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Sample records for lung ventilation scintigraphy

  1. Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy. Multiple applications besides pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sinzinger, Helmut; Rodrigues, Margarida; Kummer, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy is the diagnostic tool of choice for detection and monitoring of pulmonary embolism. However, the knowledge on its value for other or concurrent pathologies is poor. In this review scintigraphic characteristics of the main pathologies, interpretation and artefacts are described. Together with the understanding of pathophysiology of the lung, the potential gain of information derived from ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy is much higher than generally believed. In conclusion, ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy not only in PE but also in other lung diseases is underused, its value and clinical potential underestimated.

  2. [Evaluation of lung perfusion scintigraphy without ventilation scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Jurkiene, Nemira

    2002-01-01

    The role of perfusion lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) is reviewed. During the study 227 perfusion lung scans were obtained. The scans were grouped according to the PIOPED criteria into 5 groups: normal scans, very low, low, intermediate and high PE probability. The perfusion scans were analyzed according to the original PIOPED criteria, without ventilation scans. Evidence is provided that a normal perfusion scan excludes pulmonary embolism, and that a high probability lung scan, defined as a segmental perfusion defect with locally normal chest X-ray or findings in X-ray are smaller, sufficiently confirms the presence of pulmonary embolism in the majority of these patients (92.2%).

  3. Ventilation imaging of the lung: comparison of hyperpolarized helium-3 MR imaging with Xe-133 scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Altes, Talissa A; Rehm, Patrice K; Harrell, Frank; Salerno, Michael; Daniel, Thomas M; De Lange, Eduard E

    2004-07-01

    To compare hyperpolarized helium-3 (HHe) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung with standard Xe-133 lung ventilation scintigraphy. We performed a retrospective review of 15 subjects who underwent HHe MRI and Xe-133 lung ventilation imaging. Coronal MRI sections were acquired after a single inhalation of HHe gas, and standard posterior planar lung ventilation scintigraphy was performed during continuous breathing of Xe-133 gas. The first breath scintigram of each patient was compared with a composite MR image composed of the sum of the individual MR images and with the individual helium-3 MR images. Ventilation defects on the two imaging modalities were compared for size, conspicuity, and concordance in presence and location. Assessment was done separately for each of four lung quadrants. Comparing the composite HHe MR images with Xe-133 scintigraphy, ventilation defect size, conspicuity and concordance were the same in 67% (40/60), 63% (38/60), and 62% (37/60) quadrants, respectively. Comparing the individual HHe MR image sections with the Xe-133 ventilation scan, there was concordance between the ventilation defects in 27% (16/60) of quadrants. More defects were identified on the individual HHe MR images in 62% (37/60) of quadrants. There was good agreement between composite HHe MR image and first breath Xe-133 scintigraphic images, supporting the widely held assumption that HHe MRI likely depicts first breath lung ventilation.

  4. Potential Role of Lung Ventilation Scintigraphy in the Assessment of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Begic, Amela

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To highlight the importance of the lung ventilation scintigraphy (LVS) to study the regional distribution of lung ventilation and to describe most frequent abnormal patterns of lung ventilation distribution obtained by this technique in COPD and to compare the information obtained by LVS with the that obtained by traditional lung function tests. Material and methods: The research was done in 20 patients with previously diagnosed COPD who were treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Clinical Center, University of Sarajevo in exacerbation of COPD during first three months of 2014. Each patient was undergone to testing of pulmonary function by body plethysmography and ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy with radio pharmaceutics Technegas, 111 MBq Tc -99m-MAA. We compared the results obtained by these two methods. Results: All patients with COPD have a damaged lung function tests examined by body plethysmography implying airflow obstruction, but LVS indicates not only airflow obstruction and reduced ventilation, but also indicates the disorders in distribution in lung ventilation. Conclusion: LVS may add further information to the functional evaluation of COPD to that provided by traditional lung function tests and may contribute to characterizing the different phenotypes of COPD. PMID:25132709

  5. Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in an adult with congenital unilateral hyperlucent lung

    SciTech Connect

    Wegener, W.A.; Velchik, M.G. )

    1990-10-01

    A variety of congenital and acquired etiologies can give rise to the radiographic finding of a unilateral hyperlucent lung. An unusual case of congenital lobar emphysema diagnosed in a young adult following the initial discovery of a hyperexpanded, hyperlucent lung is reported. Although subsequent bronchoscopy and radiologic studies detailed extensive anatomic abnormalities, functional imaging also played an important role in arriving at this rare diagnosis. In particular, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy identified the small contralateral lung as the functional lung and helped narrow the differential diagnosis to etiologies involving obstructive airway disorders.

  6. 99mTc technegas ventilation and perfusion lung scintigraphy for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolus.

    PubMed

    Howarth, D M; Lan, L; Thomas, P A; Allen, L W

    1999-04-01

    Lung scintigraphy is used widely for diagnosis of pulmonary embolus (PE). Technegas ventilation imaging has many advantages over other methods, but little outcome data exists on this technique. The aims of this study were to better define the role of lung scintigraphy in the management of patients with suspected PE and to evaluate technegas ventilation imaging by following patient outcomes. A group of 717 out of 834 consecutive patients, referred to a university teaching hospital for lung scintigraphy to confirm or refute the diagnosis of PE, was followed for 18-30 mo to determine clinical outcome. The follow-up endpoints were death as a result of PE, death as a result of hemorrhage after treatment for PE, uncomplicated survival, survival with subsequent PE, nonfatal hemorrhage after treatment for PE and recurrence of PE in treated patients. Ventilation imaging was performed using technegas, and perfusion imaging was performed using intravenous 99mTc macroaggregated albumin. The modified PIOPED (Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis) diagnostic criterion was used for interpretation of lung scintigraphy. Diagnostic results included 3.5% normal studies, 67.4% assessed as low probability for PE, 10% as moderate probability for PE and 19.1% as high probability for PE. A total of 231 patents received therapy with heparin, followed by warfarin, including those receiving anticoagulation therapy for other conditions. Ninety-six percent of patients with normal and low probability studies (n = 508) had good outcomes, 6 patients died as a result of PE and 12 subsequently developed PE. The odds ratio for death by PE in this group was 0.2. Of the 72 moderate probability studies, 39 patients were untreated. In this group there was 1 death due to PE, and PE subsequently developed in 2 patients. None of the remaining 33 treated patients died, but 4 patients experienced bleeding complications. The odds ratio for death by PE in the moderate probability group was

  7. Evaluation of residual functional lung volume on Tc-99m DTPA aerosol ventilation and Tc-99m MAA perfusion scintigraphy in primary ciliary dyskinesia (Kartagener syndrome).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chang, Chin-Chuan; Lai, Yung-Chuang; Lu, Chia-Ying; Dai, Zen-Kong

    2008-12-01

    Kartagener syndrome is diagnosed as sinusitis, bronchitis (bronchiectasis), and situs inversus by the clinical features. It is a subclass of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) disease. A 12-year-old girl who had frequent upper and lower airway infections since birth, which was confirmed as Kartagener syndrome by HRCT imaging. We present the residual functional lung volume and mucociliary clearance findings seen on Tc-99m DTPA aerosol ventilation and Tc-99m MAA perfusion scintigraphy.

  8. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolus using ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy: more than 0.5 segment of ventilation/perfusion mismatch is sufficient.

    PubMed

    Howarth, D M; Booker, J A; Voutnis, D D

    2006-05-01

    To determine the optimal diagnostic cut-off point using a simplified criterion for the detection of pulmonary embolus (PE) and to evaluate the criterion's utility and reporter reproducibility. Lung scintigraphy was carried out in 924 patients for the diagnosis of PE. This group consisted of 316 men and 608 women with median age of 63 years (range 18-94 years). Ventilation imaging was carried out with Tc-99m Technegas followed by perfusion imaging using 190 MBq Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin. Studies were classified using a 6-category probability criterion of incremental ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch: A, normal; B, low (minor matched V/Q defects or segmental matched V/Q defects without opacity on chest X-ray); C, low-moderate (a partial segment of V/Q mismatch); D, moderate (1 segment of mismatch); E, moderate-high (1-2 segments of V/Q mismatch) and F, high probability (=2 segments of V/Q mismatch). Clinical end-points at 3 and 6 months were death by PE or PE treated with anticoagulation therapy. Three-reporter reproducibility was determined by kappa statistic on a subgroup of patients (53/924). A total of 122 patients (13%) had a confirmed diagnosis of PE at 3 months and no additional cases were registered at 6 months. The lung scintigraphy probability classification showed: normal 152 (16%), low 620 (67%), low-moderate 20 (2%), moderate 28 (3%), moderate-high 24 (3%) and high 80 (9%). The respective sensitivities and specificities, where the diagnostic cut-offs were established at F, high; E, moderate-high; D, moderate and C, low-moderate probability, were F, 64 and 100%; E, 82 and 99%; D, 95 and 98% and C, 98 and 96%. The respective false-negative cases for F, E, D and C cut-offs were 44, 22, 7 and 3. Using the revised Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis reporting classification reporter agreement showed kappa values of 0.31-0.48. Using a simplified 2-category (>0.5 segment of V/Q mismatch positive, all others negative) criterion

  9. Quantification of lung injury using ventilation and perfusion distributions obtained from gamma scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Brook, B S; Murphy, C M; Breen, D; Miles, A W; Tilley, D G; Wilson, A J

    2007-12-01

    This paper explores the potential of isotope V/Q lung scans to quantify lung disease. Areas of restricted perfusion in subjects with a pulmonary embolus (PE) were identified in 3D reconstructions of V/Q images achieved using anatomical data from the Visible Human Project. From these, the extent of lung damage was quantified. Significant differences in the values of both LogSD V and LogSD Q (p > 0.05) obtained from plots of V and Q against Log(V/Q) were found between normal subjects and subjects with a PE, but no correlation was found between either of these parameters and the degree of lung damage in subjects with a PE (p > 0.05). Whilst V/Q values were log normally distributed, the V/Q distributions from the subjects with a PE failed to show the bimodal distribution predicted from theoretical considerations and MIGET measurements previously reported. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean and standard deviation values of the V/Q distributions between normal subject and subjects with a PE (p < 0.05) but not in the median values (p > 0.05). There was no correlation between the mean, median and standard deviation of the distributions from the subjects with a PE and the percentage of damage present (p > 0.05).

  10. Ventilation/Perfusion SPECT lung scintigraphy and computed tomography pulmonary angiography in patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Bravo, S; Banzo, I; Quirce, R; Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Jiménez-Bonilla, J; Martínez-Amador, N; Parra, J A; González-Macías, J; Carril, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to compare ventilation/perfusion SPECT lung scintigraphy (V/Q-SPECT) and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in patients with suspicion of pulmonary embolism (PE). This prospectively designed study included 53 patients with intermediate or high clinical probability of PE. A V/Q-SPECT and CTPA was performed on all patients. The V/Q-SPECT was interpreted according to the European Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (EANMMI) guidelines. CTPA was reported as positive, negative, or indeterminate. CTPA was positive in 22 cases, negative in 28, and indeterminate in 3. V/Q-SPECT was positive in 27 cases, negative in 24, and non-diagnostic in 2. In the 22 with positive CTPA, V/Q-SPECT was positive in 18, negative in 3, and non-diagnostic in 1. In the 28 with negative CTPA, V/Q-SPECT was positive in 8, negative in 19, and non-diagnostic in 1. In the 3 with indeterminate CTPA, V/Q-SPECT was positive in 1 and negative in 2. In the 2 non-diagnostic cases V/Q-SPECT, CTPA was positive in 1 and negative in one. In the 10 high clinical probabilities, CTPA and V/Q-SPECT were positive in 7, negative in 2, and in 1, CTPA was positive and V/Q-SPECT negative. In the 38 intermediate probability group, CTPA and V/Q-SPECT were positive in 11, negative in 17, with CTPA negative and V/Q-SPECT positive in 8, and in 2 CTPA was positive and V/Q-SPECT negative. The results show that V/Q-SPECT detected PE in 5 patients more than CTPA. Our results show a 77% concordance of both techniques. Overall V/Q-SPECT detected PE in 18% more patients than CTPA in the intermediate group. Both techniques have a complementary role when a diagnosis cannot be made with one of them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of mean transit time in the engrafted lung with 133Xe lung ventilation scintigraphy improves diagnosis of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in living-donor lobar lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Takayoshi; Sato, Shuhei; Kato, Katsuya; Gobara, Hideo; Akaki, Shiro; Date, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Staging of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) following lung transplantation is based on declines in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)). The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of (133)Xe ventilation scintigraphy in the early detection of BOS following living-donor lobar lung transplantation (LDLLT), to compare (133)Xe washout imaging with computed tomography (CT) findings for early detection of BOS following LDLLT, and to evaluate (133)Xe washout imaging by quantitative analyses. Subjects comprised 30 double-lung recipients and 1 single-lung recipient, who had undergone LDLLT at our institution and survived more than 1 year. Clinically diagnosed BOS developed in six recipients. Declines in graft function were evaluated using a combination of three methods, namely, dynamic spirometry, high-resolution CT (HRCT), and (133)Xe ventilation scintigraphy. Findings for all transplanted lungs were compared between CT and (133)Xe washout imaging. (133)Xe washout imaging was assessed using mean transit time (MTT) of bi-and unilateral lungs. Correlations between MTT of bilateral lungs and FEV(1)% were evaluated. Differences in MTT between BOS and non-BOS lungs, and between non-BOS and donor lungs were also evaluated on unilateral lungs. Appropriate cut-off values of MTT of unilateral lungs were set for the diagnosis of BOS. In all six BOS cases, prolonged-washout images of engrafted lungs revealed early-phase BOS with declines from baseline FEV(1), whereas only one BOS case could be detected using early CT findings of BO (bronchodilatation, decrease in number and size of pulmonary vessels, thickening of septal lines, and volume reduction). A significant correlation was identified between MTT and FEV(1)% (r = -0.346, P < 0.0001). MTT of unilateral lungs was significantly longer in BOS lungs than in non-BOS lungs (P < 0.0001). The cut-off MTT of unilateral lungs for the diagnosis of BOS was set at 64.77 s. Our data show that (133)Xe washout imaging offers

  12. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y. Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-02

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  13. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  14. Significance of single ventilation/perfusion mismatches in krypton-81m/technetium-99m lung scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.M.; Palestro, C.J.; Markowitz, D.; Alderson, P.O.

    1986-03-01

    The significance of a single area of ventilation/perfusion (V/P) mismatch in lung scans performed on patients suspected of pulmonary embolism (PE) was evaluated. Ten of 20 patients with this scan finding were found to have PE. An intermediate probability of PE was found with segmental (71%) or subsegmental (45%) single V/P mismatches. Seven of 16 patients with a single V/P mismatch and without a matching radiographic opacity had PE. Three of the four patients who had a V/P mismatch and a matching radiographic opacity were found to have PE. Multiview ventilation imaging with 81mKr was found to have advantages for the evaluation of single V/P mismatches. Based on the data available at this time, a single V/P mismatch suggests an intermediate probability of PE.

  15. Solubilized xenon 133 lung scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Lung scanning using solubilized xenon 133 can provide important information concerning both pulmonary perfusion and ventilation. This technique proved valuable in establishing the diagnosis of congenital lobar emphysema in a 7-month-old baby.

  16. Comparison of 133 xenon ventilation equilibrium scan (XV) and 99m technetium transmission (TT) scan for use in regional lung analysis by 2D gamma scintigraphy in healthy and cystic fibrosis lungs.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Kirby L; Wu, Jihong; Donaldson, Scott H; Bennett, William D

    2013-04-01

    Quantification of particle deposition in the lung by gamma scintigraphy requires a reference image for location of regions of interest (ROIs) and normalization to lung thickness. In various laboratories, the reference image is made by a transmission scan ((57)Co or (99m)Tc) or gas ventilation scan ((133)Xe or (81)Kr). There has not been a direct comparison of measures from the two methods. We compared (99m)Tc transmission scans to (133)Xe equilibrium ventilation scans as reference images for 38 healthy subjects and 14 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients for their effects on measures of regional particle deposition: the central-to-peripheral ratio of lung counts (C/P); and ROI area versus forced vital capacity. Whole right lung ROI was based on either an isocontour threshold of three times the soft tissue transmission (TT) or a threshold of 20% of peak xenon ventilation counts (XV). We used a central ROI drawn to 50% of height and of width of the whole right lung ROI and placed along the left lung margin and centered vertically. In general, the correlation of normalized C/P (nC/P) between the two methods was strong. However, the value of nC/P was significantly smaller for the XV method than the TT method. Regression equations for the relationship of nC/P between the two methods were, for healthy subjects, y=0.75x+0.61, R(2)=0.64 using rectangular ROIs and y=0.76x+0.45, R(2)=0.66 using isocontour ROIs; and for CF patients, y=0.94x+0.46, R(2)=0.43 and y=0.85x+0.42, R(2)=0.41, respectively. (1) A transmission scan with an isocontour outline in combination with a rectangular central region to define the lung borders may be more useful than a ventilation scan. (2) Close correlation of nC/Ps measured by transmission or gas ventilation should allow confident comparison of values determined by the two methods.

  17. Tomographic ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy in the monitoring of the effect of treatment in pulmonary embolism: serial follow-up over a 6-month period.

    PubMed

    Begic, Amela; Jögi, Jonas; Hadziredzepovic, Amra; Kucukalic-Selimović, Elma; Begovic-Hadzimuratovic, Sadzida; Bajc, Marika

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a severe condition with nonspecific symptoms. Diagnosis relies on medical imaging but follow-up is currently based on clinical symptoms and general risk factors. The duration of anticoagulant treatment after an acute episode of PE is still subject to debate and the best method of identifying the risk of recurrence in individual patients is undefined. Tomographic lung scintigraphy [ventilation/perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (V/P SPECT)] has improved the diagnostic accuracy with regard to PE but has not been evaluated for PE follow-up. The aim of this prospective study was to quantitatively follow the natural history of treated PE using V/P SPECT, which could prove helpful in defining an anticoagulant treatment regime for individual patients. Of 83 consecutive patients with clinically suspected PE examined with V/P SPECT, 23 patients with confirmed PE were followed by serial V/P SPECT examinations over a 6-month period. All patients were also followed clinically. The mean relative decrease in PE extent compared with the time of diagnosis was 54±26% at 2 weeks, 79±30% at 3 months, and 82±30% at 6 months. Significant resolution of mismatched perfusion defects occurred between V/P SPECT controls within the first 3 months of anticoagulation (P<0.001) but not thereafter. V/P SPECT identified four patients with chronic PE, even though all patients were free from symptoms at 3-month follow-up. Follow-up of PE with V/P SPECT is feasible to evaluate treatment effectiveness in individual patients and to identify patients that develop chronic PE. This study also confirms that resolution of perfusion defects after PE occurs within the first 3 months of treatment. It is therefore recommended that V/P SPECT follow-up should be considered at 3 months after diagnosis.

  18. Adaptive lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Linton, D M

    2001-09-01

    Adaptive lung ventilation (ALV) is a method of closed-loop mechanical ventilation analogous to modern closed-loop technology in aviation such as the autopilot and automatic landing system. The algorithm of the controller of ALV is designed to automatically provide pressure-controlled synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (P-SIMV) and weaning as individually required in any clinical situation. The synchronized pressure limited breaths constantly adapt to the patient requirements to encourage optimal alveolar ventilation with minimal adverse physiological disturbance and timely weaning. The ease of application, efficiency, and safety of the first ALV controllers have been demonstrated in lung models, in patients with normal lungs undergoing general anesthesia, in patients requiring unusual positioning, in transition to and from one-lung anesthesia, and in long-term ventilation of patients with various lung pathologies and in weaning patients who have restrictive or obstructive pulmonary disease. Prospective comparative studies of ALV versus other currently used manually selected modes of mechanical ventilation, such as the one reported in this article, should confirm the safety and identify the benefits of this form of advanced closed-loop mechanical ventilation technology.

  19. Rater agreement in lung scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, F; Andersson, T; Rydman, H; Qvarner, N; Måre, K

    1996-09-01

    The PIOPED criteria in their original and revised forms are today's standards in the interpretation of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy. When the PIOPED criteria are used by experienced raters with training in consensus interpretation, the agreement rates have been demonstrated to be excellent. Our purpose was to investigate the rates of agreement between 2 experienced raters from different hospital who had no training in consensus interpretation. The 2 raters investigated a population of 195 patients. This group included 72 patients from a previous study who had an intermediate probability of pulmonary embolism and who had also been examined by pulmonary angiography. The results demonstrated moderate agreement rates with a kappa value of 0.54 (0.45-0.63 in a 95% confidence interval), which is similar to the kappa value of the PIOPED study but significantly lower than the kappa values of agreement rates among consensus-trained raters. There was a low consistency in the intermediate probability category, with a proportional agreement rate of 0.39 between the experienced raters. The moderate agreement rates between raters from different hospitals make it difficult to compare study populations of a certain scintigraphic category in different hospitals. Further investigations are mandatory for accurate diagnosis when the scintigrams are in the category of intermediate probability of pulmonary embolism.

  20. Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy: what is still needed? A review considering technetium-99m-labeled macro-aggregates of albumin.

    PubMed

    Zöphel, Klaus; Bacher-Stier, Claudia; Pinkert, Jörg; Kropp, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy (LPS) with technetium-99m-labeled macro-aggregates of albumin (Tc-99m-MAA) is well established in the diagnostic of pulmonary embolism (PE). In the last decade, it was shown that single-photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) acquisition of LPS overcame static scintigraphy. Furthermore, there are rare indications for LPS, such as preoperative quantification of regional lung function prior to lung resection or transplantation, optimization of lung cancer radiation therapy, quantification of right-left shunt, planning of intra-arterial chemotherapy, and several rare indications in pediatrics. Moreover, LPS with Tc-99m-MAA is a safe method with low radiation exposure. PE can also be diagnosed by spiral computer tomography (CT), ultrasound, magnetic resonance angiography, or pulmonary angiography (PA, former gold standard). The present review considers all these methods, especially spiral CT, and compares them with LPS with respect to sensitivity and specificity and gives an overview of established and newer publications. It shows that LPS with Tc-99m-MAA represents a diagnostic method of continuing value for PE. In comparison with spiral CT and/or PA, LPS is not to be defeated as mentioned also by the most actual Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) II reports. This applies in particular to chronic or recurring embolisms, whereas currently spiral CT may be of greater value for major or life-threatening embolisms. At present, LPS cannot be replaced by other methods in some applications, such as pediatrics or in the quantification of regional pulmonary function in a preoperative context or prior to radiation therapy. LPS still has a place in the diagnostics of PE and is irreplaceable in several rare indications as described earlier.

  1. Use of quantitative lung scintigraphy to predict postoperative pulmonary function in lung cancer patients undergoing lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Win, Thida; Laroche, Clare M; Groves, Ashley M; White, Carol; Wells, Francis C; Ritchie, Andrew J; Tasker, Angela D

    2004-10-01

    In patients with non-small cell lung cancer, the only realistic chance of cure is surgical resection. However, in some of these patients there is such poor respiratory reserve that surgery can result in an unacceptable quality of life. In order to identify these patients, various pulmonary function tests and scintigraphic techniques have been used. The current American College of Physicians and British Thoracic Society guidelines do not recommend the use of quantitative ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy to predict postoperative function in lung cancer patients undergoing lobectomy. These guidelines may have been influenced by previous scintigraphic studies performed over a decade ago. Since then there have been advances in both surgical techniques and scintigraphic techniques, and the surgical population has become older and more female represented. We prospectively performed spirometry and quantitative ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy on 61 consecutive patients undergoing lobectomy for lung cancer. Spirometry was repeated one-month postsurgery. Both a simple segment counting technique alone and scintigraphy were used to predict the postoperative lung function. There was statistically significant correlation (p < 0.01) between the predicted postoperative lung function using both the simple segment counting technique and the scintigraphic techniques. However, the correlation using simple segment counting was of negligible difference compared to scintigraphy. In keeping with current American Chest Physician and British Thoracic Society guidelines, our results suggest that quantitative ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy is not necessary in the preoperative assessment of lung cancer patients undergoing lobectomy. The simple segmenting technique can be used to predict postoperative lung function in lobectomy patients.

  2. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  3. DTPA aerosol in ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy for diagnosing pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, N P; Pratt, J P; Talusani, S; Quaife, R A; Kumpe, D; Lear, J L

    1997-11-01

    The use of lung scintigraphy in evaluating suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) is controversial. Several diagnostic methods have been described for lung scans, of which the most widely applied uses 99mTc-MAA for perfusion, 133Xe for ventilation and PIOPED diagnostic criteria. This study evaluates the accuracy of lung scintigraphy using an alternative ventilation agent, 99mTc-diethylenetriamine pentacetic acid (DTPA) aerosol, and specific criteria. Diagnostic criteria for DTPA aerosol ventilation were prospectively applied to 5017 patients over a 9-yr period. Lung scan interpretations were analyzed for frequency of occurrence, and results were compared to those of angiography in 455 patients. Scans were interpreted as normal, low or high probability in 79% of patients and as either indeterminate or medium probability in 21% of patients. Three patients had normal scans and negative angiography. In patients with low-probability scans, 111 angiograms were performed: 103 (93%) were negative, and 8 (7%) were positive. In patients with indeterminate scans, 114 angiograms were performed: 85 (75%) were negative, and 29 (25%) were positive. In patients with medium-probability scans, 149 angiograms were performed: 86 (58%) were negative, and 63 (42%) were positive. In patients with high-probability scans, 78 angiograms were performed: 6 (8%) were negative, and 72 (92%) were positive. These results indicate that lung scintigraphy using DTPA aerosol and our criteria is accurate in diagnosing and stratifying risk of pulmonary embolic disease. Compared with 133Xe and PIOPED criteria, DTPA ventilation and our criteria reduced the false-negative rate in low-probability scans (7% versus 16%, p < 0.005) and decreased the fraction of intermediate-probability scans (21 % versus 39%, p < 0.01).

  4. Correlation between lung scintigraphy and long-term outcome in survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Hiroomi; Kubota, Akio; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Oue, Takaharu; Kitayama, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Makoto

    2006-09-01

    Lung scintigraphy has been used to evaluate the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). However, the relationship between lung scintigraphy and long-term outcome of CDH remains unclear. The aim of this study is to determine whether lung scintigraphy correlates with long-term pulmonary morbidity and nutritional status in survivors of CDH. Consecutive 31 survivors of CDH were enrolled in this study. The initial scan was performed at 1-2 months when the patients were ready for discharge and the follow-up scan was performed following an approximately 1-year interval. The regional ventilation and perfusion were evaluated using (133)Xe-inhalation and intravenous (99m)Tc-MAA injection, respectively. The ventilation and perfusion of the ipsilateral lung was expressed as a percentage of that of the contralateral lung. Physical growth at 1 and 2 years, and pulmonary morbidity were reviewed from medical records. The ventilation and perfusion of the ipsilateral lung at the follow-up scan increased significantly from those at the initial scan. Ten patients had pulmonary morbidity. The ventilation and perfusion of the ipsilateral lung was significantly lower in the patients with pulmonary morbidity compared to the patients without pulmonary morbidity. The initial ventilation and perfusion of the ipsilateral lung were strongly correlated with body weight at 1 and 2 years (ventilation: R = 0.503, P < 0.01; perfusion: R = 0.760, P < 0.0001). These results suggest that lung scintigraphy is useful to predict long-term pulmonary morbidity and poor nutritional status in survivors of CDH.

  5. Improving the diagnostic performance of lung scintigraphy in suspected pulmonary embolic disease.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, F V; Turner, S; Scarsbrook, A F

    2006-12-01

    to determine the effectiveness of a new imaging algorithm in the investigation of suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). A new imaging algorithm for suspected PE was introduced following the installation of a multisection computed tomography (CT) machine at our institution. Before its installation, patients with suspected PE were evaluated with ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy. Subsequently, patients were triaged according to chest radiography (CR) and respiratory history to either lung scintigraphy or CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Patients with a normal CR and no history of lung disease were evaluated using perfusion (Q) scintigraphy [ventilation (V) scintigraphy was no longer performed]. Patients with an abnormal CR, asthma or chronic lung disease were evaluated using CTPA. All V/Q images in a continuous 3-year period before the introduction of the new imaging algorithm and all Q images performed in a 3-year period after its introduction were retrospectively reviewed. Imaging reports were categorized into normal, non-diagnostic (low or intermediate probability) or high probability for PE. Patients in the later group who subsequently underwent CTPA, were also reviewed. After the policy change the percentage of normal scintigrams significantly increased (39 to 60%; p<0.001). There was a non-significant increase in the percentage of high probability scintigrams (15 to 18%; p=0.716). Overall the diagnostic yield of lung scintigraphy improved significantly (54 to 78%; p<0.001). the diagnostic performance of lung scintigraphy can be improved by careful triage of patients to either Q scintigraphy or CTPA based on clinical history and CR findings. Q scintigraphy remains a valuable diagnostic test in the investigation of suspected PE in carefully selected patients.

  6. [Value of radionuclide lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis and quantitative analysis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Ni, Xin-Hai; He, Jian-Guo; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Xiong, Chang-Ming; He, Zuo-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    This study was to assess the reliability of perfusion/ventilation (Q/V) lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis and quantitative analysis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). A total of 78 in-patients with pulmonary hypertension who had no history of congenital heart disease, valvular disease and acute pulmonary embolism were included in this study. All patients underwent Q/V scintigraphy for detecting CTEPH. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of Q/V scintigraphy were defined by comparing with the results of pulmonary angiography. Percentage of Perfusion Defect score (PPDs%) was calculated in patients with CTEPH confirmed by pulmonary angiography. The correlations between PPDs% and mPAP, PPDs% and SPAP were analyzed. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of a high-probability Q/V scintigraphy interpretation were 96.0%, 81.1% and 86.9%, respectively, compared with 100%, 69.8% and 79.5% for the combination of high- and intermediate- probability Q/V scintigraphy interpretation. PPDs% was significantly correlated with mPAP and SPAP (r = 0.538 for mPAP, P < 0.01 and r = 0.456 for SPAP, P < 0.05). Perfusion/ventilation lung scintigraphy is a valuable technique for diagnosis and quantitative analysis of CTEPH.

  7. Guidelines for lung scintigraphy in children.

    PubMed

    Ciofetta, Gianclaudio; Piepsz, Amy; Roca, Isabel; Fisher, Sybille; Hahn, Klaus; Sixt, Rune; Biassoni, Lorenzo; De Palma, Diego; Zucchetta, Pietro

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this set of guidelines is to help the nuclear medicine practitioner perform a good quality lung isotope scan. The indications for the test are summarised. The different radiopharmaceuticals used for the ventilation and the perfusion studies, the technique for their administration, the dosimetry, the acquisition of the images, the processing and the display of the images are discussed in detail. The issue of whether a perfusion-only lung scan is sufficient or whether a full ventilation-perfusion study is necessary is also addressed. The document contains a comprehensive list of references and some web site addresses which may be of further assistance.

  8. Generation of parametric images during routine Tc-99m PYP inhalation/Tc-99m MAA perfusion lung scintigraphy. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Miron, S D; Wiesen, E J; Feiglin, D H; Cohen, A M; Bellon, E M

    1991-07-01

    A simple technique is described for generating ventilation/perfusion ratio and perfusion/ventilation ratio images from the posterior Tc-99m PYP aerosol inhalation and Tc-99m MAA perfusion images obtained during routine lung scintigraphy. These images highlight areas of ventilation/perfusion incongruence--mismatch or reverse mismatch--that may sometimes be difficult to detect on conventional images.

  9. Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in the PIOPED study. Part I. Data collection and tabulation.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, A; Juni, J E; Sostman, H D; Coleman, R E; Thrall, J; McKusick, K A; Froelich, J W; Alavi, A

    1993-07-01

    The Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) study of more than 700 patients is the largest existing study of the accuracy of lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Perfusion scans were obtained in all patients and ventilation scans in almost all, using standardized techniques. Chest radiographs were obtained in all patients within 12 hr of the lung scan. Most patients underwent pulmonary arteriography. The images were interpreted according to a set of interpretive criteria which remained constant throughout the trial. A standardized, detailed description of each image set was derived by consensus of teams of two readers blinded to clinical and arteriographic findings. This communication reports the methods used to describe and categorize the ventilation-perfusion scintigrams obtained in patients who were enrolled in the PIOPED study. Scintigraphic technique is reviewed briefly, probability assessment is described and the scan description is reviewed in detail. The form used to describe the findings on ventilation-perfusion scans is reproduced. Use of this standardized description permits retrospective evaluation of the PIOPED interpretive criteria. In addition, it represents a rigorous approach to scan analysis which could facilitate application of formal interpretive schemes and enhance the reproducibility of lung scan interpretations in the clinical setting.

  10. An evaluation of preoperative and postoperative ventilation and perfusion lung scintigraphy in the screening for pulmonary embolism after elective orthopedic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, A.M.; Palevsky, H.I.; Steinberg, M.E.; Hartman, K.M.; Alavi, A.; Lotke, P.A. )

    1991-01-01

    One hundred two patients undergoing elective knee or hip arthroplasty were studied with radionuclide ventilation scans (V) and perfusion scans (Q) preoperatively (preop) and postoperatively (postop) to assess their relative value in the diagnosis of asymptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) after orthopedic surgery. Postop Q were read in combination with preop V and Q and postop V using prospective investigation of pulmonary embolism diagnosis (PIOPED) criteria. Of 25 postop Q interpreted as either high or intermediate probability for PE, preop Q were judged useful in 96%; the postop V were useful in 78%; and the preop V were not helpful in any of the cases. Of 63 postop Q interpreted as low probability, preop Q were useful in 74%; the postop V were useful in only 33%; and the preop V were useful in only one case. When postop Q were read as normal (14 cases), none of the three auxiliary studies were found to be useful. Overall, postop V were more helpful than preop Q in only 2%, and preop V contributed significantly in only 1%. This experience suggests that preop Q alone is the most useful adjunct to the postop Q in the postoperative evaluation for PE. The authors conclude that to screen for asymptomatic PE after elective orthopedic surgery, preop Q should be performed in all cases, preop V are not necessary, and postop V need be performed only if a baseline preop Q is not available.

  11. Single-lung ventilation in pediatric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Dinesh K

    2005-12-01

    Single-lung ventilation is requested for an increasing spectrum of surgical procedures in infants and children. A clear understanding of the physiology of single-lung ventilation, the techniques of lung separation, and the technical skill necessary to apply these techniques are essential for an anesthesiologist practicing thoracic anesthesia. This article focuses on various devices available for single-lung ventilation in the pediatric age group, the relevant respiratory physiology, and the strategies that optimize oxygenation during one-lung anesthesia.

