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Sample records for lung surfactant centrifugation

  1. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  2. Aerosol delivery of synthetic lung surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is a widely accepted technique of non-invasive respiratory support in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome due to lack of lung surfactant. If this approach fails, the next step is often intubation, mechanical ventilation (MV) and intratracheal instillation of clinical lung surfactant. Objective. To investigate whether aerosol delivery of advanced synthetic lung surfactant, consisting of peptide mimics of surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) and synthetic lipids, during nCPAP improves lung function in surfactant-deficient rabbits. Methods. Experimental synthetic lung surfactants were produced by formulating 3% Super Mini-B peptide (SMB surfactant), a highly surface active SP-B mimic, and a combination of 1.5% SMB and 1.5% of the SP-C mimic SP-Css ion-lock 1 (BC surfactant), with a synthetic lipid mixture. After testing aerosol generation using a vibrating membrane nebulizer and aerosol conditioning (particle size, surfactant composition and surface activity), we investigated the effects of aerosol delivery of synthetic SMB and BC surfactant preparations on oxygenation and lung compliance in saline-lavaged, surfactant-deficient rabbits, supported with either nCPAP or MV. Results. Particle size distribution of the surfactant aerosols was within the 1–3 µm distribution range and surfactant activity was not affected by aerosolization. At a dose equivalent to clinical surfactant therapy in premature infants (100 mg/kg), aerosol delivery of both synthetic surfactant preparations led to a quick and clinically relevant improvement in oxygenation and lung compliance in the rabbits. Lung function recovered to a greater extent in rabbits supported with MV than with nCPAP. BC surfactant outperformed SMB surfactant in improving lung function and was associated with higher phospholipid values in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid; these findings were irrespective of the type of ventilatory support

  3. Surfactant treatments alter endogenous surfactant metabolism in rabbit lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Oetomo, S.B.; Lewis, J.; Ikegami, M.; Jobe, A.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of exogenous surfactant on endogenous surfactant metabolism was evaluated using a single-lobe treatment strategy to compare effects of treated with untreated lung within the same rabbit. Natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, or 0.45% NaCl was injected into the left main stem bronchus by use of a Swan-Ganz catheter. Radiolabeled palmitic acid was then given by intravascular injection at two times after surfactant treatment, and the ratios of label incorporation and secretion in the left lower lobe to label incorporation and secretion in the right lung were compared. The treatment procedure resulted in a reasonably uniform surfactant distribution and did not disrupt lobar pulmonary blood flow. Natural rabbit surfactant increased incorporation of palmitate into saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC) approximately 2-fold (P less than 0.01), and secretion of labeled Sat PC increased approximately 2.5-fold in the surfactant-treated left lower lobe relative to the right lung (P less than 0.01). Although Survanta did not alter incorporation, it did increase secretion but not to the same extent as rabbit surfactant (P less than 0.01). Alteration of endogenous surfactant Sat PC metabolism in vivo by surfactant treatments was different from that which would have been predicted by previous in vitro studies.

  4. Surfactant for pediatric acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Willson, Douglas F; Chess, Patricia R; Notter, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is placed on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients who have ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS.

  5. [Recent findings in fetal lung development: structure, surfactant, lung fluid].

    PubMed

    Schwartze, H

    1990-01-01

    A great deal of lung development takes place after birth; new alveoli continue to develop until 8-11 years. However, the differentiation of epithelial cells is characteristic of the fetal lung from 24 weeks of gestation onwards: this is the point at which the surfactant containing type II cells can first be identified. Lung blood flow and the metabolic rate of type II cells increase in parallel rates the last 20% of the gestation period. The timely synthesis of surfactant depends on the availability of the fetal hormones T3, cortisol and prolactin, whereas this synthesis is inhibited by insulin and testosterone. Endogenous surfactant consists of 80% phosphatidylcholine and 10% protein. A sufficient quantity of surfactant is only available at term. Nowadayx, surfactant deficiency can be treated successfully with various exogenous surfactant preparations. Fetal lung liquid contributes about one half to the amniotic fluid. It is partly secreted by an active transport system. Secretion is inhibited by the stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors in the lung tissue. The epithelial surface of the alveoli is a barrier which limits protein penetration considerably; lung liquid contains minimal amounts of protein. Under pathological conditions (RDS, haemorrhagic lung oedema) the alveolar barrier is disturbed so that plasma protein penetrate into the air spaces and form hyaline membranes.

  6. Pulmonary surfactants and their role in pathophysiology of lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant is an agent that decreases the surface tension between two media. The surface tension between gaseous-aqueous interphase in the lungs is decreased by the presence of a thin layer of fluid known as pulmonary surfactant. The pulmonary surfactant is produced by the alveolar type-II (AT-II) cells of the lungs. It is essential for efficient exchange of gases and for maintaining the structural integrity of alveoli. Surfactant is a secretory product, composed of lipids and proteins. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol are the major lipid constituents and SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D are four types of surfactant associated proteins. The lipid and protein components are synthesized separately and are packaged into the lamellar bodies in the AT-II cells. Lamellar bodies are the main organelle for the synthesis and metabolism of surfactants. The synthesis, secretion and recycling of the surfactant lipids and proteins is regulated by complex genetic and metabolic mechanisms. The lipid-protein interaction is very important for the structural organization of surfactant monolayer and its functioning. Alterations in surfactant homeostasis or biophysical properties can result in surfactant insufficiency which may be responsible for diseases like respiratory distress syndrome, lung proteinosis, interstitial lung diseases and chronic lung diseases. The biochemical, physiological, developmental and clinical aspects of pulmonary surfactant are presented in this article to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of these diseases.

  7. Lung surfactants and different contributions to thin film stability.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Eline; Bhamla, M Saad; Kao, Peter; Fuller, Gerald G; Vermant, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The surfactant lining the walls of the alveoli in the lungs increases pulmonary compliance and prevents collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. In premature born infants, surfactant deficiency causes problems, and lung surfactant replacements are instilled to facilitate breathing. These pulmonary surfactants, which form complex structured fluid-fluid interfaces, need to spread with great efficiency and once in the alveolus they have to form a thin stable film. In the present work, we investigate the mechanisms affecting the stability of surfactant-laden thin films during spreading, using drainage flows from a hemispherical dome. Three commercial lung surfactant replacements Survanta, Curosurf and Infasurf, along with the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), are used. The surface of the dome can be covered with human alveolar epithelial cells and experiments are conducted at the physiological temperature. Drainage is slowed down due to the presence of all the different lung surfactant replacements and therefore the thin films show enhanced stability. However, a scaling analysis combined with visualization experiments demonstrates that different mechanisms are involved. For Curosurf and Infasurf, Marangoni stresses are essential to impart stability and interfacial shear rheology does not play a role, in agreement with what is observed for simple surfactants. Survanta, which was historically the first natural surfactant used, is rheologically active. For DPPC the dilatational properties play a role. Understanding these different modes of stabilization for natural surfactants can benefit the design of effective synthetic surfactant replacements for treating infant and adult respiratory disorders.

  8. [Pulmonary surfactant homeostasis associated genetic abnormalities and lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaojing; Sun, Xiuzhu; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng; Zhao, Xueming; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Huabin; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is synthesized and secreted by alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells, which is a complex compound formed by proteins and lipids. Surfactant participates in a range of physiological processes such as reducing the surface tension, keeping the balance of alveolar fluid, maintaining normal alveolar morphology and conducting host defense. Genetic disorders of the surfactant homeostasis genes may result in lack of surfactant or cytotoxicity, and lead to multiple lung diseases in neonates, children and adults, including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper has provided a review for the functions and processes of pulmonary surfactant metabolism, as well as the connection between disorders of surfactant homeostasis genes and lung diseases.

  9. [Liposome phospholipid substitution and lung function in surfactant deprived rats].

    PubMed

    Obladen, M

    1985-01-01

    In vivo activity of an artificial surfactant was studied in surfactant depleted rats. After tenfold alveolar lavage, PaO2, tidal volume, and compliance of the respiratory system fell to one third of initial value. Substitution of large unilamellar vesicles containing 90% Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and 10% unsaturated phosphatidylglycerol largely restored oxygenation and lung mechanics in most animals. Complete normalization with weaning from the ventilator, however, was achieved neither with liposomes nor with natural surfactant concentrate.

  10. Role of lymphatics in removal of sheep lung surfactant lipid.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, M M; O'Brodovich, H M; Young, S L

    1983-04-01

    To study the role of lung lymphatics in the removal of surfactant lipid from the sheep lung, we injected [1-14C]palmitate intravenously into six animals previously fitted with a cannula draining the caudal mediastinal lymph node. Lung lymph was collected for 100 h after injection of radiolabel. We obtained alveolar lavage material through a tracheostomy in four other animals after intravenous injection of [9,10-3H]palmitate. We measured radioactivity at several time points in lipid extracts from lymph, lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Alveolar lavage disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) specific activity peaked at about 40 h and was reduced to 30% of this value by 82 h. About 2% of the injected radiolabel was incorporated into lung tissue lipids. Only 4% of the level of labeling achieved in lung tissue lipids was found in lung lymph lipid during 100 h of lymph collection. Sixty-three percent of radiolabel in lymph lipid was recovered in phospholipids, and 29% of phospholipid radiolabel was found in DSPC. The distribution of phosphorus and palmitate radiolabel in lung lymph phospholipid did not closely resemble that of surfactant lipid. No rise in lung lymph DSPC specific activity was observed following the peak in lavage specific activity. If surfactant lipid is removed from the alveolar compartment without extensive recycling, then we conclude that the lung lymphatics do not play a major role in the clearance of surfactant lipid from the alveolar surface. PMID:6687883

  11. [Study of novel artificial lung surfactants incorporating partially fluorinated amphiphiles].

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    Lung surfactants (LS), a complex of ∼90 wt% lipids (mainly dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine or DPPC) and ∼10 wt% surfactant proteins (SP-A, -B, -C, and -D), adsorb to an air-alveolar fluid interface and then lower its surface tension down to near zero during expiration. Intratracheal instillation of exogenous LS preparations can effectively compensate for surfactant deficiency in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Surfacten® (Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Osaka, Japan), a modified bovine lung extract and an effective surfactant replacement in treatment for RDS patients, is supplemented with DPPC, palmitic acid, and tripalmitin. For the premature infants suffering from RDS, instillation of Surfacten® leads to a dramatic improvement in lung function and compliance. Herein, the author reviews potential use of newly designed preparations containing a mimicking peptide of SP-B and also introduces the current research on the preparations incorporated with partially fluorinated amphiphiles to improve their efficacy.

  12. Endotoxin suppresses surfactant synthesis in cultured rat lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F.

    1989-02-01

    Pulmonary complications secondary to postburn sepsis are a major cause of death in burned patients. Using an in vitro organotypic culture system, we examined the effect of E. coli endotoxin (LPS) on lung cell surfactant synthesis. Our results showed that E. coli endotoxin (1.0, 2.5, 10 micrograms LPS/ml) was capable of suppressing the incorporation of /sup 3/H-choline into de novo synthesized surfactant, lamellar bodies (LB), and common myelin figures (CMF) at 50%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. In a similar study, we were able to show that LPS also inhibited /sup 3/H-palmitate incorporation by cultured lung cells. LPS-induced suppression of surfactant synthesis was reversed by hydrocortisone. Our results suggest that LPS may play a significant role in reducing surfactant synthesis by rat lung cells, and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis-related respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in burn injury.

  13. The Pulmonary Surfactant: Impact of Tobacco Smoke and Related Compounds on Surfactant and Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J Elliott

    2004-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, one of the most pervasive habits in society, presents many well established health risks. While lung cancer is probably the most common and well documented disease associated with tobacco exposure, it is becoming clear from recent research that many other diseases are causally related to smoking. Whether from direct smoking or inhaling environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), termed secondhand smoke, the cells of the respiratory tissues and the lining pulmonary surfactant are the first body tissues to be directly exposed to the many thousands of toxic chemicals in tobacco. Considering the vast surface area of the lung and the extreme attenuation of the blood-air barrier, it is not surprising that this organ is the primary route for exposure, not just to smoke but to most environmental contaminants. Recent research has shown that the pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, is the first site of defense against particulates or gas components of smoke. However, it is not clear what effect smoke has on the surfactant. Most studies have demonstrated that smoking reduces bronchoalveolar lavage phospholipid levels. Some components of smoke also appear to have a direct detergent-like effect on the surfactant while others appear to alter cycling or secretion. Ultimately these effects are reflected in changes in the dynamics of the surfactant system and, clinically in changes in lung mechanics. Similarly, exposure of the developing fetal lung through maternal smoking results in postnatal alterations in lung mechanics and higher incidents of wheezing and coughing. Direct exposure of developing lung to nicotine induces changes suggestive of fetal stress. Furthermore, identification of nicotinic receptors in fetal lung airways and corresponding increases in airway connective tissue support a possible involvement of nicotine in postnatal asthma development. Finally, at the level of the alveoli of the lung, colocalization of nicotinic

  14. The Pulmonary Surfactant: Impact of Tobacco Smoke and Related Compounds on Surfactant and Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J Elliott

    2004-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, one of the most pervasive habits in society, presents many well established health risks. While lung cancer is probably the most common and well documented disease associated with tobacco exposure, it is becoming clear from recent research that many other diseases are causally related to smoking. Whether from direct smoking or inhaling environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), termed secondhand smoke, the cells of the respiratory tissues and the lining pulmonary surfactant are the first body tissues to be directly exposed to the many thousands of toxic chemicals in tobacco. Considering the vast surface area of the lung and the extreme attenuation of the blood-air barrier, it is not surprising that this organ is the primary route for exposure, not just to smoke but to most environmental contaminants. Recent research has shown that the pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, is the first site of defense against particulates or gas components of smoke. However, it is not clear what effect smoke has on the surfactant. Most studies have demonstrated that smoking reduces bronchoalveolar lavage phospholipid levels. Some components of smoke also appear to have a direct detergent-like effect on the surfactant while others appear to alter cycling or secretion. Ultimately these effects are reflected in changes in the dynamics of the surfactant system and, clinically in changes in lung mechanics. Similarly, exposure of the developing fetal lung through maternal smoking results in postnatal alterations in lung mechanics and higher incidents of wheezing and coughing. Direct exposure of developing lung to nicotine induces changes suggestive of fetal stress. Furthermore, identification of nicotinic receptors in fetal lung airways and corresponding increases in airway connective tissue support a possible involvement of nicotine in postnatal asthma development. Finally, at the level of the alveoli of the lung, colocalization of nicotinic

  15. Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) interactions with model lung surfactant lipids and an SP-B fragment.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Jackman, Donna; Booth, Valerie

    2011-06-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is the most abundant protein component of lung surfactant, a complex mixture of proteins and lipids. SP-A performs host defense activities and modulates the biophysical properties of surfactant in concerted action with surfactant protein B (SP-B). Current models of lung surfactant mechanism generally assume SP-A functions in its octadecameric form. However, one of the findings of this study is that when SP-A is bound to detergent and lipid micelles that mimic lung surfactant phospholipids, it exists predominantly as smaller oligomers, in sharp contrast to the much larger forms observed when alone in water. These investigations were carried out in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylphosphocholine (DPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (LMPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (LMPG), and mixed LMPC + LMPG micelles, using solution and diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have also probed SP-A's interaction with Mini-B, a biologically active synthetic fragment of SP-B, in the presence of micelles. Despite variations in Mini-B's own interactions with micelles of different compositions, SP-A is found to interact with Mini-B in all micelle systems and perhaps to undergo a further structural rearrangement upon interacting with Mini-B. The degree of SP-A-Mini-B interaction appears to be dependent on the type of lipid headgroup and is likely mediated through the micelles, rather than direct binding.

  16. Interfacial reactions of ozone with surfactant protein B in a model lung surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hugh I; Kim, Hyungjun; Shin, Young Shik; Beegle, Luther W; Jang, Seung Soon; Neidholdt, Evan L; Goddard, William A; Heath, James R; Kanik, Isik; Beauchamp, J L

    2010-02-24

    Oxidative stresses from irritants such as hydrogen peroxide and ozone (O(3)) can cause dysfunction of the pulmonary surfactant (PS) layer in the human lung, resulting in chronic diseases of the respiratory tract. For identification of structural changes of pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) due to the heterogeneous reaction with O(3), field-induced droplet ionization (FIDI) mass spectrometry has been utilized. FIDI is a soft ionization method in which ions are extracted from the surface of microliter-volume droplets. We report structurally specific oxidative changes of SP-B(1-25) (a shortened version of human SP-B) at the air-liquid interface. We also present studies of the interfacial oxidation of SP-B(1-25) in a nonionizable 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol (POG) surfactant layer as a model PS system, where competitive oxidation of the two components is observed. Our results indicate that the heterogeneous reaction of SP-B(1-25) at the interface is quite different from that in the solution phase. In comparison with the nearly complete homogeneous oxidation of SP-B(1-25), only a subset of the amino acids known to react with ozone are oxidized by direct ozonolysis in the hydrophobic interfacial environment, both with and without the lipid surfactant layer. Combining these experimental observations with the results of molecular dynamics simulations provides an improved understanding of the interfacial structure and chemistry of a model lung surfactant system subjected to oxidative stress.

  17. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Chander, A

    1989-12-01

    We investigated secretion of lung surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) using isolated perfused rat lung preparation after labeling the lung lipids in vitro with [methyl-3H]choline. The perfusion medium was Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 10 mM glucose and 3% fatty acid-poor bovine serum albumin. After ventilation of lungs with air containing 5% CO2 (control) for 1 h, 0.91% +/- 0.04 (mean +/- SE, n = 6) of total lung lipid radioactivity (greater than 95% in PC) was recovered in the cell-free lavage fluid. The secretion of PC was increased with terbutaline (50 microM), 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, 100 microM), phorbol L2-myristate 13-acetate (30 ng/ml), and ATP (1 mM), in each case by approximately 150%. Secretion of PC was also increased by 160% if the lungs were ventilated with air containing 0% CO2. The low CO2-mediated PC secretion was time and concentration dependent. The dose-response curve for 0-10% CO2 was S-shaped. The low CO2-induced increase in PC secretion could be largely reversed with diffusible weak acids (25 mM, acetate or butyrate) in the perfusion medium. An increase (70%) in secretion was also induced with 10 mM NH4Cl, suggesting a role for intracellular alkalosis. These observations suggest that intracellular alkalosis stimulates lung surfactant secretion. Alkalosis-stimulated secretion of PC was additive with that with terbutaline (5 X 10(-7) to 5 X 10(-4) M) or 10(-4) M 8-BrcAMP, suggesting that alkalosis effect was not mediated through the beta-adrenergic pathway of surfactant secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2514603

  18. Corticosteroids and surfactant change lung function and protein leaks in the lungs of ventilated premature rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, M; Berry, D; elKady, T; Pettenazzo, A; Seidner, S; Jobe, A

    1987-01-01

    Fetal rabbits were treated with corticosteroids by maternal administration for 48 h before delivery at 27 d gestational age. The treated and control rabbits were placed on ventilator-plethysmographs so that ventilation could be adjusted by regulation of tidal volumes to 10-13 ml/kg body wt. [125I]albumin was mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth, alternate rabbits from each litter were treated with Surfactant-TA, and [131I]albumin was injected intravascularly. The movement of the labeled albumins into and out of the alveolar wash and lung tissue was measured after 30 min of ventilation. Corticosteroid treatment (total dose, 0.2 mg/kg betamethasone) significantly decreased the protein leak across the endothelium (P less than 0.001) but increased the protein leak across the epithelium (P less than 0.001). Surfactant treatment decreased both the endothelial and epithelial leaks, and the combination of surfactant and corticosteroid treatments decreased endothelial leaks to 29% of control values and increased compliance more than either treatment alone. The 48-h corticosteroid treatment did not increase alveolar surfactant pool sizes. Corticosteroids significantly changed lung protein leaks independently of surfactant, and improved the response of the preterm lung to surfactant treatments. PMID:3571492

  19. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 < Ca < 0.05. This effect diminished by decrease in airways diameter. This approach will help elucidate surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  20. Mature Surfactant Protein-B Expression by Immunohistochemistry as a Marker for Surfactant System Development in the Fetal Sheep Lung.

    PubMed

    Lock, Mitchell C; McGillick, Erin V; Orgeig, Sandra; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I Caroline; Morrison, Janna L

    2015-11-01

    Evaluation of the number of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) is an important measure of the lung's ability to produce surfactant. Immunohistochemical staining of these cells in lung tissue commonly uses antibodies directed against mature surfactant protein (SP)-C, which is regarded as a reliable SP marker of type II AECs in rodents. There has been no study demonstrating reliable markers for surfactant system maturation by immunohistochemistry in the fetal sheep lung despite being widely used as a model to study lung development. Here we examine staining of a panel of surfactant pro-proteins (pro-SP-B and pro-SP-C) and mature proteins (SP-B and SP-C) in the fetal sheep lung during late gestation in the saccular/alveolar phase of development (120, 130, and 140 days), with term being 150 ± 3 days, to identify the most reliable marker of surfactant producing cells in this species. Results from this study indicate that during late gestation, use of anti-SP-B antibodies in the sheep lung yields significantly higher cell counts in the alveolar epithelium than SP-C antibodies. Furthermore, this study highlights that mature SP-B antibodies are more reliable markers than SP-C antibodies to evaluate surfactant maturation in the fetal sheep lung by immunohistochemistry.

  1. Newtonian to non-Newtonian flow transition in lung surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoughi, Amir; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2010-11-01

    The lining of normal lungs is covered by surfactants, because otherwise the surface tension of the aqueous layer would be too large to allow breathing. A lack of functioning surfactants can lead to respiratory distress syndrome, a potentially fatal condition in both premature infants and adults, and a major cause of death in the US and world-wide. We use a home-built Brewster angle microscope on an optically accessible deep channel viscometer to simultaneously observe the mesoscale structures of DPPC, the primary constituent of lung surfactant, on water surface and measure the interfacial velocity field. The measured interfacial velocity is compared to Navier-Stokes computations with the Boussinesq-Scriven surface model. Results show that DPPC monolayer behaves i) purely elastically at low surface pressures on water, ii) viscoelastically at modest surface pressures, exhibiting non-zero surface shear viscosity that is independent of the shear rate and flow inertia, and iii) at surface pressures approaching film collapse, DPPC loses its fluid characteristics, and a Newtonian surface model no longer captures its hydrodynamics.

  2. Characterization of VAMP-2 in the lung: implication in lung surfactant secretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengcheng; Howard, Marcia D; Zhang, Honghao; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Bell, Anna; Jin, Nili; Mishra, Amarjit; Liu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for reducing the surface tension of alveolar space, thus preventing the alveoli from collapse. Lung surfactant is synthesized in alveolar epithelial type II cells and stored in lamellar bodies before being released via the fusion of lamellar bodies with the apical plasma membrane. SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptors) play an essential role in membrane fusion. We have previously demonstrated the requirement of t-SNARE (target SNARE) proteins, syntaxin 2 and SNAP-23 (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein 23), in regulated surfactant secretion. Here, we characterized the distribution of VAMPs (vesicle-associated membrane proteins) in rat lung and alveolar type II cells. VAMP-2, -3 and -8 are shown in type II cells at both mRNA and protein levels. VAMP-2 and -8 were enriched in LB (lamellar body) fraction. Immunochemistry studies indicated that VAMP-2 was co-localized with the LB marker protein, LB-180. Functionally, the cytoplasmic domain of VAMP-2, but not VAMP-8 inhibited surfactant secretion in type II cells. We suggest that VAMP-2 is the v-SNARE (vesicle SNARE) involved in regulated surfactant secretion.

  3. Characterization of VAMP-2 in the Lung: Implication in Lung Surfactant Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengcheng; Howard, Marcia D.; Zhang, Honghao; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Bell, Anna; Jin, Nili; Mishra, Amarjit; Liu, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for reducing the surface tension of alveolar space, thus preventing the alveoli from collapse. Lung surfactant is synthesized in alveolar epithelial type II cells and stored in lamellar bodies before being released via the fusion of lamellar bodies with the apical plasma membrane. The soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) play an essential role in membrane fusion. We have previously demonstrated the requirement of t-SNARE proteins, syntaxin 2 and SNAP-23, in regulated surfactant secretion. Here, we characterized the distribution of vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) in rat lung and alveolar type II cells. VAMP-2, 3 and 8 were shown to be present in type II cells at both mRNA and protein levels. VAMP-2 and -8 were enriched in lamellar body fraction. Immunochemistry studies indicated that VAMP-2 was co-localized with the lamellar body marker protein, LB-180. Functionally, the cytoplasmic domain of VAMP-2, but not VAMP-8 inhibited surfactant secretion in type II cells. This study suggests that VAMP-2 may be the v-SNARE involved in regulated surfactant secretion. PMID:22571236

  4. CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping mechanism for damping vibration forces occurring during the operation of a centrifuge is described. The vibration damping mechanism comprises a plurality of nested spaced cylindrical elements surrounding the rotating shaft of the centrifuge. Some of the elements are held substantially stationary while the others are held with respect to a pair of hearings spaced along the rotating shaft. A fluid is retained about the cylindrical elements.

  5. The effect of air pollutants on lung surfactant surface tension

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, E.S.; Fettissoff, P.

    1981-01-01

    This study is concerned with the effects of certain pollutants on the surface tension of pulmonary surfactant (..gamma..). Surface tension of the aqueous phase of a canine lung homogenate was measured by a ring tensiometer. Environmental pollutants (Cl/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, NH/sub 3/ and SO/sub 2/) were added to the lung extract in liquid form. Variations of ..gamma.. with time, temperature and pollutant concentration were observed. Effects were observed with Cl/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ but not with NH/sub 3/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or HCl. No clear distinction was observed between oxidants and reductants, but some intriguing time variations were observed.

  6. Molecular mobility in the monolayers of foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Lalchev, Z I; Todorov, R K; Christova, Y T; Wilde, P J; Mackie, A R; Clark, D C

    1996-01-01

    Certain physical properties of a range of foam film types that are believed to exist in vivo in the lung have been investigated. The contribution of different lung surfactant components found in porcine lung surfactant to molecular surface diffusion in the plane of foam films has been investigated for the first time. The influence of the type and thickness of black foam films, temperature, electrolyte concentration, and extract composition on surface diffusion has been studied using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Fluorescent phospholipid probe molecules in foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant samples or their hydrophobic extracts consisting of surfactant lipids and hydrophobic lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, exhibited more rapid diffusion than observed in films of its principal lipid component alone, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl. This effect appears to be due to contributions from minor lipid components present in the total surfactant lipid extracts. The minor lipid components influence the surface diffusion in foam films both by their negative charge and by lowering the phase transition temperature of lung surfactant samples. In contrast, the presence of high concentrations of the hydrophillic surfactant protein A (SP-A) and non-lung-surfactant proteins in the sample reduced the diffusion coefficient (D) of the lipid analog in the adsorbed layer of the films. Hysteresis behavior of D was observed during temperature cycling, with the cooling curve lying above the heating curve. However, in cases where some surface molecular aggregation and surface heterogeneity were observed during cooling, the films became more rigid and molecules at the interfaces became immobilized. The thickness, size, capillary pressure, configuration, and composition of foam films of lung surfactant prepared in vitro support their investigation as realistic structural analogs of the surface films that exist in vivo in the lung

  7. Untapped therapeutic potential of surfactant proteins: is there a case for recombinant SP-D supplementation in neonatal lung disease?

    PubMed

    Clark, Howard W

    2010-06-01

    Whilst pulmonary surfactant therapy has been highly successful in reducing mortality from respiratory distress syndrome of the newborn, a significant proportion of infants born at less than 28 weeks' gestation develop neonatal chronic lung disease. This has a complex pathogenesis but infection, inflammation, oxygen toxicity and ventilator-induced lung injury in the premature infant are all recognised risk factors for its development. Current surfactant therapies in clinical use do not contain all surfactant components and lack the hydrophilic surfactant proteins A and D. These proteins are known to have important roles in surfactant homeostasis and in protecting the lung against inflammation. This review examines the evidence from animal models supporting a role for surfactant protein-D in particular in reducing inflammation in the lung and speculates that supplementation of current surfactant therapies with recombinant forms of surfactant protein-D may help offset the risk of development of chronic lung disease.

  8. Natural history of five children with surfactant protein C mutations and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Avital, Avraham; Hevroni, Avigdor; Godfrey, Simon; Cohen, Shlomo; Maayan, Channa; Nusair, Samir; Nogee, Lawrence M; Springer, Chaim

    2014-11-01

    Interstitial lung diseases in infants and children are uncommon and may be caused by specific inborn errors of surfactant metabolism. Five children with open lung biopsy diagnosed interstitial lung disease were followed (mean of 27.2 years) and evaluated for surfactant protein gene mutations. Four of the children were originally diagnosed as desquamative interstitial pneumonitis and one as chronic interstitial pneumonitis. All had good response to chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine treatment for periods of 7-38 months. Lung function tests, incremental exercise tests, and rentgenological studies were performed in the children. Surfactant protein gene mutations were searched in all the patients and in part of their families. Three of the patients, aged now 32, 29, and 37 years, feel well and have normal lung function, while two of the patients, both females, aged 28 and 37 years, conduct normal activities of daily living, have healthy children but have clinical, physiological and rentgenological evidence of restrictive lung disease. All five patients were found to have surfactant protein C gene (SFTPC) mutations, three of them with the most common mutation (p.I73T) and the other two with new mutations of surfactant protein C gene (p.I38F and p.V39L). We conclude that detection of surfactant protein mutations should be attempted in all children presenting with interstitial lung disease. Furthermore, treatment with hydroxychloroquine should be considered in children with SFTPC mutations. Prospective evaluation of hydroxychloroquine therapy in a greater number of patients is needed.

  9. Synthesis and surface activity of diether-linked phosphoglycerols: potential applications for exogenous lung surfactants.

    PubMed

    Notter, Robert H; Wang, Zhongyi; Wang, Zhengdong; Davy, Jason A; Schwan, Adrian L

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of three phosphoglycerols is described, one of which contains the previously unknown phosphonoglycerol headgroup. The surface tension-lowering capabilities of synthetic lung surfactant mixtures containing the PG analogs were measured on the pulsating bubble surfactometer and compared to known controls. The PG-containing mixtures exhibited superior surface tension-lowering properties indicating the significant potential of these analogs as components in synthetic exogenous lung surfactants.

  10. Effects of surfactant/budesonide therapy on oxidative modifications in the lung in experimental meconium-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincova, J; Tomcikova Mikusiakova, L; Kosutova, P; Antosova, M; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-02-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a serious condition, which can be treated with exogenous surfactant and mechanical ventilation. However, meconium-induced inflammation, lung edema and oxidative damage may inactivate delivered surfactant and thereby reduce effectiveness of the therapy. As we presumed that addition of anti-inflammatory agent into the surfactant may alleviate inflammation and enhance efficiency of the therapy, this study was performed to evaluate effects of surfactant therapy enriched with budesonide versus surfactant-only therapy on markers of oxidative stress in experimental model of MAS. Meconium suspension (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) was instilled into the trachea of young rabbits, whereas one group of animals received saline instead of meconium (C group, n = 6). In meconium-instilled animals, respiratory failure developed within 30 min. Then, meconium-instilled animals were divided into 3 groups according to therapy (n = 6 each): with surfactant therapy (M + S group), with surfactant + budesonide therapy (M + S + B), and without therapy (M group). Surfactant therapy consisted of two bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) with diluted surfactant (Curosurf, 5 mg phospholipids/ml, 10 ml/kg) followed by undiluted surfactant (100 mg phospholipids/kg), which was in M + S + B group enriched with budesonide (Pulmicort, 0.5 mg/ml). Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 hours. At the end of experiment, blood sample was taken for differential white blood cell (WBC) count. After euthanizing animals, left lung was saline-lavaged and cell differential in BAL was determined. Oxidative damage, i.e. oxidation of lipids (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and conjugated dienes) and proteins (dityrosine and lysine-lipoperoxidation products) was estimated in lung homogenate and isolated mitochondria. Total antioxidant capacity was evaluated in lung homogenate and plasma. Meconium instillation increased transmigration of neutrophils and production of free

  11. Inhibition of pulmonary surfactants synthesis during N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Li, Lian; She, Hua; Yue, Shaojie; Li, Chen; Luo, Ziqiang

    2010-09-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ionotropic glutamate receptors widely distributed in the central nervous system, and have been extensively investigated for their roles in embryonic development, synaptic plasticity and neuroexcitoxicity. Their functions in the peripheral nervous system and non-neural tissues have caught much attention recently. Over-activation of NMDA receptors induces excitotoxic lung injury. But the endogenous cell types in the lungs that express NMDA receptors remains elusive and the molecular mechanism underlies NMDA-induced lung injury has not been fully characterized. In this work, we reported that functional NMDA receptors were expressed in alveolar type II cells in the lungs. Over-activation of these receptors led to down-regulation of pulmonary surfactants synthesis. We further demonstrated that decreased cellular choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase alpha expression induced by NMDA treatment accounted for the decreased pulmonary surfactants synthesis. Our results provided important clues for treatment of glutamate lung injury by modulating pulmonary surfactants system.

  12. Exogenous surfactant suppresses inflammation in experimental endotoxin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Neha; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of exogenous surfactant and surfactant phospholipids on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Exogenous surfactant (porcine surfactant) and surfactant phospholipid (dipalmitoyl phospholipid DPPC, hexadecanol, tylaxopol) were instilled intratracheally with LPS in rats. Expression of surfactant apoproteins (SP-A) and the cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and -2) was studied by immunohistochemistry, and apoptosis was analyzed by in situ terminal dUTP nick end labeling TUNEL assay. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured in the isolated macrophages by fluorescence measurement with dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). LPS-induced oxidative burst and apoptosis at 72 hours were reduced by both porcine and synthetic surfactant. SP-A as well as COX-1 and -2 expressions were suppressed with synthetic surfactant treatment, whereas with porcine surfactant (P-SF) the SP-A expression was enhanced in response to LPS administration. These results indicate that exogenous surfactant inhibits LPS-induced inflammation. This anti-inflammatory activity may be an important outcome of surfactant therapy in endotoxin-induced respiratory distress.

  13. The Role of Surfactant in Lung Disease and Host Defense against Pulmonary Infections.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life as it lines the alveoli to lower surface tension, thereby preventing atelectasis during breathing. Surfactant is enriched with a relatively unique phospholipid, termed dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, and four surfactant-associated proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D. The hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, together with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, confer surface tension-lowering properties to the material. The more hydrophilic surfactant components, SP-A and SP-D, participate in pulmonary host defense and modify immune responses. Specifically, SP-A and SP-D bind and partake in the clearance of a variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens and can dampen antigen-induced immune function of effector cells. Emerging data also show immunosuppressive actions of some surfactant-associated lipids, such as phosphatidylglycerol. Conversely, microbial pathogens in preclinical models impair surfactant synthesis and secretion, and microbial proteinases degrade surfactant-associated proteins. Deficiencies of surfactant components are classically observed in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, where surfactant replacement therapies have been the mainstay of treatment. However, functional or compositional deficiencies of surfactant are also observed in a variety of acute and chronic lung disorders. Increased surfactant is seen in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a disorder characterized by a functional deficiency of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor or development of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies. Genetic polymorphisms of some surfactant proteins such as SP-C are linked to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we briefly review the composition, antimicrobial properties, and relevance of pulmonary surfactant to lung disorders and present its therapeutic implications.

  14. Altered lipid synthesis in type II pneumonocytes exposed to lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, N R; Tesan, M; Tyler, N E; Bleasdale, J E

    1986-01-01

    When type II pneumonocytes were exposed to purified lung surfactant that contained 1-palmitoyl-2-[3H]palmitoyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine, radiolabelled surfactant was apparently taken up by the cells since it could not be removed by either repeated washing or exchange with non-radiolabelled surfactant, but was released when the cells were lysed. After 4 h of exposure to [3H]surfactant, more than half of the 3H within cells remained in disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Incorporation of [3H]choline, [14C]palmitate and [14C]acetate into glycerophospholipids was decreased in type II cells exposed to surfactant and this inhibition, like surfactant uptake, was half-maximal when the extracellular concentration of surfactant was approx. 0.1 mumol of lipid P/ml. Inhibition of incorporation of radiolabelled precursors by surfactant occurred rapidly and reversibly and was not due solely to dilution of the specific radioactivity of intracellular precursors. Activity of dihydroxyacetone-phosphate acyltransferase, but not glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, was decreased in type II cells exposed to surfactant and this was reflected by a decrease in the 14C/3H ratio of total lipids synthesized when cells incubated with [U-14C]glycerol and [2-3H]glycerol were exposed to surfactant. Phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol and cholesterol, either individually or mixed in the molar ratio found in surfactant, did not mimic purified surfactant in the inhibition of glycerophospholipid synthesis. In contrast, an apoprotein fraction isolated from surfactant inhibited greatly the incorporation of [3H]choline into lipids and this inhibitory activity was labile to heat and to trypsin. It is concluded that the apparent uptake of surfactant by type II cells in vitro is accompanied by an inhibition of glycerophospholipid synthesis via a mechanism that involves a surfactant apoprotein. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3827860

  15. Keeping lung surfactant where it belongs: protein regulation of two-dimensional viscosity.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Coralie; Waring, Alan; Zasadzinski, Joseph A

    2005-07-01

    Lung surfactant causes the surface tension, gamma, in the alveoli to drop to nearly zero on exhalation; in the upper airways gamma is approximately 30 mN/m and constant. Hence, a surface tension gradient exists between alveoli and airways that should lead to surfactant flow out of the alveoli and elimination of the surface tension gradient. However, the lung surfactant specific protein SP-C enhances the resistance to surfactant flow by regulating the ratio of solid to fluid phase in the monolayer, leading to a jamming transition at which the monolayer transforms from fluidlike to solidlike. The accompanying three orders of magnitude increase in surface viscosity helps minimize surfactant flow to the airways and likely stabilizes the alveoli against collapse. PMID:15833995

  16. Overcoming inactivation of the lung surfactant by serum proteins: a potential role for fluorocarbons?

    PubMed

    Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2015-08-14

    In many pulmonary conditions serum proteins interfere with the normal adsorption of components of the lung surfactant to the surface of the alveoli, resulting in lung surfactant inactivation, with potentially serious untoward consequences. Here, we review the strategies that have recently been designed in order to counteract the biophysical mechanisms of inactivation of the surfactant. One approach includes protein analogues or peptides that mimic the native proteins responsible for innate resistance to inactivation. Another perspective uses water-soluble additives, such as electrolytes and hydrophilic polymers that are prone to enhance adsorption of phospholipids. An alternative, more recent approach consists of using fluorocarbons, that is, highly hydrophobic inert compounds that were investigated for partial liquid ventilation, that modify interfacial properties and can act as carriers of exogenous lung surfactant. The latter approach that allows fluidisation of phospholipid monolayers while maintaining capacity to reach near-zero surface tension definitely warrants further investigation.

  17. Comparative characterization of pulmonary surfactant aggregates and alkaline phosphatase isozymes in human lung carcinoma tissue.

    PubMed

    Iino, Nozomi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Harada, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Seiji; Koyama, Iwao; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2007-05-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) isozymes are surfactant-associated proteins (SPs). Since several different AP isozymes have been detected in the pneumocytes of lung cancer patients, we attempted to identify the relationship between pulmonary surfactant aggregate subtypes and AP isozymes. Pulmonary surfactant aggregates were isolated from carcinoma and non-carcinoma tissues of patients with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. Upon analysis, ultraheavy, heavy, and light surfactant aggregates were detected in the non-carcinoma tissues, but no ultraheavy surfactant aggregates were found in the carcinoma tissues. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) was detected as two bands (a 27-kDa band and a 54-kDa band) in the ultraheavy, heavy, and light surfactant aggregates found in the non-carcinoma tissues. Although both SP-A bands were detected in the heavy and light surfactant aggregates from adenocarcinoma tissues, the 54-kDa band was not detected in squamous cell carcinoma tissues. Liver AP (LAP) was detected in the heavy and light surfactant aggregates from both non-carcinoma and squamous carcinoma tissues, but not in heavy surfactant aggregates from adenocarcinoma tissues. A larger amount of bone type AP (BAP) was found in light surfactant aggregate fractions from squamous cell carcinomas than those from adenocarcinoma tissues or non-carcinoma tissues from patients with either type of cancer. LAP, BAP, and SP-A were identified immunohistochemically in type II pneumocytes from non-carcinoma tissues and adenocarcinoma cells, but no distinct SP-A staining was observed in squamous cell carcinoma tissues. The present study has thus revealed several differences in pulmonary surfactant aggregates and AP isozymes between adenocarcinoma tissue and squamous cell carcinoma tissue.

  18. Altered lipid synthesis in type II pneumonocytes exposed to lung surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Bleasdale, J.E.; Thakur, N.R.

    1986-05-01

    Uptake of lung surfactant by isolated type II cells was accompanied by decreased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)choline, (/sup 14/C)-palmitate and (/sup 14/C)acetate into phospholipids. Inhibition of incorporation of radiolabeled precursors, like uptake of surfactant, was half-maximal at approximately 0.1 ..mu..mol surfactant lipid P/ml, and was not due to altered specific radioactivities of intracellular precursor pools. Activity of DHAP acyltransferase, but not G-3-P acyltransferase, was decreased in type II cells exposed to surfactant. This was reflected in a decreased /sup 14/C//sup 3/H ratio in total lipids synthesized when cells incubated with (U-/sup 14/C)glycerol and (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol were exposed to surfactant. Disaturated phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylglycerol and cholesterol (individually or mixed) did not mimic the inhibition of precursor incorporation observed with whole surfactant. In contrast, an apoprotein fraction isolated from surfactant inhibited the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)choline into lipids by type II cells. Inhibitory activity of the apoprotein fraction (either alone or mixed with lipids) was half-maximal at approximately 0.5 ..mu..g protein/ml, and was labile to heat and to trypsin. Lipid synthesis in some other cell types (but not all) was also influenced by extracellular surfactant. These data support the proposition that synthesis of surfactant lipids is inhibited in type II cells that are taking up extracellular surfactant.

  19. Characterization of Particulate Matter Transport across the Lung-Surfactant Barrier using Langmuir Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Jeremy; Dennin, Michael; Levine, Alex; George, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the transport of particulate matter acros the lung using a monolayer of bovine lung surfactant tagged with NBD in conjunction with alveolar lung cells below the air-water interface. The monolaye dynamically compressed and expanded to induce phase transitions as well as buckling and folding. Polystyrene spheres ranging from 20 to 500 nm in diameter were tagged with fluorescent molecules and deposited on the monolayer. We will present results of preliminary studies of the transport of beads from the air-water surface to the lung cells through the monolayer. Characterization of the transfer will focus on differential fluorescence microscopy to distinguish uncoated beads from beads from beads coated with surfactant monolayers. The presence or absence of surfactant associated with the beads provides insight into potential transfer mechanisms and will serve as an input into models of the bead transfer. We gladly acknowledge the support of NSF grant DMR-1309402.

  20. Respiratory failure following anti-lung serum: study on mechanisms associated with surfactant system damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lachmann, B.; Hallman, M.; Bergmann, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    Within 2 minutes intravenous anti-lung serum (ALS) into guinea pig induces a respiratory failure that is fatal within 30 min. The relationship between surfactant, alveolar-capillary permeability and respiratory failure was studied. Within two minutes ALS induced a leak in the alveolar-capillary barrier. Within 30 minutes 28.3% (controls, given normal rabbit serum: 0.7%) of iv /sup 131/I-albumin, and 0.5% (controls 0.02%) of iv surfactant phospholipid tracer were recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage. Furthermore, 57% (controls 32%) of the endotracheally administered surfactant phospholipid became associated with lung tissue and only less than 0.5% left the lung. The distribution of proteins and phospholipids between the in vivo small volume bronchoalveolar lavages and the ex vivo bronchoalveolar lavages were dissimilar: 84% (controls 20%) of intravenously injected, lavageable /sup 131/I-albumin and 23% (controls 18%) of total lavageable phospholipid were recovered in the in vivo small volume bronchoalveolar lavages. ALS also decreased lavageable surfactant phospholipid by 41%. After ALS the minimum surface tension increased. The supernatant of the lavage increased the minimum surface tension of normal surfactant. In addition, the sediment fraction of the lavage had slow surface adsorption, and a marked reduction in 35,000 and 10,000 MW peptides. Exogenous surfactant ameliorated the ALS-induced respiratory failure. We propose that inhibition, altered intrapulmonary distribution, and dissociation of protein and phospholipid components of surfactant are important in early pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure.

  1. Altered turnover and synthesis rates of lung surfactant following thoracic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, P.G.; Ahier, R.G.; Anderson, R.L.

    1987-02-01

    Between 2-6 weeks after thoracic irradiation with 10 Gy X rays, when levels of surfactant in the alveoli show the greatest increase, there is a reduction in the rate of radioactivity loss from /sup 3/H-choline labeled disaturated phosphatidylcholine from the lung. This indicates a reduced turnover of surfactant. Discrepancies between the halving times for specific activity and for total radioactivity of the disaturated phospholipids suggest that at between 2 and 3 weeks post-irradiation, removal and degradation of surfactant almost ceases, but that synthesis continues normally. However, by 3 weeks post-irradiation, choline-/sup 3/H incorporation into disaturated phosphatidylcholine suggests that surfactant synthesis is increased about two-fold. The reduced number of macrophages recovered from alveolar lavage between about 2 and 6 weeks post-irradiation may indicate a reason for the lengthened turnover times of surfactant over this period. Nevertheless, the stimulated surfactant production that takes place from about 3 weeks onward suggests an additional active response to radiation or to radiation damage by the type II pneumonocytes. These studies confirm that the maximum levels of alveolar surfactant seen at 3 weeks post-irradiation result from a different lung response than that responsible for the increase in surfactant, which occurs within hours of irradiation.

  2. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-02-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs.

  3. Properties of mixed monolayers of clinical lung surfactant, serum albumin and hydrophilic polymers.

    PubMed

    Minkov, I; Mircheva, K; Grozev, N; Tz, Ivanova; Panaiotov, I

    2013-01-01

    It is now established that the surface activity of the clinically used lung surfactant is reduced by serum proteins and can be restored by adding the hydrophilic polymers. The mechanisms of lung surfactant inactivation by serum proteins and restoring effect by the hydrophilic polymers remain not completely understood. In this paper the state and rheological dilatational properties of surface films formed from clinical lung surfactant Exosurf, Survanta, Curosurf and Alveofact in the presence of serum albumin (BSA) and hydrophilic polymers polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Dextran were studied. The obtained results suggest that the lung surfactant and BSA mixtures spread at air-water interface form a DPPC/BSA mixed monolayers with lower content of DPPC. The presence of hydrophilic polymers PVP, PEG and Dextran restore the DPPC content in the surface film. The effectiveness of the DPPC spreading and formation of better compacted film increases in order Exosurf, Survanta, Curosurf, Alveofact. The obtained results are in accordance with the generally admitted ideas about the mechanisms of serum protein inactivation and restoring effect of hydrophilic polymers based on the previously studies of the lung surfactant adsorption rate.

  4. KL4 Peptide Induces Reversible Collapse Structures on Multiple Length Scales in Model Lung Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Michael Henderson, J.; Walther, Frans J.; Waring, Alan J.; Ruchala, Piotr; Notter, Robert H.; Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of KL4, a 21-residue amphipathic peptide approximating the overall ratio of positively charged to hydrophobic amino acids in surfactant protein B (SP-B), on the structure and collapse of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol monolayers. As reported in prior work on model lung surfactant phospholipid films containing SP-B and SP-B peptides, our experiments show that KL4 improves surfactant film reversibility during repetitive interfacial cycling in association with the formation of reversible collapse structures on multiple length scales. Emphasis is on exploring a general mechanistic connection between peptide-induced nano- and microscale reversible collapse structures (silos and folds). PMID:22208194

  5. Effects of smoke inhalation on surfactant phospholipids and phospholipase A2 activity in the mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Oulton, M.; Moores, H.K.; Scott, J.E.; Janigan, D.T.; Hajela, R. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of smoke inhalation on the pulmonary surfactant system were examined in mice exposed for 30 minutes to smoke generated from the burning of polyurethane foam. At 8 or 12 hours after exposure, surfactants were isolated separately from lung lavage (extracellular surfactant) and residual lung tissue (intracellular surfactant) for phospholipid analysis. Calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) was measured on a microsomal fraction prepared from the tissue homogenate. Smoke inhalation produced a twofold increase in extracellular surfactant total phospholipid. While there was no change in the total phospholipid or phosphatidylcholine (PC) content of the intracellular surfactant, smoke inhalation significantly decreased the disaturated species of PC (DSPC). The specific activity of PLA2 was reduced by more than 50% in both groups of exposed mice. Smoke inhalation appears to result in selective depletion of the DSPC of intracellular surfactant and PLA2 involved in its synthesis. This depletion may be compensated for by increased secretion or slower breakdown of the material present in the extracellular compartment.

  6. Compatible solutes: ectoine and hydroxyectoine improve functional nanostructures in artificial lung surfactants.

    PubMed

    Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Sachan, Amit Kumar; Kerth, Andreas; Lentzen, Georg; Neuhaus, Thorsten; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2011-12-01

    Ectoine and hydroxyectoine belong to the family of compatible solutes and are among the most abundant osmolytes in nature. These compatible solutes protect biomolecules from extreme conditions and maintain their native function. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of ectoine and hydroxyectoine on the domain structures of artificial lung surfactant films consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and the lung surfactant specific surfactant protein C (SP-C) in a molar ratio of 80:20:0.4. The pressure-area isotherms are found to be almost unchanged by both compatible solutes. The topology of the fluid domains shown by scanning force microscopy, which is thought to be responsible for the biophysical behavior under compression, however, is modified giving rise to the assumption that ectoine and hydroxyectoine are favorable for a proper lung surfactant function. This is further evidenced by the analysis of the insertion kinetics of lipid vesicles into the lipid-peptide monolayer, which is clearly enhanced in the presence of both compatible solutes. Thus, we could show that ectoine and hydroxyectoine enhance the function of lung surfactant in a simple model system, which might provide an additional rationale to inhalative therapy.

  7. Effect of hypoxia on lung gene expression and proteomic profile: insights into the pulmonary surfactant response

    PubMed Central

    Olmeda, Bárbara; Umstead, Todd M.; Silveyra, Patricia; Pascual, Alberto; López-Barneo, José; Phelps, David S.; Floros, Joanna; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of lung to hypoxia has been previously reported to be associated with significant alterations in the protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue. In the present work we have used a proteomic approach to describe the changes in protein complement induced by moderate long-term hypoxia (rats exposed to 10% O2 for 72 hours) in BAL and lung tissue, with a special focus on the proteins associated with pulmonary surfactant, which could indicate adaptation of this system to limited oxygen availability. The analysis of the general proteomic profile indicates a hypoxia-induced increase in proteins associated with inflammation both in lavage and lung tissue. Analysis at mRNA and protein levels revealed no significant changes induced by hypoxia on the content in surfactant proteins or their apparent oligomeric state. In contrast, we detected a hypoxia-induced significant increase in the expression and accumulation of hemoglobin in lung tissue, at both mRNA and protein levels, as well as an accumulation of hemoglobin both in BAL and associated with surface-active membranes of the pulmonary surfactant complex. Evaluation of pulmonary surfactant surface activity from hypoxic rats showed no alterations in its spreading ability, ruling out inhibition by increased levels of serum or inflammatory proteins. PMID:24576641

  8. Lessons from the biophysics of interfaces: lung surfactant and tear fluid.

    PubMed

    Rantamäki, Antti H; Telenius, Jelena; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Holopainen, Juha M

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight into the biophysical properties and functions of tear fluid and lung surfactant--two similar fluids covering the epithelium of two distinctive organs. Both fluids form a layer-like structure that essentially comprise of an aqueous layer next to the epithelium and an anterior lipid layer at the air-water interface. The aqueous layers contain soluble proteins and metabolites, and they are responsible for the host defence system and nutrition of the organ. However, many proteins also interact with the lipid layer and are important for the surface-active function of the fluid film. The lipid layer of lung surfactant comprises mainly of phospholipids, especially phosphatidylcholines, and only small amounts of non-polar lipids, mainly cholesterol. In contrast, tear fluid lipid layer comprises of a mixture of polar and non-polar lipids. However, the relative proportion and the spectrum of different polar and non-polar lipids seem to be more extensive in tear fluid than in lung surfactant. The differing lipid compositions generate distinctive lipid layer structures. Despite the structural differences, these lipid layers decrease the surface tension of the air-water interface. The structure of the tear film lipid layer also minimises the evaporation of the tear fluid. In lung surfactant surface activity is crucial for the function of the organ, as the lipid layer prevents the collapse of the lung alveoli during the compression-expansion cycle of breathing. Similarly the tear film experiences a compression-expansion cycle during blinking. The dynamics of this cycle have been studied to a lesser extent and are not as clear as those of lung surfactant. The common structure and properties suggest a similar behaviour under rapid compression-expansion for both fluids. PMID:21352946

  9. A novel nanobody specific for respiratory surfactant protein A has potential for lung targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Mei; He, Xian; Li, Nan; Yu, Feng; Hu, Yang; Wang, Liu-Sheng; Zhang, Peng; Du, Yu-Kui; Du, Shan-Shan; Yin, Zhao-Fang; Wei, Ya-Ru; Mulet, Xavier; Coia, Greg; Weng, Dong; He, Jian-Hua; Wu, Min; Li, Hui-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lung-targeting drugs are thought to be potential therapies of refractory lung diseases by maximizing local drug concentrations in the lung to avoid systemic circulation. However, a major limitation in developing lung-targeted drugs is the acquirement of lung-specific ligands. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SPA) is predominantly synthesized by type II alveolar epithelial cells, and may serve as a potential lung-targeting ligand. Here, we generated recombinant rat pulmonary SPA (rSPA) as an antigen and immunized an alpaca to produce two nanobodies (the smallest naturally occurring antibodies) specific for rSPA, designated Nb6 and Nb17. To assess these nanobodies’ potential for lung targeting, we evaluated their specificity to lung tissue and toxicity in mice. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that these anti-rSPA nanobodies selectively bound to rat lungs with high affinity. Furthermore, we intravenously injected fluorescein isothiocyanate-Nb17 in nude mice and observed its preferential accumulation in the lung to other tissues, suggesting high affinity of the nanobody for the lung. Studying acute and chronic toxicity of Nb17 revealed its safety in rats without causing apparent histological alterations. Collectively, we have generated and characterized lung-specific nanobodies, which may be applicable for lung drug delivery. PMID:25926731

  10. Effects of lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, and palmitic acid on monolayer stability.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, J; Takamoto, D Y; von Nahmen, A; Lipp, M M; Lee, K Y; Waring, A J; Zasadzinski, J A

    2001-01-01

    Langmuir isotherms and fluorescence and atomic force microscopy images of synthetic model lung surfactants were used to determine the influence of palmitic acid and synthetic peptides based on the surfactant-specific proteins SP-B and SP-C on the morphology and function of surfactant monolayers. Lung surfactant-specific protein SP-C and peptides based on SP-C eliminate the loss to the subphase of unsaturated lipids necessary for good adsorption and respreading by inducing a transition between monolayers and multilayers within the fluid phase domains of the monolayer. The morphology and thickness of the multilayer phase depends on the lipid composition of the monolayer and the concentration of SP-C or SP-C peptide. Lung surfactant protein SP-B and peptides based on SP-B induce a reversible folding transition at monolayer collapse that allows all components of surfactant to be retained at the interface during respreading. Supplementing Survanta, a clinically used replacement lung surfactant, with a peptide based on the first 25 amino acids of SP-B also induces a similar folding transition at monolayer collapse. Palmitic acid makes the monolayer rigid at low surface tension and fluid at high surface tension and modifies SP-C function. Identifying the function of lung surfactant proteins and lipids is essential to the rational design of replacement surfactants for treatment of respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:11325728

  11. Multilayers at the surface of solutions of exogenous lung surfactant: direct observation by neutron reflection.

    PubMed

    Follows, D; Tiberg, F; Thomas, R K; Larsson, M

    2007-02-01

    Pharmacy-grade exogenous lung surfactant preparations of bovine and porcine origin, dispersed in physiological electrolyte solution have been studied. The organization and dynamics at the air/water interface at physiological temperature was analysed by neutron reflection. The results show that a well-defined surface phase is formed, consisting of a multilayer structure of lipid/protein bilayers alternating with aqueous layers, with a repetition period of about 70 A and correlation depths of 3 to >25 bilayers, depending on electrolyte composition and time. The experimental surfactant concentration of 0.15% (w/w) is far below that used in therapeutic application of exogenous surfactants and it is therefore likely that similar multilayer structures are also formed at the alveolar surface in the clinical situation during surfactant substitution therapy. Lung surfactant preparations in dry form swell in aqueous solution towards a limit of about 60% (w/w) of water, forming a lamellar liquid-crystalline phase above about 34 degrees C, which disperses into lamellar bodies at higher water concentrations. The lamellar spacings in the surface multilayers at the air/water interface are smaller than those in the saturated limit even though they are in contact with much greater water concentrations. The surface multilayers are laterally disordered in a way that is consistent with fragments of Lalpha-phase lamellae. The near surface layers of the multilayer structure have a significant protein content (only SP-B and SP-C are present in the preparations). The results demonstrate that a multilayer structure can be formed in exogenous surfactant even at very low concentrations and indicate that multilayers need to be incorporated into present interpretations of in vitro studies of similar lung surfactant preparations, which are largely based on monolayer models.

