperresponsiveness and lung remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Elizabeth L; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Pastura, Patricia A; Acciani, Thomas H; Deutsch, Gail H; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Hardie, William D; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2009-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha and its receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor, are induced after lung injury and are associated with remodeling in chronic pulmonary diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis and asthma. Expression of TGF-alpha in the lungs of adult mice causes fibrosis, pleural thickening, and pulmonary hypertension, in addition to increased expression of a transcription factor, early growth response-1 (Egr-1). Egr-1 was increased in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and the vascular adventitia in the lungs of mice conditionally expressing TGF-alpha in airway epithelium (Clara cell secretory protein-rtTA(+/-)/[tetO](7)-TGF-alpha(+/-)). The goal of this study was to determine the role of Egr-1 in TGF-alpha-induced lung disease. To accomplish this, TGF-alpha-transgenic mice were crossed to Egr-1 knockout (Egr-1(ko/ko)) mice. The lack of Egr-1 markedly increased the severity of TGF-alpha-induced pulmonary disease, dramatically enhancing airway muscularization, increasing pulmonary fibrosis, and causing greater airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Smooth muscle hyperplasia, not hypertrophy, caused the ASM thickening in the absence of Egr-1. No detectable increases in pulmonary inflammation were found. In addition to the airway remodeling disease, vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension were also more severe in Egr-1(ko/ko) mice. Thus, Egr-1 acts to suppress epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated airway and vascular muscularization, fibrosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness in the absence of inflammation. This provides a unique model to study the processes causing pulmonary fibrosis and ASM thickening without the complicating effects of inflammation.

  3. Association between vascular-poor area of primary tumors and epidermal growth factor receptor gene status in advanced lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yosuke; Masago, Katsuhiro; Kubo, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Daichi; Sakamori, Yuichi; Nagai, Hiroki; Kim, Young Hak; Togashi, Kaori; Mishima, Michiaki

    2012-12-01

    Mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR mutation) is a very important marker in the treatment for non-small cell lung cancer. Since signaling from this receptor induces tumor-associated angiogenesis, we hypothesized that lung cancers with EGFR mutations tend to develop locally with increased angiogenesis. Thus, the association between vascular-poor area of primary tumors and EGFR status was retrospectively investigated in advanced lung adenocarcinomas. To assess vascular-poor area, contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans taken before initial treatment for lung cancer were analyzed, together with primary tumor location (peripheral or central) and size. We analyzed 178 patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. EGFR mutations were detected in 95 of the 178 patients (53.4 %). EGFR mutation was found to be significantly related to women (P = 0.0070), never-smokers (P < 0.0001), and tumors without vascular-poor area (P < 0.0001). Based on a multivariate analysis, presence of EGFR mutations was independently associated with never-smokers (P = 0.0046), lack of vascular-poor area (P = 0.0001), and tumor size >30 mm (P = 0.0080). EGFR mutations were found in 41 of 51 never-smokers without vascular-poor area (80.4 %), 19 of 36 never-smokers with vascular-poor area (52.8 %), 19 of 37 current or former-smokers without vascular-poor area (51.4 %), and 16 of 54 current or former-smokers with vascular-poor area (29.6 %). This study showed an association between vascular-poor area of primary tumors and EGFR status. As a consequence, evaluation using a combination of smoking status and vascular-poor area allows us to predict presence of EGFR mutations at a high frequency.

  4. Ablation of Liver X receptors α and β leads to spontaneous peripheral squamous cell lung cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu-Bing; Miao, Yi-Fei; Wu, Wan-Fu; Li, Yu; D'Errico, Francesca; Su, Wen; Burns, Alan R; Huang, Bo; Maneix, Laure; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2016-07-01

    The etiology of peripheral squamous cell lung cancer (PSCCa) remains unknown. Here, we show that this condition spontaneously develops in mice in which the genes for two oxysterol receptors, Liver X Receptor (LXR) α (Nr1h3) and β (Nr1h2), are inactivated. By 1 y of age, most of these mice have to be euthanized because of severe dyspnea. Starting at 3 mo, the lungs of LXRα,β(Dko) mice, but not of LXRα or LXRβ single knockout mice, progressively accumulate foam cells, so that by 1 y, the lungs are covered by a "golden coat." There is infiltration of inflammatory cells and progressive accumulation of lipid in the alveolar wall, type 2 pneumocytes, and macrophages. By 14 mo, there are three histological lesions: one resembling adenomatous hyperplasia, one squamous metaplasia, and one squamous cell carcinoma characterized by expression of transformation-related protein (p63), sex determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2), cytokeratin 14 (CK14), and cytokeratin 13 (CK13) and absence of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), and prosurfactant protein C (pro-SPC). RNA sequencing analysis at 12 mo confirmed a massive increase in markers of M1 macrophages and lymphocytes. The data suggest a previously unidentified etiology of PSCCa: cholesterol dysregulation and M1 macrophage-predominant lung inflammation combined with damage to, and aberrant repair of, lung tissue, particularly the peripheral parenchyma. The results raise the possibility that components of the LXR signaling may be useful targets in the treatment of PSCCa. PMID:27335465

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 of 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.

  6. Towards predicting the lung fibrogenic activity of MWCNT: Key role of endocytosis, kinase receptors and ERK 1/2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Vietti, Giulia; Ibouraadaten, Saloua; Palmai-Pallag, Mihaly; Yakoub, Yousof; Piret, Jean-Pascal; Marbaix, Etienne; Lison, Dominique; van den Brule, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been reported to induce lung inflammation and fibrosis in rodents. We investigated the direct and indirect cellular mechanisms mediating the fibrogenic activity of multi-wall (MW) CNT on fibroblasts. We showed that MWCNT indirectly stimulate lung fibroblast (MLg) differentiation, via epithelial cells and macrophages, whereas no direct effect of MWCNT on fibroblast differentiation or collagen production was detected. MWCNT directly stimulated the proliferation of fibroblasts primed with low concentrations of growth factors, such as PDGF, TGF-β or EGF. MWCNT prolonged ERK 1/2 phosphorylation induced by low concentrations of PDGF or TGF-β in fibroblasts. This phenomenon and the proliferative activity of MWCNT on fibroblasts was abrogated by the inhibitors of ERK 1/2, PDGF-, TGF-β- and EGF-receptors. This activity was also reduced by amiloride, an endocytosis inhibitor. Finally, the lung fibrotic response to several MWCNT samples (different in length and diameter) correlated with their in vitro capacity to stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts and to prolong ERK 1/2 signaling in these cells. Our findings point to a crosstalk between MWCNT, kinase receptors, ERK 1/2 signaling and endocytosis which stimulates the proliferation of fibroblasts. The mechanisms of action identified in this study contribute to predict the fibrogenic potential of MWCNT.

  7. A Geometric Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Julie; Marshall, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Children possess a genuine curiosity for exploring the natural world around them. One third grade teacher capitalized on this inherent trait by leading her students on "A Geometric Scavenger Hunt." The four-lesson inquiry investigation described in this article integrates mathematics and science. Among the students' discoveries was the fact that…

  8. A Geospatial Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Adriana E.; Williams, Nikki A.; Metoyer, Sandra K.; Morris, Jennifer N.; Berhane, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of technology such as Global Positioning System (GPS) units and Google Earth for a simple-machine scavenger hunt, you will transform a standard identification activity into an exciting learning experience that motivates students, incorporates practical skills in technology, and enhances students' spatial-thinking skills. In the…

  9. Immune-Modulation by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors: Implication on Anti-Tumor Immunity in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Amanda C.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Hong, Waun Ki; Perez-Soler, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Skin toxicity is the most common toxicity caused by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, and has been associated with clinical efficacy. As EGFR inhibitors enhance the expression of antigen presenting molecules in affected skin keratinocytes, they may concurrently facilitate neo-antigen presentation in lung cancer tumor cells contributing to anti-tumor immunity. Here, we investigated the modulatory effect of the EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib on antigen presenting molecules and PD-L1, prominent immune checkpoint protein, of skin keratinocytes and lung cancer cell lines to delineate the link between EGFR signaling pathway inhibition and potential anti-tumor immunity. Erlotinib up-regulated MHC-I and MHC-II proteins on IFNγ treated keratinocytes but abrogated IFNγ-induced expression of PD-L1, suggesting the potential role of infiltrating autoreactive T cells in the damage of keratinocytes in affected skin. Interestingly, the surface expression of MHC-I, MHC-II, and PD-L1 was up-regulated in response to IFNγ more often in lung cancer cell lines sensitive to erlotinib, but only expression of PD-L1 was inhibited by erlotinib. Further, erlotinib significantly increased T cell mediated cytotoxicity on lung cancer cells. Lastly, the analysis of gene expression dataset of 186 lung cancer cell lines from Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia demonstrated that overexpression of PD-L1 was associated with sensitivity to erlotinib and higher expression of genes related to antigen presenting pathways and IFNγ signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that the EGFR inhibitors can facilitate anti-tumor adaptive immune responses by breaking tolerance especially in EGFR driven lung cancer that are associated with overexpression of PD-L1 and genes related to antigen presentation and inflammation. PMID:27467256

  10. Immune-Modulation by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors: Implication on Anti-Tumor Immunity in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Im, Jin S; Herrmann, Amanda C; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Hong, Waun Ki; Perez-Soler, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Skin toxicity is the most common toxicity caused by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, and has been associated with clinical efficacy. As EGFR inhibitors enhance the expression of antigen presenting molecules in affected skin keratinocytes, they may concurrently facilitate neo-antigen presentation in lung cancer tumor cells contributing to anti-tumor immunity. Here, we investigated the modulatory effect of the EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib on antigen presenting molecules and PD-L1, prominent immune checkpoint protein, of skin keratinocytes and lung cancer cell lines to delineate the link between EGFR signaling pathway inhibition and potential anti-tumor immunity. Erlotinib up-regulated MHC-I and MHC-II proteins on IFNγ treated keratinocytes but abrogated IFNγ-induced expression of PD-L1, suggesting the potential role of infiltrating autoreactive T cells in the damage of keratinocytes in affected skin. Interestingly, the surface expression of MHC-I, MHC-II, and PD-L1 was up-regulated in response to IFNγ more often in lung cancer cell lines sensitive to erlotinib, but only expression of PD-L1 was inhibited by erlotinib. Further, erlotinib significantly increased T cell mediated cytotoxicity on lung cancer cells. Lastly, the analysis of gene expression dataset of 186 lung cancer cell lines from Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia demonstrated that overexpression of PD-L1 was associated with sensitivity to erlotinib and higher expression of genes related to antigen presenting pathways and IFNγ signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that the EGFR inhibitors can facilitate anti-tumor adaptive immune responses by breaking tolerance especially in EGFR driven lung cancer that are associated with overexpression of PD-L1 and genes related to antigen presentation and inflammation. PMID:27467256

  11. Intra-Peritoneal Administration of Mitochondrial DNA Provokes Acute Lung Injury and Systemic Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 9.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lemeng; Deng, Songyun; Zhao, Shuangping; Ai, Yuhang; Zhang, Lina; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Tan, Hongyi; Wu, Dongdong

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of sepsis is complex. Mitochondrial dysfunction, which is responsible for energy metabolism, intrinsic apoptotic pathway, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammatory responses, is closely related with severe sepsis induced death. Mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) contain un-methylated cytosine phosphate guanine (CpG) motifs, which exhibit immune stimulatory capacities. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanism of mtDNA release on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic inflammation. Following LPS injection, plasma mtDNA copies peak at 8 h. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, mtDNA in toll like receptor 4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were significantly decreased. MtDNA intra-peritoneal administration causes apparent ALI as demonstrated by increased lung injury score, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) total protein and wet/dry (W/D) ratio; mtDNA injection also directly provokes systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by increased IL-1β, IL-6, high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) level; while nuclear DNA (nDNA) could not induce apparent ALI and systemic inflammation. However, compared with WT mice, TLR4 KO could not protect from mtDNA induced ALI and systemic inflammation. Specific TLR9 inhibitor, ODN 2088 pretreatment can significantly attenuate mtDNA induced ALI and systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by improved lung injury score, decreased lung wet/dry ratio, BALF total protein concentration, and decreased systemic level of IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB1. MtDNA administration activates the expression of p-P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in lung tissue and specific TLR9 inhibitor pretreatment can attenuate this activation. Thus, LPS-induced mtDNA release occurs in a TLR4-dependent manner, and mtDNA causes acute lung injury and systemic inflammation in a TLR9-dependent and TLR4-independent manner. PMID:27589725

  12. Intra-Peritoneal Administration of Mitochondrial DNA Provokes Acute Lung Injury and Systemic Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 9

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lemeng; Deng, Songyun; Zhao, Shuangping; Ai, Yuhang; Zhang, Lina; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Tan, Hongyi; Wu, Dongdong

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of sepsis is complex. Mitochondrial dysfunction, which is responsible for energy metabolism, intrinsic apoptotic pathway, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammatory responses, is closely related with severe sepsis induced death. Mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) contain un-methylated cytosine phosphate guanine (CpG) motifs, which exhibit immune stimulatory capacities. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanism of mtDNA release on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic inflammation. Following LPS injection, plasma mtDNA copies peak at 8 h. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, mtDNA in toll like receptor 4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were significantly decreased. MtDNA intra-peritoneal administration causes apparent ALI as demonstrated by increased lung injury score, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) total protein and wet/dry (W/D) ratio; mtDNA injection also directly provokes systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by increased IL-1β, IL-6, high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) level; while nuclear DNA (nDNA) could not induce apparent ALI and systemic inflammation. However, compared with WT mice, TLR4 KO could not protect from mtDNA induced ALI and systemic inflammation. Specific TLR9 inhibitor, ODN 2088 pretreatment can significantly attenuate mtDNA induced ALI and systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by improved lung injury score, decreased lung wet/dry ratio, BALF total protein concentration, and decreased systemic level of IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB1. MtDNA administration activates the expression of p-P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in lung tissue and specific TLR9 inhibitor pretreatment can attenuate this activation. Thus, LPS-induced mtDNA release occurs in a TLR4-dependent manner, and mtDNA causes acute lung injury and systemic inflammation in a TLR9-dependent and TLR4-independent manner. PMID:27589725

  13. Roles of genotypes of beta2-adrenergic receptor in the relationship between eosinophil counts and lung function in Taiwanese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Chu; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Shen, Chen-Yang; Lei, Huan-Yao; Guo, Yueliang Leon; Su, Huey-Jen

    2003-05-01

    To examine the roles of genetic polymorphism of the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) in the relationship between eosinophil (EOS) counts and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) counts and lung function, we recruited a random sample from the 1996 nationwide survey of asthma prevalence in middle school children. A total of 149 subjects--42 asthmatic children, 38 asthmatics in remission (no reported attack for more than 12 months), and 69 nonasthmatics--completed a physical evaluation, pulmonary function test, and determination of EOS, ECP, and beta2AR genotypes at amino acids 16 and 27. Asthmatic children had higher EOS and ECP than did nonasthmatics. No association was found between asthma and beta2AR genotypes. Lung function was significantly and inversely correlated with EOS but not with ECP in asthmatic children. By genotype, an inverse correlation between lung function and EOS was found in asthmatic children with Arg16Arg or Gln27Glu. A nonsignificant but similar inverse correlation was found in asthmatic children with Arg16Gly or Gln27Gln. However, a nonsignificant but positive correlation was found in asthmatic children with Gly16Gly. In conclusion, we suggest that EOS is a better clinical indicator of airway inflammation than ECP when children are not having an asthma attack. The association between an increase of EOS and lower lung function can be differentiated by beta2AR genotypes at amino acid 16.

  14. Type I interferons induce lung protease responses following respiratory syncytial virus infection via RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Foronjy, Robert F.; Taggart, Clifford C.; Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Weldon, Sinéad; Cummins, Neville; Geraghty, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The role of proteases in viral infection of the lung is poorly understood. Thus, we examined MMP and cathepsin proteases in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infected mouse lungs. RSV induced gene expression for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) -2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -10, -12, -13, -14, -16, -17, -19, -20, -25, -27, -28 and cathepsins B, C, E, G, H, K, L1, S, W and Z in the airways of FVB/NJ mice. Increased proteases were present in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue during infection. Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (Mavs) and Trif deficient mice were exposed to RSV. Mavs deficient mice had significantly lower expression of airway MMP-2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -10, -12, -13 and -28 and cathepsins C, G, K, S, W and Z. In lung epithelial cells, retinoic acid–inducible gene-1 (RIG-I) was identified as the major RIG-I- like receptor (RLR) required for RSV induced protease expression via MAVS. Overexpression of RIG-I or treatment with IFN-β in these cells induced MMP and cathepsin gene and protein expression. The significance of RIG-1 protease induction was demonstrated by the fact that inhibiting proteases with batimastat, E64 or ribavirin prevented airway hyperresponsiveness and enhanced viral clearance in RSV infected mice. PMID:25005357

  15. Increased killer immunoglobulin-like receptor expression and functional defects in natural killer cells in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Omar, Suliman Y; Marshall, Ernie; Middleton, Derek; Christmas, Stephen E

    2011-05-01

    Frequencies of natural killer (NK) cells from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or small cell lung cancer (SCLC) did not differ from healthy controls. A higher proportion of NK cells from NSCLC patients expressed the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) CD158b than in controls (P = 0.0004), in the presence or absence of its ligand, HLA-C1. A similar result was obtained for CD158e in the presence of its ligand HLA-Bw4 in NSCLC patients (P = 0.003); this was entirely attributable to the Bw4I group of alleles in the presence of which a fivefold higher percentage of CD158e(+) NK cells was found in NSCLC patients than controls. Proportions of CD158b(+) NK cells declined with advancing disease in NSCLC patients. Expression of NKp46, CD25 and perforin A, and production of interferon-γ following stimulation with interleukin-12 and interleukin-18, were all significantly lower in NK cells from NSCLC patients than in controls. Both NK cell cytotoxicity and granzyme B expression were also reduced in lung cancer patients. Increased inhibitory KIR expression would decrease NK cell cytotoxic function against tumour cells retaining class I HLA expression. Furthermore, the reduced ability to produce interferon-γ would restrict the ability of NK cells to stimulate T-cell responses in patients with lung cancer.

  16. Expression of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the lungs and lymphoid tissue of pigs.

    PubMed

    Kuzemtseva, Liudmila; Pérez, Mónica; Mateu, Enric; Segalés, Joaquim; Darwich, Laila

    2015-02-01

    The pattern of distribution of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in different tissues varies between species. The aim of the present study was to describe the distribution of TLR9 expression in selected tissues and organs of healthy pigs at 3 weeks and 3 months of age. Representative formalin-fixed samples of lung, thymus and secondary lymphoid tissues were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. TLR9 positive staining was observed in epithelial cells, vascular endothelium and myoepithelial-like cells, as well as in cells of the alveolar septa of the lung. Antigen presenting cells of perifollicular zones (interdigitating, macrophage and dendritic-like cells) of the Peyer's patches, lymph nodes, spleen and thymus were also immunoreactive for TLR9. No differences were seen in TLR9 protein expression in tissues from the two age groups.

  17. Macrophage binding to receptor VCAM-1 transmits survival signals in breast cancer cells that invade the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.; Massagué, Joan

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Aberrant expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in breast cancer cells is associated with lung relapse, but the role of VCAM-1 as a mediator of metastasis has remained unknown. We report that VCAM-1 provides a survival advantage to breast cancer cells that infiltrate leukocyte-rich microenvironments such as the lungs. VCAM-1 tethers metastasis-associated macrophages to cancer cells via counter-receptor α4 integrins. Clustering of cell surface VCAM-1, acting through Ezrin, triggers Akt activation and protects cancer cells from pro-apoptotic cytokines such as TRAIL. This pro-survival function of VCAM-1 can be blocked by antibodies against α4 integrins. Thus, newly disseminated cancer cells expressing VCAM-1 can thrive in leukocyte-rich microenvironments through juxtacrine activation of a VCAM-1–Ezrin-PI3K/Akt survival pathway. PMID:22014578

  18. Sensitivity of bronchopulmonary receptors to cold and heat mediated by transient receptor potential cation channel subtypes in an ex vivo rat lung preparation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun; Sun, Biying; Li, Qian; Luo, Pin; Dong, Li; Rong, Weifang

    2011-08-15

    Changes in airway temperature can result in respiratory responses such as cough, bronchoconstriction and mucosal secretion after cold exposure and hyperventilation after heat exposure. In the present investigation, we examined the activity of bronchopulmonary receptors in response to activators of thermo-sensitive transient receptor potential (TS-TRP) cation channels using an ex vivo rat lung preparation. Receptive fields in small bronchioles were probed with von Frey hair monofilaments, warm (50°C) or cold (8°C) saline or saline containing TS-TRP agonists. Among 233 fibers tested, 159 (68.2%) responded to heat (50°C). A large proportion of heat-responsive receptors (107/145) were also activated by capsaicin. Heat and capsaicin-evoked responses were both blocked by TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine. Only 15.3% of airway receptors responded to cold, which was associated with sensitivity to TRPM8 agonist menthol but not to TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde (CA). Moreover, cold-evoked responses was unaffected by TRPA1 antagonist HC-03001. Our observations suggest that TRPV1 and TRPM8 are involved in transducing heat and cold in the lower respiratory tract, respectively.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells protect cigarette smoke-damaged lung and pulmonary function partly via VEGF-VEGF receptors.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiao-Jun; Song, Lin; Han, Feng-Feng; Cui, Zhi-Lei; Chen, Xi; Guo, Xue-Jun; Xu, Wei-Guo

    2013-02-01

    Progressive pulmonary inflammation and emphysema have been implicated in the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), while current pharmacological treatments are not effective. Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been identified as one such possible strategy for treatment of lung diseases including acute lung injury (ALI) and pulmonary fibrosis. However, their role in COPD still requires further investigation. The aim of this study is to test the effect of administration of rat MSCs (rMSCs) on emphysema and pulmonary function. To accomplish this study, the rats were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 11 weeks, followed by administration of rMSCs into the lungs. Here we show that rMSCs infusion mediates a down-regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, and IL-6) and proteases (MMP9 and MMP12) in lung, an up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor 2, and transforming growth factor (TGFβ-1), while reducing pulmonary cell apoptosis. More importantly, rMSCs administration improves emphysema and destructive pulmonary function induced by CS exposure. In vitro co-culture system study of human umbilical endothelial vein cells (EA.hy926) and human MSCs (hMSCs) provides the evidence that hMSCs mediates an anti-apoptosis effect, which partly depends on an up-regulation of VEGF. These findings suggest that MSCs have a therapeutic potential in emphysematous rats by suppressing the inflammatory response, excessive protease expression, and cell apoptosis, as well as up-regulating VEGF, VEGF receptor 2, and TGFβ-1. PMID:22949406

  20. Role of toll-like receptor 4 in acute neutrophilic lung inflammation induced by intratracheal bacterial products in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Wakako; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Koh, Hidefumi; Shimizu, Mie; Ogawa, Yuko; Hasegawa, Naoki; Miyasho, Taku; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Ishizaka, Akitoshi

    2008-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) represent a conserved family of innate immune recognition receptors. Among TLRs, TLR4 is important for the recognition of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas TLR2 recognizes cell wall constituents of Gram-positive microorganisms, such as peptidoglycan (PGN). Methods To evaluate the role of TLR4 in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) or PGN, we compared inflammatory cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung pathology between C3H/HeJ (TLR4 mutant) and wild-type C3H/HeN mice. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in plasma and BAL fluid and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation in the lung were also evaluated. Results In C3H/HeJ mice, LPS-induced neutrophil emigration was significantly decreased compared with C3H/HeN mice, whereas PGN-induced neutrophil emigration did not differ. Differential cell count in BAL fluid revealed comparable neutrophil recruitment in the alveolar space. In TLR4 mutant mice, LPS-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), KC, and CXCL10 in plasma and BAL fluid was attenuate, which was not different after PGN. NF-κB translocation in the lung was significantly decreased in C3H/HeJ compared with C3H/HeN mice, whereas PGN-induced NF-κB translocation was not different. Conclusion These results suggest that TLR4 mediates inflammatory cascade induced by Gram-negative bacteria that is locally administered. PMID:22096342

  1. Poor response to gefitinib in lung adenocarcinoma with concomitant epidermal growth factor receptor mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianya; Zheng, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Sheng, Yihong; Ding, Wei; Zhou, Jianying

    2015-03-01

    A patient presenting with concomitant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation is rare. We report a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient with concomitant ALK rearrangement and exon 19 (E746-A750del) EGFR mutation. The ALK rearrangement was confirmed not only in the primary tumor biopsy specimen, but also in the pleural effusion cell block by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Ventana ALK immunohistochemistry assay, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. No clinical benefit using chemotherapy or EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib was obtained in this case.