  12. Lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: current methods and interpretation criteria in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Skarlovnik, Ajda; Hrastnik, Damjana; Fettich, Jure; Grmek, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Background In current clinical practice lung scintigraphy is mainly used to exclude pulmonary embolism (PE). Modified diagnostic criteria for planar lung scintigraphy are considered, as newer scitigraphic methods, especially single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are becoming more popular. Patients and methods. Data of 98 outpatients who underwent planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy and 49 outpatients who underwent V/Q SPECT from the emergency department (ED) were retrospectively collected. Planar V/Q images were interpreted according to 0.5 segment mismatch criteria and revised PIOPED II criteria and perfusion scans according to PISA-PED criteria. V/Q SPECT images were interpreted according to the criteria suggested in EANM guidelines. Final diagnosis of PE was based on the clinical decision of an attending physician and evaluation of a 12 months follow-up period. Results Using 0.5 segment mismatch criteria and revised PIOPED II, planar V/Q scans were diagnostic in 93% and 84% of cases, respectively. Among the diagnostic planar scans readings specificity for 0.5 segment mismatch criteria was 98%, and 99% for revised PIOPED II criteria. V/Q SPECT showed a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98%, without any non-diagnostic cases. In patients with low pretest probability for PE, planar V/Q scans assessed by 0.5 segment mismatch criteria were diagnostic in 92%, and in 85% using revised PIOPED II criteria, while perfusion scintigraphy without ventilation scans was diagnostic in 80%. Conclusions Lung scintigraphy yielded diagnostically definitive results and is reliable in ruling out PE in patients from ED. V/Q SPECT has excellent specificity and sensitivity without any non-diagnostic results. Percentage of non-diagnostic results in planar lung scintigraphy is considerably smaller when 0.5 segment mismatch criteria instead of revised PIOPED II criteria are used. Diagnostic value of perfusion scintigraphy according to PISA-PED criteria is

  13. Lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: current methods and interpretation criteria in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Skarlovnik, Ajda; Hrastnik, Damjana; Fettich, Jure; Grmek, Marko

    2014-06-01

    In current clinical practice lung scintigraphy is mainly used to exclude pulmonary embolism (PE). Modified diagnostic criteria for planar lung scintigraphy are considered, as newer scitigraphic methods, especially single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are becoming more popular. Data of 98 outpatients who underwent planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy and 49 outpatients who underwent V/Q SPECT from the emergency department (ED) were retrospectively collected. Planar V/Q images were interpreted according to 0.5 segment mismatch criteria and revised PIOPED II criteria and perfusion scans according to PISA-PED criteria. V/Q SPECT images were interpreted according to the criteria suggested in EANM guidelines. Final diagnosis of PE was based on the clinical decision of an attending physician and evaluation of a 12 months follow-up period. Using 0.5 segment mismatch criteria and revised PIOPED II, planar V/Q scans were diagnostic in 93% and 84% of cases, respectively. Among the diagnostic planar scans readings specificity for 0.5 segment mismatch criteria was 98%, and 99% for revised PIOPED II criteria. V/Q SPECT showed a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98%, without any non-diagnostic cases. In patients with low pretest probability for PE, planar V/Q scans assessed by 0.5 segment mismatch criteria were diagnostic in 92%, and in 85% using revised PIOPED II criteria, while perfusion scintigraphy without ventilation scans was diagnostic in 80%. Lung scintigraphy yielded diagnostically definitive results and is reliable in ruling out PE in patients from ED. V/Q SPECT has excellent specificity and sensitivity without any non-diagnostic results. Percentage of non-diagnostic results in planar lung scintigraphy is considerably smaller when 0.5 segment mismatch criteria instead of revised PIOPED II criteria are used. Diagnostic value of perfusion scintigraphy according to PISA-PED criteria is inferior to combined V/Q scintigraphy; the difference is

  14. Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, producing an entity known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). There are various forms of VILI, including volutrauma (i.e., injury caused by overdistending the lung), atelectrauma (injury due to repeated opening/closing of lung units), and biotrauma (release of mediators that can induce lung injury or aggravate pre-existing injury, potentially leading to multiple organ failure). Experimental data in the pediatric context are in accord with the importance of VILI, and appear to show age-related susceptibility to VILI, although a conclusive link between use of large Vts and mortality has not been demonstrated in this population. The relevance of VILI in the pediatric intensive care unit population is thus unclear. Given the physiological and biological differences in the respiratory systems of infants, children, and adults, it is difficult to directly extrapolate clinical practice from adults to children. This Critical Care Perspective analyzes the relevance of VILI to the pediatric population, and addresses why pediatric patients might be less susceptible than adults to VILI. PMID:25003705

  15. Regional distribution of ventilation assessed by Kr-81m scintigraphy employing temporal Fourier transform

    SciTech Connect

    Slosman, D.; Susskind, H.; Cinotti, L.; van Giessen, J.W.; Brill, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Temporal Fourier analysis was applied to Kr-81m ventilation scintigraphy to determine the amplitude (AMP1) and phase (PHA1) of the first harmonic of a single composite respiratory cycle and to compare regional patterns in subjects with obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and nonobstructed subjects. Six nonobstructed subjects, three subjects with small airway disease, six subjects with COPD, and one subject with restrictive disease were investigated. The mean value of the functional PHA1 image (PHA1m) correlated negatively with 1-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1) (r = -0.801, P less than .001), with %FEV1/FVC (r = -0.636, P less than .01) and maximum midexpiratory flow rate (FEF25-75%) (r = -0.723, P less than .002), and correlated positively with residual volume (r = 0.640, P less than .01). PHA1m values for the six subjects with COPD were significantly higher (t = 2.359, P less than .05) than for the ten nonobstructed subjects. Display of phase and amplitude functional images permits a visual evaluation of the regional distribution of ventilation to be made. Regional abnormalities of air flow were detected in obstructed subjects, and the presence of airway obstruction could be predicted. Dynamic ventilation imaging, therefore, appears to be a potentially useful noninvasive technique to assess lung impairment on a localized level.

  16. Lung-protective ventilation in neonatology.

    PubMed

    van Kaam, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is considered an important risk factor in the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and is primarily caused by overdistension (volutrauma) and repetitive opening and collapse (atelectrauma) of terminal lung units. Lung-protective ventilation should therefore aim to reduce tidal volumes, and recruit and stabilize atelectatic lung units (open lung ventilation strategy). This review will summarize the available evidence on lung-protective ventilation in neonatology, discussing both high-frequency ventilation (HFV) and positive pressure ventilation (PPV). It shows that HFV does not appear to have a clear benefit over PPV, although most studies failed to apply a true open lung ventilation strategy during HFV. The evidence on the optimal tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure and the role for lung recruitment during lung-protective PPV is extremely limited. Volume-targeted ventilation seems to be a promising mode in terms of lung protection, but more studies are needed. Due to the lack of convincing evidence, lung-protective ventilation and modes seem to be implemented in daily clinical practice at a slow pace.

  17. Study of the auditory tube by ventilation scintigraphy with technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, Andrei P; Denis, Christian; Dubois, Francis; Martin, Christian; Prades, Jean-Michel

    2005-12-01

    The two essential regulating mechanisms of the middle ear pressure are the trans-mucosal gas exchange in the middle ear and the ventilation function of the eustachian tube (ET). The physiological mechanism of these both functions is not yet clear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the ET pressure equilibrium function by ventilation scintigraphy with technetium-99m. The rabbit animal model in vivo was used to study the presence and role of the ventilation of the tympanic cavity via auditory tube. The obtained results did not show any ventilation function of the ET despite active opening by muscle movement. In our experience, ventilation scintigraphy with technetium-99m is not a reliable method to study the auditory tube pressure equilibrium function in physiological conditions.

  18. Ventilatory management of one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Della Rocca, G; Coccia, C

    2011-05-01

    Hypoxemia is considered to be the most important challenge during one-lung ventilation (OLV). Recent studies, however, have shown that one-lung ventilation can involve some lung damage and can therefore be per se a cause of hypoxemia. OLV can be associated to an injury: but the techniques used to improve oxygenation may also damage the lung. A new ventilator approach should be used and applied with regards to what is so far known in terms of "lung protection" also during OLV.

  19. Pulmonary embolism: role of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Onyedika, Chukwuemeka; Glaser, Joseph E; Freeman, Leonard M

    2013-03-01

    The evaluation for pulmonary embolism in the emergency setting has many challenges. Patients often present with symptoms that are nonspecific. Emergency Department physicians utilize their own subjective judgment or objective clinical algorithms, such as the Wells Score to assess the likelihood of the patient having PE. Other techniques, such as D-dimer assays and Doppler ultrasound leg studies for deep venous thrombosis are very useful, as well. Ventilation-perfusion lung scans and computed tomography pulmonary angiography are both available in most institutions. However, factors such as sensitivity or specificity, overnight availability, radiation exposure, and comfort with interpretation criteria play a role in deciding which procedure should be used. Relative merits of both the procedures will be discussed.

  20. Perfusion Scintigraphy and Patient Selection for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Reilly, John J.; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Objectives: To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. Methods: We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non–high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Measurements and Main Results: Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Conclusions: Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung. PMID:20538961

  1. Perfusion scintigraphy and patient selection for lung volume reduction surgery.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A; Hoffman, Eric A; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C; Decamp, Malcolm M; Reilly, John J; Washko, George R

    2010-10-01

    It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non-high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non-upper lobe-predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non-upper lobe-predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung.

  2. New evidence in one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Meleiro, H; Correia, I; Charco Mora, P

    2017-09-26

    Mechanical ventilation in thoracic surgery has undergone significant changes in recent years due to the implementation of the protective ventilation. This review will analyze recent ventilatory strategies in one-lung ventilation. A MEDLINE research was performed using Mesh term "One-Lung Ventilation" including randomized clinical trials, metanalysis, reviews and systematic reviews published in the last 6 years. Search was performed on 21st March 2017. A total of 75 articles were initially found. After title and abstract review 14 articles were included. Protective ventilation is not simply synonymous of low tidal volume ventilation, but it also includes routine use of PEEP and alveolar recruitment maneuver. New techniques are still in discussion namely PEEP adjustment, ratio inspiration:expiration, ideal type of anesthesia during one-lung ventilation and hypercapnic ventilation. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Current role of lung scintigraphy in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Giordano, A; Angiolillo, D J

    2001-12-01

    The pivotal role of lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) has been questioned in recent years due to the introduction of spiral computed tomography. However, the scintigraphic results used for comparisons are often those of the authoritative PIOPED (Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis) study, carried out in the 1980s. Pulmonary scintigraphy has progressed from those years both in the methodological and interpretative fields, although perhaps too slowly. Results better than those of PIOPED's have been presented by study groups who used: 1) perfusion-only approach, 2) SPET imaging; 3) new interpretative criteria; 4) different prediction rules to integrate clinical and scintigraphic probabilities of PE. These advances are still insufficiently recognised by the nuclear medicine community, possibly due to a sort of PIOPED-based "cultural globalisation". This paper reviews the actual advantages and limitations of nuclear medicine techniques, the diagnostic role of scintigraphy within the diagnostic algorithms proposed by international working groups and scientific societies and the results obtained from SPET imaging in the diagnosis of PE.

  4. Usefulness of lung perfusion scintigraphy before lung cancer resection in patients with ventilatory obstruction.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Tommaso C; Schillaci, Orazio; Pompeo, Eugenio; Mineo, Davide; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2006-11-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative lung perfusion scintigraphy performed by planar acquisition and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in predicting postoperative pulmonary function of patients with resectable lung cancer and obstructive ventilatory defect. The study enrolled 39 patients (mean age, 67 +/- 2.1 years). All patients underwent preoperative and postoperative pulmonary function tests. Cut-off values for postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) were 65% of the predicted value for pneumonectomy and 45% for lobectomy. A semiquantitative analysis of planar and SPECT lung perfusion scintigraphy images was performed preoperatively to estimate postoperative predicted FEV1 (FEV1ppo). Relationships between FEV1ppo and measured postoperative FEV1 were tested by the Pearson correlation and Bland Altman agreement tests. Twenty-eight lobectomies and 11 pneumonectomies were performed. The FEV1ppo estimated by mean planar lung scintigraphy was 1.85 +/- 0.38 L, with a Pearson correlation coefficient to the measured FEV1 of 0.8632 (p < 0.001). The mean FEV1ppo estimated by SPECT was 1.78 +/- 0.31 L, with a Pearson coefficient to the measured FEV1 of 0.8527 (p < 0.001). Both values showed a more significant correlation with postoperative measured FEV1 after lobectomy (p < 0.001) than after pneumonectomy (p = 0.045). The Bland Altman test confirmed satisfactory agreement of FEV1ppo estimated by both planar lung scintigraphy and SPECT with FEV1 measured by spirometry. Both planar lung scintigraphy and SPECT can accurately predict postoperative FEV1 and can therefore be considered reliable tools in establishing operability of patients with lung cancer and ventilatory obstruction.

  5. Uneven ventilation of the lung following trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Lozman, J; Dutton, R E; Newell, J; Powers, S R

    1977-01-01

    Ventilatory function of the lungs has been studied in 13 post-trauma patients using a two compartment analysis. The analysis is based upon a model of the lung which describes a nitrogen washout curve in terms of fast and slowly ventilated compartments. Data output from a digital computer provides values that compare the fractions of the alveolar ventilation and volume of the two compartments. All patients on initial investigation had large identifiable slow spaces. Subsequent evaluation at a time of clinical improvement showed that the ventilation of the slow space had increased significantly (P less than .003), whereas no change was evident in the volume fraction. The ventilation to volume ratio of the slow space, measured on these two separate occasions increased in twelve of the patients studied. An increase in this ratio correlated with improvement in the patient's clinical condition. PMID:921355

  6. Myocardial perfusion as assessed by thallium-201 scintigraphy during the discontinuation of mechanical ventilation in ventilator-dependent patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hurford, W.E.; Lynch, K.E.; Strauss, H.W.; Lowenstein, E.; Zapol, W.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Patients who cannot be separated from mechanical ventilation (MV) after an episode of acute respiratory failure often have coexisting coronary artery disease. The authors hypothesized that increased left ventricular (LV) wall stress during periods of spontaneous ventilation (SV) could alter myocardial perfusion in these patients. Using thallium-201 (201TI) myocardial scintigraphy, the authors studied the occurrence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities during periods of SV in 15 MV-dependent patients (nine women, six men; aged 71 {plus minus} 7 yr, mean {plus minus} SD). Fourteen of these patients were studied once with 201TI myocardial scintigraphy during intermittent mechanical ventilation (IMV) and again on another day, after at least 10 min of SV through a T-piece. One patient was studied during SV only. Thirteen of 14 of the patients (93%) studied during MV had abnormal patterns of initial myocardial 201TI uptake, but only 1 patient demonstrated redistribution of 201TI on delayed images. The remainder of the abnormalities observed during MV were fixed defects. SV produced significant alterations of myocardial 201TI distribution or transient LV dilation, or both, in 7 of the 15 patients (47%). Four patients demonstrated new regional decreases of LV myocardial thallium concentration with redistribution of the isotope on delayed images. The patient studied only during SV also had myocardial 201TI defects with redistribution. Five patients (3 also having areas of 201TI redistribution) had transient LV dilation during SV.

  7. Chinese multi-center study of lung scintigraphy and CT pulmonary angiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    He, Jia; Wang, Feng; Dai, Hao-jie; Li, Mei; Wang, Qian; Yao, Zhiming; Lv, Bin; Xiong, Chang-ming; He, Jian-guo; Liu, Zhi-hong; He, Zuo-Xiang; Fang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate diagnostic value of the PISA-PED and PIOPED II criteria for lung scintigraphy and compare it with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for the detection of pulmonary embolism (PE). Five hundred and forty-four consecutive patients with suspected PE were enrolled. All patients underwent lung ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scan, chest radiography, and CTPA. Two readers used the PIOPED II criteria, and 2 used the PISA-PED criteria for the interpretation of lung scintigraphy. CTPA scans were interpreted by two experienced radiologists. Lung scintigraphy and CTPA were categorized as PE present, absent or non-diagnostic. PE was present in 321 of 544 patients. Using PIOPED II criteria, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 85.1, 82.5, 88.1, and 78.4% respectively for V/P scan. Using PISA-PED criteria, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 86.0, 81.2, 86.8, and 80.1% respectively, and none was non-diagnostic. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 81.7, 93.4, 94.9, and 77.3%, respectively for CTPA. PISA-PED interpretation has similar diagnostic accuracy to PIOPED II interpretation, does not have non-diagnostic scan, with lower cost and radiation, thus should be considered as a choice for patients with suspected PE.

  8. Mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury in healthy lungs.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro Leme; Negrini, Daniela; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macêdo

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an essential method of patient support, but it may induce lung damage, leading to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). VILI is the result of a complex interplay among various mechanical forces that act on lung structures, such as type I and II epithelial cells, endothelial cells, macrophages, peripheral airways, and the extracellular matrix (ECM), during mechanical ventilation. This article discusses ongoing research focusing on mechanisms of VILI in previously healthy lungs, such as in the perioperative period, and the development of new ventilator strategies for surgical patients. Several experimental and clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate the mechanisms of mechanotransduction in each cell type and in the ECM, as well as the role of different ventilator parameters in inducing or preventing VILI. VILI may be attenuated by reducing the tidal volume; however, the use of higher or lower levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers during the perioperative period is a matter of debate. Many questions concerning the mechanisms of VILI in surgical patients remain unanswered. The optimal threshold value of each ventilator parameter to reduce VILI is also unclear. Further experimental and clinical studies are necessary to better evaluate ventilator settings during the perioperative period in different types of surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. PREOPERATIVE PREDICTION OF LUNG FUNCTION IN PNEUMONECTOMY BY SPIROMETRY AND LUNG PERFUSION SCINTIGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays an increasing number of lung resections are being done because of the rising prevalence of lung cancer that occurs mainly in patients with limited lung function, what is caused by common etiologic factor - smoking cigarettes. Loss of lung tissue in such patients can worsen much the postoperative pulmonary function. So it is necessary to asses the postoperative pulmonary function especially after maximal resection, i.e. pneumonectomy. Objective: To check over the accuracy of preoperative prognosis of postoperative lung function after pneumonectomy using spirometry and lung perfusion scinigraphy. Material and methods: The study was done on 17 patients operated at the Clinic for thoracic surgery, who were treated previously at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases “Podhrastovi” in the period from 01. 12. 2008. to 01. 06. 2011. Postoperative pulmonary function expressed as ppoFEV1 (predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second) was prognosticated preoperatively using spirometry, i.e.. simple calculation according to the number of the pulmonary segments to be removed and perfusion lung scintigraphy. Results: There is no significant deviation of postoperative achieved values of FEV1 from predicted ones obtained by both methods, and there is no significant differences between predicted values (ppoFEV1) obtained by spirometry and perfusion scintigraphy. Conclusion: It is necessary to asses the postoperative pulmonary function before lung resection to avoid postoperative respiratory failure and other cardiopulmonary complications. It is absolutely necessary for pneumonectomy, i.e.. maximal pulmonary resection. It can be done with great possibility using spirometry or perfusion lung scintigraphy. PMID:23378687

  10. Regional tidal lung strain in mechanically ventilated normal lungs.

    PubMed

    Paula, Luis Felipe; Wellman, Tyler J; Winkler, Tilo; Spieth, Peter M; Güldner, Andreas; Venegas, Jose G; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Carvalho, Alysson R; Vidal Melo, Marcos F

    2016-12-01

    Parenchymal strain is a key determinant of lung injury produced by mechanical ventilation. However, imaging estimates of volumetric tidal strain (ε = regional tidal volume/reference volume) present substantial conceptual differences in reference volume computation and consideration of tidally recruited lung. We compared current and new methods to estimate tidal volumetric strains with computed tomography, and quantified the effect of tidal volume (VT) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on strain estimates. Eight supine pigs were ventilated with VT = 6 and 12 ml/kg and PEEP = 0, 6, and 12 cmH2O. End-expiratory and end-inspiratory scans were analyzed in eight regions of interest along the ventral-dorsal axis. Regional reference volumes were computed at end-expiration (with/without correction of regional VT for intratidal recruitment) and at resting lung volume (PEEP = 0) corrected for intratidal and PEEP-derived recruitment. All strain estimates demonstrated vertical heterogeneity with the largest tidal strains in middependent regions (P < 0.01). Maximal strains for distinct estimates occurred at different lung regions and were differently affected by VT-PEEP conditions. Values consistent with lung injury and inflammation were reached regionally, even when global measurements were below critical levels. Strains increased with VT and were larger in middependent than in nondependent lung regions. PEEP reduced tidal-strain estimates referenced to end-expiratory lung volumes, although it did not affect strains referenced to resting lung volume. These estimates of tidal strains in normal lungs point to middependent lung regions as those at risk for ventilator-induced lung injury. The different conditions and topography at which maximal strain estimates occur allow for testing the importance of each estimate for lung injury.

  11. Lung Injury After One-Lung Ventilation: A Review of the Pathophysiologic Mechanisms Affecting the Ventilated and the Collapsed Lung.

    PubMed

    Lohser, Jens; Slinger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Lung injury is the leading cause of death after thoracic surgery. Initially recognized after pneumonectomy, it has since been described after any period of 1-lung ventilation (OLV), even in the absence of lung resection. Overhydration and high tidal volumes were thought to be responsible at various points; however, it is now recognized that the pathophysiology is more complex and multifactorial. All causative mechanisms known to trigger ventilator-induced lung injury have been described in the OLV setting. The ventilated lung is exposed to high strain secondary to large, nonphysiologic tidal volumes and loss of the normal functional residual capacity. In addition, the ventilated lung experiences oxidative stress, as well as capillary shear stress because of hyperperfusion. Surgical manipulation and/or resection of the collapsed lung may induce lung injury. Re-expansion of the collapsed lung at the conclusion of OLV invariably induces duration-dependent, ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inflammatory cytokines are released in response to localized injury and may promote local and contralateral lung injury. Protective ventilation and volatile anesthesia lessen the degree of injury; however, increases in biochemical and histologic markers of lung injury appear unavoidable. The endothelial glycocalyx may represent a common pathway for lung injury creation during OLV, because it is damaged by most of the recognized lung injurious mechanisms. Experimental therapies to stabilize the endothelial glycocalyx may afford the ability to reduce lung injury in the future. In the interim, protective ventilation with tidal volumes of 4 to 5 mL/kg predicted body weight, positive end-expiratory pressure of 5 to 10 cm H2O, and routine lung recruitment should be used during OLV in an attempt to minimize harmful lung stress and strain. Additional strategies to reduce lung injury include routine volatile anesthesia and efforts to minimize OLV duration and hyperoxia.

  12. Comparing lung regions of interest in gamma scintigraphy for assessing inhaled therapeutic aerosol deposition.

    PubMed

    Biddiscombe, Martyn F; Meah, Sally N; Underwood, S Richard; Usmani, Omar S

    2011-06-01

    Two-dimensional gamma scintigraphy is an important technique used to evaluate the lung deposition from inhaled therapeutic aerosols. Images are divided into regions of interest and deposition indices are derived to quantify aerosol distribution within the intrapulmonary airways. In this article, we compared the different approaches that have been historically used between different laboratories for geometrically defining lung regions of interest. We evaluated the effect of these different approaches on the derived indices classically used to assess inhaled aerosol deposition in the lungs. Our primary intention was to assess the ability of different regional lung templates to discriminate between central and peripheral airway deposition patterns generated by inhaling aerosols of different particle sizes. We investigated six methods most commonly reported in the scientific literature to define lung regions of interest and assessed how different each of the derived regional lung indices were between the methods to quantify regional lung deposition. We used monodisperse albuterol aerosols of differing particle size (1.5, 3, and 6 μm) in five mild asthmatic subjects [forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1)) 90% predicted] to test the different approaches of each laboratory. We observed the areas of geometry used to delineate central (C) and peripheral (P) lung regions of interest varied markedly between different laboratories. There was greater similarity between methods in values of penetration index (PI), defined as P/C aerosol counts normalized by P/C krypton ventilation counts, compared to nonnormalized C/P or P/C aerosol count-ratios. Normalizing the aerosol deposition P/C count-ratios by the ventilation P/C count-ratios, reduced the variability of the data. There was dependence of the regional lung deposition indices on the size of the P region of interest in that, as P increased, C/P count-ratios decreased and P/C count-ratios increased, whereas PI was less

  13. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scan Lung VQ Scan Related Topics Arrhythmia Cough Deep Vein Thrombosis Pulmonary Embolism Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... this topic. Related reading Chest X Ray Cough Deep Vein Thrombosis Pulmonary Embolism Rate This Content: Updated: December 9, 2016 Twitter ...

  14. "Open lung ventilation optimizes pulmonary function during lung surgery".

    PubMed

    Downs, John B; Robinson, Lary A; Steighner, Michael L; Thrush, David; Reich, Richard R; Räsänen, Jukka O

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated an "open lung" ventilation (OV) strategy using low tidal volumes, low respiratory rate, low FiO2, and high continuous positive airway pressure in patients undergoing major lung resections. In this phase I pilot study, twelve consecutive patients were anesthetized using conventional ventilator settings (CV) and then OV strategy during which oxygenation and lung compliance were noted. Subsequently, a lung resection was performed. Data were collected during both modes of ventilation in each patient, with each patient acting as his own control. The postoperative course was monitored for complications. Twelve patients underwent open thoracotomies for seven lobectomies and five segmentectomies. The OV strategy provided consistent one-lung anesthesia and improved static compliance (40 ± 7 versus 25 ± 4 mL/cm H2O, P = 0.002) with airway pressures similar to CV. Postresection oxygenation (SpO2/FiO2) was better during OV (433 ± 11 versus 386 ± 15, P = 0.008). All postoperative chest x-rays were free of atelectasis or infiltrates. No patient required supplemental oxygen at any time postoperatively or on discharge. The mean hospital stay was 4 ± 1 d. There were no complications or mortality. The OV strategy, previously shown to have benefits during mechanical ventilation of patients with respiratory failure, proved safe and effective in lung resection patients. Because postoperative pulmonary complications may be directly attributable to the anesthetic management, adopting an OV strategy that optimizes lung mechanics and gas exchange may help reduce postoperative problems and improve overall surgical results. A randomized trial is planned to ascertain whether this technique will reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. One-lung overventilation does not induce inflammation in the normally ventilated contralateral lung.

    PubMed

    Almendros, Isaac; Gutierrez, Patricia T; Closa, Daniel; Navajas, Daniel; Farre, Ramon

    2008-06-30

    The aim was to assess whether induction of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in one lung triggers a concomitant inflammatory response in the normally ventilated contralateral lung. To this end, a differential ventilator was used in 6 rats. One lung was normally ventilated (3.5 ml/kg b.w.) and the contralateral lung was overstretched (15 ml/kg b.w.). Six control rats were normally ventilated (3.5 ml/kg b.w. each lung). After 3h, edema and gene expression of MIP-2 in the lung, and plasma and liver TNF-alpha were assessed. Overexpression of MIP-2 and edema were found in the overventilated lung but not in the normally ventilated contralateral lung. No detectable levels of circulating and liver TNF-alpha were detected. These data do not support the hypothesis of an early positive feedback in the lung inflammation during the mechanical ventilation.

  16. Distribution of lung blood on modified bilateral Glenn shunt evaluated by Tc-99m-MAA lung perfusion scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Si, Biao; Luan, Zhao-sheng; Wang, Tong-jian; Ning, Yan-song; Li, Na; Zhu, Meng; Liu, Zhong-min; Ding, Guang-hong; Qiao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of lung blood in a modified bilateral Glenn procedure designed in our institute with lung perfusion scintigraphy. Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent modified bilateral Glenn operation from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 7 patients who underwent bidirectional Glenn shunt. Radionuclide lung perfusion scintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m-macro aggregated albumin (MAA) in all patients. For the patients in modified bilateral Glenn group, the time at which the radioactivity accumulation peaked did not differ significantly between the right and left lung field (t = 0.608, P = 0.554). The incidence of perfusion abnormality in each lung lobe also did not differ significantly (P = 0.426 by Fisher exact test). The radioactive counts were higher in the right lung than in the left lung, but the difference was not statistically significant (t = 1.502, P = 0.157). Radioactive perfusion in the lower lung field was significantly greater than that in the upper field (t = 4.368, P < 0.001). Compared with that in the bidirectional Glenn group, the ratio of radioactivity in the right lung to that in left lung was significantly lower in the modified bilateral Glenn group (t = 3.686, P = 0.002). Lung perfusion scintigraphy confirmed the benefit of the modified bilateral Glenn shunt with regard to more balanced blood perfusion in both lungs. PMID:27661042

  17. The effect of changing ventilator settings on indices of ventilation inhomogeneity in small ventilated lungs

    PubMed Central

    Schmalisch, G; Proquitté, H; Roehr, CC; Wauer, RR

    2006-01-01

    Background In ventilated newborns the use of multiple breath washout (MBW) techniques for measuring both lung volume and ventilation inhomogeneity (VI) is hampered by the comparatively high dead space fraction. We studied how changes in ventilator settings affected VI indices in this particular population. Methods Using a computer simulation of a uniformly ventilated volume the interaction between VI indices (lung clearance index (LCI), moment ratios (M1/M0, M2/M0, AMDN1, AMDN2) of the washout curve) and tidal volume (VT), dead space (VD) and functional residual capacity (FRC) were calculated. The theoretical results were compared with measurements in 15 ventilated piglets (age <12 h, median weight 1135 g) by increasing the peak inspiratory pressure (PIP). FRC and VI indices were measured by MBW using 0.8% heptafluoropropane as tracer gas. Results The computer simulation showed that the sensitivity of most VI indices to changes in VD/VT and VT/FRC increase, in particular for VD/VT > 0.5. In piglets, the raised PIP caused a significant increase of VT from 15.4 ± 9.5 to 21.9 ± 14.7 (p = 0.003) and of the FRC from 31.6 ± 14.7 mL to 35.0 ± 15.9 mL (p = 0.006), whereas LCI (9.15 ± 0.75 to 8.55 ± 0.74, p = 0.019) and the moment ratios M1/M0, M2/M0 (p < 0.02) decreased significantly. No significant changes were seen in AMDN1 and AMDN2. The within-subject variability of the VI indices (coefficient of variation in brackets) was distinctly higher (LCI (9.8%), M1/M0 (6.6%), M2/M0 (14.6%), AMDN1 (9.1%), AMDN2 (16.3%)) compared to FRC measurements (5.6%). Computer simulations showed that significant changes in VI indices were exclusively caused by changes in VT and FRC and not by an improvement of the homogeneity of alveolar ventilation. Conclusion In small ventilated lungs with a high dead space fraction, indices of VI may be misinterpreted if the changes in ventilator settings are not considered. Computer simulations can help to prevent this misinterpretation. PMID

  18. Pulmonary embolism during pregnancy: diagnosis with lung scintigraphy or CT angiography?

    PubMed

    Revel, Marie-Pierre; Cohen, Stéphanie; Sanchez, Olivier; Collignon, Marie-Anne; Thiam, Rokhaya; Redheuil, Alban; Meyer, Guy; Frija, Guy

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the rate of positive, negative, and indeterminate results and the agreement between initial and expert readings for lung scintigraphy and computed tomographic (CT) angiography performed in patients suspected of having pulmonary embolism (PE) during pregnancy. Institutional review board approval was obtained. The authors retrospectively analyzed the images from lung scintigraphy and CT angiography performed in pregnant patients during the past 9 years. Images from 46 CT angiographic examinations performed in 43 patients and 91 of 94 lung scintigraphic examinations were reviewed by experts, whose readings were then compared with the initial reports. For CT angiography, the quality of opacification was graded as good, suboptimal, or poor and intraarterial attenuation was measured. The rates of positive findings (seven of 43 patients [16%] with CT angiography and 10 of 91 patients [11%] with scintigraphy, P = .36), negative findings (28 of 43 patients [65%] with CT angiography and 64 of 91 patients [70%] with scintigraphy, P = .54), and indeterminate findings (eight of 43 patients [19%] with CT angiography and 17 of 91 patients [19%] with scintigraphy, P = .99) were similar for CT angiography and lung scintigraphy. There were four discrepancies between initial and expert readings for CT angiography (κ = 0.84; confidence interval: 0.68, 0.99) and 14 for lung scintigraphy (κ = 0.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.63, 0.87). Opacification was classified as good for only 23 of the 46 CT angiographic examinations (50%). Attenuation values were significantly different among the groups with good, suboptimal, or poor opacification. Alternative diagnoses unsuspected at chest radiography were demonstrated at CT angiography in five of the 43 patients (12%). The mean maternal radiation dose was 0.9 mSv for lung scintigraphy and 7.3 mSv for CT angiography. Lung scintigraphy and CT angiography have comparable performances for PE diagnosis during pregnancy. Interobserver

  19. History of Mechanical Ventilation. From Vesalius to Ventilator-induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Arthur S

    2015-05-15

    Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving therapy that catalyzed the development of modern intensive care units. The origins of modern mechanical ventilation can be traced back about five centuries to the seminal work of Andreas Vesalius. This article is a short history of mechanical ventilation, tracing its origins over the centuries to the present day. One of the great advances in ventilatory support over the past few decades has been the development of lung-protective ventilatory strategies, based on our understanding of the iatrogenic consequences of mechanical ventilation such as ventilator-induced lung injury. These strategies have markedly improved clinical outcomes in patients with respiratory failure.

  20. Automated quantitative analysis of ventilation-perfusion lung scintigrams

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G.H.; Vernon, P.; Seed, W.A.

    1984-05-01

    An automated computer analysis of ventilation (Kr-81m) and perfusion (Tc-99m) lung images has been devised that produces a graphical image of the distribution of ventilation and perfusion, and of ventilation-perfusion ratios. The analysis has overcome the following problems: the identification of the midline between two lungs and the lung boundaries, the exclusion of extrapulmonary radioactivity, the superimposition of lung images of different sizes, and the format for presentation of the data. Therefore, lung images of different sizes and shapes may be compared with each other. The analysis has been used to develop normal ranges from 55 volunteers. Comparison of younger and older age groups of men and women show small but significant differences in the distribution of ventilation and perfusion, but no differences in ventilation-perfusion ratios.

  1. Ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Gutierrez; Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato Soibelmann

    2013-01-01

    In preterm infants, the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced lung injuries and subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of the present review was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of injury that involve cytokine-mediated inflammation to contribute to the development of new preventive strategies. Relevant articles were retrieved from the PubMed database using the search terms "ventilator-induced lung injury preterm", "continuous positive airway pressure", "preterm", and "bronchopulmonary dysplasia". The resulting data and other relevant information were divided into several topics to ensure a thorough, critical view of ventilation-induced lung injury and its consequences in preterm infants. The role of pro-inflammatory cytokines (particularly interleukins 6 and 8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) as mediators of lung injury was assessed. Evidence from studies conducted with animals and human newborns is described. This evidence shows that brief periods of mechanical ventilation is sufficient to induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Other forms of mechanical and non-invasive ventilation were also analyzed as protective alternatives to conventional mechanical ventilation. It was concluded that non-invasive ventilation, intubation followed by early surfactant administration and quick extubation for nasal continuous positive airway pressure, and strategies that regulate tidal volume and avoid volutrauma (such as volume guarantee ventilation) protect against ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants. PMID:24553514

  2. Protective lung ventilation in operating room: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Constantin, J M; Jaber, S

    2014-06-01

    Postoperative pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications adversely affect clinical outcomes and healthcare utilization, so that prevention has become a measure of the quality of perioperative care. Mechanical ventilation is an essential support therapy to maintain adequate gas exchange during general anesthesia for surgery. Mechanical ventilation using high tidal volume (VT) (between 10 and 15 mL/kg) has been historically encouraged to prevent hypoxemia and atelectasis formation in anesthetized patients undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery. However, there is accumulating evidence from both experimental and clinical studies that mechanical ventilation, especially the use of high VT and plateau pressure, may potentially aggravate or even initiate lung injury. Ventilator-associated lung injury can result from cyclic alveolar overdistension of non-dependent lung tissue, and repetitive opening and closing of dependent lung tissue resulting in ultrastructural damage at the junction of closed and open alveoli. Lung-protective ventilation, which refers to the use of lower VT and limited plateau pressure to minimize overdistension, and positive end-expiratory pressure to prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration, was shown to improve outcome in critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It has been recently suggested that this approach might also be beneficial in a broader population, especially in critically ill patients without ARDS at the onset of mechanical ventilation. There is, however, little evidence regarding a potential beneficial effect of lung protective ventilation during surgery, especially in patients with healthy lungs. Although surgical patients are frequently exposed to much shorter periods of mechanical ventilation, this is an important gap in knowledge given the number of patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the operating room. This review developed the benefits of lung protective ventilation during surgery

  3. Pulmonary embolism in pregnancy: comparison of pulmonary CT angiography and lung scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Carole A; McDermott, Shaunagh; Freyne, Bridget J; Brennan, Donal J; Collins, Conor D; Skehan, Stephen J

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively compare the diagnostic adequacy of lung scintigraphy with that of pulmonary CT angiography (CTA) in the care of pregnant patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. Patient characteristics, radiology report content, additional imaging performed, final diagnosis, and diagnostic adequacy were recorded for pregnant patients consecutively referred for lung scintigraphy or pulmonary CTA according to physician preference. Measurements of pulmonary arterial enhancement were performed on all pulmonary CTA images of pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy and pulmonary CTA studies deemed inadequate for diagnosis at the time of image acquisition were further assessed, and the cause of diagnostic inadequacy was determined. The relative contribution of the inferior vena cava to the right side of the heart was measured on nondiagnostic CTA images and compared with that on CTA images of age-matched nonpregnant women, who were the controls. Twenty-eight pulmonary CTA examinations were performed on 25 pregnant patients, and 25 lung scintigraphic studies were performed on 25 pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy was more frequently adequate for diagnosis than was pulmonary CTA (4% vs 35.7%) (p = 0.0058). Pulmonary CTA had a higher diagnostic inadequacy rate among pregnant than nonpregnant women (35.7% vs 2.1%) (p < 0.001). Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava was identified in eight of 10 nondiagnostic pulmonary CTA studies. We found that lung scintigraphy was more reliable than pulmonary CTA in pregnant patients. Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava is a common finding at pulmonary CTA of pregnant patients.