  12. Lung Surfactant Microbubbles Increase Lipophilic Drug Payload for Ultrasound-Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sirsi, Shashank R.; Fung, Chinpong; Garg, Sumit; Tianning, Mary Y.; Mountford, Paul A.; Borden, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The cavitation response of circulating microbubbles to targeted ultrasound can be used for noninvasive, site-specific delivery of shell-loaded materials. One challenge for microbubble-mediated delivery of lipophilic compounds is the limitation of drug loading into the microbubble shell, which is commonly a single phospholipid monolayer. In this study, we investigated the use of natural lung surfactant extract (Survanta®, Abbott Nutrition) as a microbubble shell material in order to improve drug payload and delivery. Pulmonary surfactant extracts such as Survanta contain hydrophobic surfactant proteins (SP-B and SP-C) that facilitate lipid folding and retention on lipid monolayers. Here, we show that Survanta-based microbubbles exhibit wrinkles in bright-field microscopy and increased lipid retention on the microbubble surface in the form of surface-associated aggregates observed with fluorescence microscopy. The payload of a model lipophilic drug (DiO), measured by flow cytometry, increased by over 2-fold compared to lipid-coated microbubbles lacking SP-B and SP-C. Lung surfactant microbubbles were highly echogenic to contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging at low acoustic intensities. At higher ultrasound intensity, excess lipid was observed to be acoustically cleaved for localized release. To demonstrate targeting, a biotinylated lipopolymer was incorporated into the shell, and the microbubbles were subjected to a sequence of radiation force and fragmentation pulses as they passed through an avidinated hollow fiber. Lung surfactant microbubbles showed a 3-fold increase in targeted deposition of the model fluorescent drug compared to lipid-only microbubbles. Our results demonstrate that lung surfactant microbubbles maintain the acoustic responsiveness of lipid-coated microbubbles with the added benefit of increased lipophilic drug payload. PMID:23781287

  13. Biophysical behavior of lung surfactant: implications for respiratory physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Notter, R H

    1988-07-01

    The major emphasis of this article has been the complex, multicomponent system of surfactants that are required for proper pulmonary mechanics and function in the mammalian lung. Although LS was discovered over 30 years ago, and soon after was linked directly with neonatal RDS, it has taken a significant time for researchers to develop a fundamental understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system, and its actions and roles in respiratory physiology. Nonetheless, knowledge about LS has increased greatly over the past decade, and it is now clear that exogenous surfactant replacement therapy for infants with RDS provides a substantial clinical advantage for these patients. Indeed, the therapy is life-saving in many very small premature infants, and as experience accrues, and therapy is optimized, this advance is clearly a major step forward in neonatology. Perhaps the most prominent theme that has been presented throughout the discussion here is that pulmonary surfactant research must take advantage of interdisciplinary descriptions and cross-correlations for accurate and rapid progress. One positive feature of prior work on lung surfactant replacement and RDS is that its difficulty has forced investigators toward a level of understanding that is sound enough to extend LS research into related fields, such as lung injury and ARDS. These areas have their own complications, including a much more diverse pathology and injury progressions than found with neonatal RDS. In fact, if defining the role of lung surfactant in ARDS (and developing replacement therapy for it) had been the goal of investigators before considering neonatal RDS, it is difficult to imagine a positive outcome. The situation now, however, is one where it is realistic to think of recognizing when and how LS effects will occur in different ARDS lung injuries, so that surfactant replacement will have the best opportunity to help mitigate their progressive pathology. In dealing with ARDS, it is well to

  14. Adsorption of surfactant lipids by single-walled carbon nanotubes in mouse lung upon pharyngeal aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kapralov, Alexander A; Feng, Wei Hong; Amoscato, Andrew A; Yanamala, Naveena; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Winnica, Daniel E; Kisin, Elena R; Kotchey, Gregg P; Gou, Pingping; Sparvero, Louis J; Ray, Prabir; Mallampalli, Rama K; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A; Kagan, Valerian E

    2012-05-22

    The pulmonary route represents one of the most important portals of entry for nanoparticles into the body. However, the in vivo interactions of nanoparticles with biomolecules of the lung have not been sufficiently studied. Here, using an established mouse model of pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we recovered SWCNTs from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), purified them from possible contamination with lung cells, and examined the composition of phospholipids adsorbed on SWCNTs by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We found that SWCNTs selectively adsorbed two types of the most abundant surfactant phospholipids: phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Molecular speciation of these phospholipids was also consistent with pulmonary surfactant. Quantitation of adsorbed lipids by LC-MS along with the structural assessments of phospholipid binding by atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the phospholipids (∼108 molecules per SWCNT) formed an uninterrupted "coating" whereby the hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipids were adsorbed onto the SWCNT with the polar head groups pointed away from the SWCNT into the aqueous phase. In addition, the presence of surfactant proteins A, B, and D on SWCNTs was determined by LC-MS. Finally, we demonstrated that the presence of this surfactant coating markedly enhanced the in vitro uptake of SWCNTs by macrophages. Taken together, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo adsorption of the surfactant lipids and proteins on SWCNTs in a physiologically relevant animal model.

  15. Expression and Localization of Lung Surfactant Proteins in Human Testis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Walter; Matthies, Cord; Ruf, Christian; Hartmann, Arndt; Garreis, Fabian; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Surfactant proteins (SPs) have been described in various tissues and fluids including tissues of the nasolacrimal apparatus, airways and digestive tract. Human testis have a glandular function as a part of the reproductive and the endocrine system, but no data are available on SPs in human testis and prostate under healthy and pathologic conditions. Objective The aim of the study was the detection and characterization of the surfactant proteins A, B, C and D (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D) in human testis. Additionally tissue samples affected by testicular cancer were investigated. Results Surfactant proteins A, B, C and D were detected using RT-PCR in healthy testis. By means of Western blot analysis, these SPs were detected at the protein level in normal testis, seminoma and seminal fluid, but not in spermatozoa. Expression of SPs was weaker in seminoma compared to normal testicular tissue. SPs were localized in combination with vimentin immunohistochemically in cells of Sertoli and Leydig. Conclusion Surfactant proteins seem to be inherent part of the human testis. By means of physicochemical properties the proteins appear to play a role during immunological and rheological process of the testicular tissue. The presence of SP-B and SP-C in cells of Sertoli correlates with their function of fluid secretion and may support transportation of spermatozoa. In seminoma the expression of all SP's was generally weaker compared to normal germ cells. This could lead to a reduction of immunomodulatory and rheology processes in the germ cell tumor. PMID:26599233

  16. Antiinflammatory Effect of N-Acetylcysteine Combined with Exogenous Surfactant in Meconium-Induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincova, J; Mikusiakova, L Tomcikova; Kosutova, P; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) can be treated by exogenous surfactant (S). However, aspirated meconium initiates local inflammation and oxidation which may inactivate surfactant and reduce its action. This experimental study estimated whether combined use of surfactant and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can enhance effectiveness of therapy. Meconium-instilled rabbits were non-treated (M), treated with monotherapies (M + S, M + NAC), combined therapy (M + S + NAC), or received saline instead of meconium (controls, C). Surfactant therapy consisted of two lung lavages (BAL) with diluted Curosurf (5 mg phospholipids/ml, 10 ml/kg) followed by undiluted Curosurf (100 mg phospholipids/kg). N-acetylcysteine (Acc Injekt, 10 mg/kg) was given intravenously in M + S + NAC group 10 min after surfactant therapy. Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 h. Then, differential white cell count in the blood (WBC) was determined. Left lung was saline-lavaged and differential cell count in BAL was determined. In right lung tissue, wet/dry weight ratio, oxidation markers (TBARS, 3NT) and interleukines (IL-2, IL-6, IL-13, and TNFα) using ELISA and RT-PCR were estimated. Combined S + NAC therapy significantly decreased W/D ratio, TBARS, 3NT, and IL, whereas the effect of monotherapies (either S or NAC) was less obvious. In conclusion, addition of NAC to surfactant treatment may enhance the therapeutic outcome in MAS.

  17. The Interplay of Lung Surfactant Proteins and Lipids Assimilates the Macrophage Clearance of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Christian A.; Schaefer, Ulrich F.; Herrmann, Jennifer; Kirch, Julian; Cañadas, Olga; Echaide, Mercedes; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Casals, Cristina; Müller, Rolf; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2012-01-01

    The peripheral lungs are a potential entrance portal for nanoparticles into the human body due to their large surface area. The fact that nanoparticles can be deposited in the alveolar region of the lungs is of interest for pulmonary drug delivery strategies and is of equal importance for toxicological considerations. Therefore, a detailed understanding of nanoparticle interaction with the structures of this largest and most sensitive part of the lungs is important for both nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. Astonishingly, there is still little known about the bio-nano interactions that occur after nanoparticle deposition in the alveoli. In this study, we compared the effects of surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) on the clearance of magnetite nanoparticles (mNP) with either more hydrophilic (starch) or hydrophobic (phosphatidylcholine) surface modification by an alveolar macrophage (AM) cell line (MH-S) using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Both proteins enhanced the AM uptake of mNP compared with pristine nanoparticles; for the hydrophilic ST-mNP, this effect was strongest with SP-D, whereas for the hydrophobic PL-mNP it was most pronounced with SP-A. Using gel electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering methods, we were able to demonstrate that the observed cellular effects were related to protein adsorption and to protein-mediated interference with the colloidal stability. Next, we investigated the influence of various surfactant lipids on nanoparticle uptake by AM because lipids are the major surfactant component. Synthetic surfactant lipid and isolated native surfactant preparations significantly modulated the effects exerted by SP-A and SP-D, respectively, resulting in comparable levels of macrophage interaction for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanoparticles. Our findings suggest that because of the interplay of both surfactant lipids and proteins, the AM clearance of nanoparticles is essentially the same, regardless of different

  18. Functional importance of the NH2-terminal insertion sequence of lung surfactant protein B

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Shelli L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Waring, Alan J.; Walther, Frans J.; Hernandez-Juviel, Jose M.; Ruchala, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is required for proper surface activity of pulmonary surfactant. In model lung surfactant lipid systems composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids, the unsaturated lipids are removed from the film at high compression. It is thought that SP-B helps anchor these lipids closely to the monolayer in three-dimensional cylindrical structures termed “nanosilos” seen by atomic force microscopy imaging of deposited monolayers at high surface pressures. Here we explore the role of the SP-B NH2 terminus in the formation and stability of these cylindrical structures, specifically the distribution of lipid stack height, width, and density with four SP-B truncation peptides: SP-B 1–25, SP-B 9–25, SP-B 11–25, and SP-B 1–25Nflex (prolines 2 and 4 substituted with alanine). The first nine amino acids, termed the insertion sequence and the interface seeking tryptophan residue 9, are shown to stabilize the formation of nanosilos while an increase in the insertion sequence flexibility (SP-B 1–25Nflex) may improve peptide functionality. This provides a functional understanding of the insertion sequence beyond anchoring the protein to the two-dimensional membrane lining the lung, as it also stabilizes formation of nanosilos, creating reversible repositories for fluid lipids at high compression. In lavaged, surfactant-deficient rats, instillation of a mixture of SP-B 1–25 (as a monomer or dimer) and synthetic lung lavage lipids quickly improved oxygenation and dynamic compliance, whereas SP-B 11–25 surfactants showed oxygenation and dynamic compliance values similar to that of lipids alone, demonstrating a positive correlation between formation of stable, but reversible, nanosilos and in vivo efficacy. PMID:20023175

  19. Human Pulmonary Surfactant Protein SP-A1 Provides Maximal Efficiency of Lung Interfacial Films.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Pascual, Alicia; Arroyo, Raquel; Floros, Joanna; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipoprotein complex that reduces surface tension to prevent alveolar collapse and contributes to the protection of the respiratory surface from the entry of pathogens. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a hydrophilic glycoprotein of the collectin family, and its main function is related to host defense. However, previous studies have shown that SP-A also aids in the formation and biophysical properties of pulmonary surfactant films at the air-water interface. Humans, unlike rodents, have two genes, SFTPA1 and SFTPA2. The encoded proteins, SP-A1 and SP-A2, differ quantitatively or qualitatively in function. It has been shown that both gene products are necessary for tubular myelin formation, an extracellular structural form of lung surfactant. The goal of this study was to investigate potential differences in the biophysical properties of surfactants containing human SP-A1, SP-A2, or both. For this purpose, we have studied for the first time, to our knowledge, the biophysical properties of pulmonary surfactant from individual humanized transgenic mice expressing human SP-A1, SP-A2, or both SP-A1 and SP-A2, in the captive bubble surfactometer. We observed that pulmonary surfactant containing SP-A1 reaches lower surface tension after postexpansion interfacial adsorption than surfactants containing no SP-A or only SP-A2. Under interfacial compression-expansion cycling conditions, surfactant films containing SP-A1 also performed better, particularly with respect to the reorganization of the films that takes place during compression. On the other hand, addition of recombinant SP-A1 to a surfactant preparation reconstituted from the hydrophobic fraction of a porcine surfactant made it more resistant to inhibition by serum than the addition of equivalent amounts of SP-A2. We conclude that the presence of SP-A1 allows pulmonary surfactant to adopt a particularly favorable structure with optimal biophysical properties.

  20. Human Pulmonary Surfactant Protein SP-A1 Provides Maximal Efficiency of Lung Interfacial Films.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Pascual, Alicia; Arroyo, Raquel; Floros, Joanna; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipoprotein complex that reduces surface tension to prevent alveolar collapse and contributes to the protection of the respiratory surface from the entry of pathogens. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a hydrophilic glycoprotein of the collectin family, and its main function is related to host defense. However, previous studies have shown that SP-A also aids in the formation and biophysical properties of pulmonary surfactant films at the air-water interface. Humans, unlike rodents, have two genes, SFTPA1 and SFTPA2. The encoded proteins, SP-A1 and SP-A2, differ quantitatively or qualitatively in function. It has been shown that both gene products are necessary for tubular myelin formation, an extracellular structural form of lung surfactant. The goal of this study was to investigate potential differences in the biophysical properties of surfactants containing human SP-A1, SP-A2, or both. For this purpose, we have studied for the first time, to our knowledge, the biophysical properties of pulmonary surfactant from individual humanized transgenic mice expressing human SP-A1, SP-A2, or both SP-A1 and SP-A2, in the captive bubble surfactometer. We observed that pulmonary surfactant containing SP-A1 reaches lower surface tension after postexpansion interfacial adsorption than surfactants containing no SP-A or only SP-A2. Under interfacial compression-expansion cycling conditions, surfactant films containing SP-A1 also performed better, particularly with respect to the reorganization of the films that takes place during compression. On the other hand, addition of recombinant SP-A1 to a surfactant preparation reconstituted from the hydrophobic fraction of a porcine surfactant made it more resistant to inhibition by serum than the addition of equivalent amounts of SP-A2. We conclude that the presence of SP-A1 allows pulmonary surfactant to adopt a particularly favorable structure with optimal biophysical properties. PMID:27508436

  1. Donor surfactant protein D (SP-D) polymorphisms are associated with lung transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    Aramini, B; Kim, C; Diangelo, S; Petersen, E; Lederer, D J; Shah, L; Robbins, H; Floros, J; Arcasoy, S M; Sonett, J R; D'Ovidio, F

    2013-08-01

    Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is the major factor limiting long-term success of lung transplantation. Polymorphisms of surfactant protein D (SP-D), an important molecule within lung innate immunity, have been associated with various lung diseases. We investigated the association between donor lung SP-D polymorphisms and posttransplant CLAD and survival in 191 lung transplant recipients consecutively transplanted. Recipients were prospectively followed with routine pulmonary function tests. Donor DNA was assayed by pyrosequencing for SP-D polymorphisms of two single-nucleotide variations altering amino acids in the mature protein N-terminal domain codon 11 (Met(11) Thr), and in codon 160 (Ala(160) Thr) of the C-terminal domain. CLAD was diagnosed in 88/191 patients, and 60/191 patients have died. Recipients of allografts that expressed the homozygous Met(11) Met variant of aa11 had significantly greater freedom from CLAD development and better survival compared to those with the homozygous Thr(11) Th variant of aa11. No significant association was noted for SP-D variants of aa160. Lung allografts with the SP-D polymorphic variant Thr(11) Th of aa11 are associated with development of CLAD and reduced survival. The observed genetic differences of the donor lung, potentially with their effects on innate immunity, may influence the clinical outcomes after lung transplantation.

  2. The Effects of Lung Protective Ventilation or Hypercapnic Acidosis on Gas Exchange and Lung Injury in Surfactant Deficient Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hummler, Helmut D.; Banke, Katharina; Wolfson, Marla R.; Buonocore, Giuseppe; Ebsen, Michael; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Fuchs, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background Permissive hypercapnia has been shown to reduce lung injury in subjects with surfactant deficiency. Experimental studies suggest that hypercapnic acidosis by itself rather than decreased tidal volume may be a key protective factor. Objectives To study the differential effects of a lung protective ventilatory strategy or hypercapnic acidosis on gas exchange, hemodynamics and lung injury in an animal model of surfactant deficiency. Methods 30 anesthetized, surfactant-depleted rabbits were mechanically ventilated (FiO2 = 0.8, PEEP = 7cmH2O) and randomized into three groups: Normoventilation-Normocapnia (NN)-group: tidal volume (Vt) = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 40 mmHg; Normoventilation-Hypercapnia (NH)-group: Vt = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg by increasing FiCO2; and a Hypoventilation-Hypercapnia (HH)-group: Vt = 4.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg. Plasma lactate and interleukin (IL)-8 were measured every 2 h. Animals were sacrificed after 6 h to perform bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), to measure lung wet-to-dry weight, lung tissue IL-8, and to obtain lung histology. Results PaO2 was significantly higher in the HH-group compared to the NN-group (p<0.05), with values of the NH-group between the HH- and NN-groups. Other markers of lung injury (wet-dry-weight, BAL-Protein, histology-score, plasma-IL-8 and lung tissue IL-8) resulted in significantly lower values for the HH-group compared to the NN-group and trends for the NH-group towards lower values compared to the NN-group. Lactate was significantly lower in both hypercapnia groups compared to the NN-group. Conclusion Whereas hypercapnic acidosis may have some beneficial effects, a significant effect on lung injury and systemic inflammatory response is dependent upon a lower tidal volume rather than resultant arterial CO2 tensions and pH alone. PMID:26840779

  3. L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) enhances lung surfactant phospholipid flux in rabbit fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, B.; Datta, S.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Steinberg, H.; Das, D.K.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of thyroid hormone on surfactant phospholipid production in fetal lung was studied by simultaneously measuring the surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) content and its turnover in lamellar body and alveolar lavage fractions. Pregnant New Zealand white rabbits of 27 days' gestation were properly anesthetized and the uterus opened by a midline incision. Each fetus in each litter was injected with T/sub 3/ along with (/sup 14/C)-palmitate and (/sup 3/H)-choline. Control fetuses were injected with saline instead of T/sub 3/. PC was isolated from lamellar body and lung lavage from each fetus. Zilversmit equations for a two-compartment precursor-product model was used to analyze specific activity versus time curves and the turnover times for surfactant PC. Fluxes of surfactant PC were then calculated from its turnover times and pool sizes. The biological half-life for (/sup 14/C)-palmitate and (/sup 3/H)-choline labeled PC did not change by T/sub 3/ treatment. Turnover times for labeled palmitate and choline were 9.2 hr and 10.0 hr, respectively, for normal fetus and 6.0 hr and 5.8 hr, respectively, for T/sub 3/-treated fetus. While the pool size of PC recovered by the alveolar wash did not change significantly, T/sub 3/ enhanced the flux of this phospholipid from the lamellar bodies into alveolar space by 1.7 times within 4 hr. These results suggest that thyroid hormone may promote fetal lung development by enhancing the release of surfactant into the alveolar space.

  4. Effects of ozone and acid aerosol exposures on surfactant-associated protein A in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Su, W.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the effect of ozone and/or acid aerosol exposure on the level of surfactant associated protein A (SP-A), its gene expression and functionality in the lung. Guinea pigs were exposed to (1) a single exposure to 0.2 to 0.8 ppm ozone for 6 hr and sacrificed at 0 to 120 hr postexposure, (2) 0.8 ppm ozone, 6 hr/day for 3 to 5 days and sacrificed immediately postexposure, or (3) 0.8 ppm ozone, 600 [mu]g/m[sup 3] sulfuric acid, or ozone plus acid for 6 hr and sacrificed at 72 hr postexposure. The concentration of SP-A was determined by ELISA in lavage fluid, lavage cell pellets, and lung tissue compartments. SP-A gene expression was examined in lung tissue by Northern and slot blot analysis. Effect of ozone exposure on functionality of surfactant was tested by its ability to modulate phagocytic cell respiratory burst in a luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL) assay of phagocytic cells simulated by PMA or opsonized-zymosan. There were isolated, but significant, changes in SP-A concentrations in the lavage cell and the lavage fluid compartments at 24 and 48 hr after single exposure to 0.8 ppm ozone, respectively. Exposure to ozone and ozone plus acid also slightly increased total SP-A level in the lung. No change in SP-A gene expression was detected under the exposure conditions examined. However, surfactant from ozone exposed animals significantly enhanced CL response of phagocytic cells stimulated by either PMA or opsonized-zymosan. Blocking of the enhancement of CL by a rabbit anti-human SP-A antibody strongly suggested that SP-A may contribute in the altered respiratory burst of phagocytic cells induced by surfactant from ozone exposed animals.

  5. Long-chain Acylcarnitines Reduce Lung Function by Inhibiting Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Chikara; Bharathi, Sivakama; Uppala, Radha; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Wang, Dongning; McHugh, Kevin; Zou, Ye; Wang, Jieru; Alcorn, John F; Zuo, Yi Y; Hirschey, Matthew D; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-09-25

    The role of mitochondrial energy metabolism in maintaining lung function is not understood. We previously observed reduced lung function in mice lacking the fatty acid oxidation enzyme long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD). Here, we demonstrate that long-chain acylcarnitines, a class of lipids secreted by mitochondria when metabolism is inhibited, accumulate at the air-fluid interface in LCAD(-/-) lungs. Acylcarnitine accumulation is exacerbated by stress such as influenza infection or by dietary supplementation with l-carnitine. Long-chain acylcarnitines co-localize with pulmonary surfactant, a unique film of phospholipids and proteins that reduces surface tension and prevents alveolar collapse during breathing. In vitro, the long-chain species palmitoylcarnitine directly inhibits the surface adsorption of pulmonary surfactant as well as its ability to reduce surface tension. Treatment of LCAD(-/-) mice with mildronate, a drug that inhibits carnitine synthesis, eliminates acylcarnitines and improves lung function. Finally, acylcarnitines are detectable in normal human lavage fluid. Thus, long-chain acylcarnitines may represent a risk factor for lung injury in humans with dysfunctional fatty acid oxidation.

  6. Surfactant-based drug delivery systems for treating drug-resistant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Murthy, R S R; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Among all cancers, lung cancer is the major cause of deaths. Lung cancer can be categorized into two classes for prognostic and treatment purposes: small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Both categories of cancer are resistant to certain drugs. Various mechanisms behind drug resistance are over-expression of superficial membrane proteins [glycoprotein (P-gp)], lung resistance-associated proteins, aberration of the intracellular enzyme system, enhancement of the cell repair system and deregulation of cell apoptosis. Structure-performance relationships and chemical compatibility are consequently major fundamentals in surfactant-based formulations, with the intention that a great deal investigation is committed to this region. With the purpose to understand the potential of P-gp in transportation of anti-tumor drugs to cancer cells with much effectiveness and specificity, several surfactant-based delivery systems have been developed which may include microspheres, nanosized drug carriers (nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, stealth liposomes, nanogels, polymer-drug conjugates), novel powders, hydrogels and mixed micellar systems intended for systemic and/or localized delivery. PMID:25013959

  7. Clinical review: Exogenous surfactant therapy for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - where do we go from here?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterised by severe hypoxemic respiratory failure and poor lung compliance. Despite advances in clinical management, morbidity and mortality remains high. Supportive measures including protective lung ventilation confer a survival advantage in patients with ARDS, but management is otherwise limited by the lack of effective pharmacological therapies. Surfactant dysfunction with quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of both phospholipids and proteins are characteristic of patients with ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement in animal models of ARDS and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome shows consistent improvements in gas exchange and survival. However, whilst some adult studies have shown improved oxygenation, no survival benefit has been demonstrated to date. This lack of clinical efficacy may be related to disease heterogeneity (where treatment responders may be obscured by nonresponders), limited understanding of surfactant biology in patients or an absence of therapeutic effect in this population. Crucially, the mechanism of lung injury in neonates is different from that in ARDS: surfactant inhibition by plasma constituents is a typical feature of ARDS, whereas the primary pathology in neonates is the deficiency of surfactant material due to reduced synthesis. Absence of phenotypic characterisation of patients, the lack of an ideal natural surfactant material with adequate surfactant proteins, coupled with uncertainty about optimal timing, dosing and delivery method are some of the limitations of published surfactant replacement clinical trials. Recent advances in stable isotope labelling of surfactant phospholipids coupled with analytical methods using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry enable highly specific molecular assessment of phospholipid subclasses and synthetic rates that can be utilised for phenotypic characterisation and individualisation of exogenous surfactant

  8. Constrained sessile drop as a new configuration to measure low surface tension in lung surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Laura M Y; Lu, James J; Chan, Yawen W; Ng, Amy; Zhang, Ling; Hoorfar, Mina; Policova, Zdenka; Grundke, Karina; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2004-08-01

    Existing methodology for surface tension measurements based on drop shapes suffers from the shortcoming that it is not capable to function at very low surface tension if the liquid dispersion is opaque, such as therapeutic lung surfactants at clinically relevant concentrations. The novel configuration proposed here removes the two big restrictions, i.e., the film leakage problem that is encountered with such methods as the pulsating bubble surfactometer as well as the pendant drop arrangement, and the problem of the opaqueness of the liquid, as in the original captive bubble arrangement. A sharp knife edge is the key design feature in the constrained sessile drop that avoids film leakage at low surface tension. The use of the constrained sessile drop configuration in conjunction with axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure surface tension allows complete automation of the setup. Dynamic studies with lung surfactant can be performed readily by changing the volume of a sessile drop, and thus the surface area, by means of a motor-driven syringe. To illustrate the validity of using this configuration, experiments were performed using an exogenous lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) at 5.0 mg/ml. A comparison of results obtained for BLES at low concentration between the constrained sessile drop and captive bubble arrangement shows excellent agreement between the two approaches. When the surface area of the BLES film (0.5 mg/ml) was compressed by about the same amount in both systems, the minimum surface tensions attained were identical within the 95% confidence limits.

  9. Effect of type 2 cell mitosis on the surfactant system of injured mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.J.

    1983-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of type 2 cell proliferation, and specifically mitosis, on the surfactant system after lung injury. Lung injury was produced in mice with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The lamellar body (LB) volume density and the LB area of tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-T) labeled and mitotic type 2 cells were determined by combining light microscopic autoradiography with electron microscopic morphometry. Over a 48-hour period, the LB volume density of proliferating (/sup 3/H-T-labeled) type 2 cells decreased from 20.7% to 7.6% and the LB area per cell decreased from 9.1 to 2.4 ..mu..m/sup 2/. These changes were closely related to type 2 cell mitosis, since the LB volume density decreased from 19.2% to 2.9% and the LB area per cell decreased from 9.1 to 1.7 ..mu.. m/sup 2/ between prophase and telophase, but they were independent of the time elapsed since injury. These results indicate that mitosis influenced the LB content of type 2 cells after lung injury and suggest a previously unrecognized link between cell division and the surfactant system of the lung. 38 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Size Influences the Effect of Hydrophobic Nanoparticles on Lung Surfactant Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Mridula V.; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Koshkina, Olga; Maskos, Michael; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar lung surfactant (LS) is a complex lipid protein mixture that forms an interfacial monolayer reducing the surface tension to near zero values and thus preventing the lungs from collapse. Due to the expanding field of nanotechnology and the corresponding unavoidable exposure of human beings from the air, it is crucial to study the potential effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on the structural organization of the lung surfactant system. In the present study, we investigated both, the domain structure in pure DPPC monolayers as well as in lung surfactant model systems. In the pure lipid system we found that two different sized hydrophobic polymeric nanoparticles with diameter of ∼12 nm and ∼136 nm have contrasting effect on the functional and structural behavior. The small nanoparticles inserted into fluid domains at the LE-LC phase transition are not visibly disturbing the phase transition but disrupting the domain morphology of the LE phase. The large nanoparticles led to an expanded isotherm and to a significant decrease in the line tension and thus to a drastic disruption of the domain structures at a much lower number of nanoparticles with respect to the lipid. The surface activity of the model LS films again showed drastic variations due to presence of different sized NPs illustrated by the film balance isotherms and the atomic force microscopy. AFM revealed laterally profuse multilayer protrusion formation on compression but only in the presence of 136 nm sized nanoparticles. Moreover we investigated the vesicle insertion process into a preformed monolayer. A severe inhibition was observed only in the presence of ∼136 nm NPs compared to minor effects in the presence of ∼12 nm NPs. Our study clearly shows that the size of the nanoparticles made of the same material determines the interaction with biological membranes. PMID:24411261

  11. Pilot study exploring lung allograft surfactant protein A (SP-A) expression in association with lung transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    D'Ovidio, F; Kaneda, H; Chaparro, C; Mura, M; Lederer, D; Di Angelo, S; Takahashi, H; Gutierrez, C; Hutcheon, M; Singer, L G; Waddell, T K; Floros, J; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-10-01

    Primary graft failure and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) limit lung transplant long-term outcomes. Various lung diseases have been correlated with surfactant protein (SP) expression and polymorphisms. We sought to investigate the role of SP expression in lung allografts prior to implantation, in relation to posttransplant outcomes. The expression of SP-(A, B, C, D) mRNA was assayed in 42 allografts. Posttransplant assessments include pulmonary function tests, bronchoscopy, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and biopsies to determine allograft rejection. BALF was assayed for SP-A, SP-D in addition to cytokines IL-8, IL-12 and IL-2. The diagnosis of CLAD was evaluated 6 months after transplantation. Lung allografts with low SP-A mRNA expression prior to implantation reduced survival (Log-rank p < 0.0001). No association was noted for the other SPs. Allografts with low SP-A mRNA had greater IL-2 (p = 0.03) and IL-12 (p < 0.0001) in the BALF and a greater incidence of rejection episodes (p = 0.003). Levels of SP-A mRNA expression were associated with the SP-A2 polymorphisms (p = 0.015). Specifically, genotype 1A1A(0) was associated with lower SP-A mRNA expression (p < 0.05). Lung allografts with low levels of SP-A mRNA expression are associated with reduced survival. Lung allograft SP-A mRNA expression appears to be associated with SP-A gene polymorphisms.

  12. In vitro dissolution of uranium-contaminated soil in simulated lung fluid containing a pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Spitler, Grant; Spitz, Henry; Glasser, Stephan; Hoffman, M Kathryn; Bowen, James

    2015-03-01

    During the latter part of the twentieth century, the United States developed a highly technical nuclear weapons complex that involved workers at many facilities performing complex missions at a number of different industrial sites across the country. Now, many of these sites are being remediated to remove legacy materials including chemical and radioactive wastes. Along with remediation comes the responsibility to adequately assess risk to cleanup workers who could be exposed to any hazardous materials, including resuspended uranium dust, encountered during environmental restoration. Inhalation of resuspended uranium represents one of the exposure hazards at an abandoned former metal rolling mill where approximately 11 thousand tons of uranium metal was rolled between 1947 and 1958. Residual uranium contamination in the dirt floor of this abandoned site has been exposed to rain, ice, snow, and other environmental factors for more than 50 y. This report describes the solubility of the uranium contamination in this dirt measured in vitro using a modified recipe for simulated lung fluid that contains a pulmonary surfactant. Small (0.1 g) aliquots of dirt collected at this site were sequentially dissolved in simulated lung fluid for increasing periods of time up to 30 d. Solubility was classified according to the ICRP categories as fast, medium, and slow. Results demonstrate that the solubility designation for the uranium contamination in the dirt is approximately 50% fast, 15% medium, and 35-40% slow. There was no observed difference in solubility when a pulmonary surfactant was added to the simulated lung fluid.

  13. In vitro dissolution of uranium-contaminated soil in simulated lung fluid containing a pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Spitler, Grant; Spitz, Henry; Glasser, Stephan; Hoffman, M Kathryn; Bowen, James

    2015-03-01

    During the latter part of the twentieth century, the United States developed a highly technical nuclear weapons complex that involved workers at many facilities performing complex missions at a number of different industrial sites across the country. Now, many of these sites are being remediated to remove legacy materials including chemical and radioactive wastes. Along with remediation comes the responsibility to adequately assess risk to cleanup workers who could be exposed to any hazardous materials, including resuspended uranium dust, encountered during environmental restoration. Inhalation of resuspended uranium represents one of the exposure hazards at an abandoned former metal rolling mill where approximately 11 thousand tons of uranium metal was rolled between 1947 and 1958. Residual uranium contamination in the dirt floor of this abandoned site has been exposed to rain, ice, snow, and other environmental factors for more than 50 y. This report describes the solubility of the uranium contamination in this dirt measured in vitro using a modified recipe for simulated lung fluid that contains a pulmonary surfactant. Small (0.1 g) aliquots of dirt collected at this site were sequentially dissolved in simulated lung fluid for increasing periods of time up to 30 d. Solubility was classified according to the ICRP categories as fast, medium, and slow. Results demonstrate that the solubility designation for the uranium contamination in the dirt is approximately 50% fast, 15% medium, and 35-40% slow. There was no observed difference in solubility when a pulmonary surfactant was added to the simulated lung fluid. PMID:25627945

  14. Fluidization of a Dipalmitoyl Phosphatidylcholine Monolayer by Fluorocarbon Gases: Potential Use in Lung Surfactant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Frédéric; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Vandamme, Thierry F.; Goldmann, Michel; Fontaine, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Fluorocarbon gases (gFCs) were found to inhibit the liquid-expanded (LE)/liquid-condensed (LC) phase transition of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) Langmuir monolayers. The formation of domains of an LC phase, which typically occurs in the LE/LC coexistence region upon compression of DPPC, is prevented when the atmosphere above the DPPC monolayer is saturated with a gFC. When contacted with gFC, the DPPC monolayer remains in the LE phase for surface pressures lower than 38 mN m−1, as assessed by compression isotherms and fluorescence microscopy (FM). Moreover, gFCs can induce the dissolution of preexisting LC phase domains and facilitate the respreading of the DPPC molecules on the water surface, as shown by FM and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. gFCs have thus a highly effective fluidizing effect on the DPPC monolayer. This gFC-induced fluidizing effect was compared with the fluidizing effect brought about by a mixture of unsaturated lipids and proteins, namely the two commercially available lung surfactant substitutes, Curosurf and Survanta, which are derived from porcine and bovine lung extracts, respectively. The candidate FCs were chosen among those already investigated for biomedical applications, and in particular for intravascular oxygen transport, i.e., perfluorooctyl bromide, perfluorooctylethane, bis(perfluorobutyl)ethene, perfluorodecalin, and perfluorooctane. The fluidizing effect is most effective with the linear FCs. This study suggests that FCs, whose biocompatibility is well documented, may be useful in lung surfactant substitute compositions. PMID:16500985

  15. Dynamic Surface Activity of a Fully Synthetic Phospholipase-Resistant Lipid/Peptide Lung Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Frans J.; Waring, Alan J.; Hernandez-Juviel, Jose M.; Gordon, Larry M.; Schwan, Adrian L.; Jung, Chun-Ling; Chang, Yusuo; Wang, Zhengdong; Notter, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Background This study examines the surface activity and resistance to phospholipase degradation of a fully-synthetic lung surfactant containing a novel diether phosphonolipid (DEPN-8) plus a 34 amino acid peptide (Mini-B) related to native surfactant protein (SP)-B. Activity studies used adsorption, pulsating bubble, and captive bubble methods to assess a range of surface behaviors, supplemented by molecular studies using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), and plasmon resonance. Calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE) was used as a positive control. Results DEPN-8+1.5% (by wt.) Mini-B was fully resistant to degradation by phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in vitro, while CLSE was severely degraded by this enzyme. Mini-B interacted with DEPN-8 at the molecular level based on FTIR spectroscopy, and had significant plasmon resonance binding affinity for DEPN-8. DEPN-8+1.5% Mini-B had greatly increased adsorption compared to DEPN-8 alone, but did not fully equal the very high adsorption of CLSE. In pulsating bubble studies at a low phospholipid concentration of 0.5 mg/ml, DEPN-8+1.5% Mini-B and CLSE both reached minimum surface tensions <1 mN/m after 10 min of cycling. DEPN-8 (2.5 mg/ml)+1.5% Mini-B and CLSE (2.5 mg/ml) also reached minimum surface tensions <1 mN/m at 10 min of pulsation in the presence of serum albumin (3 mg/ml) on the pulsating bubble. In captive bubble studies, DEPN-8+1.5% Mini-B and CLSE both generated minimum surface tensions <1 mN/m on 10 successive cycles of compression/expansion at quasi-static and dynamic rates. Conclusions These results show that DEPN-8 and 1.5% Mini-B form an interactive binary molecular mixture with very high surface activity and the ability to resist degradation by phospholipases in inflammatory lung injury. These characteristics are promising for the development of related fully-synthetic lipid/peptide exogenous surfactants for treating diseases of surfactant deficiency or dysfunction. PMID

  16. [The phenol turbidity test for measurement of pulmonary surfactants in amniotic fluid--rapid test for fetal lung maturity (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, H; Shimada, N; Kuramoto, R; Mochizuki, Y; Nishizima, M; Arai, M; Osanai, K; Ishihara, K; Goso, K; Hotta, K

    1981-05-01

    A simple and sensitive procedure for the quantitative estimation of pulmonary surfactants in the amniotic fluid is described. The method is based on the formation of turbidity from the amniotic fluid surfactants with phenol. Amniotic fluid drawn through an intrauterine catheter was centrifuged at 2000 rpm for 5 min. One ml of 5% aqueous phenol solution was added to 1.0 ml of the diluted supernatant. Control solution was prepared by addition of 1.0 ml of distilled water to the supernatant, instead of phenol solution. The turbidity was measured spectrophotometrically against control at 340 nm 5 to 10 min after agitation on a Vortex mixer for 5 sec. The turbidity obtained from amniotic fluid with phenol was proportional to the increase in total phospholipids in the fluid measured enzymatically. Moreover, only lecithin in the phospholipids was related to the turbidity formation. Sphyngomyelin, lysolecithin, phosphatidylethanolamin did not produce any turbidity with phenol. The spectrophotometric reading of 87 cases (31-41 weeks) was ranged at 0.18-3.52. Four cases with lower value (0.40) showed neonatal respiratory problem. The phenol turbidity test is more useful for the detection of fetal lung maturity comparing with the generally used shake test.

  17. Analysis of lung surfactant model systems with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Bourdos, N; Kollmer, F; Benninghoven, A; Ross, M; Sieber, M; Galla, H J

    2000-01-01

    An often-used model lung surfactant containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), and the surfactant protein C (SP-C) was analyzed as Langmuir-Blodgett film by spatially resolved time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to directly visualize the formation and composition of domains. Binary lipid and lipid/SP-C systems were probed for comparison. TOF-SIMS spectra revealed positive secondary ions (SI) characteristic for DPPC and SP-C, but not for DPPG. SI mapping results in images with domain structures in DPPC/DPPG and DPPG/SP-C, but not in DPPC/SP-C films. We are able to distinguish between the fluid and condensed areas probably due to a matrix effect. These findings correspond with other imaging techniques, fluorescence light microscopy (FLM), scanning force microscopy (SFM), and silver decoration. The ternary mixture DPPC/DPPG/SP-C transferred from the collapse region exhibited SP-C-rich domains surrounding pure lipid areas. The results obtained are in full accordance with our earlier SFM picture of layered protrusions that serve as a compressed reservoir for surfactant material during expansion. Our study demonstrates once more that SP-C plays a unique role in the respiration process. PMID:10866961

  18. Probing perturbation of bovine lung surfactant extracts by albumin using DSC and 2H-NMR.

    PubMed

    Nag, Kaushik; Keough, Kevin M W; Morrow, Michael R

    2006-05-15

    Lung surfactant (LS), a lipid-protein mixture, forms films at the lung air-water interface and prevents alveolar collapse at end expiration. In lung disease and injury, the surface activity of LS is inhibited by leakage of serum proteins such as albumin into the alveolar hypophase. Multilamellar vesicular dispersions of a clinically used replacement, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), to which (2% by weight) chain-perdeuterated dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPG mixtures-d(62)) had been added, were studied using deuterium-NMR spectroscopy ((2)H-NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC scans of BLES showed a broad gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition between 10-35 degrees C, with a temperature of maximum heat flow (T(max)) around 27 degrees C. Incorporation of the DPPC-d(62) into BLES-reconstituted vesicles did not alter the T(max) or the transition range as observed by DSC or the hydrocarbon stretching modes of the lipids observed using infrared spectroscopy. Transition enthalpy change and (2)H-NMR order parameter profiles were not significantly altered by addition of calcium and cholesterol to BLES. (2)H-NMR spectra of the DPPC-d(62) probes in these samples were characteristic of a single average lipid environment at all temperatures. This suggested either continuous ordering of the bilayer through the transition during cooling or averaging of the DPPC-d(62) environment by rapid diffusion between small domains on a short timescale relative to that characteristic of the (2)H-NMR experiment. Addition of 10% by weight of soluble bovine serum albumin (1:0.1, BLES/albumin, dry wt/wt) broadened the transition slightly and resulted in the superposition of (2)H-NMR spectral features characteristic of coexisting fluid and ordered phases. This suggests the persistence of phase-separated domains throughout the transition regime (5-35 degrees C) of BLES with albumin. The study suggests albumin can cause segregation of protein bound-lipid domains in

  19. Probing Perturbation of Bovine Lung Surfactant Extracts by Albumin using DSC and 2H-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Kaushik; Keough, Kevin M. W.; Morrow, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Lung surfactant (LS), a lipid-protein mixture, forms films at the lung air-water interface and prevents alveolar collapse at end expiration. In lung disease and injury, the surface activity of LS is inhibited by leakage of serum proteins such as albumin into the alveolar hypophase. Multilamellar vesicular dispersions of a clinically used replacement, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), to which (2% by weight) chain-perdeuterated dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPG mixtures-d62) had been added, were studied using deuterium-NMR spectroscopy (2H-NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC scans of BLES showed a broad gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition between 10–35°C, with a temperature of maximum heat flow (Tmax) around 27°C. Incorporation of the DPPC-d62 into BLES-reconstituted vesicles did not alter the Tmax or the transition range as observed by DSC or the hydrocarbon stretching modes of the lipids observed using infrared spectroscopy. Transition enthalpy change and 2H-NMR order parameter profiles were not significantly altered by addition of calcium and cholesterol to BLES. 2H-NMR spectra of the DPPC-d62 probes in these samples were characteristic of a single average lipid environment at all temperatures. This suggested either continuous ordering of the bilayer through the transition during cooling or averaging of the DPPC-d62 environment by rapid diffusion between small domains on a short timescale relative to that characteristic of the 2H-NMR experiment. Addition of 10% by weight of soluble bovine serum albumin (1:0.1, BLES/albumin, dry wt/wt) broadened the transition slightly and resulted in the superposition of 2H-NMR spectral features characteristic of coexisting fluid and ordered phases. This suggests the persistence of phase-separated domains throughout the transition regime (5–35°C) of BLES with albumin. The study suggests albumin can cause segregation of protein bound-lipid domains in surfactant at NMR timescales (10−5 s

  20. Determination of phosphatidylcholine and disaturated phosphatidylcholine content in lung surfactant by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Scarim, J; Ghanbari, H; Taylor, V; Menon, G

    1989-04-01

    A rapid isocratic method for determining the total phosphatidylcholine and disaturated phosphatidylcholine levels in lung surfactant preparations by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is described. The analysis was performed on a 3.9 x 300 mm mu-Porasil column with detection by refractive index. The lipids were eluted with a solvent system of chloroform-acetonitrile-methanol-water-85% phosphoric acid 650:650:500:130:2 (v/v/v/v/v). A 4.6 x 30 mm silica guard column was used in place of an injector loop which served as a sample concentrator and purifier. Phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylglycerol, all known components of lung surfactants, were eluted from the loop column and were prevented from reaching the analytical column. Sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine elute later than the phosphatidylcholines on the analytical column. The method was developed so that phosphatidylcholines elute as a single peak regardless of the fatty acid chain length (C12-C20). When the sample was first oxidized with a potassium permanganate-potassium metaperiodate solution, and potentially interfering oxidation products were removed by extraction into a basic aqueous phase, then only the disaturated phosphatidylcholines were analyzed. PMID:2754340

  1. Fluorescence, polarized fluorescence, and Brewster angle microscopy of palmitic acid and lung surfactant protein B monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, M M; Lee, K Y; Waring, A; Zasadzinski, J A

    1997-01-01

    Fluorescence, polarized fluorescence, and Brewster angle microscopy reveal that human lung surfactant protein SP-B and its amino terminus (SP-B[1-25]) alter the phase behavior of palmitic acid monolayers by inhibiting the formation of condensed phases and creating a new fluid protein-rich phase. This fluid phase forms a network that separates condensed phase domains at coexistence and persists to high surface pressures. The network changes the monolayer collapse mechanism from heterogeneous nucleation/growth and fracturing processes to a more homogeneous process through isolating individual condensed phase domains. This results in higher surface pressures at collapse, and monolayers easier to respread on expansion, factors essential to the in vivo function of lung surfactant. The network is stabilized by a low-line tension between the coexisting phases, as confirmed by the observation of extended linear domains, or "stripe" phases, and a Gouy-Chapman analysis of protein-containing monolayers. Comparison of isotherm data and observed morphologies of monolayers containing SP-B(1-25) with those containing the full SP-B sequence show that the shortened peptide retains most of the native activity of the full-length protein, which may lead to cheaper and more effective synthetic replacement formulations. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:9168053

  2. Effect of surfactant on regional lung function in an experimental model of respiratory distress syndrome in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Sam; Porra, Liisa; Broche, Ludovic; Albu, Gergely; Malaspinas, Iliona; Doras, Camille; Strengell, Satu; Peták, Ferenc; Habre, Walid

    2015-08-01

    We assessed the changes in regional lung function following instillation of surfactant in a model of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) induced by whole lung lavage and mechanical ventilation in eight anaesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated New Zealand White rabbits. Regional specific ventilation (sV̇) was measured by K-edge subtraction synchrotron computed tomography during xenon washin. Lung regions were classified as poorly aerated (PA), normally aerated (NA), or hyperinflated (HI) based on regional density. A functional category was defined within each class based on sV̇ distribution (High, Normal, and Low). Airway resistance (Raw), respiratory tissue damping (G), and elastance (H) were measured by forced oscillation technique at low frequencies before and after whole lung saline lavage-induced (100 ml/kg) RDS, and 5 and 45 min after intratracheal instillation of beractant (75 mg/kg). Surfactant instillation improved Raw, G, and H (P < 0.05 each), and gas exchange and decreased atelectasis (P < 0.001). It also significantly improved lung aeration and ventilation in atelectatic lung regions. However, in regions that had remained normally aerated after lavage, it decreased regional aeration and increased sV̇ (P < 0.001) and sV̇ heterogeneity. Although surfactant treatment improved both central airway and tissue mechanics and improved regional lung function of initially poorly aerated and atelectatic lung, it deteriorated regional lung function when local aeration was normal prior to administration. Local mechanical and functional heterogeneity can potentially contribute to the worsening of RDS and gas exchange. These data underscore the need for reassessing the benefits of routine prophylactic vs. continuous positive airway pressure and early "rescue" surfactant therapy in very immature infants. PMID:25997942

  3. Mechanisms to explain surfactant responses.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Alan H

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant is now standard of care for infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Surfactant treatments are effective because of complex metabolic interactions between surfactant and the preterm lung. The large treatment dose functions as substrate; it is taken up by the preterm lung and is reprocessed and secreted with improved function. The components of the treatment surfactant remain in the preterm lung for days. If lung injury is avoided, then surfactant inhibition is minimized. Prenatal corticosteroids complement surfactant to further enhance lung function. The magic of surfactant therapy results from the multiple interactions between surfactant and the preterm lung.

  4. An alternatively spliced surfactant protein B mRNA in normal human lung: disease implication.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Z; Wang, G; Demello, D E; Floros, J

    1999-01-01

    We identified an alternatively-spliced surfactant protein B (SP-B) mRNA from normal human lung with a 12 nt deletion at the beginning of exon 8. This deletion causes a loss of four amino acids in the SP-B precursor protein. Sequence comparison of the 3' splice sites reveals only one difference in the frequency of U/C in the 11 predominantly-pyrimidine nucleotide tract, 73% for the normal and 45% for the alternatively-spliced SP-B mRNA (77-99% for the consensus sequence). Analysis of SP-B mRNA in lung indicates that the abundance of the alternatively-spliced form is very low and varies among individuals. Although the relative abundance of the deletion form of SP-B mRNA remains constant among normal lungs, it is found with relatively higher abundance in the lungs of some individuals with diseases such as congenital alveolar proteinosis, respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, alveolar capillary dysplasia and hypophosphatasia. This observation points to the possibility that the alternative splicing is a potential regulatory mechanism of SP-B and may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease under certain circumstances. PMID:10493923

  5. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Gordon, Larry M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight), the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS) assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary-alveolar protein

  6. Synthetic lung surfactants containing SP-B and SP-C peptides plus novel phospholipase-resistant lipids or glycerophospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Notter, Robert H.; Gupta, Rohun; Schwan, Adrian L.; Wang, Zhengdong; Shkoor, Mohanad Gh

    2016-01-01

    Background This study examines the biophysical and preclinical pulmonary activity of synthetic lung surfactants containing novel phospholipase-resistant phosphonolipids or synthetic glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB) DATK and/or SP-Css ion-lock 1 peptides that replicate the functional biophysics of surfactant proteins (SP)-B and SP-C. Phospholipase-resistant phosphonolipids used in synthetic surfactants are DEPN-8 and PG-1, molecular analogs of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), while glycerophospholipids used are active lipid components of native surfactant (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight). The objective of the work is to test whether these novel lipid/peptide synthetic surfactants have favorable preclinical activity (biophysical, pulmonary) for therapeutic use in reversing surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods Surface activity of synthetic lipid/peptide surfactants was assessed in vitro at 37 °C by measuring adsorption in a stirred subphase apparatus and dynamic surface tension lowering in pulsating and captive bubble surfactometers. Shear viscosity was measured as a function of shear rate on a Wells-Brookfield micro-viscometer. In vivo pulmonary activity was determined by measuring lung function (arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance) in ventilated rats and rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by saline lavage to lower arterial PO2 to <100 mmHg, consistent with clinical acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Results Synthetic surfactants containing 5:3:2 DPPC:POPC:POPG or 9:1 DEPN-8:PG-1 combined with 3% (by wt) of S-MB DATK, 3% SP-Css ion-lock 1, or 1.5% each of both peptides all adsorbed rapidly to low equilibrium surface tensions and also reduced surface tension to ≤1 mN/m under dynamic compression at 37 °C. However, dual-peptide surfactants containing 1.5% S-MB DATK + 1.5% SP-Css ion-lock 1 combined with 9:1 DEPN-8

  7. Restoration of lung surfactant protein D by IL-6 protects against secondary pneumonia following hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Stephen; Moran, Ana; Lionakis, Mihalis; Mastrangelo, Mary-Ann A.; Halder, Tripti; Huby, Maria del Pilar; Wu, Yong; Tweardy, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To identify novel approaches to improve innate immunity in the lung following trauma complicated by hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) for prevention of nosocomial pneumonia. Methods We developed a rat model of T/HS followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) pneumonia to assess the effect of alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis, and its prevention by IL-6, on lung surfactant protein (SP)-D protein levels, lung bacterial burden, and survival from PA pneumonia, as well as to determine whether AEC apoptosis is a consequence of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Lung UPR transcriptome analysis was performed on rats subjected to sham, T/HS, and T/HS plus IL-6 protocols. Group comparisons were performed via Kaplan–Meier or ANOVA. Results T/HS decreased lung SP-D by 1.8-fold (p < 0.05), increased PA bacterial burden 9-fold (p < 0.05), and increased PA pneumonia mortality by 80% (p < 0.001). IL-6, when provided at resuscitation, normalized SP-D levels (p < 0.05), decreased PA bacterial burden by 4.8-fold (p < 0.05), and prevented all mortality from PA pneumonia (p < 0.001). The UPR transcriptome was significantly impacted by T/HS; IL-6 treatment normalized the T/HS-induced UPR transcriptome changes (p < 0.05). Conclusions Impaired innate lung defense occurs following T/HS and is mediated, in part, by reduction in SP-D protein levels, which, along with AEC apoptosis, may be mediated by the UPR, and prevented by use of IL-6 as a resuscitation adjuvant. PMID:24291043

  8. Endogenous lung surfactant inspired pH responsive nanovesicle aerosols: Pulmonary compatible and site-specific drug delivery in lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nitin; Shirsath, Nitesh; Singh, Ankur; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-01-01

    Concerns related to pulmonary toxicity and non-specificity of nanoparticles have limited their clinical applications for aerosol delivery of chemotherapeutics in lung cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary surfactant mimetic nanoparticles that offer pH responsive release specifically in tumor may be a possible solution to overcome these issues. We therefore developed lung surfactant mimetic and pH responsive lipid nanovesicles for aerosol delivery of paclitaxel in metastatic lung cancer. 100–200 nm sized nanovesicles showed improved fusogenicity and cytosolic drug release, specifically with cancer cells, thereby resulting in improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in B16F10 murine melanoma cells and cytocompatibility with normal lung fibroblasts (MRC 5). The nanovesicles showed airway patency similar to that of endogenous pulmonary surfactant and did not elicit inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages. Their aerosol administration while significantly improving the biodistribution of paclitaxel in comparison to Taxol (i.v.), also showed significantly higher metastastes inhibition (~75%) in comparison to that of i.v. Taxol and i.v. Abraxane. No signs of interstitial pulmonary fiborisis, chronic inflammation and any other pulmonary toxicity were observed with nanovesicle formulation. Overall, these nanovesicles may be a potential platform to efficiently deliver hydrophobic drugs as aerosol in metastatic lung cancer and other lung diseases, without causing pulmonary toxicity. PMID:25403950

  9. Endogenous lung surfactant inspired pH responsive nanovesicle aerosols: Pulmonary compatible and site-specific drug delivery in lung metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nitin; Shirsath, Nitesh; Singh, Ankur; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-11-01

    Concerns related to pulmonary toxicity and non-specificity of nanoparticles have limited their clinical applications for aerosol delivery of chemotherapeutics in lung cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary surfactant mimetic nanoparticles that offer pH responsive release specifically in tumor may be a possible solution to overcome these issues. We therefore developed lung surfactant mimetic and pH responsive lipid nanovesicles for aerosol delivery of paclitaxel in metastatic lung cancer. 100-200 nm sized nanovesicles showed improved fusogenicity and cytosolic drug release, specifically with cancer cells, thereby resulting in improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in B16F10 murine melanoma cells and cytocompatibility with normal lung fibroblasts (MRC 5). The nanovesicles showed airway patency similar to that of endogenous pulmonary surfactant and did not elicit inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages. Their aerosol administration while significantly improving the biodistribution of paclitaxel in comparison to Taxol (i.v.), also showed significantly higher metastastes inhibition (~75%) in comparison to that of i.v. Taxol and i.v. Abraxane. No signs of interstitial pulmonary fiborisis, chronic inflammation and any other pulmonary toxicity were observed with nanovesicle formulation. Overall, these nanovesicles may be a potential platform to efficiently deliver hydrophobic drugs as aerosol in metastatic lung cancer and other lung diseases, without causing pulmonary toxicity.