  2. An overlapping set of genes is regulated by both NFIB and the glucocorticoid receptor during lung maturation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lung maturation is a late fetal developmental event in both mice and humans. Because of this, lung immaturity is a serious problem in premature infants. Disruption of genes for either the glucocorticoid receptor (Nr3c1) or the NFIB transcription factors results in perinatal lethality due to lung immaturity. In both knockouts, the phenotype includes excess cell proliferation, failure of saccularization and reduced expression of markers of epithelial differentiation. This similarity suggests that the two genes may co-regulate a specific set of genes essential for lung maturation. Results We analyzed the roles of these two transcription factors in regulating transcription using ChIP-seq data for NFIB, and RNA expression data and motif analysis for both. Our new ChIP-seq data for NFIB in lung at E16.5 shows that NFIB binds to a NFI motif. This motif is over-represented in the promoters of genes that are under-expressed in Nfib-KO mice at E18.5, suggesting an activator role for NFIB. Using available microarray data from Nr3c1-KO mice, we further identified 52 genes that are under-expressed in both Nfib and Nr3c1 knockouts, an overlap which is 13.1 times larger than what would be expected by chance. Finally, we looked for enrichment of 738 recently published transcription factor motifs in the promoters of these putative target genes and found that the NFIB and glucocorticoid receptor motifs were among the most enriched, suggesting that a subset of these genes may be directly activated by Nfib and Nr3c1. Conclusions Our data provide the first evidence for Nfib and Nr3c1 co-regulating genes related to lung maturation. They also establish that the in vivo DNA-binding specificity of NFIB is the same as previously seen in vitro, and highly similar to that of the other NFI-family members NFIA, NFIC and NFIX. PMID:24661679

  3. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic plant-derived cannabinoid, decreases inflammation in a murine model of acute lung injury: role for the adenosine A(2A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Pinheiro, Milena L; Vitoretti, Luana B; Mariano-Souza, Domenica P; Quinteiro-Filho, Wanderley M; Akamine, Adriana T; Almeida, Vinícius I; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Hallak, Jaime E; Zuardi, Antônio W; Crippa, José A; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-03-01

    Acute lung injury is an inflammatory condition for which treatment is mainly supportive because effective therapies have not been developed. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid component of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), has potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the possible anti-inflammatory effect of cannabidiol in a murine model of acute lung injury. Analysis of total inflammatory cells and differential in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was used to characterize leukocyte migration into the lungs; myeloperoxidase activity of lung tissue and albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed by colorimetric assays; cytokine/chemokine production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was also analyzed by Cytometric Bead Arrays and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). A single dose of cannabidiol (20mg/kg) administered prior to the induction of LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced acute lung injury decreases leukocyte (specifically neutrophil) migration into the lungs, albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) 1, 2, and 4days after the induction of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Additionally, adenosine A(2A) receptor is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol on LPS-induced acute lung injury because ZM241385 (4-(2-[7-Amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol) (a highly selective antagonist of adenosine A(2A) receptor) abrogated all of the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol previously described. Thus, we show that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of acute lung injury and that this effect is most likely associated with an increase in the extracellular adenosine offer and signaling through adenosine A(2A) receptor.

  4. CXC Receptor 1 and 2 and Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors Alter Radiation-induced Lung Disease in the Mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Jessica; Haston, Christina K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We previously reported increased numbers of neutrophils to be associated with the development of the radiation-induced lung responses of alveolitis (pneumonitis) and fibrosis in mice. In the present study we investigated whether CXC receptor 1 and 2 antagonism with DF2156A, a small molecule inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis, or the neutrophil elastase inhibitor sivelestat decreases the lung response to irradiation. Methods and Materials: KK/HIJ mice received 14 Gy whole-thorax irradiation, and a subset of them received drug treatment 3 times per week from the day of irradiation until they were killed because of respiratory distress symptoms. Results: Irradiated mice receiving sivelestat survived 18% longer than did mice receiving radiation alone (73 vs 60 days for female mice, 91 vs 79 days for male mice), whereas postirradiation survival times did not differ between the group of mice receiving DF2156A and the radiation-only group. The numbers of neutrophils in lung tissue and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid did not differ among groups of irradiated mice, but they significantly exceeded the levels in unirradiated control mice. The extent of alveolitis, assessed histologically, did not differ between irradiated mice treated with either drug and those receiving radiation alone, when assessed at the end of the experiment, but it was significantly reduced, as were the neutrophil measures, in sivelestat-treated mice at the common kill time of 60 days after irradiation. Mice treated with radiation and DF2156A developed significantly less fibrosis than did mice receiving radiation alone, and this difference was associated with decreased expression of interleukin-13 in lung tissue. Conclusions: We conclude that neutrophil elastase inhibition affects alveolitis and prolongs survival, whereas CXCR1/2 antagonism reduces radiation-induced fibrotic lung disease in mice without affecting the onset of distress.

  5. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a mediator of lung toxicity for coal fly ash particulate material.

    PubMed

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Johansen, Mark E; Roberts, Jessica K; Thomas, Karen C; Romero, Erin G; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2012-03-01

    Environmental particulate matter (PM) pollutants adversely affect human health, but the molecular basis is poorly understood. The ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been implicated as a sensor for environmental PM and a mediator of adverse events in the respiratory tract. The objectives of this study were to determine whether TRPV1 can distinguish chemically and physically unique PM that represents important sources of air pollution; to elucidate the molecular basis of TRPV1 activation by PM; and to ascertain the contributions of TRPV1 to human lung cell and mouse lung tissue responses exposed to an insoluble PM agonist, coal fly ash (CFA1). The major findings of this study are that TRPV1 is activated by some, but not all of the prototype PM materials evaluated, with rank-ordered responses of CFA1 > diesel exhaust PM > crystalline silica; TRP melastatin-8 is also robustly activated by CFA1, whereas other TRP channels expressed by airway sensory neurons and lung epithelial cells that may also be activated by CFA1, including TRPs ankyrin 1 (A1), canonical 4α (C4α), M2, V2, V3, and V4, were either slightly (TRPA1) or not activated by CFA1; activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 occurs via cell surface interactions between the solid components of CFA1 and specific amino acid residues of TRPV1 that are localized in the putative pore-loop region; and activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 is not exclusive in mouse lungs but represents a pathway by which CFA1 affects the expression of selected genes in lung epithelial cells and airway tissue.

  6. Daidzein attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via toll-like receptor 4/NF-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guang; Sun, Bo; Li, Tian-zuo

    2015-06-01

    Daidzein, a diphenolic isoflavone from many plants and herbs, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of daidzein on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury have not been determined. The aim of this study was to detect the effects of daidzein on LPS-induced acute lung injury and investigate the molecular mechanisms. Daidzein was intraperitoneally injected (2, 4, 8 mg/kg) 30 min after intratracheal instillation of LPS (5 mg/kg) in rats. The results showed that daidzein treatment remarkably improved the pulmonary histology and decreased the lung wet/dry weight ratios. We also found that daidzein significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases of macrophages and neutrophils infiltration of lung tissues, as well as markedly attenuated MPO activity. Moreover, daidzein effectively reduced the inflammatory cytokines release and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). Furthermore, daidzein significantly inhibited LPS-induced toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) protein up-expressions and NF-κB activation in lung tissues. In vitro, daidzein obviously inhibited the expressions of TLR4 and MyD88 and the activation of NF-κB in LPS-stimulated A549 alveolar epithelial cells. In conclusion, these data indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of daidzein against LPS-induced ALI may be due to its ability to inhibit TLR4-MyD88-NF-κB pathway and daidzein may be a potential therapeutic agent for LPS-induced ALI. PMID:25887269

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) Is a Mediator of Lung Toxicity for Coal Fly Ash Particulate Material

    PubMed Central

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Johansen, Mark E.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Thomas, Karen C.; Romero, Erin G.; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S.; Veranth, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental particulate matter (PM) pollutants adversely affect human health, but the molecular basis is poorly understood. The ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been implicated as a sensor for environmental PM and a mediator of adverse events in the respiratory tract. The objectives of this study were to determine whether TRPV1 can distinguish chemically and physically unique PM that represents important sources of air pollution; to elucidate the molecular basis of TRPV1 activation by PM; and to ascertain the contributions of TRPV1 to human lung cell and mouse lung tissue responses exposed to an insoluble PM agonist, coal fly ash (CFA1). The major findings of this study are that TRPV1 is activated by some, but not all of the prototype PM materials evaluated, with rank-ordered responses of CFA1 > diesel exhaust PM > crystalline silica; TRP melastatin-8 is also robustly activated by CFA1, whereas other TRP channels expressed by airway sensory neurons and lung epithelial cells that may also be activated by CFA1, including TRPs ankyrin 1 (A1), canonical 4α (C4α), M2, V2, V3, and V4, were either slightly (TRPA1) or not activated by CFA1; activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 occurs via cell surface interactions between the solid components of CFA1 and specific amino acid residues of TRPV1 that are localized in the putative pore-loop region; and activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 is not exclusive in mouse lungs but represents a pathway by which CFA1 affects the expression of selected genes in lung epithelial cells and airway tissue. PMID:22155782

  8. Screening for tumor suppressors: Loss of ephrin receptor A2 cooperates with oncogenic KRas in promoting lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yeddula, Narayana; Xia, Yifeng; Ke, Eugene; Beumer, Joep; Verma, Inder M.

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, a major form of non-small cell lung cancer, is the leading cause of cancer deaths. The Cancer Genome Atlas analysis of lung adenocarcinoma has identified a large number of previously unknown copy number alterations and mutations, requiring experimental validation before use in therapeutics. Here, we describe an shRNA-mediated high-throughput approach to test a set of genes for their ability to function as tumor suppressors in the background of mutant KRas and WT Tp53. We identified several candidate genes from tumors originated from lentiviral delivery of shRNAs along with Cre recombinase into lungs of Loxp-stop-Loxp-KRas mice. Ephrin receptorA2 (EphA2) is among the top candidate genes and was reconfirmed by two distinct shRNAs. By generating knockdown, inducible knockdown and knockout cell lines for loss of EphA2, we showed that negating its expression activates a transcriptional program for cell proliferation. Loss of EPHA2 releases feedback inhibition of KRAS, resulting in activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling, leading to enhanced cell proliferation. Intriguingly, loss of EPHA2 induces activation of GLI1 transcription factor and hedgehog signaling that further contributes to cell proliferation. Small molecules targeting MEK1/2 and Smoothened hamper proliferation in EphA2-deficient cells. Additionally, in EphA2 WT cells, activation of EPHA2 by its ligand, EFNA1, affects KRAS–RAF interaction, leading to inhibition of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK pathway and cell proliferation. Together, our studies have identified that (i) EphA2 acts as a KRas cooperative tumor suppressor by in vivo screen and (ii) reactivation of the EphA2 signal may serve as a potential therapeutic for KRas-induced human lung cancers. PMID:26542681

  9. Acquired resistance of non-small cell lung cancer to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Murakami, Akiko; Kobayashi, Isao; Kato, Motoyasu; Shukuya, Takehito; Tajima, Ken; Shimada, Naoko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-03-01

    Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) triggers anti-apoptotic signaling, proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance, which leads to development and progression of human epithelial cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Inhibition of EGFR by tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib and erlotinib has provided a new hope for the cure of NSCLC patients. However, acquired resistance to gefitinib and erlotinib via EGFR-mutant NSCLC has occurred through various molecular mechanisms such as T790M secondary mutation, MET amplification, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) overexpression, PTEN downregulation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and other mechanisms. This review will discuss the biology of receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition and focus on the molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors of EGFR-mutant NSCLC.

  10. Estrogen Receptor 1 Gene Expression and Its Combination with Estrogen Receptor 2 or Aromatase Expression Predicts Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aresti, Unai; Carrera, Sergio; Iruarrizaga, Eluska; Fuente, Natalia; Marrodan, Ines; de Lobera, Abigail Ruiz; Muñoz, Alberto; Buque, Aitziber; Condori, Elizabeth; Ugalde, Irene; Calvo, Begoña; Vivanco, Guillermo López

    2014-01-01

    The biological roles of estrogen receptor 1 (ERS1), estrogen receptor 2 (ERS2), and aromatase (CYP19A1) genes in the development of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear, as is the use of their expression as a prognostic factor. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of estrogen receptors and aromatase mRNA expression, along with aromatase protein concentration, in resected NSCLC patients. Tumor and non-tumor lung tissue samples were analyzed for the mRNA expression of ERS1, ERS2 and CYP19A1 by RT-PCR. Aromatase concentration was measured with an ELISA. A total of 96 patients were included. ERS1 expression was significantly higher in non-tumor tissue than in tumor samples. Two gene expression categories were created for each gene (and protein): high and low. ERS1 high category showed increased overall survival (OS) when compared to the low expression category. Aromatase protein concentration was significantly higher in tumor samples. Higher ERS1 expression in tumor tissues was related to longer overall survival. The analysis of gene expression combinations provides evidence for longer OS when both ERS1 and ERS2 are highly expressed. ESR1, alone or in combination with ERS2 or CYP19A1, is the most determining prognostic factor within the analyzed 3 genes. It seems that ERS1 can play a role in NSCLC prognosis, alone or in combination with other genes such as ERS2 or Cyp19a1. ERS2 in combination with aromatase concentration could have a similar function. PMID:25310221

  11. Regulation of Class A scavenger receptor-mediated cell adhesion and surface localization by PI3K: identification of a regulatory cytoplasmic motif

    PubMed Central

    Cholewa, Jill; Nikolic, Dejan; Post, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of cytoplasmic motifs in differentially regulating SR-A function was demonstrated by deleting the first 49 cytoplasmic aa (SR-AΔ1–49), which abolished SR-A-mediated ligand internalization without reducing cell adhesion. To identify additional cytoplasmic motifs within the first 49 aa that regulate SR-A function, the acidic residues in a conserved motif (EDAD) were changed to their amide derivatives (SR-AQNAN). The function and regulation of SR-AQNAN were compared with that of SR-AΔ1–49 and SR-A in transfected HEK-293 cells. Blocking PI3K activation inhibited SR-A, but not SR-AΔ1–49- or SR-AQNAN-mediated cell adhesion. Although deleting (SR-AΔ1–49) or mutating (SR-AQNAN) the EDAD motif abolished the PI3K sensitivity of SR-A-mediated cell adhesion, these mutations did not affect ligand internalization or PI3K activation during cell adhesion. To define the mechanism by which PI3K regulates SR-A-mediated cell adhesion, the cellular localization of wild-type and mutant SR-A was examined. PI3K inhibition reduced surface localization of SR-A but not of SR-AΔ1–49 or SR-AQNAN. The regulation of SR-A surface localization by PI3K was confirmed in peritoneal macrophages, which endogenously express SR-A. Together, these results suggest a pathway in which SR-A binding to an immobilized ligand activates PI3K to recruit more receptor to the plasma membrane and enhances cell adhesion. PMID:19952357

  12. Unique Toll-Like Receptor 4 Activation by NAMPT/PBEF Induces NFκB Signaling and Inflammatory Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Sara M.; Ceco, Ermelinda; Evenoski, Carrie L.; Danilov, Sergei M.; Zhou, Tong; Chiang, Eddie T.; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Mapes, Brandon; Zhao, Jieling; Gursoy, Gamze; Brown, Mary E.; Adyshev, Djanybek M.; Siddiqui, Shahid S.; Quijada, Hector; Sammani, Saad; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Saadat, Laleh; Yousef, Mohammed; Wang, Ting; Liang, Jie; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-induced inflammatory lung injury (VILI) is mechanistically linked to increased NAMPT transcription and circulating levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase (NAMPT/PBEF). Although VILI severity is attenuated by reduced NAMPT/PBEF bioavailability, the precise contribution of NAMPT/PBEF and excessive mechanical stress to VILI pathobiology is unknown. We now report that NAMPT/PBEF induces lung NFκB transcriptional activities and inflammatory injury via direct ligation of Toll–like receptor 4 (TLR4). Computational analysis demonstrated that NAMPT/PBEF and MD-2, a TLR4-binding protein essential for LPS-induced TLR4 activation, share ~30% sequence identity and exhibit striking structural similarity in loop regions critical for MD-2-TLR4 binding. Unlike MD-2, whose TLR4 binding alone is insufficient to initiate TLR4 signaling, NAMPT/PBEF alone produces robust TLR4 activation, likely via a protruding region of NAMPT/PBEF (S402-N412) with structural similarity to LPS. The identification of this unique mode of TLR4 activation by NAMPT/PBEF advances the understanding of innate immunity responses as well as the untoward events associated with mechanical stress-induced lung inflammation. PMID:26272519

  13. Toll-like receptor 2 participates in the response to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Hoth, J Jason; Hudson, William P; Brownlee, Noel A; Yoza, Barbara K; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Meredith, J Wayne; McCall, Charles E

    2007-10-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We report that Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. To show this, we use a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans based on histologic, morphologic, and biochemical criteria of acute lung injury. The inflammatory response to pulmonary contusion in our mouse model is characterized by pulmonary edema, neutrophil transepithelial migration, and increased expression of the innate immunity proinflammatory cytokines IL 1beta and IL 6, the adhesion intracellular adhesion molecule 1, and chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1. Compared with wild-type animals, contused Tlr2(-/-) mice have significantly reduced pulmonary edema and neutrophilia. These findings are associated with decreased levels of circulating chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1. In contrast, systemic IL 6 levels remain elevated in the TLR2-deficient phenotype. These results show that TLR2 has a primary role in the neutrophil response to acute lung injury. We suggest that an unidentified noninfectious ligand generated by pulmonary contusion acts via TLR2 to generate inflammatory responses.

  14. MIIP accelerates epidermal growth factor receptor protein turnover and attenuates proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Fu, Jianhua; Ling, Yihong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The migration and invasion inhibitory protein (MIIP) has been discovered recently to have inhibitory functions in cell proliferation and migration. Overexpression of MIIP reduced the intracellular steady-state level of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein in lung cancer cells with no effect on EGFR mRNA expression compared to that in the control cells. This MIIP-promoted EGFR protein degradation was reversed by proteasome and lysosome inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of both proteasomal and lysosomal pathways in this degradation. This finding was further validated by pulse-chase experiments using 35S-methionine metabolic labeling. We found that MIIP accelerates EGFR protein turnover via proteasomal degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum and then via the lysosomal pathway after its entry into endocytic trafficking. MIIP-stimulated downregulation of EGFR inhibits downstream activation of Ras and blocks the MEK signal transduction pathway, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. The negative correlation between MIIP and EGFR protein expression was validated in lung adenocarcinoma samples. Furthermore, the higher MIIP protein expression predicts a better overall survival of Stage IA-IIIA lung adenocarcinoma patients who underwent radical surgery. These findings reveal a new mechanism by which MIIP inhibits cell proliferation. PMID:26824318

  15. Characterization of a thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor in guinea pig lung membranes using a radioiodinated thromboxane mimetic

    SciTech Connect

    Saussy, D.L. Jr.; Mais, D.E.; Dube, G.P.; Magee, D.E.; Brune, K.A.; Kurtz, W.L.; Williams, C.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) are potent constrictors of airway smooth muscle and may mediate some of the pulmonary effects of leukotrienes. To date, the TXA2/PGH2 receptor in lung has not been well characterized. In this report, we describe the evaluation of the TXA2/PGH2 receptor in guinea pig lung membranes using the new radiolabeled TXA2 mimetic (1S(1 alpha,2 beta(5Z),3 alpha(1E,3S*),4 alpha))-7-(3-(3-hydroxy-4-(4'- iodophenoxy)-1-butenyl)-7-oxabicyclo-(2.2.1)heptan-2-yl)-5-h eptenoic acid (IBOP). IBOP elicited a dose-dependent contraction of guinea pig lung parenchymal strips (EC50 = 3.03 +/- 0.97 nM, three experiments), which was blocked by the TXA2/PGH2 antagonists SQ29548 (pKB = 7.44 +/- 0.2, three experiments), BM13505 (pKB = 6.29 +/- 0.26, three experiments), and I-PTA-OH (pKB = 5.82 +/- 0.36, three experiments). In radioligand binding studies, the binding of (125I)IBOP to guinea pig lung membranes prepared from perfused lungs was saturable, displaceable, and dependent upon protein concentration. Binding was optimal at pH 6.5 and was enhanced by the addition of mono- and divalent cations. The standard assay buffer was 25 mM 3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid, pH 6.5, 100 mM NaCl, 5 mM MgCl2. Binding was inhibited by pretreatment with dithiothreitol, N-ethylmaleimide, or beta-mercaptoethanol. Binding was unaffected by the addition of guanine nucleotide analogs at concentrations up to 300 microM. Analysis of the time course of binding of (125)IBOP at 30 degrees yielded k-1 = 0.0447 min-1, k1 = 2.49 x 10(8) M-1 min-1, and Kd = k-1/k1 = 180 pM. Computer analysis of equilibrium binding studies using nonlinear methods (LUNDON-1) revealed a single class of noninteracting binding sites with a Kd of 86.9 +/- 11.9 pM and a Bmax of 81.8 +/- 7.7 fmol/mg of protein (three experiments).

  16. Identification of a long non-coding RNA gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor opposite strand, which stimulates cell migration in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Eliza J; Seim, Inge; Pauli, Jana P; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Thomas, Patrick B; Carter, Shea L; Walpole, Carina M; Fung, Jenny N T; Josh, Peter; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2013-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in non‑small cell lung cancer tumourigenesis are largely unknown; however, recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are likely to play a role. In this study, we used public databases to identify an mRNA-like, candidate long non-coding RNA, GHSROS (GHSR opposite strand), transcribed from the antisense strand of the ghrelin receptor gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed higher expression of GHSROS in lung cancer tissue compared to adjacent, non-tumour lung tissue. In common with many long non-coding RNAs, GHSROS is 5' capped and 3' polyadenylated (mRNA-like), lacks an extensive open reading frame and harbours a transposable element. Engineered overexpression of GHSROS stimulated cell migration in the A549 and NCI-H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, but suppressed cell migration in the Beas-2B normal lung-derived bronchoepithelial cell line. This suggests that GHSROS function may be dependent on the oncogenic context. The identification of GHSROS, which is expressed in lung cancer and stimulates cell migration in lung cancer cell lines, contributes to the growing number of non-coding RNAs that play a role in the regulation of tumourigenesis and metastatic cancer progression.

  17. BN 52021 (a platelet activating factor-receptor antagonist) decreases alveolar macrophage-mediated lung injury in experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Arellano, J L; Martín, T; López-Novoa, J M; Sánchez, M L; Montero, A; Jiménez, A

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of research indirectly suggest that platelet activating factor (PAF) may intervene in the pathogenesis of extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA). The specific aim of our study was to evaluate the participation of PAF on macrophage activation during the acute phase of EAA in an experimental model of this disease developed in guinea pigs. Initially we measured the concentration of PAF in bronchoalvedar lavage fluid, blood and lung tissue. In a second phase we evaluate the participation of PAF on alveolar macrophage activation and parenchymal lung injury. The effect of PAF on parenchymal lung injury was evaluated by measuring several lung parenchymatous lesion indices (lung index, bronchoalvedar lavage fluid (BALF) lactic hydrogenase activity and BALF alkaline phosphatase activity) and parameters of systemic response to the challenge (acute phase reagents). We observed that induction of the experimental EAA gave rise to an increase in the concentration of PAF in blood and in lung tissue. The use of the PAF-receptor antagonist BN52021 decreases the release of lysosomal enzymes (beta-glucuronidase and tartrate-sensitive acid phosphatase) to the extracellular environment both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, antagonism of the PAF receptors notably decreases pulmonary parenchymatous lesion. These data suggest that lung lesions from acute EAA are partly mediated by local production of PAF. PMID:9705608

  18. C/EBPα and the Vitamin D Receptor Cooperate in the Regulation of Cathelicidin in Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Puneet; Wei, Ran; Sun, Cheng; Gombart, Adrian F; Koeffler, H Phillip; Diamond, Gill; Christakos, Sylvia

    2015-02-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) have been reported to have an important role in the regulation of innate immunity. We earlier reported that the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin is induced by 1,25(OH)2D3 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells with a resultant increase in antimicrobial activity against airway pathogens. In this study, we demonstrate that C/EBP alpha (C/EBPα) is a potent enhancer of human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene transcription in human lung epithelial cells. In addition we found that C/EBPα functionally cooperates with VDR in the regulation of CAMP transcription. A C/EBP binding site was identified at -627/-619 within the CAMP promoter, adjacent to the vitamin D response element (VDRE; -615/-600). Mutation of this site markedly attenuated the transcriptional response to C/EBPα as well as to 1,25(OH)2D3, further indicating cooperation between these two factors in the regulation of CAMP. ChIP analysis using 1,25(OH)2D3 treated human lung epithelial cells showed C/EBPα and VDR binding to the CAMP promoter. C/EBPα has previously been reported to cooperate with Brahma (Brm), an ATPase that is component of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. We found that dominant negative Brm significantly inhibited C/EBPα as well as 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated induction of CAMP transcription, suggesting the functional involvement of Brm. These findings define novel mechanisms involving C/EBPα, SWI/SNF, and 1,25(OH)2D3 in the regulation of CAMP in lung epithelial cells. These mechanisms of enhanced activation of the CAMP gene in lung epithelial cells suggest potential candidates for the development of modulators of innate immune responses for adjunct therapy in the treatment of airway infections. PMID:25078430

  19. Crosstalk between Integrin αvβ3 and Estrogen Receptor-α Is Involved in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Proliferation in Human Lung Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ran; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Westfall, Jennifer; London, David; Cao, James H.; Mousa, Shaker A.; Luidens, Mary; Hercbergs, Aleck; Davis, Faith B.; Davis, Paul J.; Lin, Hung-Yun

    2011-01-01

    A cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone that activates extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 has been identified on integrin αvβ3. We have examined the actions of thyroid hormone initiated at the integrin on human NCI-H522 non-small cell lung carcinoma and NCI-H510A small cell lung cancer cells. At a physiologic total hormone concentration (10−7 M), T4 significantly increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) abundance in these cell lines, as did 3, 5, 3′-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) at a supraphysiologic concentration. Neutralizing antibody to integrin αvβ3 and an integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide blocked thyroid hormone-induced PCNA expression. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) lacks thyroid hormone function but inhibits binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin receptor; tetrac eliminated thyroid hormone-induced lung cancer cell proliferation and ERK1/2 activation. In these estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive lung cancer cells, thyroid hormone (T4>T3) caused phosphorylation of ERα; the specific ERα antagonist ICI 182,780 blocked T4-induced, but not T3-induced ERK1/2 activation, as well as ERα phosphorylation, proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and hormone-dependent thymidine uptake by tumor cells. Thus, in ERα-positive human lung cancer cells, the proliferative action of thyroid hormone initiated at the plasma membrane is at least in part mediated by ERα. In summary, thyroid hormone may be one of several endogenous factors capable of supporting proliferation of lung cancer cells. Activity as an inhibitor of lung cancer cell proliferation induced at the integrin receptor makes tetrac a novel anti-proliferative agent. PMID:22132110