  4. Critical evaluation of lung scintigraphy in cystic fibrosis: study of 113 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Piepsz, A.; Wetzburger, C.; Spehl, M.; Machin, D.; Dab, I.; Ham, H.R.; Vandevivere, J.; Baran, D.

    1980-10-01

    A long-term study has been performed on 285 lung perfusion scintigrams obtained from 113 patients with cystic fibrosis. Transverse and longitudinal comparisons with clinical and radiological scores, as well as retrospective analysis of the deceased patients, were the methods used in order to evaluate the importance of the scintigraphic images. It appears that lung scintigraphy is the best index of the regional lung impairment, and contributes, as does a chest radiograph, to the early detection of lung lesions, the two methods being complementary.

  5. Lung amyloid nodule detected by 99mTc-aprotinin scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Satoru; Kubota, Kazuo; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Kouketu, Rikiya; Morooka, Miyako; Kawai, Shigeo; Takeda, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Sugiyama, Haruhito

    2012-07-01

    We present a case in which an amyloid lung nodule was diagnosed preoperatively by amyloid scintigraphy (99m)Tc-aprotinin. A 65-year-old man complained of marked weight loss (9 kg) over a period of 6 months. An abnormal shadow in the middle field of the right lung was detected on chest X-ray, corresponding to a 16-mm nodule in the right middle lobe on thoracic computed tomography (CT). Total protein and immunoglobulin G levels were elevated to 8.3 and 2245 mg/dl, respectively, but other blood tests including several tumor marker levels and Cryptococcus antibodies were all within normal range. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed no uptake by the lung nodule, so lung amyloidosis was considered as differential diagnosis. To avoid risk of bleeding on bronchoscopy, noninvasive amyloid scintigraphy using (99m)Tc-aprotinin was first performed. A nodular, abnormal accumulation was observed in the right middle lung lobe. Diagnostic imaging strongly suggested amyloidosis, so video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed rather than bronchoscopy. Pathological samples showed positive staining with Congo red, and A-λ amyloidosis was diagnosed on the basis of immunostaining. Scintigraphy using (99m)Tc-aprotinin offers a useful, noninvasive method for assessing lung amyloidosis.

  6. Reversible ventilation and perfusion abnormalities in unilateral obstructed lung

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, H.E.; Jones, R.L.; King, E.G.; Sproule, B.J.; Fortune, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    An intraluminal carcinoid tumor obstructing the left mainstem bronchus produced hypoxemia through alteration in ventilation/perfusion matching. Studies of regional lung function using 133-xenon (/sup 133/Xe) and a multiprobe computerized instrumentation system documented a reduction of perfusion to 22 percent and ventilation to 6 percent of the total. There was negligible washout of intravenously injected /sup 133/Xe from the left lung consistent with air trapping. Four days after left mainstem bronchial sleeve resection, perfusion, ventilation and washout of injected xenon had significantly improved and by four months postresection, all measurements were virtually normal, although complete restoration of perfusion in relation to ventilation was delayed. Regional lung function studied with a multiprobe system in this patient provided a clinical model for the study of ventilation and perfusion inter-relationships in large airway obstruction and demonstrated that a prolonged time may be required for return of perfusion to normal.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ventilation and Perfusion in the Lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, Gordon Kim (Inventor); Hopkins, Susan Roberta (Inventor); Buxton, Richard Bruce (Inventor); Pereira De Sa, Rui Carlos (Inventor); Theilmann, Rebecca Jean (Inventor); Cronin, Matthew Vincent (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods, devices, and systems are disclosed for implementing a fully quantitative non-injectable contrast proton MRI technique to measure spatial ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) matching and spatial distribution of ventilation and perfusion. In one aspect, a method using MRI to characterize ventilation and perfusion in a lung includes acquiring an MR image of the lung having MR data in a voxel and obtaining a breathing frequency parameter, determining a water density value, a specific ventilation value, and a perfusion value in at least one voxel of the MR image based on the MR data and using the water density value to determine an air content value, and determining a ventilation-perfusion ratio value that is the product of the specific ventilation value, the air content value, the inverse of the perfusion value, and the breathing frequency.

  8. Cellular Stress Failure in Ventilator-injured Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Vlahakis, Nicholas E.; Hubmayr, Rolf D.

    2005-01-01

    The clinical and experimental literature has unequivocally established that mechanical ventilation with large tidal volumes is injurious to the lung. However, uncertainty about the micromechanics of injured lungs and the numerous degrees of freedom in ventilator settings leave many unanswered questions about the biophysical determinants of lung injury. In this review we focus on experimental evidence for lung cells as injury targets and the relevance of these studies for human ventilator-associated lung injury. In vitro, the stress-induced mechanical interactions between matrix and adherent cells are important for cellular remodeling as a means for preventing compromise of cell structure and ultimately cell injury or death. In vivo, these same principles apply. Large tidal volume mechanical ventilation results in physical breaks in alveolar epithelial and endothelial plasma membrane integrity and subsequent triggering of proinflammatory signaling cascades resulting in the cytokine milieu and pathologic and physiologic findings of ventilator-associated lung injury. Importantly, though, alveolar cells possess cellular repair and remodeling mechanisms that in addition to protecting the stressed cell provide potential molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-associated lung injury in the future. PMID:15695492

  9. Ventilation/perfusion mismatch during lung aeration at birth.

    PubMed

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; te Pas, Arjan B; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A; Wheeler, Kevin I; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sonobe, Takashi; Hooper, Stuart B

    2014-09-01

    At birth, the transition to newborn life is triggered by lung aeration, which stimulates a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF). Current theories predict that the increase in PBF is spatially related to ventilated lung regions as they aerate after birth. Using simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography we investigated the spatial relationships between lung aeration and the increase in PBF after birth. Six near-term (30-day gestation) rabbits were delivered by caesarean section, intubated and an intravenous catheter inserted, before they were positioned for X-ray imaging. During imaging, iodine was injected before ventilation onset, after ventilation of the right lung only, and after ventilation of both lungs. Unilateral ventilation increased iodine levels entering both left and right pulmonary arteries (PAs) and significantly increased heart rate, iodine ejection per beat, diameters of both left and right PAs, and number of visible vessels in both lungs. Within the 6th intercostal space, the mean gray level (relative measure of iodine level) increased from 68.3 ± 11.6 and 70.3 ± 7.5%·s to 136.3 ± 22.6 and 136.3 ± 23.7%·s in the left and right PAs, respectively. No differences were observed between vessels in the left and right lungs, despite the left lung not initially being ventilated. The increase in PBF at birth is not spatially related to lung aeration allowing a large ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or pulmonary shunting, to occur in the partially aerated lung at birth.

  10. Right pulmonary artery atresia with left circumflex coronary collaterals supplying the affected lung diagnosed by V/Q scintigraphy and CTA: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen-Tian; Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Han, Ting-Ting; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2014-12-01

    Ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) lung scintigraphy has been a popular diagnostic test for evaluation of pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) for almost 40 years. Despite the validation of V/Q scintigraphy, it is important to remember that there are causes of unmatched perfusion defects that are not due to PE. Here, we describe a very rare case of right main pulmonary artery atresia with left circumflex coronary collaterals supplying the affected lung in an adult patient diagnosed by V/Q scan and CT angiography (CTA). Lung perfusion scan disclosed the total absence of perfusion in the right lung, while ventilation scan disclosed decreased size of the right lung with diminished but homogeneous radioactivity distribution. CTA showed occlusion of the right main pulmonary artery with no evidence of embolus. Three-dimensional reconstruction demonstrated large, tortuous collateral vessels arising from the left circumflex coronary branch to the affected lung indicating collaterals formed from the coronary circulation to the pulmonary circulation. We highlight that demonstrations on V/Q scintigraphy in such cases should be interpreted with caution.

  11. Effect of unilateral breathing exercises on regional lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Tucker, B; Jenkins, S; Cheong, D; Robinson, P

    1999-09-01

    We investigated the effect of a unilateral thoracic expansion exercise (TEE), a breathing manoeuvre used by physiotherapists, on regional lung ventilation. Nine trained physiotherapists aged 22-37 years completed the study. Technegas lung ventilation scans were used to determine the effect of a right unilateral TEE performed when sitting. This was compared with a maximal deep breath. Total radioactivity in each lung was determined. Each lung was sectioned into three equal zones (upper, middle and lower) and the ratio of radioactivity for each of the corresponding lung zones calculated. Ventilation was preferentially distributed to the right lung in all participants during both breathing manoeuvres. The mean (+/- S.E.M.) radioactivity ratios (right/left lung) were greater during a unilateral TEE (1.17 +/- 0.02) than during a deep breath (1.07 +/- 0.01). Seven participants achieved significantly greater ventilation to the right middle (1.15 +/- 0.03, P = 0.02) and lower zones (1.34 +/- 0.03, P = 0.02) during a unilateral TEE than to the corresponding zones on the left; this was evident soon after the initiation of the breath. The findings of this study show that relative regional ventilation to the ipsilateral lung can be increased during a unilateral TEE in trained individuals.

  12. Intravenous versus inhalation anaesthesia for one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Módolo, Norma S P; Módolo, Marília P; Marton, Marcos A; Volpato, Enilze; Monteiro Arantes, Vinícius; do Nascimento Junior, Paulo; El Dib, Regina P

    2013-07-11

    This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2008.The technique called one-lung ventilation can confine bleeding or infection to one lung, prevent rupture of a lung cyst or, more commonly, facilitate surgical exposure of the unventilated lung. During one-lung ventilation, anaesthesia is maintained either by delivering an inhalation anaesthetic to the ventilated lung or by infusing an intravenous anaesthetic. It is possible that the method chosen to maintain anaesthesia may affect patient outcomes. Inhalation anaesthetics may impair hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) and increase intrapulmonary shunt and hypoxaemia. The objective of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of intravenous versus inhalation anaesthesia for one-lung ventilation. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); The Cochrane Library (2012, Issue 11); MEDLINE (1966 to November 2012); EMBASE (1980 to November 2012); Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS, 1982 to November 2012) and ISI web of Science (1945 to November 2012), reference lists of identified trials and bibliographies of published reviews. We also contacted researchers in the field. No language restrictions were applied. The date of the most recent search was 19 November 2012. The original search was performed in June 2006. We included randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials of intravenous (e.g. propofol) versus inhalation (e.g. isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane) anaesthesia for one-lung ventilation in both surgical and intensive care participants. We excluded studies of participants who had only one lung (i.e. pneumonectomy or congenital absence of one lung). Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We included in this updated review 20 studies that enrolled 850 participants, all of which

  13. Low Tidal Volume Ventilation in Patients Without Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Ye; Zhu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life threatening respiratory condition characterized by breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leading to flooding of the alveolar space producing the classical chest radiograph of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. In this study, we employed lung protective ventilation strategies in patients without acute lung injury (ALI) to determine whether mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volume would provide more clinical benefits to patients without ALI.

  14. Evaluation of revised criteria for ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sostman, H D; Coleman, R E; DeLong, D M; Newman, G E; Paine, S

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the revised PIOPED (Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis) criteria for categorization of ventilation-perfusion lung scans and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the revised criteria with that of the original PIOPED criteria and subjective probability estimates. The ventilation-perfusion scans of 104 consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary embolism were reviewed. All patients had also undergone pulmonary angiography. The scans were categorized according to the original and revised PIOPED criteria, and a "gestalt" percent probability estimate was made. In addition, the official clinical interpretation (made with the original PIOPED criteria) was recorded. The gestalt percent probability estimate was the most accurate for assessing the likelihood of pulmonary embolism (area under the receiver operating characteristic [ROC] curve = 0.836). The revised PIOPED criteria (area under the ROC curve = 0.753) were more accurate than the original PIOPED criteria. The revised PIOPED criteria are more accurate than the original PIOPED criteria. Experienced readers of lung scans can achieve higher accuracy after applying formal criteria by using their experience and subjective judgment.

  15. [First diagnostic choice in patients with high clinical suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism: helical CT or ventilation/perfusion pulmonary scintigraphy?].

    PubMed

    Ferrán, N; Martín-Comín, J; Bajén, M; Carrera, D; Mora, J; Ricart, Y; Sánchez, F; Mast, R

    2005-01-01

    Comparative analysis about helical CT (ThC) vs ventilation-perfusion pulmonary scintigraphy (V/P Sc) diagnosis effectiveness, as a first diagnosis technique in patients with high clinical suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism (PT). Prospective study of 30 patients with high clinical suspicion and high Dimer-D levels (> 250 microg/l). The diagnosis was defined as anticoagulant therapeutic prescription and posterior clinical evolution. V/P Sc were performed to each patient within the next 48 h (an average of 14.8 h) after TCh, without anticoagulant treatment. We classified the scintigrams according to the PIOPED criteria and hTC images as positive, negative and indeterminated. In sixteen patients final diagnosis was PT: in 9 both techniques were positive; in 5 scintigraphy was positive with normal hTC and in 1, hTC was normal with negative scintigraphy. The last case was an indeterminated hTC with negative scintigraphy. In fourteen patients, final diagnosis was non-PT: in 6 both techniques were negative; in 7 scintigraphy was negative with positive hTC and in 1, both results were indeterminated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and efficiency were respectively 87.5, 100, 100, 87.5 and 93 % for V/P Sc and 62, 50, 58.8, 53.8 and 53 % for TCh. V/P Sc has better PT diagnosis reliability. It is recommended to do V/P Sc in all patients with high clinical suspicion of PT.

  16. [Ventilation in acute respiratory distress. Lung-protective strategies].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Rossaint, R; Dembinski, R

    2012-11-01

    Ventilation of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with protective ventilator settings is the standard in patient care. Besides the reduction of tidal volumes, the adjustment of a case-related positive end-expiratory pressure and preservation of spontaneous breathing activity at least 48 h after onset is part of this strategy. Bedside techniques have been developed to adapt ventilatory settings to the individual patient and the different stages of ARDS. This article reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and ventilator-induced lung injury and presents current evidence-based strategies for ventilator settings in ARDS.

  17. [Incidence and imaging characteristics of skeletal metastases detected by bone scintigraphy in lung cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Jauković, Ljiljana; Ajdinović, Boris; Janković, Zoran; Dugonjić, Sanja

    2006-12-01

    Detection of metastatic bone disease by skeletal scintigraphy is a classical application of nuclear medicine in cancer patients. Detection of bone metastases in patients with lung cancer is necessary for an appropriate treatment modality. The aim of this study was to report the frequency and imaging characteristics of bone metastases detected by bone scintigraphy (BS) using technetium-99m phosphonates in patients with lung cancer. We retrospectively analyzed a total of one hundred patients (78 males and 22 females), mean age of 63.3 years, with the diagnosis of lung cancer, who underwent BS during a three-year-period (2003-2005). Scintiscans were classified as positive, negative and suspicious with regard to the presence of bone metastases. The incidence of positive, negative and suspicious findings were 57%. 32% and 11%, respectively. Out of 57 patients with bone metastases, 51 had multiple asymmetric foci of increased tracer activity localized in the ribs, spine, extremities, pelvis, sternum, scapula and skull in 72%, 54%, 49%, 37%, 12%, 9% and 5% of scans, respectively. BS revealed solitary metastases in 6 of the patients. The lesions were located in the lower limbs in three patients and in the upper limbs, pelvis and sternum in the remaining three patients. Bone scintigraphy plays a significant role in staging and selecting of patients for curative lung surgery. Due to the fact that metastatic involvment of the extremities was frequently shown, our study suggests that systematic inclusion of the limbs in BS acquisition should be obligatory.

  18. Linking lung function and inflammatory responses in ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Vincenzo; Hantos, Zoltan; Sly, Peter D; Zosky, Graeme R

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury are poorly understood. We used strain-dependent responses to mechanical ventilation in mice to identify associations between mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung. BALB/c, C57BL/6, and 129/Sv mice were ventilated using a protective [low tidal volume and moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers] or injurious (high tidal volume and zero PEEP) ventilation strategy. Lung mechanics and lung volume were monitored using the forced oscillation technique and plethysmography, respectively. Inflammation was assessed by measuring numbers of inflammatory cells, cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) levels, and protein content of the BAL. Principal components factor analysis was used to identify independent associations between lung function and inflammation. Mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung were dependent on ventilation strategy and mouse strain. Three factors were identified linking 1) pulmonary edema, protein leak, and macrophages, 2) atelectasis, IL-6, and TNF-α, and 3) IL-1β and neutrophils, which were independent of responses in lung mechanics. This approach has allowed us to identify specific inflammatory responses that are independently associated with overstretch of the lung parenchyma and loss of lung volume. These data provide critical insight into the mechanical responses in the lung that drive local inflammation in ventilator-induced lung injury and the basis for future mechanistic studies in this field.

  19. [Diagnostic imaging in acute pulmonary embolism. The use of spiral computed tomography, lung scintigraphy and echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning; Jørgensen, Henrik Boel; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2005-10-10

    Acute pulmonary embolism is an underdiagnosed and potentially lethal condition. Treatment may be lifesaving but is associated with severe side effects. Thus, reliable diagnostic imaging is essential. We conducted a literature review on the use of spiral computed tomography, lung scintigraphy and echocardiography in acute pulmonary embolism and identified 562 articles, of which 16 original papers met our inclusion criteria. From these, we concluded that none of the modalities is applicable in every situation. Spiral computed tomography can confirm the diagnosis but cannot rule out subsegmental embolism. With lung scintigraphy, perfusion imaging alone is probably sufficient and suited to both confirming and ruling out the diagnosis. Echocardiography should be reserved for patients with an emergent need for treatment and cannot rule out the diagnosis.

  20. Mechanical ventilation for imaging the small animal lung.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, Laurence W; Johnson, G Allan

    2002-01-01

    This review emphasizes some of the challenges and benefits of in vivo imaging of the small animal lung. Because mechanical ventilation plays a key role in high-quality, high-resolution imaging of the small animal lung, the article focuses particularly on the problems of ventilation support, control of breathing motion and lung volume, and imaging during different phases of the breathing cycle. Solutions for these problems are discussed primarily in relation to magnetic resonance imaging, both conventional proton imaging and the newer, hyperpolarized helium imaging of pulmonary airways. Examples of applications of these imaging solutions to normal and diseased lung are illustrated in the rat and guinea pig. Although difficult to perform, pulmonary imaging in the small animal can be a valuable source of information not only for the normal lung, but also for the lung challenged by disease.

  1. Effects of body temperature on ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Akinci, Ozkan I; Celik, Mehmet; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Martino, Janice M; Tugrul, Simru; Ozcan, Perihan E; Yilmazbayhan, Dilek; Yeldandi, Anjana V; Turkoz, Kemal H; Kiran, Bayram; Telci, Lütfi; Cakar, Nahit

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of body temperature on ventilator-induced lung injury. Thirty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 6 groups based on their body temperature (normothermia, 37 +/- 1 degrees C; hypothermia, 31 +/- 1 degrees C; hyperthermia, 41 +/- 1 degrees C). Ventilator-induced lung injury was achieved by ventilating for 1 hour with pressure-controlled ventilation mode set at peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) of 30 cmH2O (high pressure, or HP) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 0 cmH2O. In control subjects, PIP was set at 14 cmH2O (low pressure, or LP) and PEEP set at 0 cmH2O. Systemic chemokine and cytokine (tumor necrosis factor alpha , interleukin 1 beta , interleukin 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) levels were measured. The lungs were assessed for histological changes. Serum chemokines and cytokines were significantly elevated in the hyperthermia HP group compared with all 3 groups, LP (control), normothermia HP, and hypothermia HP. Oxygenation was better but not statistically significant in hypothermia HP compared with other HP groups. Cumulative mean histology scores were higher in hyperthermia HP and normothermia HP groups compared with control and normothermia HP groups. Concomitant hyperthermia increased systemic inflammatory response during HP ventilation. Although hypothermia decreased local inflammation in the lung, it did not completely attenuate systemic inflammatory response associated with HP ventilation.

  2. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime lung scintigraphy findings in low-dose amiodarone therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaya, G Capa; Ertay, T; Tuna, B; Bekis, R; Tasci, C; Sayit, E; Yilmaz, O; Kargi, A; Durak, H

    2006-01-01

    Amiodarone (AD)-induced pulmonary toxicity is one of the major complications of long-term AD therapy. Technetium-99m-labeled D: ,L: -hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (Tc-99m HMPAO) scintigraphy has been used to assess lung injury. We designed this study to clarify lung uptake changes of Tc-99m HMPAO using low doses of AD (5 mg/kg/day) during long-term therapy in a rabbit model. Group 1 consisted of 7 rabbits fed with AD by gavage for 6 months. To investigate the effect of ketamine on Tc-99m HMPAO uptake, 5 rabbits were included in Group 2 as a control group. Tc-99m HMPAO scintigraphy was performed in both Group 1 and Group 2 at baseline and after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks of AD intake. After 16, 20, and 24 weeks of drug intake, Tc-99m HMPAO scintigraphy was repeated only in group 1. One-min anterior images were acquired 30 min after the injection of 37 MBq of Tc-99m HMPAO. For semiquantitative evaluation, the mean count values were obtained and lung/background and liver/background ratios were calculated. Histopathologic evaluation was performed. No increase in lung and liver uptake of Tc-99m HMPAO was found 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks after drug intake. There was no significant increase in L/B and H/B ratios of Tc-99m HMPAO in Group 1 compared with Group 2. Both scintigraphic studies and histopathologic examinations showed nonspecific changes. Longitudinal studies investigating Tc-99m HMPAO lung uptake may be planned in patients carrying risk factors for AD-induced lung toxicity.

  3. Mechanical Power and Development of Ventilator-induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Cressoni, Massimo; Gotti, Miriam; Chiurazzi, Chiara; Massari, Dario; Algieri, Ilaria; Amini, Martina; Cammaroto, Antonio; Brioni, Matteo; Montaruli, Claudia; Nikolla, Klodiana; Guanziroli, Mariateresa; Dondossola, Daniele; Gatti, Stefano; Valerio, Vincenza; Vergani, Giordano Luca; Pugni, Paola; Cadringher, Paolo; Gagliano, Nicoletta; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2016-05-01

    The ventilator works mechanically on the lung parenchyma. The authors set out to obtain the proof of concept that ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) depends on the mechanical power applied to the lung. Mechanical power was defined as the function of transpulmonary pressure, tidal volume (TV), and respiratory rate. Three piglets were ventilated with a mechanical power known to be lethal (TV, 38 ml/kg; plateau pressure, 27 cm H2O; and respiratory rate, 15 breaths/min). Other groups (three piglets each) were ventilated with the same TV per kilogram and transpulmonary pressure but at the respiratory rates of 12, 9, 6, and 3 breaths/min. The authors identified a mechanical power threshold for VILI and did nine additional experiments at the respiratory rate of 35 breaths/min and mechanical power below (TV 11 ml/kg) and above (TV 22 ml/kg) the threshold. In the 15 experiments to detect the threshold for VILI, up to a mechanical power of approximately 12 J/min (respiratory rate, 9 breaths/min), the computed tomography scans showed mostly isolated densities, whereas at the mechanical power above approximately 12 J/min, all piglets developed whole-lung edema. In the nine confirmatory experiments, the five piglets ventilated above the power threshold developed VILI, but the four piglets ventilated below did not. By grouping all 24 piglets, the authors found a significant relationship between the mechanical power applied to the lung and the increase in lung weight (r = 0.41, P = 0.001) and lung elastance (r = 0.33, P < 0.01) and decrease in PaO2/FIO2 (r = 0.40, P < 0.001) at the end of the study. In piglets, VILI develops if a mechanical power threshold is exceeded.

  4. [Classification and terminology of artificial lung ventilation].

    PubMed

    Gal'perin, Iu S

    2005-01-01

    The author considers the main features of a prepared edition of the international standard ISO 4135:2001 "Equipment for anesthesia and artificial ventilation. Glossary" as the state standard of Russia. He shows methods for classification of the modes of ventilation support. A classification scheme of its procedures is proposed, by giving necessary notes. The abbreviations of these procedures are given in the Russian and English languages. The shorthand notations of airways gas pressure in the characteristic points of a respiratory cycle are clarified in detail and on this basis the procedures for limiting inspiration pressure during controlled artificial ventilation.

  5. Differential lung ventilation via tracheostomy using two endotracheal tubes in an infant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Demirkol, Demet; Ataman, Yasemin; Gündoğdu, Gökhan

    2017-09-08

    This case report presents differential lung ventilation in an infant. The aim is to define an alternative technique for performing differential lung ventilation in children. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this kind. A 4.2-kg, 2.5-month-old Asian boy was referred to our facility with refractory hypoxemia and hypercarbia due to asymmetric lung disease with atelectasis of the left lung and hyperinflation of the right lung. He was unresponsive to conventional ventilator strategies; different ventilator settings were required. To perform differential lung ventilation, two separate single-lumen endotracheal tubes were inserted into the main bronchus of each lung by tracheotomy; the tracheal tubes were attached to discrete ventilators. The left lung was ventilated with a lung salvage strategy using high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, and the right lung was ventilated with a lung-protective strategy using pressure-regulated volume control mode. Differential lung ventilation was performed successfully with this technique without complications. Differential lung ventilation may be a lifesaving procedure in select patients who have asymmetric lung disease. Inserting two single-lumen endotracheal tubes via tracheotomy for differential lung ventilation can be an effective and safe alternative method.

  6. Acute pulmonary embolism: sensitivity and specificity of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in PIOPED II study.

    PubMed

    Sostman, H Dirk; Stein, Paul D; Gottschalk, Alexander; Matta, Fadi; Hull, Russell; Goodman, Larry

    2008-03-01

    To use Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) II data to retrospectively determine sensitivity and specificity of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphic studies categorized as pulmonary embolism (PE) present or PE absent and the proportion of patients for whom these categories applied. The PIOPED II study had institutional review board approval at all participating centers. Patient informed consent was obtained; the study was HIPAA compliant. Approval and consent included those for future retrospective research. Patients in the PIOPED II database of clinical and imaging results were included if they had diagnosis at computed tomographic (CT) angiography, Wells score, and diagnosis at V/Q scanning. V/Q scan central readings were recategorized as PE present (PIOPED II reading = high probability of PE), PE absent (PIOPED II reading = very low probability of PE or normal), or nondiagnostic (PIOPED II reading = low or intermediate probability of PE). A composite reference standard was used: the PIOPED II digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) result, or if there was no definitive DSA result, CT angiographic results that were concordant with the Wells score (ie, positive CT angiographic result and Wells score > 2 or negative CT angiographic result and Wells score < 6). Sensitivity and specificity of recategorized central readings were computed. With the exclusion of patients with intermediate or low probability, the sensitivity of a high probability (PE present) scan finding was 77.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 69.7%, 85.0%), while the specificity of very low probability or normal (PE absent) scan finding was 97.7% (95% CI: 96.4%, 98.9%). The percentage of patients with a PE present or PE absent scan finding was 73.5% (95% CI: 70.7%, 76.4%). In a population similar to that in PIOPED II, results of V/Q scintigraphy can be diagnostically definitive in a majority of patients; thus, it can be considered an appropriate pulmonary imaging

  7. Analysis of atelectasis, ventilated, and hyperinflated lung during mechanical ventilation by dynamic CT.

    PubMed

    David, Matthias; Karmrodt, Jens; Bletz, Carsten; David, Sybil; Herweling, Annette; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Markstaller, Klaus

    2005-11-01

    To study the dynamics of lung compartments by dynamic CT (dCT) imaging during uninterrupted pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and different positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) settings in healthy and damaged lungs. Experimental animal investigation. Experimental animal facility of a university department. In seven anesthetized pigs, static inspiratory pressure volume curves were obtained to identify the individual lower inflection point (LIP) before and after saline solution lung lavage. During PCV, PEEP was adjusted 5 millibars (mbar) below the individually determined LIP (LIP - 5), at the LIP, and 5 mbar above the LIP (LIP + 5). Measurements were repeated before and after induction of lung damage. Hemodynamics, arterial and mixed venous blood gases, and dCT imaging in one juxtadiaphragmatic slice (effective temporal resolution of 100 ms) were assessed during uninterrupted PCV in series of three successive respiratory cycles. The mean fractional area (FA) of the hyperinflated lung (FA-H), mean FA of ventilated lung, mean FA of poorly ventilated lung, and mean FA of nonventilated lung (FA-NV), and the change in FA of the whole lung area (DeltaFA) were compared at different PEEP settings. Calculated pulmonary shunt (Qs/Qt) was compared to FA-NV. LIP + 5 decreased the amount of atelectasis (FA-NV) and increased hyperinflation (FA-H) in healthy and injured lungs. Cyclic changes of atelectasis (DeltaFA-NV) and hyperinflation (DeltaFA-H) were observed in both healthy and injured lungs. In the injured but not in the healthy lungs, the amount of cyclic changes of atelectasis and hyperinflation were independent from the adjusted PEEP level. FA-NV correlated with the calculated Qs/Qt, with a slight overestimation (mean +/- SEM, 2.1 +/- 4.1%). dCT imaging allows the following: (1) the quantification of the extent of atelectasis, ventilated, poorly ventilated, and hyperinflated lung parenchyma during ongoing mechanical ventilation; (2) the detection and quantification

  8. Vibration-response imaging versus quantitative perfusion scintigraphy in the selection of patients for lung-resection surgery.

    PubMed

    Comce, Fatma; Bingol, Zuleyha; Kiyan, Esen; Tanju, Serhan; Toker, Alper; Cagatay, Pembe; Ece, Turhan

    2011-12-01

    In patients being considered for lung-resection surgery, quantitative perfusion scintigraphy is used to predict postoperative lung function and guide the determination of lung-resection candidacy. Vibration-response imaging has been proposed as a noninvasive, radiation-free, and simpler method to predict postoperative lung function. We compared vibration-response imaging to quantitative perfusion scintigraphy for predicting postoperative FEV(1) and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (D(LCO)). We enrolled 35 candidates for lung resection. Twenty-five patients had preoperative FEV(1) and D(LCO) MEASUREMENTS: The vibration-response-imaging measurements showed strong correlation with the quantitative-perfusion-scintigraphy measurements of predicted postoperative FEV(1)% (r = 0.87, P < .001), predicted postoperative FEV(1) (r = 0.90, P < .001), and predicted postoperative D(LCO)% (r = 0.90, P < .001). There was a correlation between predicted postoperative FEV(1) (% and L) measured via quantitative perfusion scintigraphy and the actual postoperative FEV(1) (% and L) (r = 0.47, P = .048, r = 0.73, P < .001). There was no difference between the vibration-response-imaging measurements and the actual postoperative measurements of predicted postoperative FEV(1) (% and L). There was a correlation between predicted postoperative FEV(1) (% and L) measured via vibration-response imaging and actual postoperative FEV(1) (% and L) (r = 0.52, P = .044, r = 0.79, P < .001). The mean differences between the predicted and actual postoperative FEV(1) values were 49 mL with vibration-response imaging, versus 230 mL with quantitative perfusion scintigraphy. Neither the vibration-response imaging nor the quantitative perfusion scintigraphy predicted postoperative D(LCO)% values agreed with the actual postoperative D(LCO)% values. Vibration-response imaging may be a good alternative to quantitative perfusion scintigraphy in evaluating lung-resection candidacy.

  9. Perfusion lung scintigraphy for the prediction of postoperative residual pulmonary function in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kovacević-Kuśmierek, Katarzyna; Kozak, Józef; Pryt, Łukasz; Bieńkiewicz, Małgorzata; Cichocki, Paweł; Kuśmierek, Jacek; Płachcińska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of postoperative pulmonary function in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is crucial for proper qualification for surgery, the only effective therapeutic method. The aim of the study was to select the most accurate method for acquisition and processing of lung perfusion scintigraphy (LPS) combined with spirometry for prediction of postoperative pulmonary function in patients qualified for surgery. LPS was performed in 70 patients (40 males, 30 females), with preoperative spirometry (mean FEV1preop = 2.26 ± 0.72 L), after administration of 185 MBq of 99mTc-microalbumin/macroaggregate, using planar (appa) and SPECT/CT methods. Predicted postoperative lung function (FEV1pred) was calculated as a part of active lung parenchyma to remain after surgery. A non-imaging segment counting method was also applied. FEV1pred(appa, SPECT, SPECT/CT, segm.) were further compared with actual FEV1postop values obtained from postoperative spirometry. In the whole studied group (47 lobectomies, 23 pneumonectomies) mean value of FEV1postop was equal to 1.76 (± 0.56) L. FEV1pred(appa, SPECT, SPECT/CT, segm.) were equal to 1.75 (± 0.58) L, 1.71 (± 0.57) L, 1.72 (± 0.57) L and 1.57 (± 0.58) L, respectively. A segment counting method systematically lowered predicted FEV1 values (p < 10-5). Moreover, in 31 patients with FEV1preop < 2 L error of predicted values was assessed with Bland-Altman method. Mean absolute differences FEV1postop - FEV1pred amounted to: appa - (0.04 ± 0.13) L, SPECT - (0.07 ± 0.14) L, SPECT/CT - (0.06 ± 0.14) L and segm. - (0.21 ± 0.19) L, respectively. Lower limit of 95% confidence interval calculated for planar - optimal method, was equal to -220 mL (also determined separately in subgroups after lobectomy and pneumonectomy). This study shows that planar LPS may be applied for prediction of postoperative pulmonary function in patients qualified for pneumonectomy and lobectomy. If actual FEV1postop value is to be ≥ 800 m

  10. [Deep versus moderate neuromuscular block during one-lung ventilation in lung resection surgery].

    PubMed

    Casanova, Javier; Piñeiro, Patricia; De La Gala, Francisco; Olmedilla, Luis; Cruz, Patricia; Duque, Patricia; Garutti, Ignacio

    Neuromuscular relaxants are essential during general anesthesia for several procedures. Classical anesthesiology literature indicates that the use of neuromuscular blockade in thoracic surgery may be deleterious in patients in lateral decubitus position in one-lung ventilation. The primary objective of our study was to compare respiratory function according to the degree of patient neuromuscular relaxation. Secondary, we wanted to check that neuromuscular blockade during one-lung ventilation is not deleterious. A prospective, longitudinal observational study was made in which each patient served as both treated subject and control. 76 consecutive patients programmed for lung resection surgery in Gregorio Marañon Hospital along the year of 2013 who required one-lung ventilation in lateral decubitus were included. Ventilator data, hemodynamic parameters were registered in different moments according to train-of-four response (intense, deep and moderate blockade) during one-lung ventilation. Peak, plateau and mean pressures were significantly lower during the intense and deep blockade. Besides, compliance and peripheral oxygen saturation were significantly higher in those moments. Heart rate was significantly higher during deep blockade. No mechanical ventilation parameters were modified during measurements. Deep neuromuscular blockade attenuates the poor lung mechanics observed during one-lung ventilation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. [Therapeutic consequences of lung scintigraphy in patients with intermediate probability of pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Marmolin, Ea Sofie; Møller, Louise; Johansen, Allan; Madsen, Poul Henning; Hess, Søren

    2009-05-04

    Pulmonary embolism has a high mortality and is difficult to diagnose. Lung scintigraphy is widely used. However, a significant number of patients receive an inconclusive result. The aim of this study was to determine how patients with an intermediate result were handled. Case notes from 321 (77%) of a total of 416 consecutive patients who underwent lung scintigraphy at Odense University Hospital in 2004 were examined retrospectively. We found 98 (30%) patients with an intermediate probability of pulmonary embolism, among whom 14 (14%) underwent further investigation, 28 (29%) received treatment, and in 29 (30%) cases, the result was interpreted as negative for pulmonary embolism. We found no significant difference in demographic data or results of investigations performed before the scintigraphy between those who received treatment and those who did not, nor was there any difference between those who were interpreted as negative and those who were not. Few patients with intermediate probability underwent further investigation and one third was interpreted as negative for pulmonary embolism, contrary to the recommendations of several guidelines. In patients with intermediate probability of pulmonary embolism we demonstrated no differences in patient history or clinical presentation between those who received treatment and those who did not.