  10. Endogenous lung surfactant inspired pH responsive nanovesicle aerosols: pulmonary compatible and site-specific drug delivery in lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Nitin; Shirsath, Nitesh; Singh, Ankur; Joshi, Kalpana S; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-01-01

    Concerns related to pulmonary toxicity and non-specificity of nanoparticles have limited their clinical applications for aerosol delivery of chemotherapeutics in lung cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary surfactant mimetic nanoparticles that offer pH responsive release specifically in tumor may be a possible solution to overcome these issues. We therefore developed lung surfactant mimetic and pH responsive lipid nanovesicles for aerosol delivery of paclitaxel in metastatic lung cancer. 100-200 nm sized nanovesicles showed improved fusogenicity and cytosolic drug release, specifically with cancer cells, thereby resulting in improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in B16F10 murine melanoma cells and cytocompatibility with normal lung fibroblasts (MRC 5). The nanovesicles showed airway patency similar to that of endogenous pulmonary surfactant and did not elicit inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages. Their aerosol administration while significantly improving the biodistribution of paclitaxel in comparison to Taxol (i.v.), also showed significantly higher metastastes inhibition (~75%) in comparison to that of i.v. Taxol and i.v. Abraxane. No signs of interstitial pulmonary fiborisis, chronic inflammation and any other pulmonary toxicity were observed with nanovesicle formulation. Overall, these nanovesicles may be a potential platform to efficiently deliver hydrophobic drugs as aerosol in metastatic lung cancer and other lung diseases, without causing pulmonary toxicity. PMID:25403950

  11. The effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 deficiency on pulmonary surfactant in a mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Cory M; Cybulskie, Candice; Milos, Scott; Zuo, Yi Y; McCaig, Lynda A; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2016-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by arterial hypoxemia accompanied by severe inflammation and alterations to the pulmonary surfactant system. Published data has demonstrated a protective effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (Mmp3) deficiency against the inflammatory response associated with ARDS; however, the effect of Mmp3 on physiologic parameters and alterations to surfactant have not been previously studied. It was hypothesized that Mmp3 deficient (Mmp3(-/-)) mice would be protected against lung dysfunction associated with ARDS and maintain a functional pulmonary surfactant system. Wild type (WT) and Mmp3(-/-) mice were subjected to acid-aspiration followed by mechanical ventilation. Mmp3(-/-) mice maintained higher arterial oxygenation compared with WT mice at the completion of ventilation. Significant increase in functional large aggregate surfactant forms were observed in Mmp3(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. These findings further support a role of Mmp3 as an attractive therapeutic target for drug development in the setting of ARDS.

  12. Molecular dynamics of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its metabolite interacting with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Chavarría, Helmut I; Guizado, Teobaldo R C; Pimentel, Andre S

    2015-08-28

    The interaction of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its ultimate carcinogenic 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers was successfully performed using molecular dynamics. The DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol bilayer (64 : 64 : 2) was used as the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayer model and compared with the DPPC bilayer as a reference. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide were inserted in water and lipid phases in order to investigate their interactions with the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers. The radial distribution function between two P atoms in polar heads shows that the 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide affects the order between the P atoms in the DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol model more than dibenz[a,h]anthracene, which is a consequence of its preference for the polar heads and dibenz[a,h]anthracene prefers to be located in the hydrocarbon chain of the phospholipid bilayers. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide may form aggregates in water and lipid phases, and in the water-lipid interface. The implications for the possible effect of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide in the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers are discussed.

  13. DNA Methylation Profile and Expression of Surfactant Protein A2 gene in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grageda, Melissa; Silveyra, Patricia; Thomas, Neal J.; DiAngelo, Susan L.; Floros, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the methylation profile of genes allow for the identification of biomarkers that may guide diagnosis and effective treatment of disease. Human surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in lung homeostasis and immunity, and is encoded by two genes (SFTPA1 and SFTPA2). The goal of this study was to identify differentially methylated CpG sites in the promoter region of the SFTPA2 gene in lung cancer tissue, and to determine the correlation between the promoter’s methylation profile and gene expression. For this, we collected 28 pairs of cancerous human lung tissue and adjacent non-cancerous (NC) lung tissue: 17 adenocarcinoma (AC), 9 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 2 AC with SCC features, and we evaluated DNA methylation of the SFTPA2 promoter region by bisulfite conversion. Our results identified a higher methylation ratio in one CpG site of the SFTPA2 gene in cancerous tissue vs. NC tissue (0.36 vs. 0.11, p=0.001). When assessing AC samples, we also found cancerous tissues associated with a higher methylation ratio (0.43 vs. 0.10, p=0.02). In the SCC group, although cancerous tissue showed a higher methylation ratio (0.22 vs. 0.11), this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.35). Expression of SFTPA2 mRNA and total SP-A protein was significantly lower in cancer tissue when compared to adjacent NC tissue (p<0.001), and correlated with the hypermethylated status of a SFTPA2 CpG site in AC samples. The findings of this pilot study may hold promise for future use of SFTPA2 as a biomarker for the diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:25514367

  14. Environmental Pollutant Ozone Causes Damage to Lung Surfactant Protein B (SP-B)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein found in the surfactant fluid at the air–water interface of the lung. Exposure to the air pollutant ozone could potentially damage SP-B and lead to respiratory distress. We have studied two peptides, one consisting of the N-terminus of SP-B [SP-B(1–25)] and the other a construct of the N- and C-termini of SP-B [SP-B(1–25,63–78)], called SMB. Exposure to dilute levels of ozone (∼2 ppm) of monolayers of each peptide at the air–water interface leads to a rapid reaction, which is evident from an increase in the surface tension. Fluorescence experiments revealed that this increase in surface tension is accompanied by a loss of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue at the interface. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity experiments show that, in contrast to suggestions in the literature, the peptides are not solubilized upon oxidation but rather remain at the interface with little change in their hydration. Analysis of the product material reveals that no cleavage of the peptides occurs, but a more hydrophobic product is slowly formed together with an increased level of oligomerization. We attributed this to partial unfolding of the peptides. Experiments conducted in the presence of phospholipids reveal that the presence of the lipids does not prevent oxidation of the peptides. Our results strongly suggest that exposure to low levels of ozone gas will damage SP-B, leading to a change in its structure. The implication is that the oxidized protein will be impaired in its ability to interact at the air–water interface with negatively charged phosphoglycerol lipids, thus compromising what is thought to be its main biological function. PMID:26270023

  15. Environmental Pollutant Ozone Causes Damage to Lung Surfactant Protein B (SP-B).

    PubMed

    Hemming, Joanna M; Hughes, Brian R; Rennie, Adrian R; Tomas, Salvador; Campbell, Richard A; Hughes, Arwel V; Arnold, Thomas; Botchway, Stanley W; Thompson, Katherine C

    2015-08-25

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein found in the surfactant fluid at the air-water interface of the lung. Exposure to the air pollutant ozone could potentially damage SP-B and lead to respiratory distress. We have studied two peptides, one consisting of the N-terminus of SP-B [SP-B(1-25)] and the other a construct of the N- and C-termini of SP-B [SP-B(1-25,63-78)], called SMB. Exposure to dilute levels of ozone (~2 ppm) of monolayers of each peptide at the air-water interface leads to a rapid reaction, which is evident from an increase in the surface tension. Fluorescence experiments revealed that this increase in surface tension is accompanied by a loss of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue at the interface. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity experiments show that, in contrast to suggestions in the literature, the peptides are not solubilized upon oxidation but rather remain at the interface with little change in their hydration. Analysis of the product material reveals that no cleavage of the peptides occurs, but a more hydrophobic product is slowly formed together with an increased level of oligomerization. We attributed this to partial unfolding of the peptides. Experiments conducted in the presence of phospholipids reveal that the presence of the lipids does not prevent oxidation of the peptides. Our results strongly suggest that exposure to low levels of ozone gas will damage SP-B, leading to a change in its structure. The implication is that the oxidized protein will be impaired in its ability to interact at the air-water interface with negatively charged phosphoglycerol lipids, thus compromising what is thought to be its main biological function. PMID:26270023

  16. Sustained Inflation at Birth Did Not Alter Lung Injury from Mechanical Ventilation in Surfactant-Treated Fetal Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Noah H.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Miura, Yuichiro; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sustained inflations (SI) are used with the initiation of ventilation at birth to rapidly recruit functional residual capacity and may decrease lung injury and the need for mechanical ventilation in preterm infants. However, a 20 second SI in surfactant-deficient preterm lambs caused an acute phase injury response without decreasing lung injury from subsequent mechanical ventilation. Hypothesis A 20 second SI at birth will decrease lung injury from mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated preterm fetal lambs. Methods The head and chest of fetal sheep at 126±1 day GA were exteriorized, with tracheostomy and removal of fetal lung fluid prior to treatment with surfactant (300 mg in 15 ml saline). Fetal lambs were randomized to one of four 15 minute interventions: 1) PEEP 8 cmH2O; 2) 20 sec SI at 40 cmH2O, then PEEP 8 cmH2O; 3) mechanical ventilation with 7 ml/kg tidal volume; or 4) 20 sec SI then mechanical ventilation at 7 ml/kg. Fetal lambs remained on placental support for the intervention and for 30 min after the intervention. Results SI recruited a mean volume of 6.8±0.8 mL/kg. SI did not alter respiratory physiology during mechanical ventilation. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HSP60, and total protein in lung fluid similarly increased in both ventilation groups. Modest pro-inflammatory cytokine and acute phase responses, with or without SI, were similar with ventilation. SI alone did not increase markers of injury. Conclusion In surfactant treated fetal lambs, a 20 sec SI did not alter ventilation physiology or markers of lung injury from mechanical ventilation. PMID:25419969

  17. Interindividual Variability in the Expression of Surfactant Protein A and B in the Human Lung During Development

    PubMed Central

    Cau, F.; Pisu, E.; Gerosa, C.; Senes, G.; Ronchi, F.; Botta, C.; Di Felice, E.; Uda, F.; Marinelli, V.; Faa, G.; Fanos, V.; Moretti, C.; Fanni, D.

    2016-01-01

    The surfactant complex, thanks to its multiple actions including decrease of surface-tension and antimicrobial activity, plays a fundamental role in newborn survival, lowering the risk of respiratory distress syndrome. The aim of this work was to determine if the synthesis of two surfactant proteins (SP), SPA and pro-SPB, shows some inter-individual variability during lung development in the intrauterine life. Immunoreactivity for SPA and pro-SPB was investigated in the lungs of 40 subjects, including 15 fetuses, ranging from 14 to 22 weeks of gestation, and 25 neonates, from 24 to 41 weeks. Lung samples were formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded and routinely processed. SPA and pro-SPB were detected utilizing commercial antibodies. A semi-quantitative grading system (1 to 4) was applied, based on the number of reactive cells and the intensity of immunostaining. Surfactant protein immunostaining was found in three compartments: bronchi, bronchioles and alveoli, starting from 14 weeks of gestation in the bronchial epithelium and from the 21st week in the alveolar spaces. Differences were found regarding SPA and pro-SPB expression in the vast majority of subjects: in some lungs, SPA was more expressed whereas in others pro-SPB showed an higher degree of immunoreactivity. The expression of both surfactant proteins was not strictly correlated with gestational age. Whereas the highest levels of reactivity were detected in at term neonates, on the other hand one case with grade 3 was detected at 22 weeks and one negative case for both proteins was observed at 31 weeks. Our data clearly show a marked inter-individual variability regarding the production of SPA and pro-SPB and suggest the existence of other epigenetic factors, acting during gestation, that might influence surfactant production and, consequently, the survival potential of neonates at birth. PMID:27734990

  18. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by the A sub 2 adenosine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gilfillan, A.M.; Gobran, L.I.; Rooney, S.A. )

    1987-05-01

    The authors previously reported that adenosine (A) stimulates secretion of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major component of surfactant, in type II pneumocytes. To determine how this effect is mediated we examined the effect of P{sub 1} purinoceptor agonists -N{sup 6}-phenylisoprpyl-A (PIA), 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxyamido-A (NECA), 2-chloro-A (CA) - and antagonists - theophylline (T) and 8-phenyltheophylline (8PT) - on PC secretion and cAMP levels in type II cells isolated from the adult rat. The cells were preincubated with {sup 3}H-choline for 20 h, transferred to fresh medium and incubated {plus minus} test agents for 1.5 h after which {sup 3}H-PC in the cells and medium was measured. A and its analogs stimulated PC secretion in a dose-dependent manner. At the optimal concentration (A, 1 mM; analogs, 0.01 mM) secretion was stimulated approx. 2-fold from a basal rate of 0.08-1.02% of total PC in the medium after 1.5 h. The potency order was NECA>CA=L-PIA>A>D-PIA. The EC{sub 50} for NECA was 8.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M. The effect of NECA was significantly inhibited by 8PT (0.01 mM) and T (0.05 mM). NECA, A and L-PIA increased cellular cAMP levels 34, 12 and 8 fold, respectively, from a basal level of 0.23-0.28 pmol/10{sup 6} cells. These data suggest that the A{sub 2} subtype of the P{sub 1} receptor mediates the effect of A. In newborn rabbits, lung lavage PC increased form 24.1 {plus minus} 1.6 ug P/g lung dry wt at 0 h to 62.6 {plus minus} 7.7 after breathing for 3 h (n=13). 8PT (15 mg/kg, i.m.) at 0 h decreased the PC content at 3 h by 29% to 44.4 {plus minus} 5.1 ug/g. This suggests a functional role for the P{sub 1} receptor in lung surfactant secretion.

  19. Secretagogues of lung surfactant increase annexin A7 localization with ABCA3 in alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Gerelsaikhan, Tudevdagva; Chen, Xiao-Liang; Chander, Avinash

    2011-12-01

    Membrane fusion between the lamellar bodies and plasma membrane is an obligatory event in the secretion of lung surfactant. Previous studies have postulated a role for annexin A7 (A7) in membrane fusion during exocytosis in some cells including alveolar type II cells. However, the intracellular trafficking of A7 during such fusion is not described. In this study, we investigated association of endogenous A7 with lamellar bodies in alveolar type II cells following treatment with several secretagogues of lung surfactant. Biochemical studies with specific antibodies showed increased membrane-association of cell A7 in type II cells stimulated with agents that increase secretion through different signaling mechanisms. Immuno-fluorescence studies showed increased co-localization of A7 with ABCA3, the lamellar body marker protein. Because these agents increase surfactant secretion through activation of PKC and PKA, we also investigated the effects of PKC and PKA inhibitors, bisindolylmaleimideI (BisI) and H89, respectively, on A7 partitioning. Western blot analysis showed that these inhibitors prevented secretagogue-mediated A7 increase in the membrane fractions. These inhibitors also blocked increased co-localization of A7 with ABCA3 in secretagogue-treated cells, as revealed by immuno-fluorescence studies. In vitro studies with recombinant A7 showed phosphorylation with PKC and PKA. The cell A7 was also phosphorylated in cells treated with surfactant secretagogues. Thus, our studies demonstrate that annexin A7 relocates to lamellar bodies in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We suggest that activation of protein kinase promotes phosphorylation and membrane-association of A7 presumably to facilitate membrane fusion during lung surfactant secretion.

  20. Overcoming Rapid Inactivation of Lung Surfactant: Analogies Between Competitive Adsorption and Colloid Stability

    PubMed Central

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Stenger, Patrick C.; Shieh, Ian; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2009-01-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a mixture of lipids and proteins that line the alveolar air-liquid interface, lowering the interfacial tension to levels that make breathing possible. In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inactivation of LS is believed to play an important role in the development and severity of the disease. This review examines the competitive adsorption of LS and surface-active contaminants, such as serum proteins, present in the alveolar fluids of ARDS patients, and how this competitive adsorption can cause normal amounts of otherwise normal LS to be ineffective in lowering the interfacial tension. LS and serum proteins compete for the air-water interface when both are present in solution either in the alveolar fluids or in a Langmuir trough. Equilibrium favors LS as it has the lower equilibrium surface pressure, but the smaller proteins are kinetically favored over multi-micron LS bilayer aggregates by faster diffusion. If albumin reaches the interface, it creates an energy barrier to subsequent LS adsorption that slows or prevents the adsorption of the necessary amounts of LS required to lower surface tension. This process can be understood in terms of classic colloid stability theory in which an energy barrier to diffusion stabilizes colloidal suspensions against aggregation. This analogy provides qualitative and quantitative predictions regarding the origin of surfactant inactivation. An important corollary is that any additive that promotes colloid coagulation, such as increased electrolyte concentration, multivalent ions, hydrophilic non-adsorbing polymers such as PEG, dextran, etc. or polyelectrolytes such as chitosan, added to LS, also promotes LS adsorption in the presence of serum proteins and helps reverse surfactant inactivation. The theory provides quantitative tools to determine the optimal concentration of these additives and suggests that multiple additives may have a synergistic effect. A variety of physical and chemical

  1. Diesel exhaust particulate material expression of in vitro genotoxic activities when dispersed into a phospholipid component of lung surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X. C.; Keane, M. J.; Ong, T. M.; Harrison, J. C.; Slaven, J. E.; Bugarski, A. D.; Gautam, M.; Wallace, W. E.

    2009-02-01

    Bacterial mutagenicity and mammalian cell chromosomal and DNA damage in vitro assays were performed on a diesel exhaust particulate material (DPM) standard in two preparations: as an organic solvent extract, and as an aqueous dispersion in a simulated pulmonary surfactant. U.S. National Institute for Standards and Technology DPM SRM 2975 expressed mutagenic activity in the Salmonella reversion assay, and for in vitro genotoxicity to mammalian cells as micronucleus induction and as DNA damage in both preparations: as an acetone extract of the DPM mixed into dimethylsulfoxide, and as a mixture of whole DPM in a dispersion of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. Dispersion in surfactant was used to model the conditioning of DPM depositing on the deep respiratory airways of the lung. DPM solid residue after acetone extraction was inactive when assayed as a surfactant dispersion in the micronucleus induction assay, as was surfactant dispersion of a respirable particulate carbon black. In general, a given mass of the DPM in surfactant dispersion expressed greater activity than the solvent extract of an equal mass of DPM.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  3. Clinical review: Exogenous surfactant therapy for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome--where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Dushianthan, Ahilanandan; Cusack, Rebecca; Goss, Victoria; Postle, Anthony D; Grocott, Mike P W

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterised by severe hypoxemic respiratory failure and poor lung compliance. Despite advances in clinical management, morbidity and mortality remains high. Supportive measures including protective lung ventilation confer a survival advantage in patients with ARDS, but management is otherwise limited by the lack of effective pharmacological therapies. Surfactant dysfunction with quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of both phospholipids and proteins are characteristic of patients with ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement in animal models of ARDS and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome shows consistent improvements in gas exchange and survival. However, whilst some adult studies have shown improved oxygenation, no survival benefit has been demonstrated to date. This lack of clinical efficacy may be related to disease heterogeneity (where treatment responders may be obscured by nonresponders), limited understanding of surfactant biology in patients or an absence of therapeutic effect in this population. Crucially, the mechanism of lung injury in neonates is different from that in ARDS: surfactant inhibition by plasma constituents is a typical feature of ARDS, whereas the primary pathology in neonates is the deficiency of surfactant material due to reduced synthesis. Absence of phenotypic characterisation of patients, the lack of an ideal natural surfactant material with adequate surfactant proteins, coupled with uncertainty about optimal timing, dosing and delivery method are some of the limitations of published surfactant replacement clinical trials. Recent advances in stable isotope labelling of surfactant phospholipids coupled with analytical methods using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry enable highly specific molecular assessment of phospholipid subclasses and synthetic rates that can be utilised for phenotypic characterisation and individualisation of exogenous surfactant

  4. Proteomic and Lipidomic Analysis of Nanoparticle Corona upon Contact with Lung Surfactant Reveals Differences in Protein, but Not Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Raesch, Simon Sebastian; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Rurainski, Alexander; Selzer, Dominik; Ruge, Christian Arnold; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Schaefer, Ulrich Friedrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-12-22

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) constitutes the first line of host defense in the deep lung. Because of its high content of phospholipids and surfactant specific proteins, the interaction of inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) with the pulmonary surfactant layer is likely to form a corona that is different to the one formed in plasma. Here we present a detailed lipidomic and proteomic analysis of NP corona formation using native porcine surfactant as a model. We analyzed the adsorbed biomolecules in the corona of three NP with different surface properties (PEG-, PLGA-, and Lipid-NP) after incubation with native porcine surfactant. Using label-free shotgun analysis for protein and LC-MS for lipid analysis, we quantitatively determined the corona composition. Our results show a conserved lipid composition in the coronas of all investigated NPs regardless of their surface properties, with only hydrophilic PEG-NPs adsorbing fewer lipids in total. In contrast, the analyzed NP displayed a marked difference in the protein corona, consisting of up to 417 different proteins. Among the proteins showing significant differences between the NP coronas, there was a striking prevalence of molecules with a notoriously high lipid and surface binding, such as, e.g., SP-A, SP-D, DMBT1. Our data indicate that the selective adsorption of proteins mediates the relatively similar lipid pattern in the coronas of different NPs. On the basis of our lipidomic and proteomic analysis, we provide a detailed set of quantitative data on the composition of the surfactant corona formed upon NP inhalation, which is unique and markedly different to the plasma corona. PMID:26575243

  5. Proteomic and Lipidomic Analysis of Nanoparticle Corona upon Contact with Lung Surfactant Reveals Differences in Protein, but Not Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Raesch, Simon Sebastian; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Rurainski, Alexander; Selzer, Dominik; Ruge, Christian Arnold; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Schaefer, Ulrich Friedrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-12-22

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) constitutes the first line of host defense in the deep lung. Because of its high content of phospholipids and surfactant specific proteins, the interaction of inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) with the pulmonary surfactant layer is likely to form a corona that is different to the one formed in plasma. Here we present a detailed lipidomic and proteomic analysis of NP corona formation using native porcine surfactant as a model. We analyzed the adsorbed biomolecules in the corona of three NP with different surface properties (PEG-, PLGA-, and Lipid-NP) after incubation with native porcine surfactant. Using label-free shotgun analysis for protein and LC-MS for lipid analysis, we quantitatively determined the corona composition. Our results show a conserved lipid composition in the coronas of all investigated NPs regardless of their surface properties, with only hydrophilic PEG-NPs adsorbing fewer lipids in total. In contrast, the analyzed NP displayed a marked difference in the protein corona, consisting of up to 417 different proteins. Among the proteins showing significant differences between the NP coronas, there was a striking prevalence of molecules with a notoriously high lipid and surface binding, such as, e.g., SP-A, SP-D, DMBT1. Our data indicate that the selective adsorption of proteins mediates the relatively similar lipid pattern in the coronas of different NPs. On the basis of our lipidomic and proteomic analysis, we provide a detailed set of quantitative data on the composition of the surfactant corona formed upon NP inhalation, which is unique and markedly different to the plasma corona.

  6. Effects of simulated microgravity on surfactant and water balance of lung in animals with different resistance to stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryndina, Irina; Vasilieva, Natalia

    Weightlessness is accompanied by redistribution of blood flow in lung, changes of lung volumes and gas exchange (Prisk et al., 2002; Grigoriev, Baranov, 2003). On the other hand, it is known that microgravity is considered as a kind of moderate stress (Grigoriev et al., 2004). Stress response may differ in animals resistant or vulnerable to stress (Sudakov, 2007). To study the effects of simulated microgravity upon lung, we used 20 male albino rats tested for behavior in the "open field" and than divided into active (stress resistant - SR ) and passive (stress vulnerable - CV) groups. Two mouse lines were used with similar goal - C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice (n=16). According to data obtained earlier, BALB/c mice referred as more stress vulnerable, in contrast to C57BL/6 mice, which are considered to be relatively stress resistant (Flint et al., 2007). We have previously shown that changes in lung surfactant system after psychosocial stress or long-term immobilization are less pronounced in stress resistant rats (Vasilieva, Bryndina, 2012). The aim of this work is to study the properties and biochemical composition of pulmonary surfactant and lung water balance in rats and mice with different stress resistance in antiorthostatic suspension (AOS) of short and long duration. Simulated microgravity was reproduced according to procedure of Ilyin-Novikov in modification of Morey-Holton. The duration of exposure was 10 days for rats and 30 days for mice. The properties of pulmonary surfactant were assessed by the evaluation of surface activity (surface tension - ST), the content of total phospholipids (PL) and their fractions. Simultaneously we calculated the gravimetric water balance indices: lung coefficient, "dry residue" and wet-to-dry ratio. Total and extravascular lung fluid and pulmonary blood supply were estimated as well. The experiments demonstrated that there was a decrease of surface tension of surfactant films after 10-day AOS in both groups of rats (to a greater

  7. Effects of perfluorohexane vapor on relative blood flow distribution in an animal model of surfactant-depleted lung injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubler, Matthias; Souders, Jennifer E.; Shade, Erin D.; Polissar, Nayak L.; Bleyl, Jorg U.; Hlastala, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that treatment with vaporized perfluorocarbon affects the relative pulmonary blood flow distribution in an animal model of surfactant-depleted acute lung injury. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: A university research laboratory. SUBJECTS: Fourteen New Zealand White rabbits (weighing 3.0-4.5 kg). INTERVENTIONS: The animals were ventilated with an FIO(2) of 1.0 before induction of acute lung injury. Acute lung injury was induced by repeated saline lung lavages. Eight rabbits were randomized to 60 mins of treatment with an inspiratory perfluorohexane vapor concentration of 0.2 in oxygen. To compensate for the reduced FIO(2) during perfluorohexane treatment, FIO(2) was reduced to 0.8 in control animals. Change in relative pulmonary blood flow distribution was assessed by using fluorescent-labeled microspheres. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Microsphere data showed a redistribution of relative pulmonary blood flow attributable to depletion of surfactant. Relative pulmonary blood flow shifted from areas that were initially high-flow to areas that were initially low-flow. During the study period, relative pulmonary blood flow of high-flow areas decreased further in the control group, whereas it increased in the treatment group. This difference was statistically significant between the groups (p =.02) as well as in the treatment group compared with the initial injury (p =.03). Shunt increased in both groups over time (control group, 30% +/- 10% to 63% +/- 20%; treatment group, 37% +/- 20% to 49% +/- 23%), but the changes compared with injury were significantly less in the treatment group (p =.03). CONCLUSION: Short treatment with perfluorohexane vapor partially reversed the shift of relative pulmonary blood flow from high-flow to low-flow areas attributable to surfactant depletion.

  8. Differential interactions of gelatin nanoparticles with the major lipids of model lung surfactant: changes in the lateral membrane organization.

    PubMed

    Daear, Weiam; Lai, Patrick; Anikovskiy, Max; Prenner, Elmar J

    2015-04-30

    There has been an increasing interest in the potential of nanomedicine, particularly in the use of nanoparticles between 10 nm and 1 μm in diameter as drug delivery vehicles. For pulmonary drug delivery, it is important to understand the effect of polymeric nanoparticles on the lung surfactant in order to optimize the carriers by reducing their potential toxicological effects. This work presents a biophysical study of the impact of gelatin nanoparticles on packing and lateral organization of simple and complex lipid layers containing the major components of lung surfactant. Zwitterionic phosphatidylcholines, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerols, and the sterol cholesterol were employed in the models. In addition, the impact of acyl chain length was investigated. Packing was determined by surface pressure-area isotherms, whereas direct imaging of the surfactant at the air-water interface was performed using Brewster angle microscopy. Our results indicate minor changes in the surface pressure-area isotherms but concomitantly significant effects on the lateral organization of the monolayers upon nanoparticle addition. The data also suggest differential interactions of nanoparticles with the major lipid classes. Gelatin nanoparticles interact stronger with negatively charged phosphatidyl-glycerols compared to zwitterionic phosphatidyl-cholines. Furthermore, charge distribution depending on the molar lipid ratio and acyl chain saturation is important as well. Even cholesterol, whose concentration is low compared to other components, plays an important role in nanoparticle interactions.

  9. Non-ionic surfactant modified cationic liposomes mediated gene transfection in vitro and in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wuxiao; Izumisawa, Tomohiro; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Qi, Xianrong; Kitamoto, Dai; Maitani, Yoshie

    2009-02-01

    As reported previously, cationic liposomes formulated with dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and N,N-methyl hydroxyethyl aminopropane carbamoyl cholesterol (MHAPC-liposomes) achieved efficient gene transfection in the mouse lung following intratracheal injection. We have studied here the role of surfactants, mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A) and polysorbate 80 (Tween 80), in affecting gene transfection of MHAPC-lipoplexes (complex with pCMV-luc DNA) in A549 cells and in the mouse lung. MEL-A increased gene transfection of MHAPC-lipoplexes significantly in vitro and slightly in the mouse lung, while Tween 80 decreased it both in vitro and in vivo. As assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence imaging, MEL-A might faciliate gene dissociation from MHAPC-lipoplexes with fluorescein-labeled oligodeoxynucleotide (FITC-ODN) after internalization into the cells and retained the lipoplexes in the mouse lung for prolonged time, while Tween 80 was inefficient to deliver foreign gene into target cells and in the lung. These results demonstrated that MEL-A is advantageous to Tween 80 in the modification of cationic liposomes as gene delivery vectors in the lung. PMID:19182397

  10. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Omodeo Salè, Fausta; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  11. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  12. Bilayer characteristics of a diether phosphonolipid analog of the major lung surfactant glycerophospholipid dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Skita, V; Chester, D W; Oliver, C J; Turcotte, J G; Notter, R H

    1995-05-01

    Thermal and lyotropic phase behavior was studied by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry for a diether phosphonolipid analog (DEPN-8) of the major lung surfactant glycerophospholipid dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC). DEPN-8 differs in an ether, rather than an ester, bond at the acyl chain-backbone linkage and a headgroup phosphonate (isosteric methylene substitution) versus phosphate constituent. Analysis of lamellar diffraction maxima demonstrated that at high relative humidity (98%) and temperatures below the liquid crystal phase transition (approximately 45 degrees C), DEPN-8 formed interdigitated bilayers with a characteristic periodicity of 41.9-46.5 A. At low humidity the gel phase DEPN-8 bilayers were characteristic of a normal L beta phase with a periodicity equivalent to DPPC (57-59 A). Above the liquid crystal thermal phase transition, bilayer spacing for both DEPN-8 and DPPC was 51-52 A, characteristic of the L alpha phase. Complete assessments of both lamellar and in-plane X-ray scattering used to construct electron density profiles and structure-factor plots for DEPN-8 defined more fully the interdigitated bilayer state at high humidity and low temperature. Compared to DPPC, it is energetically favorable for DEPN-8 to form interdigitated bilayers under conditions of excess water and low temperature. The flexible character of the ether bonds in DEPN-8 allows increased hydrophobic interactions between acyl chains, without generating a steric penalty from the increased packing density of the molecules. Additionally, the ether bond and the phosphonate moiety may allow for more energetically favorable interactions between the choline portion of the headgroup and water. The DEPN-8 ether linkage may also contribute to the improved adsorption and film respreading found previously for this phosphonolipid compared to DPPC.

  13. Palmitoylation as a key factor to modulate SP-C-lipid interactions in lung surfactant membrane multilayers.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Nuria; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Garcia-Alvarez, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) has been regarded as the most specific protein linked to development of mammalian lungs, and great efforts have been done to understand its structure-function relationships. Previous evidence has outlined the importance of SP-C palmitoylation to sustain the proper dynamics of lung surfactant, but the mechanism by which this posttranslational modification aids SP-C to stabilize the interfacial surfactant film along the compression-expansion breathing cycles, is still unrevealed. In this work we have compared the structure, orientation and lipid-protein interactions of a native palmitoylated SP-C with those of a non-palmitoylated recombinant SP-C (rSP-C) form in air-exposed multilayer membrane environments, by means of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Palmitoylation does not affect the secondary structure of the protein, which exhibits a full α-helical conformation in partly dehydrated phospholipid multilayer films. However, differences between the Amide I band of the IR spectrum of palmitoylated and non-palmitoylated proteins suggest subtle differences affecting the environment of their helical component. These differences are accompanied by differential effects on the IR bands from phospholipid phosphates, indicating that palmitoylation modulates lipid-protein interactions at the headgroup region of phospholipid layers. On the other hand, the relative dichroic absorption of polarized IR has allowed calculating that the palmitoylated protein adopts a more tilted transmembrane orientation than the non-palmitoylated SP-C, likely contributing to more compact, dehydrated and possibly stable multilayer lipid-protein films. As a whole, the behavior of multilayer films containing palmitoylated SP-C may reflect favorable structural properties for surfactant reservoirs at the air-liquid respiratory interface.

  14. Lost after translation: insights from pulmonary surfactant for understanding the role of alveolar epithelial dysfunction and cellular quality control in fibrotic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Nureki, Shin-Ichi; Beers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Dating back nearly 35 years ago to the Witschi hypothesis, epithelial cell dysfunction and abnormal wound healing have reemerged as central concepts in the pathophysiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in adults and in interstitial lung disease in children. Alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells represent a metabolically active compartment in the distal air spaces responsible for pulmonary surfactant biosynthesis and function as a progenitor population required for maintenance of alveolar integrity. Rare mutations in surfactant system components have provided new clues to understanding broader questions regarding the role of AT2 cell dysfunction in the pathophysiology of fibrotic lung diseases. Drawing on data generated from a variety of model systems expressing disease-related surfactant component mutations [surfactant proteins A and C (SP-A and SP-C); the lipid transporter ABCA3], this review will examine the concept of epithelial dysfunction in fibrotic lung disease, provide an update on AT2 cell and surfactant biology, summarize cellular responses to mutant surfactant components [including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and intrinsic apoptosis], and examine quality control pathways (unfolded protein response, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, macroautophagy) that can be utilized to restore AT2 homeostasis. This integrated response and its derangement will be placed in the context of cell stress and quality control signatures found in patients with familial or sporadic IPF as well as non-surfactant-related AT2 cell dysfunction syndromes associated with a fibrotic lung phenotype. Finally, the need for targeted therapeutic strategies for pulmonary fibrosis that address epithelial ER stress, its downstream signaling, and cell quality control are discussed. PMID:26186947

  15. NMR shielding and a thermodynamic study of the effect of environmental exposure to petrochemical solvent on DPPC, an important component of lung surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monajjemi, M.; Afsharnezhad, S.; Jaafari, M. R.; Abdolahi, T.; Nikosade, A.; Monajemi, H.

    2007-12-01

    The chemical and petrochemical industries are the major air polluters. Millions of workers are exposed to toxic chemicals on the job, and it is becoming more toxic, causing much damage to respiratory system, today. One of the main components of lung alveoli is a surfactant. DPPC (Dipalmitolphosphatidylcholine) is the predominant lipid component in the lung surfactant, which is responsible for lowering surface tension in alveoli. In this article, we used an approximate model and ab initio computations to describe interactions between DPPC and some chemical solvents, such as benzene, toluene, heptane, acetone, chloroform, ether, and ethanol, which cause lung injuries and lead to respiratory distress such as ARDS. The effect of these solvents on the conformation and disordering of the DPPC head group was investigated by calculations at the Hatree-Fock level using the 6-31G basis set with the Onsager continuum solvation, GAIO, and frequency models. The simulation model was confirmed by accurate NMR measurements as concerns conformational energy. Water can be the most suitable solvent for DPPC. Furthermore, this study shows that ethanol has the most destructive effect on the conformation and lipid disorder of the DPPC head group of the lung surfactant in our model. Our finding will be useful for detecting the dysfunction of DPPC in the lung surfactant caused by acute or chronic exposures to air toxics from petrochemical organic solvent emission source and chronic alcohol consumption, which may lead to ARDS.

  16. Interactions of the C-terminus of lung surfactant protein B with lipid bilayers are modulated by acyl chain saturation.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; Farver, R Suzanne; Kuznetsova, Anna; Sippel, Katherine H; Mills, Frank D; Elliott, Douglas W; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R

    2008-11-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is critical to minimizing surface tension in the alveoli. The C-terminus of SP-B, residues 59-80, has much of the surface activity of the full protein and serves as a template for the development of synthetic surfactant replacements. The molecular mechanisms responsible for its ability to restore lung compliance were investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and (31)P and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. SP-B(59-80) forms an amphipathic helix which alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics in fluid lamellar phase 4:1 DPPC:POPG and 3:1 POPC:POPG MLVs. At higher levels of SP-B(59-80) in the POPC:POPG lipid system a transition to a nonlamellar phase is observed while DPPC:POPG mixtures remain in a lamellar phase. Deuterium NMR shows an increase in acyl chain order in DPPC:POPG MLVs on addition of SP-B(59-80); in POPC:POPG MLVs, acyl chain order parameters decrease. Our results indicate SP-B(59-80) penetrates deeply into DPPC:POPG bilayers and binds more peripherally to POPC:POPG bilayers. Similar behavior has been observed for KL(4), a peptide mimetic of SP-B which was originally designed using SP-B(59-80) as a template and has been clinically demonstrated to be successful in treating respiratory distress syndrome. The ability of these helical peptides to differentially partition into lipid lamellae based on their degree of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in lipid dynamics suggest a mechanism for lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:18694722

  17. Interactions between DPPC as a component of lung surfactant and amorphous silica nanoparticles investigated by HILIC-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Silina, Yuliya E; Welck, Jennifer; Kraegeloh, Annette; Koch, Marcus; Fink-Straube, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports a rapid HILIC-ESI-MS assay to quantify dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) as component of lung surfactant for nanosafety studies. The technique was used to investigate the concentration-dependent sorption of DPPC to two-sizes of amorphous SiO2 nanoparticles (SiO2-NPs) in a MeOH:H2O (50/50v/v) mixture and in cell culture medium. In MeOH:H2O (50/50v/v), the sorption of DPPC was positively correlated with the nanoparticles concentration. A substantial affinity of small amorphous SiO2-NPs (25nm) to DPPC standard solution compared to bigger SiO2-NPs (75nm) was not confirmed for biological specimens. After dispersion of SiO2-NPs in DPPC containing cell culture medium, the capacity of the SiO2-NPs to bind DPPC was reduced in comparison to a mixture of MeOH:H2O (50/50v/v) regardless from the nanoparticles size. Furthermore, HILIC-ESI-MS revealed that A549 cells internalized DPPC during growth in serum containing medium complemented with DPPC. This finding was in a good agreement with the potential of alveolar type II cells to recycle surfactant components. Binding of lipids present in the cell culture medium to amorphous SiO2-NPs was supported by means of HILIC-ESI-MS, TEM and ICP-MS independently.

  18. CENTRIFUGE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.; Urey, H.C.; Cohen, K.

    1960-08-01

    A high-speed centrifuge for the separation of gaseous isotopes is designed comprising a centrifugal pump mounted on the outlet of a centrifuge bowl and arranged to pump the heavy and light fractions out of the centrifuge bowl in two separate streams.

  19. Surfactant and pulmonary blood flow distributions following treatment of premature lambs with natural surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, A; Ikegami, M; Jacobs, H; Jones, S

    1984-01-01

    Prematurely delivered lambs were treated with radiolabeled natural surfactant by either tracheal instillation at birth and before the onset of mechanical ventilation, or after 23 +/- 1 (+/- SE) min of mechanical ventilation. Right ventricular blood flow distributions, left ventricular outputs, and left-to-right ductal shunts were measured with radiolabeled microspheres. After sacrifice, the lungs of lambs receiving surfactant at birth inflated uniformly with constant distending pressure while the lungs of lambs treated after a period of ventilation had aerated, partially aerated, and atelectatic areas. All lungs were divided into pieces which were weighed and catalogued as to location. The amount of radiolabeled surfactant and microsphere-associated radioactivity in each piece of lung was quantified. Surfactant was relatively homogenously distributed to pieces of lung from lambs that were treated with surfactant at birth; 48% of lung pieces received amounts of surfactant within +/- 25% of the mean value. Surfactant was preferentially recovered from the aerated pieces of lungs of lambs treated after a period of mechanical ventilation, and the distribution of surfactant to these lungs was very nonhomogeneous. Right ventricular blood flow distributions to the lungs were quite homogeneous in both groups of lambs. However, in 8 of 12 lambs, pulmonary blood flow was preferentially directed away from those pieces of lung that received relatively large amounts of surfactant and toward pieces of lung that received less surfactant. This acute redirection of pulmonary blood flow distribution may result from the local changes in compliances within the lung following surfactant instillation. PMID:6546766

  20. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is comprised of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. PMID:23026158

  1. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  2. Effect of maternal/fetal vitamin A deficiency on fetal rat lung surfactant protein expression and the response to prenatal dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Zachman, R D; Grummer, M A

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine whether maternal/fetal vitamin A deficiency in vivo had an effect on fetal lung surfactant protein expression and its response to antenatal maternal dexamethasone (DEX). Weanling female rats at 21 d (30-35 g) were fed control (C) (4 mg of vitamin A/kg of diet) or a vitamin A-deficient (D) (0.06 of mg vitamin A/kg) diet. These females were mated, and at selected pregnancy dates fetal and maternal tissues were obtained. Control mothers had liver retinyl palmitate (RP) concentrations of 246 +/- 32 nmol/g of wet weight; those in the D group had 6.1 +/- 2.9 nmol/g of wet weight. Control fetal liver RP was 12-fold higher and control fetal lung RP was 3-fold higher than in the D group (liver: 18.5 +/- 0.4 nmol/g versus 1.5 +/- 0.25 nmol/g; lung: 1.8 +/- 0.98 nmol/g versus 0.6 +/- 0.2 nmol/g). Neither fetal lung surfactant protein (SP)-C mRNA nor SP-A mRNA was affected by vitamin A deficiency. In a second experiment, pregnant rats from both C and D groups were injected with either DEX (1 mg/kg) or an equal volume of saline on d 15-17, and killed on d 18. DEX increased fetal lung SP-C mRNA 2-fold over the level found in the saline-injected group (saline, 1.0 +/- 0.2 versus DEX, 2.1 +/- 0.2, p < 0.02). This increase in SP-C mRNA also occurred in fetal lungs from the D group (saline, 1.8 +/- 0.4 versus DEX 3.7 +/- 0.2, p < 0.01). Retinoic acid receptor-beta mRNA, which responds to vitamin A levels and DEX in many systems, was lower in fetal lungs of the D group that had been treated with DEX. We conclude that fetal rat lung development, as measured by SP-C mRNA and SP-A mRNA, and the SP-C mRNA response to DEX, was not affected by vitamin A deficiency. PMID:9475281

  3. Retinoic acid and dexamethasone affect RAR-beta and surfactant protein C mRNA in the MLE lung cell line.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Zachman, R D

    1998-01-01

    Lung development and surfactant biosynthesis are affected by retinoic acid (RA) and dexamethasone (Dex). Using a mouse lung epithelial cell line, we are exploring RA-Dex interactions through the study of RA and Dex effects on RA receptor (RAR) and surfactant protein (SP) C mRNA expression. RA increased expression of RAR-beta (5.5 times) and SP-C (2 times) mRNA, with maximal effects at 24 h and at 10(-6) M. The RA induction was not inhibited by cycloheximide, suggesting RA affects transcription. With added actinomycin D, RA did not affect the disappearance rate of RAR-beta mRNA, but SP-C mRNA degradation was slowed, indicating an effect on SP-C mRNA stability. Dex decreased RAR-beta and SP-C expression to 75 and 70% of control values, respectively, with greatest effects at 48 h and at 10(-7) M. There was no effect of Dex on either RAR-beta or SP-C mRNA disappearance with actinomycin D. However, cycloheximide prevented the effect of Dex. Despite Dex, RA increased both RAR-beta and SP-C mRNA. This work suggests that RA and Dex affect RAR-beta and SP-C genes by different mechanisms. PMID:9458794

  4. Experimental Study on How Human Lung Surfactant Protein SP-B1-25 is Oxidized by Ozone in the Presence of Fe(II) and Ascorbic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, A. J.; Enami, S.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    We will report the results of experiments on the chemical fate of the human lung surfactant protein SP-B1-25 upon exposure to gaseous ozone in realistic aqueous media simulating the conditions prevalent in epithelial lining fluids in polluted ambient air. Our experiments consist of exposing aqueous microjets containing SP-B1-25, the natural antioxidant ascorbic acid, and the Fe2+ carried by most atmospheric fine particulates, under mild acidic conditions, such as those created by the innate lung host defense response. Reactants and the products of such interactions are detected via online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We will show that ascorbic acid largely inhibits the ozonation of SP-B1-25 in the absence of Fe2+, leading to the formation of an ascorbic acid ozonide (Enami et al., PNAS 2008). In the presence of Fe2+, however, the ozonide decomposes into reactive intermediates that result in the partial oxidation of SP-B1-25, presumable affecting its function as surfactant. We infer that these experimental results establish a plausible causal link for the observed synergic adverse health effects of ambient ozone and fine particulates

  5. Combined effect of synthetic protein, Mini-B, and cholesterol on a model lung surfactant mixture at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Aishik; Hui, Erica; Waring, Alan J; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2016-04-01

    The overall goal of this work is to study the combined effects of Mini-B, a 34 residue synthetic analog of the lung surfactant protein SP-B, and cholesterol, a neutral lipid, on a model binary lipid mixture containing dipalmitolphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), that is often used to mimic the primary phospholipid composition of lung surfactants. Using surface pressure vs. mean molecular area isotherms, fluorescence imaging and analysis of lipid domain size distributions; we report on changes in the structure, function and stability of the model lipid-protein films in the presence and absence of varying composition of cholesterol. Our results indicate that at low cholesterol concentrations, Mini-B can prevent cholesterol's tendency to lower the line tension between lipid domain boundaries, while maintaining Mini-B's ability to cause reversible collapse resulting in the formation of surface associated reservoirs. Our results also show that lowering the line tension between domains can adversely impact monolayer folding mechanisms. We propose that small amounts of cholesterol and synthetic protein Mini-B can together achieve the seemingly opposing requirements of efficient LS: fluid enough to flow at the air-water interface, while being rigid enough to oppose irreversible collapse at ultra-low surface tensions. PMID:26775740

  6. Combined effect of synthetic protein, Mini-B, and cholesterol on a model lung surfactant mixture at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Aishik; Hui, Erica; Waring, Alan J; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2016-04-01

    The overall goal of this work is to study the combined effects of Mini-B, a 34 residue synthetic analog of the lung surfactant protein SP-B, and cholesterol, a neutral lipid, on a model binary lipid mixture containing dipalmitolphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), that is often used to mimic the primary phospholipid composition of lung surfactants. Using surface pressure vs. mean molecular area isotherms, fluorescence imaging and analysis of lipid domain size distributions; we report on changes in the structure, function and stability of the model lipid-protein films in the presence and absence of varying composition of cholesterol. Our results indicate that at low cholesterol concentrations, Mini-B can prevent cholesterol's tendency to lower the line tension between lipid domain boundaries, while maintaining Mini-B's ability to cause reversible collapse resulting in the formation of surface associated reservoirs. Our results also show that lowering the line tension between domains can adversely impact monolayer folding mechanisms. We propose that small amounts of cholesterol and synthetic protein Mini-B can together achieve the seemingly opposing requirements of efficient LS: fluid enough to flow at the air-water interface, while being rigid enough to oppose irreversible collapse at ultra-low surface tensions.

  7. Centrifuge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sartory, Walter K.; Eveleigh, John W.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a continuous flow blood separation centrifuge are provided. The hematocrit of the entrant whole blood is continuously maintained at an optimum constant value by the addition of plasma to the entrant blood. The hematocrit of the separated red cells is monitored to indicate the degree of separation taking place, thereby providing a basis for regulating the flow through the centrifuge.

  8. Structural similarity between bovine conglutinin and bovine lung surfactant protein D and demonstration of liver as a site of synthesis of conglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, B L; Lu, J; Reid, K B

    1993-01-01

    Conglutinin is a Ca(2+)-dependent, carbohydrate-binding, serum protein which contains an N-terminal collagen-like region and a C-terminal, C-type lectin domain. To date, conglutinin, which appears to play an important role in defence mechanisms, has been fully described, by protein sequence analysis, only in the bovine system. To allow comparison of lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) with conglutinin, within one species, a full-length cDNA clone for SP-D has been isolated from a bovine lung library. The derived amino acid sequence for bovine SP-D shows a higher (78%) level of identity to the sequence of conglutinin than to the sequence of human or rat SP-D (67 and 65% respectively). However, SP-D and conglutinin are known to have different carbohydrate-binding specificities, therefore some of the 16 residues conserved in the C-type lectin domains of all three species of SP-D, but which are not conserved in conglutinin, appear likely to be involved in determination of specificity. The use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-derived DNA probe for bovine SP-D in Northern blotting studies yielded a signal from bovine liver mRNA as well as the expected signal from bovine lung mRNA. Since SP-D appears to be a lung-specific protein, it seems probable that the liver is the primary site of synthesis of conglutinin. Images Figure 4 PMID:8436402

  9. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations.

  10. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations. PMID:12640270

  11. Degradation and rearrangement of a lung surfactant lipid at the air-water interface during exposure to the pollutant gas ozone.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Katherine C; Jones, Stephanie H; Rennie, Adrian R; King, Martin D; Ward, Andrew D; Hughes, Brian R; Lucas, Claire O M; Campbell, Richard A; Hughes, Arwel V

    2013-04-01

    The presence of unsaturated lipids in lung surfactant is important for proper respiratory function. In this work, we have used neutron reflection and surface pressure measurements to study the reaction of the ubiquitous pollutant gas-phase ozone, O3, with pure and mixed phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface. The results reveal that the reaction of the unsaturated lipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, POPC, with ozone leads to the rapid loss of the terminal C9 portion of the oleoyl strand of POPC from the air-water interface. The loss of the C9 portion from the interface is accompanied by an increase in the surface pressure (decrease in surface tension) of the film at the air-water interface. The results suggest that the portion of the oxidized oleoyl strand that is still attached to the lipid headgroup rapidly reverses its orientation and penetrates the air-water interface alongside the original headgroup, thus increasing the surface pressure. The reaction of POPC with ozone also leads to a loss of material from the palmitoyl strand, but the loss of palmitoyl material occurs after the loss of the terminal C9 portion from the oleoyl strand of the molecule, suggesting that the palmitoyl material is lost in a secondary reaction step. Further experiments studying the reaction of mixed monolayers composed of unsaturated lipid POPC and saturated lipid dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, DPPC, revealed that no loss of DPPC from the air-water interface occurs, eliminating the possibility that a reactive species such as an OH radical is formed and is able to attack nearby lipid chains. The reaction of ozone with the mixed films does cause a significant change in the surface pressure of the air-water interface. Thus, the reaction of unsaturated lipids in lung surfactant changes and impairs the physical properties of the film at the air-water interface.

  12. Role of surfactant protein-A (SP-A) in lung injury in response to acute ozone exposure of SP-A deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Rizwanul; Umstead, Todd M.; Ponnuru, Padmavathi; Guo Xiaoxuan; Hawgood, Samuel; Phelps, David S.; Floros, Joanna . E-mail: jfloros@psu.edu

    2007-04-01

    Millions are exposed to ozone levels above recommended limits, impairing lung function, causing epithelial damage and inflammation, and predisposing some individuals to pneumonia, asthma, and other lung conditions. Surfactant protein-A (SP-A) plays a role in host defense, the regulation of inflammation, and repair of tissue damage. We tested the hypothesis that the lungs of SP-A(-/-) (KO) mice are more susceptible to ozone-induced damage. We compared the effects of ozone on KO and wild type (WT) mice on the C57BL/6 genetic background by exposing them to 2 parts/million of ozone for 3 or 6 h and sacrificing them 0, 4, and 24 h later. Lungs were subject to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or used to measure endpoints of oxidative stress and inflammation. Despite more total protein in BAL of KO mice after a 3 h ozone exposure, WT mice had increased oxidation of protein and had oxidized SP-A dimers. In KO mice there was epithelial damage as assessed by increased LDH activity and there was increased phospholipid content. In WT mice there were more BAL PMNs and elevated macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Changes in MIP-2 and MCP-1 were observed in both KO and WT, however mRNA levels differed. In KO mice MIP-2 mRNA levels changed little with ozone, but in WT levels they were significantly increased. In summary, several aspects of the inflammatory response differ between WT and KO mice. These in vivo findings appear to implicate SP-A in regulating inflammation and limiting epithelial damage in response to ozone exposure.

  13. Natural Anti-Infective Pulmonary Proteins: In Vivo Cooperative Action of Surfactant Protein SP-A and the Lung Antimicrobial Peptide SP-BN.

    PubMed

    Coya, Juan Manuel; Akinbi, Henry T; Sáenz, Alejandra; Yang, Li; Weaver, Timothy E; Casals, Cristina

    2015-08-15

    The anionic antimicrobial peptide SP-B(N), derived from the N-terminal saposin-like domain of the surfactant protein (SP)-B proprotein, and SP-A are lung anti-infective proteins. SP-A-deficient mice are more susceptible than wild-type mice to lung infections, and bacterial killing is enhanced in transgenic mice overexpressing SP-B(N). Despite their potential anti-infective action, in vitro studies indicate that several microorganisms are resistant to SP-A and SP-B(N). In this study, we test the hypothesis that these proteins act synergistically or cooperatively to strengthen each other's microbicidal activity. The results indicate that the proteins acted synergistically in vitro against SP-A- and SP-B(N)-resistant capsulated Klebsiella pneumoniae (serotype K2) at neutral pH. SP-A and SP-B(N) were able to interact in solution (Kd = 0.4 μM), which enabled their binding to bacteria with which SP-A or SP-B(N) alone could not interact. In vivo, we found that treatment of K. pneumoniae-infected mice with SP-A and SP-B(N) conferred more protection against K. pneumoniae infection than each protein individually. SP-A/SP-B(N)-treated infected mice showed significant reduction of bacterial burden, enhanced neutrophil recruitment, and ameliorated lung histopathology with respect to untreated infected mice. In addition, the concentrations of inflammatory mediators in lung homogenates increased early in infection in contrast with the weak inflammatory response of untreated K. pneumoniae-infected mice. Finally, we found that therapeutic treatment with SP-A and SP-B(N) 6 or 24 h after bacterial challenge conferred significant protection against K. pneumoniae infection. These studies show novel anti-infective pathways that could drive development of new strategies against pulmonary infections.

  14. Molecular species of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol in rat lung surfactant and different pools of pneumocytes type II.