  20. A Critical Role for P2X7 Receptor-Induced VCAM-1 Shedding and Neutrophil Infiltration during Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amarjit; Guo, Yujie; Zhang, Li; More, Sunil; Weng, Tingting; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Huang, Chaoqun; Liang, Yurong; Pushparaj, Samuel; Gou, Deming; Breshears, Melanie; Liu, Lin

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary neutrophils are the initial inflammatory cells that are recruited during lung injury and are crucial for innate immunity. However, pathological recruitment of neutrophils results in lung injury. The objective of this study is to determine whether the novel neutrophil chemoattractant, soluble VCAM-1 (sVCAM-1), recruits pathological levels of neutrophils to injury sites and amplifies lung inflammation during acute lung injury. The mice with P2X7 receptor deficiency, or treated with a P2X7 receptor inhibitor or anti-VCAM-1 Abs, were subjected to a clinically relevant two-hit LPS and mechanical ventilation-induced acute lung injury. Neutrophil infiltration and lung inflammation were measured. Neutrophil chemotactic activities were determined by a chemotaxis assay. VCAM-1 shedding and signaling pathways were assessed in isolated lung epithelial cells. Ab neutralization of sVCAM-1 or deficiency or antagonism of P2X7R reduced neutrophil infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine levels. The ligands for sVCAM-1 were increased during acute lung injury. sVCAM-1 had neutrophil chemotactic activities and activated alveolar macrophages. VCAM-1 is released into the alveolar airspace from alveolar epithelial type I cells through P2X7 receptor-mediated activation of the metalloproteinase ADAM-17. In conclusion, sVCAM-1 is a novel chemoattractant for neutrophils and an activator for alveolar macrophages. Targeting sVCAM-1 provides a therapeutic intervention that could block pathological neutrophil recruitment, without interfering with the physiological recruitment of neutrophils, thus avoiding the impairment of host defenses. PMID:27559050

  1. Identification and characterization of a cell surface scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein of Sciaenops ocellatus: bacterial interaction and its dependence on the conserved structural features of the SRCR domain.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Reng; Sun, Bo-Guang; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Li

    2013-03-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) proteins are secreted or membrane-bound receptors with one or multiple SRCR domains. Members of the SRCR superfamily are known to have diverse functions that include pathogen recognition and immunoregulation. In teleost, although protein sequences with SRCR structure have been identified in some species, very little functional investigation has been carried out. In this study, we identified and characterized a teleost SRCR protein from red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. The protein was named S. ocellatus SRCR1 (SoSRCRP1). SoSRCRP1 is 410-residue in length and was predicted to be a transmembrane protein, with the extracellular region containing a collagen triple helix repeat and a SRCR domain. The SRCR domain has six conserved cysteines, of which, C338 and C399, C351 and C409, and C379 and C389 were predicted to form three disulfide bonds. SoSRCRP1 expression was detected mainly in immune-relevant tissues and upregulated by bacterial and viral infection. In head kidney leukocytes, bacterial infection stimulated the expression of SoSRCRP1, and the expressed SoSRCRP1 was localized on cell surface. Recombinant SoSRCRP1 (rSoSRCRP1) corresponding to the SRCR domain was purified from Escherichia coli and found to be able to bind Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. To examine the structure-function relationship of SoSRCRP1, the mutant proteins SoSRCRP1M1, SoSRCRP1M2, SoSRCRP1M3, and SoSRCRP1M4 were created, which bear C351S and C409S, C338S, C379S, and R325A mutations respectively. Compared to rSoSRCRP1, all mutants were significantly reduced in the ability of bacterial interaction, with the highest reduction observed with SoSRCRP1M4. Taken together, these results indicate that SoSRCRP1 is a cell surface-localized SRCR protein that binds bacterial ligands in a manner that depends on the conserved structural features of the SRCR domain. PMID:23291106

  2. Modulation of antigen-induced responses by serotonin and prostaglandin E2 via EP1 and EP4 receptors in the peripheral rat lung.

    PubMed

    Larsson-Callerfelt, Anna-Karin; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Kühl, Anna-Rebekka; Lex, Dennis; Uhlig, Stefan; Martin, Christian

    2013-01-15

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway and prostanoids may critically contribute to the early allergic airway response. In the rat lung, serotonin (5-HT) is a major mediator of antigen-induced contractions. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the relative role of the COX pathway and serotonin for antigen-induced contractions in the rat lung. Airway responses were studied in rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLS). Lung slices were stimulated with ovalbumin or serotonin after pretreatment with COX inhibitors or specific TP or EP receptor antagonists. Changes in airway size (contractions/relaxations) were measured by a digital video camera. The supernatants were analysed for changes in prostaglandin and serotonin release. Airway contractions to ovalbumin were attenuated by the unselective COX inhibitor indomethacin, the selective COX-1 inhibitor FR-122047 and COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The EP(1) receptor antagonist ONO-8713 reduced the contractions, whereas the EP(4) receptor antagonist L-161,982 significantly increased the contractile response to ovalbumin. The 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin completely inhibited the ovalbumin-induced contractions. The different COX inhibitors decreased the production of prostaglandins but did not affect the synthesis of serotonin. The serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction was attenuated by celecoxib and ONO-8713, but not by methacholine. Taken together, our data indicate that PGE(2) is the main prostanoid involved in the early allergic airway response in the rat lung. PGE(2) appears to act both as a primary mediator of antigen-induced airway contraction via the EP(4) receptor and as a downstream modulator of serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction via the EP(1) receptor.

  3. Aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) enhances lung myofibroblast differentiation through transforming growth factor β receptor-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Tumelty, Kathleen E; Smith, Barbara D; Nugent, Matthew A; Layne, Matthew D

    2014-01-31

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic and fatal lung disease characterized by the overgrowth, hardening, and scarring of lung tissue. The exact mechanisms of how IPF develops and progresses are unknown. IPF is characterized by extracellular matrix remodeling and accumulation of active TGFβ, which promotes collagen expression and the differentiation of smooth muscle α-actin (SMA)-positive myofibroblasts. Aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) is an extracellular matrix protein secreted by fibroblasts and myofibroblasts and is expressed in fibrotic human lung tissue and in mice with bleomycin-induced fibrosis. Importantly, ACLP knockout mice are significantly protected from bleomycin-induced fibrosis. The goal of this study was to identify the mechanisms of ACLP action on fibroblast differentiation. As primary lung fibroblasts differentiated into myofibroblasts, ACLP expression preceded SMA and collagen expression. Recombinant ACLP induced SMA and collagen expression in mouse and human lung fibroblasts. Knockdown of ACLP slowed the fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition and partially reverted differentiated myofibroblasts by reducing SMA expression. We hypothesized that ACLP stimulates myofibroblast formation partly through activating TGFβ signaling. Treatment of fibroblasts with recombinant ACLP induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad3. This phosphorylation and induction of SMA was dependent on TGFβ receptor binding and kinase activity. ACLP-induced collagen expression was independent of interaction with the TGFβ receptor. These findings indicate that ACLP stimulates the fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition by promoting SMA expression via TGFβ signaling and promoting collagen expression through a TGFβ receptor-independent pathway. PMID:24344132

  4. Empowerment Improvement of the Scavenger`s Identity in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubtim, Somkid; Srisantisuk, Somsak; Chareonsudjai, Pisit; Yoshihide, Sakurai

    The objectives of this study were to analyze the scavenger`s identity, identify means of constructing empowerment for Solid Waste Management (SWM) and design steps of the empowerment for an experiment on suitable model implementation. To accomplish the first objective, a content analysis, specialists` consultation and non-participatory observation were conducted. Subsequently, an analysis of a survey on a focus group and in-depth semi-structured interviews based on scavengers and stakeholders` voices was conducted to reveal possibilities to identify means that could be synthesized and access possible means of empowerment steps. The results of the study show that former researchers variously identified the scavengers` identity to suit multi-dimensional perspectives. The resistance and uninterest in them reflected their role as a low status in society that strongly took the economic boundary but lightly took other boundaries into consideration. The overall image of perspectives in the past caused unsolvable solutions. Meanwhile, the reengineering of the scavengers` system by applying a sectional approach based on a holistic approach could reveal significant factors which enabled to fit the scavengers into a proper place of the SWM. Needless to say, this means could construct possible steps of empowerment; it was also synthesized for the improvement of the scavenger`s identity.

  5. Atmospheric scavenging exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. The airborne HCl concentration varied from 0.2 to 10.0 ppm and the raindrop sizes tested included 0.55 mm, 1.1 mm, and 3.0 mm. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments. A large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique employed. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity.

  6. Mechanisms of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Resistance and Strategies to Overcome Resistance in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoon Soo; Choi, Chang-Min

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations that lead to hyperactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling are detected in approximately 50% of lung adenocarcinoma in people from the Far East population and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are now the standard first line treatment for advanced disease. They have led to a doubling of progression-free survival and an increase in overall survival by more than 2 years. However, emergence of resistant clones has become the primary cause for treatment failure, and has created a new challenge in the daily management of patients with EGFR mutations. Identification of mechanisms leading to inhibitor resistance has led to new therapeutic modalities, some of which have now been adapted for patients with unsuccessful tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. In this review, we describe mechanisms of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance and the available strategies to overcoming resistance. PMID:27790276

  7. Serum estrogen and tumor-positive estrogen receptor-alpha are strong prognostic classifiers of non-small-cell lung cancer survival in both men and women

    PubMed Central

    Olivo-Marston, Susan E.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Mollerup, Steen; Bowman, Elise D.; Remaley, Alan T.; Forman, Michele R.; Skaug, Vidar; Zheng, Yun-Ling; Haugen, Aage; Harris, Curtis C.

    2010-01-01

    The role of tumor estrogen receptors (ERs) and serum estrogen in lung cancer is inconclusive. We investigated the hypothesis that ERs and functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the estrogen biosynthesis pathway are associated with poorer lung cancer survival. Lung cancer patients (n = 305) from a National Cancer Institute-Maryland (NCI-MD) case–case cohort in the Baltimore metropolitan area were used as a test cohort. To validate, 227 cases from the NCI-MD case–control cohort and 293 cases from a Norwegian lung cancer cohort were studied. Information on demographics, tobacco and reproductive histories was collected in an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Serum estrogen, progesterone, tumor messenger RNA expression of hormone receptors and germ line DNA polymorphisms were analyzed for associations with lung cancer survival. Patients in the highest tertile of serum estrogen had worse survival in all three cohorts (P combined < 0.001). Furthermore, the variant allele of estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) polymorphism (rs2228480) was significantly associated with increased tumor ER-α levels and worse survival in all three cohorts [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.59, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20– 4.01; HR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.08–2.87 and HR = 2.85, 95% CI: 1.31–4.36). Other polymorphisms associated with lower serum estrogen correlated with improved survival. Results were independent of gender and hormone replacement therapy. We report a significant association of increased serum estrogen with poorer survival among lung cancer male and female patients. Understanding the genetic control of estrogen biosynthesis and response in lung cancer could lead to improved prognosis and therapy. PMID:20729390

  8. Expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in lungs of immune-suppressed rat with Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanmei; Zhang, Xiaohong; Feng, Xuanlin; Liu, Xiaoshu; Deng, Lei; Liang, Zong-An

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is involved in the regulation of host responses to Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii). The aim of the present study was to examine the function of TLR4 in lung inflammation in immune-suppressed rats with A. baumannii infection. A total of 72 Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into the control, A. baumannii infection and immune-suppressed infection groups. The immune-suppressed infection group was treated with 100 mg/kg hydrocortisone by subcutaneous injection every other day for 2 weeks prior to A. baumannii infection. Lung tissue was obtained on the 3rd and 7th day after tracheal inoculation with A. baumannii. The expression of TLR4 in bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells, and alveolar macrophage was examined using immunohistochemistry. The levels of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were detected using ELISA. The results showed that in the control group, the expression of TLR4 was upregulated in the bronchial and alveolar epithelial, and alveolar macrophages, and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were increased in the early phase of A. baumannii infection. On the 7th day, no significant difference in the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α was observed between the A. baumannii infection and control groups. Conversely, the expression of TLR4 was downregulated in the immune-suppressed group, and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were reduced on the 3rd day after infection. In the subsequent observation period, the expression of TLR4 was upregulated and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were increased. In conclusion, the results show a critical role of TLR4 in mediating effective immune response in the lung of rat with A. baumannii infection. PMID:27703512

  9. Specific single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies to angiotensin II AT(2) receptor: evaluation of the angiotensin II receptor expression in normal and tumor-bearing mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masaaki; Yan, Heping; Zegarra-Moro, Ofelia; Edl, Jennifer; Oursler, Stephanie; Chard-Bergstrom, Cindy; Andrews, Gordon; Kanehira, Tsutomu; Takekoshi, Susumu; Mernaugh, Ray

    2008-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism by which angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT(2)) regulates carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis, we have newly developed anti-AT(2) single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies using a rodent phage-displayed recombinant antibody library with various peptide fragments of the receptor protein, and investigated the expression of the AT(2) receptor protein. The specificity of the antibodies was verified using AT(2) over-expressing COS-7 cells and AT(2) naturally expressing PC12W cells. In control wild type mouse lung, a stronger immunoreactivity was observed in bronchial epithelial cells. A moderate immunoreactivity was detected in pulmonary vascular walls and vascular endothelial cells. In the lungs possessing tobacco-specific nitrosamine (NNK)-induced tumors, significantly increased AT(2) and AT(1 )immunostaining was observed in adenomatous lesions. These data suggest that the increase in both receptors' expression in the alveolar epithelial cells may be accompanied with the onset of NNK-induced tumorigenesis and hence play important roles in lung tumorigenesis.

  10. Specific Single Chain Variable Fragment (ScFv) Antibodies to Angiotensin II AT2 Receptor: Evaluation of the Angiotensin II Receptor Expression in Normal and Tumor-bearing Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Masaaki; Yan, Heping; Zegarra-Moro, Ofelia; Edl, Jennifer; Oursler, Stephanie; Chard-Bergstrom, Cindy; Andrews, Gordon; Kanehira, Tsutomu; Takekoshi, Susumu; Mernaugh, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Summary To gain insight into the mechanism by which angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2) regulates carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis, we have newly developed anti-AT2 single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies using a rodent phage-displayed recombinant antibody library with various peptide fragments of the receptor protein, and investigated the expression of the AT2 receptor protein. The specificity of the antibodies was verified using AT2 over-expressing COS-7 cells and AT2 naturally expressing PC12W cells. In control wild type mouse lung, a stronger immunoreactivity was observed in bronchial epithelial cells. A moderate immunoreactivity was detected in pulmonary vascular walls and vascular endothelial cells. In the lungs possessing tobacco-specific nitrosamine (NNK)-induced tumors, significantly increased AT2 and AT1 immunostaining was observed in adenomatous lesions. These data suggest that the increase in both receptors' expression in the alveolar epithelial cells may be accompanied with the onset of NNK-induced tumorigenesis and hence play important roles in lung tumorigenesis. PMID:18438736

  11. miR-134 inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Wei, Furong; Zhang, Jianbo; Wang, Xingwu; Li, Baosheng

    2016-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently activated in a wide range of solid tumours and represents an important therapeutic target. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been recognized as a rational and potential modality for anti-EGFR therapies. However, more EGFR-targeting miRNAs need to be explored. In this study, we identified a novel EGFR-targeting miRNA, miRNA-134 (miR-134), in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Luciferase assays confirmed that EGFR is a direct target of miR-134. In addition, the overexpression of miR-134 inhibited EGFR-related signaling and suppressed NSCLC cells proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, suggesting that miR-134 functions as a tumour suppressor in NSCLC. Further mechanistic investigation including RNAi and rescue experiments suggested that the down-regulation of EGFR by miR-134 partially contributes to the antiproliferative role of miR-134. Last, in vivo experiments demonstrated that miR-134 suppressed tumour growth of A549 xenograft in nude mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-134 inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by targeting the EGFR.

  12. Evaluation of a novel saliva‐based epidermal growth factor receptor mutation detection for lung cancer: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Dan; Liang, Hao; Wei, Fang; Akin, David; Feng, Ziding; Yan, QingXiang; Li, Yin; Zhen, Yan; Xu, Lin; Dong, Gaochao; Wan, Huajing; Dong, Jingsi; Qiu, Xiaoming; Qin, Changlong; Zhu, Daxing; Wang, Xi; Sun, Tong; Zhang, Wenbiao; Li, Canjun; Tang, Xiaojun; Qiao, Youlin

    2016-01-01

    Background This article describes a pilot study evaluating a novel liquid biopsy system for non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The electric field‐induced release and measurement (EFIRM) method utilizes an electrochemical biosensor for detecting oncogenic mutations in biofluids. Methods Saliva and plasma of 17 patients were collected from three cancer centers prior to and after surgical resection. The EFIRM method was then applied to the collected samples to assay for exon 19 deletion and p.L858 mutations. EFIRM results were compared with cobas results of exon 19 deletion and p.L858 mutation detection in cancer tissues. Results The EFIRM method was found to detect exon 19 deletion with an area under the curve (AUC) of 1.0 in both saliva and plasma samples in lung cancer patients. For L858R mutation detection, the AUC of saliva was 1.0, while the AUC of plasma was 0.98. Strong correlations were also found between presurgery and post‐surgery samples for both saliva (0.86 for exon 19 and 0.98 for L858R) and plasma (0.73 for exon 19 and 0.94 for L858R). Conclusion Our study demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing EFIRM to rapidly, non‐invasively, and conveniently detect epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in the saliva of patients with NSCLC, with results corresponding perfectly with the results of cobas tissue genotyping. PMID:27385985

  13. Intratracheal administration of a nanoparticle-based therapy with the angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene attenuates lung cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Atsushi; Baoum, Abdulgader; Ohta, Naomi; Jacquez, Stephanie; Seo, Gwi-Moon; Berkland, Cory; Tamura, Masaaki

    2012-04-15

    Targeted gene delivery, transfection efficiency, and toxicity concerns remain a challenge for effective gene therapy. In this study, we dimerized the HIV-1 TAT peptide and formulated a nanoparticle vector (dTAT NP) to leverage the efficiency of this cell-penetrating strategy for tumor-targeted gene delivery in the setting of intratracheal administration. Expression efficiency for dTAT NP-encapsulated luciferase or angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) plasmid DNA (pDNA) was evaluated in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells cultured in vitro or in vivo in orthotopic tumor grafts in syngeneic mice. In cell culture, dTAT NP was an effective pDNA transfection vector with negligible cytotoxicity. Transfection efficiency was further increased by addition of calcium and glucose to dTAT/pDNA NP. In orthotopic tumor grafts, immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that dTAT NP successfully delivered pDNA to the tumor, where it was expressed primarily in tumor cells along with the bronchial epithelium. Notably, gene expression in tumor tissues persisted at least 14 days after intratracheal administration. Moreover, bolus administration of dTAT NP-encapsulated AT2R or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) pDNA markedly attenuated tumor growth. Taken together, our findings offer a preclinical proof-of-concept for a novel gene delivery system that offers an effective intratracheal strategy for administering lung cancer gene therapy.

  14. TGF-β1 Upregulates the Expression of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1 in Murine Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Li; Zhou, Yong; Dong, Liang; Chen, Rui-Qi; Sun, Guo-Ying; Liu, Tian; Ran, Wen-Zhuo; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) increases the expression of TGF-β family genes, which are known as profibrogenic cytokines in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we determined whether TGF-β1 regulated the expression of TREM-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. The expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1 was increased on day 7, 14, and 21 after single intratracheal injection of bleomycin (BLM). And there was positive correlation between the expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1. TGF-β1 increased expression of TREM-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. The expression of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) was increased in lung tissues from mouse after BLM injection and in mouse macrophages after TGF-β1 treatment, respectively. TGF-β1 significantly increased the relative activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with plasmid contenting wild type-promoter of TREM-1. But TGF-β1 had no effect on the activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with a mutant-TREM1 plasmid carrying mutations in the AP-1 promoter binding site. In conclusion, we found the expression of TREM-1 was increased in lung tissues from mice with pulmonary fibrosis. TGF-β1 increased the expression of TREM-1 in mouse macrophages partly via the transcription factor AP-1. PMID:26738569

  15. Concordance of folate receptor-α expression between biopsy, primary tumor and metastasis in breast cancer and lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Ann-Jean; Charehbili, Ayoub; Hoogstins, Charlotte E.S.; Prevoo, Hendrica A. J. M.; Singhal, Sunil; Low, Philip S.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    Folate receptor alpha (FRα) is known to be upregulated in a variety of cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and breast cancer. To ensure reliable implementation of diagnostic- and therapeutic agents, concordance of FRα expression between biopsy, primary tumor and metastases is important. Using immunohistochemistry (Mab 26B3.F2) these concordances were investigated in 60 NSCLC and 40 breast cancer patients. False positivity of FRα expression on breast and lung cancer biopsies was limited to less than 5%. In NSCLC, FRα expression was shown in 21/34 adenocarcinomas and 4/26 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Concordance of FRα expression between biopsy and primary tumor was achieved in respectively 83% and 91% of adenocarcinomas and SCCs. Approximately 80% of all local and distant metastases of NSCLC patients showed concordant FRα expression as their corresponding primary tumor. In breast cancer, FRα positivity was shown in 12/40 biopsies, 20/40 lumpectomies and 6/20 LN metastases, with concordance of 68% between biopsy and primary tumor and 60% between primary tumor and LN metastases. In conclusion, this study shows high concordance rates of FRα expression between biopsies and metastases compared to primary NSCLC and breast cancers, underscoring the applicability of FRα-targeted agents in these patients. PMID:26943581

  16. Induction of apoptosis by tumor suppressor FHIT via death receptor signaling pathway in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wu-Guo; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Fang, Bingliang; Roth, Jack A; Ji, Lin

    2007-04-20

    FHIT is a novel tumor suppressor gene located at human chromosome 3p14.2. Restoration of wild-type FHIT in 3p14.2-deficient human lung cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis. In this study, we analyzed potential upstream/downstream molecular targets of the FHIT protein and found that FHIT specifically targeted and regulated death receptor (DR) genes in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Exogenous expression of FHIT by a recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer upregulated expression of DR genes. Treatment with a recombinant TRAIL protein, a DR-specific ligand, in Ad-FHIT-transduced NSCLC cells considerably enhanced FHIT-induced apoptosis, further demonstrating the involvement of DRs in FHIT-induced apoptosis. Moreover, we also found that FHIT targeted downstream of the DR-mediated signaling pathway. FHIT overexpression disrupted mitochondrial membrane integrity and activated multiple pro-apoptotic proteins in NSCLC cell. These results suggest that FHIT induces apoptosis through a sequential activation of DR-mediated pro-apoptotic signaling pathways in human NSCLC cells. PMID:17328863

  17. Immunocytochemical localization of the nuclear 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine receptor in the adult rat: liver, kidney, heart, lung and spleen.

    PubMed

    Luo, M; Faure, R; Tong, Y A; Dussault, J H

    1989-04-01

    A monoclonal antibody was used for the localization of the nuclear T3 receptor in different tissues of the adult rat: the liver, kidney, heart, lung, spleen, testis, and pituitary. In the liver, the immunoreactivity was found uniformly distributed in the nuclei of hepatocytes. Sections incubated with a control ascitic fluid or with the same ascitic fluid pre-adsorbed with purified receptor showed no specific staining. In the kidney, the immunoreactivity was higher in the epithelial cell of the proximal convoluted tubes and juxtaglomerular cells. In the heart, only the myocardial cells were stained. In the lung, the immunoreactivity was confined to type II pneumocytes and alveolar macrophages. In the spleen, only a few mature lymphocyte and macrophage cell nuclei were stained. These results show that: 1) the abundance of the nuclear T3 correlates with previous studies using hormone binding techniques; 2) the nuclear T3 receptor is selectively located in certain cell types, which possess a precise local function.