  12. Contribution of gular pumping to lung ventilation in monitor lizards.

    PubMed

    Owerkowicz, T; Farmer, C G; Hicks, J W; Brainerd, E L

    1999-06-04

    A controversial hypothesis has proposed that lizards are subject to a speed-dependent axial constraint that prevents effective lung ventilation during moderate- and high-speed locomotion. This hypothesis has been challenged by results demonstrating that monitor lizards (genus Varanus) experience no axial constraint. Evidence presented here shows that, during locomotion, varanids use a positive pressure gular pump to assist lung ventilation. Disabling the gular pump reveals that the axial constraint is present in varanids but it is masked by gular pumping under normal conditions. These findings support the prediction that the axial constraint may be found in other tetrapods that breathe by costal aspiration and locomote with a lateral undulatory gait.

  13. Heliox Improves Carbon Dioxide Removal during Lung Protective Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Beurskens, Charlotte J; Brevoord, Daniel; Lagrand, Wim K; van den Bergh, Walter M; Vroom, Margreeth B; Preckel, Benedikt; Horn, Janneke; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Helium is a noble gas with low density and increased carbon dioxide (CO2) diffusion capacity. This allows lower driving pressures in mechanical ventilation and increased CO2 diffusion. We hypothesized that heliox facilitates ventilation in patients during lung-protective mechanical ventilation using low tidal volumes. Methods. This is an observational cohort substudy of a single arm intervention study. Twenty-four ICU patients were included, who were admitted after a cardiac arrest and mechanically ventilated for 3 hours with heliox (50% helium; 50% oxygen). A fixed protective ventilation protocol (6 mL/kg) was used, with prospective observation for changes in lung mechanics and gas exchange. Statistics was by Bonferroni post-hoc correction with statistical significance set at P < 0.017. Results. During heliox ventilation, respiratory rate decreased (25 ± 4 versus 23 ± 5 breaths min(-1), P = 0.010). Minute volume ventilation showed a trend to decrease compared to baseline (11.1 ± 1.9 versus 9.9 ± 2.1 L min(-1), P = 0.026), while reducing PaCO2 levels (5.0 ± 0.6 versus 4.5 ± 0.6 kPa, P = 0.011) and peak pressures (21.1 ± 3.3 versus 19.8 ± 3.2 cm H2O, P = 0.024). Conclusions. Heliox improved CO2 elimination while allowing reduced minute volume ventilation in adult patients during protective mechanical ventilation.

  14. Comparison of actual tidal volume in neonatal lung model volume control ventilation using three ventilators.

    PubMed

    Toyama, H; Endo, Y; Ejima, Y; Matsubara, M; Kurosawa, S

    2011-07-01

    In neonates, small changes in tidal volumes (V(T)) may lead to complications. Previous studies have shown a significant difference between ventilator-measured tidal volume and tidal volume delivered (actual V(T)). We evaluated the accuracy of three different ventilators to deliver small V(T) during volume-controlled ventilation. We tested Servo 300, 840 ventilator and Evita 4 Neoflow ventilators with lung models simulating normal and injured neonatal lung compliance models. Gas volume delivered from the ventilator into the test circuit (V(TV)) and actual V(T) to the test lung were measured using Ventrak respiration monitors at set V(T) (30 ml). The gas volume increase of the breathing circuit was then calculated. Tidal volumes of the SV300 and PB840 in both lung models were similar to the set V(T) and the actual tidal volumes in the injured model (20.7 ml and 19.8 ml, respectively) were significantly less than that in the normal model (27.4 ml and 23.4 ml). PB840 with circuit compliance compensation could not improve the actual V(T). V(TV) of the EV4N in the normal and the injured models (37.8 ml and 46.6 ml) were markedly increased compared with set V(T), and actual V(T) were similar to set V(T) in the normal and injured model (30.2 ml and 31.9 ml, respectively). EV4N measuring V(T) close to the lung could match actual V(T) to almost the same value as the set V(T) however the gas volume of the breathing circuit was increased. If an accurate value for the patient's actual V(T) is needed, this V(T) must be measured by a sensor located between the Y-piece and the tracheal tube.

  15. Increasing the accuracy of lung perfusion scintigraphy in children with bidirectional Glenn circulation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yutaka; Momoi, Nobuo; Mitomo, Masaki; Aoyagi, Yoshimichi; Endo, Kisei; Matsumoto, Ayumi; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2010-12-01

    In children who have undergone a bidirectional Glenn procedure without antegrade or additional pulmonary blood flow, we have often noted a discrepancy between apparent lung perfusion on scintigraphy and superior vena cava angiography when evaluating right and left pulmonary blood flow. We found a tendency for radionuclide, tracer 99mTc-MAA, when administered through a single upper extremity vein, to preferentially accumulate in the ipsilateral lung. In the present study, we examined whether the ratio of right-to-left pulmonary flow varied when 99mTc-MAA was administered via either the right upper or the left upper extremity vein. We studied six children (median age 1.3 ± 0.23 years) who underwent a bidirectional Glenn before total cavopulmonary connection. Five children who underwent biventricular repair served as a control. Perfusion scintigraphy using 99mTc-labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA) was performed in all children. First, we injected radionuclide via the right upper extremity and calculated the pulmonary accumulation in both lungs (R-image). Second, we injected the same dose of radionuclide via the left upper extremity and calculated the pulmonary accumulation (B-image), which represented the resulting administration via both upper extremities. The lung accumulation that resulted from radionuclide administration via the left upper extremity (L-image) was determined by subtracting the R-image from the B-image. We evaluated the right-to-total pulmonary blood flow ratio (radionuclide accumulation in right lung / radionuclide accumulation in both lungs) in the R-, L- and B-images. The right-to-total pulmonary blood flow ratios in the R-, L- and B-images were 815 ± 15.3%, 39.8 ± 11.7% and 61.3 ± 11.8%, respectively, and there were significant differences among the three images (P < 0.01). On the other hand, in the control group, the right-to-total pulmonary blood flow ratios in the R-, L- and B-images were 59.3 ± 22.4%, 57.8 ± 26.4% and 58.8

  16. Recurrent Recruitment Manoeuvres Improve Lung Mechanics and Minimize Lung Injury during Mechanical Ventilation of Healthy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Lucy Kathleen; Kowallik, Anke; Uhlig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation (MV) of mice is increasingly required in experimental studies, but the conditions that allow stable ventilation of mice over several hours have not yet been fully defined. In addition, most previous studies documented vital parameters and lung mechanics only incompletely. The aim of the present study was to establish experimental conditions that keep these parameters within their physiological range over a period of 6 h. For this purpose, we also examined the effects of frequent short recruitment manoeuvres (RM) in healthy mice. Methods Mice were ventilated at low tidal volume VT = 8 mL/kg or high tidal volume VT = 16 mL/kg and a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 2 or 6 cmH2O. RM were performed every 5 min, 60 min or not at all. Lung mechanics were followed by the forced oscillation technique. Blood pressure (BP), electrocardiogram (ECG), heart frequency (HF), oxygen saturation and body temperature were monitored. Blood gases, neutrophil-recruitment, microvascular permeability and pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood serum as well as histopathology of the lung were examined. Results MV with repetitive RM every 5 min resulted in stable respiratory mechanics. Ventilation without RM worsened lung mechanics due to alveolar collapse, leading to impaired gas exchange. HF and BP were affected by anaesthesia, but not by ventilation. Microvascular permeability was highest in atelectatic lungs, whereas neutrophil-recruitment and structural changes were strongest in lungs ventilated with high tidal volume. The cytokines IL-6 and KC, but neither TNF nor IP-10, were elevated in the BAL and serum of all ventilated mice and were reduced by recurrent RM. Lung mechanics, oxygenation and pulmonary inflammation were improved by increased PEEP. Conclusions Recurrent RM maintain lung mechanics in their physiological range during low tidal volume ventilation of healthy mice by preventing atelectasis and

  17. [Examination of R-L shunt ratio mensuration using dynamic images in lung perfusion scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hajime; Yamada, Sayaka; Yoshioka, Chiho; Tamaoki, Toyoshi; Miura, Syunichi; Suzuki, Motoki; Makino, Tetsuzou

    2008-05-20

    We examined a method of quantitative analysis that used dynamic and static images to measure the Right-left (R-L) shunt ratio in lung perfusion scintigraphy. A total of 18 patients suspected of having R-L shunt brought on by congenital heart disease were referred for lung perfusion scintigraphy from November 2005 to February 2007 at our hospital. We acquired anterior dynamic images, set ROIs in all fields of view, and measured the highest count. We acquired anterior and posterior static images of the chest and measured lung counts. We considered the highest count on dynamic images to be the total injection dose per one second, normalized the acquisition time of static images, and calculated the R-L shunt ratio. We weighed the measurement results of the R-L shunt ratio obtained by the dynamic method against that of the whole-body method by t-test and the least-squares method. When we used a posterior static image in the dynamic method, we found that the coefficient of correlation (r) was 0.9831. The result of the t-test was that there was no significant difference at a level of significance of 1%. We think the use of the dynamic method is possible in R-L shunt ratio measurement and can shorten the examination time.

  18. Ventilation and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Eichinger, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Summary A close interaction between the respiratory pump, pulmonary parenchyma and blood circulation is essential for a normal lung function. Many pulmonary diseases present, especially in their initial phase, a variable regional impairment of ventilation and perfusion. In the last decades various techniques have been established to measure the lung function. Besides the global pulmonary function tests (PFTs) imaging techniques gained increasing importance to detect local variations in lung function, especially for ventilation and perfusion assessment. Imaging modalities allow for a deeper regional insight into pathophysiological processes and enable improved planning of invasive procedures. In contrast to computed tomography (CT) and the nuclear medicine techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a radiation free imaging modality gained increasing importance since the early 1990 for the assessment of pulmonary function. The major inherent problems of lung tissue, namely the low proton density and the pulmonary and cardiac motion, were overcome in the last years by a constant progress in MR technology. Some MR techniques are still under development, a process which is driven by scientific questions regarding the physiology and pathophysiology of pulmonary diseases, as well as by the need for fast and robust clinically applicable imaging techniques as safe therapy monitoring tools. MRI can be considered a promising ionizing-free alternative to techniques like CT or nuclear medicine techniques for the evaluation of lung function. The goal of this article is to provide an overview on selected MRI techniques for the assessment of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. PMID:22802864

  19. [Lung-brain interaction in the mechanically ventilated patient].

    PubMed

    López-Aguilar, J; Fernández-Gonzalo, M S; Turon, M; Quílez, M E; Gómez-Simón, V; Jódar, M M; Blanch, L

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) admitted to the ICU present neuropsychological alterations, which in most cases extend beyond the acute phase and have an important adverse effect upon quality of life. The aim of this review is to deepen in the analysis of the complex interaction between lung and brain in critically ill patients subjected to mechanical ventilation. This update first describes the neuropsychological alterations occurring both during the acute phase of ICU stay and at discharge, followed by an analysis of lung-brain interactions during mechanical ventilation, and finally explores the etiology and mechanisms leading to the neurological disorders observed in these patients. The management of critical patients requires an integral approach focused on minimizing the deleterious effects over the short, middle or long term. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of spontaneous effort during mechanical ventilation: normal lung versus injured lung.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Uchiyama, Akinori; Fujino, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The role of preserving spontaneous effort during mechanical ventilation and its interaction with mechanical ventilation have been actively investigated for several decades. Inspiratory muscle activities can lower the pleural components surrounding the lung, leading to an increase in transpulmonary pressure when spontaneous breathing effort is preserved during mechanical ventilation. Thus, increased transpulmonary pressure provides various benefits for gas exchange, ventilation pattern, and lung aeration. However, it is important to note that these beneficial effects of preserved spontaneous effort have been demonstrated only when spontaneous effort is modest and lung injury is less severe. Recent studies have revealed the 'dark side' of spontaneous effort during mechanical ventilation, especially in severe lung injury. The 'dark side' refers to uncontrollable transpulmonary pressure due to combined high inspiratory pressure with excessive spontaneous effort and the injurious lung inflation pattern of Pendelluft (i.e., the translocation of air from nondependent lung regions to dependent lung regions). Thus, during the early stages of severe ARDS, the strict control of transpulmonary pressure and prevention of Pendelluft should be achieved with the short-term use of muscle paralysis. When there is preserved spontaneous effort in ARDS, spontaneous effort should be maintained at a modest level, as the transpulmonary pressure and the effect size of Pendelluft depend on the intensity of the spontaneous effort.

  1. Distribution of lung blood on modified bilateral Glenn shunt evaluated by Tc-99m-MAA lung perfusion scintigraphy: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Si, Biao; Luan, Zhao-Sheng; Wang, Tong-Jian; Ning, Yan-Song; Li, Na; Zhu, Meng; Liu, Zhong-Min; Ding, Guang-Hong; Qiao, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of lung blood in a modified bilateral Glenn procedure designed in our institute with lung perfusion scintigraphy. Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent modified bilateral Glenn operation from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 7 patients who underwent bidirectional Glenn shunt. Radionuclide lung perfusion scintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m-macro aggregated albumin (MAA) in all patients. For the patients in modified bilateral Glenn group, the time at which the radioactivity accumulation peaked did not differ significantly between the right and left lung field (t = 0.608, P = 0.554). The incidence of perfusion abnormality in each lung lobe also did not differ significantly (P = 0.426 by Fisher exact test). The radioactive counts were higher in the right lung than in the left lung, but the difference was not statistically significant (t = 1.502, P = 0.157). Radioactive perfusion in the lower lung field was significantly greater than that in the upper field (t = 4.368, P < 0.001). Compared with that in the bidirectional Glenn group, the ratio of radioactivity in the right lung to that in left lung was significantly lower in the modified bilateral Glenn group (t = 3.686, P = 0.002). Lung perfusion scintigraphy confirmed the benefit of the modified bilateral Glenn shunt with regard to more balanced blood perfusion in both lungs.

  2. Mechanical ventilation increases the inflammatory response induced by lung contusion.

    PubMed

    van Wessem, Karlijn J P; Hennus, Marije P; van Wagenberg, Linda; Koenderman, Leo; Leenen, Luke P H

    2013-07-01

    Posttraumatic lung contusion is common after blunt chest trauma, and patients often need ventilatory support. Lung contusion induces an inflammatory response signified by primed polymorph neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs) in blood and tissue. Mechanical ventilation (MV) can also cause an inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to develop an animal model to investigate the effect of high-volume ventilation on the inflammatory response in blunt chest trauma. We assigned 23 male Sprague-Dawley rats to either MV or bilateral lung contusion followed by MV. We used three extra rats as controls. Lung contusion was induced by a blast generator, a device releasing a single pressure blast wave centered on the chest. We determined tissue and systemic inflammation by absolute PMN numbers in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), myeloperoxidase, interleukin (IL)-6, IL 1β, growth-related oncogene-KC, and IL-10 in both plasma and BALF. Survival after blunt chest trauma was correlated to the distance to the blast generator. Compared with controls, both MV and blast plus MV rats showed increased systemic and pulmonary inflammation, expressed by higher PMNs, myeloperoxidase levels, and cytokine levels in both blood and BALF. Blast plus MV rats showed a higher systemic and pulmonary inflammatory response than MV rats. The blast generator generated reproducible blunt chest trauma in rats. Mechanical ventilation after lung contusion induced a larger overall inflammatory response than MV alone, which indicates that local damage contributes not only to local inflammation, but also to systemic inflammation. This emphasizes the importance of lung protective ventilation strategies after pulmonary contusion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reproducibility of intensity-based estimates of lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kaifang; Bayouth, John E.; Ding, Kai; Christensen, Gary E.; Cao, Kunlin; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Lung function depends on lung expansion and contraction during the respiratory cycle. Respiratory-gated CT imaging and image registration can be used to estimate the regional lung volume change by observing CT voxel density changes during inspiration or expiration. In this study, the authors examine the reproducibility of intensity-based estimates of lung tissue expansion and contraction in three mechanically ventilated sheep and ten spontaneously breathing humans. The intensity-based estimates are compared to the estimates of lung function derived from image registration deformation field. Methods: 4DCT data set was acquired for a cohort of spontaneously breathing humans and anesthetized and mechanically ventilated sheep. For each subject, two 4DCT scans were performed with a short time interval between acquisitions. From each 4DCT data set, an image pair consisting of a volume reconstructed near end inspiration and a volume reconstructed near end exhalation was selected. The end inspiration and end exhalation images were registered using a tissue volume preserving deformable registration algorithm. The CT density change in the registered image pair was used to compute intensity-based specific air volume change (SAC) and the intensity-based Jacobian (IJAC), while the transformation-based Jacobian (TJAC) was computed directly from the image registration deformation field. IJAC is introduced to make the intensity-based and transformation-based methods comparable since SAC and Jacobian may not be associated with the same physiological phenomenon and have different units. Scan-to-scan variations in respiratory effort were corrected using a global scaling factor for normalization. A gamma index metric was introduced to quantify voxel-by-voxel reproducibility considering both differences in ventilation and distance between matching voxels. The authors also tested how different CT prefiltering levels affected intensity-based ventilation reproducibility. Results

  4. Regional ventilation/perfusion mismatch pattern in patient with Swyer James (MacLeod's) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Asa, Sertac; Akyel, Reşit; Atahan, Ersan; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2014-09-01

    Swyer James (McLeod's) syndrome (SJMS) is an uncommon disease, which occurs as a result of childhood bronchiolitis obliterans. Patients may not be diagnosed until later in their life. A 46-year-old man underwent ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy for acute onset of dyspnea. The scan showed markedly diminished ventilation and perfusion unilaterally on the right middle and inferior lobes. However, mismatched ventilation-perfusion pattern was shown on the upper right lobe, which was consistent with pulmonary embolism. Unilaterally matched ventilation/perfusion defect can see in SJMS in lung scintigraphy; however, when pulmoner embolism may accompany, scintigraphy should be carefully examined.

  5. Regional ventilation/perfusion mismatch pattern in patient with Swyer James (MacLeod's) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Sait; Asa, Sertac; Akyel, Reşit; Atahan, Ersan; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2014-01-01

    Swyer James (McLeod's) syndrome (SJMS) is an uncommon disease, which occurs as a result of childhood bronchiolitis obliterans. Patients may not be diagnosed until later in their life. A 46-year-old man underwent ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy for acute onset of dyspnea. The scan showed markedly diminished ventilation and perfusion unilaterally on the right middle and inferior lobes. However, mismatched ventilation-perfusion pattern was shown on the upper right lobe, which was consistent with pulmonary embolism. Unilaterally matched ventilation/perfusion defect can see in SJMS in lung scintigraphy; however, when pulmoner embolism may accompany, scintigraphy should be carefully examined. PMID:25535507

  6. Ventilator-associated respiratory infection following lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jordi; Caralt, Berta; López, Iker; Augustin, Salvador; Roman, Antonio; Gavalda, Joan; Rello, Jordi

    2015-03-01

    The medical records of 170 adult patients who underwent lung transplantation between January 2010 and December 2012 were reviewed to assess the incidence, causative organisms, risk factors and outcomes of post-operative pneumonia and tracheobronchitis. 20 (12%) patients suffered 24 episodes of ventilator-associated pneumonia. The condition was associated with mean increases of 43 days in mechanical ventilation and of 35 days in hospital stay, and significantly higher hospital mortality (OR 9.0, 95% CI 3.2-25.1). Pseudomonas aeruginosa (eight out of 12 patients were multidrug-resistant) was the most common pathogen, followed by Enterobacteriaceae (one out of five patients produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases). Gastroparesis occurred in 55 (32%) patients and was significantly associated with pneumonia (OR 6.2, 95% CI 2.2-17.2). Ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis was associated with a mean increase of 28 days in mechanical ventilation and 30.5 days in hospital stay, but was not associated with higher mortality (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.4-3.2). Pseudomonas aeruginosa (six out of 16 patients were multidrug resistant) was the most common pathogen, followed by Enterobacteriaceae (three out of 14 patients produced extended-spectrum β-lactamase). Patients with gastroparesis also had more episodes of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (40% versus 12%, p<0.001). In conclusion, ventilator-associated pneumonia following lung transplantation increased mortality. Preventing gastroparesis probably decreases the risk of pneumonia and tracheobronchitis. Multidrug-resistant bacteria frequently cause post-lung-transplantation pneumonia and tracheobronchitis. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  7. Numerical simulation of volume-controlled mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Bolun; Cai, Maolin; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2016-11-09

    Mechanical ventilation is a key therapy for patients who cannot breathe adequately by themselves, and dynamics of mechanical ventilation system is of great significance for life support of patients. Recently, models of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 1 lung are used to simulate the respiratory system of patients. However, humans have 2 lungs. When the respiratory characteristics of 2 lungs are different, a single-lung model cannot reflect real respiratory system. In this paper, to illustrate dynamic characteristics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs, we propose a mathematical model of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs and conduct experiments to verify the model. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs. This research study can be used for improving the efficiency and safety of volume-controlled mechanical ventilation system.

  8. Referral Patterns and Diagnostic Yield of Lung Scintigraphy in the Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zannier, Erik; Zuckier, Lionel S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study is to assess referral patterns and the yield of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy in patients referred for acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients who underwent V/Q studies between April 1, 2008, and March 31, 2010. Patients were subdivided into 4 groups based on their referral source: emergency department (ED), hospital inpatient ward, outpatient thrombosis clinic, and all other outpatient sources. Results. A total of 1008 patients underwent V/Q scintigraphy to exclude acute PE. The number of ED, inpatient, thrombosis clinic, and outpatient studies was 43 (4.3%), 288 (28.6%), 351 (34.8%), and 326 (32.3%). Proportion of patients with contrast contraindication varied significantly among the different groups. Of the 1,008 studies, 331 (32.8%) were interpreted as normal, 408 (40.5%) as low, 158 (15.7%) as intermediate, and 111 (11.0%) as high probability for PE. 68 (6.7%) patients underwent CTPA within 2 weeks following V/Q. Conclusion. The rate of nondiagnostic studies is lower than that reported in previously published data, with a relatively low rate of intermediate probability studies. Only a small fraction of patients undergoing a V/Q scan will require a CTPA. PMID:28491475

  9. Detection of Rib Metastases in Patients with Lung Cancer: A Comparative Study of MRI, CT and Bone Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan-Qing; Yang, Yang; Xing, Yan-Fen; Jiang, Sen; Sun, Xi-Wen

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the imaging findings of bone scintigraphy, chest CT and chest MRI in 55 cases of lung cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the detection of rib metastases were compared between imaging modalities on both a per-lesion and a per-patient basis. On a per-lesion basis, MRI sensitivity and accuracy were significantly higher than that of bone scintigraphy and CT (P<0.05). The sensitivities, specificities, and accuracy levels between CT and bone scintigraphy did not differ on either a per-lesion or per-patient basis (P>0.05). MRI appears to be superior for the detection of ribs metastases in lung cancer. PMID:23300617

  10. Detection of rib metastases in patients with lung cancer: a comparative study of MRI, CT and bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Qing; Yang, Yang; Xing, Yan-Fen; Jiang, Sen; Sun, Xi-Wen

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the imaging findings of bone scintigraphy, chest CT and chest MRI in 55 cases of lung cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the detection of rib metastases were compared between imaging modalities on both a per-lesion and a per-patient basis. On a per-lesion basis, MRI sensitivity and accuracy were significantly higher than that of bone scintigraphy and CT (P<0.05). The sensitivities, specificities, and accuracy levels between CT and bone scintigraphy did not differ on either a per-lesion or per-patient basis (P>0.05). MRI appears to be superior for the detection of ribs metastases in lung cancer.

  11. Lung mass appearing as a dilated left ventricle on Tc-99m tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Williams, Robert; Mclean, Emma; O' Connell, Rachel; Nunan, Thomas O; O'Doherty, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    Tc-99m tetrofosmin is a common tracer used in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Several benign and malignant tumors also take up tetrofosmin. We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with a history of a left lung mass awaiting resection. The patient was referred for a myocardial perfusion scan for preoperative risk assessment. The myocardial perfusion scan revealed a large cavitated lesion mimicking a dilated left ventricle and the CT scan revealed a large mass in the left lung with central necrosis displacing the heart and mediastinum. The patient underwent thoracotomy with resection of the mass and the histology confirmed atypical carcinoid. This case highlights noncardiac uptake of Tc-99m tetrofosmin in an atypical carcinoid.

  12. Marked pericardial inhomogeneity of specific ventilation at total lung capacity and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanping; Butler, James P; Lindholm, Peter; Walvick, Ronn P; Loring, Stephen H; Gereige, Jessica; Ferrigno, Massimo; Albert, Mitchell S

    2009-10-31

    We measured regional ventilation at 1l above functional residual capacity (FRC+1L) and total lung capacity (TLC) in three normal subjects and four elite breath-hold divers, and above TLC after glossopharyngeal insufflation (TLC+GI) in the divers. Hyperpolarized (3)He MRI was used to map the local ventilation per unit volume over the entire lung. At TLC and above, there was markedly increased regional ventilation of the lungs in the pericardial region compared with the relatively uniform ventilation throughout the rest of the lung. The distribution of fractional ventilation regionally was relatively uniform at FRC+1L, with a small non-gravitational cephalocaudal gradient of specific ventilation in the supine posture. Our observations at high lung volumes are consistent with the effect of high pleural tension in the concave pericardial region, which promotes expansion of the subjacent lung, leading to a higher local effective compliance and a higher specific ventilation.

  13. Dual-energy lung perfusion and ventilation CT in children.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2013-03-01

    Dual-energy thoracic CT provides two key insights into lung physiology, i.e. regional perfusion and ventilation, and has been actively investigated to find clinically relevant applications since the introduction of dual-source CT. This functional information provided by dual-energy thoracic CT is supplementary because high-resolution thoracic anatomy is entirely preserved on dual-energy thoracic CT. In addition, virtual non-contrast imaging can omit pre-contrast scanning. In this respect, dual-energy CT imaging technique is at least dose-neutral, which is a critical requirement for paediatric imaging. In this review, imaging protocols, analysis methods, clinical applications and diagnostic pitfalls of dual-energy thoracic CT for evaluating lung perfusion and ventilation in children are described.

  14. SU-E-J-249: Correlation of Mean Lung Ventilation Value with Ratio of Total Lung Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, N; Qu, H; Xia, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Lung ventilation function measured from 4D-CT and from breathing correlated CT images is a novel concept to incorporate the lung physiologic function into treatment planning of radiotherapy. The calculated ventilation functions may vary from different breathing patterns, affecting evaluation of the treatment plans. The purpose of this study is to correlate the mean lung ventilation value with the ratio of the total lung volumes obtained from the relevant CTs. Methods: A ventilation map was calculated from the variations of voxel-to-voxel CT densities from two breathing phases from either 4D-CT or breathing correlated CTs. An open source image registration tool of Plastimatch was used to deform the inhale phase images to the exhale phase images. To calculate the ventilation map inside lung, the whole lung was delineated and the tissue outside the lung was masked out. With a software tool developed in house, the 3D ventilation map was then converted in the DICOM format associated with the planning CT images. The ventilation map was analyzed on a clinical workstation. To correlate ventilation map thus calculated with lung volume change, the total lung volume change was compared the mean ventilation from our method. Results: Twenty two patients who underwent stereotactic body irradiation for lung cancer was selected for this retrospective study. For this group of patients, the ratio of lung volumes for the inhale (Vin ) and exhale phase (Vex ) was shown to be linearly related to the mean of the local ventilation (Vent), Vin/Vex=1.+0.49*Vent (R2=0.93, p<0.01). Conclusion: The total lung volume change is highly correlated with the mean of local ventilation. The mean of local ventilation may be useful to assess the patient's lung capacity.

  15. A comparison of conventional surfactant treatment and partial liquid ventilation on the lung volume of injured ventilated small lungs.

    PubMed

    Proquitté, Hans; Hartenstein, Sebastian; Koelsch, Uwe; Wauer, Roland R; Rüdiger, Mario; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2013-08-01

    As an alternative to surfactant therapy (ST), partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perfluorocarbons (PFC) has been considered as a treatment for acute lung injury (ALI) in newborns. The instilled PFC is much heavier than the instilled surfactant and the aim of this study was to investigate whether PLV, compared to ST, increases the end-expiratory volume of the lung (VL). Fifteen newborn piglets (age <12 h, mean weight 678 g) underwent saline lung lavage to achieve a surfactant depletion. Thereafter animals were randomized to PLV (n = 8), receiving PFC PF5080 (3M, Germany) at 30 mL kg(-1), and ST (n = 7) receiving 120 mg Curosurf®. Blood gases, hemodynamics and static compliance were measured initially (baseline), immediately after ALI, and after 240 min mechanical ventilation with either technique. Subsequently all piglets were killed; the lungs were removed in toto and frozen in liquid N2. After freeze-drying the lungs were cut into lung cubes (LCs) with edge lengths of 0.7 cm, to calculate VL. All LCs were weighed and the density of the dried lung tissue was calculated. No statistically significant differences between treatment groups PLV and ST (means ± SD) were noted in body weight (676 ± 16 g versus 679 ± 17 g; P = 0.974) or lung dry weight (1.64 ± 0.29 g versus 1.79 ± 0.48 g; P = 0.48). Oxygenation index and ventilatory efficacy index did not differ significantly between both groups at any time. VL (34.28 ± 6.13 mL versus 26.22 ± 8.1 mL; P < 0.05) and the density of the dried lung tissue (48.07 ± 5.02 mg mL(-1) versus 69.07 ± 5.30 mg mL(-1); P < 0.001), however, differed significantly between the PLV and ST groups. A 4 h PLV treatment of injured ventilated small lungs increased VL by 30% and decreased lung density by 31% compared to ST treatment, indicating greater lung distension after PLV compared to ST.

  16. Increasing inspiratory time exacerbates ventilator-induced lung injury during high-pressure/high-volume mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Alfredo V; Bartlett, Robert H; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2002-10-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury may be caused by overdistension of alveoli during high-pressure ventilation. In this study, we examined the effects of increasing inspiratory time on ventilator-induced lung injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four different groups with ten animals per group. Each group was then ventilated for 30 mins with one of four ventilator strategies. All groups were ventilated with an Fio2 of 1.0 and a positive end-expiratory pressure of 0 cm H2O. Group LoP was the negative control group and was ventilated with low pressures (peak inspiratory pressure = 12 cm H2O, rate = 30, and inspiratory time = 0.5 secs). Groups iT = 0.5, iT = 1.0, and iT = 1.5 were the experimental groups and were ventilated with high pressures (peak inspiratory pressure = 45 cm H2O, rate = 10, and inspiratory times = 0.5 secs, iT = 1.0 sec, and iT = 1.5 secs, respectively). Outcome measures included lung compliance, Pao /Fio ratio, wet/dry lung weight, and dry lung/body weight. Final static lung compliance (p =.0002) and Pao2/Fio2 (p =.001) decreased as inspiratory time increased. Wet/dry lung weights (p <.0001) and dry lung/body weights (p <.0001) increased as inspiratory time increased. Light microscopy revealed evidence of intra-alveolar edema and hemorrhage in the iT = 1.0 and iT = 1.5 animals but not the LoP and iT = 0.5 animals. Increasing inspiratory time during high-pressure/high-volume mechanical ventilation is associated with an increase in variables of lung injury.

  17. Lung protective ventilation strategy for the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Nicola; De Feo, Carlo

    2013-02-28

    Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury require mechanical ventilatory support. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury are further complicated by ventilator-induced lung injury. Lung protective ventilation strategies may lead to improved survival. This systematic review is an update of a Cochrane review originally published in 2003 and updated in 2007. To assess the effects of ventilation with lower tidal volume on morbidity and mortality in patients aged 16 years or older affected by acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury. A secondary objective was to determine whether the comparison between low and conventional tidal volume was different if a plateau airway pressure of greater than 30 to 35 cm H20 was used. In our previous 2007 updated review, we searched databases from inception until 2006. In this third updated review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Web of Science from 2006 to September 2012. We also updated our search of databases of ongoing research and of reference lists from 2006 to September 2012. We included randomized controlled trials comparing ventilation using either a lower tidal volume (Vt) or low airway driving pressure (plateau pressure 30 cm H2O or less), resulting in a tidal volume of 7 ml/kg or less, versus ventilation that used Vt in the range of 10 to 15 ml/kg in adults (16 years old or older) with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury. We independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Wherever appropriate, results were pooled. We applied fixed-effect and random-effects models. We did not find any new study which were eligible for inclusion in this update. The total number of studies remained unchanged, six trials involving 1297 patients. Five trials had a low risk of bias. One trial had an unclear risk of bias. Mortality at day 28 was significantly reduced by lung

  18. Airway pressure release ventilation and successful lung donation.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Kenny; Seder, Christopher W; Weinberger, Jeffrey B; Sills, Patty A; Hagan, Michael; Janczyk, Randy J

    2011-03-01

    Donor management with airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) improves oxygenation and increases lung donation while maintaining equivalent graft survival. Retrospective case series. Private, tertiary care, level I trauma center. Forty-five consecutive organ donors. Management with assist/control ventilation (ACV) or APRV. Demographic characteristics, medical history, mode of brain death, and partial pressure of arterial oxygen (Pao(2))/fraction of inspired oxygen (Fio(2)) ratios on admission and after 100% oxygen challenge, percentage of lungs transplanted, and graft survival. Twenty potential donors were managed with ACV and 25 were managed with APRV during the study period. The APRV patients were younger than the ACV patients (mean [SD] age, 34 [11] vs 41 [12] years, respectively; P = .05). Otherwise, there was no difference between the ACV and APRV groups with respect to demographic characteristics, medical history, or mode of brain death. Although the ACV and APRV groups had similar Pao(2)/Fio(2) ratios on admission and the mean time on the ventilator was the same, the APRV group had a higher Pao(2)/Fio(2) ratio than the ACV group (mean [SD], 498 [43] vs 334 [104] mm Hg, respectively; P < .001) after 100% oxygen challenge. The ACV group ultimately donated 7 of 40 potential lungs (18%) compared with 42 of 50 potential lungs (84%) in the APRV group (P < .001). There was no difference in the number of other organs per donor procured from the 2 groups. Survival of grafts managed with both APRV and ACV compared favorably with national averages. The use of APRV prior to procurement may increase the rate of successful lung donation.

  19. Ventilation in dogs on cardiopulmonary bypass with and without lungs.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoeft, P; de Francquen, P; Gelin, M; Van Stratum, M; Joris, M; Servais, N; Jank, K; Grevisse, P; Demeester, M; Smets, P

    1979-12-01

    In 13 anesthetized or awake dogs, on cardiopulmonary bypass, we varied PaO2 and PaCO2 while continuously monitoring ventilatory responses and mechanics, to assess the dog's ability to maintain eupneic ventilation for any chemical drive. In a second group of 13 dogs on cardiopulmonary bypass we repeated the tests after removal of both lungs, to assess the importance of pulmonary feedback and mechanics. The VE/PO2 plot formed two hyperbolas, asymptotic to 39 Torr PO2 with lungs, and to 27 without; both intercepted zero ventilation near 200 Torr. Hyperoxic apnea occurred at, or below, PCO2 30 +/- 7 Torr under barbiturate and 20 +/- 4 Torr under morphine. Steady-state low PCO2 (10 Torr) turned off hypoxic drives as low as 20 Torr PO2. Empty-chest dogs had a low respiratory frequency (18 vs. 40), and near zero dynamic elastance; ventilatory work per minute and airway resistance were the same with and without lungs. Chest wall ventilatory responses are grossly independent of the presence of absence of lungs.