    PubMed Central

    Schlame, M; Casals, C; Rüstow, B; Rabe, H; Kunze, D

    1988-01-01

    It is not yet completely understood how a cell is able to export specific phospholipids, like dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (dipalmitoyl-PC), which is secreted by pneumocytes type II, into pulmonary surfactant. The acyl species composition of [3H]PC which was synthesized in type II cells in the presence of [2-3H]glycerol resembled the species composition of PC localized in intracellular pneumocyte membranes. This species pattern was different from the pattern of PC of lamellar bodies, i.e., intracellularly stored surfactant, by a higher proportion of dipalmitoyl-PC mainly at expense of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PC. Lamellar body PC in turn showed the same species distribution as surfactant PC. The data suggest that subcellular compartmentation and/or intracellular transfer of PC destined to storage in lamellar bodies, but not secretion of lamellar bodies, involves an enrichment of dipalmitoyl-PC and a depletion of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PC. In contrast, the acyl species pattern of phosphatidylglycerol does not seem to undergo gross changes on the path from synthesis to secretion. PMID:3421943

  15. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, L.S.; Leonard, R.A.

    1993-10-19

    A method is described for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor. 6 figures.

  16. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Lorac S.; Leonard, Ralph A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor.

  17. Interdependent TTF1 - ErbB4 interactions are critical for surfactant protein-B homeostasis in primary mouse lung alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Marten, Elger; Nielsen, Heber C; Dammann, Christiane E L

    2015-09-01

    ErbB4 receptor and thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1 are important modulators of fetal alveolar type II (ATII) cell development and injury. ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1, promoting its expression in MLE-12 cells, an ATII cell line. Both proteins are known to promote surfactant protein-B gene (SftpB) and protein (SP-B) expression, but their feedback interactions on each other are not known. We hypothesized that TTF-1 expression has a feedback effect on ErbB4 expression in an in-vitro model of isolated mouse ATII cells. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the effects of overexpressing HER4 and Nkx2.1, the genes of ErbB4 and TTF-1 on TTF-1 and ErbB4 protein expression, respectively, as well as SP-B protein expression in primary fetal mouse lung ATII cells. Transient ErbB4 protein overexpression upregulated TTF-1 protein expression in primary fetal ATII cells, similarly to results previously shown in MLE-12 cells. Transient TTF-1 protein overexpression down regulated ErbB4 protein expression in both cell types. TTF-1 protein was upregulated in primary transgenic ErbB4-depleted adult ATII cells, however SP-B protein expression in these adult transgenic ATII cells was not affected by the absence of ErbB4. The observation that TTF-1 is upregulated in fetal ATII cells by ErbB4 overexpression and also in ErbB4-deleted adult ATII cells suggests additional factors interact with ErbB4 to regulate TTF-1 levels. We conclude that the interdependency of TTF-1 and ErbB4 is important for surfactant protein levels. The interactive regulation of ErbB4 and TTF-1 needs further elucidation.

  18. The protective effect of different airway humidification liquids to lung after tracheotomy in traumatic brain injury: The role of pulmonary surfactant protein-A (SP-A).

    PubMed

    Su, Xinyang; Li, Zefu; Wang, Meilin; Li, Zhenzhu; Wang, Qingbo; Lu, Wenxian; Li, Xiaoli; Zhou, Youfei; Xu, Hongmei

    2016-02-10

    The purpose of this study was to establish a rat model of a brain injury with tracheotomy and compared the wetting effects of different airway humidification liquids, afterward, the best airway humidification liquid was selected for the clinical trial, thus providing a theoretical basis for selecting a proper airway humidification liquid in a clinical setting. Rats were divided into a sham group, group A (0.9% NaCl), group B (0.45% NaCl), group C (0.9% NaCl+ambroxol) and group D (0.9% NaCl+Pulmicort). An established rat model of traumatic brain injury with tracheotomy was used. Brain tissue samples were taken to determine water content, while lung tissue samples were taken to determine wet/dry weight ratio (W/D), histological changes and expression levels of SP-A mRNA and SP-A protein. 30 patients with brain injury and tracheotomy were selected and divided into two groups based on the airway humidification liquid instilled in the trachea tube, 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl+ambroxol. Blood was then extracted from the patients to measure the levels of SP-A, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The difference between group C and other groups in lung W/D and expression levels of SP-A mRNA and SP-A protein was significant (P<0.05). In comparison, the histological changes showed that the lung tissue damage was smallest in group C compared to the three other groups. Aspect of patients, 0.45% NaCl group and 0.9% NaCl+ambroxol group were significantly different in the levels of SP-A, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α (P<0.01). In the present study, 0.9% NaCl+ambroxol promote the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, which inhibit the release of inflammatory factors and cytokines, making it an ideal airway humidification liquid.

  19. The protective effect of different airway humidification liquids to lung after tracheotomy in traumatic brain injury: The role of pulmonary surfactant protein-A (SP-A).

    PubMed

    Su, Xinyang; Li, Zefu; Wang, Meilin; Li, Zhenzhu; Wang, Qingbo; Lu, Wenxian; Li, Xiaoli; Zhou, Youfei; Xu, Hongmei

    2016-02-10

    The purpose of this study was to establish a rat model of a brain injury with tracheotomy and compared the wetting effects of different airway humidification liquids, afterward, the best airway humidification liquid was selected for the clinical trial, thus providing a theoretical basis for selecting a proper airway humidification liquid in a clinical setting. Rats were divided into a sham group, group A (0.9% NaCl), group B (0.45% NaCl), group C (0.9% NaCl+ambroxol) and group D (0.9% NaCl+Pulmicort). An established rat model of traumatic brain injury with tracheotomy was used. Brain tissue samples were taken to determine water content, while lung tissue samples were taken to determine wet/dry weight ratio (W/D), histological changes and expression levels of SP-A mRNA and SP-A protein. 30 patients with brain injury and tracheotomy were selected and divided into two groups based on the airway humidification liquid instilled in the trachea tube, 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl+ambroxol. Blood was then extracted from the patients to measure the levels of SP-A, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The difference between group C and other groups in lung W/D and expression levels of SP-A mRNA and SP-A protein was significant (P<0.05). In comparison, the histological changes showed that the lung tissue damage was smallest in group C compared to the three other groups. Aspect of patients, 0.45% NaCl group and 0.9% NaCl+ambroxol group were significantly different in the levels of SP-A, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α (P<0.01). In the present study, 0.9% NaCl+ambroxol promote the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, which inhibit the release of inflammatory factors and cytokines, making it an ideal airway humidification liquid. PMID:26611525

  20. Innovation in surfactant therapy I: surfactant lavage and surfactant administration by fluid bolus using minimally invasive techniques.

    PubMed

    Dargaville, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the field of exogenous surfactant therapy continues more than two decades after the drug became commercially available. One such innovation, lung lavage using dilute surfactant, has been investigated in both laboratory and clinical settings as a treatment for meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Studies in animal models of MAS have affirmed that dilute surfactant lavage can remove meconium from the lung, with resultant improvement in lung function. In human infants both non-randomised studies and two randomised controlled trials have demonstrated a potential benefit of dilute surfactant lavage over standard care. The largest clinical trial, performed by our research group in infants with severe MAS, found that lung lavage using two 15-ml/kg aliquots of dilute surfactant did not reduce the duration of respiratory support, but did appear to reduce the composite outcome of death or need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A further trial of lavage therapy is planned to more precisely define the effect on survival. Innovative approaches to surfactant therapy have also extended to the preterm infant, for whom the more widespread use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has meant delaying or avoiding administration of surfactant. In an effort to circumvent this problem, less invasive techniques of bolus surfactant therapy have been trialled, including instillation directly into the pharynx, via laryngeal mask and via brief tracheal catheterisation. In a recent clinical trial, instillation of surfactant into the trachea using a flexible feeding tube was found to reduce the need for subsequent intubation. We have developed an alternative method of brief tracheal catheterisation in which surfactant is delivered via a semi-rigid vascular catheter inserted through the vocal cords under direct vision. In studies to date, this technique has been relatively easy to perform, and resulted in rapid improvement in lung function and reduced need for

  1. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  2. Dynamics of Structural Parameters and Accumulation of Collagen Fibrils in Rat Lung after Inhalations of Surfactant-BL at Various Terms of Bleomycin-Induced Alveolitis.

    PubMed

    Volchkov, V A; Dubrovskaya, V F; Valkovich, A A; Klestova, O V; Serzhanina, V A; Zhuikov, A G; Seiliev, A A; Rosenberg, O A

    2016-08-01

    Rats were subjected to surfactant-BL inhalations at the early and late phases of bleomycininduced alveolitis. In both regimens, the drug reduced the severity of inflammation. In the acute phase of alveolitis, the therapeutic effect of inhalation was accompanied by activation of the synthesis of fine lose collagen fibrils. In the late phase of alveolitis, inhalation of surfactant-BL thickened the fibrils and diminished their population in alveolar walls. PMID:27591866

  3. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  4. Different effects of surfactant proteins B and C - implications for development of synthetic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing a surfactant protein C analogue in a simple phospholipid mixture gives similar tidal volumes as treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf(R)) but ventilation with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is needed for this synthetic surfactant to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptide since treatment with a synthetic surfactant containing the 21-residue peptide (LysLeu(4))(4)Lys (KL(4)) gives low lung gas volumes in experiments also performed with PEEP. Surfactant preparations containing both surfactant proteins B and C or their analogues prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration even if ventilated without PEEP. Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with different natural surfactants indicates that both the lipid composition and the proteins are important in order to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. Synthetic surfactants containing two peptides may be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future but more trials need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants.

  5. Infasurf and Curosurf: Theoretical and Practical Considerations with New Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy N.; Cunsolo, Stephanie M.; Gal, Peter; Ransom, J. Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Type II pneumocytes, normally responsible for surfactant production and release, are insufficiently formed and differentiated in the premature infant born before 34 weeks' gestation. Without an adequate amount of pulmonary surfactant, alveolar surface tension increases, leading to collapse and decreased lung compliance. Pulmonary surfactants are naturally occurring substances made of lipids and proteins. They lower surface tension at the interface between the air in the lungs, specifically at the alveoli, and the blood in the capillaries. This review examines the relative benefits of the two most recently marketed surfactants, calfactan (Infasurf) and poractant alfa (Curosurf). PMID:23300398

  6. METHOD OF CENTRIFUGE OPERATION

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, K.

    1960-05-10

    A method of isotope separation is described in which two streams are flowed axially of, and countercurrently through, a cylindrical centrifuge bowl. Under the influence of a centrifugal field, the light fraction is concentrated in a stream flowing through the central portion of the bowl, whereas the heavy fraction is concentrated in a stream at the periphery thereof.

  7. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  8. Delivery and performance of surfactant replacement therapies to treat pulmonary disorders.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Kaviratna, Anubhav; Berkland, Cory; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2013-08-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for optimal pulmonary function throughout life. An absence or deficiency of surfactant can affect the surfactant pool leading to respiratory distress. Even if the coupling between surfactant dysfunction and the underlying disease is not always well understood, using exogenous surfactants as replacement is usually a standard therapeutic option in respiratory distress. Exogenous surfactants have been extensively studied in animal models and clinical trials. The present article provides an update on the evolution of surfactant therapy, types of surfactant treatment, and development of newer-generation surfactants. The differences in the performance between various surfactants are highlighted and advanced research that has been conducted so far in developing the optimal delivery of surfactant is discussed.

  9. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  10. Localisation of exogenous surfactants in cell membranes in the air-blood barrier: rat model.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Andrzej; Biczysko, Wiesława; Wasowicz, Marcin; Surowiak, Paweł; Zabel, Maciej; Florek, Ewa

    2003-11-01

    The use of exogenous surfactants has been introduced into the therapy of patients of different ages. Much better results have been obtained in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome with surfactants enriched with surfactant proteins. In the following study we used protein-containing surfactants (survanta and curosurf). The aim of the following study was to determine the localisation of artificial surfactants in the lung tissue. Using the Immunogold Technique, biotinylated surfactant proteins were traced in the air-blood barriers. In all lungs the exogenous surfactant was present only in some alveoli. In these parts small areas of atelectasis as well as oedema and transudate accumulation were seen. These changes were less severe after biotinylated curosurf treatment. In electron microscope studies we found surfactant elements in the air-blood barrier and other structures of the alveolar septa. Immunogold studies confirm the presence of biotynylated surfactant in the elements of the air-blood barrier. PMID:14655120

  11. Maintaining end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure prevents worsening of ventilator-induced lung injury caused by chest wall constriction in surfactant-depleted rats

    PubMed Central

    Loring, Stephen H.; Pecchiari, Matteo; Valle, Patrizia Della; Monaco, Ario; Gentile, Guendalina; D'Angelo, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To see whether in acute lung injury (ALI) 1) compression of the lungs caused by thoracoabdominal constriction degrades lung function and worsens ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and 2) maintaining end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure (Pl) by increasing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) reduces the deleterious effects of chest wall constriction. Design Experimental study in rats. Setting Physiology laboratory. Interventions ALI was induced in 3 groups of 9 rats by saline lavage. Nine animals immediately sacrificed served as control group. Group L had lavage only, group LC had the chest wall constricted with an elastic binder, and group LCP had the same chest constriction but with PEEP raised to maintain end-expiratory Pl. After lavage, all groups were ventilated with the same pattern for 1½ hr. Measurements and Main Results Pl, measured with an esophageal balloon-catheter, lung volume changes, arterial blood gasses and pH were assessed during mechanical ventilation (MV). Lung wet-to-dry ratio (W/D), albumin, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and MIP-2 in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and serum E-selectin and von Willebrand Factor (vWF) were measured at the end of MV. Lavage caused hypoxemia and acidemia, increased lung resistance and elastance, and decreased end-expiratory lung volume. With prolonged MV, lung mechanics, hypoxemia, and W/D were significantly worse in group LC. Pro-inflammatory cytokines except E-selectin were elevated in serum and BALF in all groups, with significantly greater levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in group LC, which also exhibited significantly worse bronchiolar injury and greater heterogeneity of airspace expansion at a fixed Pl than other groups. Conclusions Chest wall constriction in ALI reduces lung volume, worsens hypoxemia, and increases pulmonary edema, mechanical abnormalities, pro-inflammatory mediator release, and histological signs of VILI. Maintaining end-expiratory Pl at preconstriction

  12. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  13. Time and volume dependence of dead space in healthy and surfactant-depleted rat lungs during spontaneous breathing and mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dassow, Constanze; Schwenninger, David; Runck, Hanna; Guttmann, Josef

    2013-11-01

    Volumetric capnography is a standard method to determine pulmonary dead space. Hereby, measured carbon dioxide (CO2) in exhaled gas volume is analyzed using the single-breath diagram for CO2. Unfortunately, most existing CO2 sensors do not work with the low tidal volumes found in small animals. Therefore, in this study, we developed a new mainstream capnograph designed for the utilization in small animals like rats. The sensor was used for determination of dead space volume in healthy and surfactant-depleted rats (n = 62) during spontaneous breathing (SB) and mechanical ventilation (MV) at three different tidal volumes: 5, 8, and 11 ml/kg. Absolute dead space and wasted ventilation (dead space volume in relation to tidal volume) were determined over a period of 1 h. Dead space increase and reversibility of the increase was investigated during MV with different tidal volumes and during SB. During SB, the dead space volume was 0.21 ± 0.14 ml and increased significantly at MV to 0.39 ± 0.03 ml at a tidal volume of 5 ml/kg and to 0.6 ± 0.08 ml at a tidal volume of 8 and 11 ml/kg. Dead space and wasted ventilation during MV increased with tidal volume. This increase was mostly reversible by switching back to SB. Surfactant depletion had no further influence on the dead space increase during MV, but impaired the reversibility of the dead space increase.

  14. Time and volume dependence of dead space in healthy and surfactant-depleted rat lungs during spontaneous breathing and mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dassow, Constanze; Schwenninger, David; Runck, Hanna; Guttmann, Josef

    2013-11-01

    Volumetric capnography is a standard method to determine pulmonary dead space. Hereby, measured carbon dioxide (CO2) in exhaled gas volume is analyzed using the single-breath diagram for CO2. Unfortunately, most existing CO2 sensors do not work with the low tidal volumes found in small animals. Therefore, in this study, we developed a new mainstream capnograph designed for the utilization in small animals like rats. The sensor was used for determination of dead space volume in healthy and surfactant-depleted rats (n = 62) during spontaneous breathing (SB) and mechanical ventilation (MV) at three different tidal volumes: 5, 8, and 11 ml/kg. Absolute dead space and wasted ventilation (dead space volume in relation to tidal volume) were determined over a period of 1 h. Dead space increase and reversibility of the increase was investigated during MV with different tidal volumes and during SB. During SB, the dead space volume was 0.21 ± 0.14 ml and increased significantly at MV to 0.39 ± 0.03 ml at a tidal volume of 5 ml/kg and to 0.6 ± 0.08 ml at a tidal volume of 8 and 11 ml/kg. Dead space and wasted ventilation during MV increased with tidal volume. This increase was mostly reversible by switching back to SB. Surfactant depletion had no further influence on the dead space increase during MV, but impaired the reversibility of the dead space increase. PMID:23950167

  15. Pulmonary surfactant adsorption is increased by hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Taeusch, H William; Dybbro, Eric; Lu, Karen W

    2008-04-01

    In acute lung injuries, inactivating agents may interfere with transfer (adsorption) of pulmonary surfactants to the interface between air and the aqueous layer that coats the interior of alveoli. Some ionic and nonionic polymers reduce surfactant inactivation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested directly whether an ionic polymer, hyaluronan, or a nonionic polymer, polyethylene glycol, enhanced adsorption of a surfactant used clinically. We used three different methods of measuring adsorption in vitro: a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer; a King/Clements device; and a spreading trough. In addition we measured the effects of both polymers on surfactant turbidity, using this assay as a nonspecific index of aggregation. We found that both hyaluronan and polyethylene glycol significantly increased the rate and degree of surfactant material adsorbed to the surface in all three assays. Hyaluronan was effective in lower concentrations (20-fold) than polyethylene glycol and, unlike polyethylene glycol, hyaluronan did not increase apparent aggregation of surfactant. Surfactant adsorption in the presence of serum was also enhanced by both polymers regardless of whether hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol was included with serum in the subphase or added to the surfactant applied to the surface. Therefore, endogenous polymers in the alveolar subphase, or exogenous polymers added to surfactant used as therapy, may both be important for reducing inactivation of surfactant that occurs with various lung injuries.

  16. A systems approach to mapping transcriptional networks controlling surfactant homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout life. Lung lipid and surfactant homeostasis requires regulation among multi-tiered processes, coordinating the synthesis of surfactant proteins and lipids, their assembly, trafficking, and storage in type II cells of the lung. The mechanisms regulating these interrelated processes are largely unknown. Results We integrated mRNA microarray data with array independent knowledge using Gene Ontology (GO) similarity analysis, promoter motif searching, protein interaction and literature mining to elucidate genetic networks regulating lipid related biological processes in lung. A Transcription factor (TF) - target gene (TG) similarity matrix was generated by integrating data from different analytic methods. A scoring function was built to rank the likely TF-TG pairs. Using this strategy, we identified and verified critical components of a transcriptional network directing lipogenesis, lipid trafficking and surfactant homeostasis in the mouse lung. Conclusions Within the transcriptional network, SREBP, CEBPA, FOXA2, ETSF, GATA6 and IRF1 were identified as regulatory hubs displaying high connectivity. SREBP, FOXA2 and CEBPA together form a common core regulatory module that controls surfactant lipid homeostasis. The core module cooperates with other factors to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, cell growth and development, cell death and cell mediated immune response. Coordinated interactions of the TFs influence surfactant homeostasis and regulate lung function at birth. PMID:20659319

  17. Electrical surface potential of pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Zoya; Rodenstein, Mathias; Döhner, Jana; Eng, Lukas M; Amrein, Matthias

    2006-11-21

    Pulmonary surfactant is a mixed lipid protein substance of defined composition that self-assembles at the air-lung interface into a molecular film and thus reduces the interfacial tension to close to zero. A very low surface tension is required for maintaining the alveolar structure. The pulmonary surfactant film is also the first barrier for airborne particles entering the lung upon breathing. We explored by frequency modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) the structure and local electrical surface potential of bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) films. BLES is a clinically used surfactant replacement and here served as a realistic model surfactant system. The films were distinguished by a pattern of molecular monolayer areas, separated by patches of lipid bilayer stacks. The stacks were at positive electrical potential with respect to the surrounding monolayer areas. We propose a particular molecular arrangement of the lipids and proteins in the film to explain the topographic and surface potential maps. We also discuss how this locally variable surface potential may influence the retention of charged or polar airborne particles in the lung.

  18. History of surfactant up to 1980.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Remarkable insight into disturbed lung mechanics of preterm infants was gained in the 18th and 19th century by the founders of obstetrics and neonatology who not only observed respiratory failure but also designed devices to treat it. Surfactant research followed a splendid and largely logical growth curve. Pathological changes in the immature lung were characterized in Germany by Virchow in 1854 and by Hochheim in 1903. The Swiss physiologist von Neergard fully understood surfactant function in 1929, but his paper was ignored for 25 years. The physical properties of surfactant were recognized in the early 1950s from research on warfare chemicals by Pattle in Britain and by Radford and Clements in the United States. The causal relationship of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and surfactant deficiency was established in the USA by Avery and Mead in 1959. The Australian obstetrician Liggins induced lung maturity with glucocorticoids in 1972, but his discovery was not fully believed for another 20 years. A century of basic research was rewarded when Fujiwara introduced surfactant substitution in Japan in 1980 for treatment and prevention of RDS.

  19. Surfactant protein D, Club cell protein 16, Pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine, C-reactive protein, and Fibrinogen biomarker variation in chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Lock-Johansson, Sofie; Vestbo, Jørgen; Sorensen, Grith Lykke

    2014-11-25

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multifaceted condition that cannot be fully described by the severity of airway obstruction. The limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted researchers to investigate a multitude of surrogate biomarkers of disease for the assessment of patients, prediction of risk, and guidance of treatment. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of observations for a selection of recently investigated pulmonary inflammatory biomarkers (Surfactant protein D (SP-D), Club cell protein 16 (CC-16), and Pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC/CCL-18)) and systemic inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen) with COPD. The relevance of these biomarkers for COPD is discussed in terms of their biological plausibility, their independent association to disease and hard clinical outcomes, their modification by interventions, and whether changes in clinical outcomes are reflected by changes in the biomarker.

  20. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  1. Attack on centrifugal costs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.F.

    1986-03-01

    The Monsanto Chocolate Bayou plant has had an aggressive and successful energy conservation program. The combined efforts have resulted in a 80% reduction in unit energy consumption compared to 1972. The approach of using system audits to optimize fluid systems was developed. Since most of the fluid movers are centrifugal, the name Centrifugal Savings Task Force was adopted. There are three tools that are particularly valuable in optimizing fluid systems. First, a working level understanding of the Affinity Laws seems a must. In addition, the performance curves for the fluid movers is needed. The last need is accurate system field data. Systems effectively managed at the Chocolate Bayou plant were process air improvement, feed-water pressure reduction, combustion air blower turbine speed control, and cooling tower pressure reduction. Optimization of centrifugal systems is an often-overlooked opportunity for energy savings. The basic guidelines are to move only the fluid needed, and move it at as low a pressure as possible.

  2. The biophysical function of pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Rugonyi, Sandra; Biswas, Samares C; Hall, Stephen B

    2008-11-30

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers surface tension in the lungs. Physiological studies indicate two key aspects of this function: that the surfactant film forms rapidly; and that when compressed by the shrinking alveolar area during exhalation, the film reduces surface tension to very low values. These observations suggest that surfactant vesicles adsorb quickly, and that during compression, the adsorbed film resists the tendency to collapse from the interface to form a 3D bulk phase. Available evidence suggests that adsorption occurs by way of a rate-limiting structure that bridges the gap between the vesicle and the interface, and that the adsorbed film avoids collapse by undergoing a process of solidification. Current models, although incomplete, suggest mechanisms that would partially explain both rapid adsorption and resistance to collapse as well as how different constituents of pulmonary surfactant might affect its behavior. PMID:18632313

  3. Non-specificity of surfactant deficiency in neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed Central

    James, D K; Chiswick, M L; Harkes, A; Williams, M; Hallworth, J

    1984-01-01

    The phospholipid content of lung fluid taken from 77 babies during the first day of life was studied. Babies with hyaline membrane disease had low concentrations of the surfactant phospholipids phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylglycerol. The palmitic acid content in phosphatidylcholine was also lower than normal. Surfactant deficiency was not, however, specific for hyaline membrane disease, as similar phospholipid abnormalities were observed in babies with congenital pneumonia and transient tachypnoea of the newborn. These findings have important clinical implications. They are relevant to research into surfactant substitution and cast doubts on the value of the antenatal phospholipid lung profile of amniotic fluid in predicting the risk of hyaline membrane disease. PMID:6426671

  4. Enhancing Centrifugal Separation With Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Separation of biological cells by coil-planet centrifuge enhanced by electrophoresis. By itself, coil-planet centrifuge offers relatively gentle method of separating cells under low centrifugal force in physiological medium that keeps cells alive. With addition of voltage gradient to separation column of centrifuge, separation still gentle but faster and more complete. Since separation apparatus contains no rotary seal, probability of leakage, contamination, corrosion, and short circuits reduced.

  5. Lightweight Shield for Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luper, C.

    1982-01-01

    Centrifuge bowl composed of laminated aluminum offers required combination of high strength at reduced weight. Around outside wall of bowl core of 1/16 inch thick spun aluminum are wrapped two layers of aluminum, each also one-sixteenth inch thick. Layered structure prevents cracks from propagating through wall.

  6. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  7. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  8. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  9. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  10. Structure-function relationships in pulmonary surfactant membranes: from biophysics to therapy.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is an essential lipid-protein complex to maintain an operative respiratory surface at the mammalian lungs. It reduces surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface to stabilise the lungs against physical forces operating along the compression-expansion breathing cycles. At the same time, surfactant integrates elements establishing a primary barrier against the entry of pathogens. Lack or deficiencies of the surfactant system are associated with respiratory pathologies, which treatment often includes supplementation with exogenous materials. The present review summarises current models on the molecular mechanisms of surfactant function, with particular emphasis in its biophysical properties to stabilise the lungs and the molecular alterations connecting impaired surfactant with diseased organs. It also provides a perspective on the current surfactant-based strategies to treat respiratory pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  11. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  12. Centrifugal unbalance detection system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Reeves, George; Mets, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A system consisting of an accelerometer sensor attached to a centrifuge enclosure for sensing vibrations and outputting a signal in the form of a sine wave with an amplitude and frequency that is passed through a pre-amp to convert it to a voltage signal, a low pass filter for removing extraneous noise, an A/D converter and a processor and algorithm for operating on the signal, whereby the algorithm interprets the amplitude and frequency associated with the signal and once an amplitude threshold has been exceeded the algorithm begins to count cycles during a predetermined time period and if a given number of complete cycles exceeds the frequency threshold during the predetermined time period, the system shuts down the centrifuge.

  13. Centrifugal adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Tsao, Yow-Min D. (Inventor); Lee, Wenshan (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A gas-liquid separator uses a helical passageway to impart a spiral motion to a fluid passing therethrough. The centrifugal force generated by the spiraling motion urges the liquid component of the fluid radially outward which forces the gas component radially inward. The gas component is then separated through a gas-permeable, liquid-impervious membrane and discharged through a central passageway. A filter material captures target substances contained in the fluid.

  14. Oscillatory counter-centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shujing; Nadim, Ali

    2016-02-01

    In ordinary centrifugation, a suspended particle that is heavier than the displaced fluid migrates away from the rotation axis when the fluid-filled container rotates steadily about that axis. In contrast a particle that is lighter than the displaced fluid (e.g., a bubble) migrates toward the rotation axis in a centrifuge. In this paper, we show theoretically that if a fluid-filled container rotates in an oscillatory manner as a rigid body about an axis, at high enough oscillation frequencies, the sense of migration of suspended particles is reversed. That is, in that case particles denser than the fluid migrate inward, while those that are lighter than the fluid move outward. We term this unusual phenomenon "Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation" or OCC, for short. Through application of the method of averaging to the equations of motion, we derive a simple criterion to predict the occurrence of OCC. The analysis also reveals that the time-average of the Coriolis force in the radial direction is the term that is responsible for this effect. In addition, we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Rubinow-Keller lift force on particle trajectories and find that OCC persists even when these forces are active. The phenomenon awaits experimental verification.

  15. The evolutionary significance of pulmonary surfactant in lungfish (Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Orgeig, S; Daniels, C B

    1995-08-01

    In this study, we characterized surfactant lipids from the lungs of the lungfish, Protopterus annectens, Lepidosiren paradoxa, and Neoceratodus fosteri (Sarcopterygiia: Dipnoi). We quantified the types of phospholipids present, the amounts of total phospholipid, disaturated phospholipid (DSP)--purported to be the primary surface tension-controlling agent--and cholesterol (CHOL), an important fluidizer. The surfactant phospholipid profiles of all three lungfish were very similar to each other and those of many other animals reported previously. Phosphatidylcholine was the dominant phospholipid (60% to 80%); phosphatidylglycerol was virtually absent; and there was a significant proportion of the combination of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol (10%). The Australian lungfish N. forsteri possessed a surfactant 5 times richer in CHOL and 2 and 3 times poorer in DSP than the surfactant of the African lungfish P. annectens and the South American lungfish L. paradoxa, respectively. Hence, the CHOL/DSP mass ratio of N. forsteri was 12 and 20 times greater than that of P. annectens and L. paradoxa, respectively. Therefore, the surfactant composition of the two derived species of lungfish (P. annectens and L. paradoxa) very closely resembles that of amphibians, whereas surfactant from the primitive lungfish (N. forsteri) is almost identical to that of the primitive air-breathing actinopterygiian fish. Thus, it is likely that pulmonary surfactant had only a single origin, coinciding with that of the vertebrates. As with most nonmammalian vertebrates, it is possible that lungfish surfactant functions as an antiglue at low lung volumes or when the lungs are completely collapsed. Furthermore, it appears that within a species, an increase in lung development correlates with an increase in the relative amount of surfactant cholesterol and a decrease in the phospholipid saturation level.

  16. Surfactant titration of nanoparticle-protein corona.

    PubMed

    Maiolo, Daniele; Bergese, Paolo; Mahon, Eugene; Dawson, Kenneth A; Monopoli, Marco P

    2014-12-16

    Nanoparticles (NP), when exposed to biological fluids, are coated by specific proteins that form the so-called protein corona. While some adsorbing proteins exchange with the surroundings on a short time scale, described as a "dynamic" corona, others with higher affinity and long-lived interaction with the NP surface form a "hard" corona (HC), which is believed to mediate NP interaction with cellular machineries. In-depth NP protein corona characterization is therefore a necessary step in understanding the relationship between surface layer structure and biological outcomes. In the present work, we evaluate the protein composition and stability over time and we systematically challenge the formed complexes with surfactants. Each challenge is characterized through different physicochemical measurements (dynamic light scattering, ζ-potential, and differential centrifugal sedimentation) alongside proteomic evaluation in titration type experiments (surfactant titration). 100 nm silicon oxide (Si) and 100 nm carboxylated polystyrene (PS-COOH) NPs cloaked by human plasma HC were titrated with 3-[(3-Cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS, zwitterionic), Triton X-100 (nonionic), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, anionic), and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB, cationic) surfactants. Composition and density of HC together with size and ζ-potential of NP-HC complexes were tracked at each step after surfactant titration. Results on Si NP-HC complexes showed that SDS removes most of the HC, while DTAB induces NP agglomeration. Analogous results were obtained for PS NP-HC complexes. Interestingly, CHAPS and Triton X-100, thanks to similar surface binding preferences, enable selective extraction of apolipoprotein AI (ApoAI) from Si NP hard coronas, leaving unaltered the dispersion physicochemical properties. These findings indicate that surfactant titration can enable the study of NP-HC stability through surfactant variation and also selective separation

  17. Gas Centrifuges and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, David

    2004-09-15

    Gas centrifuges have been an ideal enrichment method for a wide variety of countries. Many countries have built gas centrifuges to make enriched uranium for peaceful nuclear purposes. Other countries have secretly sought centrifuges to make highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. In more recent times, several countries have secretly sought or built gas centrifuges in regions of tension. The main countries that have been of interest in the last two decades have been Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Currently, most attention is focused on Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea. These states did not have the indigenous abilities to make gas centrifuges, focusing instead on illicit and questionable foreign procurement. The presentation covered the following main sections: Spread of centrifuges through illicit procurement; Role of export controls in stopping proliferation; Increasing the transparency of gas centrifuge programs in non-nuclear weapon states; and, Verified dismantlement of gas centrifuge programs. Gas centrifuges are important providers of low enriched uranium for civil nuclear power reactors. They also pose special nuclear proliferation risks. We all have special responsibilities to prevent the spread of gas centrifuges into regions of tension and to mitigate the consequences of their spread into the Middle East, South Asia, and North Asia.

  18. Extraction and Quantification of Carbon Nanotubes in Biological Matrices with Application to Rat Lung Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Doudrick, Kyle; Corson, Nancy; Oberdörster, Günter; Elder, Alison; Herckes, Pierre; Halden, Rolf U.; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Extraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from biological matrices such as rat lung tissue is integral to developing a quantification method for evaluating the environmental and human health exposure and toxicity of CNTs. The ability of various chemical treatment methods, including Solvable (2.5% sodium hydroxide/surfactant mixture), ammonium hydroxide, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and proteinase K, to extract CNTs from rat lung tissue was evaluated. CNTs were quantified using programmed thermal analysis (PTA). Two CNTs were used to represent the lower (500°C) and upper (800°C) PTA limit of CNT thermal stability. The recovery efficiency of each of the eight chemical reagents evaluated was found to depend on the ability to (1) minimize oxidation of CNTs, (2) remove interfering background carbon from the rat lung tissue, and (3) separate the solid-phase CNTs from the liquid-phase dissolved tissue via centrifugation. A two-step extraction method using Solvable and proteinase K emerged as the optimal approach, enabling a recovery of 98 ± 15% of a 2.9 ± 0.19 µg CNT loading that was spiked into whole rat lungs. Due to its high yield and applicability to low organ burdens of nanomaterials, this extraction method is particularly well suited for in vivo studies to quantify clearance rates and retained CNTs in lungs and other organs. PMID:23992048

  19. The Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-08-04

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages. __________________________________________________

  20. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  1. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

    1999-10-01

    The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

  2. National geotechnical centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, J. A.; Kunz, N.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    A high G-ton centrifuge, able to take a 2700 kg (6000 lb) payload up to 300 G, is described. The stability of dams and embankments, the bearing capacity of soil foundations, and the dynamic behavior of foundations due to vibration of machinery are examples of applications. A power rating of 6,000 kW (9,000 hp) was established for the motor. An acceptable maximum speed of 70 rpm was determined. A speed increase with a ratio of 1:3 is discussed. The isolated tension straps, the anti-spreader bar and the flexwall bucket, and safety precautions are also discussed.

  3. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  4. Composition, structure and mechanical properties define performance of pulmonary surfactant membranes and films.

    PubMed

    Parra, Elisa; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory surface in the mammalian lung is stabilized by pulmonary surfactant, a membrane-based system composed of multiple lipids and specific proteins, the primary function of which is to minimize the surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface, optimizing the mechanics of breathing and avoiding alveolar collapse, especially at the end of expiration. The goal of the present review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the structure, lipid-protein interactions and mechanical features of surfactant membranes and films and how these properties correlate with surfactant biological function inside the lungs. Surfactant mechanical properties can be severely compromised by different agents, which lead to surfactant inhibition and ultimately contributes to the development of pulmonary disorders and pathologies in newborns, children and adults. A detailed comprehension of the unique mechanical and rheological properties of surfactant layers is crucial for the diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases, either by analyzing the contribution of surfactant impairment to the pathophysiology or by improving the formulations in surfactant replacement therapies. Finally, a short review is also included on the most relevant experimental techniques currently employed to evaluate lung surfactant mechanics, rheology, and inhibition and reactivation processes.

  5. A method for preparing radiolabelled rat pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R W; Harwood, J L; Richards, R J

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for the preparation of rat pulmonary surfactant, radiolabelled specifically in the phosphatidylcholine species, which may be used for degradative studies of the lipoprotein complex. Intravenously administered [methyl-14C]choline chloride is maximally incorporated into alveolar surface surfactant 8 h after injection, and more than 97% of this radiolabel is present in the phosphatidylcholine fraction of the surfactant and, of this, 75% is associated with the dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine species. Electron microscopy indicates that the isolated surfactant has a similar physical form to that found at the alveolar surface. The mineral alpha-quartz can be used to increase the yield of surfactant lavaged from the lung surface, but the complex isolated from rats treated in this manner has a low specific radioactivity (less than 1000 d.p.m./mg) compared with that prepared from control animals (22860 d.p.m./mg). PMID:3755594

  6. Advanced centrifugal contactor development

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, S.F.; Jubin, R.T.; Ladd, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), compact centrifugal contactors were designed and prototypes were built for the Breeder Reprocessing Engineering Test (BRET) facility. These contactors were designed for a nominal throughput of 0.1 metric tons of heavy metal per day. While construction of BRET has been put on indefinite hold, development of the 5.5-cm-diam rotor centrifugal contactors has advanced due to their broad applicability in other areas of reprocessing. Development has been concentrated in three areas: (1) mass transfers, (2) hydraulics, and (3) fabrication. Mass transfer development has involved determining how the stage efficiency is affected by the rotor speed, phase ratio, and feed flow rate. Hydraulic efforts have focused on the cascade operation with individual stage failures. Fabrication development has resulted in reducing the number of rotor components from seven to four. This paper discusses the results of these development efforts. 20 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Centrifugal shot blast system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997.

  8. Surfactant Uptake Dynamics in Mammalian Cells Elucidated with Quantitative Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; Fujii, Kenkichi; Bito, Kotatsu; Naito, Satoru; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of surfactant-induced cell lysis has been studied with quantitative coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy. The dynamics of surfactant molecules as well as intracellular biomolecules in living Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells has been examined for a low surfactant concentration (0.01 w%). By using an isotope labeled surfactant having CD bonds, surfactant uptake dynamics in living cells has been traced in detail. The simultaneous CARS imaging of the cell itself and the internalized surfactant has shown that the surfactant molecules is first accumulated inside a CHL cell followed by a sudden leak of cytosolic components such as proteins to the outside of the cell. This finding indicates that surfactant uptake occurs prior to the cell lysis, contrary to what has been believed: surface adsorption of surfactant molecules has been thought to occur first with subsequent disruption of cell membranes. Quantitative CARS microspectroscopy enables us to determine the molecular concentration of the surfactant molecules accumulated in a cell. We have also investigated the effect of a drug, nocodazole, on the surfactant uptake dynamics. As a result of the inhibition of tubulin polymerization by nocodazole, the surfactant uptake rate is significantly lowered. This fact suggests that intracellular membrane trafficking contributes to the surfactant uptake mechanism. PMID:24710120

  9. Barrier or carrier? Pulmonary surfactant and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Alberto; Cruz, Antonio; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    To consider the lung as a target for drug delivery and to optimise strategies directed at the pulmonary route, it is essential to consider the role of pulmonary surfactant, a thin lipid-protein film lining the respiratory surface of mammalian lungs. Membrane-based surfactant multilayers are essential for reducing the surface tension at the respiratory air-liquid interface to minimise the work of breathing. Different components of surfactant are also responsible for facilitating the removal of potentially pathological entities such as microorganisms, allergens or environmental pollutants and particles. Upon inhalation, drugs or nanoparticles first contact the surfactant layer, and these interactions critically affect their lifetime and fate in the airways. This review summarises the current knowledge on the possible role and effects of the pulmonary surfactant system in drug delivery strategies. It also summarises the evidence that suggests that pulmonary surfactant is far from being an insuperable barrier and could be used as an efficient shuttle for delivering hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds deep into the lung and the organism.

  10. Centrifuge treatment of coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Kazak; V.Z. Kaidalov; L.F. Syrova; O.S. Miroshnichenko; A.S. Minakov

    2009-07-15

    New technology is required for the removal of water and heavy fractions from regular coal tar. Centrifuges offer the best option. Purification of coal tar by means of centrifuges at OAO NLMK permits the production of pitch coke or electrode pitch that complies with current standards.

  11. Centrifugal microfluidics for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gorkin, Robert; Park, Jiwoon; Siegrist, Jonathan; Amasia, Mary; Lee, Beom Seok; Park, Jong-Myeon; Kim, Jintae; Kim, Hanshin; Madou, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2010-07-21

    The centrifugal microfluidic platform has been a focus of academic and industrial research efforts for almost 40 years. Primarily targeting biomedical applications, a range of assays have been adapted on the system; however, the platform has found limited commercial success as a research or clinical tool. Nonetheless, new developments in centrifugal microfluidic technologies have the potential to establish wide-spread utilization of the platform. This paper presents an in-depth review of the centrifugal microfluidic platform, while highlighting recent progress in the field and outlining the potential for future applications. An overview of centrifugal microfluidic technologies is presented, including descriptions of advantages of the platform as a microfluidic handling system and the principles behind centrifugal fluidic manipulation. The paper also discusses a history of significant centrifugal microfluidic platform developments with an explanation of the evolution of the platform as it pertains to academia and industry. Lastly, we review the few centrifugal microfluidic-based sample-to-answer analysis systems shown to date and examine the challenges to be tackled before the centrifugal platform can be more broadly accepted as a new diagnostic platform. In particular, fully integrated, easy to operate, inexpensive and accurate microfluidic tools in the area of in vitro nucleic acid diagnostics are discussed.

  12. Rat growth during chronic centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Oyama, J.

    1978-01-01

    Female weanling rats were chronically centrifuged at 4.15 G with controls at terrestrial gravity. Samples were sacrificed for body composition studies at 0, 28, 63, 105 and 308 days of centrifugation. The centrifuged group approached a significantly lower mature body mass than the controls (251 and 318g) but the rate of approach was the same in both groups. Retirement to 1G on the 60th day resulted in complete recovery. Among individual components muscle, bone, skin, CNS, heart, kidneys, body water and body fat were changed in the centrifuged group. However, an analysis of the growth of individual components relative to growth of the total fat-free compartment revealed that only skin (which increased in mass) was responding to centrifugation per se.

  13. Dendrimer-surfactant interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yiyun; Zhao, Libo; Li, Tianfu

    2014-04-28

    In this article, we reviewed the interactions between dendrimers and surfactants with particular focus on the interaction mechanisms and physicochemical properties of the yielding dendrimer-surfactant aggregates. In order to provide insight into the behavior of dendrimers in biological systems, the interactions of dendrimers with bio-surfactants such as phospholipids in bulk solutions, in solid-supported bilayers and at the interface of phases or solid-states were discussed. Applications of the dendrimer-surfactant aggregates as templates to guide the synthesis of nanoparticles and in drug or gene delivery were also mentioned.

  14. MicroRNA-206 regulates surfactant secretion by targeting VAMP-2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honghao; Guo, Yujie; Mishra, Amarjit; Gou, Deming; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant secretion is a highly regulated process. Our previous studies have shown that VAMP-2 is essential for surfactant secretion. In the present study we investigated the role of miR-206 in surfactant secretion through VAMP-2. VAMP-2 was confirmed to be a target of miR-206 by 3'-untranslational region (3'-UTR) luciferase assay. Mutations in the predicated miR-206 binding sites reduced the binding of miR-206 to the 3'-UTR of VAMP-2. miR-206 decreased the expression of VAMP-2 protein and decreased the lung surfactant secretion in alveolar type II cells. In conclusion, miR-206 regulates lung surfactant secretion by limiting the availability of VAMP-2 protein.

  15. MicroRNA-206 regulates surfactant secretion by targeting VAMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Honghao; Guo, Yujie; Mishra, Amarjit; Gou, Deming; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Liu, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Lung surfactant secretion is a highly regulated process. Our previous studies have shown that VAMP-2 is essential for surfactant secretion. In the present study we investigated the role of miR-206 in surfactant secretion through VAMP-2. VAMP-2 was confirmed to be a target of miR-206 by 3′-untranslational region (3′-UTR) luciferase assay. Mutations in the predicated miR-206 binding sites reduced the binding of miR-206 to the 3′-UTR of VAMP-2. miR-206 decreased the expression of VAMP-2 protein and decreased the lung surfactant secretion in alveolar type II cells. In conclusion, miR-206 regulates lung surfactant secretion by limiting the availability of VAMP-2 protein. PMID:25481410

  16. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century. PMID:25029818

  17. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  18. Gas centrifuge purge method

    DOEpatents

    Theurich, Gordon R.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

  19. Surfactant waterflood oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Kudchadker, M.V.; Whittington, L.E.

    1982-03-16

    Disclosed is a surfactant waterflooding oil recovery process for use in high salinity water-containing formations employing two separate surfactant-containing slugs or a single slug in which the composition is changed from the first to the last portion of the slug injected into the formation. The first portion of the surfactant fluid contains a surfactant combination which exhibits optimum low surface tension characteristics, and the second or latter portion of the surfactant slug contains a blend of surfactants which produces a high viscosity fluid. Use of hydrophilic viscosity-increasing polymer is thus avoided, eliminating the interaction between polymer and surfactant which causes a reduction in surfactant effectiveness.

  20. SURFACTANTS AND SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the limitations of pump-and-trat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the application...

  1. Centrifugal dryers keep pace with the market

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-03-15

    New plant design and upgrades create a shift in dewatering strategies. The article describes recent developments. Three major manufacturers supply centrifugal dryers - TEMA, Centrifugal & Mechanical Industries (CMI) and Ludowici. CMI introduced a line of vertical centrifugal dryers. TEMA improved the techniques by developing a horizontal vibratory centrifuge (HVC) which simplified maintenance. 3 figs., 1 photo.

  2. Microwave assisted centrifuge and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    Centrifuge samples may be exposed to microwave energy to heat the samples during centrifugation and to promote separation of the different components or constituents of the samples using a centrifuge device configured for generating microwave energy and directing the microwave energy at a sample located in the centrifuge.

  3. HOUSINGS AND MOUNTINGS FOR CENTRIFUGES

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-08-16

    A protective housing for a gas centrifuge comprises a slidable connection between flanges and framework portions for absorbing rotational energy in case of bursting of the rotor and a sealing means for sealing the rotor chamber.

  4. Variable-Speed Instrumented Centrifuges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, David K.; Brown, Allan H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes conceptual pair of centrifuges, speed of which varied to produce range of artificial gravities in zero-gravity environment. Image and data recording and controlled temperature and gravity provided for 12 experiments. Microprocessor-controlled centrifuges include video cameras to record stop-motion images of experiments. Potential applications include studies of effect of gravity on growth and on production of hormones in corn seedlings, experiments with magnetic flotation to separate cells, and electrophoresis to separate large fragments of deoxyribonucleic acid.

  5. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  6. Centrifugation-based Purification of Emerging Low-dimensional Materials and Their Thin-film Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Woo

    Polydispersity in low-dimensional materials offers many interesting challenges and properties. In particular, the one- and two-dimensional carbon allotropes such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have demonstrated exquisite optoelectronic properties that are highly sensitive to their physical structures, where subtle variations in diameter and thickness render them with significantly different electronic band structures. Thus, the carbon nanomaterials have been the subject of extensive studies that address their polydispersity issues. Among these, solution-phase, buoyant density-based methods such as density gradient ultracentrifugation have been widely utilized to enrich subpopulations of carbon nanotubes and graphene with narrow distribution in diameter and thickness, enabling their applications in various next-generation thin-film devices. In this thesis, I present further advancement of centrifugation-based processing methods for emerging low-dimensional materials through systematic utilization of previously explored surfactant systems, development of novel surfactant types, and study of correlation between the chemical structure of surfactants and the dispersion and optoelectronic properties of the nanomaterials. First, I employ an iterative density gradient ultracentrifugation with a combination of anionic surfactants and addition of excess counter-ions to achieve isolation of novel diameter species of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. The purification of carbon nanotubes with simultaneous, ultrahigh-purity refinement in electronic type and diameter distribution leads to collaborative studies on heat distribution characteristics and diameter-dependent direct current and radio frequency performances in monodisperse carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. Next, I develop the use of non-ionic polymeric surfactants for centrifugation-based processes. Specifically, I utilize polypropylene and polyethylene oxide-based block copolymers with density

  7. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  8. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Seifart, Carola . E-mail: zwiebel@mailer.uni-marburg.de; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  9. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  10. Extensive intraalveolar pulmonary hemorrhage in infants dying after surfactant therapy.

    PubMed

    Pappin, A; Shenker, N; Hack, M; Redline, R W

    1994-04-01

    To assess the possible relationship between exogenous surfactant therapy and pulmonary hemorrhage in premature infants, we compared autopsy findings in 15 infants treated with exogenous surfactant and in 29 who died before the introduction of surfactant therapy. Infants who met the following criteria were included: birth weight 501 to 1500 gm, survival 4 hours to 7 days, and no congenital anomalies. Average birth weight, gestational age, and age at death were equivalent for the two groups. High rates of pulmonary hemorrhage were present in both groups (treated 80% vs untreated 83%). The untreated group had higher incidences of interstitial hemorrhage and lung hematomas and significantly more large interstitial hemorrhages: 31% untreated versus 0% treated (p < 0.05). The overall rate of intraalveolar hemorrhage was similar in the two groups, but surfactant-treated infants were more likely to have extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage: 53% versus 14% (p < 0.05). Most surfactant-treated infants who survived more than 24 hours had extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage (8/9). Patients who had extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage, with or without prior surfactant therapy, frequently had clinically significant pulmonary hemorrhage (7/12). These findings indicate that infants who die after surfactant therapy have higher rates of a specific type of pulmonary hemorrhage--extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage.

  11. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties. PMID:26869216

  12. A synthetic segment of surfactant protein A: structure, in vitro surface activity, and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Walther, F J; David-Cu, R; Leung, C; Bruni, R; Hernández-Juviel, J; Gordon, L M; Waring, A J

    1996-06-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a 248-residue, water-soluble, lipid-associating protein found in lung surfactant. Analysis of the amino acid sequence using the Eisenberg hydrophobic moment algorithm predicts that the SP-A segment spanning residues 114-144 has high hydrophobic moments, typical of lipid-associating amphipathic domains. The secondary structure, in vitro surface activity and in vivo lung activity of this SP-A sequence were studied with a 31-residue synthetic peptide analog (A114-144). Analysis of the secondary structure using circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated association with lipid dispersions and a dominant helical content. Surface activity measurements of A114-144 with surfactant lipid dispersions and the hydrophobic surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B/C) showed that A114-144 enhances surface activity under conditions of dynamic compression and respreading on a Langmuir/Wilhelmy surface balance. Synthetic surfactant dispersions containing A114-144 improved lung compliance in spontaneously breathing, 28-d premature rabbits to a greater degree than surfactant dispersions with synthetic SP-B/C and synthetic surfactant lipids alone. These observations indicate that inclusion of A114-144 may improve synthetic preparations currently used for surfactant replacement therapy.

  13. SEDIMENTATION IN THE ANGLE CENTRIFUGE.

    PubMed

    Pickels, E G

    1943-01-20

    1. Using hemocyanin from Limulus polyphemus as a test material, the process of sedimentation in the angle centrifuge, operating both in vacuum and in the open air, has been investigated. 2. Sedimentation in a given field of force was found less efficient when centrifugation was conducted in the open air, because of thermal convection. 3. Correlations have been made with results obtained in the analytical ultracentrifuge, and a theory of sedimentation in inclined tubes has been presented to explain the experimental results. 4. It has been shown that under proper conditions the angle centrifuge may be used for approximate determinations of particle size. 5. Recommendations, based mostly on experimental evidence, have been made for improving sedimentation and interpreting results. 6. To counteract convective disturbances of either thermal or inertial origin, a satisfactory method has been developed which consists of furnishing the fluid under study with a synthetic density gradient, formed with sucrose or some other non-sedimentable material.

  14. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, D. C.; Martin, R. F., Jr.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    Particles leving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E x B drift. This effect which we refer to as 'centrifugal trapping' appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E x B drift speed) plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  15. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins strongly induce negative curvature.

    PubMed

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W; Rananavare, Shankar B; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-07-01

    The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C greatly accelerate the adsorption of vesicles containing the surfactant lipids to form a film that lowers the surface tension of the air/water interface in the lungs. Pulmonary surfactant enters the interface by a process analogous to the fusion of two vesicles. As with fusion, several factors affect adsorption according to how they alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, suggesting that adsorption proceeds via a rate-limiting structure with negative curvature, in which the hydrophilic face of the phospholipid leaflets is concave. In the studies reported here, we tested whether the surfactant proteins might promote adsorption by inducing lipids to adopt a more negative curvature, closer to the configuration of the hypothetical intermediate. Our experiments used x-ray diffraction to determine how the proteins in their physiological ratio affect the radius of cylindrical monolayers in the negatively curved, inverse hexagonal phase. With binary mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), the proteins produced a dose-related effect on curvature that depended on the phospholipid composition. With DOPE alone, the proteins produced no change. With an increasing mol fraction of DOPC, the response to the proteins increased, reaching a maximum 50% reduction in cylindrical radius at 5% (w/w) protein. This change represented a doubling of curvature at the outer cylindrical surface. The change in spontaneous curvature, defined at approximately the level of the glycerol group, would be greater. Analysis of the results in terms of a Langmuir model for binding to a surface suggests that the effect of the lipids is consistent with a change in the maximum binding capacity. Our findings show that surfactant proteins can promote negative curvature, and support the possibility that they facilitate adsorption by that mechanism. PMID:26153706

  16. Hydrophobic Surfactant Proteins Strongly Induce Negative Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W.; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C greatly accelerate the adsorption of vesicles containing the surfactant lipids to form a film that lowers the surface tension of the air/water interface in the lungs. Pulmonary surfactant enters the interface by a process analogous to the fusion of two vesicles. As with fusion, several factors affect adsorption according to how they alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, suggesting that adsorption proceeds via a rate-limiting structure with negative curvature, in which the hydrophilic face of the phospholipid leaflets is concave. In the studies reported here, we tested whether the surfactant proteins might promote adsorption by inducing lipids to adopt a more negative curvature, closer to the configuration of the hypothetical intermediate. Our experiments used x-ray diffraction to determine how the proteins in their physiological ratio affect the radius of cylindrical monolayers in the negatively curved, inverse hexagonal phase. With binary mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), the proteins produced a dose-related effect on curvature that depended on the phospholipid composition. With DOPE alone, the proteins produced no change. With an increasing mol fraction of DOPC, the response to the proteins increased, reaching a maximum 50% reduction in cylindrical radius at 5% (w/w) protein. This change represented a doubling of curvature at the outer cylindrical surface. The change in spontaneous curvature, defined at approximately the level of the glycerol group, would be greater. Analysis of the results in terms of a Langmuir model for binding to a surface suggests that the effect of the lipids is consistent with a change in the maximum binding capacity. Our findings show that surfactant proteins can promote negative curvature, and support the possibility that they facilitate adsorption by that mechanism. PMID:26153706

  17. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  18. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-05-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  19. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-04-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  20. Biophysicochemical Interaction of a Clinical Pulmonary Surfactant with Nanoalumina.

    PubMed

    Mousseau, F; Le Borgne, R; Seyrek, E; Berret, J-F

    2015-07-01

    We report on the interaction of pulmonary surfactant composed of phospholipids and proteins with nanometric alumina (Al2O3) in the context of lung exposure and nanotoxicity. We study the bulk properties of phospholipid/nanoparticle dispersions and determine the nature of their interactions. The clinical surfactant Curosurf, both native and extruded, and a protein-free surfactant are investigated. The phase behavior of mixed surfactant/particle dispersions was determined by optical and electron microscopy, light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. It exhibits broad similarities with that of strongly interacting nanosystems such as polymers, proteins or particles, and supports the hypothesis of electrostatic complexation. At a critical stoichiometry, micron-sized aggregates arising from the association between oppositely charged vesicles and nanoparticles are formed. Contrary to the models of lipoprotein corona or of particle wrapping, our work shows that vesicles maintain their structural integrity and trap the particles at their surfaces. The agglomeration of particles in surfactant phase is a phenomenon of importance that could change the interactions of the particles with lung cells.