  18. Gene-by-environment effect of house dust mite on purinergic receptor P2Y12 (P2RY12) and lung function in children with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bunyavanich, Supinda; Boyce, Joshua A.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Distinct receptors likely exist for leukotriene(LT)E4, a potent mediator of airway inflammation. Purinergic receptor P2Y12 is needed for LTE4-induced airways inflammation, and P2Y12 antagonism attenuates house dust mite-induced pulmonary eosinophilia in mice. Although experimental data support a role for P2Y12 in airway inflammation, its role in human asthma has never been studied. Objective To test for association between variants in the P2Y12 gene (P2RY12) and lung function in human subjects with asthma, and to examine for gene-by-environment interaction with house dust mite exposure. Methods 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in P2RY12 were genotyped in 422 children with asthma and their parents (n=1266). Using family-based methods, we tested for associations between these SNPs and five lung function measures. We performed haplotype association analyses and tested for gene-by-environment interactions using house dust mite exposure. We used the false discovery rate to account for multiple comparisons. Results Five SNPs in P2RY12 were associated with multiple lung function measures (P values 0.006–0.025). Haplotypes in P2RY12 were also associated with lung function (P values 0.0055–0.046). House dust mite exposure modulated associations between P2RY12 and lung function, with minor allele homozygotes exposed to house dust mite demonstrating worse lung function than those unexposed (significant interaction P values 0.0028–0.040). Conclusions and clinical relevance P2RY12 variants were associated with lung function in a large family-based asthma cohort. House dust mite exposure caused significant gene-by-environment effects. Our findings add the first human evidence to experimental data supporting a role for P2Y12 in lung function. P2Y12 could represent a novel target for asthma treatment. PMID:22010907

  19. Acrolein induces apoptosis through the death receptor pathway in A549 lung cells: role of p53.

    PubMed

    Roy, Julie; Pallepati, Pragathi; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Averill-Bates, Diana A

    2010-03-01

    Acrolein, a highly reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde, is an omnipresent environmental pollutant. Chronic and acute human exposures occur through exogenous and endogenous sources, including food, vapors of overheated cooking oil, house and forest fires, cigarette smoke, and automobile exhaust. Acrolein is a toxic byproduct of lipid peroxidation, which has been implicated in pulmonary, cardiac, and neurodegenerative diseases. This study shows that p53 is an initiating factor in acrolein-induced death receptor activation during apoptosis in A549 human lung cells. Exposure of cells to acrolein (0-50 micromol/L) mainly caused apoptosis, which was manifested by execution phase events such as condensation of nuclear chromatin, phosphatidylserine externalization, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Levels of necrosis (approximately 5%) were low. Acrolein triggered the death receptor pathway of apoptosis, causing elevation of Fas ligand (FasL) and translocation of adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain to the plasma membrane. Acrolein caused activation of caspase-8, caspase-2, caspase-7, and the cross-talk pathway mediated by Bid cleavage. Activation of p53 and increased expression of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) occurred in response to acrolein. FasL upregulation and caspase-8 activation were decreased by p53 inhibitor pifithrin-alpha and antioxidant polyethylene glycol catalase. These findings increase our knowledge about the induction of cell death pathways by acrolein, which has important implications for human health.

  20. Current concepts. I. High affinity receptors for bombesin/GRP-like peptides on human small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, T.W.; Carney, D.N.; Cuttitta, F.; Quattrocchi, K.; Minna, J.D.

    1985-07-15

    The binding of a radiolabeled bombesin analogue to human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines was investigated. (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 4/)bombesin bound with high affinity (Kd = 0.5 nM) to a single class of sites (2000/cell) using SCLC line NCI-H446. Binding was reversible, saturable and specific. The pharmacology of binding was investigated, using NCI-H466 and SCLC line NCI-H345. Bombesin and structurally related peptides, such as gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), but not other peptides, such as substance P or vasopressin, inhibited high affinity (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 4/)BN binding activity. Finally, the putative receptor, a 78,000 dalton polypeptide, was identified by purifying radiolabeled cell lysates on bombesin or GRP affinity resins and then displaying the bound polypeptides on sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gels. Because SCLC both produces bombesin/GRP-like peptides and contains high affinity receptors for these peptides, they may function as important autocrine regulatory factors for human SCLC. 31 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Antiestrogen fulvestrant enhances the antiproliferative effects of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in human non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garon, Edward B.; Pietras, Richard J.; Finn, Richard S.; Kamranpour, Naeimeh; Pitts, Sharon; Márquez-Garbán, Diana C.; Desai, Amrita J.; Dering, Judy; Hosmer, Wylie; von Euw, Erika M.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Slamon, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen receptor (ER) signaling and its interaction with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a potential therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To explore cross-communication between ER and EGFR, we have correlated ER pathway gene and protein expression profiles and examined effects of antiestrogens with or without EGFR inhibitors in preclinical models of human NSCLC. Methods We evaluated 54 NSCLC cell lines for growth inhibition with EGFR inhibitors, antiestrogen treatment or the combination. Each line was evaluated for baseline ER pathway protein expression. The majority were also evaluated for baseline ER pathway gene expression. Human NSCLC xenografts were evaluated for effects of inhibition of each pathway either individually or in combination. Results The specific antiestrogen fulvestrant has modest single agent activity in vitro, but in many lines fulvestrant adds to effects of EGFR inhibitors, including synergy in the EGFR mutant, erlotinib-resistant H1975 line. ERα, ERβ, progesterone receptor (PR)-A, PR-B and aromatase proteins are expressed in all lines to varying degrees, with trends towards lower aromatase in more sensitive cell lines. Sensitivity to fulvestrant correlates with greater baseline ERα gene expression. Tumor stability is achieved in human tumor xenografts with either fulvestrant or EGFR inhibitors, but tumors regress significantly when both pathways are inhibited. Conclusions These data provide a rationale for further investigation of the antitumor activity of combined therapy with antiestrogen and anti-EGFR agents in the clinic. Future work should also evaluate dual ER and EGFR inhibition in the setting of secondary resistance to EGFR inhibition. PMID:23399957

  2. Fucoidan inhibition of lung cancer in vivo and in vitro : role of the Smurf2-dependent ubiquitin proteasome pathway in TGFβ receptor degradation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Lin, Tung-Yi; Wu, Yu-Chung; Tsao, Shu-Ming; Hwang, Pai-An; Shih, Yu-Wei; Hsu, Jason

    2014-09-15

    Fucoidan, a polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweeds, reduces tumor cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrate that fucoidan reduces tumor size in LLC1-xenograft male C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, we found that LLC1-bearing mice continuously fed fucoidan showed greater antitumor activity than mice with discontinuous feeding. Fucoidan inhibited the in vitro growth of lung cancer cells. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) receptors (TGFRs) play important roles in the regulation of proliferation and progression, and high TGFRI expression in lung cancer specimens is associated with a worse prognosis. Herein, using lung cancer cells, we found that fucoidan effectively reduces TGFRI and TGFRII protein levels in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, fucoidan reduces TGFR downstream signaling events, including those in Smad2/3 and non-Smad pathways: Akt, Erk1/2, and FAK phosphorylation. Furthermore, fucoidan suppresses lung cancer cell mobility upon TGFβ stimulation. To elucidate how fucoidan decreases TGFR proteins in lung cancer cells, we found that fucoidan enhances the ubiquitination proteasome pathway (UPP)-mediated degradation of TGFRs in A549 and CL1-5 cells. Mechanistically, fucoidan promotes Smurf2 and Smad7 to conjugate TGFRs, resulting in TGF degradation; however, Smurf2-shRNA abolishes fucoidan-enhanced UPP-mediated TGFR degradation. Our study is the first to identify a novel mechanism for the antitumor activity of fucoidan, namely decreasing tumor growth by modulating the TGFR/Smad7/Smurf2-dependent axis, leading to TGFR protein degradation and inhibition of lung cancer cell progression in vitro and in vivo. Our current findings indicate that fucoidan is a potential therapeutic agent or dietary supplementation for lung cancer, acting via the Smurf2-dependent ubiquitin degradation of TGFβ receptors.

  3. Slit2-Robo4 receptor responses inhibit ANDV directed permeability of human lung microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Elena E; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Mackow, Erich R

    2013-08-01

    Hantaviruses nonlytically infect human endothelial cells (ECs) and cause edematous and hemorrhagic diseases. Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), and Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Hantaviruses enhance vascular endothelial growth factor directed EC permeability resulting in the disassembly of inter-endothelial cell adherens junctions (AJs). Recent studies demonstrate that Slit2 binding to Robo1/Robo4 receptors on ECs has opposing effects on AJ disassembly and vascular fluid barrier functions. Here we demonstrate that Slit2 inhibits ANDV and HTNV induced permeability and AJ disassembly of pulmonary microvascular ECs (PMECs) by interactions with Robo4. In contrast, Slit2 had no effect on the permeability of ANDV infected human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). Analysis of Robo1/Robo4 expression determined that PMECs express Robo4, but not Robo1, while HUVECs expressed both Robo4 and Robo1 receptors. SiRNA knockdown of Robo4 in PMECs prevented Slit2 inhibition of ANDV induced permeability demonstrating that Robo4 receptors determine PMEC responsiveness to Slit2. Collectively, this data demonstrates a selective role for Slit2/Robo4 responses within PMECs that inhibits ANDV induced permeability and AJ disassembly. These findings suggest Slit2s utility as a potential HPS therapeutic that stabilizes the pulmonary endothelium and antagonizes ANDV induced pulmonary edema.

  4. Progesterone receptor (PR) polyproline domain (PPD) mediates inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kawprasertsri, Sornsawan; Pietras, Richard J; Marquez-Garban, Diana C; Boonyaratanakornkit, Viroj

    2016-05-01

    Recent evidence has suggested a possible role for progesterone receptor (PR) in the progression of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, little is known concerning roles of PR in NSCLC. PR contains a polyproline domain (PPD), which directly binds to the SH3 domain of signaling molecules. Because PPD-SH3 interactions are essential for EGFR signaling, we hypothesized that the presence of PR-PPD interfered with EGFR-mediated signaling and cell proliferation. We examined the role of PR-PPD in cell proliferation and signaling by stably expressing PR-B, or PR-B with disrupting mutations in the PPD (PR-BΔSH3), from a tetracycline-regulated promoter in A549 NSCLC cells. PR-B dose-dependently inhibited cell growth in the absence of ligand, and progestin (R5020) treatment further suppressed the growth. Treatment with RU486 abolished PR-B- and R5020-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation. Expression of PR-BΔSH3 and treatment with R5020 or RU486 had no effect on cell proliferation. Furthermore, PR-B expression but not PR-BΔSH3 expression reduced EGF-induced A549 proliferation and activation of ERK1/2, in the absence of ligand. Taken together, our data demonstrated the significance of PR extranuclear signaling through PPD interactions in EGFR-mediated proliferation and signaling in NSCLC.

  5. Discordance of Mutation Statuses of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and K-ras between Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung and Brain Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Rau, Kun-Ming; Chen, Han-Ku; Shiu, Li-Yen; Chao, Tsai-Ling; Lo, Yi-Ping; Wang, Chin-Chou; Lin, Meng-Chih; Huang, Chao-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Mutations on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of adenocarcinomas of lung have been found to be associated with increased sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and K-ras mutations may correlate with primary resistance. We aimed to explore the discordant mutation statuses of EGFR and K-ras between primary tumors and matched brain metastases in adenocarcinomas of lung. We used a sensitive Scorpion ARMS method to analyze EGFR mutation, and Sanger sequencing followed by allele-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction to analyze K-ras mutation. Forty-nine paired tissues with both primary adenocarcinoma of lung and matched brain metastasis were collected. Thirteen patients (26.5%) were discordant for the status of EGFR between primary and metastatic sites. K-ras gene could be checked in paired specimens from 33 patients, thirteen patients (39.6%) were discordant for the status of K-ras. In primary lung adenocarcinoma, there were 14 patients of mutant EGFR had mutant K-ras synchronously. This study revealed that the status of EGFR mutation in lung adenocarcinomas is relatively consistent between primary and metastatic sites compared to K-ras mutation. However, there are still a few cases of adenocarcinoma of lung showing discordance for the status of EGFR mutation. Repeated analysis of EGFR mutation is highly recommended if tissue from metastatic or recurrent site is available for the evaluation of target therapy. PMID:27070580

  6. Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) in lung cells by wood smoke particulate material.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Darien; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Romero, Erin G; Hughen, Ronald W; Light, Alan R; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2013-05-20

    Cigarette smoke, diesel exhaust, and other combustion-derived particles activate the calcium channel transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), causing irritation and inflammation in the respiratory tract. It was hypothesized that wood smoke particulate and select chemical constituents thereof would also activate TRPA1 in lung cells, potentially explaining the adverse effects of wood and other forms of biomass smoke on the respiratory system. TRPA1 activation was assessed using calcium imaging assays in TRPA1-overexpressing HEK-293 cells, mouse primary trigeminal neurons, and human adenocarcinoma (A549) lung cells. Particles from pine and mesquite smoke were less potent agonists of TRPA1 than an equivalent mass concentration of an ethanol extract of diesel exhaust particles; pine particles were comparable in potency to cigarette smoke condensate, and mesquite particles were the least potent. The fine particulate (PM < 2.5 μm) of wood smoke were the most potent TRPA1 agonists and several chemical constituents of wood smoke particulate, 3,5-ditert-butylphenol, coniferaldehyde, formaldehyde, perinaphthenone, agathic acid, and isocupressic acid, were TRPA1 agonists. Pine particulate activated TRPA1 in mouse trigeminal neurons and A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, which was inhibited by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. TRPA1 activation by wood smoke particles occurred through the electrophile/oxidant-sensing domain (i.e., C621/C641/C665/K710), based on the inhibition of cellular responses when the particles were pretreated with glutathione; a role for the menthol-binding site of TRPA1 (S873/T874) was demonstrated for 3,5-ditert-butylphenol. This study demonstrated that TRPA1 is a molecular sensor for wood smoke particulate and several chemical constituents thereof, in sensory neurons and A549 cells, suggesting that TRPA1 may mediate some of the adverse effects of wood smoke in humans.

  7. In vitro invasion of small-cell lung cancer cell lines correlates with expression of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Damstrup, L.; Rude Voldborg, B.; Spang-Thomsen, M.; Brünner, N.; Skovgaard Poulsen, H.

    1998-01-01

    Formation of metastasis is a multistep process involving attachment to the basement membrane, local proteolysis and migration into surrounding tissues, lymph or bloodstream. In the present study, we have analysed the correlation between in vitro invasion and presence of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a panel of 21 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines. We have previously reported that ten of these cell lines expressed EGFR protein detected by radioreceptor and affinity labelling assays. In 11 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines, EGFR mRNA was detected by Northern blot analysis. In vitro invasion in a Boyden chamber assay was found in all EGFR-positive cell lines, whereas no invasion was detected in the EGFR-negative cell lines. Quantification of the in vitro invasion in 12 selected SCLC cell lines demonstrated that, in the EGFR-positive cell lines, between 5% and 16% of the cells added to the upper chamber were able to traverse the Matrigel membrane. Expression of several matrix metalloproteases (MMP), of tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP) and of cathepsin B was evaluated by immunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). However, in vitro invasive SCLC cell lines could not be distinguished from non-invasive cell lines based on the expression pattern of these molecules. In six SCLC cell lines, in vitro invasion was also determined in the presence of the EGFR-neutralizing monoclonal antibody mAb528. The addition of this antibody resulted in a significant reduction of the in vitro invasion in three selected EGFR-positive cell lines. Our results show that only EGFR-positive SCLC cell lines had the in vitro invasive phenotype, and it is therefore suggested that the EGFR might play an important role for the invasion potential of SCLC cell lines. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9744504

  8. Inhibition of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Cobra Venom α-Neurotoxins: Is There a Perspective in Lung Cancer Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Alama, Angela; Bruzzo, Cristina; Cavalieri, Zita; Forlani, Alessandra; Utkin, Yuri; Casciano, Ida; Romani, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine exerts its oncogenic effects through the binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and the activation of downstream pathways that block apoptosis and promote neo-angiogenesis. The nAChRs of the α7 subtype are present on a wide variety of cancer cells and their inhibition by cobra venom neurotoxins has been proposed in several articles and reviews as a potential innovative lung cancer therapy. However, since part of the published results was recently retracted, we believe that the antitumoral activity of cobra venom neurotoxins needs to be independently re-evaluated. We determined the activity of α-neurotoxins from Naja atra (short-chain neurotoxin, α-cobrotoxin) and Naja kaouthia (long-chain neurotoxin, α-cobratoxin) in vitro by cytotoxicity measurements in 5 lung cancer cell lines, by colony formation assay with α7nAChRs expressing and non-expressing cell lines and in vivo by assessing tumor growth in an orthotopic Non-Obese Diabetic/Severe Combined Immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse model system utilizing different treatment schedules and dosages. No statistically significant reduction in tumor growth was observed in the treatment arms in comparison to the control for both toxins. Paradoxically α-cobrotoxin from Naja atra showed the tendency to enhance tumor growth although, even in this case, the statistical significance was not reached. In conclusion our results show that, in contrast with other reports, the nAChR inhibitors α-cobratoxin from N. kaouthia and α-cobrotoxin from N. atra neither suppressed tumor growth nor prolonged the survival of the treated animals. PMID:21695184

  9. Scavenging for Better Library Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocking, Terry S.; Schafer, Susan A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Library Scavenger Hunt program at Baylor University (part of the reading and study skills program) which emphasizes learning what sources are available in a college library, where they are located, and how to use them. (SR)

  10. Methylation of the estrogen receptor CpG island distinguishes spontaneous and plutonium-induced tumors from nitrosamine-induced lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Belinsky, S.A.; Baylin, S.B.; Issa, J.J.

    1995-12-01

    CpG islands located in the promoter region of genes constitute one mechanism for regulating transcription. These islands are normally free of methylation, regardless of the expression state of the gene. Hypermethylation of CpG islands, the addition of a methyl group to the internal cytosine within CpG dinucleotides, can cause silencing of a gene. Hypermethylation has been detected as an early event at specific chromosome loci during the development of colon cancer and represents one mechanism used by neoplatic cells to inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Recent studies have demonstrated this mechanism in inactivation of the VHL tumor suppressor gene in 19% of sporadic renal tumors and the p16 {sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in 30% of non-small cell lung cancers. A recent report indicates that the estrogen receptor gene could also be inactivated through methylation. In addition, estrogen receptor CpG island methylation arises as a direct function of age in normal colonic mucosa and is present in virtually all colonic tumors. In cultured colon cancer cells, methylation-associated loss of expression of the estrogen receptor gene results in deregulated growth, suggesting a role for the estrogen receptor in colon cancer development. These results provide further evidence that gene silencing through methylation could be a predominant epigenetic mechanism underlying the development of many different types of cancer. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether estrogen receptor CpG island methylation is involved in the development of lung cancer. The frequency for methylation of the estrogen receptor CpG island in rodent lung tumors is summarized.

  11. Identification of Cell Type-Specific Differences in Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling in Primary Erythroid and Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salopiata, Florian; Depner, Sofia; Wäsch, Marvin; Böhm, Martin E.; Mücke, Oliver; Plass, Christoph; Lehmann, Wolf D.; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; Klingmüller, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO). However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR) and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid) and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR). The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in erythroid

  12. [Toll-like receptors expression in the lungs of human metapneumovirus infected mice and the effects of polyI:C on viral infection].

    PubMed

    Dou, Ying; Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Dong

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the expression changes of Toll-like receptors (TLR) in the lungs of human metapneumovirus infected BALB/c mice, and to explore the effects of PolyI:C on viral replication, HMPV-infected group, PolyI:C+hMPV group, PolyI:C+DMED group and DMEM control group were set up for this study. All mice were sacrificed on day 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 16 post inoculation. Lungs were used for viral titration, pulmonary histopathology and detection of TLRs mRNA expression by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. Results showed that the levels of viral replication in the lungs of PolyI:C+hMPV infected mice were significantly decreased and lung inflammation were also lessened compared with those of hMPV infected mice. RT-PCR detection showed that mRNA levels of most TLRs were up-regulated (P < 0.05) in the lungs of hMPV infected group compared with DMEM group. Real time PCR assay showed that TLR7-8 mRNA significantly increased in hMPV infected group in a time-dependent manner. The level of TLR3 mRNA was significantly up-regulated in PolyI:C+hMPV group at the 24 hour after intranasal inoculation. The results showed that hMPV infection up-regulated the expression of TLRs in lungs of BALB/c mice and TLR7/8 pathway might play an important role in the start of natural immune response. PolyI:C was capable of inhibiting viral replication in the lung of mice and reducing lung inflammation probably through the early activation of TLR3.

  13. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancers: an update for recent advances in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Clement

    2016-06-01

    The presence of activating gene mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor of non-small cell lung cancer patients is predictive (improved progression-free survival and improved response rate) when treated with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. The two most common mutations that account for greater than 85% of all EGFR gene mutations are in-frame deletions in exon 19 (LREA deletions) and substitution in exon 21 (L858R). Exon 18 mutations occur much less frequently at about 4% of all EGFR gene mutations. Together, exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R gene substitution are present in about 10% of Caucasian patients and 20-40% of Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. T790M gene mutation at exon 20 is associated with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early studies showed that activating EGFR gene mutations are most common in patients with adenocarcinoma histology, women, never smokers and those of Asian ethnicity. A recent multi-center phase III trial suggested that frontline epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy with afatinib is associated with improved progression-free survival compared to chemotherapy regardless of race. Moreover, guidelines now suggest EGFR gene mutation testing should be conducted in all patients with lung adenocarcinoma or mixed lung cancers with an adenocarcinoma component, regardless of characteristics such as smoking status, gender or race. The success of targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer patients has changed the treatment paradigm in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, despite a durable response of greater than a year, resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors inevitably occurs. This mini-review describes the clinically relevant EGFR gene mutations and the efficacy/toxicity of small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase

  14. Sustained activation of toll-like receptor 9 induces an invasive phenotype in lung fibroblasts: possible implications in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kirillov, Varvara; Siler, Jonathan T; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Ge, Lingyin; Davis, James; Grant, Geraldine; Nathan, Steven D; Jarai, Gabor; Trujillo, Glenda

    2015-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by excessive scarring of the lung parenchyma, resulting in a steady decline of lung function and ultimately respiratory failure. The disease course of IPF is extremely variable, with some patients exhibiting stability of symptoms for prolonged periods of time, whereas others exhibit rapid progression and loss of lung function. Viral infections have been implicated in IPF and linked to disease severity; however, whether they directly contribute to progression is unclear. We previously classified patients as rapid and slow progressors on the basis of clinical features and expression of the pathogen recognition receptor, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Activation of TLR9 in vivo exacerbated IPF in mice and induced differentiation of myofibroblasts in vitro, but the mechanism of TLR9 up-regulation and progression of fibrosis are unknown. Herein, we investigate whether transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, a pleiotropic cytokine central to IPF pathogenesis, regulates TLR9 in lung myofibroblasts. Results showed induction of TLR9 expression by TGF-β in lung myofibroblasts and a distinct profibrotic myofibroblast phenotype driven by stimulation with the TLR9 agonist, CpG-DNA. Chronic TLR9 stimulation resulted in stably differentiated α-smooth muscle actin(+)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor α(+)/CD44(+)/matrix metalloproteinase-14(+)/matrix metalloproteinase-2(+) myofibroblasts, which secrete inflammatory cytokines, invade Matrigel toward platelet-derived growth factor, and resist hypoxia-induced apoptosis. These results suggest a mechanism by which TGF-β and TLR9 responses in myofibroblasts collaborate to drive rapid progression of IPF.

  15. Chitinase 3–like–1 and its receptors in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome–associated lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; He, Chuan Hua; Herzog, Erica L.; Peng, Xueyan; Lee, Chang-Min; Nguyen, Tung H.; Gulati, Mridu; Gochuico, Bernadette R.; Gahl, William A.; Slade, Martin L.; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) comprises a group of inherited disorders caused by mutations that alter the function of lysosome-related organelles. Pulmonary fibrosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with subtypes HPS-1 and HPS-4, which both result from defects in biogenesis of lysosome-related organelle complex 3 (BLOC-3). The prototypic chitinase-like protein chitinase 3–like–1 (CHI3L1) plays a protective role in the lung by ameliorating cell death and stimulating fibroproliferative repair. Here, we demonstrated that circulating CHI3L1 levels are higher in HPS patients with pulmonary fibrosis compared with those who remain fibrosis free, and that these levels associate with disease severity. Using murine HPS models, we also determined that these animals have a defect in the ability of CHI3L1 to inhibit epithelial apoptosis but exhibit exaggerated CHI3L1-driven fibroproliferation, which together promote HPS fibrosis. These divergent responses resulted from differences in the trafficking and effector functions of two CHI3L1 receptors. Specifically, the enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis was due to abnormal localization of IL-13Rα2 as a consequence of dysfunctional BLOC-3–dependent membrane trafficking. In contrast, the fibrosis was due to interactions between CHI3L1 and the receptor CRTH2, which trafficked normally in BLOC-3 mutant HPS. These data demonstrate that CHI3L1-dependent pathways exacerbate pulmonary fibrosis and suggest CHI3L1 as a potential biomarker for pulmonary fibrosis progression and severity in HPS. PMID:26121745

  16. Platelet-activating factor exerts mitogenic activity and stimulates expression of interleukin 6 and interleukin 8 in human lung fibroblasts via binding to its functional receptor

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent proinflammatory phospholipid mediator of the lung. In this study, we demonstrate that PAF receptor mRNA and protein is expressed by human lung fibroblasts. Interaction of PAF with its specific receptor resulted in increases of tyrosine phosphorylation of several intracellular proteins, indicating that the PAF-receptor might be functionally active. PAF-induced transcription of protooncogenes c-fos and c-jun as well as of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 genes in human fibroblasts. Transcription of the interleukins was followed by secretion of the respective proteins. Moreover, PAF enhanced proliferation of fibroblasts in a concentration-dependent manner. Using signaling inhibitors, we demonstrate that PAF-induced transcription of the c-fos, IL-6, and IL-8 genes, as well as proliferation, require activation of pertussis toxin- sensitive G proteins, tyrosine kinases, and protein kinase C (PKC). In contrast, transcription of c-jun was blocked by pertussis toxin, but not by inhibitors for tyrosine kinases or PKC. These data suggest that PAF stimulates distinct signaling pathways in human lung fibroblasts. In addition, the activation of human fibroblasts by PAF leads to enhanced proliferation and to the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, which may contribute to the pathophysiological changes in pulmonary inflammation. PMID:8691134

  17. Icotinib combined whole brain radiotherapy for patients with brain metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Rui; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain is a metastatic organ that is most prone to lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). However, the prognosis of patients with brain metastasis remains very poor. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of icotinib plus whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for treating patients with brain metastasis from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated LAC. Methods All patients received standard WBRT administered to the whole brain in 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. Each patient was also instructed to take 125 mg icotinib thrice per day beginning from the first day of the WBRT. After completing the WBRT, maintenance icotinib was administered until the disease progressed or intolerable adverse effects were observed. Cranial progression-free survival (CPFS) and overall survival (OS) times were the primary endpoints. Results A total of 43 patients were enrolled in this study. Two patients (4.7%) presented a complete response (CR), whereas 20 patients (46.5%) presented a partial response (PR). The median CPFS and OS times were 11.0 and 15.0 months, respectively. The one-year CPFS rate was 40.0% for the patients harboring EGFR exon 19 deletion and 16.7% for the patients with EGFR exon 21 L858R (P=0.027). Conclusions The concurrent administration of icotinib and WBRT exhibited favorable effects on the patients with brain metastasis. EGFR exon 19 deletion was predictive of a long CPFS following icotinib plus WBRT. PMID:27499937

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors with conventional chemotherapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Song, PingPing; Li, Hui; Guo, HongBo; Jia, Hui; Zhang, BaiJiang

    2016-01-01

    We report a Chinese male patient with advanced stage lung squamous cell carcinoma who developed brain metastases after responding to treatment comprising six cycles of conventional chemotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin. The patient was then treated with oral erlotinib (150 mg/day) and whole-brain radiation therapy followed by four cycles of docetaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy. The patient then received gefitinib (250 mg/day) as a maintenance therapy until the end of the follow-up period. In this patient, progression-free survival, defined as the interval from the initiation of first-line chemotherapy to the cessation of erlotinib due to progressive disease or death from any cause, was 3 months. Overall survival, defined as the interval from the initiation of first-line chemotherapy to death from any cause, was 75 months. Erlotinib was well tolerated in combination with whole-brain radiation therapy and a favorable objective response rate was observed. Furthermore, targeted drug treatment warrants consideration in patients with a negative epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status and male patients with a history of smoking. PMID:26719713

  19. The next generation of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Conor E; Khuri, Fadlo R; Ramalingam, Suresh S

    2015-04-15

    The discovery of "driver" genomic alterations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has dramatically changed the field of thoracic oncology in recent years. The best understood of these molecular drivers are those involving the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which when aberrantly activated are integral to the development of a subset of NSCLC tumors. First-generation and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) specific to the activated EGFR have shown significant efficacy and have brought about the era of targeted therapy for NSCLC. The most common resistance mechanism is a threonine-to-methionine substitution (T790M) in exon 20 of the EGFR gene. Although the previous standard of care in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC that progressed on initial TKI therapy was chemotherapy, third-generation EGFR TKIs have now been developed and have yielded promising results for this population of patients with NSCLC. This article reviews the emerging data regarding third-generation agents in the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC.