  20. The value of lung scintigraphy in the management of airways foreign bodies in children.

    PubMed

    Guanà, R; Gesmundo, R; Maiullari, E; Bianco, E R; Vinardi, S; Cortese, M G; Silvestro, L; Canavese, F

    2009-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was made to evaluate our experience in the management of tracheobronchial foreign bodies (TFB) in children (age lung scintigraphy in patients' selection. The authors retrospectively reviewed all pediatric bronchoscopies performed by the bronchoscopic team at their Institution from July 2001 to December 2007 in the suspicion of TFB in children <14 years of age. A total of 32 TFB were identified in 25 boys and 7 girls with a mean age of 2.7 years (range, 6 months to 13 years). Diagnostic algorithm included: historical data, clinical evaluation, X-rays and nuclear medicine imaging. Bronchoscopy was performed under general anesthesia only in scintigraphy positive patients. In the procedure, a 2.7 mm pediatric flexible bronchoscope, passed through the endotracheal tube, was used exclusively for demonstrate and localize TFB and a 3.5-4 mm rigid bronchoscope to extract it. Extraction with the rigid bronchoscope was successful in all cases. The average time of the procedure using both instruments was 46 min (range 35 to 200 minutes). There were no complications associated with any of the procedures in these children. Rigid bronchoscopic extraction of paediatric TFB can be performed safely with minimal risks and complications. Careful patient's' selection remains crucial for choosing candidates to bronchoscopy. In our experience scintigraphic evaluation demonstrated to be of great value in order to have a correct pre-endoscopic diagnosis.

  1. New ventilators for the ICU--usefulness of lung performance reporting.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, P D

    2006-07-01

    Monitoring the functional and mechanical properties of the lungs during positive pressure ventilation may assist in confirming the underlying pulmonary diagnosis, allow therapeutic interventions to be accurately assessed and provide information that ensures the optimal setting of the ventilator parameters and encourages timely weaning. This article reviews the range of lung function measurements, both continuous and intermittent, that may be undertaken during mechanical ventilation. The monitoring capability of ICU ventilators is increasing in complexity.

  2. Role of scintigraphy with technetium-99m depreotide in the diagnosis and management of patients with suspected lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, R; Herlin, G; Bååth, M; Aspelin, P; Kölbeck, K G

    2008-04-01

    In Sweden, there are over 3000 new lung cancer cases every year. There are still numerous patients with undetermined lesions after routine diagnostic evaluation by clinical examination, chest radiography, computed tomography (CT) of the thorax, and bronchoscopy. An appropriate method for further diagnostic workup is therefore needed. To evaluate the diagnostic value of the somatostatin analogue depreotide in patients with suspected lung cancer, and to determine in which clinical settings it would be beneficial to use 99mTc-depreotide scintigraphy. We included 99 consecutive patients referred to our hospital with suspected lung cancer. A clinical examination, bronchoscopy, chest radiography, CT of the thorax and upper abdomen, and scintigraphy were done. Scintigraphy was performed after injection of 740 MBq (99m)Tc depreotide with tomographical imaging of the thorax and whole-body scanning. The diagnostic outcome of the scintigrams was compared to CT, using morphology or clinical outcome as the endpoint. 99mTc-depreotide uptake was found in 62 out of 66 malignancies, including 57 of 58 primary lung cancer cases. Two cases of lung metastasis (one from a colon cancer and one from an adenoid cystic carcinoma originating in the palate) and one rib chondrosarcoma did not show depreotide uptake. There were 33 patients with benign lesions, of whom 16 displayed false-positive 99mTc-depreotide uptake, whereof 11 were pneumonias. Tc-99m-depreotide uptake was absent in 17 patients with benign lesions, including all 10 hamartomas. The sensitivity in detecting malignancy was 94%, and in detecting lung cancer 98%. The specificity was calculated based on two sets of data. When all cases were used, the specificity was 52%. If the 12 pneumonias are excluded, the specificity was 77%. 99mTc-depreotide scintigraphy has a high sensitivity in detecting lung cancer. The method is useful in decision-making with respect to surgery.

  3. Nicotinamide Exacerbates Hypoxemia in Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury Independent of Neutrophil Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Heather D.; Yoo, Jeena; Crother, Timothy R.; Kyme, Pierre; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Khalafi, Ramtin; Tseng, Ching W.; Parks, William C.; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Background Ventilator-induced lung injury is a form of acute lung injury that develops in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation and has a high degree of mortality. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is an enzyme that is highly upregulated in ventilator-induced lung injury and exacerbates the injury when given exogenously. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) directly inhibits downstream pathways activated by Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and is protective in other models of acute lung injury. Methods We administered nicotinamide i.p. to mice undergoing mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes to study the effects of nicotinamide on ventilator-induced lung injury. Measures of injury included oxygen saturations and bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophil counts, protein, and cytokine levels. We also measured expression of nicotinamide phosophoribosyltransferase, and its downstream effectors Sirt1 and Cebpa, Cebpb, Cebpe. We assessed the effect of nicotinamide on the production of nitric oxide during ventilator-induced lung injury. We also studied the effects of ventilator-induced lung injury in mice deficient in C/EBPε. Results Nicotinamide treatment significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration into the lungs during ventilator-induced lung injury, but did not affect protein leakage or cytokine production. Surprisingly, mice treated with nicotinamide developed significantly worse hypoxemia during mechanical ventilation. This effect was not linked to increases in nitric oxide production or alterations in expression of Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase, Sirt1, or Cebpa and Cebpb. Cebpe mRNA levels were decreased with either nicotinamide treatment or mechanical ventilation, but mice lacking C/EBPε developed the same degree of hypoxemia and ventilator-induced lung injury as wild-type mice. Conclusions Nicotinamide treatment during VILI inhibits neutrophil infiltration of the lungs consistent with a strong anti-inflammatory effect, but

  4. Lung protective mechanical ventilation and two year survival in patients with acute lung injury: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Dinglas, Victor D; Sevransky, Jonathan E; Dennison Himmelfarb, Cheryl R; Desai, Sanjay V; Shanholtz, Carl; Brower, Roy G; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of volume limited and pressure limited (lung protective) mechanical ventilation with two year survival in patients with acute lung injury. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 13 intensive care units at four hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Participants 485 consecutive mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury. Main outcome measure Two year survival after onset of acute lung injury. Results 485 patients contributed data for 6240 eligible ventilator settings, as measured twice daily (median of eight eligible ventilator settings per patient; 41% of which adhered to lung protective ventilation). Of these patients, 311 (64%) died within two years. After adjusting for the total duration of ventilation and other relevant covariates, each additional ventilator setting adherent to lung protective ventilation was associated with a 3% decrease in the risk of mortality over two years (hazard ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 0.99, P=0.002). Compared with no adherence, the estimated absolute risk reduction in two year mortality for a prototypical patient with 50% adherence to lung protective ventilation was 4.0% (0.8% to 7.2%, P=0.012) and with 100% adherence was 7.8% (1.6% to 14.0%, P=0.011). Conclusions Lung protective mechanical ventilation was associated with a substantial long term survival benefit for patients with acute lung injury. Greater use of lung protective ventilation in routine clinical practice could reduce long term mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00300248. PMID:22491953

  5. Assessment of lung toxicity caused by bleomycin and amiodarone by Tc-99m HMPAO lung scintigraphy in rats.

    PubMed

    Gumuser, G; Vural, K; Varol, T; Parlak, Y; Tuglu, I; Topal, G; Sayit, E

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the lung toxicity caused by amiodarone (AD) and bleomycin (BLM) in rats, by means of Tc-99m HMPAO lung scintigraphy. Thirty albino rats were randomly divided into five groups. After AD or BLM was dissolved with isotonic saline (SF), a 0.5 ml solution was applied to the right bronchus via a catheter. Group 1 (n = 5 rats) received a single dose of AD, group 2 (n = 5) received two doses of AD, group 3 (n = 9) received BLM, group 4 (n = 3) received hydrochloric acid (HCl), and group 5 (n = 8) received SF. Rats in groups 1, 2, 3 and 5 were given 37 MBq Tc-99m HMPAO from the tail vein on days 7, 14, 21 and 28, and at 4 and 24 h in group 4. Static images of 10 min duration were obtained at 30 and 60 min by a double-headed gamma camera (Infinia, GE, Tirat Hacermel, Israel) on 256 × 256 matrix. Regular regions of interests were drawn over the right lung (RL), left lung (LL) and the liver (Li), and lung/liver (L/Li) ratios were calculated. After the scintigraphic imaging procedures were completed, rats were killed. Lung tissues were evaluated on a scale of (+) to (+++++) for edema, alveolar structural integrity and infiltration by inflammatory cells. Groups 2 and 3 showed statistically significant differences in RL/Li and LL/Li ratios, whereby RL/Li was higher than LL/Li (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in RL/Li and LL/Li ratios in group 5 (p > 0.05). In histopathological examination, minimal damage or artifacts were observed in group 5. In group 4, almost all pathological findings were present in the right lung. Statistically significant (p < 0.01) histological differences were found when groups 1 and 5 were compared. More significant (p < 0.001) pathological effects were noted when groups 2 and 3 were compared to both groups 5 and 1. Injury was more prominent in the lung tissues of the control rats that were given HCl. Increased RL/Li ratios and histopathological findings were consistent

  6. The patient simulator for training of anesthesia residents in the management of one lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zaki-Udin; Dorfling, Johannes; McLarney, John T; Sloan, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Simulators are used extensively for the training of medical personnel. All anesthesia providers should be prepared and trained in the management of one lung ventilation for pulmonary surgery, yet familiarization with one lung ventilation may not be possible on a routine basis in the operating room. Therefore, this reports details the first use of the patient simulator (PS) to enhance the training of anesthesia residents in the management of one lung ventilation. A detailed report of our computer program for simulating one lung ventilation is included.

  7. Mechanical ventilation and lung infection in the genesis of air-space enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Sartorius, Alfonso; Lu, Qin; Vieira, Silvia; Tonnellier, Marc; Lenaour, Gilles; Goldstein, Ivan; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Air-space enlargement may result from mechanical ventilation and/or lung infection. The aim of this study was to assess how mechanical ventilation and lung infection influence the genesis of bronchiolar and alveolar distention. Methods Four groups of piglets were studied: non-ventilated-non-inoculated (controls, n = 5), non-ventilated-inoculated (n = 6), ventilated-non-inoculated (n = 6), and ventilated-inoculated (n = 8) piglets. The respiratory tract of intubated piglets was inoculated with a highly concentrated solution of Escherichia coli. Mechanical ventilation was maintained during 60 hours with a tidal volume of 15 ml/kg and zero positive end-expiratory pressure. After sacrifice by exsanguination, lungs were fixed for histological and lung morphometry analyses. Results Lung infection was present in all inoculated piglets and in five of the six ventilated-non-inoculated piglets. Mean alveolar and mean bronchiolar areas, measured using an analyzer computer system connected through a high-resolution color camera to an optical microscope, were significantly increased in non-ventilated-inoculated animals (+16% and +11%, respectively, compared to controls), in ventilated-non-inoculated animals (+49% and +49%, respectively, compared to controls), and in ventilated-inoculated animals (+95% and +118%, respectively, compared to controls). Mean alveolar and mean bronchiolar areas significantly correlated with the extension of lung infection (R = 0.50, p < 0.01 and R = 0.67, p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion Lung infection induces bronchiolar and alveolar distention. Mechanical ventilation induces secondary lung infection and is associated with further air-space enlargement. The combination of primary lung infection and mechanical ventilation markedly increases air-space enlargement, the degree of which depends on the severity and extension of lung infection. PMID:17274806

  8. Argon and xenon ventilation during prolonged ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Martens, An; Montoli, Matteo; Faggi, Giulio; Katz, Ira; Pype, Jan; Vanaudenaerde, Bart M; Van Raemdonck, Dirk E M; Neyrinck, Arne P

    2016-03-01

    Evidence supports the use of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) as a platform for active reconditioning before transplantation to increase the potential donor pool and to reduce the incidence of primary graft dysfunction. A promising reconditioning strategy is the administration of inhaled noble gases based on their organoprotective effects. Our aim was to validate a porcine warm ischemic lung injury model and investigate postconditioning with argon (Ar) or xenon (Xe) during prolonged EVLP. Domestic pigs were divided in four groups (n = 5 per group). In the negative control group, lungs were flushed immediately. In the positive control (PC) and treatment (Ar, Xe) groups, lungs were flushed after a warm ischemic interval of 2-h in situ. All grafts were evaluated and treated during normothermic EVLP for 6 h. In the control groups, lungs were ventilated with 70% N2/30% O2 and in the treatment groups with 70% Ar/30% O2 or 70% Xe/30% O2, respectively. Outcome parameters were physiological variables (pulmonary vascular resistance, peak airway pressures, and PaO2/FiO2), histology, wet-to-dry weight ratio, bronchoalveolar lavage, and computed tomography scan. A significant difference between negative control and PC for pulmonary vascular resistance, peak airway pressures, PaO2/FiO2, wet-to-dry weight ratio, histology, and computed tomography-imaging was observed. No significant differences between the injury group (PC) and the treatment groups (Ar, Xe) were found. We validated a reproducible prolonged 6-h EVLP model with 2 h of warm ischemia and described the physiological changes over time. In this model, ventilation during EVLP with Ar or Xe administered postinjury did not improve graft function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in Sedimentation of Surfactant in Ventilated Excised Rat Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Thet, Lyn Aung; Clerch, Linda; Massaro, Gloria D.; Massaro, Donald

    1979-01-01

    We ventilated excised rat lungs at a constant tidal volume (CTV); they developed areas of atelectasis which could be reversed by a large inflation (CTV + I) or prevented by the addition of positive end-expiratory pressure to the CTV. To explore the possibility that these modes of ventilation led to changes in surfactant, we lavaged the lungs and centrifuged the returns at 500 g; we measured the amount of disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) in the resultant pellet and supernatant fluid as a marker for surfactant. We found 16.9±1.5 (mean±SE), 38.0±2.4, 18.3±1.6, and 21.7±2.3% of the total lavage DSPC, in the pellet from freshly excised, CTV, CTV + I, and positive end-expiratory pressure to the CTV lungs, respectively. The total amount of lavage DSPC was the same in all groups. The ultrastructure of acellular material pelleted by sequential centrifugation of lavage returns at 500, 1,000, and 60,000 g was examined. We found mostly tubular myelin in the 500-g and 1,000-g pellets, but no tubular myelin in the 60,000-g pellet. Air inflation pressure-volume measurements from the degassed state revealed that the opening pressure and recoil pressures up to 75% of total lung capacity were significantly higher in the CTV than in the CTV + I lungs. There were no differences between these groups in air deflation or in saline inflation and deflation pressure-volume measurements. Our findings suggest that CTV leads to increases in the tubular myelin form of surfactant and that this leads to increased surface tension in alveoli which results in alveolar collapse. Images PMID:379047

  10. Autophagy in pulmonary macrophages mediates lung inflammatory injury via NLRP3 inflammasome activation during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Gongjian; Dull, Randal O; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2014-07-15

    The inflammatory response is a primary mechanism in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process by which cells break down their own components. We explored the role of autophagy in the mechanisms of mechanical ventilation-induced lung inflammatory injury. Mice were subjected to low (7 ml/kg) or high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h. Bone marrow-derived macrophages transfected with a scrambled or autophagy-related protein 5 small interfering RNA were administered to alveolar macrophage-depleted mice via a jugular venous cannula 30 min before the start of the ventilation protocol. In some experiments, mice were ventilated in the absence and presence of autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (15 mg/kg ip) or trichostatin A (1 mg/kg ip). Mechanical ventilation with a high tidal volume caused rapid (within minutes) activation of autophagy in the lung. Conventional transmission electron microscopic examination of lung sections showed that mechanical ventilation-induced autophagy activation mainly occurred in lung macrophages. Autophagy activation in the lungs during mechanical ventilation was dramatically attenuated in alveolar macrophage-depleted mice. Selective silencing of autophagy-related protein 5 in lung macrophages abolished mechanical ventilation-induced nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation and lung inflammatory injury. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also significantly attenuated the inflammatory responses caused by lung hyperinflation. The activation of autophagy in macrophages mediates early lung inflammation during mechanical ventilation via NLRP3 inflammasome signaling. Inhibition of autophagy activation in lung macrophages may therefore provide a novel and promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury.

  11. Ventilator-related causes of lung injury: the mechanical power.

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, L; Tonetti, T; Cressoni, M; Cadringher, P; Herrmann, P; Moerer, O; Protti, A; Gotti, M; Chiurazzi, C; Carlesso, E; Chiumello, D; Quintel, M

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesized that the ventilator-related causes of lung injury may be unified in a single variable: the mechanical power. We assessed whether the mechanical power measured by the pressure-volume loops can be computed from its components: tidal volume (TV)/driving pressure (∆P aw), flow, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and respiratory rate (RR). If so, the relative contributions of each variable to the mechanical power can be estimated. We computed the mechanical power by multiplying each component of the equation of motion by the variation of volume and RR: [Formula: see text]where ∆V is the tidal volume, ELrs is the elastance of the respiratory system, I:E is the inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratio, and R aw is the airway resistance. In 30 patients with normal lungs and in 50 ARDS patients, mechanical power was computed via the power equation and measured from the dynamic pressure-volume curve at 5 and 15 cmH2O PEEP and 6, 8, 10, and 12 ml/kg TV. We then computed the effects of the individual component variables on the mechanical power. Computed and measured mechanical powers were similar at 5 and 15 cmH2O PEEP both in normal subjects and in ARDS patients (slopes = 0.96, 1.06, 1.01, 1.12 respectively, R (2) > 0.96 and p < 0.0001 for all). The mechanical power increases exponentially with TV, ∆P aw, and flow (exponent = 2) as well as with RR (exponent = 1.4) and linearly with PEEP. The mechanical power equation may help estimate the contribution of the different ventilator-related causes of lung injury and of their variations. The equation can be easily implemented in every ventilator's software.

  12. Lung mucociliary transport during high-frequency ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    McEvoy, R.D.; Davies, N.J.; Hedenstierna, G.; Hartman, M.T.; Spragg, R.G.; Wagner, P.D.

    1982-09-01

    The effects of high-frequency, low-tidal-volume ventilation (HFV) and conventional intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (IPPV) on lung mucociliary transport were compared in 5 anesthetized, intubated mongrel dogs using a radioactive label. An aerosol of (/sup 99m/Tc)sulfur colloid was delivered to the dogs' airways and the subsequent clearance of isotope was followed over 4 h of either HFV or IPPV. After 4 h of IPPV, approximately 8 to 10% of the initial activity had cleared from the lung. By contrast, practically all the isotope remained in the lung after 4 h of HFV. Although the reasons for this were not definitely established in this study, several other observations were made that relate to this question. First, large amounts of mucus were visible in the trachea immediately after each of the 4-h HFV studies, whereas this was so in only one of the IPPV studies. Second, in 5 of 6 studies, a bolus of radioactive label placed on the posterior trachea after 4 h of HFV was noticed to disperse and move rapidly toward distal airways under the influence of HFV. Third, despite these findings of disturbed mucociliary transport during HFV, measurements of tracheal velocity, using a radioactive bolus technique during conventional ventilation, were the same after 4 h of HFV as after 4 h of IPPV (18.4 +/- 2.6 and 15.0 +/- 1.6 mm/min, respectively). We conclude that in the anesthetized dog HFV may alter mucociliary transport. This is unlikely to be the result of major structural damage to the mucosal surface, because tracheal mucous velocity measured after 4 h of HFV was not different from that after IPPV. It may be partly explained, however, by the retrograde flow of mucus that was observed during HFV in 5 of 6 studies.

  13. [Design of a lung simulator for teaching lung mechanics in mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    Heili-Frades, Sarah; Peces-Barba, Germán; Rodríguez-Nieto, María Jesús

    2007-12-01

    Over the last 10 years, noninvasive ventilation has become a treatment option for respiratory insufficiency in pulmonology services. The technique is currently included in pulmonology teaching programs. Physicians and nurses should understand the devices they use and the interaction between the patient and the ventilator in terms of respiratory mechanics, adaptation, and synchronization. We present a readily assembled lung simulator for teaching purposes that is reproducible and interactive. Based on a bag-in-box system, this model allows the concepts of respiratory mechanics in mechanical ventilation to be taught simply and graphically in that it reproduces the patterns of restriction, obstruction, and the presence of leaks. It is possible to demonstrate how each ventilation parameter acts and the mechanical response elicited. It can also readily simulate asynchrony and demonstrate how this problem can be corrected.

  14. Closed-loop mechanical ventilation for lung injury: a novel physiological-feedback mode following the principles of the open lung concept.

    PubMed

    Schwaiberger, David; Pickerodt, Philipp A; Pomprapa, Anake; Tjarks, Onno; Kork, Felix; Boemke, Willehad; Francis, Roland C E; Leonhardt, Steffen; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2017-06-26

    Adherence to low tidal volume (VT) ventilation and selected positive end-expiratory pressures are low during mechanical ventilation for treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Using a pig model of severe lung injury, we tested the feasibility and physiological responses to a novel fully closed-loop mechanical ventilation algorithm based on the "open lung" concept. Lung injury was induced by surfactant washout in pigs (n = 8). Animals were ventilated following the principles of the "open lung approach" (OLA) using a fully closed-loop physiological feedback algorithm for mechanical ventilation. Standard gas exchange, respiratory- and hemodynamic parameters were measured. Electrical impedance tomography was used to quantify regional ventilation distribution during mechanical ventilation. Automatized mechanical ventilation provided strict adherence to low VT-ventilation for 6 h in severely lung injured pigs. Using the "open lung" approach, tidal volume delivery required low lung distending pressures, increased recruitment and ventilation of dorsal lung regions and improved arterial blood oxygenation. Physiological feedback closed-loop mechanical ventilation according to the principles of the open lung concept is feasible and provides low tidal volume ventilation without human intervention. Of importance, the "open lung approach"-ventilation improved gas exchange and reduced lung driving pressures by opening atelectasis and shifting of ventilation to dorsal lung regions.

  15. Airway Pressure Release Ventilation and High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation: Potential Strategies to Treat Severe Hypoxemia and Prevent Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Facchin, Francesca; Fan, Eddy

    2015-10-01

    Although lifesaving, mechanical ventilation can itself be responsible for damage to lung parenchyma. This ventilator-induced lung injury is especially observed in already injured lungs of patients with ARDS. New ventilatory approaches are needed to safely treat patients with ARDS, and recent studies have suggested the potential utility of open-lung strategies. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) are 2 different open-lung strategies that have been proposed to treat refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure while preventing ventilator-induced lung injury. APRV provides increased airway pressure as a potential recruitment mechanism and allows spontaneous breathing, with the potential benefits of decreased sedation, shorter duration of mechanical ventilation, and improvement in cardiac performance. HFOV delivers very small tidal volumes, to prevent volutrauma, at a constant (relatively high) mean airway pressure, thus avoiding atelectrauma. Despite their theoretical benefits, the utility of APRV and HFOV remains unproven and controversial for the routine treatment of ARDS in adult patients. This review is focused on the theoretical and practical aspects of APRV and HFOV, provides an overview of the current evidence, and addresses their possible use in the treatment of ARDS.

  16. Pulmonary atelectasis during low stretch ventilation: "open lung" versus "lung rest" strategy.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Vito; Mascia, Luciana; Puntorieri, Valeria; Assenzio, Barbara; Elia, Vincenzo; Fornaro, Giancarlo; Martin, Erica L; Bosco, Martino; Delsedime, Luisa; Fiore, Tommaso; Grasso, Salvatore; Ranieri, V Marco

    2009-03-01

    Limiting tidal volume (VT) may minimize ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). However, atelectasis induced by low VT ventilation may cause ultrastructural evidence of cell disruption. Apoptosis seems to be involved as protective mechanisms from VILI through the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). We examined the hypothesis that atelectasis may influence the response to protective ventilation through MAPKs. Prospective randomized study. University animal laboratory. Adult male 129/Sv mice. Isolated, nonperfused lungs were randomized to VILI: VT of 20 mL/kg and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) zero; low stretch/lung rest: VT of 6 mL/kg and 8-10 cm H2O of PEEP; low stretch/open lung: VT of 6 mL/kg, two recruitment maneuvers and 14-16 cm H2O of PEEP. Ventilator settings were adjusted using the stress index. Both low stretch strategies equally blunted the VILI-induced derangement of respiratory mechanics (static volume-pressure curve), lung histology (hematoxylin and eosin), and inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay], and inhibitor of nuclear factor-kB[Western blot]). VILI caused nuclear swelling and membrane disruption of pulmonary cells (electron microscopy). Few pulmonary cells with chromatin condensation and fragmentation were seen during both low stretch strategies. However, although cell thickness during low stretch/open lung was uniform, low stretch/lung rest demonstrated thickening of epithelial cells and plasma membrane bleb formation. Compared with the low stretch/open lung, low stretch/lung rest caused a significant decrease in apoptotic cells (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated deoxyuridine-triphosphatase nick end-labeling) and tissue expression of caspase-3 (Western blot). Both low stretch strategies attenuated the activation of MAPKs. Such reduction was larger during low stretch/open lung than during low stretch/lung rest (p < 0.001). Low stretch

  17. Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy is more sensitive than multidetector CTPA in detecting chronic thromboembolic pulmonary disease as a treatable cause of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tunariu, Nina; Gibbs, Simon J R; Win, Zarni; Gin-Sing, Wendy; Graham, Alison; Gishen, Philip; Al-Nahhas, Adil

    2007-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease with a poor prognosis. Identifying chronic thromboembolic pulmonary disease as a cause of PH has major clinical implications as these patients could be potentially offered a surgical cure. Ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy has a high sensitivity to detect embolic disease but its value has been challenged with the emergence of multidetector CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). We compared the value of V/Q scintigraphy with CTPA in detecting chronic thromboembolic pulmonary disease. We retrospectively reviewed the results of V/Q scintigraphy and CTPA performed on patients who had been referred to the Pulmonary Hypertension Service at Hammersmith Hospital between 2000 and 2005. A total of 227 patients (85 males, 142 females; age range, 18-81 y; mean age, 42 y) had all tests done at Hammersmith Hospital and were included in the study. Interpretation of scans was according to the modified PIOPED (Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis) criteria. CTPA was considered as suggestive of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary disease if it showed visualization of the thrombus or webs, recanalization, perfusion abnormalities, stenosis, or strictures. Standard pulmonary angiography was performed via femoral approach. In 90% of the cases, CTPA and V/Q scintigraphy were performed within 10 d. Seventy-eight patients (group A) had a final diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) and 149 (group B) had non-CTEPH etiology. Among group A, V/Q scintigraphy was reported as high probability in 75 patients, intermediate probability in 1 patient, and low probability in 2 patients. CTPA was positive in 40 patients and negative in 38 patients. Among group B, V/Q scintigraphy was reported as low probability in 134, intermediate probability in 7, and high probability in 8 patients. CTPA was negative in 148 patients and false-positive in 1 patient. Statistical analysis showed V/Q scintigraphy to have a

  18. Perfusion scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: a self-assessment quiz

    SciTech Connect

    Egermayer, P.; Rutland, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    The authors present ten case reports with lung scintigrams in a format suitable for a self-assessment quiz. The first seven cases include perfusion scintigrams and the final diagnosis was established by postmortem examination. The last three studies include ventilation images (using nebulized /sup 99m/Tc tin colloid) and the final diagnosis established by nonradionuclide studies. The authors believe this quiz demonstrates the necessity for ventilation studies when using lung scintigraphy for a positive diagnosis.

  19. Diagnostic performance of [18F] FDG PET-CT compared to bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Margarida; Stark, Hannes; Rendl, Gundula; Rettenbacher, Lukas; Datz, Lidwina; Studnicka, Michael; Pirich, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Accurate staging of lung cancer is essential for effective patient management and selection of appropriate therapeutic strategy. The aim of this paper was to compare the value of bone scintigraphy and FDG PET-CT for detecting bone metastases in lung cancer patients and the impact of these modalities in disease staging. One hundred sixty-four lung cancer patients who had undergone both FDG PET-CT and bone scintigraphy within 14 days were included into this study. The analysis of FDG PET-CT and bone scintigraphy was carried out patient- and lesion-based. One hundred twenty-one patients were negative and 43 patients positive for bone metastases. FDG PET-CT found bone metastases in 42/43 patients and bone scintigraphy in 38/43 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG PET-CT and bone scintigraphy for detecting bone metastases were 97.7%, 100% and 99.4%, and 87.8%, 97.5% and 94.2%, respectively. FDG PET-CT identified 430 bone metastases and bone scintigraphy 246 bone metastases. Skull was the only region where bone scintigraphy identified more lesions than FDG PET-CT. Based on both scintigraphic modalities disagreement concerning disease stage was found in 3 patients. FDG PET-CT yielded a higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy than bone scintigraphy for identifying bone metastases in lung cancer patients. FDG PET-CT thus can be recommended for initial staging of lung cancer patients without applying bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases.

  20. Natural course of treated pulmonary embolism. Evaluation by perfusion lung scintigraphy, gas exchange, and chest roentgenogram.

    PubMed

    Prediletto, R; Paoletti, P; Fornai, E; Perissinotto, A; Petruzzelli, S; Formichi, B; Ruschi, S; Palla, A; Giannella-Neto, A; Giuntini, C

    1990-03-01

    Perfusion lung scintigrams, pulmonary gas exchange data, and chest roentgenograms were obtained in 33 patients during acute embolism and over the following six months in order to assess their clinical usefulness in monitoring the effect of therapy. To this purpose, the measurement of pulmonary gas exchange and the presence of chest x-ray findings were compared with perfusion lung scintigraphic abnormalities both at diagnosis and after 7, 30, and 180 days during treatment. More than 50 percent of the pulmonary arterial tree was obstructed at diagnosis, and a large part of perfusion recovery was complete within the first month. All of the gas exchange parameters were abnormal at diagnosis, and the rate of their improvement was related to that of perfusion recovery. Interestingly, PaO2st (ie, PaO2 corrected for hyperventilation) and VE tended to return to normal during the first month as a consequence of the progressive recovery of perfusion, whereas oxygen and carbon dioxide gradients and physiologic dead space showed the persistence of some abnormalities six months after diagnosis. Significant correlations were observed between the number of ULSs evaluated on the perfusion lung scintigram (and considered an index of the severity of pulmonary embolization) and all of the gas exchange parameters at diagnosis (correlation coefficients averaged from 0.41 to 0.73) and after 7 and 30 days. The enlargement of the right descending pulmonary artery and particularly the "sausage" sign and the Westermark sign were significantly associated with a higher degree of gas exchange impairment and with a more severe embolization. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that perfusion lung scintigraphy has a primary role in monitoring the recovery of patients with pulmonary embolism under treatment. Moreover, the chest roentgenogram may help in this purpose. A second major result is that the simple measurement of some gas exchange parameters may allow the assessment of functional

  1. Monitoring of regional lung ventilation using electrical impedance tomography after cardiac surgery in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Krause, Ulrich; Becker, Kristin; Hahn, Günter; Dittmar, Jörg; Ruschewski, Wolfgang; Paul, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a noninvasive method to monitor regional lung ventilation in infants and children without using radiation. The objective of this prospective study was to determine the value of EIT as an additional monitoring tool to assess regional lung ventilation after pediatric cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease in infants and children. EIT monitoring was performed in a prospective study comprising 30 pediatric patients who were mechanically ventilated after cardiac surgery. Data were analyzed off-line with respect to regional lung ventilation in different clinical situations. EIT data were correlated with respirator settings and arterial carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressure in the blood. In 29 of 30 patients, regional ventilation of the lung could sufficiently and reliably be monitored by means of EIT. The effects of the transition from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous breathing after extubation on regional lung ventilation were studied. After extubation, a significant decrease of relative impedance changes was evident. In addition, a negative correlation of arterial CO2 partial pressure and relative impedance changes could be shown. EIT was sufficient to discriminate differences of regional lung ventilation in children and adolescents after cardiac surgery. EIT reliably provided additional information on regional lung ventilation in children after cardiac surgery. Neither chest tubes nor pacemaker wires nor the intensive care unit environment interfered with the application of EIT. EIT therefore may be used as an additional real-time monitoring tool in pediatric cardiac intensive care because it is noninvasive.

  2. Exhaled volatile organic compounds as lung cancer biomarkers during one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changsong; Dong, Ran; Wang, Xiaoyang; Lian, Ailing; Chi, Chunjie; Ke, Chaofu; Guo, Lei; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Guowang; Li, Enyou

    2014-01-01

    In this study, single-lung ventilation was used to detect differences in the volatile organic compound (VOCs) profiles between lung tissues in healthy and affected lungs. In addition, changes that occurred after lung cancer resection in both the VOCs profiles of exhaled breath from ipsilateral and contralateral lungs and the VOCs profiles of exhaled breath and blood sample headspaces were also determined. Eighteen patients with non-small cell carcinoma were enrolled. Alveolar breath samples were taken separately from healthy and diseased lungs before and after the tumor resection. Solid phase microextraction–gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to assess the exhaled VOCs of the study participants. The VOCs exhibited significant differences between the contralateral and ipsilateral lungs before surgery, the contralateral and ipsilateral lungs after surgery, the ipsilateral lungs before and after surgery, and the blood samples from before and after surgery; 12, 19, 12 and 5 characteristic metabolites played decisive roles in sample classification, respectively. 2,2-Dimethyldecane, tetradecane, 2,2,4,6,6-pentamethylheptane, 2,3,4-trimethyldecane, nonane, 3,4,5,6-tetramethyloctane, and hexadecane may be generated from lipid peroxidation during surgery. Caprolactam and propanoic acid may be more promising exhaled breath biomarkers for lung cancer. PMID:25482491

  3. Helium-oxygen mixture to facilitate ventilation in patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Stephen; Robertson, Michael; Evans, Laura; Preston, Thomas J; Tobias, Joseph D; Galantowicz, Mark E; McKee, Christopher T; Hayes, Don

    2013-04-01

    A combination of helium and oxygen (heliox) can facilitate gas exchange and limit peak inspiratory pressures through reduced resistance to gas flow and decreased turbulent flow. The combination of these gases has been used for a variety of upper and lower airway conditions, including patients who were spontaneously breathing, receiving noninvasive ventilation, as well as during mechanical ventilation. To date, there are no reports regarding the use of heliox in patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome following lung transplantation. We report the use of such a combination of gases in 2 patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome following lung transplantation as a supportive measure to facilitate ventilation during the initial treatment course for acute respiratory failure in the ICU. A heliox mixture was administered with noninvasive ventilation and with mechanical ventilation through the ventilator in a heart-lung transplant recipient and a lung transplant recipient, respectively.

  4. Effect of regional lung inflation on ventilation heterogeneity at different length scales during mechanical ventilation of normal sheep lungs.

    PubMed

    Wellman, Tyler J; Winkler, Tilo; Costa, Eduardo L V; Musch, Guido; Harris, R Scott; Venegas, Jose G; Vidal Melo, Marcos F

    2012-09-01

    Heterogeneous, small-airway diameters and alveolar derecruitment in poorly aerated regions of normal lungs could produce ventilation heterogeneity at those anatomic levels. We modeled the washout kinetics of (13)NN with positron emission tomography to examine how specific ventilation (sV) heterogeneity at different length scales is influenced by lung aeration. Three groups of anesthetized, supine sheep were studied: high tidal volume (Vt; 18.4 ± 4.2 ml/kg) and zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP) (n = 6); low Vt (9.2 ± 1.0 ml/kg) and ZEEP (n = 6); and low Vt (8.2 ± 0.2 ml/kg) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; 19 ± 1 cmH(2)O) (n = 4). We quantified fractional gas content with transmission scans, and sV with emission scans of infused (13)NN-saline. Voxel (13)NN-washout curves were fit with one- or two-compartment models to estimate sV. Total heterogeneity, measured as SD[log(10)(sV)], was divided into length-scale ranges by measuring changes in variance of log(10)(sV), resulting from progressive filtering of sV images. High-Vt ZEEP showed higher sV heterogeneity at <12- (P < 0.01), 12- to 36- (P < 0.01), and 36- to 60-mm (P < 0.05) length scales compared with low-Vt PEEP, with low-Vt ZEEP in between. Increased heterogeneity was associated with the emergence of low sV units in poorly aerated regions, with a high correlation (r = 0.95, P < 0.001) between total heterogeneity and the fraction of lung with slow washout. Regional mean fractional gas content was inversely correlated with regional sV heterogeneity at <12- (r = -0.67), 12- to 36- (r = -0.74), and >36-mm (r = -0.72) length scales (P < 0.001). We conclude that sV heterogeneity at length scales <60 mm increases in poorly aerated regions of mechanically ventilated normal lungs, likely due to heterogeneous small-airway narrowing and alveolar derecruitment. PEEP reduces sV heterogeneity by maintaining lung expansion and airway patency at those small length scales.