  1. Surfactant-Amino Acid and Surfactant-Surfactant Interactions in Aqueous Medium: a Review.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    An overview of surfactant-amino acid interactions mainly in aqueous medium has been discussed. Main emphasis has been on the solution thermodynamics and solute-solvent interactions. Almost all available data on the topic has been presented in a lucid and simple way. Conventional surfactants have been discussed as amphiphiles forming micelles and amino acids as additives and their effect on the various physicochemical properties of these conventional surfactants. Surfactant-surfactant interactions in aqueous medium, various mixed surfactant models, are also highlighted to assess their interactions in aqueous medium. Finally, their applied part has been taken into consideration to interpret their possible uses.

  2. 77 FR 9273 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... COMMISSION USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct Transfer of Licenses In the Matter of USEC INC. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American... holder of materials licenses SNM-7003 and SNM-2011 for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade...

  3. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  4. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Laurence R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility Project at ARC was reviewed by a code U team to determine appropriateness adequacy for the ISSA. This report represents the findings of one consultant to this team and concentrates on scientific and technical risks. This report supports continuation of the project to the next phase of development.

  5. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-01

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  6. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-09

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  7. Serial bronchoscopic lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis under local anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, K. Rennis; Vadakkan, D. Thomas; Krishnakumar, E. V.; Anas, A. Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease, characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant composed of proteins and lipids due to defective surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage, which requires general anesthesia. Herein, we report a case of primary PAP, successfully treated with serial bronchoscopic lung lavages under local anesthesia. PMID:25814803

  8. Surfactant mixing rules applied to surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses surfactant mixing rules which have been used to describe crude oil/alkali/surfactant phase behavior, using David Lloydminster crude oil and the surfactant Neodol 25-3S. It was found that at a fixed salinity and alkali concentration, a specific mole fraction of synthetic surfactant to petroleum soap was required to produce optimal phase behavior as the water-to-oil ratio varied. This methodology is useful in understanding the relationship between the variables of water-to-oil ratio and synthetic surfactant concentration in phase behavior systems that produce a petroleum soap.

  9. Exposure to polymers reverses inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by serum, meconium, or cholesterol in the captive bubble surfactometer.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, Elena; Ospina, Olga Lucía; Echaide, Mercedes; Taeusch, H William; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    Dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant in the lungs is associated with respiratory pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or meconium aspiration syndrome. Serum, cholesterol, and meconium have been described as inhibitory agents of surfactant's interfacial activity once these substances appear in alveolar spaces during lung injury and inflammation. The deleterious action of these agents has been only partly evaluated under physiologically relevant conditions. We have optimized a protocol to assess surfactant inhibition by serum, cholesterol, or meconium in the captive bubble surfactometer. Specific measures of surface activity before and after native surfactant was exposed to inhibitors included i), film formation, ii), readsorption of material from surface-associated reservoirs, and iii), interfacial film dynamics during compression-expansion cycling. Results show that serum creates a steric barrier that impedes surfactant reaching the interface. A mechanical perturbation of this barrier allows native surfactant to compete efficiently with serum to form a highly surface-active film. Exposure of native surfactant to cholesterol or meconium, on the other hand, modifies the compressibility of surfactant films though optimal compressibility properties recover on repetitive compression-expansion cycling. Addition of polymers like dextran or hyaluronic acid to surfactant fully reverses inhibition by serum. These polymers also prevent surfactant inhibition by cholesterol or meconium, suggesting that the protective action of polymers goes beyond the mere enhancement of interfacial adsorption as described by depletion force theories.

  10. Centrifugal separator devices, systems and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H.; Law, Jack D.; Garn, Troy G.; Todd, Terry A.; Macaluso, Lawrence L.

    2012-03-20

    Centrifugal separator devices, systems and related methods are described. More particularly, fluid transfer connections for a centrifugal separator system having support assemblies with a movable member coupled to a connection tube and coupled to a fixed member, such that the movable member is constrained to movement along a fixed path relative to the fixed member are described. Also, centrifugal separator systems including such fluid transfer connections are described. Additionally, methods of installing, removing and/or replacing centrifugal separators from centrifugal separator systems are described.

  11. Design of a centrifugal blood pump: Heart Turcica Centrifugal.

    PubMed

    Demir, Onur; Biyikli, Emre; Lazoglu, Ismail; Kucukaksu, Suha

    2011-07-01

    A prototype of a new implantable centrifugal blood pump system named Heart Turcica Centrifugal (HTC) was developed as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure. In the development of HTC, effects of blade height and volute tongue profiles on the hydraulic and hemolytic performances of the pump were investigated. As a result, the prototype was manufactured using the best blade height and volute tongue profiles. Performance of the prototype model was experimentally evaluated in a closed-loop flow system using water as the medium. The hydraulic performance requirement of an LVAD (5 L/min flow rate against a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg) was attained at 2800 rpm rotational speed.

  12. Effective Surfactants Blend Concentration Determination for O/W Emulsion Stabilization by Two Nonionic Surfactants by Simple Linear Regression

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, O/W emulsion sets were prepared by using different concentrations of two nonionic surfactants. The two surfactants, tween 80(HLB=15.0) and span 80(HLB=4.3) were used in a fixed proportions equal to 0.55:0.45 respectively. HLB value of the surfactants blends were fixed at 10.185. The surfactants blend concentration is starting from 3% up to 19%. For each O/W emulsion set the conductivity was measured at room temperature (25±2°), 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80°. Applying the simple linear regression least squares method statistical analysis to the temperature-conductivity obtained data determines the effective surfactants blend concentration required for preparing the most stable O/W emulsion. These results were confirmed by applying the physical stability centrifugation testing and the phase inversion temperature range measurements. The results indicated that, the relation which represents the most stable O/W emulsion has the strongest direct linear relationship between temperature and conductivity. This relationship is linear up to 80°. This work proves that, the most stable O/W emulsion is determined via the determination of the maximum R² value by applying of the simple linear regression least squares method to the temperature–conductivity obtained data up to 80°, in addition to, the true maximum slope is represented by the equation which has the maximum R² value. Because the conditions would be changed in a more complex formulation, the method of the determination of the effective surfactants blend concentration was verified by applying it for more complex formulations of 2% O/W miconazole nitrate cream and the results indicate its reproducibility. PMID:26664063

  13. Effective Surfactants Blend Concentration Determination for O/W Emulsion Stabilization by Two Nonionic Surfactants by Simple Linear Regression.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A K

    2015-01-01

    In this work, O/W emulsion sets were prepared by using different concentrations of two nonionic surfactants. The two surfactants, tween 80(HLB=15.0) and span 80(HLB=4.3) were used in a fixed proportions equal to 0.55:0.45 respectively. HLB value of the surfactants blends were fixed at 10.185. The surfactants blend concentration is starting from 3% up to 19%. For each O/W emulsion set the conductivity was measured at room temperature (25±2°), 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80°. Applying the simple linear regression least squares method statistical analysis to the temperature-conductivity obtained data determines the effective surfactants blend concentration required for preparing the most stable O/W emulsion. These results were confirmed by applying the physical stability centrifugation testing and the phase inversion temperature range measurements. The results indicated that, the relation which represents the most stable O/W emulsion has the strongest direct linear relationship between temperature and conductivity. This relationship is linear up to 80°. This work proves that, the most stable O/W emulsion is determined via the determination of the maximum R² value by applying of the simple linear regression least squares method to the temperature-conductivity obtained data up to 80°, in addition to, the true maximum slope is represented by the equation which has the maximum R² value. Because the conditions would be changed in a more complex formulation, the method of the determination of the effective surfactants blend concentration was verified by applying it for more complex formulations of 2% O/W miconazole nitrate cream and the results indicate its reproducibility. PMID:26664063

  14. Sizing up surfactant synthesis.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2014-08-01

    Phosphatidylcholine is generated through de novo synthesis and remodeling involving a lysophospholipid. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, research from the Shimizu lab (Harayama et al., 2014) demonstrates the highly selective enzymatic behavior of lysophospholipid acyltransferases. The authors present an enzymatic model for phosphatidylcholine molecular species diversification that impacts surfactant formation.

  15. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  16. Dispersing Carbon Nanotubes with Ionic Surfactants under Controlled Conditions: Comparisons and Insight.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ricardo M F; Abreu, Bárbara; Claro, Bárbara; Buzaglo, Matat; Regev, Oren; Furó, István; Marques, Eduardo F

    2015-10-13

    A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in the surfactant-assisted exfoliation and dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in water calls for well-controlled experimental methodologies and reliable comparative metrics. We have assessed the ability of several ionic surfactants to disperse single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, resorting to a stringently controlled sonication-centrifugation method for the preparation of the dispersions. The CNT concentration was accurately measured for a wide range of surfactant concentration, using combined thermogravimetric analysis and UV-vis spectroscopy. The obtained dispersibility curves yield several quantitative parameters, which in turn allow for the effects of nanotube morphology and surfactant properties (aromatic rings, chain length, headgroup charge, and cmc) to be assessed and rationalized, both in terms of dispersed nanotube mass and surface area. The data also indicate that the CNT-surfactant association follows patterns that are markedly different from other equilibrium processes governed by hydrophobicity (such as micellization); in particular, the surfactant concentration needed for maximum dispersibility, c(s,max), and the number of surfactant molecules per unit CNT area at c(s,max) are shown to depend linearly on chain length. The results further suggest that the presence of micelles in the exfoliation process is not a key factor either for starting CNT dispersibility or attaining its saturation value.

  17. Three-dimensional model of surfactant replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Filoche, Marcel; Tai, Cheng-Feng; Grotberg, James B

    2015-07-28

    Surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) involves instillation of a liquid-surfactant mixture directly into the lung airway tree. It is widely successful for treating surfactant deficiency in premature neonates who develop neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS). However, when applied to adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), early successes were followed by failures. This unexpected and puzzling situation is a vexing issue in the pulmonary community. A pressing question is whether the instilled surfactant mixture actually reaches the adult alveoli/acinus in therapeutic amounts. In this study, to our knowledge, we present the first mathematical model of SRT in a 3D lung structure to provide insight into answering this and other questions. The delivery is computed from fluid mechanical principals for 3D models of the lung airway tree for neonates and adults. A liquid plug propagates through the tree from forced inspiration. In two separate modeling steps, the plug deposits a coating film on the airway wall and then splits unevenly at the bifurcation due to gravity. The model generates 3D images of the resulting acinar distribution and calculates two global indexes, efficiency and homogeneity. Simulating published procedural methods, we show the neonatal lung is a well-mixed compartment, whereas the adult lung is not. The earlier, successful adult SRT studies show comparatively good index values implying adequate delivery. The later, failed studies used different protocols resulting in very low values of both indexes, consistent with inadequate acinar delivery. Reasons for these differences and the evolution of failure from success are outlined and potential remedies discussed.

  18. 3D Model of Surfactant Replacement Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James; Tai, Cheng-Feng; Filoche, Marcel

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT) involves instillation of a liquid-surfactant mixture directly into the lung airway tree. Though successful in neonatal applications, its use in adults had early success followed by failure. We present the first mathematical model of 3D SRT where a liquid plug propagates through the tree from forced inspiration. In two separate modeling steps, the plug first deposits a coating film on the airway wall which subtracts from its volume, a ``coating cost''. Then the plug splits unevenly at the airway bifurcation due to gravity. The steps are repeated until a plug ruptures or reaches the tree endpoint alveoli/acinus. The model generates 3D images of the resulting acinar distribution and calculates two global indexes, efficiency and homogeneity. Simulating published literature, the earlier successful adult SRT studies show comparatively good index values, while the later failed studies do not. Those unsuccessful studies used smaller dose volumes with higher concentration mixtures, apparently assuming a well mixed compartment. The model shows that adult lungs are not well mixed in SRT due to the coating cost and gravity effects. Returning to the higher dose volume protocols could save many thousands of lives annually in the US. Supported by NIH Grants HL85156, HL84370 and Agence Nationale de la Recherche, ANR no. 2010-BLAN-1119-05.

  19. Waves in a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    Impact of the pulsed braking force on the axial gas circulation and gas content in centrifuges for uranium isotope separation was investigated by the method of numerical simulation. Pulsed brake of the rotating gas by the momentum source results into generation of the waves which propagate along the rotor of the centrifuge. The waves almost doubles the axial circulation flux in the working camera in compare with the case of the steady state breaking force with the same average power in the model under the consideration. Flux through the hole in the bottom baffle on 15% exceeds the flux in the stationary case for the same pressure and temperature in the model. We argue that the waves reduce the pressure in the GC on the same 15%.

  20. Unsymmetrical flow in a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslen, S. H.

    1984-09-01

    The differential equations for a centrifuge sector are discussed in which cylinder whose cross section is a slice of pie is presumed to be mud. Three boundary layers are considered: the cylindrical wall layer, Ekman layers at the ends and the buoyancy layers on the theta = constant walls. It is suggested that the cylinder is most of the time infinitely long, and that the atmospheric scale height is of the order of the bowl radius all of the time. Both restrictions are relaxed.

  1. Isolation and retrieval of circulating tumor cells using centrifugal forces

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Han Wei; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Khoo, Bee Luan; Li, Zi Rui; Soo, Ross A.; Tan, Daniel Shao-Weng; Lim, Wan-Teck; Han, Jongyoon; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2013-01-01

    Presence and frequency of rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in bloodstreams of cancer patients are pivotal to early cancer detection and treatment monitoring. Here, we use a spiral microchannel with inherent centrifugal forces for continuous, size-based separation of CTCs from blood (Dean Flow Fractionation (DFF)) which facilitates easy coupling with conventional downstream biological assays. Device performance was optimized using cancer cell lines (> 85% recovery), followed by clinical validation with positive CTCs enumeration in all samples from patients with metastatic lung cancer (n = 20; 5–88 CTCs per mL). The presence of CD133+ cells, a phenotypic marker characteristic of stem-like behavior in lung cancer cells was also identified in the isolated subpopulation of CTCs. The spiral biochip identifies and addresses key challenges of the next generation CTCs isolation assay including antibody independent isolation, high sensitivity and throughput (3 mL/hr); and single-step retrieval of viable CTCs. PMID:23405273

  2. Effect of surfactants on weight gain in mice.

    PubMed

    Kaneene, J B; Ross, R W

    1986-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine if four surfactants can induce increased weight gain in the mouse. Basic-H, Triton X-100, Amway All Purpose Adjuvant and X-77 were put in water and fed to various groups of ICR 21 day old female mice for a period of 43 days. All the mice were clinically normal throughout the study period. Pathological examination of a random sample of the mice revealed no gross pathological changes. Similarly, histopathological examination of the lungs, livers and intestines did not reveal any visible lesions. Basic-H and Amway surfactants induced weight gain, though not significantly, better at 0.1% (V/V) concentration while X-77 and Triton X-100 induced weight gain better at 0.4% (V/V) concentration. Overall results show that none of the surfactants tested induced significant weight gain.

  3. Twinning of amphibian embryos by centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    In the frog Xenopus laevis, the dorsal structures of the embryonic body axis normally derive from the side of the egg opposite the side of sperm entry. However, if the uncleaved egg is inclined at lg or centrifuged in an inclined position, this topographic relationship is overridden: the egg makes its dorsal axial structures according to its orientation in the gravitational/centrifugal field, irrespective of the position of sperm entry. Certain conditions of centrifugation cause eggs to develop into conjoined twins with two sets of axial structures. A detailed analysis of twinning provided some insight into experimental axis orientation. First, as with single-axis embryos, both axes in twins are oriented according to the direction of centrifugation. One axis forms at the centripetal side of the egg and the other forms at the centrifugal side, even when the side of sperm entry is normal to the centrifugal force vector. Second, if eggs are centrifuged to give twins, but are inclined at lg to prevent post-centrifugation endoplasmic redistributions, only single-axis embryos develop. Thus, a second redistribution is required for high-frequency secondary axis formation. This can be accomplished by lg (as in the single centrifugations) or by a second centrifugation directed along the egg's animal-vegetal axis.

  4. Particles causing lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.

    1984-04-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. 164 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  5. Postdeposition dispersion of aerosol medications using surfactant carriers.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowski, Amy L; Garoff, Stephen; Tilton, Robert D; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2008-12-01

    Inhaled aerosol drugs provide a means of directly treating the lungs; however, aerosol deposition and drug distribution can be nonuniform, especially in obstructive lung disease. We hypothesize that surfactant-based aerosol carriers will disperse medications over airway surfaces after deposition through surface tension driven flows, increasing dose uniformity and improving drug distribution into underventilated regions. We considered saline and surfactant aerosol delivery via cannula onto several model airway surfaces including porcine gastric mucus (PGM) and both cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEs). Fluorescent dye and microspheres (d = 100 nm, 1 mum) were used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess postdeposition dispersion. Aerosol volume median diameters were in the 1-4 mum range. The tested surfactants included sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), tyloxapol, and calfactant. All surfactants tested on PGM (tyloxapol, calfactant, SDS, and CTAB) significantly increased dispersion area versus saline with all markers (2-20-fold increases; all p < 0.04). Both surfactants tested on CF HBEs (tyloxapol and calfactant) significantly increased dispersion area versus saline with all markers (1.6-4.1-fold increases; all p Surfactant carriers enhanced dispersion after aerosol deposition onto model airway surfaces, and may improve the efficacy of inhaled preparations such as inhaled antibiotics for cystic fibrosis.

  6. Mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Noll, L.A.

    1990-12-01

    The results of an evaluation of mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several surfactant combinations have been studied. These include alkyl aryl sulfonates as primary surfactants and carboxymethylated ethoxylated (CME) surfactants and ethoxylated sulfonates (ES) as secondary surfactants. The ethoxylated surfactants increase the salinity tolerance of the primary surfactants and, in theory, allow tailoring of the surfactant system to match selected reservoir conditions. The experiments conducted included interfacial tension (IFT) measurements, phase behavior measurements, adsorption and/or chromatographic separation of mixed surfactant systems, measurements of solution properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant mixtures, and crude oil displacement experiments. The effects of temperature, surfactant concentration, salinity, presence of divalent ions, hydrocarbon type, and component proportions in the mixed surfactant combinations, and injection strategies on the performance potential of the targeted surfactant/hydrocarbon systems were studied. 40 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. In situ enhancement of pulmonary surfactant function using temporary flow reversal

    PubMed Central

    Glindmeyer, Henry W.; Smith, Bradford J.

    2012-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a pulmonary disease with a mortality rate of ∼40% and 75,000 deaths annually in the United States. Mechanical ventilation restores airway patency and gas transport but leads to ventilator-induced lung injury. Furthermore, surfactant replacement therapy is ineffective due to surfactant delivery difficulties and deactivation by vascular proteins leaking into the airspace. Here, we demonstrated that surfactant function can be substantially improved (up to 50%) in situ in an in vitro pulmonary airway model using unconventional flows that incorporate a short-term retraction of the air-liquid interface, leading to a net decrease in cellular damage. Computational fluid dynamic simulations provided insights into this method and demonstrated the physicochemical hydrodynamic foundation for the improved surfactant microscale transport and mobility. This study may provide a starting point for developing novel ventilation waveforms to improve surfactant function in edematous airways. PMID:21998268

  8. ABCA3, a key player in neonatal respiratory transition and genetic disorders of the surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Peca, Donatella; Cutrera, Renato; Masotti, Andrea; Boldrini, Renata; Danhaive, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Genetic disorders of the surfactant system are rare diseases with a broad range of clinical manifestations, from fatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in neonates to chronic interstitial lung disease (ILD) in children and adults. ABCA3 [ATP-binding cassette (ABC), subfamily A, member 3] is a lung-specific phospholipid transporter critical for intracellular surfactant synthesis and storage in lamellar bodies (LBs). Its expression is developmentally regulated, peaking prior to birth under the influence of steroids and transcription factors. Bi-allelic mutations of the ABCA3 gene represent the most frequent cause of congenital surfactant deficiency, indicating its critical role in lung function. Mutations affect surfactant lipid and protein processing and LBs' morphology, leading to partial or total surfactant deficiency. Approximately 200 mutations have been reported, most of which are unique to individuals and families, which makes diagnosis and prognosis challenging. Various types of mutations, affecting different domains of the protein, account in part for phenotype diversity. Disease-causing mutations have been reported in most coding and some non-coding regions of the gene, but tend to cluster in the first extracellular loop and the second nucleotide-binding domain (NBD), leading to defective glycosylation and trafficking defects and interfering with ATP binding and hydrolysis respectively. Mono-allelic damaging and benign variants are often subclinical but may act as disease modifiers in lung diseases such as RDS of prematurity or associate with mutations in other surfactant-related genes. Diagnosis is complex but essential and should combine pathology and ultrastructure studies on lung biopsy with broad-spectrum genetic testing of surfactant-related genes, made possible by recent technology advances in the massive parallel sequencing technology.

  9. Phosphatidylcholine composition of pulmonary surfactant from terrestrial and marine diving mammals.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Danielle B; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardner, Manuela; Kleinhenz, Danielle; Piscitelli, Marina; Raverty, Stephen; Haulena, Martin; Zimba, Paul V

    2015-06-01

    Marine mammals are repeatedly exposed to elevated extra-thoracic pressure and alveolar collapse during diving and readily experience alveolar expansion upon inhalation - a unique capability as compared to terrestrial mammals. How marine mammal lungs overcome the challenges of frequent alveolar collapse and recruitment remains unknown. Recent studies indicate that pinniped lung surfactant has more anti-adhesive components compared to terrestrial mammals, which would aid in alveolar opening. However, pulmonary surfactant composition has not yet been investigated in odontocetes, whose physiology and diving behavior differ from pinnipeds. The aim of this study was to investigate the phosphatidylcholine (PC) composition of lung surfactants from various marine mammals and compare these to a terrestrial mammal. We found an increase in anti-adhesive PC species in harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) compared to dog (Canus lupus familiaris), as well as an increase in the fluidizing PCs 16:0/14:0 and 16:0/16:1 in pinnipeds compared to odontocetes. The harbor porpoise (a representative of the odontocetes) did not have higher levels of fluidizing PCs compared to dog. Our preliminary results support previous findings that pinnipeds may have adapted unique surfactant compositions that allow them to dive at high pressures for extended periods without adverse effects. Future studies will need to investigate the differences in other surfactant components to fully assess the surfactant composition in odontocetes.

  10. Phosphatidylcholine composition of pulmonary surfactant from terrestrial and marine diving mammals

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardner, Manuela; Kleinhenz, Danielle; Piscitelli, Marina; Raverty, Stephen; Haulena, Martin; Zimba, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    Marine mammals are repeatedly exposed to elevated extra-thoracic pressure and alveolar collapse during diving and readily experience alveolar expansion upon inhalation – a unique capability as compared to terrestrial mammals. How marine mammal lungs overcome the challenges of frequent alveolar collapse and recruitment remains unknown. Recent studies indicate that pinniped lung surfactant has more anti-adhesive components compared to terrestrial mammals, which would aid in alveolar opening. However, pulmonary surfactant composition has not yet been investigated in odontocetes, whose physiology and diving behavior differ from pinnipeds. The aim of this study was to investigate the phosphatidylcholine (PC) composition of lung surfactants from various marine mammals and compare these to a terrestrial mammal. We found an increase in anti-adhesive PC species in harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) compared to dog (Canus lupus familiaris), as well as an increase in the fluidizing PCs 16:0/14:0 and 16:0/16:1 in pinnipeds compared to odontocetes. The harbor porpoise (a representative of the odontocetes) did not have higher levels of fluidizing PCs compared to dog. Our preliminary results support previous findings that pinnipeds may have adapted unique surfactant compositions that allow them to dive at high pressures for extended periods without adverse effects. Future studies will need to investigate the differences in other surfactant components to fully assess the surfactant composition in odontocetes. PMID:25812797

  11. Hyaline membrane disease and surfactant protein, SAP-35, in diabetes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nogee, L; McMahan, M; Whitsett, J A

    1988-10-01

    Surfactant-associated protein of Mr 28,000 to 35,000 (SAP-35) is an abundant glycoprotein present in the alveolus of the lung, which imparts both structural organization to surfactant phospholipids and provides regulatory information controlling surfactant phospholipid secretion and metabolism. SAP-35 expression is enhanced by 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate and epidermal growth factor during perinatal differentiation of type II epithelial cells. Its synthesis and RNA are also controlled by a variety of inhibitory factors, which include transforming growth factor and insulin. Glucocorticoids both enhance and inhibit SAP-35 expression in fetal lung explants. There is evidence that fetal hyperinsulinemia or hyperglycemia, or both, inhibit the morphologic differentiation of the type II epithelial cell in association with decreased phospholipid surfactant synthesis or secretion. Insulin is also a potent inhibitor of SAP-35 expression in fetal lung tissue, and decreased SAP-35 was previously noted in amniotic fluid of patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Recent progress in the management of diabetes in pregnancy, characterized by more rigorous metabolic control, has decreased the risk of hyaline membrane disease for the infant of the diabetic mother and is associated with normal levels of SAP-35 in amniotic fluid. Hyaline membrane disease remains a major cause of morbidity in infants of diabetic mothers but may also reflect a higher incidence of premature delivery, cesarean section, and asphyxia at delivery as well as inhibition of pulmonary surfactant phospholipid synthesis or expression of the surfactant protein SAP-35.

  12. Phosphatidylcholine composition of pulmonary surfactant from terrestrial and marine diving mammals.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Danielle B; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardner, Manuela; Kleinhenz, Danielle; Piscitelli, Marina; Raverty, Stephen; Haulena, Martin; Zimba, Paul V

    2015-06-01

    Marine mammals are repeatedly exposed to elevated extra-thoracic pressure and alveolar collapse during diving and readily experience alveolar expansion upon inhalation - a unique capability as compared to terrestrial mammals. How marine mammal lungs overcome the challenges of frequent alveolar collapse and recruitment remains unknown. Recent studies indicate that pinniped lung surfactant has more anti-adhesive components compared to terrestrial mammals, which would aid in alveolar opening. However, pulmonary surfactant composition has not yet been investigated in odontocetes, whose physiology and diving behavior differ from pinnipeds. The aim of this study was to investigate the phosphatidylcholine (PC) composition of lung surfactants from various marine mammals and compare these to a terrestrial mammal. We found an increase in anti-adhesive PC species in harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) compared to dog (Canus lupus familiaris), as well as an increase in the fluidizing PCs 16:0/14:0 and 16:0/16:1 in pinnipeds compared to odontocetes. The harbor porpoise (a representative of the odontocetes) did not have higher levels of fluidizing PCs compared to dog. Our preliminary results support previous findings that pinnipeds may have adapted unique surfactant compositions that allow them to dive at high pressures for extended periods without adverse effects. Future studies will need to investigate the differences in other surfactant components to fully assess the surfactant composition in odontocetes. PMID:25812797

  13. Interfacial behavior of pulmonary surfactant preparations containing egg yolk lecithin.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Hiromichi; Shibata, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian lungs are covered with lipid-protein complexes or pulmonary surfactants. In this work, which aimed towards the less expensive production of artificial pulmonary surfactants, we produced surfactants composed of egg yolk lecithin (eggPC), palmitic acid, and hexadecanol (= 0.30/0.35/0.35, mol/mol/mol ) containing different amounts of Hel 13-5 (NH2-KLLKLLLKLWLKLLKLLL-COOH) as a substitute for the proteins in native pulmonary surfactants. Surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (DV)-A isotherms of the mixtures were measured via the Wilhelmy and ionizing (241)Am electrode methods, respectively. The interactions between the lipid components and Hel 13-5 led to variations in the surface pressure caused by the expulsion of fluid components from the surface. Furthermore, the π-A and DV-A isotherms featured large hysteresis loops for the surfactant that contained a small amount of Hel 13-5 during compression and successive expansion cycling. To elucidate the morphology, the phase behavior was visualized in situ at the air-water interface by means of fluorescence microscopy; the images suggested less effective interactions between Hel 13-5 and the unsaturated PC in eggPC despite the similarity of their monolayer properties.

  14. Clouding behaviour in surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha; Padhan, Susanta K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, Bijay K

    2011-02-17

    A study on the phenomenon of clouding and the applications of cloud point technology has been thoroughly discussed. The phase behaviour of clouding and various methods adopted for the determination of cloud point of various surfactant systems have been elucidated. The systems containing anionic, cationic, nonionic surfactants as well as microemulsions have been reviewed with respect to their clouding phenomena and the effects of structural variation in the surfactant systems have been incorporated. Additives of various natures control the clouding of surfactants. Electrolytes, nonelectrolytes, organic substances as well as ionic surfactants, when present in the surfactant solutions, play a major role in the clouding phenomena. The review includes the morphological study of clouds and their applications in the extraction of trace inorganic, organic materials as well as pesticides and protein substrates from different sources.

  15. Clouding behaviour in surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha; Padhan, Susanta K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, Bijay K

    2011-02-17

    A study on the phenomenon of clouding and the applications of cloud point technology has been thoroughly discussed. The phase behaviour of clouding and various methods adopted for the determination of cloud point of various surfactant systems have been elucidated. The systems containing anionic, cationic, nonionic surfactants as well as microemulsions have been reviewed with respect to their clouding phenomena and the effects of structural variation in the surfactant systems have been incorporated. Additives of various natures control the clouding of surfactants. Electrolytes, nonelectrolytes, organic substances as well as ionic surfactants, when present in the surfactant solutions, play a major role in the clouding phenomena. The review includes the morphological study of clouds and their applications in the extraction of trace inorganic, organic materials as well as pesticides and protein substrates from different sources. PMID:21296314

  16. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    PubMed

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-01

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  17. Particles causing lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response, appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. The insidious and probably most important human lung disease due to particles is bronchiolar obstruction and obliteration, producing progressive impairment of air flow. The responsible particle is the complex combination of poorly digestive lipids and complex carbohydrates with active chemicals which we call cigarette smoke. More research is needed to perfect, correct and

  18. Centrifugal separators and related devices and methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H.; Law, Jack D.; Garn, Troy G.; Macaluso, Lawrence L.; Todd, Terry A.

    2012-03-06

    Centrifugal separators and related methods and devices are described. More particularly, centrifugal separators comprising a first fluid supply fitting configured to deliver fluid into a longitudinal fluid passage of a rotor shaft and a second fluid supply fitting sized and configured to sealingly couple with the first fluid supply fitting are described. Also, centrifugal separator systems comprising a manifold having a drain fitting and a cleaning fluid supply fitting are described, wherein the manifold is coupled to a movable member of a support assembly. Additionally, methods of cleaning centrifugal separators are described.

  19. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L. ); Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G. )

    1992-01-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  20. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L.; Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G.

    1992-11-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  1. Centrifugal quantum states of neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Petukhov, A. K.; Protasov, K. V.; Voronin, A. Yu.

    2008-09-01

    We propose a method for observation of the quasistationary states of neutrons localized near a curved mirror surface. The bounding effective well is formed by the centrifugal potential and the mirror Fermi potential. This phenomenon is an example of an exactly solvable “quantum bouncer” problem that can be studied experimentally. It could provide a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, as well as quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. We develop a formalism that describes quantitatively the neutron motion near the mirror surface. The effects of mirror roughness are taken into account.

  2. Testing of pyrochemical centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, L.S.; Carls, E.L.; Basco, J.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-08-01

    A centrifugal contactor that performs oxidation and reduction exchange reactions between molten metals and salts at 500 degrees Centigrade has been tested successfully at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The design is based on contactors for aqueous- organic systems operation near room temperature. In tests to demonstrate the performance of the pyrocontactor, cadmium and LICl- KCl eutectic salt were the immiscible solvent phases, and rare earths were the distributing solutes. The tests showed that the pyrocontactor mixed and separated the phases well, with stage efficiencies approaching 99% at rotor speeds near 2700 rpm. The contactor ran smoothly and reliably over the entire range of speeds that was tested.

  3. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  4. CENTRIFUGES

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    Damping bearings for use on the shafts of an ultracentrifuge were designed which are capable of passing through critical angular speeds. The shaft extending from one end of the rotor is journaled in fixed-plain bearings mounted on annular resilient shock-absorbing elements to dampen small vibrations. The shaft at the other end of the rotor is journaled in two damper-bearing assemblies which are so spaced on the shaft that a vibration node can at no time exist at both bearing assemblies. These bearings are similar to the other bearings except that the bearing housings are slidably mounted on the supporting structure for movement transverse to the rotational axis of the rotor.

  5. Surfactant waterflooding oil recovery method

    SciTech Connect

    Schievelbein, V.H.

    1981-12-29

    Oil is recovered from an underground petroleum reservoir which contains a brine having a salinity of from 50 to 220 kg/m3 total dissolved solids by injecting an alkylarylpolyalkoxy sulfate or alkylpolyalkoxy sulfate surfactant that exhibits phase stability in the brine or diluted brine. The surfactant is injected in an aqueous solution which is prepared with diluted brine which has a salinity slightly less than that required to cause partitioning of the surfactant out of the aqueous phase into the oil-water interface or oil phase. The injection of surfactant is followed by the injecting of a driving slug comprised of either diluted brine or thickened diluted brine.

  6. 76 FR 9613 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Register on November 17, 2010 (75 FR 70300), including a notice of opportunity to request a hearing, or to... COMMISSION USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order... licenses numbers SNM- 7003 and SNM-2011 for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility (Lead...

  7. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1984-12-11

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with either a petroleum sulfonate or an alkaryl sulfonate. A surfactant system containing the above surfactant useful in enhanced oil recovery processes is also provided.

  8. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  9. The Energetics of Centrifugal Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, W. K.; Jiao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A recent study has argued that the California Undercurrent, and poleward eastern boundary currents in general, generate mixing events through centrifugal instability (CI). Conditions favorable for CI are created by the strong horizontal shears developed in turbulent bottom layers of currents flowing in the direction of topographic waves. At points of abrupt topographic change, like promontories and capes, the coastal current separates from the boundary and injects gravitationally stable but dynamically unstable flow into the interior. The resulting finite amplitude development of the instability involves overturnings and diabatic mixing. The purpose of this study is to examine the energetics of CI in order to characterize it as has been done for other instabilities and develop a framework in which to estimate its regional and global impacts. We argue that CI is roughly twice as efficient at mixing as is Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and that roughly 10% of the initial energy in a CUC-like current is lost to either local mixing or the generation of unbalanced flows. The latter probably leads to non-local mixing. Thus centrifugal instability is an effective process by which energy is lost from the balanced flow and spent in mixing neighboring water masses. We argue the importance of the mixing is regional in nature, but of less importance to the global budgets given its regional specificity.

  10. BEHAVIOR OF SURFACTANT MIXTURES AT SOLID/LIQUID AND OIL/LIQUID INTERFACES IN CHEMICAL FLOODING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. P. Somasundaran

    2002-09-30

    The aim of the project is to develop and evaluate efficient novel surfactant mixtures for enhanced oil recovery. Surfactant loss by adsorption or precipitation depends to a great extent on the type of surfactant complexes and aggregates formed. Such information as well as techniques to generate the information is lacking currently particularly for surfactant mixtures and surfactant/polymer systems. A novel analytical centrifuge application is explored during the last period to generate information on structures-performance relationship for different surfactant aggregates in solution and, in turn, at interfaces. To use analytical untracentrifuge for surfactant mixtures, information on partial specific volumes of single surfactants and their mixtures is required. Towards this purpose, surface tension and density measurements were performed to determine critical micellar concentrations (cmc), partial specific volumes of n-dodecyl-{beta}-Dmaltoside (DM), nonyl phenol ethoxylated decyl ether (NP-10) and their 1:1 mixtures at 25 C. Durchschlag's theoretical calculation method was adopted to calculate the partial specific volumes. Effects of temperature and mixing, as well as methods used for estimation on micellization and partial specific volumes were studied during the current period. Surface tension results revealed no interaction between the two surfactants in mixed micelles. Partial specific volume measurements also indicated no interaction in mixed micelles. Maximum adsorption density, area per molecule and free energy of micellization were also calculated. Partial specific volumes were estimated by two experimental methods: d{sub {rho}}/dc and V{sub {sigma}}. The difference between the results of using the two methods is within 0.5% deviation. It was found that the partial specific volume is concentration dependent and sensitive to changes in temperature. The information generated in this study will be used for the study of surfactant aggregate mass distribution

  11. Sorption of linear alcohol ethoxylate surfactant homologs to soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ching; Jafvert, Chad T.

    1997-11-01

    Sorption onto five saturated soils of the homologs within the commercial surfactant mixture Brij 35 (registered trademark of ICI Americas) was investigated. Brij 35 is a mixture of linear ethoxylated alcohols, having an average of 23 ethoxy (EO) groups per molecule and alcohol chain of primarily 12 carbons in length (C 12H 25(OCH 2CH 2) 23OH). In experiments, saturated soils were exposed to various concentrations of the surfactant mixture for specified times, the slurries were centrifuged to separate the phases, the aqueous phases were extracted with 1,2-dichloroethane, and the residual homologs were derivatized with 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl chloride and analyzed by normal phase HPLC. Homologs containing 4-43 EO groups were chromatographically separated at near baseline. At aqueous Brij 35 concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (cmc), the proportion of each homolog sorbed to each of the soils increased with increasing EO chain length through the homologous series. As a result, in experiments where a significant proportion of the surfactant adsorbed, significant shifts in the aqueous phase compositions occurred to mixtures with lower mean EO numbers. A sharp break in the adsorption isotherms occurs at the cmc.

  12. Ammonium Laurate Surfactant for Cleaner Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Hanna M; Meany, Brendan; Ticey, Jeremy; Sun, Chuan-Fu; Wang, YuHuang; Cumings, John

    2015-06-30

    Experiments probing the properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and those measuring bulk composites show vastly different results. One major issue limiting the results is that the procedures required to separate and test CNTs introduce contamination that changes the properties of the CNT. These contamination residues often come from the resist used in lithographic processing and the surfactant used to suspend and deposit the CNTs, commonly sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Here we present ammonium laurate (AL), a surfactant that has previously not been used for this application, which differs from SDS only by substitution of ionic constituents but shows vastly cleaner depositions. In addition, we show that compared to SDS, AL-suspended CNTs have greater shelf stability and more selective dispersion. These results are verified using transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, ζ-potential measurements, and Raman and absorption optical spectroscopy. This surfactant is simple to prepare, and the nanotube solutions require minimal sonication and centrifugation in order to outperform SDS. PMID:26020583

  13. Fetal lung development in the diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bourbon, J R; Farrell, P M

    1985-03-01

    It seems quite likely that the normal process of fetal lung biochemical maturation is delayed by maternal diabetes and that abnormalities in the pulmonary surfactant system are involved. The appearance of PG in amniotic fluid and possibly in fetal lung is impaired or at least delayed. The same is possibly true for DSPC, the main constituent of surfactant, but recent discrepant data call for further clarification of this specific point. Careful determination of the fetal lung phospholipid profile by amniotic fluid analysis helps predict and prevent RDS in IDM, along with a careful control of the maternal diabetic condition. A study of alveolar surfactant at birth, if it could be performed in addition to amniotic fluid analysis, would help to better characterize surfactant deficiency in IDM. On the basis of both in vivo and in vitro experimental approaches, it seems clear that hyperglycemia and fetal reactional hyperinsulinism are both involved in the processes delaying fetal lung maturation. Further advances in the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to this delay will be conditional on the availability of animal models reproducing the features of the metabolic and hormonal environment of human fetuses in diabetic pregnancies. The appropriateness of in vivo models needs to be defined by two kinds of criteria: 1) presence of simultaneous hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in the fetus; 2) the presence of delayed fetal lung maturation as judged by morphology and morphometry of epithelial lung cells, by physiological assessment of surfactant, and by the phospholipid composition of the lung (and including lung tissue per se, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lamellar bodies, and/or isolated surfactant fractions). Therefore, future studies must necessarily be comprehensive in scope and include information indicating that fetal growth, blood glucose, and circulating insulin are all increased. Such models already exist in rats and rabbits. Rat models are

  14. Astronaut Gordon Cooper in centrifuge for tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper, prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 9 mission, is strapped into the gondola while undergoing tests in the centrifuge at the Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, Pennsylvania. The centrifuge is used to investigate by simulation the pilot's capability to control the vehicle during the actual flight in its booster and reentry profile.

  15. Apparatus for centrifugal separation of coal particles

    DOEpatents

    Dickie, William; Cavallaro, Joseph A.; Killmeyer, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A gravimetric cell for centrifugal separation of fine coal by density has a cylindrical body and a butterfly valve or other apparatus for selectively sealing the body radially across the approximate center of the cylinder. A removable top is provided which seals the cylinder in the centrifuge and in unvented areas.

  16. Centrifugal innervation of the mammalian olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Shinji; Yamamoto, Noboru

    2008-12-01

    Although it has been known for decades that the mammalian olfactory bulb receives a substantial number of centrifugal inputs from other regions of the brain, relatively few data have been available on the function of the centrifugal olfactory system. Knowing the role of the centrifugal projection and how it works is of critical importance to fully understanding olfaction. The centrifugal fibers can be classified into two groups, a group that release neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin, or acetylcholine, and a group originating in the olfactory cortex. Accumulating evidence suggests that centrifugal neuromodulatory inputs are associated with acquisition of odor memory. Because the distribution of the terminals on these fibers is diffuse and widespread, the neuromodulatory inputs must affect diverse subsets of bulbar neurons at the same time. In contrast, knowledge of the role of centrifugal fibers from the olfactory cortical areas is limited. Judging from recent morphological evidence, these fibers may modify the activity of neurons located in sparse and discrete loci in the olfactory bulb. Given the modular organization of the olfactory bulb, centrifugal fibers from the olfactory cortex may help coordinate the activities of restricted subsets of neurons belonging to distinct functional modules in an odor-specific manner. Because the olfactory cortex receives inputs from limbic and neocortical areas in addition to inputs from the bulb, the centrifugal inputs from the cortex can modulate odor processing in the bulb in response to non-olfactory as well as olfactory cues.

  17. Lung Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  18. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  19. Lung metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the lung; Metastatic cancer to the lung ... Metastatic tumors in the lungs are cancers that developed at other places in the body (or other parts of the lungs) and spread through the ...

  20. Simulator sickness provoked by a human centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Voge, V M

    1991-10-01

    Simulator sickness is now a well-recognized entity. It is recognized as a form of motion sickness, having a higher incidence in the more sophisticated simulators. Human centrifuges (dynamic simulators) are the newest innovation in aircrew training devices. Simulator sickness has never been reported in human centrifuges. We are reporting on a case of delayed simulator sickness in a pilot-subject after a centrifuge experience. A review of the "psycho-physiological" problems routinely experienced by subjects on human centrifuges indicates such problems are due to simulator sickness, although they are not reported as such. In this paper, we give a brief overview of simulator sickness and briefly discuss simulator sickness, as related to the human centrifuge experience.

  1. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  2. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  3. Novel Approaches to Surfactant Administration

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir; Donn, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy has been the mainstay of treatment for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome for more than twenty years. For the most part, surfactant is administered intratracheally, followed by mechanical ventilation. In recent years, the growing interest in noninvasive ventilation has led to novel approaches of administration. This paper will review these techniques and the associated clinical evidence. PMID:23243504

  4. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  5. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  6. Modifying the electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes using designed surfactant peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarajeewa, Dinushi R.; Dieckmann, Gregg R.; Nielsen, Steven O.; Musselman, Inga H.

    2012-07-01

    acid sequence of X(Valine)5(Lysine)2, where X indicates an aromatic amino acid containing either an electron-donating or electron-withdrawing functional group (i.e. p-amino-phenylalanine or p-cyano-phenylalanine). Circular dichroism spectra showed that the surfactant peptides primarily have random coil structures in an aqueous medium, both alone and in the presence of SWCNTs, simplifying analysis of the peptide/SWCNT interaction. The ability of the surfactant peptides to disperse individual SWCNTs in solution was verified using atomic force microscopy and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy. The electronic properties of the surfactant peptide/SWCNT composites were examined using the observed nanotube Raman tangential band shifts and the observed additional features near the Fermi level in the scanning tunneling spectroscopy dI/dV spectra. The results revealed that SWCNTs functionalized with surfactant peptides containing electron-donor or electron-acceptor functional groups showed n-doped or p-doped altered electronic properties, respectively. This work unveils a facile and versatile approach to modify the intrinsic electronic properties of SWCNTs using a simple peptide structure, which is easily adaptable to obtain peptide/SWCNT composites for the design of tunable nanoscale electronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characteristics of the surfactant peptides: molecular weights and retention times; determination of molar extinction coefficients of aromatic test amino acids; determination of optimum surfactant peptide concentration and centrifugation speed for the preparation of SWCNT dispersions; absorption spectra of surfactant peptide/SWCNT dispersions as a function of centrifugation speed; chirality assignments of surfactant peptide/SWCNT composites and corresponding absorption peak shifts; reproducibility of Raman G-band peak positions of surfactant peptide/SWCNT composites; STM/STS data acquisition from standard

  7. On-line surfactant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, K.I.; Neal, E.E.; Soran, P.D.; Smith, B.

    1995-04-01

    This group has developed a process to extract metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The process uses water soluble polymers to complex metal ions. The metal/polymer complex is concentrated by ultrafiltration and the metals are recovered by a pH adjustment that frees the metal ions. The metal ions pass through the ultrafiltration membrane and are recovered in a concentrated form suitable for reuse. Surfactants are present in one of the target waste streams. Surfactants foul the costly ultrafiltration membranes. It was necessary to remove the surfactants before processing the waste stream. This paper discusses an on-line device the authors fabricated to monitor the process stream to assure that all the surfactant had been removed. The device is inexpensive and sensitive to very low levels of surfactants.

  8. cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant-associated proteolipid SPL(Phe)

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Fox, J.L.; Whitsett, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    Hydrophobic surfactant-associated protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 was isolated from either/ethanol or chloroform/methanol extracts of mammalian pulmonary surfactant. Automated Edman degradation in a gas-phase sequencer showed the major N-terminus of the human low molecular weight protein to be Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-Try-Cys-Trp-Leu-Cys-Arg-Ala-Leu-. Because of the N-terminal phenylalanine, the surfactant protein was designated SPL(Phe). Antiserum generated against hydrophobic surfactant protein(s) from bovine pulmonary surfactant recognized protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 in immunoblot analysis and was used to screen a lambdagt11 expression library constructed from adult human lung poly(A)/sup +/ RNA. This resulted in identification of a 1.4-kilobase cDNA clone that was shown to encode the N-terminus of the surfactant polypeptide SPL(Phe) (Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-) within an open reading frame for a larger protein. Expression of a fused ..beta..-galactosidase-SPL (Phe) gene in Escherichia coli yielded an immunoreactive M/sub r/ 34,000 fusion peptide. Hybrid-arrested translation with the cDNA and immunoprecipitation of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled in vitro translation products of human poly(A)/sup +/ RNA with a surfactant polyclonal antibody resulted in identification of a M/sub r/ 40,000 precursor protein. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated RNA from human lung detected a 2.0-kilobase RNA that was more abundant in adult lung than in fetal lung. These proteins, and specifically SPL(Phe), may therefore be useful for synthesis of replacement surfactants for treatment of hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants or of other surfactant-deficient states.

  9. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  10. Surfactant secretion and clearance in the newborn

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, P.A.; Wright, J.R.; Clements, J.A. )

    1989-10-01

    Pregnant rabbits (30 days) were injected intravenously with (3H)choline 8 h before delivery. The fetuses were delivered, and lung lavage and lamellar body phospholipids (PL) were analyzed. Some newborns also received radioactively labeled surfactant intratracheally on delivery and were permitted to breathe. With time, intratracheal label decreased in lavage and appeared in the lamellar body fraction, and intravenous label accumulated in both pools. Using a tracer analysis for non-steady state, we calculated surfactant secretion and clearance rates for the newborn period. Before birth, both rates rose slightly from 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 at 6 h before birth to 7.3 at birth. Immediately after birth, secretion rate rose to 37.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1. Between 1.5 and 2 h after birth it fell to a minimum of 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 and then rose slowly to 6.0 at 12 h. After birth, clearance rate increased less than secretion rate (maximum 24.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 shortly after birth) then followed the same pattern but did not balance secretion rate in the 1st day.

  11. Centrifuges in gravitational physiology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Davies, Phil; Fuller, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Data from space flight and ground based experiments have clearly demonstrated the importance of Earth gravity for normal physiological function in man and animals. Gravitational Physiology is concerned with the role and influence of gravity on physiological systems. Research in this field examines how we perceive and respond to gravity and the mechanisms underlying these responses. Inherent in our search for answers to these questions is the ability to alter gravity, which is not physically possible without leaving Earth. However, useful experimental paradigms have been to modify the perceived force of gravity by changing either the orientation of subjects to the gravity vector (i.e., postural changes) or by applying inertial forces to augment the magnitude of the gravity vector. The later technique has commonly been used by applying centripetal force via centrifugation.

  12. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, N.E.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A uv-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  13. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Norman E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90.degree. and 180.degree. excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A UV-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  14. Centrifugal membrane filtration -- Task 9

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has teamed with SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, to demonstrate applications for the SpinTek technology within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the SpinTek STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{micro}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the SpinTek ST-IIL centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. An extended test run of 100 hr performed on a surrogate tank waste solution showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

  15. Innovation in surfactant therapy II: surfactant administration by aerosolization.

    PubMed

    Pillow, J Jane; Minocchieri, S

    2012-01-01

    Instilled bolus surfactant is the only approved surfactant treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, recent trends towards increased utilization of noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with surfactant deficiency have created a demand for a similarly noninvasive means of administering exogenous surfactant. Past approaches to surfactant nebulization met with varying success due to inefficient aerosol devices resulting in low intrapulmonary delivery doses of surfactant with variable clinical effectiveness. The recent development of vibrating membrane nebulizers, coupled with appropriate positioning of the interface device, indicates that efficient delivery of aerosolized surfactant is now a realistic goal in infants. Evidence of clinical effect despite low total administered dose in pilot studies, together with suggestions of enhanced homogeneity of pulmonary distribution indicate that this therapy may be applied in a cost-effective manner, with minimal patient handling and disruption. These studies need to be subjected to appropriately designed randomized controlled trials. Further work is also required to determine the optimum delivery route (mask, intranasal prong, nasopharyngeal or laryngeal), dosing amount and redosing interval.

  16. Metal Nanoparticle Pollutants Interfere with Pulmonary Surfactant Function In Vitro☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Mandeep Singh; Zhao, Lin; Smith, Ronald; Possmayer, Fred; Petersen, Nils O.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reported associations between air pollution and pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases prompted studies on the effects of gold nanoparticles (Au NP) on pulmonary surfactant function. Low levels (3.7 mol % Au/lipid, 0.98% wt/wt) markedly inhibited adsorption of a semisynthetic pulmonary surfactant (dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol/surfactant protein B (SP-B); 70:30:1 wt %). Au NP also impeded the surfactant's ability to reduce surface tension (γ) to low levels during film compression and to respread during film expansion. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Au NP generated by a seed-growth method were spherical with diameters of ∼15 nm. Including palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol appeared to coat the NP with at least one lipid bilayer but did not affect NP shape or size. Similar overall observations occurred with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol. Dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol was less effective in NP capping, although similar sized NP were formed. Including SP-B (1% wt/wt) appears to induce the formation of elongated strands of interacting threads with the fluid phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Including DPPC resulted in formation of aggregated, less spherical NP with a larger size distribution. With DPPC, strand formation due to SP-B was not observed. Agarose gel electrophoresis studies demonstrated that the aggregation induced by SP-B blocked migration of PG-coated NP. Migration was also influenced by the fluidity of the PGs. It is concluded that Au NP can interact with and sequester pulmonary surfactant phospholipids and, if inhaled from the atmosphere, could impede pulmonary surfactant function in the lung. PMID:17890383

  17. Mechanisms of Polyelectrolyte Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption at the Air-Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Patrick C.; Palazoglu, Omer A.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan, a naturally occurring cationic polyelectrolyte, restores the adsorption of the clinical lung surfactant Survanta to the air-water interface in the presence of albumin at much lower concentrations than uncharged polymers such as polyethylene glycol. This is consistent with the positively charged chitosan forming ion pairs with negative charges on the albumin and lung surfactant particles, reducing the net charge in the double-layer, and decreasing the electrostatic energy barrier to adsorption to the air-water interface. However, chitosan, like other polyelectrolytes, cannot perfectly match the charge distribution on the surfactant, which leads to patches of positive and negative charge at net neutrality. Increasing the chitosan concentration further leads to a reduction in the rate of surfactant adsorption consistent with an over-compensation of the negative charge on the surfactant and albumin surfaces, which creates a new repulsive electrostatic potential between the now cationic surfaces. This charge neutralization followed by charge inversion explains the window of polyelectrolyte concentration that enhances surfactant adsorption; the same physical mechanism is observed in flocculation and re-stabilization of anionic colloids by chitosan and in alternate layer deposition of anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes on charged colloids. PMID:19366599

  18. Effects of simultaneous exposure of surfactant to serum proteins and free radicals.

    PubMed

    Marzan, Yolanda; Mora, Rene; Butler, Aaron; Butler, Matthew; Ingenito, Edward P

    2002-03-01

    Free radicals (FRs) and serum proteins have both been implicated in the pathophysiology of surfactant dysfunction during acute lung injury (ALI). This study examines how these 2 distinct mechanisms interact to contribute to altered surfactant function in this setting. Calf lung surfactant (2 mg/mL) was incubated with no additives (C = control), and with low = (LD = 125 microM FeCl2; 250 microM H2O2) and high-dose (HD = 250 microM FeCl2, 500 microM H2O2) Fenton reaction reagents to generate hydroxyl radical. Each condition was studied with (1) no protein (N); and with 25%, 200%, and 800% (weight protein/weight phospholipid) protein added as (2) bovine albumin, (3) bovine fibrinogen, (4) hemoglobin, or (5) calf serum. Lipid (LFR) and protein (PFR) free-radical products, and modifications in the tertiary structure of Surfactant Protein A (SPA) on Western blot, were observed in N LD and N HD samples. Added proteins reduced LFR and PFR changes as well as SPA structural changes. Protection was greatest for fibrinogen, hemoglobin, and serum, and least for albumin. Minimal to no dysfunction, assayed by pulsating surfactometry, was observed in all samples. These findings indicate that addition of serum proteins to surfactant at 2 mg/mL protects against, rather than promotes, FR-mediated chemical changes in surfactant lipid and protein constituents.

  19. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  20. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1985-03-12

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with a polynuclear aromatic compound having a molecular weight of at least 155. A novel surfactant system useful in enhanced oil recovery containing the above surfactant is also provided. In addition, an improved process for the enhanced recovery of oil is provided utilizing the novel surfactant system.

  1. Gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bogovalov, S.V.; Kislov, V.A.; Tronin, I.V.

    2015-03-10

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarisation and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modelling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  2. Isotope Separation in Concurrent Gas Centrifuges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borman, V. D.

    An analytical equation defining separative power of an optimized concurrent gas centrifuge is obtained for an arbitrary binary mixture of isotopes. In the case of the uranium isotopes the equation gives δU= 12.7(V/700 m/s)2(300 K/T)L, kg SWU/yr, where L and V are the length and linear velocity of the rotor of the gas centrifuge, T is the temperature. This formula well agrees with an empirical separative power of counter current gas centrifuges.

  3. Surfactant waterflooding enhanced oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Schievelbein, V.H.

    1984-07-17

    Disclosed is a surfactant waterflooding enhanced oil recovery process and surfactant fluid suitable for use in an enhanced oil recovery process which accomplishes an increase in the amount of oil recovered over prior art methods. The surfactant fluid contains an alkylpolyalkoxy sulfate or alkylarylpolyalkoxy sulfate, or an alkylpolyalkoxyalkylene sulfonate or alkylarylpolyalkoxyalkylene sulfonate, either alone or in combination with an organic sulfonate anionic surfactant, such as petroleum sulfonate. The optimum average degree of ethoxylation of the alkoxy sulfate or alkoxy sulfonate surfactant is identified, and the surfactant fluid is formulated with a mixture of ethoxylated and sulfated or ethoxylated and sulfonated surfactants, having a broad even range of degree of ethoxylation.