  20. Patterns of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in non-small-cell lung cancers in the Gulf region

    PubMed Central

    JAZIEH, ABDUL RAHMAN; JAAFAR, HASAN; JALOUDI, MOHAMMED; MUSTAFA, RASHA SALEH; RASUL, KAKIL; ZEKRI, JAMAL; BAMEFLEH, HANAA; GASMELSEED, AHMED

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations (EGFRmut) in the Gulf region (GR) and its correlation with demographic and clinical characteristics. A multisite retrospective study was conducted, including institutions from Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar. All consecutive patients with non-small-cell lung cancer tested for EGFRmut were eligible. Data collected included demographic information, disease characteristics and EGFR test results. Data on 230 patients were obtained. The median age of the patients was 61 years (range, 26–87 years); 169 patients (69.83%) were male and 204 (88.7%) were Arab. The histological subtype was adenocarcinoma in 191 (83.4%) and squamous cell carcinoma in 21 cases (9.17%). Overall, EGFRmut were detected in 66 patients (28.7%), with a prevalence of 32.46% in adenocarcinoma. No squamous cell carcinomas were found to harbor EGFRmut. The univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that female gender, non-smoking status and adenocarcinoma subtype were significant predictors for EGFRmut. There was no difference between Arabs and non-Arabs. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first multisite study to report the prevalence of EGFRmut in the GR population, which was found to be higher compared with that in Western, but lower compared with that in Far Eastern populations. Studies evaluating the efficacy of targeted therapy in this population are underway. PMID:26807249

  1. Low-dose megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography for lung tumors using a high-efficiency image receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sillanpaa, Jussi; Chang Jenghwa; Mageras, Gikas; Yorke, Ellen; Arruda, Fernando De; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Munro, Peter; Seppi, Edward; Pavkovich, John; Amols, Howard

    2006-09-15

    We report on the capabilities of a low-dose megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) system. The high-efficiency image receptor consists of a photodiode array coupled to a scintillator composed of individual CsI crystals. The CBCT system uses the 6 MV beam from a linear accelerator. A synchronization circuit allows us to limit the exposure to one beam pulse [0.028 monitor units (MU)] per projection image. 150-500 images (4.2-13.9 MU total) are collected during a one-minute scan and reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Anthropomorphic and contrast phantoms are imaged and the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstruction is studied as a function of the number of projections and the error in the projection angles. The detector dose response is linear (R{sup 2} value 0.9989). A 2% electron density difference is discernible using 460 projection images and a total exposure of 13 MU (corresponding to a maximum absorbed dose of about 12 cGy in a patient). We present first patient images acquired with this system. Tumors in lung are clearly visible and skeletal anatomy is observed in sufficient detail to allow reproducible registration with the planning kV CT images. The MV CBCT system is shown to be capable of obtaining good quality three-dimensional reconstructions at relatively low dose and to be clinically usable for improving the accuracy of radiotherapy patient positioning.

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jeppe M; Musavian, Hanieh S; Butt, Tariq M; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Thysen, Anna H; Brix, Susanne

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H. influenzae induced severe Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P. nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P. nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable by the respiratory immune system.

  3. Successful pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy for epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, HIROKO; TAMURA, TOMOHIRO; KAGOHASHI, KATSUNORI; KAWAGUCHI, MIO; KURISHIMA, KOICHI; SATOH, HIROAKI

    2016-01-01

    Pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy has shown promise in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, although adenosquamous cell lung cancer (ASCLC) is a type of NSCLC, the availability of studies investigating its response to pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy is limited. A 66-year-old woman was referred to Mito Medical Center, University of Tsukuba with hemoptysis and a chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a large cavitary mass in the lower lobe of the left lung. The patient underwent left lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection. The tumor was staged as pT2bN2M0. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletion was identified in the adenocarcinomatous as well as the squamous cell carcinomatous components. Despite gefitinib therapy for pulmonary metastases, the patient developed cavitary metastases in both lungs. Therefore, treatment with pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy was initiated. A chest CT scan revealed significant regression of the metastatic lesions in both lungs, with thinning of the walls. The patient remains well and recurrence-free 19 months after the initiation of pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy. Therefore, the clinical response of EGFR mutation-positive ASCLC to pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy was promising, suggesting pemetrexed to be one of the key drugs for this subset of ASCLC patients. PMID:27073680

  4. Influence of age, sex and rearing systems on Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) expression pattern in gut, lung and lymphoid tissues of indigenous ducks.

    PubMed

    Kolluri, Gautham; Ramamurthy, N; Churchil, R R; Dhinakar Raj, G; Kannaki, T R

    2014-02-01

    Abstract 1. The objective of the experiment was to determine the influence of age, sex and rearing system on Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) gene expression in gut, lung and lymphoid tissues and physiological responses to stress in male and female indigenous ducks of Tamil Nadu, India. 2. A total of 36 ducks (12 males and 24 females) were obtained from local farmers and tissue samples of gut tissues (duodenum, jejunum, ileum and caecum), lymphoid organs (spleen and bursa) and lungs were collected in RNAlater solution followed by RNA extraction. 3. After normalisation to β-actin (endogenous control) qPCR analysis identified a significant effect of age, sex and rearing system on TLR7 expression in the ducks. 4. A significant up-regulation of TLR7 expression was observed in lungs, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and caecum of sexually mature (45 wk) compared with that of immature ducks (16 wk). Among sexes, male ducks had significantly higher TLR7 expression than female ducks. 5. Age and sex interactions were significant in lungs, duodenum, jejunum and caecum. Ducks reared in an extensive housing system showed significantly higher TLR7 expression in bursa, lungs, duodenum, ileum and caecum compared to intensively reared ducks. There were no effects of age, sex and rearing systems on TLR7 expression in the spleen. 6. The heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and serum corticosterone were higher in ducks reared on an intensive system compared with ducks from an extensive rearing system.

  5. Lung cancer susceptibility among atomic bomb survivors in relation to CA repeat number polymorphism of epidermal growth factor receptor gene and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakachi, Kei; Imai, Kazue; Cologne, John B; Niwa, Yasuharu; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Prevention could be improved by identifying susceptible individuals as well as improving understanding of interactions between genes and etiological environmental agents, including radiation exposure. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-signaling pathway, regulating cellular radiation sensitivity, is an oncogenic cascade involved in lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma. The cytosine adenine (CA) repeat number polymorphism in the first intron of EGFR has been shown to be inversely correlated with EGFR production. It is hypothesized that CA repeat number may modulate individual susceptibility to lung cancer. Thus, we carried out a case-cohort study within the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivor cohort to evaluate a possible association of CA repeat polymorphism with lung cancer risk in radiation-exposed or negligibly exposed (<5 mGy) A-bomb survivors. First, by dividing study subjects into Short and Long genotypes, defined as the summed CA repeat number of two alleles < or = 37 and > or = 38, respectively, we found that the Short genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, specifically adenocarcinoma, among negligibly exposed subjects. Next, we found that prior radiation exposure significantly enhanced lung cancer risk of survivors with the Long genotype, whereas the risk for the Short genotype did not show any significant increase with radiation dose, resulting in indistinguishable risks between these genotypes at a high radiation dose. Our findings imply that the EGFR pathway plays a crucial role in assessing individual susceptibility to lung adenocarcinoma in relation to radiation exposure.

  6. Lung cancer susceptibility among atomic bomb survivors in relation to CA repeat number polymorphism of epidermal growth factor receptor gene and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakachi, Kei; Imai, Kazue; Cologne, John B; Niwa, Yasuharu; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Prevention could be improved by identifying susceptible individuals as well as improving understanding of interactions between genes and etiological environmental agents, including radiation exposure. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-signaling pathway, regulating cellular radiation sensitivity, is an oncogenic cascade involved in lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma. The cytosine adenine (CA) repeat number polymorphism in the first intron of EGFR has been shown to be inversely correlated with EGFR production. It is hypothesized that CA repeat number may modulate individual susceptibility to lung cancer. Thus, we carried out a case-cohort study within the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivor cohort to evaluate a possible association of CA repeat polymorphism with lung cancer risk in radiation-exposed or negligibly exposed (<5 mGy) A-bomb survivors. First, by dividing study subjects into Short and Long genotypes, defined as the summed CA repeat number of two alleles < or = 37 and > or = 38, respectively, we found that the Short genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, specifically adenocarcinoma, among negligibly exposed subjects. Next, we found that prior radiation exposure significantly enhanced lung cancer risk of survivors with the Long genotype, whereas the risk for the Short genotype did not show any significant increase with radiation dose, resulting in indistinguishable risks between these genotypes at a high radiation dose. Our findings imply that the EGFR pathway plays a crucial role in assessing individual susceptibility to lung adenocarcinoma in relation to radiation exposure. PMID:19843645

  7. The P21-activated kinase expression pattern is different in non-small cell lung cancer and affects lung cancer cell sensitivity to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Si; Dong, Qian-Ze; Jiang, Gui-Yang; Han, Yong; Wang, Liang; Wang, En-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Exploring methods for increasing epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) sensitivity has become a major focus in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Major downstream effectors of the Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases, P21-activated kinases (PAKs) activate the main signaling pathways downstream of EGFR and thus promote tumor cell proliferation. In this study, we explored the expression pattern of phosphorylated PAKs in NSCLC and their potential value as drug targets for treating cancer. The expression and prognostic significance of phosphorylated group I and II PAKs were evaluated in 182 patients with NSCLC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed low group I PAK expression in normal lung tissues and increased expressed in the cytoplasm, particularly in lung squamous cell carcinoma. Abnormal group I PAK expression was associated with lymph node metastases and high tumor-node-metastases (TNM) stage in NSCLC patients and correlated with poor prognosis. We used group I PAK inhibitor (IPA3) to specifically decrease group I PAK activity in human lung cancer cell lines. Decreased group I PAK activity inhibited cell proliferation and combined IPA3 and EGFR-TKI (gefitinib) treatment inhibited cell proliferation in an obvious manner. Together, our results revealed the PAK expression pattern in NSCLC, and a role for group I PAK in cell proliferation, which provides evidence that decreased PAK activity may have a potential application as a molecular targeted therapy in advanced NSCLC.

  8. Gene Polymorphism of Toll-Like Receptors and Lung Function at Five to Seven Years of Age after Infant Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Lauhkonen, Eero; Koponen, Petri; Vuononvirta, Juho; Teräsjärvi, Johanna; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Toikka, Jyri O.; Helminen, Merja; He, Qiushui; Korppi, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Aim Toll-like receptors (TLR) play a crucial role in innate immunity, protecting the host from pathogens such as viruses. Genetic variations in TLRs have been associated with the severity of viral bronchiolitis in infancy and with the later occurrence of post-bronchiolitis asthma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if there are any exploratory associations between TLR gene polymorphisms and lung function at 5 to 7 years of age in former bronchiolitis patients. Methods We performed impulse oscillometry (IOS) at the median age of 6.3 years for 103 children who had been hospitalized for bronchiolitis at less than six months of age. The main parameters evaluated were airway resistance and reactance at 5Hz in baseline and post-exercise measurements. Data on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of TLR1 rs5743618, TLR2 rs5743708, TLR6 rs5743810 and TLR10 rs4129009 (TLR2 subfamily) and TLR3 rs3775291, TLR4 rs4986790, TLR7 rs179008, TLR8 rs2407992 and TLR 9 rs187084 were available for analyses. Results The TLR4 rs4986790 wild genotype A/A was associated with a greater Rrs5 response (0.72 vs. -0.42, p = 0.03) to exercise. In TLR6 rs5743810, the minor allele T was associated with greater Rrs5 response (0.80 vs. -0.03, p = 0.04) to exercise. In TLR7 rs179008, the major allele A was associated with baseline decline in dRrs/df (-1.03 vs 0.61, p = 0.01) and increased Fres (2.28 vs. 0.89, p = 0.01) in girls. Conclusion Among the nine studied TLRs, only TLR7 rs179008 showed some exploratory associations with post-bronchiolitis lung function deficiency, and polymorphisms of TLR4 rs4986790, and TLR6 rs5743810 in particular, with airway reactivity. These findings call for further confirmatory studies. PMID:26741133

  9. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent regulation of miR-196a expression controls lung fibroblast apoptosis but not proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, Emelia; Zago, Michela; Sarill, Miles; Rico de Souza, Angela; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Hamid, Qutayba; Eidelman, David H.; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2014-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor implicated in the regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Although activation of the AhR by xenobiotics such as dioxin inhibits the cell cycle and control apoptosis, paradoxically, AhR expression also promotes cell proliferation and survival independent of exogenous ligands. The microRNA (miRNA) miR-196a has also emerged as a regulator of proliferation and apoptosis but a relationship between the AhR and miR-196a is not known. Therefore, we hypothesized that AhR-dependent regulation of endogenous miR-196a expression would promote cell survival and proliferation. Utilizing lung fibroblasts from AhR deficient (AhR{sup −/−}) and wild-type (AhR{sup +/+}) mice, we show that there is ligand-independent regulation of miRNA, including low miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} cells. Validation by qRT-PCR revealed a significant decrease in basal expression of miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} compared to AhR{sup +/+} cells. Exposure to AhR agonists benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and FICZ as well as AhR antagonist CH-223191 decreased miR-196a expression in AhR{sup +/+} fibroblasts concomitant with decreased AhR protein levels. There was increased proliferation only in AhR{sup +/+} lung fibroblasts in response to serum, corresponding to a decrease in p27{sup KIP1} protein, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Increasing the cellular levels of miR-196a had no effect on proliferation or expression of p27{sup KIP1} in AhR{sup −/−} fibroblasts but attenuated cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis. This study provides the first evidence that AhR expression is essential for the physiological regulation of cellular miRNA levels- including miR-196a. Future experiments designed to elucidate the functional relationship between the AhR and miR-196a may delineate additional novel ligand-independent roles for the AhR. - Highlights: • The AhR controls proliferation and apoptosis in lung cells. • The AhR regulates the

  10. Combined Treatment With Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Gamma Ligands and Gamma Radiation Induces Apoptosis by PPARγ-Independent Up-Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Deoxyribonucleic Acid Damage Signals in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Jong; Im, Chang-Nim; Park, Seon Hwa; Moon, Eun-Yi; Hong, Sung Hee

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate possible radiosensitizing activities of the well-known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ ligand ciglitazone and novel PPARγ ligands CAY10415 and CAY10506 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity was assessed using a clonogenic cell survival assay. To investigate the mechanism underlying PPARγ ligand-induced radiosensitization, the subdiploid cellular DNA fraction was analyzed by flow cytometry. Activation of the caspase pathway by combined PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation treatment was detected by immunoblot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and flow cytometry. Results: The 3 PPARγ ligands induced cell death and ROS generation in a PPARγ-independent manner, enhanced γ-radiation–induced apoptosis and caspase-3–mediated poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in vitro. The combined PPARγ ligand/γ-radiation treatment triggered caspase-8 activation, and this initiator caspase played an important role in the combination-induced apoptosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ ligands may enhance the γ-radiation-induced DNA damage response, possibly by increasing γ-H2AX expression. Moreover, the combination treatment significantly increased ROS generation, and the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine inhibited the combined treatment-induced ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Conclusions: Taken together, these results indicated that the combined treatment of PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation synergistically induced DNA damage and apoptosis, which was regulated by ROS.

  11. Intercalated chemotherapy and erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zwitter, Matjaz; Rajer, Mirjana; Stanic, Karmen; Vrankar, Martina; Doma, Andrej; Cuderman, Anka; Grmek, Marko; Kern, Izidor; Kovac, Viljem

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Among attempts to delay development of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activating mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), intercalated therapy has not been properly evaluated. In a phase II trial, 38 patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC in advanced stage were treated with 4 to 6 3-weekly cycles of intercalated schedule with gemcitabine (1250 mg/m2, days 1 and 4), cisplatin (75 mg/m2, day 2) and erlotinib (150 mg, days 5 – 15), followed by continuous erlotinib as maintenance. In addition to standard radiologic evaluation according to RECIST, PET/CT was done prior to treatment and at 6 months, using PERCIST as a method for assessment of response. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). In general, tolerance to treatment was good, even among 8 patients with performance status 2–3 and 13 patients with brain metastases; grade 4 toxicity included 2 cases of neutropenia and 4 thrombo-embolic events. Complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) were seen in 15 (39.5%) and 17 (44.7%) cases, respectively. All cases of CR were confirmed also by PET/CT. Median PFS was 23.4 months and median overall survival (OS) was 38.3  months. After a median follow-up of 35 months, 8 patients are still in CR and on maintenance erlotinib. In conclusion, intercalated treatment for treatment-naive patients with EGFR activating mutations leads to excellent response rate and prolonged PFS and survival. Comparison of the intercalated schedule to monotherapy with TKIs in a randomized trial is warranted. PMID:27261103

  12. Co-active receptor tyrosine kinases mitigate the effect of FGFR inhibitors in FGFR1-amplified lung cancers with low FGFR1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kotani, H; Ebi, H; Kitai, H; Nanjo, S; Kita, K; Huynh, T G; Ooi, A; Faber, A C; Mino-Kenudson, M; Yano, S

    2016-07-01

    Targeted therapies are effective in subsets of lung cancers with EGFR mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations. Large-scale genomics have recently expanded the lung cancer landscape with FGFR1 amplification found in 10-20% of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). However, the response rates have been low for biomarker-directed fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor therapy in SCC, which contrasts to the relatively high rates of response seen in EGFR mutant and ALK-translocated lung cancers treated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and ALK inhibitors, respectively. In order to better understand the low response rates of FGFR1-amplified lung cancers to FGFR inhibitors, relationships between gene copy number, mRNA expression and protein expression of FGFR1 were assessed in cell lines, tumor specimens and data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The importance of these factors for the sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors was determined by analyzing drug screen data and conducting in vitro and in vivo experiments. We report that there was a discrepancy between FGFR1 amplification level and FGFR1 protein expression in a number of these cell lines, and the cancers with unexpectedly low FGFR1 expression were uniformly resistant to the different FGFR inhibitors. Further interrogation of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity in these discordant cell lines revealed co-activation of HER2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) caused by gene amplification or ligand overexpression maintained phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and MEK/ERK signaling even in the presence of FGFR inhibitor. Accordingly, co-inhibition of FGFR1 and HER2 or PDGFRα led to enhanced drug responses. In contrast, FGFR1-amplified high FGFR1 protein-expressing lung cancers are sensitive to FGFR inhibitor monotherapy by downregulating ERK signaling. Addition of a PI3K inhibitor to these high FGFR1 protein-expressing cancers further sensitized them to FGFR

  13. Prognostic value of the expression of estrogen receptor β in patients with non-small cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lihong; Zhan, Ping; Liu, Yafang; Zhou, Zejun; Zhu, Qingqing; Miu, Yingying; Wang, Xiaoxia; Jin, Jiajia; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men and the second leading cause in women worldwide. It is becoming increasingly clear that estrogen and estrogen receptors are involved in the pathogenesis and development of lung cancer. However, observational studies on the prognostic role of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are controversial. Methods To clarify the impact of ERβ in NSCLC survival, we performed this meta-analysis that included eligible studies. The combined hazard ratios (HR) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated in terms of overall survival. Results A total of eleven studies with 3,300 patients were evaluable for this meta-analysis. Our results suggested that ERβ overexpression had no relationship on survival of patients with NSCLC, the HR (95% CI) was 1.000 (0.954–1.047) overall. Moreover, there was no heterogeneity between the studies. Conclusions ERβ overexpression indicates no relationship of prognosis for patients with NSCLC. PMID:27186517

  14. Crosstalk with cancer-associated fibroblasts induces resistance of non-small cell lung cancer cells to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Chungyoul; Shin, Yong-Sung; Kim, Changhoon; Choi, So-Jung; Lee, Jinseon; Kim, So Young; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-01-01

    Although lung cancers with activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are highly sensitive to selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), these tumors invariably develop acquired drug resistance. Host stromal cells have been found to have a considerable effect on the sensitivity of cancer cells to EGFR TKIs. Little is known, however, about the signaling mechanisms through which stromal cells contribute to the response to EGFR TKI in non-small cell lung cancer. This work examined the role of hedgehog signaling in cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF)-mediated resistance of lung cancer cells to the EGFR TKI erlotinib. PC9 cells, non-small cell lung cancer cells with EGFR-activating mutations, became resistant to the EGFR TKI erlotinib when cocultured in vitro with CAFs. Polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical assays showed that CAFs induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in PC9 cells, with an associated change in the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition marker proteins including vimentin. Importantly, CAFs induce upregulation of the 7-transmembrane protein smoothened, the central signal transducer of hedgehog, suggesting that the hedgehog signaling pathway is active in CAF-mediated drug resistance. Indeed, downregulation of smoothened activity with the smoothened antagonist cyclopamine induces remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton independently of Gli-mediated transcriptional activity in PC9 cells. These findings indicate that crosstalk with CAFs plays a critical role in resistance of lung cancer to EGFR TKIs through induction of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and may be an ideal therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:26676152

  15. Acquired resistance mechanisms to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation--diversity, ductility, and destiny.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancers that harbor somatic activating mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) depend on mutant EGFR for their proliferation and survival; therefore, lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations often dramatically respond to orally available EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, emergence of acquired resistance is virtually inevitable, thus limiting improvement in patient outcomes. To elucidate and overcome this acquired resistance, multidisciplinary basic and clinical investigational approaches have been applied, using in vitro cell line models or samples obtained from lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. These efforts have revealed several acquired resistance mechanisms and candidates, including EGFR secondary mutations (T790M and other rare mutations), MET amplification, PTEN downregulation, CRKL amplification, high-level HGF expression, FAS-NFκB pathway activation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and conversion to small cell lung cancer. Interestingly, cancer cells harbor potential destiny and ductility together in acquiring resistance to EGFR-TKIs, as shown in in vitro acquired resistance models. Molecular mechanisms of "reversible EGFR-TKI tolerance" that occur in early phase EGFR-TKI exposure have been identified in cell line models. Furthermore, others have reported molecular markers that can predict response to EGFR-TKIs in clinical settings. Deeper understanding of acquired resistance mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs, followed by the development of molecular target drugs that can overcome the resistance, might turn this fatal disease into a chronic disorder.