  5. Critical evaluation of emergency stockpile ventilators in an in vitro model of pediatric lung injury.

    PubMed

    Custer, Jason W; Watson, Christopher M; Dwyer, Joe; Kaczka, David W; Simon, Brett A; Easley, R Blaine

    2011-11-01

    Modern health care systems may be inadequately prepared for mass casualty respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Current health policy has focused on the "stockpiling" of emergency ventilators, though little is known about the performance of these ventilators under conditions of respiratory failure in adults and children. In this study, we seek to compare emergency ventilator performance characteristics using a test lung simulating pediatric lung injury. Evaluation of ventilator performance using a test lung. Laboratory. None. Six transport/emergency ventilators capable of adult/child application were chosen on the basis of manufacturer specifications, Autovent 3000, Eagle Univent 754, EPV 100, LP-10, LTV 1200, and Parapac 200D. Manufacturer specifications for each ventilator were reviewed and compared with known standards for alarms and functionality for surge capacity ventilators. The delivered tidal volume, gas flow characteristics, and airway pressure waveforms were evaluated in vitro using a mechanical test lung to model pediatric lung injury and integrated software. Test lung and flow meter recordings were analyzed over a range of ventilator settings. Of the six ventilators assessed, only two had the minimum recommended alarm capability. Four of the six ventilators tested were capable of being set to deliver a tidal volume of less than 200 mL. The delivered tidal volume for all ventilators was within 8% of the nominal setting at a positive end expiratory pressure of zero but was reduced significantly with the addition of positive end expiratory pressure (range, ±10% to 30%; p < .01). All ventilators tested performed comparably at higher set tidal volumes; however, only three of the ventilators tested delivered a tidal volume across the range of ventilator settings that was comparable to that of a standard intensive care unit ventilator. Multiple ventilators are available for the provision of ventilation to children with respiratory failure in

  6. Speed of collapse of the non-ventilated lung during single-lung ventilation for thoracoscopic surgery: the effect of transient increases in pleural pressure on the venting of gas from the non-ventilated lung.

    PubMed

    Pfitzner, J; Peacock, M J; Harris, R J

    2001-10-01

    A study of 10 anaesthetised patients placed in the lateral position for thoracoscopic surgery assessed whether transient increases in pleural pressure on the side of the non-ventilated lung might increase the speed at which gas vents from that lung. The transient increases in pleural pressure were generated by the mediastinal displacement that occurs with each inspiratory phase of positive pressure ventilation of the dependent lung. When combined with a unidirectional valve allowing gas to flow out of the non-ventilated lung, and a second valve allowing ambient airflow into, but not out of, the thoracic cavity via an initial thoracoscopy access site, this mediastinal displacement could conceivably serve to 'pump' gas out of the non-ventilated lung. Using the four different combinations of valve inclusion or omission, the volume of gas that vented from the non-ventilated lung into a measuring spirometer was recorded during a 120-s measurement sequence. It was found that the speed of venting was not increased by the transient increases in pleural pressure, and that in all but one of a total of 34 measurement sequences, venting had ceased by the end of the sequence. Gas venting was a mean (SD) of 85.5 (11.9)% complete in 25 s (five breaths), and 96.6 (6.1)% complete in 60 s. This prompt partial lung collapse very likely reflected the passive elastic recoil of the lung, while the failure of transient increases in pleural pressure to result in ongoing venting of gas was probably a consequence of airways closure as the lung collapsed. It is concluded that techniques that aim to speed lung collapse by increasing pleural pressure are unlikely to be effective.

  7. Hydrogen water alleviates lung injury induced by one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qifei; Zhang, Jingyao; Wan, Yong; Song, Sidong; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Guangjian; Liu, Chang; Fu, Junke

    2015-12-01

    With the development of thoracic surgeries, one-lung ventilation (OLV) has been routinely used to facilitate surgical exposure. However, OLV can cause lung injury during the surgical process and becomes an important factor affecting the outcomes. To date, effective treatments for the prevention of lung injury caused by OLV are lacking. Hydrogen has been demonstrated to have effective protection against tissue injuries caused by oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This study investigated the efficacy of hydrogen water consumption on the prevention of lung injury induced by OLV in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 32, 240-260 g) were divided randomly into the following four groups: sham group, sham + H2 group, OLV group, OLV + H2 group. The rats drank hydrogen water or degassed hydrogen water for 4 wk before the operation and received OLV for 60 min and two-lung ventilation for 60 min. Lung tissues were assayed for wet-to-dry ratio, oxidative stress variables, proinflammatory cytokines, and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Hydrogen water consumption reduced wet-to-dry weight ratio, malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase activity and decreased the concentration of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the lung tissues compared with sham group and sham + H2 group. Hydrogen water consumption further attenuated NF-κB activation and caused histopathologic alterations. Our data demonstrated that hydrogen water consumption ameliorated OLV-induced lung injury, and it may exert its protective role by its anti-inflammation, antioxidation and reducing NF-κB activity in the lung tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High Bias Gas Flows Increase Lung Injury in the Ventilated Preterm Lamb

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Katinka P.; Kuschel, Carl A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Bertram, Jean; McKnight, Sue; Peachey, Shirley E.; Zahra, Valerie A.; Flecknoe, Sharon J.; Oliver, Mark H.; Wallace, Megan J.; Bloomfield, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation of preterm babies increases survival but can also cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), leading to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). It is not known whether shear stress injury from gases flowing into the preterm lung during ventilation contributes to VILI. Methods Preterm lambs of 131 days’ gestation (term = 147 d) were ventilated for 2 hours with a bias gas flow of 8 L/min (n = 13), 18 L/min (n = 12) or 28 L/min (n = 14). Physiological parameters were measured continuously and lung injury was assessed by measuring mRNA expression of early injury response genes and by histological analysis. Control lung tissue was collected from unventilated age-matched fetuses. Data were analysed by ANOVA with a Tukey post-hoc test when appropriate. Results High bias gas flows resulted in higher ventilator pressures, shorter inflation times and decreased ventilator efficiency. The rate of rise of inspiratory gas flow was greatest, and pulmonary mRNA levels of the injury markers, EGR1 and CTGF, were highest in lambs ventilated with bias gas flows of 18 L/min. High bias gas flows resulted in increased cellular proliferation and abnormal deposition of elastin, collagen and myofibroblasts in the lung. Conclusions High ventilator bias gas flows resulted in increased lung injury, with up-regulation of acute early response genes and increased histological lung injury. Bias gas flows may, therefore, contribute to VILI and BPD. PMID:23056572

  9. sup 111 Indium-labeled neutrophil migration into the lungs of bleomycin-treated rabbits assessed noninvasively by external scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Haslett, C.; Shen, A.S.; Feldsien, D.C.; Allen, D.; Henson, P.M.; Cherniack, R.M. )

    1989-09-01

    Factors controlling neutrophil migration into the lung are poorly understood, but their identification is important for our understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung diseases. Pulmonary inflammation is difficult to quantify, and neutrophils in tissues and BAL may not accurately represent cell migration. In this study, intravenously delivered pulses of rabbit neutrophils labeled with Indium-111 (111In-neutrophils) were used to monitor neutrophil migration into the lungs. Radioactivity quantified in the lung region of interest (ROI) of external gamma camera scintigrams recorded 24 h after intravenous 111In-neutrophil injection accurately reflected the actual neutrophil-associated lung tissue radioactivity. ROI radioactivity at 24 h also correlated closely with the percent of 111In-neutrophils that had migrated into lavageable air spaces, and this parameter therefore provided an index of total lung 111In-neutrophil migration. Using 24-h ROI radioactivity and percent of injected 111In-neutrophils recovered in BAL at 24 h as indices of neutrophil migration into the lung, it was found that intratracheal saline caused only a transient neutrophil migration, whereas 10 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin induced migration that persisted for as long as 3 wk. 111In-neutrophil migration into the lung, assessed by external scintigraphy, correlated with total neutrophils quantified in histologic sections (r = 0.71, p = 0.006). The data suggest that this approach will be valuable in investigating mechanisms controlling neutrophil migration in lung inflammation, and that 111In-neutrophil scintigraphy may provide a noninvasive index of total lung neutrophil load that might be useful in staging inflammation in patchy diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. Induction of cellular antioxidant defense by amifostine improves ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Fu, Panfeng; Murley, Jeffrey S; Grdina, David J; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2011-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that preconditioning animals with amifostine improves ventilator-induced lung injury via induction of antioxidant defense enzymes. Mechanical ventilation at high tidal volume induces reactive oxygen species production and oxidative stress in the lung, which plays a major role in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Amifostine attenuates oxidative stress and improves lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury by acting as a direct scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This study tested effects of chronic amifostine administration on parameters of oxidative stress, lung barrier function, and inflammation associated with ventilator-induced lung injury. Randomized and controlled laboratory investigation in mice and cell culture. University laboratory. C57BL/6J mice. Mice received once-daily dosing with amifostine (10-100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) 3 days consecutively before high tidal volume ventilation (30 mL/kg, 4 hrs) at day 4. Pulmonary endothelial cell cultures were exposed to pathologic cyclic stretching (18% equibiaxial stretch) and thrombin in a previously verified two-hit model of in vitro ventilator-induced lung injury. Three-day amifostine preconditioning before high tidal volume attenuated high tidal volume-induced protein and cell accumulation in the alveolar space judged by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis, decreased Evans Blue dye extravasation into the lung parenchyma, decreased biochemical parameters of high tidal volume-induced tissue oxidative stress, and inhibited high tidal volume-induced activation of redox-sensitive stress kinases and nuclear factor-kappa B inflammatory cascade. These protective effects of amifostine were associated with increased superoxide dismutase 2 expression and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymatic activities in the animal and endothelial cell culture models of ventilator-induced lung injury. Amifostine preconditioning activates lung tissue

  11. A tree-parenchyma coupled model for lung ventilation simulation.

    PubMed

    Pozin, N; Montesantos, S; Katz, I; Pichelin, M; Vignon-Clementel, I; Grandmont, C

    2017-02-22

    In this article we develop a lung-ventilation model. The parenchyma is described as an elastic homogenized media. It is irrigated by a space-filling dyadic resistive pipe network, which represents the tracheo-bronchial tree. In this model the tree and the parenchyma are strongly coupled. The tree induces an extra viscous term in the system constitutive relation, which leads, in the finite element framework, to a full matrix. We consider an efficient algorithm that takes advantage of the tree structure to enable a fast matrix-vector product computation. This framework can be used to model both free and mechanically induced respiration, in health and disease. Patient-specific lung geometries acquired from CT scans are considered. Realistic Dirichlet boundary conditions can be deduced from surface registration on CT images. The model is compared to a more classical exit-compartment approach. Results illustrate the coupling between the tree and the parenchyma, at global and regional levels, and how conditions for the purely 0D model can be inferred. Different types of boundary conditions are tested, including a nonlinear Robin model of the surrounding lung structures.

  12. Utility of ventilation and perfusion scan in the diagnosis of young military recruits with an incidental finding of hyperlucent lung.

    PubMed

    Arslan, N; Ilgan, S; Ozkan, M; Yuksekol, I; Bulakbasi, N; Pabuscu, Y; Ozguven; Bayhan, H

    2001-05-01

    Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome (SJMS) is considered to be a relatively uncommon disease presenting with unilateral hyperlucent lung due to hypoplasia of a pulmonary artery and bronchiectasis of the affected lung. In this report, we describe the ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scan findings of nine male recruits (aged 20-29 years, mean 24.4+/-2.96 years) with SJMS in whom the diagnosis was first established in adulthood. V/Q scan findings of all patients were compared with those on planar radiographs, pulmonary function studies, high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The ventilation (133Xe) and perfusion (99Tcm-macro-aggregated albumin) scans showed the characteristic pattern of a matched V/Q defect and marked air trapping on the washout phase on 133Xe scintigraphy. HRCT displayed hypodense lung with integrity of main airways, and markedly diminished vasculature on the affected side in all patients. A smaller pulmonary artery on the affected side with poor peripheral vasculature was observed with DSA in all patients. All patients had features of obstructive airway disease in varying degrees on pulmonary function studies. In contrast to other imaging methods, bronchiectasis as an etiological factor was displayed on HRCT. Some pulmonary areas, which were normal on HRCT and planar radiographs, showed air trapping on V/Q scan. Although a V/Q scan was more helpful in determining the extent of the disease and correlates well with conventional imaging methods, HRCT was the most valuable imaging method for the evaluation of aetiology in unilateral hyperlucent lung.

  13. Mechanical ventilation modulates TLR4 and IRAK-3 in a non-infectious, ventilator-induced lung injury model.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jesús; Cabrera, Nuria E; Casula, Milena; Flores, Carlos; Valladares, Francisco; Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Muros, Mercedes; Slutsky, Arthur S; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2010-03-03

    Previous experimental studies have shown that injurious mechanical ventilation has a direct effect on pulmonary and systemic immune responses. How these responses are propagated or attenuated is a matter of speculation. The goal of this study was to determine the contribution of mechanical ventilation in the regulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase-3 (IRAK-3) during experimental ventilator-induced lung injury. Prospective, randomized, controlled animal study using male, healthy adults Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 300-350 g. Animals were anesthetized and randomized to spontaneous breathing and to two different mechanical ventilation strategies for 4 hours: high tidal volume (VT) (20 ml/kg) and low VT (6 ml/kg). Histological evaluation, TLR2, TLR4, IRAK3 gene expression, IRAK-3 protein levels, inhibitory kappa B alpha (IkappaBalpha), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL6) gene expression in the lungs and TNF-alpha and IL-6 protein serum concentrations were analyzed. High VT mechanical ventilation for 4 hours was associated with a significant increase of TLR4 but not TLR2, a significant decrease of IRAK3 lung gene expression and protein levels, a significant decrease of IkappaBalpha, and a higher lung expression and serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The current study supports an interaction between TLR4 and IRAK-3 signaling pathway for the over-expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines during ventilator-induced lung injury. Our study also suggests that injurious mechanical ventilation may elicit an immune response that is similar to that observed during infections.

  14. Pressure dynamic characteristics of pressure controlled ventilation system of a lung simulator.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Ren, Shuai; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing; Deng, Qiyou

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator was proposed for experimental study. Last, simulation and experimental studies on the air flow dynamic of the mechanical ventilation system were done, and then the pressure dynamic characteristics of the mechanical system were obtained. The study can be referred to in the pulmonary diagnostics, treatment, and design of various medical devices or diagnostic systems.

  15. Pressure Dynamic Characteristics of Pressure Controlled Ventilation System of a Lung Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Ren, Shuai; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing; Deng, Qiyou

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator was proposed for experimental study. Last, simulation and experimental studies on the air flow dynamic of the mechanical ventilation system were done, and then the pressure dynamic characteristics of the mechanical system were obtained. The study can be referred to in the pulmonary diagnostics, treatment, and design of various medical devices or diagnostic systems. PMID:25197318

  16. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub

    2017-06-23

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy.

  17. Increased interleukin-8 in epithelial lining fluid of collapsed lungs during one-lung ventilation for thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Yoshimichi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tsushima, Kenji; Furuya, Shino; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yasuo, Masanori; Kubo, Keishi; Yamazaki, Yoshitaka; Hasegawa, Joh; Eguchi, Takashi; Kondo, Ryuichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Koizumi, Tomonobu

    2012-12-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate inflammatory changes in collapsed lungs during one-lung ventilation using the assistance of a bronchoscopic microsampling probe. Serial albumin and interleukin (IL)-8 concentrations in epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were measured in seven patients undergoing resection of lung tumors. The samples were taken after induction of anesthesia (baseline), 30 min after one-lung ventilation was started (point 2), just before resuming two-lung ventilation (point 3), and 30 min after two-lung ventilation was restarted (point 4). The albumin and IL-8 concentrations in ELF were significantly increased at point 2 and point 3, respectively, and remained to be high, compared to the baseline. The increase in IL-8 at point 3 was correlated with the interval of one-lung ventilation; however, none developed specific acute lung injury. These findings suggest that inflammatory changes can occur on the epithelium of a collapsed lung even in patients who underwent successful and standard thoracic surgery.

  18. Effects of sevoflurane on ventilator induced lung injury in a healthy lung experimental model.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Moreno, A; García, J; Sánchez, C; Santos, M; García, J

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) causes a systemic inflammatory response in tissues, with an increase in IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α in blood and tissues. Cytoprotective effects of sevoflurane in different experimental models are well known, and this protective effect can also be observed in VILI. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of sevoflurane in VILI. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was designed. Twenty female rats were studied. The animals were mechanically ventilated, without sevoflurane in the control group and sevoflurane 3% in the treated group (SEV group). VILI was induced applying a maximal inspiratory pressure of 35 cmH2O for 20 min without any positive end-expiratory pressure for 20 min (INJURY time). The animals were then ventilated 30 min with a maximal inspiratory pressure of 12 cmH2O and 3 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure (time 30 min POST-INJURY), at which time the animals were euthanized and pathological and biomarkers studies were performed. Heart rate, invasive blood pressure, pH, PaO2, and PaCO2 were recorded. The lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was used as an index of lung edema. No differences were found in the blood gas analysis parameters or heart rate between the 2 groups. Blood pressure was statistically higher in the control group, but still within the normal clinical range. The percentage of pulmonary edema and concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 in lung tissue in the SEV group were lower than in the control group. Sevoflurane attenuates VILI in a previous healthy lung in an experimental subclinical model in rats. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of partial liquid ventilation and nebulized perfluorocarbon on CT lung density distribution: randomized controlled study of experimental lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K P; Stenson, B J; Drummond, G B

    2005-05-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) liquid can improve gas exchange in acute lung injury. How PFC aerosol is distributed in the lung is unknown. We induced lung injury in rabbits with saline lavage, followed by mechanical ventilation in the supine position. The animals were divided into three groups: a control group, a group treated with partial liquid ventilation and a group given nebulized perfluorocarbon (PF 5080). We made CT image slices of the excised lungs. In the apical, middle and caudal slices we defined three regions of interest, from anterior to posterior, and noted the mean attenuation of each area. We also studied two rabbits which had not received lung injury or mechanical ventilation. Group means were different between the normal rabbits and all three study groups. There was a difference between the control and partial liquid ventilation groups, and between the partial liquid ventilation and nebulized groups, but no difference between the nebulized and control groups. Within each treatment group, there was no regional difference in the distribution of density. PF 5080 is not deposited in large amounts by aerosol. Less PFC was found in the lungs after partial liquid ventilation than expected. Within treatment groups, lung densities indicate less gravitational and regional differences than found in other studies.

  20. Lung mechanics in the TIMP3 null mouse and its response to mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erica L; Truscott, Emily A; Bailey, Timothy C; Leco, Kevin J; McCaig, Lynda A; Lewis, James F; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2007-03-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3) null mice develop emphysema-like airspace enlargement due to an enzymatic imbalance. This study investigates how these abnormalities alter lung mechanics and the response to 2 different mechanical ventilation strategies. Phenotypically, TIMP3 null mice had increased compliance, and decreased resistance, tissue damping, and tissue elastance over wild-type controls. Decreased compliance and increased resistance were observed following the injurious ventilation strategy; however, the TIMP3 null response to both ventilation strategies was similar to wild-type mice. In conclusion, TIMP3 null mice have significant alterations in lung mechanics; however, this does not affect their response to ventilation.

  1. [One-lung ventilation using dexmedetomidine in an emphysema patient with pneumothorax due to metastatic lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ono, Naomi; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nakano, Shoko; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Nakao, Kenta; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of double-lumen tube intubation and intraoperative one-lung ventilation under spontaneous breathing with continuous dexmedetomidine administration. A 61-year-old man developed pneumothorax due to multiple metastatic cancer, had multiple bilateral bullae, and underwent bullae resection under general anesthesia. An epidural catheter was placed at T8-9. Under dexmedetomidine sedation and regional anesthesia with lidocaine, a double-lumen tube was inserted with a Macintosh laryngoscope. The patient was under one-lung ventilation with spontaneous breathing during the operation. There were no complications from one-lung ventilation and the patient was extubated in the operating room. One-lung ventilation, which preserves spontaneous breathing, under dexmedetomidine sedation is considered effective for preventing barotrauma in patients with multiple metastatic cancer.

  2. Ventilation-induced lung injury is not exacerbated by growth restriction in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Allison, Beth J; Hooper, Stuart B; Coia, Elise; Zahra, Valerie A; Jenkin, Graham; Malhotra, Atul; Sehgal, Arvind; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Sozo, Foula; Miller, Suzanne L; Polglase, Graeme R

    2016-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and preterm birth are frequent comorbidities and, combined, increase the risk of adverse respiratory outcomes compared with that in appropriately grown (AG) infants. Potential underlying reasons for this increased respiratory morbidity in IUGR infants compared with AG infants include altered fetal lung development, fetal lung inflammation, increased respiratory requirements, and/or increased ventilation-induced lung injury. IUGR was surgically induced in preterm fetal sheep (0.7 gestation) by ligation of a single umbilical artery. Four weeks later, preterm lambs were euthanized at delivery or delivered and ventilated for 2 h before euthanasia. Ventilator requirements, lung inflammation, early markers of lung injury, and morphological changes in lung parenchymal and vascular structure and surfactant composition were analyzed. IUGR preterm lambs weighed 30% less than AG preterm lambs, with increased brain-to-body weight ratio, indicating brain sparing. IUGR did not induce lung inflammation or injury or alter lung parenchymal and vascular structure compared with AG fetuses. IUGR and AG lambs had similar oxygenation and respiratory requirements after birth and had significant, but similar, increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression, lung injury markers, gene expression, and surfactant phosphatidylcholine species compared with unventilated controls. IUGR does not induce pulmonary structural changes in our model. Furthermore, IUGR and AG preterm lambs have similar ventilator requirements in the immediate postnatal period. This study suggests that increased morbidity and mortality in IUGR infants is not due to altered lung tissue or vascular structure, or to an altered response to early ventilation.

  3. Evaluation of lung epithelial permeability in the volatile substance abuse using Tc-99m DTPA aerosol scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Cayir, Derya; Demirel, Koray; Korkmaz, Meliha; Koca, Gokhan

    2011-10-01

    Chronic inhalant use is associated with significant toxic effects, including neurological, renal, hepatic, and pulmonary damage. However, there is a paucity of reports regarding respiratory complications in inhalant abusers. The aim of this study was to evaluate pulmonary epithelial permeability in the volatile substance abuse (VSA) using Tc-99m DTPA aerosol scintigraphy. This study included 18 patients with volatile substance abuse and 18 volunteer controls. All of patients and controls were smokers. Tc-99m DTPA aerosol scintigraphy was performed in all cases. Time-activity curves from each lung were generated and clearance half-time (T(1/2)) of Tc-99m DTPA were calculated. T(1/2) of whole lung was calculated as a mean of the T(1/2) of left and right lung. The T(1/2) values of Tc-99m DTPA clearance in the substance abusers were significantly decreased as compared to the control group with respective mean values of 28.86 ± 8.44, and 62.14 ± 26.12 min (p = 0.001). It was seen Tc-99m DTPA clearance from lung was faster as the duration of substance abuse was increased. Tc-99m DTPA pulmonary clearance is markedly accelerated in the volatile substance abuse. This suggests that inhalant abuse of substance may produce abnormalities in pulmonary alveolo-capillary membrane function.

  4. The use of technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime lung scintigraphy in the detection of subclinical lung injury in patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Akkas, Burcu Esen; Gokcora, Nahide; Atasever, Tamer; Yetkin, Ilhan

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate subclinical pulmonary injury in patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) who showed normal chest radiograph and pulmonary function test results by using technetium-99 hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (Tc-99m-HMPAO) scintigraphy and to investigate the relationship between Tc-99m-HMPAO lung uptake and duration of diabetes, glycemic control, and the presence of diabetes-related microvascular complications. A total of 40 patients with NIDDM (19 men, 21 women; age 56.5 ± 6.8 years; duration of diabetes: 13.1 ± 6.7 years) were included in this study. The pulmonary vascular damage was represented as lung/liver uptake ratios (L/L ratios) calculated by Tc-99m-HMPAO lung scintigraphy. Results were compared with those of age-matched controls. The L/L ratio was 0.36 ± 0.07 in normal controls and 0.51 ± 0.16 in patients with NIDDM. The L/L ratio was significantly higher in NIDDM patients than in the control group (P=0.002). No correlation was observed between L/L ratio and the presence of diabetic complications, glycemic control, and diabetes duration. Tc-99m-HMPAO lung scintigraphy is a sensitive and an objective method for the detection of subclinical lung injury in NIDDM patients. Tc-99m-HMPAO lung uptake serves as an indicator of pulmonary injury due to diabetes, regardless of diabetes age, glycemic control, and the presence of other diabetes-related microvascular complications.

  5. SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P; Bailey, D; Bailey, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: −5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.

  6. Detection of acute inhalation injury in fire victims by means of technetium-99m DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Lin, W Y; Kao, C H; Wang, S J

    1997-02-01

    Mortality and morbidity in fire victims are largely a function of injury due to heat and smoke. While the degree and area of burn together constitute a reliable numerical measure of cutaneous injury due to heat, as yet no satisfactory measure of inhalation injury has been developed. In this study, we employed technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) radioaerosol lung scintigraphy (inhalation scan) to evaluate acute inhalation injury in fire victims. Ten normal controls and 17 survivors from a fire accident were enrolled in the study. All patients suffered from respiratory symptoms (dyspnoea and/or cough with sputum). 99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy was performed in all subjects, using a commercial lung aerosol delivery unit. The degree of lung damage was presented as the clearance rate (k; %/min) calculated from the time-activity curve over the right lungs. In addition, the distribution pattern of the radioactivity in the lungs was evaluated and classified into two groups: homogeneous distribution and inhomogeneous distribution. A plain chest radiograph (CxR) and pulmonary function test (PFT) were performed in the same group of patients. The results showed that 6/17 (35.3%) patients had inhomogeneous distribution of radioactivity in their inhalation scans, and 11/17 (64.7%) had homogeneous scans. Five of the six patients with inhomogeneous scans were admitted for further management, and all patients with homogeneous scans were discharged from the emergency department and needed no further intensive care. The clearance rates of the right lung were 0.73%+/-0.13%/min for normal controls and 1.54%+/-0.58%/min for fire victims. The difference was significant, with a P value of less than 0.01. Using a cut-off value of 0.9%/min (all normal subjects were below 0. 9%/min), 14 (82.4%) patients had abnormal clearance rates of 99mTc-DTPA from the lung. In contrast, only three (17.6%) patients had abnormal CxR and three (17.6%) had abnormal

  7. Quantitative ventilation-perfusion lung scans in infants and children: utility of a submicronic radiolabeled aerosol to assess ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brodovich, H.M.; Coates, G.

    1984-09-01

    The quantitative assessment of regional pulmonary ventilation and perfusion provides useful information regarding lung function. Its use in infants and young children, however, has been minimal because of practical and technical limitations when the distribution of ventilation is assessed by radioactive gases. In 16 infants and children we used an inexpensive commercially available nebulizer to produce a submicronic aerosol labeled with 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriamine pentacetic acid to assess ventilation quantitatively, and intravenous injections of 99mtechnetium-labeled macroaggregates of albumin to assess pulmonary perfusion quantitatively. Studies were safely completed in both ambulatory and critically ill patients, including two premature infants who had endotracheal tubes in place for ventilatory support. No sedation or patient cooperation is required. This technique enables any department of nuclear medicine to measure regional pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in infants and children.

  8. SU-E-J-87: Ventilation Weighting Effect On Mean Doses of Both Side Lungs for Patients with Advanced Stage Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, H; Xia, P; Yu, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study ventilation weighting effect on radiation doses to both side lungs for patients with advanced stage lung cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients with advanced stage lung cancer were included in this retrospective study. Proprietary software was developed to calculate the lung ventilation map based on 4DCT images acquired for radiation therapy. Two phases of inhale (0%) and exhale (50%) were used for the lung ventilation calculations. For each patient, the CT images were resampled to the same dose calculation resolution of 3mmx3mmx3mm. The ventilation distribution was then normalized by the mean value of the ventilation. The ventilation weighted dose was calculated by applying linearly weighted ventilation to the dose of each pixel. The lung contours were automatically delineated from patient CT image with lung window, excluding the tumor and high density tissues. For contralateral and ipsilateral lungs, the mean lung doses from the original plan and ventilation weighted mean lung doses were compared using two tail t-Test. Results: The average of mean dose was 6.1 ±3.8Gy for the contralateral lungs, and 26.2 ± 14.0Gy for the ipsilateral lungs. The average of ventilation weighted dose was 6.3± 3.8Gy for the contralateral lungs and 24.6 ± 13.1Gy for the ipsilateral lungs. The statistics analysis shows the significance of the mean dose increase (p<0.015) for the contralateral lungs and decrease (p<0.005) for the ipsilateral lungs. Conclusion: Ventilation weighted doses were greater than the un-weighted doses for contralateral lungs and smaller for ipsilateral lungs. This Result may be helpful to understand the radiation dosimetric effect on the lung function and provide planning guidance for patients with advance stage lung cancer.

  9. Lung stress, strain, and energy load: engineering concepts to understand the mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI).

    PubMed

    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mortality has not been reduced in over 15 years and remains ~40 %, even with protective low tidal volume (LVt) ventilation. Thus, there is a critical need to develop novel ventilation strategies that will protect the lung and reduce ARDS mortality. Protti et al. have begun to analyze the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung tissue using engineering methods in normal pigs ventilated for 54 h. They used these methods to assess the impact of a mechanical breath on dynamic and static global lung strain and energy load. Strain is the change in lung volume in response to an applied stress (i.e., Tidal Volume-Vt). This study has yielded a number of exciting new concepts including the following: (1) Individual mechanical breath parameters (e.g., Vt or Plateau Pressure) are not directly correlated with VILI but rather any combination of parameters that subject the lung to excessive dynamic strain and energy/power load will cause VILI; (2) all strain is not equal; dynamic strain resulting in a dynamic energy load (i.e., kinetic energy) is more damaging to lung tissue than static strain and energy load (i.e., potential energy); and (3) a critical consideration is not just the size of the Vt but the size of the lung that is being ventilated by this Vt. This key concept merits attention since our current protective ventilation strategies are fixated on the priority of keeping the Vt low. If the lung is fully inflated, a large Vt is not necessarily injurious. In conclusion, using engineering concepts to analyze the impact of the mechanical breath on the lung is a novel new approach to investigate VILI mechanisms and to help design the optimally protective breath. Data generated using these methods have challenged some of the current dogma surrounding the mechanisms of VILI and of the components in the mechanical breath necessary for lung protection.

  10. [A complete ventilation-perfusion mismatch following one-sided lung transplantation and postoperative hemothorax].

    PubMed

    Jellinek, H; Klepetko, W; Hiesmayr, M

    1992-03-01

    Eight days after single-lung transplantation for pulmonary hypertension, a patient presented with a hemothorax on the side of the transplanted lung that required acute thoracotomy. Pulmonary artery pressure had decreased from 78/32/58 mmHg prior to the transplant to 42/18/27 mmHg on the 2nd postoperative day. Therefore, a predominance of perfusion to the transplanted lung was expected. During induction of anesthesia, in spite of ventilation with pure oxygen the patient developed a hypoxic cardiac arrest (paO2 26 mmHg, 40% saturation measured by pulse oximetry) requiring external chest compression. Auscultation and chest movements suggested that the transplanted lung was not ventilated. Because blood flow went mainly to the transplanted lung, ventilation of the native lung was almost totally dead-space ventilation. To enable ventilation of the compressed transplanted lung, the patient was intubated using a single-lumen bronchial blocker tube to block the mainstem bronchus of the native lung. The transplanted lung could then be ventilated. Saturation increased and epinephrine re-established a stable circulation; 2500 ml blood were removed from the pleura without further complications. On the 7th postoperative day the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit without neurological deficits. A perfusion scan 28 days post-transplant revealed 89% of the perfusion going to the transplanted lung. Atelectasis of this lung resulted in a large intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction could not ameliorate the shunt because of the high pulmonary vascular resistance of the native lung.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma with FDG accumulation in the lung lacking CT/(67)gallium scintigraphy abnormality.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Akira; Kubota, Yoshitsugu; Imataki, Osamu; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Kurokohchi, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Terukazu

    2009-03-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare lymphoma characterized by the presence of large tumour cells within the blood vessels. It has been considered that IVLBCL is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. However, it has been shown that a therapeutic effect resembling that of conventional B-cell lymphomas may be obtained with the application of systemic chemotherapy at the early stage of this disease. Although involvement in the lung is often detected at autopsy, early diagnosis is quite difficult. In this report, we present a case of IVLBCL with pulmonary involvement where 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was useful in the early diagnosis. Neither computed tomography (CT) nor (67)gallium scintigraphy could reveal the presence of disease in the lung. Histological evidence of IVLBCL was obtained by TBLB after FDG uptake in the lung was confirmed by FDG-PET. The patient exhibited a good response to the subsequent combination chemotherapy. We propose that FDG-PET is a powerful tool for the early diagnosis of IVLBCL with pulmonary involvement, if the possibility of this disease presents in the patient with respiratory symptoms without abnormal findings by CT and (67)gallium scintigraphy. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Airway pressure release ventilation reduces conducting airway micro-strain in lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Emr, Bryanna; Smith, Bradford; Ruiz, Cynthia; Roy, Shreyas; Meng, Qinghe; Jain, Sumeet; Satalin, Joshua; Snyder, Kathy; Ghosh, Auyon; Marx, William H; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Nieman, Gary F; Gatto, Louis A

    2014-11-01

    Improper mechanical ventilation can exacerbate acute lung damage, causing a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). We hypothesized that VILI can be reduced by modifying specific components of the ventilation waveform (mechanical breath), and we studied the impact of airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) and controlled mandatory ventilation (CMV) on the lung micro-anatomy (alveoli and conducting airways). The distribution of gas during inspiration and expiration and the strain generated during mechanical ventilation in the micro-anatomy (micro-strain) were calculated. Rats were anesthetized, surgically prepared, and randomized into 1 uninjured control group (n = 2) and 4 groups with lung injury: APRV 75% (n = 2), time at expiration (TLow) set to terminate appropriately at 75% of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR); APRV 10% (n = 2), TLow set to terminate inappropriately at 10% of PEFR; CMV with PEEP 5 cm H2O (PEEP 5; n = 2); or PEEP 16 cm H2O (PEEP 16; n = 2). Lung injury was induced in the experimental groups by Tween lavage and ventilated with their respective settings. Lungs were fixed at peak inspiration and end expiration for standard histology. Conducting airway and alveolar air space areas were quantified and conducting airway micro-strain was calculated. All lung injury groups redistributed inspired gas away from alveoli into the conducting airways. The APRV 75% minimized gas redistribution and micro-strain in the conducting airways and provided the alveolar air space occupancy most similar to control at both inspiration and expiration. In an injured lung, APRV 75% maintained micro-anatomic gas distribution similar to that of the normal lung. The lung protection demonstrated in previous studies using APRV 75% may be due to a more homogeneous distribution of gas at the micro-anatomic level as well as a reduction in conducting airway micro-strain. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  13. Lung recruitment and endotracheal suction in ventilated preterm infants measured with electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Hough, Judith L; Shearman, Andrew D; Liley, Helen; Grant, Caroline A; Schibler, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Although suctioning is a standard airway maintenance procedure, there are significant associated risks, such as loss of lung volume due to high negative suction pressures. This study aims to assess the extent and duration of change in end-expiratory level (EEL) resulting from endotracheal tube (ETT) suction and to examine the relationship between EEL and regional lung ventilation in ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. A prospective observational clinical study of the effect of ETT suction on 20 non-muscle-relaxed preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) on conventional mechanical ventilation was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit. Ventilation distribution was measured with regional impedance amplitudes and EEL using electrical impedance tomography. ETT suction resulted in a significant increase in EEL post-suction (P < 0.01). Regionally, anterior EEL decreased and posterior EEL increased post-suction, suggesting heterogeneity. Tidal volume was significantly lower in volume-guarantee ventilation compared with pressure-controlled ventilation (P = 0.04). ETT suction in non-muscle-relaxed and ventilated preterm infants with RDS results in significant lung volume increase that is maintained for at least 90 min. Regional differences in distribution of ventilation with ETT suction suggest that the behaviour of the lung is heterogeneous in nature. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Ventilation-Based Decellularization System of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Mendez, Julio; Calle, Elizabeth A.; Hatachi, Go; Doi, Ryoichiro; Zhao, Liping; Suematsu, Takashi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Niklason, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The demand for donated organs greatly exceeds the availability. Alternatives to organ donation, such as laboratory-engineered organs, are therefore being developed. One approach is to decellularize the organ and reseed it with selected cells, ideally from the organ recipient. Organ decellularization has typically been attempted by the administration of detergents into vessels such as the portal vein in the liver. However, in the case of the lung, the airway provides another potential administration route, because it has a wide contact area between cells and detergents in the tracheal tree and alveoli. In the present study, we introduce a novel ventilation-based decellularization system for the lung and compare its efficacy to ordinary decellularization systems administering detergent through the pulmonary artery. Rat lungs were decellularized using 500 mL of 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-Propanesulfonate (CHAPS) decellularization solution administrated through the pulmonary artery (vessel group) or through the trachea (airway group). The vessel group was infused CHAPS solution using a gravitational pressure head of 20 cmH2O. The airway group was infused with the detergent using negative pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure, for a volume 10cc with each inspiration in a bioreactor. Pathological and immunohistochemical findings indicated that components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), including proteoglycans, elastic fibers, fibronectin, and laminin, were more decreased in the airway group than in the vessel group. Western blot analysis showed that MHC class I antigen and β-actin were not detected in both decellularized groups. A collagen assay showed that collagen was 70% preserved in both groups compared to native lung. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA assays showed that GAG and DNA contents were strongly diminished in both decellularized groups, but those contents were smaller in the airway group than in the vessel group

  15. Detection of early subclinical lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis by lung ventilation imaging with hyperpolarised gas MRI.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Helen; Horsley, Alex; Taylor, Chris J; Smith, Laurie; Hughes, David; Horn, Felix C; Swift, Andrew J; Parra-Robles, Juan; Hughes, Paul J; Norquay, Graham; Stewart, Neil J; Collier, Guilhem J; Teare, Dawn; Cunningham, Steve; Aldag, Ina; Wild, Jim M

    2017-08-01

    Hyperpolarised (3)He ventilation-MRI, anatomical lung MRI, lung clearance index (LCI), low-dose CT and spirometry were performed on 19 children (6-16 years) with clinically stable mild cystic fibrosis (CF) (FEV1>-1.96), and 10 controls. All controls had normal spirometry, MRI and LCI. Ventilation-MRI was the most sensitive method of detecting abnormalities, present in 89% of patients with CF, compared with CT abnormalities in 68%, LCI 47% and conventional MRI 22%. Ventilation defects were present in the absence of CT abnormalities and in patients with normal physiology, including LCI. Ventilation-MRI is thus feasible in young children, highly sensitive and provides additional information about lung structure-function relationships. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Apoptosis and proliferation in lungs of ventilated and oxygen-treated preterm infants.