  4. Structural Studies of Protein-Surfactant Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chodankar, S. N.; Aswal, V. K.; Wagh, A. G.

    2008-03-17

    The structure of protein-surfactant complexes of two proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that these two proteins form different complex structures with the surfactant. While BSA protein undergoes unfolding on addition of surfactant, lysozyme does not show any unfolding even up to very high surfactant concentrations. The unfolding of BSA protein is caused by micelle-like aggregation of surfactant molecules in the complex. On the other hand, for lysozyme protein there is only binding of individual surfactant molecules to protein. Lysozyme in presence of higher surfactant concentrations has protein-surfactant complex structure coexisting with pure surfactant micelles.

  5. Pulmonary surfactant will secure free airflow through a narrow tube.

    PubMed

    Liu, M Y; Wang, L M; Li, E; Enhorning, G

    1991-08-01

    Well functioning pulmonary surfactant is necessary to ensure alveolar stability. It is proposed that surfactant is also required to keep the finest cylindrical airways open, thereby securing an unrestricted flow of air to and from the alveoli. If the surfactant is inadequate in quality or quality there is a risk that liquid will accumulate in the most marrow section of the airway and form a blocking column. To study that possibility special glass capillaries were used. The glass capillaries were heated and extended to make a short section very narrow. In the lumen of that section a minute volume (1 microliter) of liquid was deposited, which formed a blocking column. When pressure was raised on one side of the column, it forced the liquid to move away from the narrow section. Pressure dropped to zero as air could pass, and if the liquid column consisted of calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE), pressure remained at zero because a new liquid column did not form. If, on the other hand, the liquid column consisted of saline solution it would repeatedly reform as soon as it had been pressed out of the capillary's narrow section. The same occurred if the CLSE suspension forming the liquid column was very dilute or contained inhibiting proteins. These observations did not require that the capillary consisted of the material glass; they were also noted when the narrow tube was outlined by epithelium.

  6. Membrane-surfactant interactions. The role of surfactant in mitochondrial complex III-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Valpuesta, J.M.; Arrondo, J.L.; Barbero, M.C.; Pons, M.; Goni, F.M.

    1986-05-15

    Complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase) was purified from beef heart mitochondria in the form of protein-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles (about 1:80:100 molar ratio). Detergent may be totally removed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and the resulting lipoprotein complexes retain full enzyme activity. In order to understand the role of surfactant in the mixed micelles, and the interaction of Triton X-100 with integral membrane proteins and phospholipid bilayers, both the protein-lipid-surfactant mixed micelles and the detergent-free lipoprotein system were examined from the point of view of particle size and ultrastructure, enzyme activity, tryptophan fluorescence quenching, 31P NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NMR and IR spectroscopic studies show that surfactant withdrawal induces a profound change in phospholipid architecture, from a micellar to a lamellar-like phase. However, electron microscopic observations fail to reveal the existence of lipid bilayers in the absence of detergent. We suggest that, under these conditions, the lipid:protein molar ratio (80:1) is too low to permit the formation of lipid bilayer planes, but the relative orientation and mobility of phospholipids with respect to proteins is similar to that of the lamellar phase. Protein conformational changes are also detected as a consequence of surfactant removal. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates an increase of peptide beta-structure in the absence of Triton X-100; changes in the amide II/amide I intensity ratio are also detected, although the precise meaning of these observations is unclear.

  7. Inhibition of pulmonary surfactant adsorption by serum and the mechanisms of reversal by hydrophilic polymers: theory.

    PubMed

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A; Alig, T F; Alonso, Coralie; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Taeusch, H William

    2005-09-01

    A theory based on the Smolukowski analysis of colloid stability shows that the presence of charged, surface-active serum proteins at the alveolar air-liquid interface can severely reduce or eliminate the adsorption of lung surfactant from the subphase to the interface, consistent with the observations reported in the companion article (pages 1769-1779). Adding nonadsorbing, hydrophilic polymers to the subphase provides a depletion attraction between the surfactant aggregates and the interface, which can overcome the steric and electrostatic resistance to adsorption induced by serum. The depletion force increases with polymer concentration as well as with polymer molecular weight. Increasing the surfactant concentration has a much smaller effect than adding polymer, as is observed. Natural hydrophilic polymers, like the SP-A present in native surfactant, or hyaluronan, normally present in the alveolar fluids, can enhance adsorption in the presence of serum to eliminate inactivation.

  8. Inhibition of Pulmonary Surfactant Adsorption by Serum and the Mechanisms of Reversal by Hydrophilic Polymers: Theory

    PubMed Central

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Alig, T. F.; Alonso, Coralie; de la Serna, Jorge Bernardino; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Taeusch, H. William

    2005-01-01

    A theory based on the Smolukowski analysis of colloid stability shows that the presence of charged, surface-active serum proteins at the alveolar air-liquid interface can severely reduce or eliminate the adsorption of lung surfactant from the subphase to the interface, consistent with the observations reported in the companion article (pages 1769–1779). Adding nonadsorbing, hydrophilic polymers to the subphase provides a depletion attraction between the surfactant aggregates and the interface, which can overcome the steric and electrostatic resistance to adsorption induced by serum. The depletion force increases with polymer concentration as well as with polymer molecular weight. Increasing the surfactant concentration has a much smaller effect than adding polymer, as is observed. Natural hydrophilic polymers, like the SP-A present in native surfactant, or hyaluronan, normally present in the alveolar fluids, can enhance adsorption in the presence of serum to eliminate inactivation. PMID:16006630

  9. [The role of individual stress resistance in realization of immobilization and zoosocial stress effects on pulmonary surfactant system].

    PubMed

    Vasil'eva, N N; Bryndina, I G

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of chronic exposure to immobilization and psychosocial stress on surface activity, biochemical composition of pulmonary surfactant and lung fluid balance of rats with different stress-resistance. It is shown that both types of stress lead to elevation of lysophospholipids level and decrease of surface-active properties of pulmonary surfactant, more prominent in stress-vulnerable rats. Blood supply was decreased and extravascular fluid was increased under the psychosocial stress only in stress-vulnerable animals, in all rest cases the blood supply was increased and the content of extravascular fluid was not changed. Surfactant alteration was coupled on the level of 11-OCS in the blood and amount of fluid in the lungs. The obtained results indicate that different degree of impairment in the pulmonary surfactant system during immobilization and psychosocial conflicts depends on different resistance to emotional stress.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of a Pulmonary Surfactant Film Interacting with a Carbonaceous Nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Seungho; Chang, Rakwoo; Jeon, Jonggu; Violi, Angela

    2008-01-01

    This article reports an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation to study a model pulmonary surfactant film interacting with a carbonaceous nanoparticle. The pulmonary surfactant is modeled as a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayer with a peptide consisting of the first 25 residues from surfactant protein B. The nanoparticle model with a chemical formula C188H53 was generated using a computational code for combustion conditions. The nanoparticle has a carbon cage structure reminiscent of the buckyballs with open ends. A series of molecular-scale structural and dynamical properties of the surfactant film in the absence and presence of nanoparticle are analyzed, including radial distribution functions, mean-square displacements of lipids and nanoparticle, chain tilt angle, and the surfactant protein B peptide helix tilt angle. The results show that the nanoparticle affects the structure and packing of the lipids and peptide in the film, and it appears that the nanoparticle and peptide repel each other. The ability of the nanoparticle to translocate the surfactant film is one of the most important predictions of this study. The potential of mean force for dragging the particle through the film provides such information. The reported potential of mean force suggests that the nanoparticle can easily penetrate the monolayer but further translocation to the water phase is energetically prohibitive. The implication is that nanoparticles can interact with the lung surfactant, as supported by recent experimental data by Bakshi et al. PMID:18923102

  11. Pulmonary surfactant as vehicle for intratracheally instilled tobramycin in mice infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    van't Veen, A.; Mouton, J. W.; Gommers, D.; Lachmann, B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The use of pulmonary surfactant has been proposed as a vehicle for antibiotic delivery to the alveolar compartment of the lung. This study investigated survival rates of mice with a respiratory Klebsiella pneumoniae infection treated intratracheally with tobramycin using a natural exogenous surfactant preparation as vehicle. 2. At day 1 after infection, animals were injected intratracheally with 20 microliters of the following solutions: (1) a mixture of surfactant (500 micrograms) and tobramycin (250 micrograms); (2) tobramycin (250 micrograms) alone; (3) surfactant (500 micrograms) alone; and (4) NaHCO3 buffer (control, sham-treatment). A fifth group received no treatment (control). Deaths were registered every 12 h for 8 consecutive days. 3. The results show an increased survival in the group receiving the surfactant-tobramycin mixture compared to the group receiving tobramycin alone (P < 0.05), the group receiving surfactant alone (P < 0.01) and the control groups (P < 0.01). It is concluded that intratracheal instillation of surfactant-tobramycin is superior to tobramycin alone in protecting animals from death due to a respiratory Klebsiella pneumoniae infection. PMID:8937717

  12. Demulsification of emulsions produced from surfactant recovery operations and recovery of surfactants therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, J.B.; Kudchadker, M.V.; Whittington, L.E.

    1981-07-07

    Treatment of emulsions of oil and water produced from surfactant recovery operations whereby the produced emulsions containing surfactants are demulsified and the surfactants are recovered in the water phase.

  13. Interactions between polymers and surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    de Gennes, P.G. )

    1990-11-01

    A surfactant film (at the water/air interface, or in a bilayer) is exposed to a solution of a neutral, flexible, polymer. Depending on the interactions, and on the Langmuir pressure II of the pure surfactant film, the authors expected to find three types of behavior: (I) the polymer does not absorb; (II) the polymer absorbs and mixes with the surfactant; (III) the polymer absorbs but segregates from the surfactant. Their interest here is in case II. They predict that (a) bilayers become rigid; (b) bilayers, exposed to polymer on one side only, tend to bend strongly; (c) the surface viscosity of monolayers or bilayers is considerably increased; soap films or foams, which usually drain by turbulent (two-dimensional) flows, may be stabilized in case II.

  14. Two-Stage Centrifugal Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, David

    2011-01-01

    Fan designs are often constrained by envelope, rotational speed, weight, and power. Aerodynamic performance and motor electrical performance are heavily influenced by rotational speed. The fan used in this work is at a practical limit for rotational speed due to motor performance characteristics, and there is no more space available in the packaging for a larger fan. The pressure rise requirements keep growing. The way to ordinarily accommodate a higher DP is to spin faster or grow the fan rotor diameter. The invention is to put two radially oriented stages on a single disk. Flow enters the first stage from the center; energy is imparted to the flow in the first stage blades, the flow is redirected some amount opposite to the direction of rotation in the fixed stators, and more energy is imparted to the flow in the second- stage blades. Without increasing either rotational speed or disk diameter, it is believed that as much as 50 percent more DP can be achieved with this design than with an ordinary, single-stage centrifugal design. This invention is useful primarily for fans having relatively low flow rates with relatively high pressure rise requirements.

  15. Gas centrifuge with driving motor

    DOEpatents

    Dancy, Jr., William H.

    1976-01-01

    1. A centrifuge for separating gaseous constituents of different masses comprising a vertical tubular rotor, means for introducing a gas mixture of different masses into said rotor and means for removing at least one of the gas components from the rotor, a first bearing means supporting said rotor at one end for rotational movement, a support, a damping bearing mounted on said support, a shaft fixed to said rotor at the opposite end and mechanically connecting said rotor to said damping bearing, a cup-shaped tube of electrically conductive, non-magnetic material in coaxial relationship with said shaft, the open end of said tube extending away from said rotor and the closed end of said tube being directly secured to the adjacent end of the rotor, an annular core of magnetic material fixedly mounted on said support so as to be disposed within said tube and around said shaft, and a second annular magnetic core with coils arranged thereon to receive polyphase current to produce a rotating magnetic field traversing the circumference of said tube, fixedly mounted on said support so as to surround said tube, the size of said first annular core and said second annular core being such as to permit limited radial displacement of said shaft and said tube.

  16. Induction of virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus by pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Yasukawa, Jyunichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-04-01

    We performed a genomewide analysis using a next-generation sequencer to investigate the effect of pulmonary surfactant on gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus, a clinically important opportunistic pathogen. RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis of bacterial transcripts at late log phase revealed 142 genes that were upregulated >2-fold following the addition of pulmonary surfactant to the culture medium. Among these genes, we confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis that mRNA amounts for genes encoding ESAT-6 secretion system C (EssC), an unknown hypothetical protein (NWMN_0246; also called pulmonary surfactant-inducible factor A [PsiA] in this study), and hemolysin gamma subunit B (HlgB) were increased 3- to 10-fold by the surfactant treatment. Among the major constituents of pulmonary surfactant, i.e., phospholipids and palmitate, only palmitate, which is the most abundant fatty acid in the pulmonary surfactant and a known antibacterial substance, stimulated the expression of these three genes. Moreover, these genes were also induced by supplementing the culture with detergents. The induction of gene expression by surfactant or palmitate was not observed in a disruption mutant of the sigB gene, which encodes an alternative sigma factor involved in bacterial stress responses. Furthermore, each disruption mutant of the essC, psiA, and hlgB genes showed attenuation of both survival in the lung and host-killing ability in a murine pneumonia model. These findings suggest that S. aureus resists membrane stress caused by free fatty acids present in the pulmonary surfactant through the regulation of virulence gene expression, which contributes to its pathogenesis within the lungs of the host animal.

  17. Renal Response to Chronic Centrifugation in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wang, T. J.; Corbin, B. J.; Wade, C. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Previously reported effects of chronic centrifugation on renal function in mammals are contradictory. The present study was conducted as an effort to provide a comprehensive analysis of renal response to chronic centrifugation (12 days at +2 Gz). Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (210-230 g) were used: eight centrifuged (EC) and eight off centrifuge controls (OCC). During centrifugation EC had lower body weight and food consumption. EC showed a decrease (72%) in water intake for the first two days (T1 and T2) followed by significant increases from T4-T6. EC urine output increased two-fold over the first four days, returning to baseline by T9. EC urea excretion was elevated on T3 through T5. Creatinine, Na(+), K(+), and osmolar excretion were lower than OCC over the last four days of the study. Assuming constant plasma osmolarity and creatinine levels, EC free water clearance (C(sub H2O)) was elevated significantly on T4 when the peak urine output was exhibited. EC also had a greater C(sub H2O) over the last four days, associated with a significantly lower osmolar clearance and GFR. The initial diuresis exhibited during centrifugation can be attributed to a reduced water resorption and increased urea excretion. This diuresis was mediated independent of changes in GFR over the first eight days. However, differences in excretion seen after eight days of centrifugation are probably GFR mediated which would imply animals established a new homeostatic setpoint by that time. Centrifugation elicites an acute alteration in fluid homeostasis followed by adaptation within a week.

  18. Isolation of symbiotic dinoflagellates by centrifugal elutriation

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, A.E.; Quinn, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Centrifugal elutriation, a method combining centripetal liquid flow with centrifugal force, has been used to isolate symbiotic dinoflagellates from a cnidarian host. The elutriated cells were shown to be viable by photosynthetic incorporation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and low release of photosynthetic products into the incubation medium. The level of contamination by clinging debris was low and by host solids was negligible.

  19. Centrifugal Separation of Antiprotons and Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Wrubel, J.; Kalra, R.; Novitski, E.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Zielinski, M.; Sefzick, T.; Borbely, J. S.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Muellers, A.; Walz, J.; Speck, A.

    2010-11-19

    Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons is observed, the first such demonstration with particles that cannot be laser cooled or optically imaged. The spatial separation takes place during the electron cooling of trapped antiprotons, the only method available to produce cryogenic antiprotons for precision tests of fundamental symmetries and for cold antihydrogen studies. The centrifugal separation suggests a new approach for isolating low energy antiprotons and for producing a controlled mixture of antiprotons and electrons.

  20. Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Wrubel, J; Kalra, R; Novitski, E; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Borbely, J S; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Speck, A

    2010-11-19

    Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons is observed, the first such demonstration with particles that cannot be laser cooled or optically imaged. The spatial separation takes place during the electron cooling of trapped antiprotons, the only method available to produce cryogenic antiprotons for precision tests of fundamental symmetries and for cold antihydrogen studies. The centrifugal separation suggests a new approach for isolating low energy antiprotons and for producing a controlled mixture of antiprotons and electrons.

  1. Geotechnical Centrifuge Studies of Unsaturated Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.; Mattson, E. D.; Palmer, C. D.

    2007-12-01

    Improved understanding of contaminant migration in heterogeneous, variably saturated porous media is required to better define the long-term stewardship requirements for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands and to assist in the design of effective vadose-zone barriers to contaminant migrations. A geotechnical centrifuge provides an experimental approach to explore vadose zone transport over a wide range of relevant conditions in time frames not possible for conventional bench-top experiments. Our research to date resulted in the design, construction, and testing of in-flight experimental apparatus allowing the replication of traditional bench top unsaturated transport experiments using the 2-meter radius geotechnical centrifuge capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. Additionally we conducted a series of unsaturated 1-dimenstional column experiments using conservative tracers to evaluate the effects of increased centrifugal acceleration on derived transport properties and assessing the scaling relationships for these properties. Our experimental results indicated that breakthrough times for a conservative tracer decreased significantly and systematically as a function of increased centrifugal acceleration. Differences between these experimental results and estimates based on predictive scaling rules are due to slight moisture content differences between experiments at different centrifugal accelerations. In contrast, dispersion coefficients varied systemically with centrifugal acceleration in accordance with predictive scaling rules. The results we obtained in this study indicate that the centrifuge technique is a viable experimental method for the study of subsurface processes where gravitational acceleration is important. The geotechnical centrifuge allows experiments to be completed more quickly than tests conducted at 1-gravity and can be used to experimentally address important scaling issues, and permits experiments under a range of conditions that

  2. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  3. Comparative study on toxic effects induced by oral or intravascular administration of commonly used disinfectants and surfactants in rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuying; Zhang, Shanshan; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yiqing; Hieda, Yoko; Takeshita, Haruo

    2012-07-01

    Accidental ingestion or injection of household products sometimes occurs due to their accessibility, but the toxic manifestations have not been well characterized when they are internally administered. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects induced by ingestion or injection of different ionic surfactants and disinfectants in rats. The test drugs involved benzalkonium and benzethonium (BZK and BZT, both cationic surfactants used as disinfectants), alkyldiaminoethylglycine (AEG, an amphoteric surfactant used as a disinfectant), linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS, an anionic surfactant), polyoxyethylene cetylether (PEC, a nonionic surfactant), chlorhexidine (CHX, not a surfactant but a disinfectant) and saline (control). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered one of the test drugs orally (p.o.), intravenously (i.v.) or intraarterially (i.a.). The fatal effects appeared rapidly (<30 min) in i.v.-administered rats, while taking hours (>5 h) in i.a./p.o.-administered rats after a dose of around LD(50) , although the progress and degree of toxic effects varied among the drugs tested. In intravascular administration, BZK and BZT were fatal at doses of 15-20 mg kg(-1) . Higher concentrations in lung and kidney than in blood were determined. CHX showed a high toxic effect compared with cationic surfactants. The rats administered anionic (LAS) or amphoteric (AEG) surfactant died in less than 24 h at doses over 100 mg kg(-1) . In p.o. administration, the toxic effects were concentration/dose-dependent, and all rats administered high doses of surfactants except for PEC died at 5-20 h. The overall toxic ranks could be: cationic surfactant/CHX> anionic/amphoteric surfactant > nonionic surfactant.

  4. Clinical experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J J; Walls, J T; Demmy, T L; Boley, T M; Schmaltz, R A; Goss, C F; Wagner-Mann, C C

    1993-07-01

    Since October 1986, we have had experience with 96 Sarns centrifugal pumps in 72 patients (pts). Heparinless left atrial to femoral artery or aorta bypass was used in 14 pts undergoing surgery on the thoracic aorta with 13 survivors (93%). No paraplegia or device-related complications were observed. In 57 patients, the Sarns centrifugal pump was used as a univentricular (27 pts) or biventricular (30 pts) cardiac assist device for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock. In these patients, cardiac assist duration ranged from 2 to 434 h with a hospital survival rate of 29% in those requiring left ventricular assist and 13% in those requiring biventricular assist. Although complications were ubiquitous in this mortally ill patient population, in 5,235 pump-hours, no pump thrombosis was observed. Hospital survivors followed for 4 months to 6 years have enjoyed an improved functional class. We conclude that the Sarns centrifugal pump is an effective cardiac assist device when used to salvage patients otherwise unweanable from cardiopulmonary bypass. Partial left ventricular bypass using a centrifugal pump has become our procedure of choice for unloading the left ventricle and for maintenance of distal aortic perfusion pressure when performing surgery on the thoracic aorta. This clinical experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump appears to be similar to that reported with other centrifugal assist devices.

  5. Lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lungs to take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide. People with this type of lung disorder often ... the lungs to take up oxygen and release carbon dioxide. These diseases may also affect heart function. An ...

  6. Collapsed Lung

    MedlinePlus

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a ... is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, it is called atelectasis. Causes of ...

  7. Thermodynamic effects of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins on the early adsorption of pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Schram, V; Hall, S B

    2001-09-01

    We determined the influence of the two hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, on the thermodynamic barriers that limit adsorption of pulmonary surfactant to the air-water interface. We compared the temperature and concentration dependence of adsorption, measured by monitoring surface tension, between calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE) and the complete set of neutral and phospholipids (N&PL) without the proteins. Three stages generally characterized the various adsorption isotherms: an initial delay during which surface tension remained constant, a fall in surface tension at decreasing rates, and, for experiments that reached approximately 40 mN/m, a late acceleration of the fall in surface tension to approximately 25 mN/m. For the initial change in surface tension, the surfactant proteins accelerated adsorption for CLSE relative to N&PL by more than ten-fold, reducing the Gibbs free energy of transition (DeltaG(O)) from 119 to 112 kJ/mole. For the lipids alone in N&PL, the enthalpy of transition (DeltaH(O), 54 kJ/mole) and entropy (-T. DeltaS, 65 kJ/mole at 37 degrees C) made roughly equal contributions to DeltaG(O). The proteins in CLSE had little effect on -T. DeltaS(O) (68 kJ/mole), but lowered DeltaG(O) for CLSE by reducing DeltaH(O) (44 kJ/mole). Models of the detailed mechanisms by which the proteins facilitate adsorption must meet these thermodynamic constraints.

  8. [Intrauterine growth retardation and lung development].

    PubMed

    Zana-Taïeb, E; Aubelle, M-S; El Ayoubi, M; Lopez, E; Jarreau, P-H

    2013-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that intrauterine growth restriction is associated with increased respiratory morbidity in the neonatal period with an increased risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Respiratory consequences of environmental intrauterine changes extend into childhood and adulthood with abnormal lung function tests. In animal models, changes in surfactant and alveolarization disorders vary from one study to another. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Fetal adaptations to intrauterine malnutrition result in permanent changes in lung structure, raising the question of lung "programming". PMID:23886868

  9. Hybrid pulmonary surfactant-coated nanogels mediate efficient in vivo delivery of siRNA to murine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Naessens, Thomas; De Koker, Stefaan; Zagato, Elisa; Demeester, Jo; Grooten, Johan; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-11-10

    The local delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the lungs may provide a therapeutic solution to a range of pulmonary disorders. Resident alveolar macrophages (rAM) in the bronchoalveolar lumen play a critical role in lung inflammatory responses and therefore constitute a particularly attractive target for siRNA therapeutics. However, achieving efficient gene silencing in the lung while avoiding pulmonary toxicity requires appropriate formulation of siRNA in functional nanocarriers. In this study, we evaluated pulmonary surfactant-coated dextran nanogels for the delivery of siRNA to rAM upon pharyngeal aspiration in BALB/c mice. Both the surfactant-coated and uncoated nanogels achieved high levels of siRNA uptake in rAM, yet only the surfactant-coated formulation could significantly reduce gene expression on the protein level. Surfactant-coated nanogels induced a profound downregulation of target mRNA levels, reaching 70% knockdown with ~1mgkg(-1) siRNA dose. In addition, only mild acute pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses were detected one day after nanoparticle aspiration, accompanied by a moderate neutrophil infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lumen. The latter could be substantially reduced by removal of excess surfactant from the formulation. Overall, our hybrid core-shell nanoparticles have demonstrated safe and effective siRNA delivery to rAM, providing a new therapeutic approach for treatment of inflammatory pathologies in the lung.

  10. Hybrid pulmonary surfactant-coated nanogels mediate efficient in vivo delivery of siRNA to murine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Naessens, Thomas; De Koker, Stefaan; Zagato, Elisa; Demeester, Jo; Grooten, Johan; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-11-10

    The local delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the lungs may provide a therapeutic solution to a range of pulmonary disorders. Resident alveolar macrophages (rAM) in the bronchoalveolar lumen play a critical role in lung inflammatory responses and therefore constitute a particularly attractive target for siRNA therapeutics. However, achieving efficient gene silencing in the lung while avoiding pulmonary toxicity requires appropriate formulation of siRNA in functional nanocarriers. In this study, we evaluated pulmonary surfactant-coated dextran nanogels for the delivery of siRNA to rAM upon pharyngeal aspiration in BALB/c mice. Both the surfactant-coated and uncoated nanogels achieved high levels of siRNA uptake in rAM, yet only the surfactant-coated formulation could significantly reduce gene expression on the protein level. Surfactant-coated nanogels induced a profound downregulation of target mRNA levels, reaching 70% knockdown with ~1mgkg(-1) siRNA dose. In addition, only mild acute pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses were detected one day after nanoparticle aspiration, accompanied by a moderate neutrophil infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lumen. The latter could be substantially reduced by removal of excess surfactant from the formulation. Overall, our hybrid core-shell nanoparticles have demonstrated safe and effective siRNA delivery to rAM, providing a new therapeutic approach for treatment of inflammatory pathologies in the lung. PMID:26307350

  11. Delineation of the dynamic properties of individual lipid species in native and synthetic pulmonary surfactants.

    PubMed

    Farver, Suzanne; Smith, Adam N; Mills, Frank D; Egri, Adam G; Long, Joanna R

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is characterized by a highly conserved lipid composition and the formation of unique multilamellar structures within the lung. An unusually high concentration of DPPC is a hallmark of PS and is critical to the formation of a high surface area, stable air/water interface; the unusual lipid polymorphisms observed in PS are dependent on surfactant proteins, particularly lung surfactant protein B (SP-B). The molecular mechanisms of lipid trafficking and assembly in PS remain largely uncharacterized. Using (2)H and (31)P NMR, we characterize the dynamics and polymorphisms of the major lipid species in native PS and synthetic lipid mixtures as a function of SP-B1-25 addition. Our findings point to increased dynamics and a departure from a lamellar behavior for DPPC on addition of the peptide, consistent with our observations of DPPC phase separation in native surfactant. The monounsaturated lipids POPC, POPG and POPE remain in a lamellar phase and are less affected than DPPC by surfactant peptide addition. Additionally, we demonstrate that the properties of a native PS can be successfully mimicked by using a fully synthetic lipid mixture allowing the efficient evaluation of peptidomimetics under development for PS replacement therapies via NMR spectroscopy. The specificity of the dynamic changes in DPPC relative to POPC suggests the importance of tuning partitioning properties in successful peptidomimetic design.

  12. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  13. Liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-03-11

    The performance of liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning is examined for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste Program currently under study at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Centrifugation might have application for the separation of the LiF-BeF{sub 2} salt from heavier radioactive materials fission product and actinides in the separation of fission product from actinides, in the isotope separation of fission-product cesium before transmutation of the {sup 137}Cs and {sup 135}Cs, and in the removal of spallation product from the liquid lead target. It is found that useful chemical separations should be possible using existing materials for the centrifuge construction for all four cases with the actinide fraction in fission product perhaps as low as 1 part in 10{sup 7} and the fraction of {sup 137}CS in {sup 133}Cs being as low as a few parts in 10{sup 5}. A centrifuge cascade has the advantage that it can be assembled and operated as a completely closed system without a waste stream except that associated with maintenance or replacement of centrifuge components.

  14. Aerosolized Surfactants, Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Willson, Douglas F

    2015-06-01

    Drug delivery by aerosol may have several advantages over other modes, particularly if the lung is the target organ. Aerosol delivery may allow achievement of higher concentrations while minimizing systemic effects and offers convenience, rapid onset of action, and avoidance of the needles and sterile technique necessary with intravenous drug administration. Aerosol delivery may change the pharmacokinetics of many drugs, however, and an awareness of the caveats of aerosolized drug delivery is mandatory to ensure both safety and adequate drug delivery. This paper discusses the administration of surfactants, anti-inflammatory agents, and analgesics by the aerosol route.

  15. Toxicity of cadmium to the developing lung

    SciTech Connect

    Daston, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of cadmium on the developing lung and pulmonary surfactant were studied. Pregnant rats received subcutaneous injections of cadmium chloride on days 12 to 15 of gestation and were sacrificed throughout late gestation. The treatment resulted in high embryonic mortality and growth regardation. Fetal lung weight was reduced 20 to 30% due to hypoplasia, as the number of lung cells (DNA/lung) but not cell size (protein/cell) was lowered. The ultrastructural development of alveolar epithelium was altered; cytodifferentiation was delayed; and the cytoplasmic inclusions which contain pulmonary surfactant, were reduced in the term fetus. Accumulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major component of pulmonary surfactant, was diminished in the lungs of treated fetuses. The immediate cause of this lowered accumulation was a decreased rate of synthesis of PC from choline. Carbohydrates probably represent a major source of PC precursors and are present in large quantities in the fetal lung as glycogen. The pulmonary glycogen content of cadmium-exposed fetuses was diminished. It is postulated that this is a reason for the lowered rate of PC synthesis. Maternally administered cadmium did not pass through the placenta; thus, the mechanism of fetotoxicity was indirect. Maternal cadmium exposure did result in lowered fetal zinc levels. Coadministration of zinc with cadmium raised fetal zinc concentration to control values and alleviated all fetotoxicity. Fetal zinc deficiency is a possible mechanism for the toxic effects on the developing lung. Several dams were allowed to give birth and their offspring were observed for respiratory problems. Cadmium treatment delayed parturition by about a day. Symptoms of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were observed in 11% of the treated neonates. All but one of these individuals died and had lungs with hyaline membranes. This is the only known case of an environmental agent causing neonatal RDS.

  16. Lymphatic function is required prenatally for lung inflation at birth

    PubMed Central

    Jakus, Zoltán; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Enis, David R.; Sen, Aslihan; Chia, Stephanie; Liu, Xi; Rawnsley, David R.; Yang, Yiqing; Hess, Paul R.; Zou, Zhiying; Yang, Jisheng; Guttentag, Susan H.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals must inflate their lungs and breathe within minutes of birth to survive. A key regulator of neonatal lung inflation is pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein complex which increases lung compliance by reducing alveolar surface tension (Morgan, 1971). Whether other developmental processes also alter lung mechanics in preparation for birth is unknown. We identify prenatal lymphatic function as an unexpected requirement for neonatal lung inflation and respiration. Mice lacking lymphatic vessels, due either to loss of the lymphangiogenic factor CCBE1 or VEGFR3 function, appear cyanotic and die shortly after birth due to failure of lung inflation. Failure of lung inflation is not due to reduced surfactant levels or altered development of the lung but is associated with an elevated wet/dry ratio consistent with edema. Embryonic studies reveal active lymphatic function in the late gestation lung, and significantly reduced total lung compliance in late gestation embryos that lack lymphatics. These findings reveal that lymphatic vascular function plays a previously unrecognized mechanical role in the developing lung that prepares it for inflation at birth. They explain respiratory failure in infants with congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia, and suggest that inadequate late gestation lymphatic function may also contribute to respiratory failure in premature infants. PMID:24733830

  17. 26. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Ironworks, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1879, 1881. View: Historical view, 1934, from T. T. Waterman collection, Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association. Once the molasses was separated from the sugar crystals it flowed through the spouts in the base of the centrifugals. The centrifugals' pulleys can be seen underneath the centrifugal. The centrifugal on the right has been reinforced with seven metal bands. The handles for the clutch mechanism are located above the centrifugal. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  18. Macrophages interaction with pulmonary surfactant using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Minette; Telesford, Dana Marie; Allen, Heather

    2012-04-01

    Alveolar pulmonary surfactant, composed mostly of phospholipids, is essential for maintenance of normal lung function. However, increased production of lung surfactant can lead to many pulmonary inflammatory disorders. Alveolar macrophages are responsible for the degradation of the surfactant and exhibit increased lipid uptake in inflamated lungs. Owing to their limited clearance capability, excessive accumulation of surfactant may impair their phagocytic function. In this study, the interaction of the macrophages with different lipid components was studied using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. CARS microscopy, a nonlinear vibrational technique which combines spectroscopy and microscopy, allows noninvasive characterization and imaging of chemical species without preparation or labeling. A monolayer of THP-1 macrophages and palmitic acid-d31 on phosphate buffer solution was transferred to a coverslip using the Langmuir-Blodgett method and then imaged using CARS by mapping the CH2 stretch signal of the lipid membrane of the macrophage and C-D stretch signal from palmitic acid-d31. Preliminary results showed CARS images of the macrophage on the solid substrate and thermal degradation of the sample due to long exposure to high laser power. A contrast image is expected to be observed by mapping the CH2 and C-D signals, which can show the lipid interaction and phagocytosis of the macrophage.

  19. Waterflooding employing mixtures of sulfonate surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Savins, J.G.; Waite, J.M.; Burdyn, R.F.

    1980-11-04

    A new waterflooding process is described in which at least a portion of the injected fluid comprises a viscous aqueous liquid having a monovalent salt salinity within the range of 1.5 to 4.0% by wt and containing first and second sulfonate surfactants. The first surfactant is a petroleum sulfonate having a relatively broad molecular weight distribution and the second surfactant is a synthetic alkyl or alkylaryl sulfonate having a molecular weight distribution narrower than that of the first surfactant. The first and second surfactants are present in the aqueous liquid in relative amounts such that the ratio of the concentration of the first surfactant to the concentration of the second surfactant is within the range of 1:3 to 1:1. The thickened aqueous liquid containing the above described multicomponent surfactant system also contains a water-soluble C3-C6 aliphatic alcohol. 11 claims.

  20. Changes in surfactant in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after hemithorax irradiation in patients with mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, M.; Maasilta, P.; Kivisaari, L.; Mattson, K. )

    1990-04-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the surfactant system of the lung is affected shortly after irradiation. It is unclear, however, whether surfactant plays a role in the pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis. In the present study surfactant components (saturated phosphatidylcholine, surfactant protein A, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol) and other phospholipids of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) were studied in four patients with pleural mesothelioma before and during hemithorax irradiation (70 Gy) as well as zero, 1, 2, 3, and 4 months following irradiation. The concentrations of these same components and of soluble proteins were also estimated in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) using urea as a marker of dilution. After radiotherapy, the concentrations of the surfactant components in ELF decreased to 12 to 55% of the control values before radiation, whereas the concentration of sphingomyelin in ELF increased ninefold. There were small changes in the other phospholipids. The concentration of soluble protein in ELF increased sevenfold. The minimum surface activity of crude BAL increased from 12 +/- 4 to 32 +/- 6 mN/m, and that of the sediment fraction of BAL increased from 7 +/- 4 to 22 +/- 6 mN/m, p less than 0.001. The protein-rich supernatant fraction of BAL from irradiated lung had a inhibitory effect on normal surfactant. There were significant correlations between the increasing severity of the radiologic changes on the one hand and, on the other, the saturated phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin ratio (p less than 0.001), the concentrations of soluble protein (p less than 0.001), and the concentrations of the surfactant components (p less than 0.02-0.001) in ELF.

  1. Antimicrobial and biophysical properties of surfactant supplemented with an antimicrobial peptide for treatment of bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Banaschewski, Brandon J H; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Keating, Eleonora; Haagsman, Henk P; Zuo, Yi Y; Yamashita, Cory M; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections represent an emerging health concern in clinical settings, and a lack of novel developments in the pharmaceutical pipeline is creating a "perfect storm" for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been suggested as future therapeutics for these drug-resistant bacteria, since they have potent broad-spectrum activity, with little development of resistance. Due to the unique structure of the lung, bacterial pneumonia has the additional problem of delivering antimicrobials to the site of infection. One potential solution is coadministration of AMPs with exogenous surfactant, allowing for distribution of the peptides to distal airways and opening of collapsed lung regions. The objective of this study was to test various surfactant-AMP mixtures with regard to maintaining pulmonary surfactant biophysical properties and bactericidal functions. We compared the properties of four AMPs (CATH-1, CATH-2, CRAMP, and LL-37) suspended in bovine lipid-extract surfactant (BLES) by assessing surfactant-AMP mixture biophysical and antimicrobial functions. Antimicrobial activity was tested against methillicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All AMP/surfactant mixtures exhibited an increase of spreading compared to a BLES control. BLES+CATH-2 mixtures had no significantly different minimum surface tension versus the BLES control. Compared to the other cathelicidins, CATH-2 retained the most bactericidal activity in the presence of BLES. The BLES+CATH-2 mixture appears to be an optimal surfactant-AMP mixture based on in vitro assays. Future directions involve investigating the potential of this mixture in animal models of bacterial pneumonia. PMID:25753641

  2. Update on plasma arc centrifugal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.E.; Paulson, W.S.; Eschenbach, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Over the last eight years, Retech has developed a plasma-powered system for destroying organics and stabilizing metal oxides in a non-leaching slag. The system, termed Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT), can handle a variety of waste streams such as contaminated soils, sludges, ion-exchange resins, incinerator bottom and fly-ash and drummed waste among others. This paper will review recent commercial applications of the technology. Three Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment systems having an eight-foot diameter centrifuge (PACT-8) are in the construction phase. One will be used in the Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (LESAT) system for remediating Pit 9 at the Idaho National Engineering Lab (INEL). A second unit will be located at the Retech plant in Ukiah, California. The third unit will be located at a site in Munster, Germany.

  3. Effects of chronic centrifugation on mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janer, L.; Duke, J.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to excess gravity in vitro alters the developmental sequence in embryonic mouse limbs and palates (Duke, Janer and Campbell, 1984; Duke, 1983). The effects of excess gravity on in vivo mammalian development was investigated using a small animal centrifuge. Four-week old female mice exposed to excess gravities of 1.8-3.5 G for eight weeks weighed significantly less than controls. Mice were mated after five weeks of adaptation to excess G, and sacrificed either at gestational day 12 or 18. There were fewer pregnancies in the centrifuged group (4/36) than in controls (9/31), and crown rump lengths (CRL) of embryos developing in the centrifuge were less than CRLs of 1-G embryos. These results show that although immersed in amniotic fluid, embryos are responsive to Delta-G.

  4. Centrifugal compressor design for electrically assisted boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Yang, M.; Martinez-Botas, R. F.; Zhuge, W. L.; Qureshi, U.; Richards, B.

    2013-12-01

    Electrically assisted boost is a prominent method to solve the issues of transient lag in turbocharger and remains an optimized operation condition for a compressor due to decoupling from turbine. Usually a centrifugal compressor for gasoline engine boosting is operated at high rotational speed which is beyond the ability of an electric motor in market. In this paper a centrifugal compressor with rotational speed as 120k RPM and pressure ratio as 2.0 is specially developed for electrically assisted boost. A centrifugal compressor including the impeller, vaneless diffuser and the volute is designed by meanline method followed by 3D detailed design. Then CFD method is employed to predict as well as analyse the performance of the design compressor. The results show that the pressure ratio and efficiency at design point is 2.07 and 78% specifically.

  5. Biofoams and natural protein surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring foam constituent and surfactant proteins with intriguing structures and functions are now being identified from a variety of biological sources. The ranaspumins from tropical frog foam nests comprise a range of proteins with a mixture of surfactant, carbohydrate binding and antimicrobial activities that together provide a stable, biocompatible, protective foam environment for developing eggs and embryos. Ranasmurfin, a blue protein from a different species of frog, displays a novel structure with a unique chromophoric crosslink. Latherin, primarily from horse sweat, but with similarities to salivary, oral and upper respiratory tract proteins, illustrates several potential roles for surfactant proteins in mammalian systems. These proteins, together with the previously discovered hydrophobins of fungi, throw new light on biomolecular processes at air–water and other interfaces. This review provides a perspective on these recent findings, focussing on structure and biophysical properties. PMID:20615601

  6. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles regulate translocation across pulmonary surfactant monolayer and formation of lipoprotein corona.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoqing; Jiao, Bao; Shi, Xinghua; Valle, Russell P; Fan, Qihui; Zuo, Yi Y

    2013-12-23

    Interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film, being the first line of host defense, represents the initial bio-nano interaction in the lungs. Such interaction determines the fate of the inhaled nanoparticles and their potential therapeutic or toxicological effect. Despite considerable progress in optimizing physicochemical properties of nanoparticles for improved delivery and targeting, the mechanisms by which inhaled nanoparticles interact with the pulmonary surfactant film are still largely unknown. Here, using combined in vitro and in silico methods, we show how hydrophobicity and surface charge of nanoparticles differentially regulate the translocation and interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film. While hydrophilic nanoparticles generally translocate quickly across the pulmonary surfactant film, a significant portion of hydrophobic nanoparticles are trapped by the surfactant film and encapsulated in lipid protrusions upon film compression. Our results support a novel model of pulmonary surfactant lipoprotein corona associated with inhaled nanoparticles of different physicochemical properties. Our data suggest that the study of pulmonary nanotoxicology and nanoparticle-based pulmonary drug delivery should consider this lipoprotein corona.

  7. Bio-inspired pulmonary surfactant-modified nanogels: A promising siRNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Braeckmans, Kevin; Stuart, Marc C A; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-05-28

    Inhalation therapy with small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising approach in the treatment of pulmonary disorders. However, clinical translation is severely limited by the lack of suitable delivery platforms. In this study, we aim to address this limitation by designing a novel bioinspired hybrid nanoparticle with a core-shell nanoarchitecture, consisting of a siRNA-loaded dextran nanogel (siNG) core and a pulmonary surfactant (Curosurf®) outer shell. The decoration of siNGs with a surfactant shell enhances the colloidal stability and prevents siRNA release in the presence of competing polyanions, which are abundantly present in biofluids. Additionally, the impact of the surfactant shell on the biological efficacy of the siNGs is determined in lung cancer cells. The presence of the surfactants substantially reduces the cellular uptake of siNGs. Remarkably, the lowered intracellular dose does not impede the gene silencing effect, suggesting a crucial role of the pulmonary surfactant in the intracellular processing of the nanoparticles. In order to surmount the observed reduction in cellular dose, folate is incorporated as a targeting ligand in the pulmonary surfactant shell to incite receptor-mediated endocytosis. The latter substantially enhances both cellular uptake and gene silencing potential, achieving efficient knockdown at siRNA concentrations in the low nanomolar range.

  8. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction.

  9. Bio-inspired pulmonary surfactant-modified nanogels: A promising siRNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Braeckmans, Kevin; Stuart, Marc C A; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-05-28

    Inhalation therapy with small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising approach in the treatment of pulmonary disorders. However, clinical translation is severely limited by the lack of suitable delivery platforms. In this study, we aim to address this limitation by designing a novel bioinspired hybrid nanoparticle with a core-shell nanoarchitecture, consisting of a siRNA-loaded dextran nanogel (siNG) core and a pulmonary surfactant (Curosurf®) outer shell. The decoration of siNGs with a surfactant shell enhances the colloidal stability and prevents siRNA release in the presence of competing polyanions, which are abundantly present in biofluids. Additionally, the impact of the surfactant shell on the biological efficacy of the siNGs is determined in lung cancer cells. The presence of the surfactants substantially reduces the cellular uptake of siNGs. Remarkably, the lowered intracellular dose does not impede the gene silencing effect, suggesting a crucial role of the pulmonary surfactant in the intracellular processing of the nanoparticles. In order to surmount the observed reduction in cellular dose, folate is incorporated as a targeting ligand in the pulmonary surfactant shell to incite receptor-mediated endocytosis. The latter substantially enhances both cellular uptake and gene silencing potential, achieving efficient knockdown at siRNA concentrations in the low nanomolar range. PMID:25791835

  10. Exogenous surfactant therapy in a patient with adult respiratory distress syndrome after near drowning.

    PubMed

    Staudinger, T; Bankier, A; Strohmaier, W; Weiss, K; Locker, G J; Knapp, S; Röggla, M; Laczika, K; Frass, M

    1997-10-01

    A 24-year-old woman developed adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) after near-drowning due to attempted suicide. Conventional mechanical ventilation together with prone positioning and inhaled nitric oxide could not provide sufficient oxygenation. Surface tension data (gamma min = 27 dyn/cm, stability index = 0.341) from a lavage sample supported the hypothesis that the surfactant function of this patient was drastically reduced due to a washout effect by aspiration of fresh water. Porcine surfactant (Curosurf, 50 mg/kg for each lung) was instilled via fibreoptic bronchoscope. The partial arterial carbon dioxide pressure (paCO2) and fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ratio as well as shunt fraction (Qs/Qt) improved impressively. When respiratory situation deteriorated again, surfactant application was repeated. Altogether, six bolus instillations of surfactant (total dose 300 mg/kg = 18,000 mg) were administered until the respiratory situation had stabilized and oxygenation could be maintained by conventional mechanical ventilation. The radiological findings did not show substantial amelioration. The patient developed septic shock and died 12 days after admission. Surfactant application apparently led to a significant improvement of the respiratory function. However, the outcome could not be influenced positively. The high cost of surfactant therapy prevents the more widespread early administration in patients at risk.

  11. Effects of Centrifuge Diameter and Operation on Rodent Adaptation to Chronic Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the responses of rats to centrifugation in a constant acceleration field (1.5 G). Centrifuge diameter (1.8m, 2.5m or 6.0m) and schedule of operation (Daily or weekly stop) varied between groups. Body mass, food consumption, water consumption and neurovestibular function were measured weekly. Body temperature and activity were continuously monitored using telemetry. A subset of subjects were videotaped (50 minutes per day) to allow for movement analysis. Exposure to a hyperdynamic field of this magnitude did cause the expected depression in the physiological variables monitored. Recovery was accomplished within a relatively rapid time frame; all variables returned to precentrifugation levels. In general, the magnitudes of the changes and the rate of recovery were similar at different centrifuge diameters and stopping frequency. There were cases, however, in which the magnitude of the response and/or the rate of recovery to a new steady-state were altered as a result of centrifuge diameter. In summary, these results indicate that stopping frequency has little, if any, effect on adaptation to chronic centrifugation. However, the angular velocity (omega), and therefore centrifuge diameter is an important consideration in the adaptation of an organism to chronic centrifugation.

  12. Effects of Centrifuge Diameter and Operation on Rodent Adaptation to Chronic Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the responses of rats to centrifugation in a constant acceleration field (1.5 G). Centrifuge diameter (1.8m, 2.5m or 6.0m) and schedule of operation (Daily or weekly stop) varied between groups. Body mass, food consumption, water consumption and neurovestibular function were measured weekly. Body temperature and activity were continuously monitored using telemetry. A subset of subjects were videotaped (50 minutes per day) to allow for movement analysis. Exposure to a hyperdynamic field of this magnitude did cause the expected depression in the physiological variables monitored. Recovery was accomplished within a relatively rapid time frame; all variables returned to precentrifugation levels. In general, the magnitudes of the changes and the rate of recovery were similar at different centrifuge diameters and stopping frequency. There were cases, however, in which the magnitude of the response and/or the rate of recovery to a new steady-state were altered as a result of centrifuge diameter. In summary, these results indicate that stopping frequency has little, if any, effect on adaptation to chronic centrifugation. However, the angular velocity (omega), and therefore centrifuge diameter is an important consideration in the adaptation of an organism to chronic centrifugation.

  13. Detection methods for centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Burger, Robert; Amato, Letizia; Boisen, Anja

    2016-02-15

    Centrifugal microfluidics has attracted much interest from academia as well as industry, since it potentially offers solutions for affordable, user-friendly and portable biosensing. A wide range of so-called fluidic unit operations, e.g. mixing, metering, liquid routing, and particle separation, have been developed and allow automation and integration of complex assay protocols in lab-on-a-disc systems. Besides liquid handling, the detection strategy for reading out the assay is crucial for developing a fully integrated system. In this review, we focus on biosensors and readout methods for the centrifugal microfluidics platform and cover optical as well as mechanical and electrical detection principles.

  14. System analysis of plasma centrifuges and sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    System analyses of cylindrical plasma centrifuges are presented, for which the velocity field and electromagnetic fields are calculated. The effects of different electrode geometrics, induced magnetic fields, Hall-effect, and secondary flows are discussed. It is shown that speeds of 10000 m/sec can be achieved in plasma centrifuges, and that an efficient separation of U238 and U235 in uranium plasmas is feasible. The external boundary-value problem for the deposition of sputtering products is reduced to a Fredholm integral equation, which is solved analytically by means of the method of successive approximations.

  15. Wave-Driven Rotation In Centrifugal Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-03-28

    Centrifugal mirrors use supersonic rotation to provide axial confinement and enhanced stability. Usually the rotation is produced using electrodes, but these electrodes have limited the rotation to the Alfven critical ionization velocity, which is too slow to be useful for fusion. Instead, the rotation could be produced using radio frequency waves. A fixed azimuthal ripple is a simple and efficient wave that could produce rotation by harnessing alpha particle energy. This is an extension of the alpha channeling effect. The alpha particle power and efficiency in a simulated devices is sufficient to produce rotation without external energy input. By eliminating the need for electrodes, this opens new opportunities for centrifugal traps.

  16. SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION WITH SURFACTANT REGENERATION/REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation was conducted during the spring of 1999 at Marine Corps Base, Camp LeJeune, NC. A PCE-DNAPL zone was identified and delineated by extensive soil sampling in 1997, and was further characteized by a partitioning interwell t...

  17. Lysis of red blood cells and alveolar epithelial toxicity by therapeutic pulmonary surfactants.

    PubMed

    Findlay, R D; Taeusch, H W; David-Cu, R; Walther, F J

    1995-01-01

    The risk of pulmonary hemorrhage is increased in extremely low birth weight infants treated with surfactant. The pathogenesis of this increased risk is far from clear. We tested whether exposure of cell membranes to surfactant may lead to increased membrane permeability, hypothesizing that this process may contribute to the occurrence of alveolar hemorrhage after surfactant treatment. Aliquots of washed packed red blood cells (used as membrane model) were suspended in 0.9% NaCl with various concentrations of Survanta or Exosurf for either 2 or 24 h at 37 degrees C. Cytolysis was measured by spectrophotometric determination of free Hb after centrifugation. Red cells suspended in 0.9% NaCl alone, distilled water, or various concentrations of melittin were used as negative and positive controls. Both surfactants were associated with increased hemolysis to 35% of maximum at concentrations of 1.25 mg/2 mL. Above these concentrations, Survanta was associated with no increase in hemolysis, whereas Exosurf increased hemolysis to 60% of maximum at concentrations of 12.5 mg/2 mL. In additional experiments, primary cultures of alveolar type II cells from adult rats were treated with Survanta, Exosurf, the Exosurf components tyloxapol and hexadecanol, melittin, or culture medium alone. After 24 h of incubation, lactate dehydrogenase release into the media was measured as a percent of total lactate dehydrogenase activity to indicate cytotoxicity. Lactate dehydrogenase release was < 10% for control experiments but increased sharply with Exosurf and its components tyloxapol and hexadecanol. These results indicate that surfactant may be associated with in vitro cytotoxicity and that this property differs for different surfactants and different dosages.

  18. Removal of surfactants and adducts from solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    The use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in scalable electronics and optoelectronics requires purification of the material to remove contaminants from the growth, and enrichment of the semiconducting fraction of the material through sorting. Centrifugation of aqueous suspensions of SWCNTs allows for both purification and sorting in successive steps with the aid of surfactants, but the suspension process causes oxidative damage to the SWCNTs and the surfactants are difficult to remove from the SWCNT sidewall after deposition on the substrate. These residual surfactants and adductive defects negatively impact device performance. We present a two-step approach towards reducing this disorder post-deposition using mild oxidation to remove the surfactant followed by vacuum annealing to heal the SWCNT sidewall. Thermal gravimetric analysis and temperature programmed desorption show the optimal conditions and fundamental mechanisms. Characterization of the results using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and electronic transport measurements show that the quality of the material is maintained. This research is supported by the Intelligence Community (IC) Postdoctoral Research Fellowship program

  19. Rhie-Chow interpolation in strong centrifugal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-10-01

    Rhie-Chow interpolation formulas are derived from the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. These formulas are generalized to gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields (as high as 106 g) occurring in gas centrifuges.

  20. Surfactant flooding oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, J.; Mills, M.; Tyler, T.; Ware, J.

    1980-07-29

    A method of recovering petroleum from a subterranean petroleum-containing formation penrated by at least one injection well and by at least one spaced apart production well is described. The wells being in fluid communication with the formation, comprising: (A) injecting into the formation via the injection well an aqueous, saline fluid having a salinity greater than 20,000 ppM total dissolved solids and containing a surfactant comprising petroleum sulfonates whose average equivalent weight is from 350 to 400, from 15 to 35 percent of said pertroleum sulfonates having equilvent weights of 350 or less, from 30 to 50 percent of said petroleum sulfonates having equivalent weights greater than 350 and less than 500, and from 10 to 40 percent of said petroleum sulfonates having equivalent weights of 500 and above and a solubilizing co-surfactant selected from the group consisting of ethoxylated alkanols, ethoxylated alkylphenols, alkyl or alkylaryl polyethoxy sulfates, alkyl or alkylaryl polyalkoxyalkyl sulfonates, and mixtures thereof, said surfactant fluid displacing petroleum toward the production well; and (B) recovering petroleum displaced by the surfactant fluids from the formation and via the production well.

  1. Cationic surfactants based on ferrocene

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratov, V.A.; Kucherova, N.L.; Abramzon, A.A.

    1988-07-20

    Quaternary ammonium salts based on ferrocene were synthesized and their surface active properties were studied as potential cationic surfactants and for uses including antiknock compounds. The salts were halide and nitrate derivatives of dimethylferrocenylmethylammonium and were prepared by aminomethylation of ferrocene. Chemical reaction yields, melting points, surface tension isotherms, and other characteristics were assessed.

  2. Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D as antimicrobial and immunotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Shanjana

    2010-06-01

    Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D belong to the "Soluble C-type Lectin" family of proteins and are collectively known as "Collectins". Based on their ability to recognize pathogens and to regulate the host defense, SP-A and SP-D have been recently categorized as "Secretory Pathogen Recognition Receptors". SP-A and SP-D were first identified in the lung; the expression of SP-A and SP-D has also been observed at other mucosal surfaces, such as lacrimal glands, gastrointestinal mucosa, genitourinary epithelium and periodontal surfaces. Since the role of these proteins is not fully elucidated at other mucosal surfaces, the focus of this article is on lung-SP-A and SP-D. It has become clear from research studies performed over a number of years that SP-A and SP-D are critical for the maintenance of lung homeostasis and the regulation of host defense and inflammation. However, none of the surfactant preparations available for clinical use have SP-A or SP-D. A review is presented here on SP-A- and SP-D-deficiencies in lung diseases, the importance of the administration of SP-A and SP-D, and recent patents and research directions that may lead to the design of novel SP-A- or SP-D-based therapeutics and surfactants.

  3. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  5. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  6. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  7. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  8. Centrifugal Pump Experiment for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderslice, Nicholas; Oberto, Richard; Marrero, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a Centrifugal Pump Experiment that provided an experiential learning experience to chemical engineering undergraduates at the University of Missouri in the spring of 2010 in the Unit Operations Laboratory course. Lab equipment was used by senior students with computer-based data and control technology. In…

  9. Centrifuge in space fluid flow visualization experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Dunbar, Bonnie J.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype flow visualization system is constructed to examine buoyancy driven flows during centrifugation in space. An axial density gradient is formed by imposing a thermal gradient between the two ends of the test cell. Numerical computations for this geometry showed that the Prandtl number plays a limited part in determining the flow.