  16. Cryopreserved Human Precision-Cut Lung Slices as a Bioassay for Live Tissue Banking. A Viability Study of Bronchodilation with Bitter-Taste Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Patel, Kruti R; Rosas, Ivan; Sanderson, Michael J; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-05-01

    Human precision-cut lung slices (hPCLSs) provide a unique ex vivo model for translational research. However, the limited and unpredictable availability of human lung tissue greatly impedes their use. Here, we demonstrate that cryopreservation of hPCLSs facilitates banking of live human lung tissue for routine use. Our results show that cryopreservation had little effect on overall cell viability and vital functions of immune cells, including phagocytes and T lymphocytes. In addition, airway contraction and relaxation in response to specific agonists and antagonists, respectively, were unchanged after cryopreservation. At the subcellular level, cryopreserved hPCLSs maintained Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory mechanisms for the control of airway smooth muscle cell contractility. To exemplify the use of cryopreserved hPCLSs in smooth muscle research, we provide evidence that bitter-taste receptor (TAS2R) agonists relax airways by blocking Ca(2+) oscillations in airway smooth muscle cells. In conclusion, the banking of cryopreserved hPCLSs provides a robust bioassay for translational research of lung physiology and disease. PMID:26550921

  17. Cryopreserved Human Precision-Cut Lung Slices as a Bioassay for Live Tissue Banking. A Viability Study of Bronchodilation with Bitter-Taste Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Patel, Kruti R; Rosas, Ivan; Sanderson, Michael J; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-05-01

    Human precision-cut lung slices (hPCLSs) provide a unique ex vivo model for translational research. However, the limited and unpredictable availability of human lung tissue greatly impedes their use. Here, we demonstrate that cryopreservation of hPCLSs facilitates banking of live human lung tissue for routine use. Our results show that cryopreservation had little effect on overall cell viability and vital functions of immune cells, including phagocytes and T lymphocytes. In addition, airway contraction and relaxation in response to specific agonists and antagonists, respectively, were unchanged after cryopreservation. At the subcellular level, cryopreserved hPCLSs maintained Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory mechanisms for the control of airway smooth muscle cell contractility. To exemplify the use of cryopreserved hPCLSs in smooth muscle research, we provide evidence that bitter-taste receptor (TAS2R) agonists relax airways by blocking Ca(2+) oscillations in airway smooth muscle cells. In conclusion, the banking of cryopreserved hPCLSs provides a robust bioassay for translational research of lung physiology and disease.

  18. RC-3095, a Selective Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist, Does Not Protect the Lungs in an Experimental Model of Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Freitas, Vera L.; Thomaz, Leonardo Dalla Giacomassa Rocha; Simoneti, Lucas Elias Lise; Malfitano, Christiane; De Angelis, Kátia; Ulbrich, Jane Maria; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Andrade, Cristiano Feijó

    2015-01-01

    RC-3095, a selective GRPR antagonist, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties in different models of inflammation. However, its protective effect on lungs submitted to lung ischemia-reperfusion injury has not been addressed before. Then, we administrated RC-3095 intravenously before and after lung reperfusion using an animal model of lung ischemia-reperfusion injury (LIRI) by clamping the pulmonary hilum. Twenty Wistar rats were subjected to an experimental model in four groups: SHAM, ischemia-reperfusion (IR), RC-Pre, and RC-Post. The final mean arterial pressure significantly decreased in IR and RC-Pre compared to their values before reperfusion (P < 0.001). The RC-Post group showed significant decrease of partial pressure of arterial oxygen at the end of the observation when compared to baseline (P = 0.005). Caspase-9 activity was significantly higher in the RC-Post as compared to the other groups (P < 0.013). No significant differences were observed in eNOS activity among the groups. The groups RC-Pre and RC-Post did not show any significant decrease in IL-1β (P = 0.159) and TNF-α (P = 0.260), as compared to IR. The histological score showed no significant differences among the groups. In conclusion, RC-3095 does not demonstrate a protective effect in our LIRI model. Additionally, its use after reperfusion seems to potentiate cell damage, stimulating apoptosis. PMID:25893195

  19. Radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer in the era of EGFR gene mutations and EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Moschini, Ilaria; Dell'Anna, Cristina; Losardo, Pier Luigi; Bordi, Paola; D'Abbiero, Nunziata; Tiseo, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) occurs, approximately, in 80-85% of all cases of lung cancer. The majority of patients present locally advanced or metastatic disease when diagnosed, with poor prognosis. The discovery of activating mutations in the EGFR gene has started a new era of personalized treatment for NSCLC patients. To improve the treatment outcome in patients with unresectable NSCLC and, in particular, EGFR mutated, a combined strategy of radiotherapy and medical treatment can be undertaken. In this review we will discuss preclinical data regarding EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and radiotherapy, available clinical trials investigating efficacy and toxicity of combined treatment (thoracic or whole brain radiotherapy and EGFR-TKIs) and, also, the role of local radiation in mutated EGFR patients who developed EGFR-TKI resistance.

  20. Parameterization of the scavenging coefficient for particle scavenging by drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredericks, Steven; Saylor, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    The removal of particles by drops occurs in many environmentally relevant scenarios such as particle fallout from rain, as well as in many industrial applications such as sprays for dust control in mines. In applications like these the ability of a drop to scavenge a particle is quantified by the scavenging coefficient, E, which is the fraction of particles removed. Though the physics controlling particle scavenging by drops suggests that E is controlled by several dimensionless groups, E is typically correlated to just the Stokes number. A survey of published experimental data shows significant scatter in plots of E versus the Stokes number, occasionally exceeding three orders of magnitude. There is also a large discrepancy between the published theories for E. A parameterization study was conducted to ascertain if and how inclusion of other dimensionless groups could better collapse the extant data for E and the results of that study are presented in this talk. Brief mention will also be made of recent experiments by the authors where E was measured for a liquid drop suspended in an ultrasonic standing wave field, where the drop diameter and gas velocity can be independently varied unlike the more typical experiments where these quantities are coupled.

  1. Solid waste scavenger community: an investigation in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kungskulniti, N; Pulket, C; Miller, F D; Smith, K R

    1991-01-01

    A solid waste scavenger community at On-Nooch dump site in Bangkok was investigated. The purpose was to identify the dimensions of the public health risk to this group of people and their community due to exposure to hazardous conditions from waste materials. A cross-sectional descriptive study utilizing field surveys and measurements was performed. The demographic, socioeconomic, health related and environmental characteristics of this community were examined. Health complaints and injuries were inventoried among scavengers. Prevalence of childhood respiratory illness was high especially in those households where smoking was present. Intestinal helminthic and protozoan infection in children were detected. Six individuals with possible HIV infection and a number of Hepatitis B anti-genemia were found among male respondents. An appreciable proportion of respondents fell below normal when tested for lung function. Air pollution measurements showed acceptable ambient air levels except for particulate matters. Water quality was low for both potable and nonpotable water.

  2. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Lacrimal Gland, Lung, and Liver Fibrosis in a Murine Model of Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaguchi, Saori; Ogawa, Yoko; Shimmura, Shigeto; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Hatou, Shin; Satofuka, Shingo; Nakamura, Shigeru; Imada, Toshihiro; Miyashita, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Satoru; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Ozawa, Yoko; Mori, Takehiko; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Yutaka; Ishida, Susumu; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), a serious complication following allogeneic HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation), is characterized by systemic fibrosis. The tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in the fibrotic pathogenesis, and an angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist can attenuate fibrosis. Tissue RAS is present in the lacrimal gland, lung, and liver, and is known to be involved in the fibrotic pathogenesis of the lung and liver. This study aimed to determine whether RAS is involved in fibrotic pathogenesis in the lacrimal gland and to assess the effect of an AT1R antagonist on preventing lacrimal gland, lung, and liver fibrosis in cGVHD model mice. We used the B10.D2→BALB/c (H-2d) MHC-compatible, multiple minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched model, which reflects clinical and pathological symptoms of human cGVHD. First, we examined the localization and expression of RAS components in the lacrimal glands using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Next, we administered an AT1R antagonist (valsartan; 10 mg/kg) or angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) antagonist (PD123319; 10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally into cGVHD model mice and assessed the fibrotic change in the lacrimal gland, lung, and liver. We demonstrated that fibroblasts expressed angiotensin II, AT1R, and AT2R, and that the mRNA expression of angiotensinogen was greater in the lacrimal glands of cGVHD model mice than in controls generated by syngeneic-HSCT. The inhibition experiment revealed that fibrosis of the lacrimal gland, lung, and liver was suppressed in mice treated with the AT1R antagonist, but not the AT2R antagonist. We conclude that RAS is involved in fibrotic pathogenesis in the lacrimal gland and that AT1R antagonist has a therapeutic effect on lacrimal gland, lung, and liver fibrosis in cGVHD model mice. Our findings point to AT1R antagonist as a possible target for therapeutic intervention in c

  3. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Haoran; Zhong, Wenzhao; Yang, Xuening

    2015-01-01

    The Lung Adjuvant Cisplatin Evaluation (LACE) meta-analysis and the meta-analysis of individual participant data reported by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) Meta-analysis Collaborative Group in neo-adjuvant setting validated respectively that adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy would significantly improve overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival for resectable NSCLC. However, chemotherapy has reached a therapeutic plateau. It has been confirmed that epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) targeting therapy provides a dramatic response to patients with advanced EGFR-mutation positive NSCLC. Researchers have paid more attention to exploring applications of TKIs to early resectable NSCLCs. Several studies on adjuvant TKI treatment concluded its safety and feasibility. But there existed certain limitations of these studies as inference factors to interpret data accurately: the BR19 study recruited patients among which almost 52% had stage IB and only 15 (3.0%, 15/503) had been confirmed with EGFR-mutant type; retrospective studies performed at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) selected EGFR mutant-type NSCLC patients but couldn’t avoid inherent defects inside retrospective researches; the RADIANT study revised endpoints from targeting at EGFR immunohistochemistry (IHC)+ and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)+ mutation to only EGFR IHC+ mutation, leading to selective bias; despite that the SELECT study validated efficacy of adjuvant TKI and second round of TKI after resistance occurred, a single-arm clinical trial is not that persuasive in the absence of comparison with chemotherapy. Taking all these limitations into account, CTONG1104 in China and IMPACT in Japan have been conducted and recruiting patients to offer higher level of evidences to explore efficacy of preoperative TKI therapy for early resectable EGFR mutation positive NSCLC patients (confirmed by pathological results of tumor tissue or

  4. The importance of molecular profiling in predicting response to epidermal growth factor receptor family inhibitors in non-small-cell lung cancer: focus on clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Anne S; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki

    2013-07-01

    In recent years, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family has become a key focus of non-small-cell lung cancer biology and targeted therapies, such as the reversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib and gefitinib. Initially, response to these agents was associated with certain demographic and clinical characteristics; subsequently, it was discovered that these subgroups were more likely to harbor specific mutations in the EGFR gene that enhanced tumor response. However, the presence of these mutations does not equate to therapeutic success. Other aspects of EGFR family signaling, including other types of EGFR mutations, EGFR protein expression, EGFR gene amplification, mediators of downstream signaling, and other receptors with similar downstream pathways may all play a role in response or resistance to treatment. The identification of these and other molecular determinants is driving the development of novel therapies designed to achieve improved clinical outcomes in patients.

  5. [Histology-based algorithm in the molecular diagnosis of mutations of the Epidernal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Popper, Helmut; Wrba, Fritz; Gruber-Mösenbacher, Ulrike; Hulla, Wolfgang; Pirker, Robert; Hilbe, Wolfgang; Studnicka, Michael; Mohn-Staudner, Andrea; Ploner, Ferdinand

    2011-05-01

    Patients with stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) harboring an activating mutation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Gene should be treated first-line with Gefitinib, an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). EGF receptor mutations are most common in adenocarcinomas, especially non-mucinous type, rare in squamous cell carcinomas and sarcomatoid carcinomas, and do not occur in neuroendocrine carcinomas. Therefore, the Pulmonary Pathology Working Group of the Austrian Society of Pathology, after intense discussions and in consensus with Oncologists and Pulmonologists, recommends a priori EGFR mutation analysis for all cases of adenocarcinoma, and for all other NSCLC upon clinical request. This will markedly reduce waiting time for those patients, which most likely will have the greatest benefit from EGFR TKI therapy.

  6. Somatostatin and dopamine receptor expression in lung carcinoma cells and effects of chimeric somatostatin-dopamine molecules on cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ferone, Diego; Arvigo, Marica; Semino, Claudia; Jaquet, Philippe; Saveanu, Alexandru; Taylor, John E; Moreau, Jacques-Pierre; Culler, Michael D; Albertelli, Manuela; Minuto, Francesco; Barreca, Antonina

    2005-12-01

    To study somatostatin/dopamine (SS/D) synergy in a human cell system constitutively expressing SS and D receptors (SSR and DR, respectively), we characterized the expression of SSR and DR subtypes in the non-small-cell lung cancer line Calu-6, and then we evaluated the effect on cell proliferation of SS/D chimeric molecules (BIM-23A387 and BIM-23A370), which bind with high affinity both sst(2) and D(2)R, and compared the results with those obtained by using SS-14 and subtype-selective SS analogs (SSA) and D agonists (DA). Because Calu-6 cells produce insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) peptides, which play a role in the autocrine/paracrine control of cell growth, we also investigated the effects of chimeric compounds on secretion and expression of IGF system components. Relative high levels of sst(2) and the long isoform of the D(2)R were detected by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot in Calu-6, together with sst(5) and to a lesser extent sst(3) and D(4)R. BIM-23A387 and BIM-23A370 significantly inhibited growth of Calu-6, whereas IGF-IGFBP secretion or expression was unaffected, suggesting a direct inhibitory effect. The inhibition of cell growth, measured by both [(3)H]thymidine incorporation and cell count, was significantly lower when individual SSA and DA control peptides or subtype-specific SSA and DA were tested. BIM-23A370 was more potent than BIM-23A387 (P < 0.001). These findings show that SS/D chimeras can inhibit Calu-6 proliferation in an IGF-independent manner and suggest that this enhanced potency might be because of the induction of SSR/DR dimerization. The Calu-6 cell line, constitutively expressing SSR and DR, provides a suitable model to elucidate the mechanism of action of SSA and DA on regulation of cell growth and to characterize the interaction between SSR and DR.

  7. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  8. An Autopsy Case of Two Distinct, Acquired Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-mutant Lung Adenocarcinoma: Small Cell Carcinoma Transformation and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor T790M Mutation.

    PubMed

    Furugen, Makoto; Uechi, Kayoko; Hirai, Jun; Aoyama, Hajime; Saio, Masanao; Yoshimi, Naoki; Kinjo, Takeshi; Miyagi, Kazuya; Haranaga, Shusaku; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe the case of a 63-year-old man who died from relapsed epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) exon 19 deletion lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib. According to the autopsy results, he was confirmed to have small cell carcinoma without the EGFR T790M mutation in his pancreas and left kidney metastatic specimens, while the adenocarcinoma metastatic lesion in his right kidney had the EGFR T790M mutation; both retained the somatic EGFR exon 19 deletion. We herein report an autopsy case of resistance to an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor via small cell carcinoma transformation and the EGFRT790M mutation in separate metastatic organs. PMID:26424310

  9. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daehwan; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Lee, Kangseok; Bae, Jeehyeon; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2015-08-21

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer. - Highlights: • TM-JM1/2 peptides are efficiently delivered into cells by AuNP-Apt-conjugates. • TM-JM1/2 peptides loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates inhibit DDR2 activation. • Inhibition of DDR2 activation by TM-JM1/2 peptides decreases tumor progression.

  10. CD19 regulates skin and lung fibrosis via Toll-like receptor signaling in a model of bleomycin-induced scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Iwata, Yohei; Komura, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Fumihide; Hara, Toshihide; Muroi, Eiji; Takenaka, Motoi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Tedder, Thomas F; Sato, Shinichi

    2008-06-01

    Mice subcutaneously injected with bleomycin, in an experimental model of human systemic sclerosis, develop cutaneous and lung fibrosis with autoantibody production. CD19 is a general "rheostat" that defines signaling thresholds critical for humoral immune responses, autoimmunity, and cytokine production. To determine the role of CD19 in the bleomycin-induced systemic sclerosis model, we investigated the development of fibrosis and autoimmunity in CD19-deficient mice. Bleomycin-treated wild-type mice exhibited dermal and lung fibrosis, hyper-gamma-globulinemia, autoantibody production, and enhanced serum and skin expression of various cytokines, including fibrogenic interleukin-4, interleukin-6, and transforming growth factor-beta1, all of which were inhibited by CD19 deficiency. Bleomycin treatment enhanced hyaluronan production in the skin, lung, and sera. Addition of hyaluronan, an endogenous ligand for Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4, stimulated B cells to produce various cytokines, primarily through TLR4; CD19 deficiency suppressed this stimulation. These results suggest that bleomycin induces fibrosis by enhancing hyaluronan production, which activates B cells to produce fibrogenic cytokines mainly via TLR4 and induce autoantibody production, and that CD19 deficiency suppresses fibrosis and autoantibody production by inhibiting TLR4 signals.

  11. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Enhances Bacterial Clearance and Limits Lung Consolidation in Murine Pneumonia Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Anne Jan; Achouiti, Achmed; van der Ende, Arie; Soussan, Aicha Ait; Florquin, Sandrine; de Vos, Alex; Zeerleder, Sacha S; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen in pneumonia associated with severe lung damage. Tissue injury causes release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which may perpetuate inflammation. DNA has been implicated as a DAMP that activates inflammation through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of TLR9 in MRSA pneumonia. Wild-type (Wt) and TLR9 knockout (tlr9−/−) mice were infected intranasally with MRSA USA300 (BK 11540) (5E7 CFU) and euthanized at 6, 24, 48 or 72 h for analyses. MRSA pneumonia was associated with profound release of cell-free host DNA in the airways, as reflected by increases in nucleosome and DNA levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), accompanied by transient detection of pathogen DNA in MRSA-free BALF supernatants. In BALF, as compared with Wt mice, tlr9−/− mice showed reduced tumor necrosis factor α and IL-6 levels at 6 h and reduced bacterial clearance at 6 and 24 h postinfection. Furthermore, tlr9−/− mice exhibited a greater influx of neutrophils in BALF and increased lung consolidation at 24 and 48 h. This study demonstrates the release of host- and pathogen-derived TLR9 ligands (DNA) into the alveolar space after infection with MRSA via the airways and suggests that TLR9 has proinflammatory effects during MRSA pneumonia associated with enhanced bacterial clearance and limitation of lung consolidation. PMID:27508882

  12. Methylation of the estrogen receptor CpG island in lung tumors is related to the specific type of carcinogen exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Issa, J.P.J.; Baylin, S.B.; Belinsky, S.A. |

    1996-08-15

    Promoter methylation has recently been shown to be an alternative to mutation in inactivating tumor suppressor genes in human neoplasia. Although specific carcinogen exposures have been associated with characteristic mutation patterns in genes, the factors that lead to promoter hypermethylation remain unknown. One gene target for inactivation through promoter methylation is the estrogen receptor (ER). The purpose of this investigation was to determine the methylation status of this gene in lung tumors from smokers and those who never smoked and in rodents exposed to specific environmental carcinogens. Promoter methylation at the ER locus was detected in 4 of 11 tumors from never-smokers (36.4%) and 7 of 35 tumors from smokers (20%, P < 0.001). Lung tumors induced by the tobacco-derived carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone also had a low incidence (16.7%) of ER methylation. In marked contrast, spontaneous and plutonium-induced tumors had a very high (81.8%) incidence of ER methylation. X-ray-induced tumors had an intermediate frequency of ER methylation (38.1%). The presence of ER methylation was associated with absent ER expression in rodent lung cancer cell lines. These results show for the first time that gene-specific promoter methylation can be modulated differentially depending on carcinogen exposure. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  13. An novel inhibitor of TGF-β type I receptor, IN-1130, blocks breast cancer lung metastasis through inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Yong; Min, Kyung Nan; Son, Jee-Yeon; Park, So-Yeon; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Dae-Kee; Sheen, Yhun Yhong

    2014-08-28

    TGF-β signaling plays an important role in breast cancer progression and metastasis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important step in the progression of solid tumors to metastatic disease. We previously reported that IN-1130, a novel transforming growth factor-β type I receptor kinase (ALK5) inhibitor, suppressed renal fibrosis in obstructive nephropathy (Moon et al., 2006). Here, we show that IN-1130 suppressed EMT and the lung metastasis of mammary tumors in mouse models. Treating human and mouse cell lines with IN-1130 inhibited TGF-β-mediated transcriptional activation, the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2, and TGF-β-induced-EMT, which induces morphological changes in epithelial cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that IN-1130 blocked TGF-β-induced 4T1 mammary cancer cell migration and invasion. The TGF-β-mediated increase in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression was restored by IN-1130 co-treatment with TGF-β in human epithelial cells and in 4T1 cells. Furthermore, we found that lung metastasis from primary breast cancer was inhibited by IN-1130 in both 4T1-xenografted BALB/c mice and MMTV/c-Neu transgenic mice without any change in primary tumor volume. IN-1130 prolonged the life span of tumor-bearing mice. In summary, this study indicated that IN-1130 has therapeutic potential for preventing breast cancer metastasis to the lung.

  14. Soluble Leukocyte-Associated Ig-Like Receptor-1 in Amniotic Fluid Is of Fetal Origin and Positively Associates with Lung Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Michiel L.; Olde Nordkamp, Marloes J. M.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Meyaard, Linde; Bont, Louis

    2013-01-01

    The soluble form of the inhibitory immune receptor leukocyte-Associated Ig-like Receptor-1 (sLAIR-1) is present in plasma, urine and synovial fluid and correlates to inflammation. We and others previously showed inflammatory protein expression in normal amniotic fluid at term. We hypothesized that sLAIR-1 is present in amniotic fluid during term parturition and is related to fetal lung function development. sLAIR-1 was detectable in all amniotic fluid samples (n=355) collected during term spontaneous deliveries. First, potential intra-uterine origins of amniotic fluid sLAIR-1 were explored. Although LAIR-1 was expressed on the surface of amniotic fluid neutrophils, LAIR-1 was not secreted upon ex vivo neutrophil stimulation with LPS, or PMA/ionomycin. Cord blood concentrations of sLAIR-1 were fourfold lower than and not related to amniotic fluid concentrations and placentas showed no or only sporadic LAIR-1 positive cells. Similarly, in post-mortem lung tissue of term neonates that died of non-pulmonary disorders LAIR-1 positive cells were absent or only sporadically present. In fetal urine samples, however, sLAIR-1 levels were even higher than in amniotic fluid and correlated with amniotic fluid sLAIR-1 concentrations. Second, the potential relevance of amniotic fluid sLAIR-1 was studied. sLAIR-1 concentrations had low correlation to amniotic fluid cytokines. We measured neonatal lung function in a convenient subset of 152 infants, using the single occlusion technique, at a median age of 34 days (IQR 30-39). The amniotic fluid concentration of sLAIR-1 was independently correlated to airway compliance (ρ=0.29, P=.001). Taken together, we show the consistent presence of sLAIR-1 in amniotic fluid, which originates from fetal urine. Concentrations of sLAIR-1 in amniotic fluid during term deliveries are independent from levels of other soluble immune mediators. The positive association between concentrations of amniotic fluid sLAIR-1 and neonatal lung compliance

  15. Associations of mRNA:microRNA for the Shared Downstream Molecules of EGFR and Alternative Tyrosine Kinase Receptors in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengfeng; Meng, Fei; Wang, Lili; Wong, S. C. Cesar; Cho, William C. S.; Chan, Lawrence W. C.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the top cancer killer worldwide with high mortality rate. Majority belong to non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been broadly explored as a drug target for therapy. However, the drug responses are not durable due to the acquired resistance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding and endogenous molecules that can inhibit mRNA translation initiation and degrade mRNAs. We wonder if some downstream molecules shared by EGFR and the other tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) further transduce the signals alternatively, and some miRNAs play the key roles in affecting the expression of these downstream molecules. In this study, we investigated the mRNA:miRNA associations for the direct EGFR downstream molecules in the EGFR signaling pathway shared with the other TKRs, including c-MET (hepatocyte growth factor receptor), Ron (a protein tyrosine kinase related to c-MET), PDGFR (platelet-derived growth factor receptor), and IGF-1R (insulin-like growth factor receptor-1). The multiple linear regression and support vector regression (SVR) models were used to discover the statistically significant and the best weighted miRNAs regulating the mRNAs of these downstream molecules. These two models revealed the similar mRNA:miRNA associations. It was found that the miRNAs significantly affecting the mRNA expressions in the multiple regression model were also those with the largest weights in the SVR model. To conclude, we effectively identified a list of meaningful mRNA:miRNA associations: phospholipase C, gamma 1 (PLCG1) with miR-34a, phosphoinositide-3-kinase, regulatory subunit 2 (PIK3R2) with miR-30a-5p, growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) with miR-27a, and Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) with miR-302b and miR-520e. These associations could make great contributions to explore new mechanism in NSCLCs. These candidate miRNAs may be regarded as the potential drug targets for treating NSCLCs with acquired drug resistance

  16. Nicotine activates cell-signaling pathways through muscle-type and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Diane L; Liu, Xuwan; Hopkins, Toni M; Swick, Michelle C; Dhir, Rajiv; Siegfried, Jill M

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are expressed on non-neuronal cell types, including normal bronchial epithelial cells, and nicotine has been reported to cause Akt activation in cultured normal airway cells. This study documents mRNA and protein expression of subunits known to form a muscle-type nAChR in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. In one NSCLC examined, mRNA and protein for a heteropentamer neuronal-type alpha3beta2 nAChR was detected in addition to a muscle-type receptor. Protein for the alpha5 nAChR was also detected in NSCLC cells. Although, mRNA for the alpha7 nAChR subunit was observed in all cell lines, alpha7 protein was not detectable by immunoblot in NSCLC cell extracts. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of NSCLC primary tissues from 18 patients demonstrated protein expression of nAChR alpha1 and beta1 subunits, but not alpha7 subunit, in lung tumors, indicating preferential expression of the muscle-type receptor. In addition, the beta1 subunit showed significantly increased expression in lung tumors as compared to non-tumor bronchial tissue. The alpha1 subunit also showed evidence of high expression in lung tumors. Nicotine at a concentration of 10 microM caused phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (p44/42) that could be inhibited using nAChR antagonists. Inhibition was observed at 100 nM alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) or 10 microM hexamethonium (HEX); maximal inhibition was achieved using a combination of alpha-BTX and HEX. Akt was also phosphorylated in NSCLC cells after exposure to nicotine; this effect was inhibited by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and antagonists to the neuronal-type nAChR, but not to the muscle-type receptor. Nicotine triggered influx of calcium in the 273T NSCLC cell line, suggesting that L-type calcium channels were activated. 273T cells also showed greater activation of p44/42 MAPK than of Akt in response to nicotine. Cultures treated with nicotine and the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor

  17. To scavenge or not to scavenge: that is the question

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Elzbieta; Brzuszkiewicz, Anna; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew; Rosenbaum, Gerd

    2009-09-01

    Analysis of a series of diffraction data sets measured from several native as well as nicotinic acid-soaked crystals of trypsin suggests that this potential scavenger does not have any statistically significant effect on the amount of radiation damage incurred in the crystals on X-ray irradiation at 100 K. Analysis of a series of diffraction data sets measured from four native as well as four nicotinic acid-soaked crystals of trypsin at 100 K shows a high variability in radiation-sensitivity among individual crystals for both nicotinic acid-soaked and native crystals. The level of radiation-sensitivity and the extent of its variability is statistically indistinguishable between the two conditions. This suggests that this potential scavenger does not have any statistically significant effect on the amount of radiation damage incurred in the crystals on X-ray irradiation. This is in contrast to previous results [Kauffmann et al. (2006 ▶), Structure, 14, 1099–1105] where only one crystal specimen was used for each condition (native and nicotinic acid-soaked)

  18. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Eda K.; Shumansky, Kara L.; Borst, Luke B.; Burnette, Angela D.; Sample, Christopher J.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2016-08-01

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal’s ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases.