    PubMed

    May, M; Ströbel, P; Preisshofen, T; Seidenspinner, S; Marx, A; Speer, C P

    2004-01-01

    Apoptosis and proliferation and the effect of exogenous surfactant on these processes were investigated in the lungs of mechanically ventilated/oxygen-treated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome and stillborn foetuses. Apoptotic and proliferation indices were determined in lung tissue sections from 27 ventilated/oxygen-treated preterm infants and 29 stillborn foetuses. The effect of exogenous surfactant on apoptosis and proliferation was studied in 16 ventilated preterm infants; 11 untreated infants served as control. Apoptotic and proliferating cells were identified by double labelling combining terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end-labelling or Ki-67 with cell marker proteins. Pathways to cell death were explored by immunolabelling of cleaved caspases-3, -8 and -9. In the lungs of ventilated/oxygen-treated preterm infants, the numbers of apoptotic and proliferating cells increased significantly compared to the respective numbers in the lungs of stillborn foetuses. Apoptosis was detected in alveolar epithelial cells, whereas epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells proliferated. Surfactant treatment reduced apoptosis induced by ventilation/oxygen-treatment; however, the decrease was not significant. Caspases-8 and -9 do not contribute to ventilation-induced apoptosis, whereas caspase-3 is involved. In conclusion, ventilation/oxygen-treatment induces epithelial cell apoptosis and proliferation of epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells in the lungs of preterm infants.

  17. A computational model of the topographic distribution of ventilation in healthy human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Annalisa J; Clark, Alys R; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2012-01-01

    The topographic distribution of ventilation in the lungs is determined by the interaction of several factors, including lung shape, airway tree geometry, posture, and tissue deformation. Inter-species differences in lung structure-function and technical difficulty in obtaining high resolution imaging of the upright human lung mean that it is not straightforward to experimentally determine the contribution of each of these factors to ventilation distribution. We present a mathematical model for predicting the topological distribution of inhaled air in the upright healthy human lung, based on anatomically-structured model geometries and biophysical equations for model function. Gravitational deformation of the lung tissue is predicted using a continuum model. Air flow is simulated in anatomically-based conducting airways coupled to geometrically simplified terminal acinar units with varying volume-dependent compliances. The predicted ventilation distribution is hence governed by local tissue density and elastic recoil pressure, airway resistance and acinar compliance. Results suggest that there is significant spatial variation in intrinsic tissue properties in the lungs. The model confirms experimental evidence that in the healthy lungs tissue compliance has a far greater effect than airway resistance on the spatial distribution of ventilation, and hence a realistic description of tissue deformation is essential in models of ventilation. PMID:22326472

  18. Evaluation of mosaic pattern areas in HRCT with Min-IP reconstructions in patients with pulmonary hypertension: could this evaluation replace lung perfusion scintigraphy?

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Attinà, D; Borgonovi, A; Buia, F; De Luca, F; Guidalotti, P L; Fughelli, P; Galiè, N; Zompatori, M

    2012-01-01

    defects) and homogeneous in LPS, in 5 cases inhomogeneous (1 with non-segmental patchy defects, 4 with segmental defects) in LPS images and homogeneous in Min-IP. In a general view, Min-IP reconstruction without contrast-medium showed a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 96.1%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 92.3% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100%, to recognize a pattern of lung attenuation inhomogeneous with segmental defects correspondent to a chronic thromboembolic condition, no false negative cases and three false positive cases; on the other hand LPS, on its own, showed a sensitivity of 91.67% and specificity of 93.51%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 86.84% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 96%, 3 false negative cases and 5 false positive cases. Min-IP obtained in HRCT without contrast-medium and in CTPA were equivalent. Min-IP images generally showed a higher sensitivity and specificity than LPS in the evaluation of lung perfusion regarding patients with pulmonary hypertension caused by different etiology, particularly in CTEPH patients. These results can be completed with the evaluation of HRCT and CTPA basal scans, providing more informations than ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy. HRCT images integrated by Min-IP reconstruction can represent the first step in the diagnostic algorithm of patients affected by dyspnoea and pulmonary hypertension of unknown causes, reserving the use of contrast-medium only in selected patients and reducing the patients' X-ray-exposition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C{sub 1} continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  20. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C1 continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  1. Mild hypothermia reduces ventilator-induced lung injury, irrespective of reducing respiratory rate.

    PubMed

    Aslami, Hamid; Kuipers, Maria T; Beurskens, Charlotte J P; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Schultz, Marcus J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2012-02-01

    In the era of lung-protective mechanical ventilation using limited tidal volumes, higher respiratory rates are applied to maintain adequate minute volume ventilation. However, higher respiratory rates may contribute to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Induced hypothermia reduces carbon dioxide production and might allow for lower respiratory rates during mechanical ventilation. We hypothesized that hypothermia protects from VILI and investigated whether reducing respiratory rates enhance lung protection in an in vivo model of VILI. During 4 h of mechanical ventilation, VILI was induced by tidal volumes of 18 mL/kg in rats, with respiratory rates set at 15 or 10 breaths/min in combination with hypothermia (32°C) or normothermia (37°C). Hypothermia was induced by external cooling. A physiologic model was established. VILI was characterized by increased pulmonary neutrophil influx, protein leak, wet weights, histopathology score, and cytokine levels compared with lung protective mechanical ventilation. Hypothermia decreased neutrophil influx, pulmonary levels, systemic interleukin-6 levels, and histopathology score, and it tended to decrease the pulmonary protein leak. Reducing the respiratory rate in combination with hypothermia did not reduce the parameters of the lung injury. In conclusion, hypothermia protected from lung injury in a physiologic VILI model by reducing inflammation. Decreasing the respiratory rate mildly did not enhance protection.

  2. Permissive hypercapnia to decrease lung injury in ventilated preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Thome, Ulrich H; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2009-02-01

    Lung injury in ventilated premature infants occurs primarily through the mechanism of volutrauma, often due to the combination of high tidal volumes in association with a high end-inspiratory volume and occasionally end-expiratory alveolar collapse. Tolerating a higher level of arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) is considered as 'permissive hypercapnia' and when combined with the use of low tidal volumes may reduce volutrauma and lead to improved pulmonary outcomes. Permissive hypercapnia may also protect against hypocapnia-induced brain hypoperfusion and subsequent periventricular leukomalacia. However, extreme hypercapnia may be associated with an increased risk of intracranial hemorrhage. It may therefore be important to avoid large fluctuations in PaCO2 values. Recent randomized clinical trials in preterm infants have demonstrated that mild permissive hypercapnia is safe, but clinical benefits are modest. The optimal PaCO2 goal in clinical practice has not been determined, and the available evidence does not currently support a general recommendation for permissive hypercapnia in preterm infants.

  3. Experimental ventilator-induced lung injury: exacerbation by positive end-expiratory pressure.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jesús; Herrera-Abreu, Maria Teresa; Valladares, Francisco; Muros, Mercedes; Pérez-Méndez, Lina; Flores, Carlos; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2009-06-01

    Previous experimental studies of ventilator-induced lung injury have shown that positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is protective. The authors hypothesized that the application of PEEP during volume-controlled ventilation with a moderately high tidal volume (VT) in previously healthy in vivo rats does not attenuate ventilator-induced lung injury if the peak airway pressure markedly increases during the application of PEEP. Sixty healthy, male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and randomized to be mechanically ventilated for 4 h at (1) VT of 6 ml/kg, (2) VT of 20 ml/kg, or (3) VT of 20 ml/kg plus 10 cm H2O of PEEP. Peak airway pressures, gas exchange, histologic evaluation, mortality, total lung tissue cytokine gene expression, and serum cytokine concentrations were analyzed. Peak airway pressures exceeded 30 cm H2O with high VT plus PEEP. All lungs ventilated with high VT had perivascular edema and inflammatory infiltrates. In addition, those ventilated with PEEP had small hemorrhages foci. Five animals from the high VT plus PEEP group died (P = 0.020). Animals ventilated with high VT (with or without PEEP) had a substantial increase in serum interleukin-6 (P = 0.0002), and those ventilated with high VT plus PEEP had a 5.5-fold increase in systemic levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (P = 0.007). In contrast to previous reports, PEEP exacerbated lung damage and contributed to fatal outcome in an in vivo, mild overdistension model of ventilator-induced lung injury in previously healthy rats. That is, the addition of high PEEP to a constant large VT causes injury in previously healthy animals.

  4. Arterial oxygen desaturation during one-lung ventilation in a patient with segmental pulmonary infarction.

    PubMed

    Pfitzner, J; Lance, D G; Peacocks, M J

    2005-12-01

    A left thoracotomy for decortication of an infected haemothorax was performed on a 52-year-old man with a partially infarcted left lower lobe that occurred as a rare complication of a pulmonary venous embolus. Before the completion of surgery, after an uncomplicated 40 minutes of one-lung ventilation, the left lung was temporarily re-expanded to assess air leak. On the resumption of one-lung ventilation the SpO2 fell rapidly to 85%, despite apnoeic oxygenation of the non-ventilated lung. In the absence of evidence of double-lumen tube displacement, intra-pulmonary shunting as a consequence of impaired hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in the newly expanded markedly pathological lung is considered the most likely mechanism.

  5. Lung hyperinflation by mechanical ventilation versus isolated tracheal aspiration in the bronchial hygiene of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Assmann, Crisiela Brum; Vieira, Paulo José Cardoso; Kutchak, Fernanda; Rieder, Marcelo de Mello; Forgiarini, Soraia Genebra Ibrahim; Forgiarini Junior, Luiz Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of lung hyperinflation maneuvers via a mechanical ventilator compared to isolated tracheal aspiration for removing secretions, normalizing hemodynamics and improving lung mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation. Methods This was a randomized crossover clinical trial including patients admitted to the intensive care unit and on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. Patients were randomized to receive either isolated tracheal aspiration (Control Group) or lung hyperinflation by mechanical ventilator (MVH Group). Hemodynamic and mechanical respiratory parameters were measured along with the amount of aspirated secretions. Results A total of 50 patients were included. The mean age of the patients was 44.7 ± 21.6 years, and 31 were male. Compared to the Control Group, the MVH Group showed greater aspirated secretion amount (3.9g versus 6.4g, p = 0.0001), variation in mean dynamic compliance (-1.3 ± 2.3 versus -2.9 ± 2.3; p = 0.008), and expired tidal volume (-0.7 ± 0.0 versus -54.1 ± 38.8, p = 0.0001) as well as a significant decrease in peak inspiratory pressure (0.2 ± 0.1 versus 2.5 ± 0.1; p = 0.001). Conclusion In the studied sample, the MVH technique led to a greater amount of aspirated secretions, significant increases in dynamic compliance and expired tidal volume and a significant reduction in peak inspiratory pressure. PMID:27096673

  6. Evaluation of the preventive effect of dexpanthenol in radiation injury by lung perfusion scintigraphy: a preclinical experimental model of radiation injury.

    PubMed

    Koç, Zehra P; İn, Erdal; Karslioğlu, İhsan; Üçer, Özlem; Canpolat, Sinan

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to show the preventative effects of dexpanthenol in radiation injuries caused by radiotherapy (RT) through the use of lung perfusion scintigraphy in the pre-RT and post-RT periods. Six male New Zealand rabbits (5-6 months of age and ∼2.5-3 kg in weight) were the used in this study. The animals were subjected to Tc-macroaggregated albumin lung perfusion scintigraphy in the pre-RT and post-RT (i.e. 2 weeks after treatment) periods. The scintigraphies were performed with the same dose by the same staff and the methodology used the same acquisition parameters. The rabbits were divided into two groups: group I (administered RT only) and group II (also administered intramuscular 500 mg dexpanthenol injections for 14 consecutive days after RT). Quantification was performed to compare the groups and the quantification variables were compared using a paired samples t-test, with P value less than 0.05 considered to be statistically significant. Histopathological analysis was also carried out. The post-RT scintigraphies indicated a decrease in the counts in both lungs, suggesting early post-RT injury. The difference between the counts obtained from both lungs in groups I and II was significantly different and favoured group II. Histopathological results confirmed the scintigraphy results. It is possible to estimate post-RT changes in the early period (in contrast to previous data) by lung perfusion scintigraphy. Dexpanthenol may also reduce the effects of RT to a degree. Although this is the first study to report the preventive effects of dexpanthenol on RT injuries, further studies are warranted in this area.

  7. Distribution of ventilation in American alligator Alligator mississippiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Bickler, P.E.; Spragg, R.G.; Hartman, M.T.; White, F.N.

    1985-10-01

    The regional distribution of ventilation in the multicameral lung of spontaneously ventilating alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) was studied with TTXe scintigraphy. Frequent gamma camera images of TTXe washin and washout were obtained and processed to allow evaluation of regional ventilation. Washin of TTXe to equilibrium occurred in three to four breaths in anterior, central, and posterior compartments. Washin was most rapid in the posterior compartment and slowest in the anterior. The structure of the lungs and distribution of ventilation of inspired gas is consistent with the rapid radial spread of gas through a parallel arrangement of lung units surrounding the central intrapulmonary bronchus. Washout to equilibrium of TTXe from all compartments occurred within three to four breaths. This rapid washin and washout of gas to all parts of the lung stands in contrast to the lungs of turtles and snakes, in which the caudal air sacs are relatively poorly ventilated.

  8. Adult patient with pulmonary agenesis: focusing on one-lung ventilation during general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuetian; Zhu, Cheng; Qian, Xiaozhe

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary agenesis is a rare condition with high mortality. Mechanical ventilation in these patients is challenging and there has no such case been reported in the literature. We reported a 61-year-old female with lung agenesis who presented to our hospital with pneumonia and pelvic mass. In the past, she had undergone repairing of atrial septal defect and mitral valve forming surgery at 6-year-old. Thereafter she had remained asymptomatic until this time of hospital admission. The patient underwent operation for the pelvic mass with one-lung ventilation (OLV) under general anesthesia. We highlighted the use of protective ventilation (PV) strategy during OLV. PMID:26904240

  9. Adult patient with pulmonary agenesis: focusing on one-lung ventilation during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuetian; Zhu, Cheng; Qian, Xiaozhe; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Zhongheng

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary agenesis is a rare condition with high mortality. Mechanical ventilation in these patients is challenging and there has no such case been reported in the literature. We reported a 61-year-old female with lung agenesis who presented to our hospital with pneumonia and pelvic mass. In the past, she had undergone repairing of atrial septal defect and mitral valve forming surgery at 6-year-old. Thereafter she had remained asymptomatic until this time of hospital admission. The patient underwent operation for the pelvic mass with one-lung ventilation (OLV) under general anesthesia. We highlighted the use of protective ventilation (PV) strategy during OLV.

  10. Amelioration of superoxide dismutase on ventilator-induced lung injury by suppressing leukocyte in the lungs and systemic circulation.

    PubMed

    Su, Chien-Ling; Du, Wen-Yuan; Chiang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Lee, Hui-Ling; Chen, Kuan-Hao; Wang, Jiun-; Wang, David

    2013-08-31

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is a free radical scavenger and a broad-spectrum antioxidant. Its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects have recently been noted. We studied the effects of this antioxidant on lung damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation in a model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using 8- to 12-wk-old Sprange-Dawley rats (n = 40). Animals were randomized and evenly divided into two experimental groups, low tidal volume (V(T)) ventilation (V(T) = 9 ml/kg) and high V(T) ventilation (V(T) = 28 ml/kg). Each group was evenly divided into two subgroups: ten animals were treated with superoxide dismutase (SOD; 10,000 U/kg i.v., 2 h prior to the ventilation) and the rests were treated with vehicle. Lung injury was evaluated by histological examination, and cells counts of red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) in the alveoli and the septal wall thickness in lung tissues and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The lung permeability was assessed by the wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/D), lung weight to body weight ratio (LW/BW) and protein concentration in broncholavage fluid (BALF). Levels of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the lungs were evaluated by tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) and methylguanidine (MG) in BALF, respectively. SOD pretreatment significantly decreased WBC counts in systemic circulation and in alveoli, and effectively attenuated high V(T) ventilation induced lung injury by reducing hyaline membrane development, septal wall thickness, lung W/D and LW/BW and serum LDH in relation to those of the control. In addition, lung tissues MDA and MG in BALF were also notably reduced.

  11. TRPV4 channels augment macrophage activation and ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Kazutoshi; Jian, Ming-Yuan; Townsley, Mary I.; King, Judy A.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Weber, David S.; Eyal, Fabien G.; Clapp, Mary M.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously implicated transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels and alveolar macrophages in initiating the permeability increase in response to high peak inflation pressure (PIP) ventilation. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from TRPV4−/− and TRPV4+/+ mice and instilled in the lungs of mice of the opposite genotype. Filtration coefficients (Kf) measured in isolated perfused lungs after ventilation with successive 30-min periods of 9, 25, and 35 cmH2O PIP did not significantly increase in lungs from TRPV4−/− mice but increased >2.2-fold in TRPV4+/+ lungs, TRPV4+/+ lungs instilled with TRPV4−/− macrophages, and TRPV4−/− lungs instilled with TRPV4+/+ macrophages after ventilation with 35 cmH2O PIP. Activation of TRPV4 with 4-α-phorbol didecanoate (4αPDD) significantly increased intracellular calcium, superoxide, and nitric oxide production in TRPV4+/+ macrophages but not TRPV4−/− macrophages. Cross-sectional areas increased nearly 3-fold in TRPV4+/+ macrophages compared with TRPV4−/− macrophages after 4αPDD. Immunohistochemistry staining of lung tissue for nitrotyrosine revealed increased amounts in high PIP ventilated TRPV4+/+ lungs compared with low PIP ventilated TRPV4+/+ or high PIP ventilated TRPV4−/− lungs. Thus TRPV4+/+ macrophages restored susceptibility of TRPV4−/− lungs to mechanical injury. A TRPV4 agonist increased intracellular calcium and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in harvested TRPV4+/+ macrophages but not TRPV4−/− macrophages. Kf increases correlated with tissue nitrotyrosine, a marker of peroxynitrite production. PMID:20562229

  12. Pulmonary scintigraphy in fibrosing mediastinitis due to histoplasmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.M.; Jay, S.J.; Brandt, M.J.; Holden, R.W.

    1981-04-01

    The pulmonary scintigraphic findings from our patients with fibrosing mediastinitis due to histoplasmosis are reported. The ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch mimicked pulmonary emboli. However, in these cases the chest radiographs and/or gallium-67 scintigraphy were abnormal, suggesting mediastinal or hilar disease. Awareness of the nonembolic conditions that can result in V/Q mismatches is important in the interpretation of lung scans.

  13. Measurement of lung function using Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) during mechanical ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebuya, Satoru; Koike, Tomotaka; Imai, Hiroshi; Noshiro, Makoto; Brown, Brian H.; Soma, Kazui

    2010-04-01

    The consistency of regional lung density measurements as estimated by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), in eleven patients supported by a mechanical ventilator, was validated to verify the feasibility of its use in intensive care medicine. There were significant differences in regional lung densities between the normal lung and diseased lungs associated with pneumonia, atelectasis and pleural effusion (Steel-Dwass test, p < 0.05). Temporal changes in regional lung density of patients with atelectasis were observed to be in good agreement with the results of clinical diagnosis. These results indicate that it is feasible to obtain a quantitative value for regional lung density using EIT.

  14. Linking Ventilation Heterogeneity Quantified via Hyperpolarized 3He MRI to Dynamic Lung Mechanics and Airway Hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Lui, Justin K; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Albert, Mitchell S; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI (HP 3He-MRI) have introduced the ability to render and quantify ventilation patterns throughout the anatomic regions of the lung. The goal of this study was to establish how ventilation heterogeneity relates to the dynamic changes in mechanical lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic subjects. In four healthy and nine mild-to-moderate asthmatic subjects, we measured dynamic lung resistance and lung elastance from 0.1 to 8 Hz via a broadband ventilation waveform technique. We quantified ventilation heterogeneity using a recently developed coefficient of variation method from HP 3He-MRI imaging. Dynamic lung mechanics and imaging were performed at baseline, post-challenge, and after a series of five deep inspirations. AHR was measured via the concentration of agonist that elicits a 20% decrease in the subject's forced expiratory volume in one second compared to baseline (PC20) dose. The ventilation coefficient of variation was correlated to low-frequency lung resistance (R = 0.647, P < 0.0001), the difference between high and low frequency lung resistance (R = 0.668, P < 0.0001), and low-frequency lung elastance (R = 0.547, P = 0.0003). In asthmatic subjects with PC20 values <25 mg/mL, the coefficient of variation at baseline exhibited a strong negative trend (R = -0.798, P = 0.02) to PC20 dose. Our findings were consistent with the notion of peripheral rather than central involvement of ventilation heterogeneity. Also, the degree of AHR appears to be dependent on the degree to which baseline airway constriction creates baseline ventilation heterogeneity. HP 3He-MRI imaging may be a powerful predictor of the degree of AHR and in tracking the efficacy of therapy.

  15. Open Lung Biopsy Among Critically Ill, Mechanically Ventilated Patients. A Metaanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Walkey, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Open lung biopsy may be performed to guide therapy in mechanically ventilated patients with diagnostic uncertainty regarding etiology of pulmonary infiltrates. Current evidence for open lung biopsy in mechanically ventilated patients comes from single-center case series. Objectives: We performed a metaanalysis of case series to determine diagnoses, complications, and changes in therapy after lung biopsy in critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Methods: We searched Medline for case series of lung biopsies in critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. We pooled results of individual case series using random effects metaanalysis models to obtain summary proportions. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 14 case series including a total of 512 mechanically ventilated patients with 530 histopathological diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were “fibrosis/pneumonitis” (n = 155, 25%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14–37%) and infection (n = 113, 20%; 95% CI, 15–27%). Viruses were the most commonly identified infectious etiology identified on open lung biopsy, representing 50% of potential pathogens. Diffuse alveolar damage was present in a minority of specimens (n = 100, 16%; 95% CI, 8–25%). Therapeutic changes after lung biopsy occurred in 399 patients (78%; 95% CI, 64–81%). Procedure-related complications occurred in 29% of patients (95% CI, 25–33%), most commonly persistent air leak. Mortality among mechanically ventilated patients after diagnostic open lung biopsy was 54%. Conclusions: Among mechanically ventilated patients with respiratory failure of unclear etiology, lung biopsy yielded a wide range of diagnoses and was associated with a change in therapy in most patients. PMID:26065712

  16. Linking Ventilation Heterogeneity Quantified via Hyperpolarized 3He MRI to Dynamic Lung Mechanics and Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Justin K.; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Albert, Mitchell S.; Lutchen, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI (HP 3He-MRI) have introduced the ability to render and quantify ventilation patterns throughout the anatomic regions of the lung. The goal of this study was to establish how ventilation heterogeneity relates to the dynamic changes in mechanical lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic subjects. In four healthy and nine mild-to-moderate asthmatic subjects, we measured dynamic lung resistance and lung elastance from 0.1 to 8 Hz via a broadband ventilation waveform technique. We quantified ventilation heterogeneity using a recently developed coefficient of variation method from HP 3He-MRI imaging. Dynamic lung mechanics and imaging were performed at baseline, post-challenge, and after a series of five deep inspirations. AHR was measured via the concentration of agonist that elicits a 20% decrease in the subject’s forced expiratory volume in one second compared to baseline (PC20) dose. The ventilation coefficient of variation was correlated to low-frequency lung resistance (R = 0.647, P < 0.0001), the difference between high and low frequency lung resistance (R = 0.668, P < 0.0001), and low-frequency lung elastance (R = 0.547, P = 0.0003). In asthmatic subjects with PC20 values <25 mg/mL, the coefficient of variation at baseline exhibited a strong negative trend (R = -0.798, P = 0.02) to PC20 dose. Our findings were consistent with the notion of peripheral rather than central involvement of ventilation heterogeneity. Also, the degree of AHR appears to be dependent on the degree to which baseline airway constriction creates baseline ventilation heterogeneity. HP 3He-MRI imaging may be a powerful predictor of the degree of AHR and in tracking the efficacy of therapy. PMID:26569412

  17. Gravity effects on regional lung ventilation determined by functional EIT during parabolic flights.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, I; Dudykevych, T; Hinz, J; Bodenstein, M; Hahn, G; Hellige, G

    2001-07-01

    Gravity-dependent changes of regional lung function were studied during normogravity, hypergravity, and microgravity induced by parabolic flights. Seven healthy subjects were followed in the right lateral and supine postures during tidal breathing, forced vital capacity, and slow expiratory vital capacity maneuvers. Regional 1) lung ventilation, 2) lung volumes, and 3) lung emptying behavior were studied in a transverse thoracic plane by functional electrical impedance tomography (EIT). The results showed gravity-dependent changes of regional lung ventilation parameters. A significant effect of gravity on regional functional residual capacity with a rapid lung volume redistribution during the gravity transition phases was established. The most homogeneous functional residual capacity distribution was found at microgravity. During vital capacity and forced vital capacity in the right lateral posture, the decrease in lung volume on expiration was larger in the right lung region at all gravity phases. During tidal breathing, the differences in ventilation magnitudes between the right and left lung regions were not significant in either posture or gravity phase. A significant nonlinearity of lung emptying was determined at normogravity and hypergravity. The pattern of lung emptying was homogeneous during microgravity.

  18. The stripe sign: correlation of radionuclide ventilation and perfusion with He-3 magnetic resonance lung imaging

    PubMed

    Teates; Brookeman; Daniel; Truwit; Parekh; Mugler; de Lange EE

    1999-10-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to correlate regional ventilation and perfusion images and perfusion SPECT with images made using a newly developed magnetic resonance ventilation (MRV) method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The investigation included a single patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a healthy control participant. Ventilation and perfusion images using Xe-133 and Tc-99m MAA, including perfusion SPECT, were compared with single-breath MRV with hyperpolarized He-3. RESULTS: Ventilation and perfusion defects correspond to areas of poor ventilation on MRV. High-resolution MRV images show preservation of bronchi and acinus units in areas of the "stripe sign" on the V/Q study. CONCLUSIONS: MRV imaging confirms that the stripe sign seen on nuclear perfusion imaging correlates with subsegmental preserved lung. MRV imaging has the potential for high-resolution innovative studies of subsegmental lung function, using either He-3 or Xe-129 hyperpolarized gases.

  19. Prognostic significance of the lung scintigraphy scan result and corresponding chest X-ray in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Al-Adhami, A S; Simpson, A J; Reid, J H; MacDougall, M; Murchison, J T

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether the survival of patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) relates to radiological probability of acute PE assessed using lung scintigraphy scans (LSS). Lung scintigraphy scan results from a venous thromboembolism database were categorised as high, indeterminate or low probability using the modified PIOPED criteria and corresponding chest X-rays (CXRs) as normal or abnormal. Mortality data on these cases were obtained from the General Register Office for Scotland, and survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Of the 1,818 LSS analysed, 941 (51.8%) were normal, 532 (29.3%) indeterminate and 345 (19.0%) high probability. After an adjustment for age and gender, no significant survival difference was found between patients with normal and high probability LSS (p=0.182). However, patients with indeterminate LSS had significantly lower survival than patients in the other groups. This difference persisted after adjustment for CXR result. Indeterminate LSS results are associated with a poor prognosis. Careful follow-up of patients with inderminate LSS would appear to be justified.

  20. Assessing the use of 4DCT-ventilation in pre-operative surgical lung cancer evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Jackson, Matthew; Schubert, Leah; Jones, Bernard; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Mitchell, John; Rusthoven, Chad; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian

    2017-01-01

    A primary treatment option for lung cancer patients is surgical resection. Patients who have poor lung function prior to surgery are at increased risk of developing serious and life-threatening complications after surgical resection. Surgeons use nuclear medicine ventilation-perfusion (VQ) scans along with pulmonary function test (PFT) information to assess a patient's pre-surgical lung function. The nuclear medicine images and pre-surgery PFTs are used to calculate percent predicted postoperative (%PPO) PFT values by estimating the amount of functioning lung tissue that would be lost with surgical resection. Nuclear medicine imaging is currently considered the standard of care when evaluating the amount of ventilation that would be lost due to surgery. A novel lung function imaging modality has been developed in radiation oncology that uses 4-Dimensional computed tomography data to calculate ventilation maps (4DCT-ventilation). Compared to nuclear medicine, 4DCT-ventilation is cheaper, does not require a radioactive contrast agent, provides a faster imaging procedure, and has improved spatial resolution. In this work we perform a retrospective study to assess the use of 4DCT-ventilation as a pre-operative surgical lung function evaluation tool. Specifically, the purpose of our study was to compare %PPO PFT values calculated with 4DCT-ventilation and %PPO PFT values calculated with nuclear medicine ventilation-perfusion imaging. The study included 16 lung cancer patients that had undergone 4DCT imaging, nuclear medicine imaging, and had Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV1 ) acquired as part of a standard PFT. The 4DCT datasets, spatial registration, and a density-change-based model were used to compute 4DCT-ventilation maps. Both 4DCT-ventilation and nuclear medicine images were used to calculate %PPO FEV1 . The %PPO FEV1 was calculated by scaling the pre-surgical FEV1 by (1-fraction of total resected ventilation); where the resected ventilation was

  1. The muscular basis of aerial ventilation of the primitive lung of Amia calva.

    PubMed

    Deyst, K A; Liem, K F

    1985-02-01

    Anatomical analysis, electromyography, pressure recordings, high-speed X-ray and light movies of the mechanism of air ventilation in Amia calva reveal that aerial ventilation proceeds by the action of a specialized pulse pump. The interhyoideus muscle is the dominant muscle being active during both the preparatory phase and the final, prolonged compressive phase during which new air is forced into the lung. Amia retains a relatively large residual volume in the lung and does not repeat inhalation. It often expels excess air from the buccal cavity after the lung has been fully reinflated. The pressure, kinematic and air flow patterns during air ventilation in Amia closely resemble those of the air breath in the lungfish Protopterus. We hypothesize that the basically similar electromyographic profiles of homologous muscles so characteristic for the air ventilation mechanism of Protopterus and Amia reflect a homologous anatomical as well as functional neuromuscular pattern, which has had a common and early evolutionary origin among the Teleostomi.

  2. New operational technology of intrauterine ventilation the fetus lungs by breathing gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakov, A. L.; Nikityuk, D. B.; Urakova, N. A.; Kasankin, A. A.; Chernova, L. V.; Dementiev, V. B.

    2015-11-01

    New operational technology for elimination intrauterine hypoxia and asphyxia of the fetus using endoscopic artificial ventilation lungs by respiratory gas was developed. For intrauterine ventilation of fetal lung it is proposed to enter into the uterus a special breathing mask and wear it on the head of the fetus using the original endoscopic technology. The breathing mask, developed by us is connected with external breathing apparatus with a hose. The device is called "intrauterine aqualung". Intrauterine aqualung includes a ventilator and breathing circuit with a special fold-out breathing mask that is put on inside the uterus on the head of fetus like a mesh hat. Controlled by ultrasound the technology of the introduction of the mask inside of the uterus through the natural opening in the cervix and technology of putting on the respiratory mask on the head of the fetus with its head previa were developed. The technology intrauterine ventilation of the fetus lungs by respiratory gas was developed.

  3. Genetic Targets of Hydrogen Sulfide in Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury – A Microarray Study

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, Sashko; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Strosing, Karl; Ryter, Stefan; Hummel, Matthias; Faller, Simone; Hoetzel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that inhalation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects against ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In the present study, we aimed to determine the underlying molecular mechanisms of H2S-dependent lung protection by analyzing gene expression profiles in mice. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to spontaneous breathing or mechanical ventilation in the absence or presence of H2S (80 parts per million). Gene expression profiles were determined by microarray, sqRT-PCR and Western Blot analyses. The association of Atf3 in protection against VILI was confirmed with a Vivo-Morpholino knockout model. Mechanical ventilation caused a significant lung inflammation and damage that was prevented in the presence of H2S. Mechanical ventilation favoured the expression of genes involved in inflammation, leukocyte activation and chemotaxis. In contrast, ventilation with H2S activated genes involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, angiogenesis, inhibition of apoptosis, and inflammation. Amongst others, H2S administration induced Atf3, an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic regulator. Morpholino mediated reduction of Atf3 resulted in elevated lung injury despite the presence of H2S. In conclusion, lung protection by H2S during mechanical ventilation is associated with down-regulation of genes related to oxidative stress and inflammation and up-regulation of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory genes. Here we show that Atf3 is clearly involved in H2S mediated protection. PMID:25025333

  4. The impact of spontaneous ventilation on distribution of lung aeration in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: airway pressure release ventilation versus pressure support ventilation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Rinka, Hiroshi; Kaji, Arito; Yoshimoto, Akira; Arimoto, Hideki; Miyaichi, Toshinori; Kan, Masanori

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we sought to determine which mode, airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) or pressure support ventilation (PSV), decreases atelectasis more in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This was a retrospective study in the intensive care unit. Between 2006 and 2007, we identified 18 patients with acute lung injury/ARDS who received either APRV or PSV and had a helical computed tomography scan twice in 3 days. Computed tomography data from the APRV and PSV groups (n = 9 each) were analyzed for 3-dimensional reconstruction and volumetry. Aerated lung regions (normally aerated, poorly aerated, nonaerated, and hyperinflated) were identified by their densities in Hounsfield units. The Pao(2)/Fio(2) ratio and alveolar-arteriolar oxygen gradient after ventilation were improved in both groups (P = 0.008); however, the improvements in the APRV group exceeded those in the PSV group when delivered with equal mean airway pressure (P = 0.018 and 0.015, respectively). Atelectasis decreased significantly from 41% (range, 17%-68%) to 19% (range, 6%-40%) (P = 0.008) and normally aerated volume increased significantly from 29% (range, 13%-41%) to 43% (range, 25%-56%) (P = 0.008) in the APRV group, whereas lung volume did not change in the PSV group. Spontaneous ventilation during APRV improves lung aeration by decreasing atelectasis. PSV for gas exchange is effective but not sufficient to improve lung aeration. These results indicate that APRV is more efficient than PSV as a mode of primary ventilatory support to decrease atelectasis in patients with ARDS.