  10. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  11. Mass Transfer in 12-CM Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chesna, J.C.

    2001-06-26

    One eight-stage unit (8-pack) of centrifugal contactors was tested in both extraction and stripping modes. Efficiencies approaching 100 percent were obtained in both modes. The contactors were operated successfully at a wide range of combined flow rates, including the HEF conditions. This report discusses the results of that test.

  12. APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT: RETECH PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the performance of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) and its applicability as a treatment for soils contaminated with organic and/or inorganic compounds. Both the technical and economic aspectsof the technology were examined. A...

  13. Research centrifuge accommodations on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arno, Roger D.; Horkachuk, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Life sciences research using plants and animals on the Space Station Freedom requires the ability to maintain live subjects in a safe and low stress environment for long durations at microgravity and at one g. The need for a centrifuge to achieve these accelerations is evident. Programmatic, technical, and cost considerations currently favor a 2.5 meter diameter centrifuge located either in the end cone of a Space Station Freedom node or in a separate module. A centrifuge facility could support a mix of rodent, plant, and small primate habitats. An automated cage extractor could be used to remove modular habitats in pairs without stopping the main rotor, minimizing the disruption to experiment protocols. The accommodation of such a centrifuge facility on the Space Station represents a significant demand on the crew time, power, data, volume, and logistics capability. It will contribute to a better understanding of the effects of space flight on humans, an understanding of plant growth in space for the eventual production of food, and an understanding of the role of gravity in biological processes.

  14. New Lyotropic Liquid Crystals Based on Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honciuc, Maria; Borlescu, C.; Popa, Carmen

    We presented here the phase diagrams and the influence of the external electric field on the lyotropic liquid crystal phase (LLC) for some binary and pseudoternary systems based on surfactants. Binary systems are of the type surfactant/water (S/W) and the pseudoternary systems are of the type surfactant/oil/water (S/O/W). Two surfactants have been used: the lauryl alcohol ethoxilated with 11 molecules of ethylene oxide (LA11EO), which is a nonionic compound, and a mixture of LA11EO with the cationic surfactant named alkyl C12-C14-dimethyl-benzyl ammonium chloride. Based on these two types of surfactants, pseudoternary systems were prepared. Pine oil has been used as the oil. The region where the LLC phase appears depends on the concentration of the surfactant and that of the pine oil, respectively. It is strongly influenced by the nature of the surfactant and by the presence of the pine oil for the same type of surfactant. The influence of the external electric field, investigated by measuring the electric current appearing in the samples for different concentrations of surfactant and pine oil was found to be more important in the case of the systems based on the nonionic-cationic mixture of surfactants. The results are discussed in terms of a theoretical model based on the local thermal equilibrium approach for systems running nonstatic processes.

  15. Membrane characteristics and osmotic fragility of red cells, fractionated with anglehead centrifugation and counterflow centrifugation.

    PubMed

    van der Vegt, S G; Ruben, A M; Werre, J M; de Gier, J; Staal, G E

    1985-11-01

    Red cell populations were separated on the basis of differences in density using anglehead centrifugation and on the basis of differences in mean cell volume using counterflow centrifugation. In the different fractions, mean surface area was calculated, phospholipid and cholesterol content determined as well as the osmotic behaviour in hypotonic salt solutions. Older red cells appeared to be more resistant to hypotonic salt solutions, due to favourable surface area to volume ratio. PMID:4063204

  16. Double tapered surfactant waterflood oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, J.T.; Tyler, T.N.

    1980-11-11

    Disclosed is an oil recovery process for recovering oil from subterranean formations containing relatively high salinity water , said process employing an aqueous surfactant fluid containing at least two surfactants, one primary anionic surfactant such as petroleum sulfonate and a solubilizing cosurfactant such as an alkyl or alkylaryl, polyethoxy sulfate or sulfonate. The process comprises injecting a plurality of slugs of surfactant fluids followed by a low salinity fluid containing a viscosifying amount of a hydrophilic polymer. The salinity and concentration of solubilizing cosurfactant of each surfactant slug are both decreased from the maximum level in the first slug of the surfactant fluid and in successive slugs to a minimum level at the last slug of the surfactant fluid.

  17. Alterations in surfactant protein A after acute exposure to ozone.

    PubMed

    Su, W Y; Gordon, T

    1996-05-01

    The surfactant layer covering the gas-exchange region of the lung serves as the initial site of interaction with inhaled oxidant gases. Among the endogenous compounds potentially vulnerable to oxidative injury are surfactant proteins. This study focused on the effect of ozone on surfactant protein A (SP-A) function, content, and gene expression. To determine the time course of response to ozone, guinea pigs were exposed to 0.2-0.8 parts/million (ppm) ozone for 6 h and were killed up to 120 h postexposure. To determine the effect of repeated exposure, animals were exposed to 0.8 ppm ozone for 6 h/day and were killed on days 3 and 5. A significant increase in surfactant's ability to modulate the respiratory burst induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in naive macrophages was observed at 24 h after a single 0.8 ppm ozone exposure. Because neutralizing antibodies to SP-A blunted this stimulatory effect, we hypothesized that ozone enhanced the modulatory role of SP-A in macrophage function. This alteration in function was accompanied by an influx of inflammatory cells and only marginal changes in SP-A levels as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No significant changes in steady-state levels of SP-A mRNA were observed after single or repeated exposure to ozone. Thus the inflammation that accompanies in vivo ozone exposure may result in a change in the structure and thus functional role of SP-A in modulating macrophage activity.

  18. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Solid organ transplant - lung ... the new lung Have severe disease of other organs Cannot reliably take their medicines Are unable to ... medicines Damage to your kidneys, liver, or other organs from anti-rejection medicines Future risk of certain ...

  19. Lung surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pneumonectomy; Lobectomy; Lung biopsy; Thoracoscopy; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery; VATS ... You will have general anesthesia before surgery. You will be asleep and unable to feel pain. Two common ways to do surgery on your lungs are thoracotomy and video- ...

  20. Surfactants in the management of rhinopathologies

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Philip L.; Palmer, James N.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surfactants are a class of amphiphilic surface active compounds that show several unique physical properties at liquid–liquid or liquid–solid surface interfaces including the ability to increase the solubility of substances, lower the surface tension of a liquid, and decrease friction between two mediums. Because of these unique physical properties several in vitro, ex vivo, and human trials have examined the role of surfactants as stand-alone or adjunct therapy in recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Methods: A review of the literature was performed. Results: The data from three different surfactants have been examined in this review: citric acid zwitterionic surfactant (CAZS; Medtronic ENT, Jacksonville FL), Johnson's Baby Shampoo (Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick NJ), and SinuSurf (NeilMed Pharmaceuticals, Santa Rosa, CA). Dilute surfactant therapy shows in vitro antimicrobial effects with modest inhibition of bacterial biofilm formation. In patients with CRS, surfactants may improve symptoms, most likely through its mucolytic effects. In addition, surfactants have several distinct potential benefits including their ability to improve an irrigant's penetration of the nonoperated sinus and their synergistic effects with antibiotics. However, surfactants potential for nasal irritation and possible transient ciliotoxicity may limit their use. Conclusion: Recent data suggest a possible therapeutic role of surfactants in treating rhinopathologies associated with mucostasis. Further investigation, including a standardization of surfactant formulations, is warranted to further elucidate the potential benefits and drawbacks of this therapy. PMID:23710951

  1. Micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration and air stripping for surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Lipe, K.M.; Sabatini, D.A.; Hasegawa, M.A.; Harwell, J.H.

    1996-05-01

    Micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration (MEUF) and air stripping were evaluated for surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant recovery. Two linear alkyl diphenyloxide disulfonate (DPDS) surfactants were evaluated with the contaminants naphthalene and trichloroethylene. A separation model developed from micellar partitioning principles showed a good correlation to batch MEUF studies, whereas flux analysis highlighted concentration polarization effects in relation to hydrophobe length. MEUF effectively concentrated the surfactant-contaminant system (93 to 99% retention); however, this did not result in surfactant-contaminant separation. Batch and continuous flow air stripping models were developed based upon air/water ratio, surfactant concentration, and micellar partitioning; model predictions were validated by experimental data. Sensitivity analyses illustrated the decline in contaminant-surfactant separation with increasing surfactant concentration (e.g., TCE removal efficiency declines from 83% to 37% as C-16 DPDS concentration increases from 0 to 55 mM). This effect is greater for more hydrophobic contaminants (naphthalene vs. TCE) and surfactants with greater solubilization potential (C16-DPDS vs. C-12 DPDS). The resulting design equations can account for this effect and thus properly size air strippers to achieve the desired removal efficiency in the presence of surfactant micelles. Proper selection and design of surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant recovery systems are integral to optimizing surfactant-enhanced subsurface remediation.

  2. Toxic oxidant species and their impact on the pulmonary surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Putman, E; van Golde, L M; Haagsman, H P

    1997-01-01

    In this review the effects of oxidant inhalation on the pulmonary surfactant system of laboratory animals are discussed. Oxidant lung injury is a complex phenomenon with many aspects. Inhaled oxidants interact primarily with the epithelial lining fluid (ELF), a thin layer covering the epithelial cells of the lung which contains surfactant and antioxidants. In the upper airways this layer is thick and contains high levels of antioxidants. Therefore oxidant injury in this area is rare and is more common in the lower airways where the ELF is thin and contains fewer antioxidants. In the ELF oxidants can react with antioxidants or biomolecules, resulting in inactivation of the biomolecules or in the formation of even more reactive agents. Oxidation of extracellular surfactant constituents may impair its function and affect breathing. Oxidized ELF constituents may promote inflammation and edema, which will impair the surfactant system further. Animal species differences in respiratory tract anatomy, ventilatory rate, and antioxidant levels influence susceptibility to oxidants. The oxidant exposure dose dictates injury, subsequent repair processes, and tolerance induction.

  3. Lung Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, David; El-Hashash, Ahmed; Carraro, Gianni; Tiozzo, Caterina; Sala, Frederic; Rogers, Orquidea; De Langhe, Stijn; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela; Torday, John; Bellusci, Saverio; Shi, Wei; Lubkin, Sharon R; Jesudason, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Developmental lung biology is a field that has the potential for significant human impact: lung disease at the extremes of age continues to cause major morbidity and mortality worldwide. Understanding how the lung develops holds the promise that investigators can use this knowledge to aid lung repair and regeneration. In the decade since the “molecular embryology” of the lung was first comprehensively reviewed, new challenges have emerged—and it is on these that we focus the current review. Firstly, there is a critical need to understand the progenitor cell biology of the lung in order to exploit the potential of stem cells for the treatment of lung disease. Secondly, the current familiar descriptions of lung morphogenesis governed by growth and transcription factors need to be elaborated upon with the reinclusion and reconsideration of other factors, such as mechanics, in lung growth. Thirdly, efforts to parse the finer detail of lung bud signaling may need to be combined with broader consideration of overarching mechanisms that may be therapeutically easier to target: in this arena, we advance the proposal that looking at the lung in general (and branching in particular) in terms of clocks may yield unexpected benefits. PMID:20691848

  4. A vibration model for centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Wasserman, M.O.; Wygmans, D.G.

    1992-11-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, we created the Excel worksheet ``Beam`` for analyzing vibrations in centrifugal contactors. With this worksheet, a user can calculate the first natural frequency of the motor/rotor system for a centrifugal contactor. We determined a typical value for the bearing stiffness (k{sub B}) of a motor after measuring the k{sub B} value for three different motors. The k{sub B} value is an important parameter in this model, but it is not normally available for motors. The assumptions that we made in creating the Beam worksheet were verified by comparing the calculated results with those from a VAX computer program, BEAM IV. The Beam worksheet was applied to several contactor designs for which we have experimental data and found to work well.

  5. Waves in strong centrifugal fields: dissipationless gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-04-01

    Linear waves are investigated in a rotating gas under the condition of strong centrifugal acceleration of the order 106 g realized in gas centrifuges for separation of uranium isotopes. Sound waves split into three families of the waves under these conditions. Dispersion equations are obtained. The characteristics of the waves strongly differ from the conventional sound waves on polarization, velocity of propagation and distribution of energy of the waves in space for two families having frequencies above and below the frequency of the conventional sound waves. The energy of these waves is localized in rarefied region of the gas. The waves of the third family were not specified before. They propagate exactly along the rotational axis with the conventional sound velocity. These waves are polarized only along the rotational axis. Radial and azimuthal motions are not excited. Energy of the waves is concentrated near the wall of the rotor where the density of the gas is largest.

  6. High stability design for new centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, H.; Katayama, K.; Morii, S.; Mouri, Y.; Umemura, S.; Ozawa, U.; Oda, T.

    1989-01-01

    It is essential that high-performance centrifugal compressors be free of subsynchronous vibrations. A new high-performance centrifugal compressor has been developed by applying the latest rotordynamics knowledge and design techniques: (1) To improve the system damping, a specially designed oil film seal was developed. This seal attained a damping ratio three times that of the conventional design. The oil film seal contains a special damper ring in the seal cartridge. (2) To reduce the destabilizing effect of the labyrinth seal, a special swirl canceler (anti-swirl nozzle) was applied to the balance piston seal. (3) To confirm the system damping margin, the dynamic simulation rotor model test and the full load test applied the vibration exciting test in actual load conditions.

  7. Supernatant decanting on a centrifugal platform.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Yuan, Wei-Li; Chiang, Wei-Ling; Lin, Chia-Hui

    2011-03-30

    This study presents a novel approach to decant supernatant on a centrifugal platform. By manipulating the centrifugally induced pressure and the elastic deformation of the plastic lids in the decanting chamber, fixed amounts of the supernatant can be decanted into the detection chamber at lower rotational speeds. The experimental results showed that decanted volume is affected by the volume of deformation and the operating parameters. Factors that influence the decanting ratio are also discussed. This approach has the advantages of simple design and low manufacturing cost; further, it has no need of surface modification. It has been applied to on-disk separation of plasma from whole blood, and the results showed good stability and repeatability.

  8. Spaceborne centrifugal relays for spacecraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzidane, Malika

    1991-01-01

    Acceleration using centrifugal relays is a recently discovered method for the acceleration of spaceborne payloads to high velocity at high thrust. Centrifugal relays are moving rotors which progressively accelerate reaction mass to higher velocities. One important engineering problem consists of accurately tracking the position of the projectiles and rotors and guiding each projectile exactly onto the appropriate guide tracks on each rotor. The topics of this research are the system kinematics and dynamics and the computerized guidance system which will allow the projectile to approach each rotor with exact timing with respect to the rotor rotation period and with very small errors in lateral positions. Kinematics studies include analysis of rotor and projectile positions versus time and projectile/rotor interactions. Guidance studies include a detailed description of the tracking mechanism (interrupt of optical beams) and the aiming mechanism (electromagnetic focusing) including the design of electromagnetic deflection coils and the switching circuitry.

  9. [Ventilation mechanics in the premature and the newborn. I. Statistical measurements of the isolated lungs].

    PubMed

    Wierich, W

    1976-01-01

    On 31 pairs of lungs from still borns and newborns of differing stages of maturation and age (23rd week of gestation up to the 24th week after birth) statical measurements including liquid fillings were performed. On account of the histo-mechanical tests as well as morphological and clinical data, the group could be divided into normal lungs and lungs with decreased surfactant activity. Between the 35th week of gestation and the 5th week after birth a marked increase in pulmonary maturation with unproportional changes of the histomechanical values could be demonstrated. In lungs with decreased surfactant activity the influence of life span upon the mechanical properties of pulmonary tissue could be shown. The high surface tension decreases, presumably on account of surfactant synthesis, while the values of tissue elasticity decrease as a result of overstretching.

  10. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  11. Operating and maintenance guidelines for screenbowl centrifuges

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnig, W.S.R.; Bratton, R.; Luttrell, G.

    2009-01-15

    Plant dewatering circuits equipped with screenbowl centrifuges need to be well designed, properly operated, and adequately maintained to maximize the dewatering performance. The most important 'feed variables' are particle size, dry solids feed rate and slurry flow rate. The most important 'machine variables' include pool depth, rotational speed and gearbox ratio. The article discusses the effect of these parameters and offers some maintenance guidelines. The article was adapted from a paper presented at CoalPrep 2008. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Centrifugal shot blasting. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), the Facilities Closure and Demolition Projects Integrated Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) work plan calls for the removal of one inch (1 in) depth of concrete surface in areas where contamination with technetium-99 has been identified. This report describes a comparative demonstration between two concrete removal technologies: an innovative system using Centrifugal Shot Blasting (CSB) and a modified baseline technology called a rotary drum planer.

  13. Hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex as a function of surfactant structure.

    PubMed

    Devínsky, Ferdinand; Pisárcik, Martin; Lacko, Ivan

    2009-06-01

    The present study deals with the determination of hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex in sodium bromide solution using the dynamic light scattering method. Cationic gemini surfactants with polymethylene spacer of variable length were used for the interaction with DNA. The scattering experiments were performed at constant DNA and sodium bromide concentrations and variable surfactant concentration in the premicellar and micellar regions as a function of surfactant spacer length. It was found that the DNA conformation strongly depends on the polymethylene spacer length as well as on the surfactant concentration relative to the surfactant critical micelle concentration. Gemini surfactant molecules with 4 methylene groups in the spacer were found to be the least efficient DNA compacting agent in the region above the surfactant cmc. Gemini molecules with the shortest spacer length (2 methylene groups) and the longest spacer length (8 methylene groups) investigated showed the most efficient DNA compaction ability. PMID:19592712

  14. The role of charged amphipathic helices in the structure and function of surfactant protein B.

    PubMed

    Waring, A J; Walther, F J; Gordon, L M; Hernandez-Juviel, J M; Hong, T; Sherman, M A; Alonso, C; Alig, T; Braun, A; Bacon, D; Zasadzinski, J A

    2005-12-01

    Surfactant protein B (SP-B) is essential for normal lung surfactant function. Theoretical models predict that the disulfide cross-linked, N- and C-terminal domains of SP-B fold as charged amphipathic helices, and suggest that these adjacent helices participate in critical surfactant activities. This hypothesis is tested using a disulfide-linked construct (Mini-B) based on the primary sequences of the N- and C-terminal domains. Consistent with theoretical predictions of the full-length protein, both isotope-enhanced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and molecular modeling confirm the presence of charged amphipathic alpha-helices in Mini-B. Similar to that observed with native SP-B, Mini-B in model surfactant lipid mixtures exhibits marked in vitro activity, with spread films showing near-zero minimum surface tensions during cycling using captive bubble surfactometry. In vivo, Mini-B shows oxygenation and dynamic compliance that compare favorably with that of full-length SP-B. Mini-B variants (i.e. reduced disulfides or cationic residues replaced by uncharged residues) or Mini-B fragments (i.e. unlinked N- and C-terminal domains) produced greatly attenuated in vivo and in vitro surfactant properties. Hence, the combination of structure and charge for the amphipathic alpha-helical N- and C-terminal domains are key to SP-B function.

  15. Enrichment of circulating tumor cells using a centrifugal affinity plate system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Hyun, Kyung-A; Kim, Seung-Il; Kang, Ji-Yoon; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2014-12-19

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are defined as cells that have detached from a primary tumor and are circulating in the bloodstream. Their isolation and quantification is of great value for cancer prognoses and drug testing. Here, the development of a centrifugal affinity plate (CAP) system is described, in which centrifugal force and antibody-based capture are exploited to enrich CTCs on one plate and hematological cells on the other. The CAP is rotated to exert centrifugal force on the cells in a blood sample, quickly transporting them to the anti-epithelial adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-coated and anti-CD45-coated surface of the CAP to shorten the reaction time and increase the adhesion force between the tumor and blood cells and each antibody. The effect of a rotating process on cell capture was investigated, and the capture efficiency was demonstrated using blood samples from healthy donors spiked with human non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H1650) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. The CAP system was capable of rapid isolation and identification of CTCs without the requirement for pretreatment of blood samples. Finally, the CAP system was tested to evaluate the detection efficiency of CTCs in the blood samples of breast cancer patients. The number of captured CTCs in only 1ml of blood varied from 6 to 10.

  16. In vivo assessment of a new method of pulsatile perfusion based on a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Herreros, Jesús; Ubilla, Matías; Berjano, Enrique J; Vila-Nuñez, Juan E; Páramo, José A; Sola, Josu; Mercé, Salvador

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess platelet dysfunction and damage to organs after extracorporeal circulation using a pump based on a new method that adds a pulsatile flow to the continuous flow provided by a centrifugal pump. The continuous component of the total flow (2-3 L/min) is created by a Bio-Pump centrifugal pump, while the pulsatile component is created by the pulsating of an inner membrane pneumatically controlled by an intra-aortic counterpulsation balloon console (systolic volume of 37.5 mL in an asynchronous way with a frequency of 60 bpm). Six pigs were subjected to a partial cardiopulmonary bypass lasting 180 min and were sacrificed 60 min after extracorporeal circulation was suspended. The hematological study included the measurement of hematocrit, hemoglobin, leukocytes, and platelet function. The new pump did not significantly alter either platelet count or platelet function. In contrast, hematocrit and hemoglobin were significantly reduced during extracorporeal circulation (approximately 5% P = 0.011, and 2 g/dL P = 0.01, respectively). The leukocyte count during extracorporeal circulation showed a tendency to decrease, but this was not significant. In general, the short-term use of the new pump (4 h) did not cause any serious morphological damage to the heart, lung, kidney, or liver. The results suggest that the hemodynamic performance of the new pump is similar to a conventional centrifugal pump and could therefore be appropriate for use in extracorporeal circulation.

  17. Stable isotope enrichment using a plasma centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Bures, Brian; Madden, Robert

    2012-10-01

    A primary goal of the Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program (Isotope Program) within the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) is to produce isotopes that are in short supply in the U.S. and of which there exists no or insufficient domestic commercial production capability. A vacuum arc plasma centrifuge is a rigid rotor column of metal plasma in which centrifugal forces re-distribute ions radially according to their mass/charge ratio. Early work demonstrated rotation at 2 million rpm and separation of various stable isotopes. The spinning plasma column had a Gaussian flux profile, peaked on the rigid rotor axis. This work adopts a more efficient approach, with the plasma created as a hollow column, wherein the flux is concentrated at larger radii where the centrifugal action is highest. By tailoring the vacuum arc discharge geometry, the rotation rate can also be increased to ˜10 million rpm. Data from Cu, Al and other metal plasmas will be presented and discussed in light of enriched stable isotopes needed for research and medicine.

  18. Shallow water model for horizontal centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháček, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model was proposed to simulate the solidification process of an outer shell of work roll made by the horizontal centrifugal casting technique. Shallow water model was adopted to solve the 2D average flow dynamics of melt spreading and the average temperature distribution inside the centrifugal casting mould by considering the centrifugal force, Coriolis force, viscous force due to zero velocity on the mould wall, gravity, and energy transport by the flow. Additionally, a 1D sub-model was implemented to consider the heat transfer in the radial direction from the solidifying shell to the mould. The solidification front was tracked by fulfilling the Stefan condition. Radiative and convective heat losses were included from both, the free liquid surface and the outer wall of the mould. Several cases were simulated with the following assumed initial conditions: constant height of the liquid metal (10, 20, and 30 mm), uniform temperature of the free liquid surface (1755 K). The simulation results have shown that while the solidification front remained rather flat, the free surface was disturbed by waves. The amplitude of waves increased with the liquid height. Free surface waves diminished as the solidification proceeded.

  19. In-vivo Centrifugation of Drosophila Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Susan L.; Welte, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    A major strategy for purifying and isolating different types of intracellular organelles is to separate them from each other based on differences in buoyant density. However, when cells are disrupted prior to centrifugation, proteins and organelles in this non-native environment often inappropriately stick to each other. Here we describe a method to separate organelles by density in intact, living Drosophila embryos. Early embryos before cellularization are harvested from population cages, and their outer egg shells are removed by treatment with 50% bleach. Embryos are then transferred to a small agar plate and inserted, posterior end first, into small vertical holes in the agar. The plates containing embedded embryos are centrifuged for 30 min at 3000g. The agar supports the embryos and keeps them in a defined orientation. Afterwards, the embryos are dug out of the agar with a blunt needle. Centrifugation separates major organelles into distinct layers, a stratification easily visible by bright-field microscopy. A number of fluorescent markers are available to confirm successful stratification in living embryos. Proteins associated with certain organelles will be enriched in a particular layer, demonstrating colocalization. Individual layers can be recovered for biochemical analysis or transplantation into donor eggs. This technique is applicable for organelle separation in other large cells, including the eggs and oocytes of diverse species. PMID:20613707

  20. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  1. Avoid self-priming centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The self-priming horizontal centrifugal pump becomes known to its operator either as a good pump or a bad pump. The latter is usually replaced by another type of pump, even though a properly specified self-priming centrifugal pump might have been a good choice. Use of the guidelines described in this article are intended to help in the purchase and installation of a good pump. Self-priming centrifugal pumps are used for removing liquids from below grade sumps or pits that may also contain solids, fibers and/or muck. Alternate pumps for this service include submersible pumps, vertical turbine pumps and positive displacement pumps. These alternate pumps do not pass solid particles as large as self-priming pumps do without damage. Positive displacement pumps are not normally cost-effective when pumping liquid at rates in excess of 500 gallons per minute in low-head applications. Vertical and submersible pumps must be removed when cleaning of the pump is required. Self-priming pumps are easily cleaned by opening the access plates without moving the pump; and they cost less than the other types.

  2. Research opportunities with the Centrifuge Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Glenn A.

    1992-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility on Space Station Freedom will consist of a 2.5-meter diameter Centrifuge accommodating two concentric rings of habitats and providing variable g-forces between 0.01 g and 2.0 g; modular habitats providing housing and lifesupport for rats, mice, and plants; a habitat holding system providing power, water, airflow and other utilities to several modular habitats; and a life sciences glovebox, an isolated work volume accommodating simultaneous operations by at least two scientists and providing lighting, airflow, video and data access, and other experiment support functions. The centrifuge facility will enable long-duration animal and plant microgravity research not previously possible in the NASA flight research program. It will offer unprecedented opportunities for use of on-board 1-g control populations and statistically significant numbers of specimens. On orbit 1-g controls will allow separation of the effects of microgravity from other environmental factors. Its selectable-g and simultaneous multiple-g capabilities will enable studies of gravitational thresholds, the use of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to the effects of microgravity, and ready simulation of Lunar and Martian gravities.

  3. Enhancing Dopant Solubility via Epitaxial Surfactant Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Yan, Y.; Wei, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    A general concept for enhancing dopant solubility via epitaxial surfactant growth is proposed. The key of the concept is to find the appropriate surfactants that generate high (low) levels that can transfer electrons (holes) to dopant acceptor (donor) levels in p-type (n-type) doping, thus significantly lowering the formation energy of dopants. Using first-principles density-functional calculations, our concept explains excellently the recently discovered dual-surfactant effect of Sb and H on enhancing Zn doping in epitaxially grown GaP(100) thin film and suggests that sole surfactant Te can also induce enhancement of N solubility in ZnSe(100) film. We also proposed the surfactants for enhancing p-type doing of ZnO with epitaxial growth with (000{bar 1}) surface. General rules for selecting surfactants for enhancing both p-type and n-type dopings are provided.

  4. Biophysical activity of animal-derived exogenous surfactants mixed with rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Kolomaznik, M; Calkovska, A; Herting, E; Stichtenoth, G

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous pulmonary surfactant is a potential delivery system for topical medications via the conducting airways. Due to the sensitivity to inactivation of surfactant, mutual interaction with the shipped drug should be evaluated. Little is known about the interactions between surfactant and antimicrobial drugs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether biophysical properties of animal-derived surfactants are modified by the bactericidal antibiotic rifampicin. An intracellular activity and a broad antimicrobiotic spectrum toward Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria make rifampicin an interesting substance against pulmonary infections. Curosurf® (porcine surfactant from minced lungs) and Survanta® (bovine surfactant extract) were diluted to 2.5-5.0 mg/ml of phospholipids in 0.9 % NaCl and rifampicin (RIF) was added at 1, 5, and 10 % (w/w). Minimum (γ(min)) and maximum (γ(max)) surface tension of a cyclically compressed bubble in the mixture was assessed with a pulsating bubble surfactometer. After 5 min, γ(min) of Survanta at a concentration of 3 mg/ml was significantly increased after addition of 5 and 10 % RIF (both p < 0.001). At 1 % RIF, the γ(min) of Survanta was ≈10 mN/m and this value was not significantly different to that of Survanta alone. The γ(min) of Curosurf at 3 mg/ml was increased with 10 % RIF (p < 0.001), but not with 1 and 5 %. At 5 mg/ml Survanta was inhibited by 10 % RIF (p < 0.05), while γ(min) of Curosurf was low (<5 mN/m) in all mixtures. In conclusion, Curosurf and Survanta interfere with RIF in a concentration-dependent manner. At the appropriate phospholipid concentration, especially porcine-derived surfactant is able to retain good surface activity when mixed with antibiotics.

  5. 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone promotes secretion of pulmonary aldo-keto reductases with surfactant.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Haga, Mariko; Watanabe, Gou; Shinoda, Yuhki; Endo, Satoshi; Kajiwara, Yu; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Naoki; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira

    2012-02-01

    9,10-Phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ), a major quinone in diesel exhaust particles, induces apoptosis via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) because of 9,10-PQ redox cycling. We have found that intratracheal infusion of 9,10-PQ facilitates the secretion of surfactant into rat alveolus. In the cultured rat lung, treatment with 9,10-PQ results in an increase in a lower-density surfactant by ROS generation through redox cycling of the quinone. The surfactant contains aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C15, which reduces 9,10-PQ and the enzyme level in the surfactant increases on treatment with 9,10-PQ suggesting an involvement of AKR1C15 in the redox cycling of the quinone. In six human cell types (A549, MKN45, Caco2, Hela, Molt4 and U937) only type II epithelial A549 cells secrete three human AKR1C subfamily members (AKR1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3) with the surfactant into the medium; this secretion is highly increased by 9,10-PQ treatment. Using in vitro enzyme inhibition analysis, we have identified AKR1C3 as the most abundantly secreted AKR1C member. The AKR1C enzymes in the medium efficiently reduce 9,10-PQ and initiate its redox cycling accompanied by ROS production. The exposure of A549 cells to 9,10-PQ provokes viability loss, which is significantly protected by the addition of the AKR1C3 inhibitor and antioxidant enzyme and by the removal of the surfactants from the culture medium. Thus, the AKR1C enzymes secreted in pulmonary surfactants probably participate in the toxic mechanism triggered by 9,10-PQ.

  6. 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone promotes secretion of pulmonary aldo-keto reductases with surfactant.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Haga, Mariko; Watanabe, Gou; Shinoda, Yuhki; Endo, Satoshi; Kajiwara, Yu; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Naoki; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira

    2012-02-01

    9,10-Phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ), a major quinone in diesel exhaust particles, induces apoptosis via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) because of 9,10-PQ redox cycling. We have found that intratracheal infusion of 9,10-PQ facilitates the secretion of surfactant into rat alveolus. In the cultured rat lung, treatment with 9,10-PQ results in an increase in a lower-density surfactant by ROS generation through redox cycling of the quinone. The surfactant contains aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C15, which reduces 9,10-PQ and the enzyme level in the surfactant increases on treatment with 9,10-PQ suggesting an involvement of AKR1C15 in the redox cycling of the quinone. In six human cell types (A549, MKN45, Caco2, Hela, Molt4 and U937) only type II epithelial A549 cells secrete three human AKR1C subfamily members (AKR1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3) with the surfactant into the medium; this secretion is highly increased by 9,10-PQ treatment. Using in vitro enzyme inhibition analysis, we have identified AKR1C3 as the most abundantly secreted AKR1C member. The AKR1C enzymes in the medium efficiently reduce 9,10-PQ and initiate its redox cycling accompanied by ROS production. The exposure of A549 cells to 9,10-PQ provokes viability loss, which is significantly protected by the addition of the AKR1C3 inhibitor and antioxidant enzyme and by the removal of the surfactants from the culture medium. Thus, the AKR1C enzymes secreted in pulmonary surfactants probably participate in the toxic mechanism triggered by 9,10-PQ. PMID:22281686

  7. Cationic versus anionic surfactant in tuning the structure and interaction of nanoparticle, protein, and surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2014-08-26

    The structure and interaction in complexes of anionic Ludox HS40 silica nanoparticle, anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein, and cationic dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) surfactant have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results are compared with similar complexes having anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant (Mehan, S; Chinchalikar, A. J.; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R. Langmuir 2013, 29, 11290). In both cases (DTAB and SDS), the structure in nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes is predominantly determined by the interactions of the individual two-component systems. The nanoparticle-surfactant (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for DTAB, but nanoparticle-protein (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for SDS, are found to be responsible for the resultant structure of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes. Irrespective of the charge on the surfactant, the cooperative binding of surfactant with protein leads to micellelike clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. The adsorption of these protein-surfactant complexes for DTAB on oppositely charged nanoparticles gives rise to the protein-surfactant complex-mediated aggregation of nanoparticles (similar to that of DTAB surfactant). It is unlike that of depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles with nonadsorption of protein-surfactant complexes for SDS in similarly charged nanoparticle systems (similar to that of protein alone). The modifications in nanoparticle aggregation as well as unfolding of protein in these systems as compared to the corresponding two-component systems have also been examined by selectively contrast matching the constituents.

  8. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials.

  9. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-05-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on water/air interfaces, the latter gives an impression of surfactant adsorption to a hydrophobic surface and illustrates the importance of the CMC for the adsorption process. Then attention is paid to the most important types of soil particles: humic and fulvic acids, silica, metal oxides and layered aluminosilicates. Information is provided on their structure, surface properties and primary (proton) charge characteristics, which are all important for surfactant binding. Subsequently, the adsorption of different types of surfactants on these individual soil components is discussed in detail, based on mainly experimental results and considering the specific (chemical) and electrostatic interactions, with hydrophobic attraction as an important component of the specific interactions. Adsorption models that can describe the features semi-quantitatively are briefly discussed. In the last part of the paper some trends of surfactant adsorption on soils are briefly discussed together with some complications that may occur and finally the consequences of surfactant adsorption for soil colloidal stability and permeability are considered. When we seek to understand the fate of surfactants in soil and aqueous environments, the hydrophobicity and charge density of the soil or soil particles, must be considered together with the structure, hydrophobicity and charge of the surfactants, because these factors affect the adsorption. The pH and ionic strength are important parameters with respect to the charge density of the particles. As surfactant adsorption influences soil structure and permeability, insight in surfactant adsorption to soil particles is useful for good soil management. PMID

  10. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines.

  11. Crystalline surfactant dispersions by radio frequency absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tedder, S.H.

    1986-03-01

    Recently interest has increased in the use of liquid crystalline surfactant dispersions for enhanced oil recovery. The object of the work described in the report was to develop a method of measuring the electrical properties of colloidal surfactant particles, which control the structure and stability of the surfactant dispersion. A further object was to find how these electrical properties are affected by the method used to mix the components of the dispersion. The results may be useful in solving several practical problems, including the identification of optimally performing liquid crystalline surfactant formulations for oil recovery use. Another possible use is to identify and categorize effects of the method of mixing surfactants on the final product. This information would provide guidelines for field handling of chemical recovery agents. The absorption of radio frequency energy, a process which is mediated by the surface electrical properties of the surfactant particles, was used to measure several electrical parameters of the surfactant mixtures. Two commercial petroleum sulfonate surfactants were tested by the radio frequency absorption method, and a model of their electrical properties was developed and used to fit the data. The strength of the layer of electric charges surrounding the surfactant particles was found to be related to the stability of the solution. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Immiscible displacement of oil with surfactant system

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J. E.

    1985-12-03

    In accordance with the present invention it has been found that improved recovery of oil from a subsurface earth formation can be attained by injecting into the formation a surfactant system comprising a carboxylate surfactant, a cosurfactant and an electrolyte in concentrations and proportions to form an immiscible three-phase system with the reservoir oil comprising a predominantly oil phase, a microemulsion phase and an aqueous phase. The carboxylate surfactant is preferably selected from the group consisting of branched aliphatic carboxylates and mononuclear aromatic carboxylates. Where aliphatic carboxylates are utilized as a surfactant, it is preferred that the polar organic material utilized as a cosurfactant have a solubility in water less than about ten grams per hundred grams of water ost about 20/sup 0/ C. and, when an aromatic carboxylate is utilized as a surfactant, it is preferred that the polar organic material utilized as a cosurfactant have a water solubility greater than about ten grams per hundred grams of water at about 20/sup 0/ C. In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, it has been found that surfactant systems containing carboxylate surfactants will recover optimum amounts of oil when a base is added to the surfactant system to adjust the pH to a value at which the surfactant system results nin optimum oil recovery.

  13. The efffect of sustained +Gz acceleration on extravascular lung water content in domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Weidner, W J; Hoffman, L F

    1980-06-01

    In order to examine the effects of sustained acceleration on pulmonary fluid balance, chickens were centrifuged at low sustained +G acceleration (LSG) intensities of +3Gz or +4Gz or high sustained +G acceleration (HSG) at +6Gz for varying periods. Animals were exposed to acceleration on a hydraulic-driven centrifuge. Controls (Group I) were not centrifuged. The vascular lungs were rapidly excised after centrifugation, and the extravascular lung water content (EVLW) was measured. EVLW in Group I animals = 2.19 +/- 0.38 g/g. Results indicate that positive acceleration elevated in animals exposed to +4Gz for 60 min (Group III). In this group, EVLW = 3.01 +/- 1.07 g/g. This increase is largely attributable to an elevated EVLW in those animals which died as a result of centrifugation, in which EVLW = 3.90 +/- 1.04 g/g. Exposure to +3Gz for 120 min (Group II) or +6Gz for periods up to 50 min (Group IV) did not produce significant elevations in EVLW in either group as a whole, but EVLW in those Group II animals which died as a result of centrifugation was significantly elevated. EVLW in these animals = 2.87 +/- 0.21 g/g. We conclude that pulmonary edema caused by centrifugation is dependent on both magnitude and duration of G force. PMID:7417119

  14. Monitoring the centrifugal recovery of recombinant protein inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Middelberg, A P; O'Neill, B K

    1991-04-01

    The industrial processing of proteins expressed as insoluble inclusion bodies employs a reasonably standard sequence of unit operations. One of these is centrifugation, which serves to concentrate the inclusion bodies after disruption of the host microorganism, and also separates the inclusion bodies from other cellular debris. Monitoring the performance of the centrifuge is essential if excessive product and hence financial loss is to be avoided and a reasonable separation obtained. The analytical disc centrifuge may be used to monitor the centrifugation. This instrument returns the sample size distribution with high resolution and without fouling. By obtaining size distributions of the centrifuge feed, supernatant and concentrate, the fractional collection efficiency of the centrifuge may be determined as a function of the Stokes diameter, and a mass balance constructed. PMID:1367325

  15. Hemolysis by surfactants--A review.

    PubMed

    Manaargadoo-Catin, Magalie; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Pougnas, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    An overview of the use of surfactants for erythrocyte lysis and their cell membrane action mechanisms is given. Erythrocyte membrane characteristics and its association with the cell cytoskeleton are presented in order to complete understanding of the erythrocyte membrane distortion. Cell homeostasis disturbances caused by surfactants might induce changes starting from shape modification to cell lysis. Two main mechanisms are hypothesized in literature which are osmotic lysis and lysis by solubilization even if the boundary between them is not clearly defined. Another specific mechanism based on the formation of membrane pores is suggested in the particular case of saponins. The lytic potency of a surfactant is related to its affinity for the membrane and the modification of the lipid membrane curvature. This is to be related to the surfactant shape defined by its hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties but also by experimental conditions. As a consequence, prediction of the hemolytic potency of a given surfactant is challenging. Several studies are focused on the relation between surfactant erythrolytic potency and their physico-chemical parameters such as the critical micellar concentration (CMC), the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), the surfactant membrane/water partition coefficient (K) or the packing parameter (P). The CMC is one of the most important factors considered even if a lytic activity cut-off effect points out that the only consideration of CMC not enough predictive. The relation K.CMC must be considered in addition to the CMC to predict the surfactant lytic capacity within the same family of non ionic surfactant. Those surfactant structure/lytic activity studies demonstrate the requirement to take into account a combination of physico-chemical parameters to understand and foresee surfactant lytic potency.

  16. Factors influencing surfactant composition in the newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Obladen, M

    1978-07-01

    In order to evaluate the surfactant maturation of the neonate, tracheal aspirates were analyzed in 84 newborn infants with 12h of birth. Using 2-dimensional thin-layer chromatography, 9 different phospholipids were identified. Dynamic surface tension measurements were performed with a modified Wilhelmy balance. Five different groups of infants with typical phospholipid patterns were characterized: i.e., 1. Normal term newborn. 2. RDS in the preterm infant. 3. Acceleration of lung maturity in preterm infants without RDS. 4. Retardation in term infants with RDS. 5. Therapeutic induction of pulmonary maturity in preterm infants following maternal glucocorticoid administration. Mature lung effluent contains high concentrations of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phsophatidylglycerol (PG). In infants with RDS, PC is low and PG absent. Accelerated lung maturity was observed after chronic prenatal stress, such as prolonged rupture of the membranes, chronic vaginal bleeding, and maternal hepatitis or drug addiction. Retardation of pulmonary maturity was seen in infants with alpha-1-AT-deficiency, maternal diabetes and maternal hypothyroidism. Administration of methylprednisolone to the mother 24 h to 72h before birth induced both the synthesis of PC and PG in the preterm infants, resulting in an almost full-term phospholipid pattern as early as 31 weeks of gestation. The significance of these factors on the pathogenesis of RDS is discussed.

  17. Adsorption of surfactants on mineral oxide surfaces from aqueous solutions. Part 1. Isomerically pure anionic surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Scamehorn, J.F.; Schechter, R.S.; Wade, W.H.

    1982-02-01

    The adsorption of surfactants on minerals is detrimental to surfactant-enhanced oil recovery. To minimize adsorption, the forces tending to cause it must be understood. This requires the study of relatively simple, well-defined systems. The majority of surfactant adsorption studies on mineral oxides has been made with surfactant mixtures and not with monoisomerically pure species. Some of the observed results may be due to complex surfactant intercomponent interactions. In this study, the adsorption of 3 isomerically pure alkylbenzene sulfonates was measured on alumina and kaolinite from very low concentrations to well above the critical micelle concentration and a thermodynamic model was developed, which describes the observed isotherms. 59 references.

  18. Human Lung Angiotensin Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Friedland, Joan; Silverstein, Emanuel; Drooker, Martin; Setton, Charlotte

    1981-01-01

    To enable its immunohistologic localization, angiotensin converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1) from human lung was solubilized by trypsinization and purified ∼2,660-fold to apparent homogeneity from a washed lung particulate fraction. The specific activity of pure enzyme was estimated to be 117 μmol/min per mg protein with the substrate hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine. Consistent with previously described lung enzyme studies, catalytic activity was strongly inhibited by EDTA, O-phenanthroline, SQ 20,881, and SQ 14,225 and increased by CoCl2. SQ 20,881 was a somewhat more potent inhibitor than SQ 14,225, unlike rabbit lung enzyme. The Michaelis constant (Km) with hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine was 1.6 mM. The molecular weight was estimated at 150,000 from sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single polypeptide chain estimated at 130,000 daltons. Rabbit antibody to human lung enzyme was prepared by parenteral administration of pure angiotensin-converting enzyme in Freund's adjuvant. Rabbit antibody to human lung angiotensin-converting enzyme appeared to crossreact weakly with the rabbit enzyme and strongly inhibited the catalytic activity of the enzymes from human serum, lung, and lymph node. The specificity of the rabbit antibody and purity of the final human lung enzyme preparation was suggested by the single precipitin lines obtained by radial double immunodiffusion, and by the coincidence of enzyme catalytic activity and immunoreactivity on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with both relatively pure and highly impure enzymes. Generally applicable sensitive analysis of acrylamide gels for immunoreactivity (and subsequently for any other activity) by use of intact gel slices in radial double immunodiffusion was devised. Human lung enzyme was very tightly bound to and catalytically active on anti-human enzyme antibody covalently bound to Sepharose 4B, and could not be readily dissociated without

  19. Laminar flow effects in the coil planet centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1984-01-01

    The coil planet centrifuge designed by Ito employs flow of a single liquid phase, through a rotating coiled tube in a centrifugal force field, to provide a separation of particles based on sedimentation rates. Mathematical solutions are derived for the linear differential equations governing particle behavior in the coil planet centrifuge device. These solutions are then applied as the basis of a model for optimizing particle separations.

  20. [Design and optimization of a centrifugal pump for CPCR].

    PubMed

    Pei, J; Tan, X; Chen, K; Li, X

    2000-06-01

    Requirements for an optimal centrifugal pump, the vital component in the equipment for cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation(CPCR), have been presented. The performance of the Sarns centrifugal pump (Sarns, Inc./3M, Ann arbor, MI, U.S.A) was tested. The preliminarily optimized model for CPCR was designed according to the requirements of CPCR and to the comparison and analysis of several clinically available centrifugal pumps. The preliminary tests using the centrifugal pump made in our laboratory(Type CPCR-I) have confirmed the design and the optimization.

  1. Autobalancing and FDIR for a space-based centrifuge prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward; Mah, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes centrifuge-related work performed at the Smart Systems Research Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center's Computational Sciences Division from 1995 through 2003. The goal is to develop an automated system that will sense an imbalance (both static and dynamic3) in a centrifuge and issue control commands to drive counterweights to eliminate the effects of the imbalance. This autobalancing development began when the ISS centrifuge design was not yet finalized, and was designed to work with the SSRL Centrifuge laboratory prototype, constructed in 1993-1995. Significant differences between that prototype and the current International Space Station (ISS) Centrifuge design are that: the spin axis for the SSRL Centrifuge prototype can translate freely in x and y, but not wobble, whereas the ISS centrifuge spin axis has 3 translational and two rotational degrees of freedom, supported by a vibration 34. The imbalance sensors are strained gauges both in the rotor and the stator, measuring the imbalance forces, whereas the ISS centrifuge uses eddy current displacement sensors to measure the displacements resulting from imbalance. High fidelity autobalancing and FDIR systems (for both counterweights and strain gauges) are developed and tested in MATLAB simulation, for the SSRL Centrifuge configuration. Hardware implementation of the autobalancing technology was begun in 1996, but was terminated due to lack of funding. The project lay dormant until 2001-2002 when the FDIR capability was added.

  2. Lube oil centrifuge saves Odeco $360,000/year

    SciTech Connect

    Closs, D.E.

    1983-05-01

    Purifying centrifuges were installed in the offshore drilling operation diesel engines of the Odeco Co. of New Orleans. The centrifuges extend filter life fourfold, eliminate the need to change oil at all, and defer the need for costly overhauls indefinitely. The Alfa-Laval built centrifuges were placed on 23 mobile rigs that Odeco has working in the Gulf of Mexico, and they paid for their cost twice over during the first year of operation. Originally, a lubricant centrifuge was tested aboard the Ocean Tempest. The results were so remarkable that similar installations were placed on all other vessels in the domestic drilling division.

  3. Effects of centrifugation on gonadal and adrenocortical steroids in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakihana, R.; Butte, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Many endocrine systems are sensitive to external changes in the environment. Both the pituitary adrenal and pituitary gonadal systems are affected by stress including centrifugation stress. The effect of centrifugation on the pituitary gonadal and pituitary adrenocortical systems was examined by measuring the gonadal and adrenal steroids in the plasma and brain following different duration and intensity of centrifugation stress in rats. Two studies were completed and the results are presented. The second study was carried out to describe the developmental changes of brain, plasma and testicular testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in Sprague Dawley rats so that the effect of centrifugation stress on the pituitary gonadal syatem could be better evaluated in future studies.

  4. Effects of Prolonged Centrifugation on Orthostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Malcolm M..; Hargens, A. R.; Yates, B. J.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A feasibility study conducted on the Ames 20-G Human Centrifuge examined how well humans can maintain orthostatic tolerance during and after prolonged exposures to hypergravity. Three adult males lived for periods of 22 hours in the centrifuge while it was at rest (1.00 G), and while it rotated at 9.38 RPM to provide 1.25 G-total at the mean radius of 7.62 m. Two participants also experienced 22-hour habitation sessions at 11.46 RPM, which provided 1.50 G-total. Both before and after each habitation session, the participants were given gradual onset rate (GOR) acceleration profiles at 0.067 G/sec to determine their Gz tolerance. In addition, cardiovascular responses were compared while subjects were supine, siting, and standing at various times during the habitation (stand test), and cardiovascular responsiveness was determined using a lower body negative pressure tilt table (LBNPTT) at the beginning of the experiment and after each session. Post-Pre changes in G tolerance were -0.33 (mean) +/- 0.11 (std. error) Gz for habitation at 1.00 G, -0.02 +/- 0.12 Gz for habitation at 1.25 G, and +0.41 +/- 0.13 Gz for habitation at 1.50 G. Performance on the stand test generally improved with duration of habitation in hypergravity. Our results suggest that habitation in a confined chamber at 1.00 G reduces G tolerance and leads to lowered LBNPTT tolerance. Exposure to increased G in the centrifuge leads to enhanced performance on the stand test, and to increased GOR acceleration tolerance, but only when fluid balance is maintained; when motion sickness and negative fluid balance were observed, G tolerance was reduced. The data indicate that enhanced G tolerance can result from prolonged exposure to hypergravity, but that these changes are complex and depend on multiple underlying physiological processes.

  5. From the archives of the AFIP: Lung disease in premature neonates: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Agrons, Geoffrey A; Courtney, Sherry E; Stocker, J Thomas; Markowitz, Richard I

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary disease is the most important cause of morbidity in preterm neonates, whose lungs are often physiologically and morphologically immature. Surfactant deficiency in immature lungs triggers a cascade of alveolar instability and collapse, capillary leak edema, and hyaline membrane formation. The term respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) has come to represent the clinical expression of surfactant deficiency and its nonspecific histologic counterpart, hyaline membrane disease. Historically, chest radiographs of infants with RDS predictably demonstrated decreased pulmonary expansion, symmetric generalized reticulogranular lung opacities, and air bronchograms. Refinements in perinatal medicine, including antenatal glucocorticoid administration, surfactant replacement therapy, and increasingly sophisticated ventilatory strategies have decreased the prevalence of RDS and air leak, altered familiar radiographic features, and lowered the threshold of potential viability to a gestational age of approximately 23 weeks. Alveolar paucity and pulmonary interstitial thickness in these profoundly premature neonates impair normal gas exchange and may necessitate prolonged mechanical ventilation, increasing the risk of lung injury. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), alternatively termed chronic lung disease of infancy, is a disorder of lung injury and repair originally ascribed to positive-pressure mechanical ventilation and oxygen toxicity. Before the advent of surfactant replacement therapy, chest radiographs of infants with classic BPD demonstrated coarse reticular lung opacities, cystic lucencies, and markedly disordered lung aeration that reflected alternating regions of alveolar septal fibrosis and hyperinflated normal lung parenchyma. In the current era of surfactant replacement, BPD is increasingly a disorder of very low-birth-weight neonates with arrested alveolar and pulmonary vascular development, minimal alveolar septal fibrosis and inflammation, and more subtle

  6. RADIOAUTOGRAPHY OF CHOLESTEROL IN LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Darrah, Hilary K.; Hedley-Whyte, John; Hedley-Whyte, E. Tessa

    1971-01-01

    30 Swiss albino mice aged 8 days were injected intraperitoneally with 0.2 ml of a solution of 4% N,N-dimethyl-formamide in 5% dextrose in water containing cholesterol-1,2-3H (∼1 mCi/ml). Lung tissue was embedded in an Epon mixture after either acetone and propylene oxide dehydration, partial ethanol and Epon 812 dehydration, or the precipitation of cholesterol by digitonin succeeded by partial dehydration. The distribution of cholesterol-1,2-3H in lung parenchyma in 1µ Epon section radioautograms was compared with that in frozen section radioautograms and was found to be independent of the manner of tissue processing. Grain distribution in the tissue was essentially the same whether 16, 63, 93, or 100% radioactivity was retained in the lung. However, grain distribution in the alveolar spaces differed, presumably due to displacement of pulmonary surfactant, which contains cholesterol. Intracellular distribution of cholesterol, in electron microscope radioautograms, was the same with either 51% or 93% retention of radioactivity in the lung. Loss of radioactivity into the various processing solutions was monitored. The various processing techniques have different drawbacks. PMID:19866763

  7. Cosurfactant in preflush for surfactant flood system

    SciTech Connect

    Glinsmann, G.R.; Hedges, J.H.

    1981-06-23

    In a post-primary oil recovery process involving the sequential addition of a saline preflush, a surfactant system comprising of a surfactant, a cosurfactant and brine when added to the preflush improves recovery. If desired, cosurfactant can also be added to a subsequent injected mobility buffer. The resulting system gives extraordinarily high recovery of oil.

  8. Hyaluronan decreases surfactant inactivation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen W; Goerke, Jon; Clements, John A; Taeusch, H William

    2005-02-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an anionic polymer and a constituent of alveolar fluid that can bind proteins, phospholipids, and water. Previous studies have established that nonionic polymers improve the surface activity of pulmonary surfactants by decreasing inactivation of surfactant. In this work, we investigate whether HA can also have beneficial effects when added to surfactants. We used a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer to measure mixtures of several commercially available pulmonary surfactants or native calf surfactant with and without serum inactivation. Surface properties such as equilibrium surface tension, minimum and maximum surface tensions on compression and expansion of a surface film, and degree of surface area reduction required to reach a surface tension of 10 mN/m were measured. In the presence of serum, addition of HA dramatically improved the surface activities of all four surfactants and in some cases in the absence of serum as well. These results indicate that HA reduces inactivation of surfactants caused by serum and add evidence that endogenous HAs may interact with alveolar surfactant under normal and abnormal conditions.

  9. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  10. Measuring surfactant concentration in plating solutions

    DOEpatents

    Bonivert, William D.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Hachman, John T.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the concentration of surfactants in a electrolyte containing metal ions includes applying a DC bias voltage and a modulated voltage to a counter electrode. The phase angle between the modulated voltage and the current response to the modulated voltage at a working electrode is correlated to the surfactant concentration.

  11. Kinetics of spreading of surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starov, Victor; Kovalchuk, Nina; Trybala, Anna; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    Wetting properties of surfactant solutions are determined by adsorption of surfactant at all interfaces involved. Adsorption on liquid/air and liquid/solid interface depends on surfactant chemistry. That is why the lower surface tension does not result automatically in better wetting properties. Spreading of surfactant solutions causes redistribution of surfactant at the interface and in the bulk. As a result surface concentration gradients appear and spreading kinetics is influenced by solutal Marangoni effect. Disjoining pressure, being the driving force of spreading also depends on the local surfactant concentration. Therefore spreading kinetics of surfactant solutions differ considerably from those of pure liquids. The results of experimental study on spreading kinetics of synergetic surfactant mixtures on hydrophobic substrates such as polyethylene and sylanised glass are presented for the two different regimes: complete and partial wetting and compared with the spreading kinetics of a pure liquid in those regimes. EPSRC Grant Numbers EP/J010502/1, EP/D077869/1, EU Marie Curie CoWet Grant, by ESA under Grants FASES and PASTA, and COST MP1106 Project.

  12. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

  13. Oil recovery by fluorochemical surfactant waterflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, T.W.

    1984-07-17

    The instant invention relates to the recovery of oil from subterranean oil reservoirs involving the injection of an aqueous based liquid containing a fluorochemical surfactant possessing an oleophobic-hydrophobic fluoroaliphatic group, a hydrophilic group and an oleophilic group, optionally in conjugation with a conventional enhanced oil recovery surfactant.