  19. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Holl, Eda K; Shumansky, Kara L; Borst, Luke B; Burnette, Angela D; Sample, Christopher J; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2016-08-30

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal's ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:27528673

  20. Scavenging 4-Oxo-2-nonenal.

    PubMed

    Amarnath, Venkataraman; Amarnath, Kalyani

    2015-10-19

    4-Oxo-2-nonenal (ONE), a product of cellular lipid oxidation, reacts nonspecifically with the lysine residues of proteins and is generated in increased amounts during degenerative diseases and cancer. We show that pyridoxamine, salicylamine, and related 2-aminomethylphenols react with ONE, to form pyrrolo[2,1-b][1,3]oxazines with the participation of both the amino and the phenolic groups. 2-Aminomethylphenols react with ONE as well as with the Michael adducts of ONE much more rapidly than lysine, suggesting their use for therapeutically scavenging ONE. PMID:26355561

  1. Overexpression of c-Met and CD44v6 receptors contributes to autocrine TGF-β1 signaling in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Bogatkevich, Galina S; Atnelishvili, Ilia; Akter, Tanjina; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Hoffman, Stanley; Fresco, Victor M; Fuchs, John C; Visconti, Richard P; Markwald, Roger R; Padhye, Subhas B; Silver, Richard M; Hascall, Vincent C; Misra, Suniti

    2014-03-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and the HGF receptor Met pathway are important in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease (ILD). Alternatively spliced isoforms of CD44 containing variable exon 6 (CD44v6) and its ligand hyaluronan (HA) alter cellular function in response to interaction between CD44v6 and HGF. TGF-β1 is the crucial cytokine that induces fibrotic action in ILD fibroblasts (ILDFbs). We have identified an autocrine TGF-β1 signaling that up-regulates both Met and CD44v6 mRNA and protein expression. Western blot analysis, flow cytometry, and immunostaining revealed that CD44v6 and Met colocalize in fibroblasts and in tissue sections from ILD patients and in lungs of bleomycin-treated mice. Interestingly, cell proliferation induced by TGF-β1 is mediated through Met and CD44v6. Further, cell proliferation mediated by TGF-β1/CD44v6 is ERK-dependent. In contrast, action of Met on ILDFb proliferation does not require ERK but does require p38(MAPK). ILDFbs were sorted into CD44v6(+)/Met(+) and CD44v6(-)/Met(+) subpopulations. HGF inhibited TGF-β1-stimulated collagen-1 and α-smooth muscle cell actin expression in both of these subpopulations by interfering with TGF-β1 signaling. HGF alone markedly stimulated CD44v6 expression, which in turn regulated collagen-1 synthesis. Our data with primary lung fibroblast cultures with respect to collagen-1, CD44v6, and Met expressions were supported by immunostaining of lung sections from bleomycin-treated mice and from ILD patients. These results define the relationships between CD44v6, Met, and autocrine TGF-β1 signaling and the potential modulating influence of HGF on TGF-β1-induced CD44v6-dependent fibroblast function in ILD fibrosis.

  2. Overexpression of c-Met and CD44v6 receptors contributes to autocrine TGF-β1 signaling in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Bogatkevich, Galina S; Atnelishvili, Ilia; Akter, Tanjina; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Hoffman, Stanley; Fresco, Victor M; Fuchs, John C; Visconti, Richard P; Markwald, Roger R; Padhye, Subhas B; Silver, Richard M; Hascall, Vincent C; Misra, Suniti

    2014-03-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and the HGF receptor Met pathway are important in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease (ILD). Alternatively spliced isoforms of CD44 containing variable exon 6 (CD44v6) and its ligand hyaluronan (HA) alter cellular function in response to interaction between CD44v6 and HGF. TGF-β1 is the crucial cytokine that induces fibrotic action in ILD fibroblasts (ILDFbs). We have identified an autocrine TGF-β1 signaling that up-regulates both Met and CD44v6 mRNA and protein expression. Western blot analysis, flow cytometry, and immunostaining revealed that CD44v6 and Met colocalize in fibroblasts and in tissue sections from ILD patients and in lungs of bleomycin-treated mice. Interestingly, cell proliferation induced by TGF-β1 is mediated through Met and CD44v6. Further, cell proliferation mediated by TGF-β1/CD44v6 is ERK-dependent. In contrast, action of Met on ILDFb proliferation does not require ERK but does require p38(MAPK). ILDFbs were sorted into CD44v6(+)/Met(+) and CD44v6(-)/Met(+) subpopulations. HGF inhibited TGF-β1-stimulated collagen-1 and α-smooth muscle cell actin expression in both of these subpopulations by interfering with TGF-β1 signaling. HGF alone markedly stimulated CD44v6 expression, which in turn regulated collagen-1 synthesis. Our data with primary lung fibroblast cultures with respect to collagen-1, CD44v6, and Met expressions were supported by immunostaining of lung sections from bleomycin-treated mice and from ILD patients. These results define the relationships between CD44v6, Met, and autocrine TGF-β1 signaling and the potential modulating influence of HGF on TGF-β1-induced CD44v6-dependent fibroblast function in ILD fibrosis. PMID:24324260

  3. Lung cancer in women.

    PubMed

    Coscio, Angela M; Garst, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in both men and women; however, there are some clear gender-based differences. As the incidence of lung cancer is declining in men, the incidence of lung cancer is increasing in women. Women are more likely than men to have adenocarcinoma, a histologic subtype that correlates with worsened prognosis, but women have improved survival compared with men. Genetic predisposition and the presence of estrogen receptors in lung cancer cells may predispose women to developing lung cancer. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanism and significance of these findings. PMID:17254523

  4. Adding to the Mix: Fibroblast Growth Factor and Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor Pathways as Targets in Non–small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Scott A.; Heasley, Lynn E.; Doebele, Robert C.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increasingly involves the use of molecularly targeted therapy with activity against either the tumor directly, or indirectly, through activity against host-derived mechanisms of tumor support such as angiogenesis. The most well studied signaling pathway associated with angiogenesis is the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, and the only antiangiogenic agent currently approved for the treatment of NSCLC is bevacizumab, an antibody targeted against VEGF. More recently, preclinical data supporting the role of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling in angiogenesis have been reported. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways may also stimulate tumor growth directly through activation of downstream mitogenic signaling cascades. In addition, 1 or both of these pathways have been associated with resistance to agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and VEGF. A number of agents that target FGF and/or PDGF signaling are now in development for the treatment of NSCLC. This review will summarize the potential molecular roles of PDGFR and FGFR in tumor growth and angiogenesis, as well as discuss the current clinical status of PDGFR and FGFR inhibitors in clinical development. PMID:22165970

  5. Lung vitamin E transport processes are affected by both age and environmental oxidants in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Valacchi, Giuseppe . E-mail: gvalacchi@ucdavis.edu; Vasu, Vihas T.; Yokohama, Wallace; Corbacho, Ana M.; Phung, Anh; Lim, Yunsook; Aung, Hnin Hnin; Cross, Carroll E.; Davis, Paul A.

    2007-07-15

    Despite the physiological importance of alpha-tocopherol (AT), the molecular mechanisms involved in maintaining cellular and tissue tocopherol levels remain to be fully characterized. Scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1), one of a large family of scavenger receptors, has been shown to facilitate AT transfer from HDL to peripheral tissues via apo A-1-mediated processes and to be important in the delivery of AT to the lung cells. In the present studies the effects of age and two environmental oxidants ozone (O{sub 3}) (0.25 ppm 6 h/day) and cigarette smoke (CS) (60 mg/m{sup 3} 6 h/day) for 4 days on selected aspects of AT transport in murine lung tissues were assessed. While AT levels were 25% higher (p < 0.05) and 15% lower (p < 0.05) in plasma and lung tissue, respectively, in aged versus young mice, acute environmental exposure to O{sub 3} or CS at the doses used had no effect. Gene expression levels, determined by RT-PCR of AT transport protein (ATTP), SRB1, CD36, ATP binding cassette 3 (ABCA3) and ABCA1 and protein levels, determined by Western blots for SRB1, ATTP and ABCA1 were assessed. Aged mouse lung showed a lower levels of ATTP, ABCA3 and SRB1 and a higher level CD36 and ABCA1. Acute exposure to either O{sub 3} or CS induced declines in ATTP and SRB1 in both aged and young mice lung. CD36 increased in both young and aged mice lung upon exposure to O{sub 3} and CS. These findings suggest that both age and environmental oxidant exposure affect pathways related to lung AT homeostasis and do so in a way that favors declines in lung AT. However, given the approach taken, the effects cannot be traced to changes in these pathways or AT content in any specific lung associated cell type and thus highlight the need for further follow-up studies looking at specific lung associated cell types.

  6. Energy scavenging from environmental vibration.

    SciTech Connect

    Galchev, Tzeno; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Najafi, Khalil

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an efficient energy scavenger for converting ambient low-frequency vibrations into electrical power. In order to achieve this a novel inertial micro power generator architecture has been developed that utilizes the bi-stable motion of a mechanical mass to convert a broad range of low-frequency (< 30Hz), and large-deflection (>250 {micro}m) ambient vibrations into high-frequency electrical output energy. The generator incorporates a bi-stable mechanical structure to initiate high-frequency mechanical oscillations in an electromagnetic scavenger. This frequency up-conversion technique enhances the electromechanical coupling and increases the generated power. This architecture is called the Parametric Frequency Increased Generator (PFIG). Three generations of the device have been fabricated. It was first demonstrated using a larger bench-top prototype that had a functional volume of 3.7cm3. It generated a peak power of 558{micro}W and an average power of 39.5{micro}W at an input acceleration of 1g applied at 10 Hz. The performance of this device has still not been matched by any other reported work. It yielded the best power density and efficiency for any scavenger operating from low-frequency (<10Hz) vibrations. A second-generation device was then fabricated. It generated a peak power of 288{micro}W and an average power of 5.8{micro}W from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s{sup 2} at 10Hz. The device operates over a frequency range of 20Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 2.1cm{sup 3} (3.7cm{sup 3} including casing), half of a standard AA battery. Lastly, a piezoelectric version of the PFIG is currently being developed. This device clearly demonstrates one of the key features of the PFIG architecture, namely that it is suitable for MEMS integration, more so than resonant generators, by incorporating a brittle bulk piezoelectric ceramic. This is the first micro-scale piezoelectric generator capable of <10Hz operation. The

  7. α5 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mediates nicotine-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoli; Jia, Yanfei; Zu, Shanshan; Li, Ruisheng; Jia, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Dongjie; Dang, Ningning; Wang, Yunshan

    2014-07-15

    By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previous studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. However, the mechanisms through which α5-nAChRs may influence lung carcinogenesis are far from clear. In the present study, we investigated the roles of α5-nAChR in the nicotine-induced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α in 60 specimens of lung cancer and para-carcinoma tissue. The correlations between the expression levels of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α and other clinicopathological data were analyzed. In a cell line that highly expressed α5-nAChR, the loss of α5-nAChR function by siRNA was used to study whether α5-nAChR is involved in the nicotine-induced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF through the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Cell growth was detected using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). α5-nAChR (78.3%) and HIF-1α (88.3%) were both overexpressed in NSCLC, and their expression levels were found to be correlated with each other (P<0.05). In the A549 cell line, α5-nAChR and HIF-1α were found to be expressed under normal conditions, and their expression levels were significantly increased in response to nicotine treatment. The silencing of α5-nAChR significantly inhibited the nicotine-induced cell proliferation compared with the control group and attenuated the nicotine-induced upregulation of HIF-1α and VEGF, and these effects required the cooperation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These results show that the α5-nAChR/HIF-1α/VEGF axis is involved in nicotine-induced tumor cell proliferation, which suggests that α5-nAChR may serve as a potential anticancer target in nicotine-associated lung cancer.

  8. Postnatal rat lung retinoic acid receptor (RAR) mRNA expression and effects of dexamethasone on RAR beta mRNA.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Zachman, R D

    1995-10-01

    Retinoids exert multiple effects upon lung differentiation and growth. Although the mechanisms involved are presently poorly understood, increasing evidence points to a central role of nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RAR). The purpose of this study was to determine RAR mRNA expression profile during postnatal alveolarization, compared with the expression in prenatal and adult rat lung, and to describe the effects of dexamethasone (DEX) and oxygen on postnatal lung RAR gene expression. Total RNA was isolated from lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats on prenatal day 19, on postnatal days 1, 3, 7, 10, and 14 of life, and from adults. One subgroup of littermate pups was treated with DEX daily for 3 or 7 days. In a second experiment, rats were exposed to room air or to 95% oxygen for 72 hours, and received either DEX or saline. Northern hybridization showed that the levels of all RAR subtypes in fetal lung were 45% or less of levels at postnatal day 1. The 3.7 kb RAR alpha transcript levels were lower than day 1 on days 10 and 14 (relative to day 1, day 10 = 0.54 +/- 0.05; day 14 = 0.54 +/- 0.08), but there was no change in a 2.7 kb RAR alpha transcript over this time period. By contrast, RAR beta mRNA levels were significantly higher at days 3, 10, and 14 compared with day 1 (day 3 = 1.79 +/- 0.19; day 10 = 1.41 +/- 0.14; day 14 = 1.53 +/- 0.05). Similarly, RAR gamma mRNA expression levels were higher on day 10 (1.45 +/- 0.09), but by day 14 there was no difference from day 1. Adult lung 3.7 kb RAR alpha, 2.7 kb RAR alpha, and RAR gamma were lower than day 1, but RAR beta was significantly greater (3.7 alpha = 0.52 +/- 0.05; 2.7 alpha = 0.49 +/- 0.26; gamma = 0.74 +/- 0.06; beta = 1.63 +/- 0.22). Treatment with DEX prevented the rise in RAR beta mRNA occurring on day 3 and significantly lowered (0.65 +/- 0.06) the amount of RAR beta mRNA in day 7 lung. Exposure of rat pups to oxygen caused an increase in RAR beta mRNA (1.21 +/- 0.03). DEX treatment again decreased RAR beta m

  9. NK cells infiltrating a MHC class I-deficient lung adenocarcinoma display impaired cytotoxic activity toward autologous tumor cells associated with altered NK cell-triggering receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Maux Chansac, Béatrice; Moretta, Alessandro; Vergnon, Isabelle; Opolon, Paule; Lécluse, Yann; Grunenwald, Dominique; Kubin, Marek; Soria, Jean-Charles; Chouaib, Salem; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2005-11-01

    NK cells are able to discriminate between normal cells and cells that have lost MHC class I (MHC-I) molecule expression as a result of tumor transformation. This function is the outcome of the capacity of inhibitory NK receptors to block cytotoxicity upon interaction with their MHC-I ligands expressed on target cells. To investigate the role of human NK cells and their various receptors in the control of MHC-I-deficient tumors, we have isolated several NK cell clones from lymphocytes infiltrating an adenocarcinoma lacking beta2-microglobulin expression. Unexpectedly, although these clones expressed NKG2D and mediated a strong cytolytic activity toward K562, Daudi and allogeneic MHC-class I+ carcinoma cells, they were unable to lyse the autologous MHC-I- tumor cell line. This defect was associated with alterations in the expression of natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) by NK cells and the NKG2D ligands, MHC-I-related chain A, MHC-I-related chain B, and UL16 binding protein 1, and the ICAM-1 by tumor cells. In contrast, the carcinoma cell line was partially sensitive to allogeneic healthy donor NK cells expressing high levels of NCR. Indeed, this lysis was inhibited by anti-NCR and anti-NKG2D mAbs, suggesting that both receptors are required for the induced killing. The present study indicates that the MHC-I-deficient lung adenocarcinoma had developed mechanisms of escape from the innate immune response based on down-regulation of NCR and ligands required for target cell recognition.

  10. Pharmacological blockade of the DP2 receptor inhibits cigarette smoke-induced inflammation, mucus cell metaplasia, and epithelial hyperplasia in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, Karin J; Broadhead, Alex R; Baccei, Christopher S; Scott, Jill M; Truong, Yen P; Coate, Heather; Stock, Nicholas S; Santini, Angelina M; Fagan, Patrick; Prodanovich, Patricia; Bain, Gretchen; Stearns, Brian A; King, Christopher D; Hutchinson, John H; Prasit, Peppi; Evans, Jilly F; Lorrain, Daniel S

    2010-03-01

    Prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) is one of a family of biologically active lipids derived from arachidonic acid via the action of COX-1 and COX-2. PGD(2) is released from mast cells and binds primarily to two G protein-coupled receptors, namely DP1 and DP2, the latter also known as chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells. DP2 is predominantly expressed on eosinophils, Th2 cells, and basophils, but it is also expressed to a lesser extent on monocytes, mast cells, and epithelial cells. Interaction of PGD(2) and its active metabolites with DP2 results in cellular chemotaxis, degranulation, up-regulation of adhesion molecules, and cytokine production. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease characterized by elevated lung neutrophils, macrophages, and CD8+ T lymphocytes and mucus hypersecretion. Cigarette smoke contributes to the etiology of COPD and was used here as a provoking agent in a murine model of COPD. In an acute model, {2'-[(cyclopropanecarbonyl-ethyl-amino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-4'-trifluoro-methyl-biphenyl-3-yl}-acetic acid, sodium salt (AM156) and (5-{2-[(benzoyloxycarbonyl-ethyl-amino)-methyl]-4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl}-pyridin-3-yl)-acetic acid, sodium salt) (AM206), potent DP2 receptor antagonists, dose-dependently inhibited influx of neutrophils and lymphocytes to smoke-exposed airways. In a subchronic model, AM156 and AM206 inhibited neutrophil and lymphocyte trafficking to the airways. Furthermore, AM156 and AM206 treatment inhibited mucus cell metaplasia and prevented the thickening of the airway epithelial layer induced by cigarette smoke. These data suggest that DP2 receptor antagonism may represent a novel therapy for COPD or other conditions characterized by neutrophil influx, mucus hypersecretion, and airway remodeling.

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptors as a target for cancer treatment: the emerging role of IMC-C225 in the treatment of lung and head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S; Langer, Corey J

    2002-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor is one of four receptors critical to cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival, and is widely expressed in malignant tissue, particularly in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Expression has been associated with malignant progression, inhibition of apoptosis, neoplastic angiogenesis, enhanced metastatic potential, and both chemoresistance and radioresistance. IMC-C225 is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets extracellular epidermal growth factor receptor; it has shown both in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in tumor cells lines expressing epidermal growth factor receptor, including heightened radiation response in vitro in cultured human squamous cell carcinoma and enhancement of taxane- and platinum-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. In A431 head and neck squamous cell xenografts, IMC-C225 administered both before and after radiation therapy yields a radiation enhancement factor of 3.62, attributable to both tumor necrosis and antiangiogenesis. In phase I pharmacokinetic studies, IMC-C225 has a long half-life, lending itself to convenient weekly administration. It has shown a favorable toxicity profile, limited primarily to allergic and dermatologic reactions, the latter characterized by a self-limited, sterile, acneiform rash. Anaphylaxis is rare. Standard treatment entails a loading dose of 400 mg/m(2) at week 1, followed by a maintenance dose of 250 mg/m(2) weekly. An ongoing phase III international multicenter, randomized study in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is evaluating therapeutic radiation therapy, either alone or in conjunction with IMC-C225. In a pilot trial, six of nine patients with platinum-exposed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck exhibited objective response. In an ongoing phase II trial in patients with stable or progressive disease on platinum-based therapy, the preliminary response rate is approximately 20

  12. Dissecting the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) in colon, breast, and lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Jennifer E.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) is a promising drug target since its agonists increase serum high-density lipoprotein; decrease low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and insulin associated with metabolic syndrome; improve insulin sensitivity; and decrease high fat diet-induced obesity. PPARβ/δ agonists also promote terminal differentiation and elicit anti-inflammatory activities in many cell types. However, it remains to be determined whether PPARβ/δ agonists can be developed as therapeutics because there are reports showing either pro- or anti-carcinogenic effects of PPARβ/δ in cancer models. This review examines studies reporting the role of PPARβ/δ in colon, breast, and lung cancers. The prevailing evidence would suggest that targeting PPARβ/δ is not only safe but could have anti-carcinogenic protective effects. PMID:22037942

  13. Comparison of the efficacy of icotinib in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer according to the type of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhang Xiao; Wen, Wang Xiu; Zhuang, Yu; Hua, Zang Jian; Xia, Yang Ni

    2016-01-01

    Icotinib hydrochloride is a novel epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with preclinical and clinical activity in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Exon 19 deletion and L858R point mutation are the most commonly encountered EGFR mutations in NSCLC, and they predict improved clinical outcomes following treatment with icotinib. The objective of this study was to evaluate the differential clinical efficacy of icotinib in patients with exon 19 deletion or L858R point mutation of the EGFR gene. A total of 104 patients with advanced NSCLC, who harbored exon 19 deletion or L858R point mutation of EGFR and were treated with icotinib, were enrolled in this study. The tumor response and progression-free survival were evaluated. There were no significant differences between patients with EGFR exon 19 deletion and those with L858R point mutation who received treatment with icotinib. PMID:27588191

  14. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in the Real-World Setting in Central Europe: The INSIGHT Study.

    PubMed

    Ramlau, Rodryg; Cufer, Tanja; Berzinec, Peter; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Olszewski, Włodzimierz; Popper, Helmut; Bajcic, Paolo; Dušek, Ladislav; Zbozinkova, Zuzana; Pirker, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The ImplementatioN of perSonalized medicine In NSCLC in Central Europe: EGFR testing, Histopathology, and clinical feaTures (INSIGHT) observational study assessed both implementation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation testing and treatment of patients with advanced EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a real-world setting in Central Europe. A total of 1785 patients from 14 cancer centers of six Central European countries were enrolled. EGFR mutations were detected in tumors of 13.8% of the patients. More than 70% of patients with advanced EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line therapy. The INSIGHT study demonstrated the establishment of EGFR mutation testing, a mutation rate consistent with other Caucasian patients populations, and adherence to current guidelines regarding treatment of patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumors in Central Europe.