  14. Development of a 3D circular microfluidic centrifuge for the separation of mixed particles by using their different centrifuge times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, M. J.; Nguyen, X. D.; Park, D. H.; Go, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a circular microfluidic centrifuge with two inlets and two outlets to separate mixed microparticles with a specially designed sample injection hole. To separate the mixed particles, it uses a rotational flow, generated in a chamber by counter primary flows in the microchannels. The shape and sizes of the circular microfluidic centrifuge have been designed through numerical evaluation to have a large relative centrifugal force. The difference of centrifuge times of the mixed particles of 1 μm and 6 μm was determined to be 8.2 s at an inlet Reynolds number of 500 and a sample Reynolds number of 20. In the experiment, this was measured to be about 10 s. From the separation of the two polymer particles analogous to the representative sizes of platelets and red blood cells, the circular microfluidic centrifuge shows a potential to separate human blood cells size-selectively by using the difference of centrifuge times.

  15. Theory and experiments on centrifuge cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. M.; Holsapple, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Centrifuge experimental techniques provide possibilities for laboratory simulation of ground motion and cratering effects due to explosive loadings. The results of a similarity analysis for the thermomechanical response of a continuum show that increased gravity is a necessary condition for subscale testing when identical materials for both model and prototype are being used. The general similarity requirements for this type of subscale testing are examined both theoretically and experimentally. The similarity analysis is used to derive the necessary and sufficient requirements due to the general balance and jump equations and gives relations among all the scale factors for size, density, stress, body forces, internal energy, heat supply, heat conduction, heat of detonation, and time. Additional constraints due to specific choices of material constitutive equations are evaluated separately. The class of constitutive equations that add no further requirements is identified. For this class of materials, direct simulation of large-scale cratering events at small scale on the centrifuge is possible and independent of the actual constitutive equations. For a rate-independent soil it is shown that a small experiment at gravity g and energy E is similar to a large event at 1 G but with energy equal to g3E. Consequently, experiments at 500 G with 8 grams of explosives can be used to simulate a kiloton in the field. A series of centrifuge experiments was performed to validate the derived similarity requirements and to determine the practicality of applying the technique to dry granular soils having little or no cohesion. Ten shots using Ottawa sand at various gravities confirmed reproducibility of results in the centrifuge environment, provided information on particle size effects, and demonstrated the applicability of the derived similitude requirements. These experiments used 0.5-4 grams of pentaerythritol-tetranitrate (PETN) and 1.7 grams of lead-azide explosives. They

  16. Comparison of DPPC and DPPG environments in pulmonary surfactant models.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Michael R; Temple, Sara; Stewart, June; Keough, Kevin M W

    2007-07-01

    Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance was used to monitor lipid acyl-chain orientational order in suspensions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) containing Ca(2+) and the lung surfactant proteins SP-A and SP-B separately and together. To distinguish between protein-lipid interactions involving the PC and PG lipid headgroups and to examine whether such interactions might influence spatial distribution of lipids within the bilayer, acyl chains on either the DPPC or the DPPG component of the mixture were deuterated. The lipid components of the resulting mixtures were thus either DPPC-d(62)/DPPG (7:3) or DPPC/DPPG-d(62) (7:3), respectively. SP-A had little effect on DPPC-d(62) chain order but did narrow the temperature range over which DPPG-d(62) ordered at the liquid-crystal-to-gel transition. No segregation of lipid components was seen for temperatures above or below the transition. Near the transition, though, there was evidence that SP-A promoted preferential depletion of DPPG from liquid crystalline domains in the temperature range over which gel and liquid crystal domains coexist. SP-B lowered average chain order of both lipids both above and below the main transition. The perturbations of chain order by SP-A and SP-B together were smaller than by SP-B alone. This reduction in perturbation of the lipids by the additional presence of SP-A likely indicated a strong interaction between SP-A and SP-B. The competitive lipid-lipid, lipid-protein, and protein-protein interactions suggested by these observations presumably facilitate the reorganization of surfactant material inherent in the transformation from lamellar bodies to a functional surfactant layer.

  17. Lactate metabolism in the fetal rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, M.J.; Brown, D.J.; Dooley, M.

    1986-05-01

    Lactate is frequently overlooked as a potential substrate for the fetal lung, even though it is present in the fetal circulation in concentrations as high as 8 mM. These high concentrations, coupled with the relatively low levels of glucose in the fetal blood, may indicate that lactate can substitute for glucose in pulmonary energy generation and phospholipid synthesis. A series of experiments was therefore undertaken in order to investigate the role of lactate in perinatal pulmonary development. Explants from 30 day gestation fetal rabbit lungs were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer supplemented with 3 mM (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose and varying levels of lactate. In the absence of medium lactate, fetal rabbit lung explants were capable of producing lactate at a rate of approximately 200 etamoles/mg protein/hour. The addition of lactate to the bathing medium immediately reduced net lactate production and above 4 mM, fetal rabbit lung explants became net utilizers of lactate. Media lactate concentrations of 2.5 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM also decreased glucose incorporation into total tissue disaturated phosphatidylcholine by approximately 20%, 35%, and 45%, respectively. Glucose incorporation into surfactant phosphatidylcholine was also reduced by approximately 50%, when lactate was present in the incubation medium at a concentration of 5 mM. Additional experiments also revealed that fetal lung lactate dehydrogenase activity was almost twice that found in the adult rabbit lung. These data indicate that lactate may be an important carbon source for the developing lung and could be a significant component in the manufacture of surfactant phosphatidylcholine during late gestation.

  18. Interaction of Surfactants with Block Polyelectrolyte Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichton, Mark; Bhatia, Surita

    2002-03-01

    We present SANS and rheology for poly(styrene)-poly(acrylic acid) polymers in aqueous solutions. These polymers self-assemble to form spherical micelles in aqueous solutions, and the micelles associate to create elastic, transparent gels at moderate polymer concentrations. The addition of cationic and anionic surfactants (DTAB and SDS) can be used to modify the associative interactions and solution rheology. Addition of an anionic surfactant acts to screen attractive interactions and causes a monotonic decrease in the elastic modulus. However, the addition of a cationic surfactant appears to initially induce a stronger intermicellar attraction, leading to gels with a higher elastic modulus. At higher surfactant concentrations, the cationic surfactant begins to screen intermicellar association, leading to a decrease in the strength of the gel.

  19. Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L. ); Lewis, B.A. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    At one installation, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of the research program in which twenty-one surfactants were screened for possible use to mobilize the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on actual contaminated soil samples obtained from the site. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  1. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  2. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  3. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    Lung diffusion testing measures how well the lungs exchange gases. This is an important part of lung testing , because ... gases do not move normally across the lung tissues into the blood vessels of the lung. This ...

  4. Collapsed lung (pneumothorax)

    MedlinePlus

    Air around the lung; Air outside the lung; Pneumothorax dropped lung; Spontaneous pneumothorax ... Collapsed lung can be caused by an injury to the lung. Injuries can include a gunshot or knife wound ...

  5. Lung disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - lung disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on lung disease : American Lung Association -- www.lung.org National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov ...

  6. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction.

  7. Certain surfactants significantly enhance the activity of antibiotics in the mouse model of MTB and drug resistant MTB infection and effectively remove the bacteria from a pulmonary cavity in human ex-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Risin, Semyon A; Hunter, Robert L; Kobak, Mikhail; Ariel, Boris; Vishnevsky, Boris; Erokhin, Vladislav; Demikhova, Olga; Bocharova, Irina; Stoops, James K

    2014-01-01

    Surfactants have the potential to overcome natural resistance of MTB to antibiotics which is mediated by barriers that impede the penetration of drugs to their targets. A major component of this barrier is trehalose dimycolate (TDM) which surrounds the bacteria with a thick lipid shield. In this study dodecyl maltoside (DDM) was evaluated for this purpose. This surfactant is an excellent cellular permeabilizing agent with associated low toxicity. The administration of the surfactant as an aerosol into the lungs of the infected mice achieved a 5-10 times enhancement of the isoniazid (INH) treatment gauged by the reduction of the colony forming units. This study also established proof of principle that surfactants alone applied as an aerosol can reduce the bacteria count in lungs infected with MTB. The potential of the surfactant in the therapy of human cavitary TB was also investigated using a surgically removed lung from a patient with extreme drug resistant MTB (XDR-TB). A cavity in this lung was flushed with DDM solution ex-vivo. The procedure readily removed the bacteria, excessive amounts of TDM and necrotic tissue from the cavity. These studies demonstrate that DDM can disrupt the layers of TDM and free embedded MTB and, consequently, surfactants have promise as a proficient modality for the treatment of pulmonary MTB.

  8. Postcardiotomy centrifugal assist: a single surgeon's experience.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Wagner-Mann, Colette C

    2002-11-01

    Because of the infrequent application of cardiac assist devices for postcardiotomy heart failure, most published reports include the results of learning curves from multiple surgeons. Between October 1986 and June 2001, a single surgeon used 35 Sarns Centrifugal Pumps as ventricular assist devices in 21 patients with severe hemodynamic compromise after open heart surgery (0.88% incidence). Patients' ages ranged from 39 to 77 (mean, 59.6 years). Three patients required right ventricular assist devices, 4 left ventricular assist devices, and 14 had biventricular assist devices. For all, the indication for application was inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass despite multiple inotropes and intraaortic balloon pumping. All were expected to be intraoperative deaths without further mechanical assistance. Patients were assisted from 2 to 434 h (median, 48 h). Fifteen patients (71.4%) were weaned from device(s), and 11 patients (52.4%) were hospital survivors. Actuarial survival in those dismissed from the hospital was 78% at 5 years and 39% at 10 years. Patients facing certain demise after cardiac surgery can be salvaged with temporary centrifugal mechanical assist. Results are competitive with that achieved with more sophisticated devices. Hospital survivors enjoy reasonable longevity.

  9. Centrifugation of coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Weintraub, Murray; Weiss, Milton L.; Akhtar, Sayeed

    1980-06-01

    The application of the continuous solid bowl centrifuge to the removal of solids from coal liquefaction products was investigated. The centrifuge removed from 23 to 88% of the input ash from 8 to 73% of the input organic benzene insolubles while flow rates, viscosities, and dam heights were varied. Viscosity ..mu.., effluent liquid rate Q/sub e/, and Ambler's geometric parameter ..sigma.. were graphically correlated with attained separations. The separation was relatively insensitive to the variables, as a 50-fold increase in Q/sub e//..sigma.. corresponded to a decrease in ash removal only from 84% to 60% and to a decrease in organic solids removal only from 77% to 22%. Organic solids removal was poorer and more erratic than ash removal because of the lesser density differences and greater size variability of the organics. Ancillary studies demonstrated that coal liquefaction products may behave as a Bingham Plastic fluid, and that this results in an absolute limit on the attainable solids separation. Additional studies showed that little difference in density may exist between the organic solids and liquids, and that effects of aging may threaten the validity of viscosity measurements.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Centrifugal Compressor Stabilization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    Results from a series of experiments to investigate techniques for extending the stable flow range of a centrifugal compressor are reported. The research was conducted in a high-speed centrifugal compressor at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The stabilizing effect of steadily flowing air-streams injected into the vaneless region of a vane-island diffuser through the shroud surface is described. Parametric variations of injection angle, injection flow rate, number of injectors, injector spacing, and injection versus bleed were investigated for a range of impeller speeds and tip clearances. Both the compressor discharge and an external source were used for the injection air supply. The stabilizing effect of flow obstructions created by tubes that were inserted into the diffuser vaneless space through the shroud was also investigated. Tube immersion into the vaneless space was varied in the flow obstruction experiments. Results from testing done at impeller design speed and tip clearance are presented. Surge margin improved by 1.7 points using injection air that was supplied from within the compressor. Externally supplied injection air was used to return the compressor to stable operation after being throttled into surge. The tubes, which were capped to prevent mass flux, provided 9.3 points of additional surge margin over the baseline surge margin of 11.7 points.

  11. Some aversive characteristics of centrifugally generated gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, F.

    1973-01-01

    The effective weight of rats was manipulated by centrifugation. Two effective weight levels were obtained. In three escape avoidance conditions a lever press produced a change from a base level of 2.1 g to a response level of 1.1 g. In a punishment condition a response produced a change from a 1.1 g level to a 2.1 g level and in an extinction condition responses had no effect on the 2.1 g effective weight level present. All changes took 30 sec and were maintained for an additional 10 sec before a return to base level was initiated. When responses occurred closer together than the 40 sec, they delayed the return to base level by 40 sec. This 40 sec interval is referred to as response-contingent-time. The response rate and amount of response-contingent-time served as the data. The results confirmed previous data that centrifugation is aversive. The results are interpreted as indicating that the aversiveness is attributable to the increase in effective weight, and that rats can discriminate the different angular velocity-radius of rotation combinations used.

  12. Wave Augmented Diffusers for Centrifugal Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Skoch, Gary J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual device is introduced which would utilize unsteady wave motion to slow and turn flows in the diffuser section of a centrifugal compressor. The envisioned device would substantially reduce the size of conventional centrifugal diffusers by eliminating the relatively large ninety degree bend needed to turn the flow from the radial/tangential to the axial direction. The bend would be replaced by a wall and the flow would instead exit through a series of rotating ports located on a disk, adjacent to the diffuser hub, and fixed to the impeller shaft. The ports would generate both expansion and compression waves which would rapidly transition from the hub/shroud (axial) direction to the radial/tangential direction. The waves would in turn induce radial/tangential and axial flow. This paper presents a detailed description of the device. Simplified cycle analysis and performance results are presented which were obtained using a time accurate, quasi-one-dimensional CFD code with models for turning, port flow conditions, and losses due to wall shear stress. The results indicate that a periodic wave system can be established which yields diffuser performance comparable to a conventional diffuser. Discussion concerning feasibility, accuracy, and integration follow.

  13. Centrifugally Stimulated Exospheric Ion Escape at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the transport of ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere magnetosphere of Mercury. We show that, because of small spatial scales, the centrifugal effect due to curvature of the E B drift paths can lead to significant particle energization in the parallel direction. We demonstrate that because of this effect, ions with initial speed smaller than the escape speed such as those produced via thermal desorption can overcome gravity and escape into the magnetosphere. The escape route of this low-energy exosphere originating material is largely controlled by the magnetospheric convection rate. This escape route spreads over a narrower range of altitudes when the convection rate increases. Bulk transport of low-energy planetary material thus occurs within a limited region of space once moderate magnetospheric convection is established. These results suggest that, via release of material otherwise gravitationally trapped, the E B related centrifugal acceleration is an important mechanism for the net supply of plasma to the magnetosphere of Mercury.

  14. Surfactant replacement therapy--economic impact.

    PubMed

    Pejaver, R K; al Hifzi, I; Aldussari, S

    2001-06-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS). As widespread use of surfactant is becoming a reality, it is important to assess the economic implications of this new form of therapy. A comparison study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Northwest Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Among 75 infants who received surfactant for RDS and similar number who were managed during time period just before the surfactant was available, but by set criteria would have made them eligible for surfactant. All other management modalities except surfactant were the same for all these babies. Based on the intensity of monitoring and nursing care required by the baby, the level of care was divided as: Level IIIA, IIIB, Level II, Level I. The cost per day per bed for each level was calculated, taking into account the use of hospital immovable equipment, personal salaries of nursing, medical, ancillary staff, overheads and maintenance, depreciation and replacement costs. Medications used, procedures done, TPN, oxygen, were all added to individual patient's total expenditure. 75 infants in the Surfactant group had 62 survivors. They spent a total of 4300 days in hospital. (av 69.35) Out of which 970 d (av 15.65 per patient) were ventilated days. There were 56 survivors in the non-surfactant group of 75. They had spent a total of 5023 days in the hospital (av 89.69/patient) out of which 1490 were ventilated days (av 26.60 d). Including the cost of surfactant (two doses), cost of hospital stay for each infant taking the average figures of stay would be SR 118, 009.75 per surfactant treated baby and SR 164, 070.70 per non-surfactant treated baby. The difference of 46,061 SR is 39.03% more in non-surfactant group. One Saudi rial = 8 Rs (approx at the time study was carried out.) Medical care cost varies from place to place. However, it is definitely cost-effective where surfactant is concerned. Quality adjusted

  15. Early mechanical ventilation is deleterious after aspiration-induced lung injury in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hermon, Michael M; Wassermann, Esther; Pfeiler, Claudia; Pollak, Arnold; Redl, Heinz; Strohmaier, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether mechanical ventilation after aspiration is deleterious when started before surfactant therapy. Gas exchange and lung mechanics were measured in rabbits after aspiration either mechanically ventilated before or after lavage with diluted surfactant or Ringer's solution. Lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of 2 mL/kg of a betain/HCl pepsin mixture. After 30 min of spontaneous breathing, ventilation was started in 12 rabbits, which were then treated by lavage with diluted surfactant (15 mL/kg body weight; 5.3 mg/mL, group MVpre S) or with Ringer's solution (1 mL/kg; group MVpre R). Another 12 rabbits were treated by lavage while spontaneously breathing and were then connected to the ventilator (MVpost S and MVpost R). Sham control rabbits were mechanically ventilated for 4 h. At the end of experiment, PaO2/FiO2 ratio in MVpost S was five times higher than in MVpre S (P=0.0043). Lung mechanics measurements showed significant difference between MVpre S and MVpost S (P=0.0072). There was histopathologic evidence of decreased lung injury in MVpost S. Immediate initiation of ventilation is harmful when lung injury is induced by aspiration. Further investigations are needed to clarify whether the timing of lavage with diluted surfactant has an impact on the treatment of patients with aspiration or comparable types of direct lung injury. PMID:15614133

  16. View of new centrifuge at Flight Acceleration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    View of the new centrifuge at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), located in the Flight Acceleration Facility, bldg 29. The 50-ft. arm can swing the three man gondola to create g-forces astronauts will experience during controlled flight and during reentry. The centrifuge was designed primarily for training Apollo astronauts.

  17. Coil planet centrifugation as a means for small particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    The coil planet centrifuge uses a centrifugal force field to provide separation of particles based on differences in sedimentation rates by flow through a rotating coiled tube. Three main separations are considered: (1) single phase fresh sheep and human erythrocytes, (2) single phase fixed heep and human erythrocytes, and (3) electrophoretically enhanced single phase fresh sheep and human erythrocytes.

  18. Preparation and characterization of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianxi; Qing, Yanhong; Wang, Tong; Zhu, Runliang; Wei, Jingming; Tao, Qi; Yuan, Peng; He, Hongping

    2011-08-15

    A series of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites (ZSMMs) were synthesized using montmorillonite and three zwitterionic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths at different concentrations [0.2-4.0 cation exchange capacity (CEC)]. These ZSMMs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis and differential thermo-gravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses. The zwitterionic surfactant could be intercalated into the interlayer spaces of montmorillonites and causing interlayer space-swelling. From XRD measurements, the amount of the surfactants loaded and the basal spacing increased with surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. One endothermic DTG peak occurred at ~390 °C, which was assigned to the decomposition of the zwitterionic surfactant on the organo-montmorillonites from 0.2 to 0.6 CEC. When the surfactant loading was increased, a new endothermic peak appeared at ~340 °C. From the microstructures of these ZSMMs, the mechanism of zwitterionic surfactant adsorption was proposed. At relatively low loadings of the zwitterionic surfactant, most of surfactants enter the spacing by an ion-exchange mechanism and are adsorbed onto the interlayer cation sites. When the concentration of the zwitterionic surfactant exceeds the CEC of montmorillonite, the surfactant molecules then adhere to the surface-adsorbed surfactant. Some surfactants enter the interlayers, whereas the others are attached to the clay surface. When the concentration of surfactant increases further beyond 2.0 CEC, the surfactants may occupy the inter-particle space within the house-of-cards aggregate structure.

  19. Glucocorticoid metabolism in the developing lung: adrenal-like synthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Provost, Pierre R; Boucher, Eric; Tremblay, Yves

    2013-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential to normal lung development. They participate in the regulation of important developmental events including morphological changes, and lung maturation leading to the surge of surfactant synthesis by type II epithelial cells. Antenatal GC is administered to mothers at risk of premature delivery to reduce the risk of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Sex differences were reported in RDS, in the efficiency of antenatal GC treatment independently of surfactant levels, and in surfactant lipid synthesis. Type II epithelial cell maturation is regulated by epithelial-fibroblast cell-cell communication and involves paracrine factors secreted by fibroblasts under the stimulatory effect of GC. This positive action of GC can be inhibited by androgens through the androgen receptor (AR) present in fibroblasts. In fact, lung development is regulated not only by GC and androgens but also by GC and androgen metabolisms within the developing lung. We recently reviewed the metabolism of androgens in the fetal lung [45]. Here, we review multiple aspects of GC metabolism in the developing lung including inactivation and re-activation by 11β-HSDs, synthesis from the adrenal-like synthesis pathway expressed within the lung and the putative role of CRH and ACTH originating from lung in the regulation of this pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Pregnancy and Steroids'.

  20. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  1. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-15

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  2. Fluorescence emission of pyrene in surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, Lucas; Novo, Mercedes; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2015-01-01

    The systematic description of the complex photophysical behaviour of pyrene in surfactant solutions in combination with a quantitative model for the surfactant concentrations reproduces with high accuracy the steady-state and the time resolved fluorescence intensity of pyrene in surfactant solutions near the cmc, both in the monomer and in the excimer emission bands. We present concise model equations that can be used for the analysis of the pyrene fluorescence intensity in order to estimate fundamental parameters of the pyrene-surfactant system, such as the binding equilibrium constant K of pyrene to a given surfactant micelle, the rate constant of excimer formation in micelles, and the equilibrium constant of pyrene-surfactant quenching. The values of the binding equilibrium constant K(TX100)=3300·10³ M⁻¹ and K(SDS)=190·10³ M⁻¹ for Triton X-100 (TX100) and SDS micelles, respectively, show that the partition of pyrene between bulk water and micelles cannot be ignored, even at relatively high surfactant concentrations above the cmc. We apply the model to the determination of the cmc from the pyrene fluorescence intensity, especially from the intensity ratio at two vibronic bands in the monomer emission or from the ratio of excimer to monomer emission intensity. We relate the finite width of the transition region below and above the cmc with the observed changes in the pyrene fluorescence in this region.

  3. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  4. Aqueous Foam Stabilized by Tricationic Amphiphilic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerschap, Seth; Marafino, John; McKenna, Kristin; Caran, Kevin; Feitosa, Klebert; Kevin Caran's Research Group Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The unique surface properties of amphiphilic molecules have made them widely used in applications where foaming, emulsifying or coating processes are needed. The development of novel architectures with multi-cephalic/tailed molecules have enhanced their anti-bacterial activity in connection with tail length and the nature of the head group. Here we report on the foamability of two triple head double, tail cationic surfactants (M-1,14,14, M-P, 14,14) and a triple head single tail cationic surfactant (M-1,1,14) and compare them with commercially available single headed, single tailed anionic and cationic surfactants (SDS,CTAB and DTAB). The results show that bubble rupture rate decrease with the length of the carbon chain irrespective of head structure. The growth rate of bubbles with short tailed surfactants (SDS) and longer, single tailed tricationic surfactants (M-1,1,14) was shown to be twice as high as those with longer tailed surfactants (CTAB, M-P,14,14, M-1,14,14). This fact was related to the size variation of bubbles, where the foams made with short tail surfactants exhibited higher polydispersivity than those with short tails. This suggests that foams with tricationic amphiphilics are closed linked to their tail length and generally insensitive to their head structure.

  5. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Johannes H.; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Globally the change towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application. PMID:25852670

  6. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity.

  7. A study of surfactant-assisted waterflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Scamehorn, J F; Harwell, J H

    1990-09-01

    In surfactant-assisted waterflooding, a surfactant slug is injected into a reservoir, followed by a brine spacer, followed by second surfactant slug. The charge on the surfactant in the first slug has opposite sign to that in the second slug. When the two slugs mix in the reservoir, a precipitate or coacervate is formed which plugs the permeable region of the reservoir. Subsequently injected water or brine is forced through the low permeability region of the reservoir, increasing sweep efficiency of the waterflood, compared to a waterflood not using surfactants. In this part of the work, two major tasks are performed. First, core floods are performed with oil present to demonstrate the improvement in incremental oil production, as well as permeability modification. Second, a reservoir simulation model will be proposed to further delineate the optimum strategy for implementation of the surfactant-assisted waterflooding, as well as indicate the reservoir types for which it would be most effective. Surfactants utilized were sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride. 44 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. PMID:26057244

  9. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 is protective in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lin; Bi, Jing; Zhu, Xiaodan; Wang, Guifang; Liu, Jie; Rong, Linyi; Wang, Qin; Xu, Nuo; Zhong, Ming; Zhu, Duming; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2014-09-15

    Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) plays a key role in lung development, but its role in acute lung injury has not been well characterized. Lipopolysaccharide instillation caused acute lung injury, which significantly elevated lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, protein and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inhibited surfactant protein A and C expression in lung tissue, and increased pathological injury. Pretreatment with KGF-2 improved the above lung injury parameters, partially restored surfactant protein A and C expression, and KGF-2 given 2-3 days before LPS challenge showed maximum lung injury improvement. Pretreatment with KGF-2 also markedly reduced the levels of TNF-α, MIP-2, IL-1β and IL-6 in BALF and the levels of IL-1β and IL-6 in lung tissue. Histological analysis showed there was increased proliferation of alveolar type II epithelial cells in lung parenchyma, which reached maximal 2 days after KGF-2 instillation. Intratracheal administration of KGF-2 attenuates lung injury induced by LPS, suggesting KGF-2 may be potent in the intervention of acute lung injury.

  10. Effects of surfactant depletion on regional pulmonary metabolic activity during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    de Prost, Nicolas; Costa, Eduardo L; Wellman, Tyler; Musch, Guido; Winkler, Tilo; Tucci, Mauro R; Harris, R Scott; Venegas, Jose G; Vidal Melo, Marcos F

    2011-11-01

    Inflammation during mechanical ventilation is thought to depend on regional mechanical stress. This can be produced by concentration of stresses and cyclic recruitment in low-aeration dependent lung. Positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) allows for noninvasive assessment of regional metabolic activity, an index of neutrophilic inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that, during mechanical ventilation, surfactant-depleted low-aeration lung regions present increased regional (18)F-FDG uptake suggestive of in vivo increased regional metabolic activity and inflammation. Sheep underwent unilateral saline lung lavage and were ventilated supine for 4 h (positive end-expiratory pressure = 10 cmH(2)O, tidal volume adjusted to plateau pressure = 30 cmH(2)O). We used PET scans of injected (13)N-nitrogen to compute regional perfusion and ventilation and injected (18)F-FDG to calculate (18)F-FDG uptake rate. Regional aeration was quantified with transmission scans. Whole lung (18)F-FDG uptake was approximately two times higher in lavaged than in nonlavaged lungs (2.9 ± 0.6 vs. 1.5 ± 0.3 10(-3)/min; P < 0.05). The increased (18)F-FDG uptake was topographically heterogeneous and highest in dependent low-aeration regions (gas fraction 10-50%, P < 0.001), even after correction for lung density and wet-to-dry lung ratios. (18)F-FDG uptake in low-aeration regions of lavaged lungs was higher than that in low-aeration regions of nonlavaged lungs (P < 0.05). This occurred despite lower perfusion and ventilation to dependent regions in lavaged than nonlavaged lungs (P < 0.001). In contrast, (18)F-FDG uptake in normally aerated regions was low and similar between lungs. Surfactant depletion produces increased and heterogeneously distributed pulmonary (18)F-FDG uptake after 4 h of supine mechanical ventilation. Metabolic activity is highest in poorly aerated dependent regions, suggesting local increased inflammation.

  11. Surfactant-induced alteration of arachidonic acid metabolism of mammalian cells in culture.

    PubMed

    De Leo, V A; Harber, L C; Kong, B M; De Salva, S J

    1987-04-01

    Primary irritancy in human and animal skin is characterized by an inflammatory reaction mediated, in part, by membrane-derived arachidonate metabolites. One of the mechanisms of this reaction was investigated in cultured mammalian cells using three surfactants: linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS), alkyl ethoxylate sulfate (AEOS), and TWEEN 20. These compounds listed in order in vivo irritancy are LAS greater than AEOS greater than TWEEN 20. Each of these compounds was studied in C3H-10T1/2 cells and human keratinocytes which had been prelabeled with 3H-labeled arachidonic acid (AA). After labeling, media were removed, cells were washed, and fresh media with or without surfactant were added. Cells were then incubated for 2 hr, media were removed and centrifuged, and an aliquot was assayed by liquid scintillation for release of label. In C3H-10T1/2 cells LAS and AEOS in 5-50 microM concentration stimulated 2 to 10 times the release of [3H]AA as compared to controls. In contrast, concentrations of 50-100 microM of TWEEN were required to release [3H]AA. With keratinocytes the same rank order of surfactant concentrations necessary for release was obtained as found with C3H-10T1/2 cells. High-performance liquid chromatography of media extracts of both cell systems revealed surfactant stimulation of the production of cyclooxygenase AA metabolites. These results confirm the induction of release by primary irritants of fatty acid groups from membrane phospholipids. Subsequent metabolism of these fatty acid groups are an integral part of the primary irritant response. Data presented with three known irritants in this in vitro model show a direct correlation with in vivo studies.

  12. High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.; Jongwook, Joo; Hardin, Larry W.; McCormick, Duane C.; Cousins, William T.; Lurie, Elizabeth A.; Shabbir, Aamir; Holley, Brian M.; Van Slooten, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The report "High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications" documents the work conducted at UTRC under the NRA Contract NNC08CB03C, with cost share 2/3 NASA, and 1/3 UTRC, that has been extended to 4.5 years. The purpose of this effort was to identify key technical barriers to advancing the state-of-the-art of small centrifugal compressor stages; to delineate the measurements required to provide insight into the flow physics of the technical barriers; to design, fabricate, install, and test a state-of-the-art research compressor that is representative of the rear stage of an axial-centrifugal aero-engine; and to acquire detailed aerodynamic performance and research quality data to clarify flow physics and to establish detailed data sets for future application. The design activity centered on meeting the goal set outlined in the NASA solicitation-the design target was to increase efficiency at higher work factor, while also reducing the maximum diameter of the stage. To fit within the existing Small Engine Components Test Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and to facilitate component re-use, certain key design parameters were fixed by UTRC, including impeller tip diameter, impeller rotational speed, and impeller inlet hub and shroud radii. This report describes the design effort of the High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage (HECC) and delineation of measurements, fabrication of the compressor, and the initial tests that were performed. A new High-Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage with a very challenging reduction in radius ratio was successfully designed, fabricated and installed at GRC. The testing was successful, with no mechanical problems and the running clearances were achieved without impeller rubs. Overall, measured pressure ratio of 4.68, work factor of 0.81, and at design exit corrected flow rate of 3 lbm/s met the target requirements. Polytropic efficiency of 85.5 percent and stall margin of 7.5 percent were

  13. The development of the International Space Station centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tamotsu

    2004-11-01

    Gravitational biology research facility "Centrifuge" is currently under development for the International Space Station. Research in the Complex Organism Biology, indispensable to the progress in Health Science, is only possible in the Centrifuge aboard the station. So, on-orbit 1 G controls for various specimens including small mammals, fish, and higher plants will be rigorously done in the Centrifuge. This facility is also capable of providing "reduced gravity" likely on the Moon or on Mars. Thus, it will play a key role in creating knowledge of space fundamental biology. As part of the offset of NASA's Shuttle launch services for the Japanese Experiment Module, JAXA is developing the Centrifuge Rotor (CR), the Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) and the Centrifuge Accommodation Module (CAM). Critical Design Review (CDR) of LSG was conducted on July 2004, while the system CDRs of the CAM and CR are scheduled for December 2004 and August 2005, respectively. Their launch schedules are under review.

  14. Centrifugal regulator for control of deployment rates of deployable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermalle, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements, design, and performance of a centrifugal regulator aimed at limiting deployment rates of deployable elements are discussed. The overall mechanism is comprised of four distinct functional parts in a machined housing: (1) the centrifugal brake device, which checks the payout of a deployment cable; (2) the reducing gear, which produces the spin rate necesary for the braking device; (3) the payout device, which allows the unwinding of the cable; and (4) the locking device, which prevents untimely unwinding. The centrifugal regulator is set into operation by a threshold tension of the cable which unlocks the mechanism and allows unwinding. The pulley of the windout device drives the centrifugal brake with the help of the reducing gear. The centrifugal force pushes aside weights that produce friction of the studs in a cylindrical housing. The mechanism behaved well at qualification temperature and vibrations.

  15. Measuring and balancing dynamic unbalance of precision centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yafei; Huo, Xin

    2008-10-01

    A precision centrifuge is used to test and calibrate accelerometer model parameters. Its dynamic unbalance may cause the perturbation of the centrifuge to deteriorate the test and calibration accuracy of an accelerometer. By analyzing the causes of dynamic unbalance, the influences on precision centrifuge from static unbalance and couple unbalance are developed. It is considered measuring and balancing of static unbalance is a key to resolving a dynamic unbalance problem of precision centrifuge with a disk in structure. Measuring means and calculating formulas of static unbalance amount are given, and balancing principle and method are provided. The correctness and effectiveness of this method are confirmed by experiments on a device under tuning, thereby the accurate and high-effective measuring and balancing method of dynamic unbalance of this precision centrifuge was provided.

  16. Quantitative centrifugation to extract benthic protozoa from freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Starink, M; Bär-Gilissen, M J; Bak, R P; Cappenberg, T E

    1994-01-01

    TWO METHODS FOR EXTRACTING PROTISTS FROM FRESHWATER SEDIMENT ARE DESCRIBED: (i) an adapted isopycnic centrifugation technique for sandy and gyttja-like sediments and (ii) a rate zonal centrifugation technique for sediments rich in particulate organic material (litter-like sediments). The recoveries of protists during isopycnic centrifugation in media of several densities were compared. No significant losses in sodium diatrizoate and Percoll were recorded. After known amounts of nanoflagellates were added to azoic sediments, the protists were extracted and counted. For sandy sediments, we found 100% recovery, and for the gyttja-like sediments we found a maximum recovery of 94%. The recovery of protozoa extracted from litter-like sediments, characteristic of littoral systems, depends on a given centrifugal force, on time, and on the dimensions of the flagellates. A recovery model which takes into account cell dimensions and centrifugation characteristics gives the minimum expected recovery.

  17. Effect of science laboratory centrifuge of space station environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searby, Nancy

    1990-01-01

    It is argued that it is essential to have a centrifuge operating during manned space station operations. Background information and a rationale for the research centrifuge are given. It is argued that we must provide a controlled acceleration environment for comparison with microgravity studies. The lack of control groups in previous studies throws into question whether the obseved effects were the result of microgravity or not. The centrifuge could be used to provide a 1-g environment to supply specimens free of launch effects for long-term studies. With the centrifuge, the specimens could be immediately transferred to microgravity without undergoing gradual acclimation. Also, the effects of artificial gravity on humans could be investigated. It is also argued that the presence of the centrifuge on the space station will not cause undo vibrations or other disturbing effects.

  18. Bubble Eliminator Based on Centrifugal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The fluid bubble eliminator (FBE) is a device that removes gas bubbles from a flowing liquid. The FBE contains no moving parts and does not require any power input beyond that needed to pump the liquid. In the FBE, the buoyant force for separating the gas from the liquid is provided by a radial pressure gradient associated with a centrifugal flow of the liquid and any entrained bubbles. A device based on a similar principle is described in Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System (MSC- 22863), which appears on page 48 of this issue. The FBE was originally intended for use in filtering bubbles out of a liquid flowing relatively slowly in a bioreactor system in microgravity. Versions that operate in normal Earth gravitation at greater flow speeds may also be feasible. The FBE (see figure) is constructed as a cartridge that includes two concentric cylinders with flanges at the ends. The outer cylinder is an impermeable housing; the inner cylinder comprises a gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane covering a perforated inner tube. Multiple spiral disks that collectively constitute a spiral ramp are mounted in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The liquid enters the FBE through an end flange, flows in the annular space between the cylinders, and leaves through the opposite end flange. The spiral disks channel the liquid into a spiral flow, the circumferential component of which gives rise to the desired centrifugal effect. The resulting radial pressure gradient forces the bubbles radially inward; that is, toward the inner cylinder. At the inner cylinder, the gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane allows the bubbles to enter the perforated inner tube while keeping the liquid in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The gas thus collected can be vented via an endflange connection to the inner tube. The centripetal acceleration (and thus the radial pressure gradient) is approximately proportional to the square of the flow speed and

  19. Surfactant-Assisted Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining liquid fuels from coal which are economically competitive with those obtained from petroleum based sources is a significant challenge for the researcher as well as the chemical industry. Presently, the economics of coal liquefaction are not favorable because of relatively intense processing conditions (temperatures of 430 degrees C and pressures of 2200 psig), use of a costly catalyst, and a low quality product slate of relatively high boiling fractions. The economics could be made more favorable by achieving adequate coal conversions at less intense processing conditions and improving the product slate. A study has been carried out to examine the effect of a surfactant in reducing particle agglomeration and improving hydrodynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor to increase coal conversions...

  20. Liquid-liquid extraction for surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, M.A.; Sabatini, D.A.; Harwell, J.H.

    1997-07-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction was investigated for use with surfactant enhanced subsurface remediation. A surfactant liquid-liquid extraction model (SLLEM) was developed for batch equilibrium conditions based on contaminant partitioning between micellar, water, and solvent phases. The accuracy of this fundamental model was corroborated with experimental results (using naphthalene and phenanthrene as contaminants and squalane as the extracting solvent). The SLLEM model was then expanded to nonequilibrium conditions. The effectiveness of this nonequilibrium model was corroborated with experimental results from continuous flow hollow fiber membrane systems. The validated models were used to conduct a sensitivity analysis evaluating the effects of surfactants on the removal of the contaminants in liquid-liquid extraction systems. In addition, liquid-liquid extraction is compared to air stripping for surfactant-contaminant separation. Finally, conclusions are drawn as to the impact of surfactants on liquid-liquid extraction processes, and the significance of these impacts on the optimization of surfactant-enhanced subsurface remediation.

  1. Surfactant-Templated Mesoporous Metal Oxide Nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Hongmei; Lin, Qianglu; Baber, Stacy; Naalla, Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    We demore » monstrate two approaches to prepare mesoporous metal oxide nanowires by surfactant assembly and nanoconfinement via sol-gel or electrochemical deposition. For example, mesoporous Ta 2 O 5 and zeolite nanowires are prepared by block copolymer Pluronic 123-templated sol-gel method, and mesoporous ZnO nanowires are prepared by electrodeposition in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant, in porous membranes. The morphologies of porous nanowires are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses.« less

  2. Centrifugal governor for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, M.

    1986-09-23

    A centrifugal governor is described for use with an internal combustion engine which consists of: a control rack for regulating the quantity of fuel to be supplied to the engine; flyweights radially displaceable in response to the rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever pivotable through an angle dependent upon the amount of radial displacement of the flyweights; an idling spring for urging the tension lever against radially outward displacement of the flyweights; a torque cam having a cam surface determining a fuel increment to be applied at the start of the engine; a sensor lever having one end engaged by the control rack, and another end adapted to engage with the cam surface of the torque cam; a cancelling spring interposed between the torque cam and the tension lever; a control lever; a floating lever interlocking with the control lever; and spring force adjusting means arranged at one end of the idling spring.

  3. Algorithm for Controlling a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for controlling a centrifugal compressor that serves as the prime mover in a heatpump system. Experimental studies have shown that the operating conditions for maximum compressor efficiency are close to the boundary beyond which surge occurs. Compressor surge is a destructive condition in which there are instantaneous reversals of flow associated with a high outlet-to-inlet pressure differential. For a given cooling load, the algorithm sets the compressor speed at the lowest possible value while adjusting the inlet guide vane angle and diffuser vane angle to maximize efficiency, subject to an overriding requirement to prevent surge. The onset of surge is detected via the onset of oscillations of the electric current supplied to the compressor motor, associated with surge-induced oscillations of the torque exerted by and on the compressor rotor. The algorithm can be implemented in any of several computer languages.

  4. Closed continuous-flow centrifuge rotor

    DOEpatents

    Breillatt, Jr., Julian P.; Remenyik, Carl J.; Sartory, Walter K.; Thacker, Louis H.; Penland, William Z.

    1976-01-01

    A blood separation centrifuge rotor having a generally parabolic core disposed concentrically and spaced apart within a housing having a similarly shaped cavity. Blood is introduced through a central inlet and into a central passageway enlarged downwardly to decrease the velocity of the entrant blood. Septa are disposed inside the central passageway to induce rotation of the entrant blood. A separation chamber is defined between the core and the housing wherein the whole blood is separated into red cell, white cell, and plasma zones. The zones are separated by annular splitter blades disposed within the separation chamber. The separated components are continuously removed through conduits communicating through a face seal to the outside of the rotor.

  5. A modeling study of a centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, P.; Shapiro, H.N.

    1998-12-31

    A centrifugal compressor, which is part of a chlorofluorocarbon R-114 chiller installation, was investigated, operating with a new refrigerant, hydrofluorocarbon R-236ea, a proposed alternative to R-114. A large set of R-236ea operating data, as well as a limited amount of R-114 data, were available for this study. A relatively simple analytical compressor model was developed to describe compressor performance. The model was built upon a thorough literature search, experimental data, and some compressor design parameters. Two original empirical relations were developed, providing a new approach to the compressor modeling. The model was developed in a format that would permit it to be easily incorporated into a complete chiller simulation. The model was found to improve somewhat on the quantitative and physical aspects of a compressor model of the same format found in the literature. It was found that the compressor model is specific to the particular refrigerant.

  6. [Hemodynamic analysis of a centrifugal blood pump].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Li, Qilei; Xu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper built the mathematical model of a centrifugal blood pump, which was designed by ourselves, combined it with that of the human cardiovascular system and simulated the coupling system using Matlab. Then we set up the experiment platform, linked the blood pump to mock human cardiovascular system in case of three-stage heart failure, and measured aortic pressure and flow under different speed. The comparison between experiment results and simulation results not only indicates the coupling model is correct and the blood pump works well, but also shows that with the increase of blood pump speed, the pulsation of aortic pressure and flow will be reduced, this situation will affect the structure and function of blood vessels.

  7. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  8. Analysis of centrifugal convection in rotating pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtern, Vladimir; Zimin, Valery; Hussain, Fazle

    2001-08-01

    New exact solutions, obtained for centrifugal convection of a compressible fluid in pipes and annular pipes, explain axially elongated counterflow and energy separation—poorly understood phenomena occurring in vortex devices, e.g., hydrocyclones and Ranque tubes. Centrifugal acceleration (which can be up to 106 times gravity in practical vortex tubes), combined with an axial gradient of temperature (even small), induces an intense flow from the cold end to the hot end along the pipe wall and a backflow near the axis. To account for large density variations in vortex devices, we use the axial temperature gradient as a small parameter instead of the Boussinesq approximation. For weak pipe rotation, the swirl is of solid-body type and solutions are compact: vz/vza=1-4y2+3y4 and (T-Tw)/(Ta-Tw)=(1-y2)3; where y=r/rw, the subscripts w and a denote values of axial velocity vz, temperature T, and radial distance r, at the wall and on the axis. The axial gradient of pressure, being proportional to 3y2-1, has opposite directions near the wall, y=1, and near the axis, y=0; this explains the counterflow. With increasing pipe rotation, the flow starts to converge to the axis. This causes important new effects: (i) the density and swirl velocity maxima occur away from the wall (vortex core formation), (ii) the temperature near the axis becomes lower than near the wall (the Ranque effect), (iii) the axial gradient of temperature drops from the wall to the axis, and (iv) the total axial heat flux (Nu) reaches its maximum Numax≈4000 and then decreases as swirl increases. These features can be exploited for the development of a micro-heat-exchanger, e.g., for cooling computer chips.

  9. Influence of surfactant charge on antimicrobial efficacy of surfactant-stabilized thyme oil nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Khalid; Chang, Yuhua; McLandsborough, Lynne; McClements, David Julian

    2011-06-01

    Thyme oil-in-water nanoemulsions stabilized by a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80, T80) were prepared as potential antimicrobial delivery systems (pH 4). The nanoemulsions were highly unstable to droplet growth and phase separation, which was attributed to Ostwald ripening due to the relatively high water solubility of thyme oil. Ostwald ripening could be inhibited by incorporating ≥75% of corn oil (a hydrophobic material with a low water solubility) into the nanoemulsion droplets. The electrical characteristics of the droplets in the nanoemulsions were varied by incorporating ionic surfactants with different charges after homogenization: a cationic surfactant (lauric arginate, LAE) or an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). The antifungal activity of nanoemulsions containing positive, negative, or neutral thymol droplets was then conducted against four strains of acid-resistant spoilage yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces bailli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, and Brettanomyces naardenensis. The antifungal properties of the three surfactants (T80, LAE, SDS) were also tested in the absence of thymol droplets. Both ionic surfactants showed strong antifungal activity in the absence of thymol droplets, but no antimicrobial activity in their presence. This effect was attributed to partitioning of the antimicrobial surfactant molecules between the oil droplet and microbial surfaces, thereby reducing the effective concentration of active surfactants available to act as antimicrobials. This study shows oil droplets may decrease the efficacy of surfactant-based antimicrobials, which has important consequences for formulating effective antimicrobial agents for utilization in emulsion-based food and beverage products. PMID:21520914

  10. Human decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into functional alveolar type II-like cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Alejandro; de la Torre, Paz; Grande, Jesús; Haller, Thomas; Flores, Ana I; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Lung alveolar type II (ATII) cells are specialized in the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex that reduces surface tension to minimize the work of breathing. Surfactant synthesis, assembly and secretion are closely regulated and its impairment is associated with severe respiratory disorders. At present, well-established ATII cell culture models are not available. In this work, Decidua-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (DMSCs) have been differentiated into Alveolar Type II- Like Cells (ATII-LCs), which display membranous cytoplasmic organelles resembling lamellar bodies, the organelles involved in surfactant storage and secretion by native ATII cells, and accumulate disaturated phospholipid species, a surfactant hallmark. Expression of characteristic ATII cells markers was demonstrated in ATII-LCs at gene and protein level. Mimicking the response of ATII cells to secretagogues, ATII-LCs were able to exocytose lipid-rich assemblies, which displayed highly surface active capabilities, including faster interfacial adsorption kinetics than standard native surfactant, even in the presence of inhibitory agents. ATII-LCs could constitute a highly useful ex vivo model for the study of surfactant biogenesis and the mechanisms involved in protein processing and lipid trafficking, as well as the packing and storage of surfactant complexes.

  11. Human Decidua-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiate into Functional Alveolar Type II-Like Cells that Synthesize and Secrete Pulmonary Surfactant Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrada, Alejandro; de la Torre, Paz; Grande, Jesús; Haller, Thomas; Flores, Ana I.; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Lung alveolar type II (ATII) cells are specialized in the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex that reduces surface tension to minimize the work of breathing. Surfactant synthesis, assembly and secretion are closely regulated and its impairment is associated with severe respiratory disorders. At present, well-established ATII cell culture models are not available. In this work, Decidua-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (DMSCs) have been differentiated into Alveolar Type II- Like Cells (ATII-LCs), which display membranous cytoplasmic organelles resembling lamellar bodies, the organelles involved in surfactant storage and secretion by native ATII cells, and accumulate disaturated phospholipid species, a surfactant hallmark. Expression of characteristic ATII cells markers was demonstrated in ATII-LCs at gene and protein level. Mimicking the response of ATII cells to secretagogues, ATII-LCs were able to exocytose lipid-rich assemblies, which displayed highly surface active capabilities, including faster interfacial adsorption kinetics than standard native surfactant, even in the presence of inhibitory agents. ATII-LCs could constitute a highly useful ex vivo model for the study of surfactant biogenesis and the mechanisms involved in protein processing and lipid trafficking, as well as the packing and storage of surfactant complexes. PMID:25333871

  12. A straight path centrifugal blood pump concept in the Capiox centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Kijima, T; Oshiyama, H; Horiuchi, K; Nogawa, A; Hamasaki, H; Amano, N; Nojiri, C; Fukasawa, H; Akutsu, T

    1993-07-01

    This article describes comparative studies of a newly developed "straight path" centrifugal pump (Capiox centrifugal pump) targeted for open-heart surgery and circulatory support. A unique straight path design of the rotor was very effective in reducing the pump's rotational speed and prime volume. This pump was evaluated for hydraulics, hemolysis, depriming characteristics, cavitation, and heat generation. Two commercially available centrifugal pumps, the Biomedicus cone-type pump and the Sarns 3M impeller-type pump, were used as controls. The new pump required the lowest pump speed to produce the same flow rates under the same pressure loads and demonstrated the lowest hemolysis and the lowest temperature rise with the outlet clamped. The air volume required to deprime the new pump was one-third to one-half that for the other pumps, and no sign of cavitation was observed even if a small amount of air was introduced to the pump inlet under a negative pressure of 200 mm Hg.

  13. Surfactant Activated Dip-Pen Nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2005-03-01

    Direct nanoscale patterning of maleimide-linked biotin on mercaptosilane-functionalized glass substrates using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is facilitated by the addition of a small amount of the biocompatible nonionic surfactant Tween-20. A correlation was found between activated ink transfer from the AFM tip when surfactant was included in the ink and an increase in the wettability of the partially hydrophobic silanized substrate. Surfactant concentration represents a new control variable for DPN that complements relative humidity, tip-substrate contact force, scan speed, and temperature. Using surfactants systematically as ink additives expands the possible ink-substrate combinations that can be used for patterning biotin and other molecules. For example, we are currently exploring the possibility of developing nickel/nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-maleimide based inks that will bind to mercaptosilanized glass surfaces for the reversible immobilization of biomolecules containing polyhistidine tags.

  14. Cis-acting sequences from a human surfactant protein gene confer pulmonary-specific gene expression in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Korfhagen, T.R.; Glasser, S.W.; Wert, S.E.; Bruno, M.D.; Daugherty, C.C.; McNeish, J.D.; Stock, J.L.; Potter, S.S.; Whitsett, J.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is produced in late gestation by developing type II epithelial cells lining the alveolar epithelium of the lung. Lack of surfactant at birth is associated with respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants. Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a highly hydrophobic peptide isolated from pulmonary tissue that enhances the biophysical activity of surfactant phospholipids. Like surfactant phospholipid, SP-C is produced by epithelial cells in the distal respiratory epithelium, and its expression increases during the latter part of gestation. A chimeric gene containing 3.6 kilobases of the promoter and 5{prime}-flanking sequences of the human SP-C gene was used to express diphtheria toxin A. The SP-C-diphtheria toxin A fusion gene was injected into fertilized mouse eggs to produce transgenic mice. Affected mice developed respiratory failure in the immediate postnatal period. Morphologic analysis of lungs from affected pups showed variable but severe cellular injury confined to pulmonary tissues. Ultrastructural changes consistent with cell death and injury were prominent in the distal respiratory epithelium. Proximal components of the tracheobronchial tree were not severely affected. Transgenic animals were of normal size at birth, and structural abnormalities were not detected in nonpulmonary tissues. Lung-specific diphtheria toxin A expression controlled by the human SP-C gene injured type II epithelial cells and caused extensive necrosis of the distal respiratory epithelium. The absence of type I epithelial cells in the most severely affected transgenic animals supports the concept that developing type II cells serve as precursors to type I epithelial cells.

  15. The lung mechanical behavior change with 100% oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hsuan-Tso

    In medicine, delivery of hyperbaric oxygen to the lung is necessary and quite common to use for critical care. However, it is known that too much oxygen, under different conditions, can be toxic. For example, at an oxygen fraction of 50% at normal atmospheric pressure, the alveoli will show damage after long periods of exposure (several hours). Prolonged or high oxygen concentrations (up to 50%) can cause oxidative damage to cell membranes, the collapse of the alveoli in the lungs, retinal detachment, and seizures. Oxygen toxicity is managed by reducing the exposure to elevated oxygen levels. The possible mechanisms of oxygen toxicity are not fully understood, but the two main hypotheses in literature are direct point out cellular damage or surfactant dysfunction. Most previous studies have focused on long-term (greater than 4 hours) exposure and the effects on lung. Very little is known regarding the short-term effects of oxygen on lung. In this study, we choose to investigate short-term (five tidal volume) changes in lung under oxygen. To test this, we measured any sensitive mechanical behavior change in the lung using indentation. In the experiments, we measured excised mammalian lungs inflated with air or 100% oxygen, to different pressure (4, 12, 25cmH2O) and different indenter displacement (1, 2, 3mm). Our results show the lung becomes stiffer even when exposed to oxygen in the short term. In addition, inflating air again, the lung mechanical property shows some reversible behavior. This phenomenon is more obvious at low inflation pressure than in high pressure after exposure oxygen. We suggest that pulmonary surfactant plays an important role in the observed change. Also, we can say that the exposure time for oxygen toxicity to occur could be shorted that previously thought short-term. This conclusion is important to understand and accommodate oxygen toxicity in the lung.

  16. C₆₀ fullerene promotes lung monolayer collapse.

    PubMed

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Urbini, Laura; Monticelli, Luca

    2015-03-01

    Airborne nanometre-sized pollutants are responsible for various respiratory diseases. Such pollutants can reach the gas-exchange surface in the alveoli, which is lined with a monolayer of lung surfactant. The relationship between physiological effects of pollutants and molecular-level interactions is largely unknown. Here, we determine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on the properties of a model of lung monolayer using molecular simulations. We simulate phase-separated lipid monolayers in the presence of a model pollutant nanoparticle, C₆₀ fullerene. In the absence of nanoparticles, the monolayers collapse only at very low surface tensions (around 0 mN m(-1)). In the presence of nanoparticles, instead, monolayer collapse is observed at significantly higher surface tensions (up to ca 10 mN m(-1)). Collapse at higher tensions is related to lower mechanical rigidity of the monolayer. It is possible that similar mechanisms operate on lung surfactant in vivo, which suggests that health effects of airborne carbon nanoparticles may be mediated by alterations of the mechanical properties of lung surfactant.

  17. Process for making surfactant capped nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A Paul; Rockenberger, Joerg

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for making surfactant capped nanocrystals of transition metal oxides. The process comprises reacting a metal cupferron complex of the formula M Cup, wherein M is a transition metal, and Cup is a cupferron, with a coordinating surfactant, the reaction being conducted at a temperature ranging from about 250 to about 300 C., for a period of time sufficient to complete the reaction.

  18. Water balance in rats exposed to chronic centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R M; Wade, C E

    2000-07-01

    Changes in gravitational load have been shown to alter renal function, which could potentially affect water balance. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the effects of chronic centrifugation on water balance. Eight Sprague-Dawley rats were centrifuged (12 days at 2 G), and eight rats were used as a control group. Water balance over the course of the study was determined by quantifying the percentage (%) of total body water [TBW; (TBW/body mass)] and water flux (water consumption - urine volume). TBW was estimated, by means of deuterium oxide dilution, before the study and after 3 days of centrifugation and by means of desiccation after 12 days of centrifugation. %TBW did not change in the centrifuged rats from initial levels or relative to controls over the course of the study. Differences between the sum of water consumption and sum of urine volume for the 12-day period were the same in both groups. Although an initial period of negative water balance was observed, the lack of a change in %TBW among the three measurement periods or in water flux over the 12 days of centrifugation suggests that water balance is not negatively affected as a result of centrifugation at 2 G.

  19. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (SS-6656, Alfoterra 35, 38, 63,65,68) have been identified which can change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. All the carbonate surfaces (Lithographic Limestone, Marble, Dolomite and Calcite) show similar behavior with respect to wettability alteration with surfactant 4-22. Anionic surfactants (5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38 and Alfoterra-68), which lower the interfacial tension with a West Texas crude oil to very low values (<10{sup -2} nM/m), have also been identified. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability, mobilization, and imbibition studies.

  20. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate wettability. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.