  15. Overcoming resistance to first/second generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ALK inhibitors in oncogene-addicted advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Romanidou, Ourania; Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico; Califano, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represent the two oncogenic events with an impact on current clinical practice. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and crizotinib are the standard of care for the treatment of EGFR mutant and ALK gene rearranged advanced NSCLC patients. Unfortunately, despite initial clinical benefit, acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs or crizotinib usually develops after an average of 10–12 months of treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanisms of resistance to first/second generation EGFR-TKIs and crizotinib. In particular, we focus on strategies to overcome resistance due to secondary EGFR T790M mutation and mutations of the ALK domain. PMID:27239236

  16. Detection of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in formalin fixed paraffin embedded biopsies in Malaysian non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are reportedly associated with various responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving the anti-EGFR agents. Detection of the mutation therefore plays an important role in therapeutic decision making. The aim of this study was to detect EGFR mutations in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples using both Scorpion ARMS and high resolution melt (HRM) assay, and to compare the sensitivity of these methods. Results All of the mutations were found in adenocarcinoma, except one that was in squamous cell carcinoma. The mutation rate was 45.7% (221/484). Complex mutations were also observed, wherein 8 tumours carried 2 mutations and 1 tumour carried 3 mutations. Conclusions Both methods detected EGFR mutations in FFPE samples. HRM assays gave more EGFR positive results compared to Scorpion ARMS. PMID:23590575

  17. Radical scavenging and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory activities of standardized extracts of Ficus racemosa stem bark.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Urooj, Asna; Vishwanath, Bannikuppe S

    2010-12-01

    The present study evaluated the radical scavenging and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of cold and hot aqueous extracts of Ficus racemosa (Moraceae) stem bark. The extracts were standardized using HPLC. Radical scavenging activity was determined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory activity using rabbit lung and partially purified porcine kidney ACE. HPLC profiles of cold aqueous extract (FRC) showed the presence of bergenin, an isocoumarin, while hot aqueous extract (FRH) was found to contain ferulic acid, kaempferol and coumarin in addition to bergenin. FRH showed significantly higher (p ≤ 0.01) radical scavenging activity than FRC and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), consequently resulting in a significantly lower (p ≤ 0.01) IC₅₀ value than FRC and BHT. Both the extracts exhibited a dose dependent inhibition of porcine kidney and rabbit lung ACE. FRH showed significantly higher (p ≤ 0.01) activity than FRC with lower IC(50) values of 1.36 and 1.91 μg/mL respectively, for porcine kidney and rabbit lung ACE, compared with those of FRC (128 and 291 μg/mL). Further, a significant correlation (r = 0.893; p ≤ 0.05) was observed between radical scavenging activity and ACE-inhibitory activity. This is the first report on the ACE-inhibitory activity of F. racemosa stem bark suggesting its potential to be utilized as a therapeutic alternative for hypertension. PMID:20564493

  18. Efficacy of bronchoscopic biopsy for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pei; Pan, Qingqing; Wang, Mengzhao; Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background To explore the efficacy of bronchoscopic biopsy for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma. Methods All patients with bronchoscopic biopsy-proven lung adenocarcinoma at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 2009 to November 2011 were enrolled. Scorpion amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) was used to detect EGFR gene mutations and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect ALK rearrangement. The correlation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) results with standard methods for EGFR mutation status and ALK rearrangement were checked. Results Bronchoscopic specimens were successfully used to detect EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement with success rates of 85.2% and 71.3%, respectively, in non-small cell lung cancer patients. EGFR analysis by ARMS yielded a positive result in 35.8% (33/92) and positive ALK rearrangement was detected by FISH in 7.8% (6/77) of cases. It was more likely to be unsuccessful in patients with tumor cells less than 100/high power field and the ratio tumor numbers in 0–10%. In EGFR-IHC, the sensitivity and specificity of E746-A750 deletions were 73.3% (11/15) and 93.3% (70/75), respectively, and those of L858R were 93.3% (14/15) and 93.2% (69/74), respectively. In ALK-IHC, the sensitivity and specificity were 50% (3/6) and 100% (71/71), respectively. Conclusions Small bronchoscopic specimens could achieve higher successful detection rates via EGFR mutation and ALK gene rearrangement. PMID:26557908

  19. Targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor-Resistant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by Inducing Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Degradation via Methionine 790 Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Fan, Xing-Xing; Wong, Maria Pik; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Zhong-Qiu; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Lu, Lin-Lin; Zhou, Yan-Ling; Yau, Li-Fong; Tin, Vicky Pui-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR mutation, but TKI resistance is common. Almost half of the acquired resistance patients are due to additional T790M mutation on EGFR (EGFRT790M), thus overcoming TKI resistance is important. In this study, we aim to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TKI resistance as well as the molecular and biological effects of EGFRT790M after redox manipulation. Results: The basal ROS levels in EGFRT790M-containing TKI-resistant NSCLC cell lines were substantially high. Sixty-three human lung tumors showed higher NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (NOX2) expression than normal lung tissues, which may contribute to high basal ROS in cancer and poor survival. Interestingly, only NOX3 was upregulated by sanguinarine, a pharmacological agent to elevate ROS, and resulted in EGFR overoxidation, degradation, and apoptosis. By contrast, such responses were lacking in EGFRWT cells. Selective EGFRT790M degradation was manipulated by redox imbalance between NOX3 and methionine reductase A (MsrA). Furthermore, the in vivo tumor suppression effect of sanguinarine, NOX3 upregulation, and EGFR degradation were confirmed. Innovation: We have found a new treatment strategy to overcome TKI resistance by selectively inducing EGFRT790M degradation via specific stimulation of methionine 790 (M790) oxidation. It can be achieved via manipulating redox imbalance between NOX3 and MsrA. Conclusion: Targeting EGFR by elevating ROS and redox imbalance is a potential new strategy to develop a new EGFR inhibitor for TKI-resistant patients with a wide therapeutic window between EGFRT790M and EGFRWT. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 263–279. PMID:26528827

  20. Expression and significance of transforming growth factor-β receptor type II and DPC4/Smad4 in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HONG; WANG, JING-WEI; LIU, LI-XIN; YAN, JI-DONG; REN, SHU-HUA; LI, YAN; LU, ZHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptor type II (TβRII) and DPC4/Smad4 in the TGF-β signaling pathway and the importance of these expression levels in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The mRNA and protein expression levels of TβRII and DPC4/Smad4 were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively, in NSCLC and control nonlesional lung tissues of 60 patients. The protein expression levels of DPC4/Smad4 were detected by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded samples of NSCLC. In addition, the correlations among the expression levels of TβRII and DPC4/Smad4 and their association with the clinical and pathological features of NSCLC were analyzed. The expression levels of TβRII and DPC4/Smad4 in NSCLC tissues were significantly lower when compared with the control nonlesional lung tissues (P<0.05). In addition, the expression of TβRII and DPC4/Smad4 in poorly-differentiated NSCLC tissues was significantly lower compared with moderately- or well-differentiated NSCLC tissues (P<0.05). The expression levels of TβRII and DPC4/Smad4 were significantly lower in NSCLC tissues with metastatic lymph nodes compared with tissue without metastatic lymph nodes (P<0.05). Thus, the expression levels were demonstrated to significantly correlate with the clinical and pathological stages, and subsequently were shown to be associated with the occurrence and progression of NSCLC. In conclusion, TβRII and DPC4/Smad4 may play an important role in the tumorigenesis, differentiation and progression of NSCLC via the TGF-β signaling pathway. PMID:25452807

  1. A Protocol for Detecting and Scavenging Gas-phase Free Radicals in Mainstream Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Long-Xi; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Freed, Jack H.

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with human cancers. It has been reported that most of the lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking 5,6,7,12. Although tobacco tars and related products in the particle phase of cigarette smoke are major causes of carcinogenic and mutagenic related diseases, cigarette smoke contains significant amounts of free radicals that are also considered as an important group of carcinogens9,10. Free radicals attack cell constituents by damaging protein structure, lipids and DNA sequences and increase the risks of developing various types of cancers. Inhaled radicals produce adducts that contribute to many of the negative health effects of tobacco smoke in the lung3. Studies have been conducted to reduce free radicals in cigarette smoke to decrease risks of the smoking-induced damage. It has been reported that haemoglobin and heme-containing compounds could partially scavenge nitric oxide, reactive oxidants and carcinogenic volatile nitrosocompounds of cigarette smoke4. A 'bio-filter' consisted of haemoglobin and activated carbon was used to scavenge the free radicals and to remove up to 90% of the free radicals from cigarette smoke14. However, due to the cost-ineffectiveness, it has not been successfully commercialized. Another study showed good scavenging efficiency of shikonin, a component of Chinese herbal medicine8. In the present study, we report a protocol for introducing common natural antioxidant extracts into the cigarette filter for scavenging gas phase free radicals in cigarette smoke and measurement of the scavenge effect on gas phase free radicals in mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) using spin-trapping Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) Spectroscopy1,2,14. We showed high scavenging capacity of lycopene and grape seed extract which could point to their future application in cigarette filters. An important advantage of these prospective scavengers is that they can be obtained in large quantities from byproducts of tomato or wine

  2. A protocol for detecting and scavenging gas-phase free radicals in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Long-Xi; Dzikovski, Boris G; Freed, Jack H

    2012-01-02

    Cigarette smoking is associated with human cancers. It has been reported that most of the lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking (5,6,7,12). Although tobacco tars and related products in the particle phase of cigarette smoke are major causes of carcinogenic and mutagenic related diseases, cigarette smoke contains significant amounts of free radicals that are also considered as an important group of carcinogens(9,10). Free radicals attack cell constituents by damaging protein structure, lipids and DNA sequences and increase the risks of developing various types of cancers. Inhaled radicals produce adducts that contribute to many of the negative health effects of tobacco smoke in the lung(3). Studies have been conducted to reduce free radicals in cigarette smoke to decrease risks of the smoking-induced damage. It has been reported that haemoglobin and heme-containing compounds could partially scavenge nitric oxide, reactive oxidants and carcinogenic volatile nitrosocompounds of cigarette smoke(4). A 'bio-filter' consisted of haemoglobin and activated carbon was used to scavenge the free radicals and to remove up to 90% of the free radicals from cigarette smoke(14). However, due to the cost-ineffectiveness, it has not been successfully commercialized. Another study showed good scavenging efficiency of shikonin, a component of Chinese herbal medicine(8). In the present study, we report a protocol for introducing common natural antioxidant extracts into the cigarette filter for scavenging gas phase free radicals in cigarette smoke and measurement of the scavenge effect on gas phase free radicals in mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) using spin-trapping Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) Spectroscopy(1,2,14). We showed high scavenging capacity of lycopene and grape seed extract which could point to their future application in cigarette filters. An important advantage of these prospective scavengers is that they can be obtained in large quantities from byproducts of

  3. Mapping inhibitor response to the in-frame deletions, insertions and duplications of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jingheng; Wu, Qi; Liu, Zhenguo; Wang, Jianhui; Lin, Xianfu

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has become a well-established target for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, a large number of in-frame deletion, insertion and duplication mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain have been observed to alter drug response to such a kinase target. Thus, a systematic investigation of the intermolecular interactions between the clinical small-molecule agents and various EGFR in-frame mutants would help to establish a complete picture of drug response to kinase mutations in lung cancer, and to design new EGFR inhibitors with high potency and selectivity to target drug-resistant mutants. Here, we describe a combined pipeline to explore the drug response of five representative EGFR inhibitors, including three FDA-approved agents (gefitinib, erlotinib and lapatinib) and two compounds under clinical development (AEE788 and TAK-285) to a number of clinically relevant EGFR in-frame mutations, aiming at a comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanism and biological implication underlying drug resistance and sensitivity to EGFR in-frame mutations. It was found that the insertion and duplication mutations in exon 20 can generally cause drug resistance to EGFR due to the reduced size of kinase's active pocket, while deletion mutations in exon 19 associate closely with increased inhibitor sensitivity to EGFR by establishing additional non-bonded interactions across complex interface, including hydrogen bonds, cation-π interactions and hydrophobic contacts.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} agonists inhibit the replication of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Ralf . E-mail: ralf.arnold@medizin.uni-magdeburg.de; Koenig, Wolfgang

    2006-07-05

    We have previously shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonists inhibited the inflammatory response of RSV-infected human lung epithelial cells. In this study, we supply evidence that specific PPAR{gamma} agonists (15d-PGJ{sub 2}, ciglitazone, troglitazone, Fmoc-Leu) efficiently blocked the RSV-induced cytotoxicity and development of syncytia in tissue culture (A549, HEp-2). All PPAR{gamma} agonists under study markedly inhibited the cell surface expression of the viral G and F protein on RSV-infected A549 cells. This was paralleled by a reduced cellular amount of N protein-encoding mRNA determined by real-time RT-PCR. Concomitantly, a reduced release of infectious progeny virus into the cell supernatants of human lung epithelial cells (A549, normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE)) was observed. Similar results were obtained regardless whether PPAR{gamma} agonists were added prior to RSV infection or thereafter, suggesting that the agonists inhibited viral gene expression and not the primary adhesion or fusion process.

  5. beta(2)-adrenergic receptor Arg16/Arg16 genotype is associated with reduced lung function, but not with asthma, in the Hutterites.

    PubMed

    Summerhill, E; Leavitt, S A; Gidley, H; Parry, R; Solway, J; Ober, C

    2000-08-01

    In a genome-wide screen for asthma loci in the Hutterites, a marker locus on chromosome 5q23-31 showed evidence of linkage to asthma (C. Ober and colleagues, Hum. Molec. Genet. 1998;7:1393). To determine whether the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR) gene is the 5q-linked asthma locus in the Hutterites, we genotyped this sample for polymorphisms in the beta(2)AR gene. Neither the Arg16Gly nor Gln27Glu polymorphisms showed evidence of linkage to qualitative measures of asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) (p > 0.10) or to quantitative measures of serum IgE and airway reactivity (p > 0.10). In contrast, FEV(1) percentage of predicted and FVC percentage of predicted were significantly lower among individuals homozygous for the Arg16 allele (FEV(1) %: 98.3 +/- 13.2% versus 103. 8 +/- 14.9%, p = 0.003; FVC %: 104.2 +/- 12.3% versus 108.3 +/- 13. 2%, p = 0.02 by t test). These findings held true for adolescents and adults, but not for children lung growth or the rate of decline of lung function with age. PMID:10934093

  6. Aging of whiskey increases 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Hitoshi; Tsunoue, Hideaki; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2004-08-11

    1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of Japanese whiskey after various aging periods in oak barrels was measured to evaluate the antioxidative effects of whiskey. The activity of the whiskey increased with the aging period with high correlation. The activity of various types of whiskey was measured and shown to be correlated to the potentiation of the GABAA receptor response measured in a previous paper. However, the fragrant compounds in the whiskey which potentiated the GABAA receptor response had low DPPH radical scavenging activity, while phenol derivatives had high radical scavenging activity. The whiskey was extracted by pentane. The aqueous part showed the scavenging activity, whereas the pentane part did not. Thus, both the DPPH radical scavenging activity and the potentiation of the GABAA receptor response increased during whiskey aging in oak barrels, but were due to different components. The whiskey protected the H2O2-induced death of E. coli more than ethanol at the same concentration as that of the whiskey. The changes that occurred in the whiskey during aging may be the reason aged whiskies are so highly valued.

  7. Aging of whiskey increases 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Hitoshi; Tsunoue, Hideaki; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2004-08-11

    1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of Japanese whiskey after various aging periods in oak barrels was measured to evaluate the antioxidative effects of whiskey. The activity of the whiskey increased with the aging period with high correlation. The activity of various types of whiskey was measured and shown to be correlated to the potentiation of the GABAA receptor response measured in a previous paper. However, the fragrant compounds in the whiskey which potentiated the GABAA receptor response had low DPPH radical scavenging activity, while phenol derivatives had high radical scavenging activity. The whiskey was extracted by pentane. The aqueous part showed the scavenging activity, whereas the pentane part did not. Thus, both the DPPH radical scavenging activity and the potentiation of the GABAA receptor response increased during whiskey aging in oak barrels, but were due to different components. The whiskey protected the H2O2-induced death of E. coli more than ethanol at the same concentration as that of the whiskey. The changes that occurred in the whiskey during aging may be the reason aged whiskies are so highly valued. PMID:15291502

  8. Functional expression of the transient receptor potential channel TRPA1, a sensor for toxic lung inhalants, in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Büch, Thomas Robert Heinrich; Schäfer, Eva Anna Maria; Demmel, Maria-Theresia; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Thiermann, Horst; Gudermann, Thomas; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette

    2013-12-01

    The cation channel TRPA1 functions as a chemosensory protein and is directly activated by a number of noxious inhalants. A pulmonary expression of TRPA1 has been described in sensory nerve endings and its stimulation leads to the acceleration of inflammatory responses in the lung. Whereas the function of TRPA1 in neuronal cells is well defined, only few reports exist suggesting a role in epithelial cells. The aim of the present study was therefore (1) to evaluate the expression of TRPA1 in pulmonary epithelial cell lines, (2) to characterize TRPA1-promoted signaling in these cells, and (3) to study the extra-neuronal expression of this channel in lung tissue sections. Our results revealed that the widely used alveolar type II cell line A549 expresses TRPA1 at the mRNA and protein level. Furthermore, stimulating A549 cells with known TRPA1 activators (i.e., allyl isothiocyanate) led to an increase in intracellular calcium levels, which was sensitive to the TRPA1 blocker ruthenium red. Investigating TRPA1 coupled downstream signaling cascades it was found that TRPA1 activation elicited a stimulation of ERK1/2 whereas other MAP kinases were not affected. Finally, using epithelial as well as neuronal markers in immunohistochemical approaches, a non-neuronal TRPA1 protein expression was detected in distal parts of the porcine lung epithelium, which was also found examining human lung sections. TRPA1-positive staining co-localized with both epithelial and neuronal markers underlining the observed epithelial expression pattern. Our findings of a functional expression of TRPA1 in pulmonary epithelial cells provide causal evidence for a non-neuronal TRPA1-mediated control of inflammatory responses elicited upon TRPA1-mediated registration of toxic inhalants in vivo. PMID:23994502

  9. Differential innate immune cell signatures and effects regulated by toll-like receptor 4 during murine lung tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Carla-Maria; Xiong, Ka-Na; Velmurugan, Kalpana; Xiong, Julie; Osgood, Ross S; Bauer, Alison K

    2016-04-01

    Tumor promotion is an early and critical stage during lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). We previously demonstrated that Tlr4 mutant mice were more susceptible to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-induced pulmonary inflammation and tumor promotion in comparison to Tlr4-sufficient mice. Our study objective was to elucidate the underlying differences in Tlr4 mutant mice in innate immune cell populations, their functional responses, and the influence of these cellular differences on ADC progenitor (type II) cells following BHT-treatment. BALB (Tlr4-sufficient) and C.C3-Tlr4(Lps-d)/J (BALB(Lpsd); Tlr4 mutant) mice were treated with BHT (promoter) followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and flow cytometry processing on the lungs. ELISAs, Club cell enrichment, macrophage function, and RNA isolation were also performed. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) co-cultured with a type II cell line were used for wound healing assays. Innate immune cells significantly increased in whole lung in BHT-treated BALB(Lpsd) mice compared to BALB mice. BHT-treated BALB(Lpsd) mice demonstrated enhanced macrophage functionality, increased epithelial wound closure via BMDMs, and increased Club cell number in BALB(Lpsd) mice, all compared to BALB BHT-treated mice. Cytokine/chemokine (Kc, Mcp1) and growth factor (Igf1) levels also significantly differed among the strains and within macrophages, gene expression, and cell surface markers collectively demonstrated a more plastic phenotype in BALB(Lpsd) mice. Therefore, these correlative studies suggest that distinct innate immune cell populations are associated with the differences observed in the Tlr4-mutant model. Future studies will investigate the macrophage origins and the utility of the pathways identified herein as indicators of immune system deficiencies and lung tumorigenesis. PMID:27093379

  10. The nested structure of a scavenger community

    PubMed Central

    Selva, Nuria; Fortuna, Miguel A

    2007-01-01

    Scavenging is a widespread phenomenon in vertebrate communities which has rarely been accounted for, in spite of playing an essential role in food webs by enhancing nutrient recycling and community stability. Most studies on scavenger assemblages have often presented an oversimplified view of carrion foraging. Here, we applied for the first time the concept of nestedness to the study of a species-rich scavenger community in a forest ecosystem (Białowieża Primeval Forest, Poland) following a network approach. By analysing one of the most complete datasets existing up to now in a pristine environment, we have shown that the community of facultative scavengers is not randomly assembled but highly nested. A nested pattern means that species-poor carcasses support a subset of the scavenger assemblage occurring at progressively species-rich carcasses. This result contradicts the conventional view of facultative scavenging as random and opportunistic and supports recent findings in scavenging ecology. It also suggests that factors other than competition play a major role in determining community structure. Nested patterns in scavenger communities appear to be promoted by the high diversity in carrion resources and consumers, the differential predictability of the ungulate carcass types and stressful environmental conditions. PMID:17301021

  11. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  12. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  13. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  14. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  15. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  16. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Receptor Agonists Mediate Pro-fibrotic Responses in Normal Human Lung Fibroblasts via S1P2 and S1P3 Receptors and Smad-independent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Katrin; Menyhart, Katalin; Killer, Nina; Renault, Bérengère; Bauer, Yasmina; Studer, Rolf; Steiner, Beat; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver; Gatfield, John

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 modulators constitute a new class of drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling, however, is also involved in the development of fibrosis. Using normal human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the induction of fibrotic responses by the S1P receptor (S1PR) agonists S1P, FTY720-P, ponesimod, and SEW2871 and compared them with the responses induced by the known fibrotic mediator TGF-β1. In contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not induce expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin. However, TGF-β1, S1P, and FTY720-P caused robust stimulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and increased pro-fibrotic marker gene expression including connective tissue growth factor. Ponesimod showed limited and SEW2871 showed no pro-fibrotic potential in these readouts. Analysis of pro-fibrotic signaling pathways showed that in contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not activate Smad2/3 signaling but rather activated PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling to induce ECM synthesis. The strong induction of ECM synthesis by the nonselective agonists S1P and FTY720-P was due to the stimulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors, whereas the weaker induction of ECM synthesis at high concentrations of ponesimod was due to a low potency activation of S1P3 receptors. Finally, in normal human lung fibroblast-derived myofibroblasts that were generated by TGF-β1 pretreatment, S1P and FTY720-P were effective stimulators of ECM synthesis, whereas ponesimod was inactive, because of the down-regulation of S1P3R expression in myofibroblasts. These data demonstrate that S1PR agonists are pro-fibrotic via S1P2R and S1P3R stimulation using Smad-independent pathways. PMID:23589284

  17. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  18. Apoptotic action of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation in human non small-cell lung cancer is mediated via proline oxidase-induced reactive oxygen species formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Young; Ahn, Jin Hee; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2007-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma ligands have been shown to inhibit human lung cancers by inducing apoptosis and differentiation. In the present study, we elucidated the apoptotic mechanism of PPARgamma activation in human lung cancers by using a novel PPARgamma agonist, 1-(trans-methylimino-N-oxy)-6-(2-morpholinoethoxy)-3-phenyl-(1H-indene-2-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (KR-62980), and rosiglitazone. PPARgamma activation selectively inhibited cell viability of non-small-cell lung cancer with little effect on small-cell lung cancer and normal lung cells. The cell death induced by PPARgamma activation presented apoptotic features of oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation in A549 human non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was accompanied by increased expression of proline oxidase (POX), a redox enzyme expressed in mitochondria, upon incubation with the agonists. POX RNA interference treatment blocked PPARgamma-induced ROS formation and cytotoxicity, suggesting that POX plays a functional role in apoptosis through ROS formation. The apoptotic effects by the agonists were antagonized by bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPARgamma antagonist, and by knockdown of PPARgamma expression, indicating the involvement of PPARgamma in these actions. The results of the present study suggest that PPARgamma activation induces apoptotic cell death in non-small-cell lung carcinoma mainly through ROS formation via POX induction.

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as initial therapy for non-small cell lung cancer: focus on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation testing and mutation-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Roengvoraphoj, Monic; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Dragnev, Konstantin H; Rigas, James R

    2013-12-01

    Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has been implicated in tumorigenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common type of lung cancer. As a result, EGFR has become a key focus for the development of personalized therapy, with several molecular biomarkers having been investigated as potential predictors of response with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in NSCLC (e.g., EGFR expression, EGFR gene copy gain, and EGFR mutations). Of these, activating mutations in EGFR have thus far given the most consistent results based on the available evidence from preclinical studies and clinical trials. In an attempt to identify patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment with EGFR TKIs, EGFR mutation testing is being increasingly utilized in clinical practice. Currently in the United States, no EGFR TKI or accompanying mutational test is approved for the identification and first-line treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC. However, the first-generation EGFR TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib, as well as investigational ErbB family TKIs and EGFR mutation testing methods are being evaluated in this setting. This review will discuss EGFR mutation testing as a biomarker of response to EGFR TKIs and the evolution of EGFR mutational analysis in NSCLC. Completed and ongoing clinical trials evaluating currently available or investigational EGFR TKIs as first-line therapy in molecularly and clinically selected patients with NSCLC, with a focus on trials in patients whose tumors have EGFR mutations, will also be reviewed.

  20. Genetically modified T cells targeting interleukin-11 receptor α-chain kill human osteosarcoma cells and induce the regression of established osteosarcoma lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gangxiong; Yu, Ling; Cooper, Laurence J N; Hollomon, Mario; Huls, Helen; Kleinerman, Eugenie S

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases remains a challenge. T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), which recognizes a tumor-associated antigen, have shown activity against hematopoietic malignancies in clinical trials, but this requires the identification of a specific receptor on the tumor cell. In the current study, we found that interleukin (IL)-11Rα was selectively expressed on 14 of 16 osteosarcoma patients' lung metastases and four different human osteosarcoma cell lines, indicating that IL-11Rα may be a novel target for CAR-specific T-cell therapy. IL-11Rα expression was absent or low in normal organ tissues, with the exception of the gastrointestinal tract. IL-11Rα-CAR-specific T cells were obtained by non-viral gene transfer of Sleeping Beauty DNA plasmids and selectively expanded ex vivo using artificial antigen-presenting cells derived from IL-11Rα + K562 cells genetically modified to coexpress T-cell costimulatory molecules. IL-11Rα-CAR(+) T cells killed all four osteosarcoma cell lines in vitro; cytotoxicity correlated with the level of IL-11Rα expression on the tumor cells. Intravenous injection of IL-11Rα-CAR(+) T cells into mice resulted in the regression of osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases with no organ toxicity. Together, the data suggest that IL-11Rα-CAR T cells may represent a new therapy for patients with osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases. PMID:22075555

  1. Expression of G protein-coupled receptor 56 is associated with tumor progression in non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yanjie; Li, Aiqin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Lingling

    2016-01-01

    Background G protein-coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) is an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor with essential functions for cell physiology and survival, and its expression correlates with prognosis in a number of malignancies. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship of GPR56 expression with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Methods The levels of GPR56 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 157 NSCLC tissue samples. The association between GPR56 and clinicopathological parameters was evaluated by χ2 test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to demonstrate the prognosis role of GPR56. The function of GPR56 in NSCLC cell lines was also explored through overexpression