  5. Effects of Lung Expansion Therapy on Lung Function in Patients with Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Huey; Yeh, Ming-Chu; Hu, Han-Chung; Lee, Chung-Shu; Li, Li-Fu; Chen, Ning-Hung; Huang, Chung-Chi; Kao, Kuo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Common complications in PMV include changes in the airway clearance mechanism, pulmonary function, and respiratory muscle strength, as well as chest radiological changes such as atelectasis. Lung expansion therapy which includes IPPB and PEEP prevents and treats pulmonary atelectasis and improves lung compliance. Our study presented that patients with PMV have improvements in lung volume and oxygenation after receiving IPPB therapy. The combination of IPPB and PEEP therapy also results in increase in respiratory muscle strength. The application of IPPB facilitates the homogeneous gas distribution in the lung and results in recruitment of collapsed alveoli. PEEP therapy may reduce risk of respiratory muscle fatigue by preventing premature airway collapse during expiration. The physiologic effects of IPPB and PEEP may result in enhancement of pulmonary function and thus increase the possibility of successful weaning from mechanical ventilator during weaning process. For patients with PMV who were under the risk of atelectasis, the application of IPPB may be considered as a supplement therapy for the enhancement of weaning outcome during their stay in the hospital.

  6. Effects of Lung Expansion Therapy on Lung Function in Patients with Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Huey; Yeh, Ming-Chu; Hu, Han-Chung; Lee, Chung-Shu; Li, Li-Fu; Chen, Ning-Hung; Huang, Chung-Chi; Kao, Kuo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Common complications in PMV include changes in the airway clearance mechanism, pulmonary function, and respiratory muscle strength, as well as chest radiological changes such as atelectasis. Lung expansion therapy which includes IPPB and PEEP prevents and treats pulmonary atelectasis and improves lung compliance. Our study presented that patients with PMV have improvements in lung volume and oxygenation after receiving IPPB therapy. The combination of IPPB and PEEP therapy also results in increase in respiratory muscle strength. The application of IPPB facilitates the homogeneous gas distribution in the lung and results in recruitment of collapsed alveoli. PEEP therapy may reduce risk of respiratory muscle fatigue by preventing premature airway collapse during expiration. The physiologic effects of IPPB and PEEP may result in enhancement of pulmonary function and thus increase the possibility of successful weaning from mechanical ventilator during weaning process. For patients with PMV who were under the risk of atelectasis, the application of IPPB may be considered as a supplement therapy for the enhancement of weaning outcome during their stay in the hospital. PMID:27445550

  7. The Impact of Lung Ventilation on Some Cytokines after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    PubMed

    Toikkanen, V; Rinne, T; Nieminen, R; Moilanen, E; Laurikka, J; Porkkala, H; Tarkka, M; Mennander, A

    2017-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass induces a systematic inflammatory response, which is partly understood by investigation of peripheral blood cytokine levels alone; the lungs may interfere with the net cytokine concentration. We investigated whether lung ventilation influences lung passage of some cytokines after coronary artery bypass grafting. In total, 47 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were enrolled, and 37 were randomized according to the ventilation technique: (1) No-ventilation group, with intubation tube detached from the ventilator; (2) low tidal volume group, with continuous low tidal volume ventilation; and (3) continuous 10 cm H2O positive airway pressure. Ten selected patients undergoing surgery without cardiopulmonary bypass served as a referral group. Representative pulmonary and radial artery blood samples were collected for the evaluation of calculated lung passage (pulmonary/radial artery) of the pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 and interleukin 8) and the anti-inflammatory interleukin 10 immediately after induction of anesthesia (T1), 1 h after restoring ventilation/return of flow in all grafts (T2), and 20 h after restoring ventilation/return of flow in all grafts (T3). Pulmonary/radial artery interleukin 6 and pulmonary/radial artery interleukin 8 ratios ( p = 0.001 and p = 0.05, respectively) decreased, while pulmonary/radial artery interleukin 10 ratio ( p = 0.001) increased in patients without cardiopulmonary bypass as compared with patients with cardiopulmonary bypass. The pulmonary/radial artery equation is an innovative means for the evaluation of cytokine lung passage after coronary artery bypass grafting. The mode of lung ventilation has no impact on some cytokines after coronary artery bypass grafting in patients treated with cardiopulmonary bypass.

  8. Improvement in Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatch after Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction: Quantitative Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei Won; Lee, Sang Min; Shin, So Youn; Park, Tai Sun; Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Namkug; Hong, Yoonki; Lee, Jae Seung; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Seo, Joon Beom

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR) increases ventilation and therefore improves ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) mismatch. Materials and Methods All patients provided written informed consent to be included in this study, which was approved by the Institutional Review Board (2013-0368) of Asan Medical Center. The physiologic changes that occurred after BLVR were measured by using xenon-enhanced ventilation and iodine-enhanced perfusion dual-energy computed tomography (CT). Patients with severe emphysema plus hyperinflation who did not respond to usual treatments were eligible. Pulmonary function tests, the 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) test, quality of life assessment, and dual-energy CT were performed at baseline and 3 months after BLVR. The effect of BLVR was assessed with repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Twenty-one patients were enrolled in this study (median age, 68 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], 0.75 L ± 0.29). After BLVR, FEV1 (P < .001) and 6MWD (P = .002) improved significantly. Despite the reduction in lung volume (-0.39 L ± 0.44), both ventilation per voxel (P < .001) and total ventilation (P = .01) improved after BLVR. However, neither perfusion per voxel (P = .16) nor total perfusion changed significantly (P = .49). Patients with lung volume reduction of 50% or greater had significantly better improvement in FEV1 (P = .02) and ventilation per voxel (P = .03) than patients with lung volume reduction of less than 50%. V/Q mismatch also improved after BLVR (P = .005), mainly owing to the improvement in ventilation. Conclusion The dual-energy CT analyses showed that BLVR improved ventilation and V/Q mismatch. This increased lung efficiency may be the primary mechanism of improvement after BLVR, despite the reduction in lung volume. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  9. The role of an ambient pressure oxygen source during one-lung ventilation for thoracoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Pfitzner, J

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is facilitated by prompt collapse of the non-ventilated ('operated') lung, and interrupted and impeded if there is a need for oxygen (O2) delivery by continuous positive airways pressure in order to manage hypoxaemia. It has been proposed that connecting an ambient pressure O2 source to the airway of the non-ventilated lung at the time one-lung ventilation is initiated and before the chest is opened will, by avoiding entrainment of ambient nitrogen, serve to facilitate lung collapse. It has also been proposed that leaving the O2 source connected will enable, not only ongoing apnoeic oxygenation before the chest is opened, but also the thoracoscopic procedure to commence with the operated lung fully pre-oxygenated (with an inspired oxygen fraction of 1), and apnoeic oxygenation to continue throughout the operative procedure in those patients who exhibit a degree of small airways patency at ambient pressure. In reality, several factors can influence the speed of collapse of the operated lung, and very many factors can influence the incidence of hypoxaemia during one-lung ventilation. It therefore appears unlikely that the necessary evidence to support these proposals will be forthcoming from randomised clinical studies on large numbers of patients. Rather, the necessary evidence may only be provided by specifically designed within-patient clinical measurement studies. Nevertheless, it is argued that, in the meantime, there is already sufficient rationale for an ambient pressure O2 source to be connected to the airway of the non-ventilated lung, and for it to remain connected for the duration of one-lung ventilation.

  10. More accurate quantification of pulmonary blood flow by magnetic resonance imaging than by lung perfusion scintigraphy in patients with fontan circulation.

    PubMed

    Fratz, Sohrab; Hess, John; Schwaiger, Markus; Martinoff, Stefan; Stern, Heiko C

    2002-09-17

    Quantitative evaluation of pulmonary perfusion using lung perfusion scintigraphy in patients with atriopulmonary anastomosis (APA) or total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) or partial cavopulmonary connection (PCPC) is difficult because of preferential draining of the venae cavae to one lung. Scintigraphy is the gold standard. Phase-velocity MRI (PV-MRI) is a new technique for determining pulmonary perfusion. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether PV-MRI is more accurate than scintigraphy for quantitative evaluation of pulmonary perfusion ratios in patients with APA, TCPC, or PCPC. We studied 15 patients with APA, TCPC, or PCPC (16+/-7 years old, 4 female). Twelve patients (15+/-8 years old, 3 female) with a single pulmonary blood source supplied by a subpulmonary ventricle, ensuring complete mixing of the radioactive tracer before entering the pulmonary circulation, served as controls. Pulmonary scintigraphy and PV-MRI were performed in all patients. Bland-Altman analysis showed a clinically unacceptable difference of 7.1% right pulmonary blood flow (27.2% upper and -13.0% lower limit of agreement) between the two methods in the study group. The two methods agreed excellently in the control group (difference, 1.6%; 4.0% upper and -7.2% lower limit of agreement), showing that the bad agreement in the study group was caused by the problems encountered using pulmonary scintigraphy in patients with APA, TCPC, or PCPC. Because of preferential caval flow into either lung, PV-MRI is more accurate for evaluating pulmonary perfusion ratios than lung perfusion scintigraphy in patients with Fontan-like circulation.

  11. Surfactant treatment effects on lung structure and type II cells of preterm ventilated lambs.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, K E; Ikegami, M; Dillard, L M; Jobe, A H

    2000-05-01

    We evaluated surfactant treatment effects on lung morphology and alveolar type II cells of preterm ventilated lambs. Lambs were ventilated for 10 h following treatment of the right lung with natural surfactant. Lung parenchyma from the surfactant-treated right and the untreated left lung was compared morphometrically. Mechanical ventilation without surfactant resulted in distention of alveolar ducts accompanied by shallowing and loss of well-defined alveoli without disruption of collagen or elastin fibers. Surfactant treatment almost completely prevented these changes. The percent of normal parenchyma was 82 +/- 7% in surfactant-treated lobes and 26 +/- 5% in the nontreated lobes (p < 0.05). Type II cells became flatter in lungs ventilated without surfactant, and cell shape was preserved by surfactant treatment. The volume densities of lamellar bodies and multivesicular bodies in alveolar type II cells were not changed by surfactant treatment. With or without surfactant treatment, mechanical ventilation was associated with a shift in lamellar body distribution to a smaller size and a decrease in glycogen content of type II cells. Surfactant treatment of the preterm lung prevents alveolar distortion and atelectasis, but does not result in changes in subcellular organelles in immature type II cells.

  12. SIMULATING VENTILATION DISTRIBUTION IN HETEROGENOUS LUNG INJURY USING A BINARY TREE DATA STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Colletti, Ashley A.; Amini, Reza; Kaczka, David W.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the impact of mechanical heterogeneity on the distribution of regional flows and pressures in the injured lung, we developed an anatomic model of the canine lung comprised of an asymmetric branching airway network which can be stored as binary tree data structure. The entire tree can be traversed using a recursive flow divider algorithm, allowing for efficient computation of acinar flow and pressure distributions in a mechanically heterogeneous lung. These distributions were found to be highly dependent on ventilation frequency and the heterogeneity of tissue elastances, reflecting the preferential distribution of ventilation to areas of lower regional impedance. PMID:21872852

  13. Nitric oxide synthase 3 contributes to ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaporidi, Katerina; Francis, Roland C.; Bloch, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) depletion or inhibition reduces ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), but the responsible mechanisms remain incompletely defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of endothelial NOS, NOS3, in the pathogenesis of VILI in an in vivo mouse model. Wild-type and NOS3-deficient mice were ventilated with high-tidal volume (HVT; 40 ml/kg) for 4 h, with and without adding NO to the inhaled gas. Additional wild-type mice were pretreated with tetrahydrobiopterin and ascorbic acid, agents that can prevent NOS-generated superoxide production. Arterial blood gas tensions, histology, and lung mechanics were evaluated after 4 h of HVT ventilation. The concentration of protein, IgM, cytokines, malondialdehyde, and 8-isoprostane were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Myeloperoxidase activity, total and oxidized glutathione levels, and NOS-derived superoxide production were measured in lung tissue homogenates. HVT ventilation induced VILI in wild-type mice, as reflected by decreased lung compliance, increased concentrations of protein and cytokines in BALF, and oxidative stress. All indices of VILI were ameliorated in NOS3-deficient mice. Augmenting pulmonary NO levels by breathing NO during mechanical ventilation did not increase lung injury in NOS3-deficient mice. HVT ventilation increased NOS-inhibitable superoxide production in lung extracts from wild-type mice but not in those from NOS3-deficient mice. Administration of tetrahydrobiopterin and ascorbic acid ameliorated VILI in wild-type mice. Our results indicate that NOS3 contributes to ventilator-induced lung injury via increased production of superoxide. PMID:20453164

  14. The current and continuing important role of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in evaluating patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Leonard M; Stein, Evan G; Sprayregen, Seymour; Chamarthy, Murthy; Haramati, Linda B

    2008-11-01

    After the publication of the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) study in 1990, there was considerable controversy concerning the ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) study in regard to its low sensitivity and high number of nondiagnostic examinations when used in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Many lessons have been learned from the PIOPED database that have greatly improved our interpretive skills in the 2 decades since the study was performed. One of the key problems negatively impacting interpretation was the predominantly inpatient population that was studied. Inpatients generally are sicker patients with abnormal chest x-rays. This factor significantly degrades V/Q interpretation. A normal chest x-ray greatly facilitates accurate interpretation of the lung scan. The emergence of computed tomography angiography (CTA) in the early to mid-1990s provided a superb new means of imaging patients with suspected PE. As this technology became more sophisticated with multidetector units, it became the procedure of choice in the great majority of medical centers. CT scanners located in or proximal to many emergency departments as well as its 24/7 availability supported this preference. Within the past 2 to 3 years, the publication of the PIOPED II study as well as some other prospective and retrospective studies have confirmed similar diagnostic accuracy for CTA and V/Q studies. Additionally, there have been several recent publications cautioning physicians about the large radiation dose associated with CTA, particularly to the female breast. Considering the great benefits of both techniques as well as their limitations, it is prudent for both clinicians and imaging physicians to develop an appropriate approach to studying patients with suspected PE. Considerations such as objective clinical assessment, D-dimer assay and the chest x-ray appearance all play significant roles in this decision-making process.

  15. TU-A-12A-02: Novel Lung Ventilation Imaging with Single Energy CT After Single Inhalation of Xenon: Comparison with SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Negahdar, M; Yamamoto, T; Shultz, D; Gable, L; Shan, X; Mittra, E; Loo, B; Maxim, P; Diehn, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a novel lung functional imaging method to determine the spatial distribution of xenon (Xe) gas in a single inhalation as a measure of regional ventilation. We compare Xe-CT ventilation to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation, which is the current clinical reference. Regional lung ventilation information may be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of pulmonary diseases such as COPD, radiotherapy planning, and assessing the progression of toxicity after radiation therapy. Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, Xe-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for three patients including one patient with severe emphysema and two lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. For Xe- CT, we acquired two breath-hold single energy CT images of the entire lung with inspiration of 100% O2 and a mixture of 70% Xe and 30% O2, respectively. A video biofeedback system was used to achieve reproducible breath-holds. We used deformable image registration to align the breathhold images with each other to accurately subtract them, producing a map of the distribution of Xe as a surrogate of lung ventilation. We divided each lung into twelve parts and correlated the Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement at each part with the SPECT ventilation count of the corresponding part of the lung. Results: The mean of the Pearson linear correlation coefficient values between the Xe-CT and ventilation SPECT count for all three patients were 0.62 (p<0.01). The Xe-CT image had a higher resolution than SPECT, and did not show central airway deposition artifacts that were present in the SPECT image. Conclusion: We developed a rapid, safe, clinically practical, and potentially widely accessible method for regional lung functional imaging. We demonstrated strong correlations between the Xe-CT ventilation image and SPECT ventilation image as the clinical reference. This ongoing study will investigate more patients to confirm this finding.

  16. Exogenous surfactant restores lung function but not peripheral immunosuppression in ventilated surfactant-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenhil, Harriet A; Lachmann, Burkhard; Haitsma, Jack J; Zijlstra, Jitske; Heijnen, Cobi J; Jansen, Nicolaas J; van Vught, Adrianus J

    2006-01-01

    The authors have previously shown that mechanical ventilation can result in increased pulmonary inflammation and suppressed peripheral leukocyte function. In the present study the effect of surfactant therapy on pulmonary inflammation and peripheral immune function in ventilated surfactant-deficient rats was assessed. Surfactant deficiency was induced by repeated lung lavage, treated rats with surfactant or left them untreated, and ventilated the rats during 2 hours. Nonventilated rats served as healthy control group. Expression of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), interleukin (IL)-1beta, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) were measured in total lung homogenates. Outside the lung phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced lymphocyte proliferation, interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-10 production, and natural killer activity were measured in splenocytes. After 2 hours of mechanical ventilation, expression of MIP-2, IL-1beta, and HSP70 increased significantly in the lungs of surfactant-deficient rats. Outside the lung, mitogen-induced proliferation and production of IFN-gamma and IL-10 reduced significantly. Only natural killer cell activity remained unaffected. Surfactant treatment significantly improved lung function, but could not prevent increased pulmonary expression of MIP-2, IL-1beta, and HSP70 and decreased peripheral mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-gamma and IL-10 production in vitro. In conclusion, 2 hours of mechanical ventilation resulted in increased lung inflammation and partial peripheral leukocyte suppression in surfactant-deficient rats. Surfactant therapy ameliorated lung function but could not prevent or restore peripheral immunosuppression. The authors postulate that peripheral immunosuppression may occur in ventilated surfactant deficient patients, which may enhance susceptibility for infections.

  17. Detection of meningioma metastasis to liver and lung using somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Lanfranchi, Michael; Nikpoor, Nayer

    2013-08-01

    Extracranial meningioma metastasis is rare. We report a case of a 74-year-old Caucasian man with intracranial recurrence of atypical meningioma treated with a combination of surgical resection and gamma knife radiotherapy over a 4-year period. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using (111)In pentreotide for surveillance of tumor recurrence showed multiple pulmonary and hepatic metastases.

  18. Physiology in Medicine: Understanding dynamic alveolar physiology to minimize ventilator induced lung injury (VILI).

    PubMed

    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Joshua; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Andrews, Penny L; Aiash, Hani; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2017-04-06

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a serious clinical problem with the main treatment being supportive in the form of mechanical ventilation. However, mechanical ventilation can be a double edge sword, if set improperly can exacerbate the tissue damage caused by ARDS and is known as ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). In order to minimize VILI we must understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms of tissue damage at the alveolar level. In this Physiology in Medicine paper the dynamic physiology of alveolar inflation and deflation during mechanical ventilation will be reviewed. In addition, the pathophysiologic mechanisms of VILI will be reviewed and this knowledge used to suggest an optimal mechanical breath profile (MBP - all airway pressures, volumes, flows, rates and the duration that they are applied at both inspiration and expiration) necessary to minimize VILI. Our review suggests that the current protective ventilation strategy known as the 'Open Lung Strategy' would be the optimal lung protective approach. However, the viscoelastic behavior of dynamic alveolar inflation and deflation has not yet been incorporated into protective mechanical ventilation strategies. Using our knowledge of dynamic alveolar mechanics (i.e the dynamic change in alveolar and alveolar duct size and shape during tidal ventilation) to modify the MBP necessary to minimize VILI will reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS.

  19. Injurious mechanical ventilation in the normal lung causes a progressive pathologic change in dynamic alveolar mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, Lucio A; Albert, Scott; Carney, David; Gatto, Louis A; Halter, Jeffrey M; Nieman, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory distress syndrome causes a heterogeneous lung injury, and without protective mechanical ventilation a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury can occur. To ventilate noncompliant lung regions, high inflation pressures are required to 'pop open' the injured alveoli. The temporal impact, however, of these elevated pressures on normal alveolar mechanics (that is, the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during ventilation) is unknown. In the present study we found that ventilating the normal lung with high peak pressure (45 cmH20) and low positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP of 3 cmH2O) did not initially result in altered alveolar mechanics, but alveolar instability developed over time. Methods Anesthetized rats underwent tracheostomy, were placed on pressure control ventilation, and underwent sternotomy. Rats were then assigned to one of three ventilation strategies: control group (n = 3, Pcontrol = 14 cmH2O, PEEP = 3 cmH2O), high pressure/low PEEP group (n = 6, Pcontrol = 45 cmH2O, PEEP = 3 cmH2O), and high pressure/high PEEP group (n = 5, Pcontrol = 45 cmH2O, PEEP = 10 cmH2O). In vivo microscopic footage of subpleural alveolar stability (that is, recruitment/derecruitment) was taken at baseline and than every 15 minutes for 90 minutes following ventilator adjustments. Alveolar recruitment/derecruitment was determined by measuring the area of individual alveoli at peak inspiration (I) and end expiration (E) by computer image analysis. Alveolar recruitment/derecruitment was quantified by the percentage change in alveolar area during tidal ventilation (%I – EΔ). Results Alveoli were stable in the control group for the entire experiment (low %I – EΔ). Alveoli in the high pressure/low PEEP group were initially stable (low %I – EΔ), but with time alveolar recruitment/derecruitment developed. The development of alveolar instability in the high pressure/low PEEP group was associated with histologic lung injury. Conclusion A

  20. Does airway pressure release ventilation alter lung function after acute lung injury?

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Smith, D B

    1995-03-01

    During airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), tidal ventilation occurs between the increased lung volume established by the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and the relaxation volume of the respiratory system. Concern has been expressed that release of CPAP may cause unstable alveoli to collapse and not reinflate when airway pressure is restored. To compare pulmonary mechanics and oxygenation in animals with acute lung injury during CPAP with and without APRV. Experimental, subject-controlled, randomized crossover investigation. Anesthesiology research laboratory, University of South Florida College of Medicine Health Sciences Center. Ten pigs of either sex. Acute lung injury was induced with an intravenous infusion of oleic acid (72 micrograms/kg) followed by randomly alternated 60-min trials of CPAP with and without APRV. Continuous positive airway pressure was titrated to produce an arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation of at least 95% (FIO2 = 0.21). Airway pressure release ventilation was arbitrarily cycled to atmospheric pressure 10 times per minute with a release time titrated to coincide with attainment of respiratory system relaxation volume. Cardiac output, arterial and mixed venous pH, blood gas tensions, hemoglobin concentration and oxyhemoglobin saturation, central venous pressure, pulmonary and systemic artery pressures, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, airway gas flow, airway pressure, and pleural pressure were measured. Tidal volume (VT), dynamic lung compliance, intrapulmonary venous admixture, pulmonary vascular resistance, systemic vascular resistance, oxygen delivery, oxygen consumption, and oxygen extraction ratio were calculated. Central venous infusion of oleic acid reduced PaO2 from 94 +/- 4 mm Hg to 52 +/- 9 mm Hg (mean +/- 1 SD) (p < 0.001) and dynamic lung compliance from 40 +/- 6 mL/cm H2O to 20 +/- 6 mL/cm H2O (p = 0.002) and increased venous admixture from 13 +/- 3% to 32 +/- 7% (p < 0.001) in ten swine

  1. High frequency oscillatory ventilation attenuates the activation of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shimaoka; Fujino; Taenaka; Hiroi; Kiyono; Yoshiya

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent investigations have shown that leukocyte activation is involved in the pathogenesis of ventilator-associated lung injury. This study was designed to investigate whether the inflammatory responses and deterioration of oxygenation in ventilator-associated lung injury are attenuated by high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFO). We analyzed the effects of HFO compared with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) on the activation of pulmonary macrophages and neutrophils in 10 female rabbits. RESULTS: After surfactant depletion, the rabbits were ventilated by CMV or HFO at the same mean airway pressure. Surfactant-depletion followed by 4 h mechanical ventilation hindered pulmonary oxygenation in both groups. Impairment of oxygenation was less severe in the HFO group than in the CMV group. In the HFO group the infiltration of granulocytes into alveolar spaces occurred more readily than in the CMV group. Compared with CMV, HFO resulted in greater attenuation of beta2-integrin expression, not only on granulocytes, but also on macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: In the surfactant-depleted lung, the activation of leukocytes was attenuated by HFO. Reduced inflammatory response correlated with decreased impairment of oxygenation. HFO may reduce lung injury via the attenuation of pulmonary inflammation.

  2. Ventilation-based segmentation of the lungs using hyperpolarized (3)He MRI.

    PubMed

    Tustison, Nicholas J; Avants, Brian B; Flors, Lucia; Altes, Talissa A; de Lange, Eduard E; Mugler, John P; Gee, James C

    2011-10-01

    To develop an automated segmentation method to differentiate the ventilated lung volume on (3) He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Computational processing (CP) for each subject consisted of the following three essential steps: 1) inhomogeneity bias correction, 2) whole lung segmentation, and 3) subdivision of the lung segmentation into regions of similar ventilation. Evaluation consisted of two comparative analyses: i) comparison of the number of defects scored by two human readers in 43 subjects, and ii) simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) in 18 subjects in which the ventilation defects were manually segmented by four human readers. There was excellent correlation between the number of ventilation defects tabulated by CP and reader #1 (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.86), CP and reader #2 (ICC = 0.85), and between the two readers (ICC = 0.97). The STAPLE results from the second analysis yielded the following sensitivity/specificity numbers: CP (0.898/0.905), radiologist #1 (0.743/0.897), radiologist #2 (0.501/0.985), radiologist #3 (0.898/0.848), and the first author (0.600/0.984). We developed and evaluated an automated method for quantifying the ventilated lung volume on (3) He MRI. The findings strongly indicate that our proposed algorithmic processing may be a reliable, automatic method for quantitating ventilation defects. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Core body temperature control by total liquid ventilation using a virtual lung temperature sensor.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Mathieu; Micheau, Philippe; Robert, Raymond; Avoine, Olivier; Tissier, Renaud; Germim, Pamela Samanta; Vandamme, Jonathan; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Herve

    2014-12-01

    In total liquid ventilation (TLV), the lungs are filled with a breathable liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) while a liquid ventilator ensures proper gas exchange by renewal of a tidal volume of oxygenated and temperature-controlled PFC. Given the rapid changes in core body temperature generated by TLV using the lung has a heat exchanger, it is crucial to have accurate and reliable core body temperature monitoring and control. This study presents the design of a virtual lung temperature sensor to control core temperature. In the first step, the virtual sensor, using expired PFC to estimate lung temperature noninvasively, was validated both in vitro and in vivo. The virtual lung temperature was then used to rapidly and automatically control core temperature. Experimentations were performed using the Inolivent-5.0 liquid ventilator with a feedback controller to modulate inspired PFC temperature thereby controlling lung temperature. The in vivo experimental protocol was conducted on seven newborn lambs instrumented with temperature sensors at the femoral artery, pulmonary artery, oesophagus, right ear drum, and rectum. After stabilization in conventional mechanical ventilation, TLV was initiated with fast hypothermia induction, followed by slow posthypothermic rewarming for 1 h, then by fast rewarming to normothermia and finally a second fast hypothermia induction phase. Results showed that the virtual lung temperature was able to provide an accurate estimation of systemic arterial temperature. Results also demonstrate that TLV can precisely control core body temperature and can be favorably compared to extracorporeal circulation in terms of speed.

  4. Relationship between airway narrowing, patchy ventilation and lung mechanics in asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Tgavalekos, N T; Musch, G; Harris, R S; Vidal Melo, M F; Winkler, T; Schroeder, T; Callahan, R; Lutchen, K R; Venegas, J G

    2007-06-01

    Bronchoconstriction in asthma results in patchy ventilation forming ventilation defects (VDefs). Patchy ventilation is clinically important because it affects obstructive symptoms and impairs both gas exchange and the distribution of inhaled medications. The current study combined functional imaging, oscillatory mechanics and theoretical modelling to test whether the degrees of constriction of airways feeding those units outside VDefs were related to the extent of VDefs in bronchoconstricted asthmatic subjects. Positron emission tomography was used to quantify the regional distribution of ventilation and oscillatory mechanics were measured in asthmatic subjects before and after bronchoconstriction. For each subject, ventilation data was mapped into an anatomically based lung model that was used to evaluate whether airway constriction patterns, consistent with the imaging data, were capable of matching the measured changes in airflow obstruction. The degree and heterogeneity of constriction of the airways feeding alveolar units outside VDefs was similar among the subjects studied despite large inter-subject variability in airflow obstruction and the extent of the ventilation defects. Analysis of the data amongst the subjects showed an inverse relationship between the reduction in mean airway conductance, measured in the breathing frequency range during bronchoconstriction, and the fraction of lung involved in ventilation defects. The current data supports the concept that patchy ventilation is an expression of the integrated system and not just the sum of independent responses of individual airways.

  5. Intratracheal pulmonary ventilation improves gas exchange during laparoscopy in a pediatric lung injury model.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julie R; Kaviani, Amir; Watson, Kenneth; Thompson, John; Wilson, Jay M; Fauza, Dario O

    2005-01-01

    This study was aimed at determining whether intraoperative intratracheal pulmonary ventilation (ITPV) could prevent/treat respiratory complications of laparoscopy in a model of pediatric pulmonary insufficiency. Severe lung injury was induced in 0- to 2-month-old lambs (n = 5) by endotracheal saline lavage. Animals then underwent establishment of CO2 pneumoperitoneum. Intraperitoneal pressures were progressively raised from 0 to 15 mm Hg, at intervals of 5 mm Hg. At each interval, blood gas and hemodynamic data were recorded, 20 minutes after initiation of both conventional ventilation and pure ITPV. All ventilatory parameters were constant and identical on both modes of ventilation. On conventional ventilation, severe respiratory acidosis and hypoxemia ensued at intraperitoneal pressures of 5 mm Hg and 10 mm Hg or more, respectively. Compared with conventional ventilation, ITPV led to statistically significant decreases in PCO2 at intraperitoneal pressures of 5 mm Hg (43.2 +/- 5.2 vs 56.1 +/- 6.6 mm Hg) and 10 mm Hg (45.1 +/- 3.2 vs 61 +/- 6.3 mm Hg) and to significant increases in PO2 at 10 mm Hg (92 +/- 10.2 vs 61 +/- 8.1 mm Hg), resolving the acidosis and hypoxemia at those pressure levels. Compared with conventional ventilation, ITPV improves both CO2 removal and oxygenation during CO2 pneumoperitoneum in a pediatric lung injury model. Intratracheal pulmonary ventilation may be a safer intraoperative mode of ventilation for neonates and children with respiratory failure who require laparoscopy.

  6. Anesthesia in an adult patient with tracheal hemangiomas: one-lung ventilation for lung lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Shogo; Okutani, Ryu; Oda, Yutaka

    2012-04-01

    Primary tracheal tumors are rare in adults, and careful airway management is required during anesthesia for affected patients. We report the case of a patient with tracheal hemangiomas undergoing nontracheal operation. A 61-year-old woman was scheduled for a lung operation. During preoperative examination, hemangiomas were detected on the tracheal mucosa. As she was asymptomatic and the degree of airway stenosis was small, treatment was not required for the hemangiomas, and left upper lobectomy for lung cancer was scheduled. After induction of general anesthesia, a regular tracheal tube was inserted under fiberoptic bronchoscopy, with care taken to prevent damage to the hemangiomas. An endobronchial blocker was inserted for one-lung ventilation. The operation was performed uneventfully, and the tracheal tube was replaced postoperatively with a laryngeal mask airway while the patient was under deep anesthesia and neuromuscular blockade. The mask was removed after confirming lack of bleeding from the hemangiomas. No hypoxia or other complications occurred during or after the operation.

  7. Application of mid-frequency ventilation in an animal model of lung injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mireles-Cabodevila, Eduardo; Chatburn, Robert L; Thurman, Tracy L; Zabala, Luis M; Holt, Shirley J; Swearingen, Christopher J; Heulitt, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    Mid-frequency ventilation (MFV) is a mode of pressure control ventilation based on an optimal targeting scheme that maximizes alveolar ventilation and minimizes tidal volume (VT). This study was designed to compare the effects of conventional mechanical ventilation using a lung-protective strategy with MFV in a porcine model of lung injury. Our hypothesis was that MFV can maximize ventilation at higher frequencies without adverse consequences. We compared ventilation and hemodynamic outcomes between conventional ventilation and MFV. This was a prospective study of 6 live Yorkshire pigs (10 ± 0.5 kg). The animals were subjected to lung injury induced by saline lavage and injurious conventional mechanical ventilation. Baseline conventional pressure control continuous mandatory ventilation was applied with V(T) = 6 mL/kg and PEEP determined using a decremental PEEP trial. A manual decision support algorithm was used to implement MFV using the same conventional ventilator. We measured P(aCO2), P(aO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide, cardiac output, arterial and venous blood oxygen saturation, pulmonary and systemic vascular pressures, and lactic acid. The MFV algorithm produced the same minute ventilation as conventional ventilation but with lower V(T) (-1 ± 0.7 mL/kg) and higher frequency (32.1 ± 6.8 vs 55.7 ± 15.8 breaths/min, P < .002). There were no differences between conventional ventilation and MFV for mean airway pressures (16.1 ± 1.3 vs 16.4 ± 2 cm H2O, P = .75) even when auto-PEEP was higher (0.6 ± 0.9 vs 2.4 ± 1.1 cm H2O, P = .02). There were no significant differences in any hemodynamic measurements, although heart rate was higher during MFV. In this pilot study, we demonstrate that MFV allows the use of higher breathing frequencies and lower V(T) than conventional ventilation to maximize alveolar ventilation. We describe the ventilatory or hemodynamic effects of MFV. We also demonstrate that the application of a decision support algorithm to manage MFV

  8. Individualized lung recruitment during high-frequency ventilation in preterm infants is not associated with lung hyperinflation and air leaks.

    PubMed

    De Jaegere, Anne P; Deurloo, Eline E; van Rijn, Rick R; Offringa, Martin; van Kaam, Anton H

    2016-08-01

    Lung recruitment during high-frequency ventilation (HFV) in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) has been associated with an increased risk of lung hyperinflation and air leaks. Individualizing the lung recruitment procedure to the severity of lung disease of each patient might reduce these risks. In this prospective cohort study, we evaluated chest X-ray (CXR) characteristics during individualized oxygenation-guided lung recruitment with HFV in preterm infants with RDS, before and after surfactant therapy. Two pediatric radiologists scored radiolucency, the presence of lung hyperinflation, and/or air leaks following lung recruitment during HFV in 69 infants before and 39 infants after surfactant treatment. Following lung recruitment, the median radiolucency score was 2, with 44 (64 %) infants having a score ≤2. Only mild to moderate hyperinflation was seen in 13 (19 %) infants, with no air leaks. After the surfactant, the radiolucency score improved in 62 % of 39 paired CXRs (p < 0.001). Mild to moderate hyperinflation was seen in nine (24 %) patients. During the entire admission, only four (6 %) of the patients developed air leaks. The risk of significant hyperinflation and air leaks is low when using an individualized oxygenation-guided recruitment procedure during HFV in preterm infants with RDS. • Lung recruitment during high-frequency ventilation in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome is associated with an increased risk of lung hyperinflation and air leaks. What is New: • The risk of lung hyperinflation and air leaks is low when using an individualized oxygenation-guided lung recruitment procedure during high-frequency ventilation in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome.

  9. Dynamic Characteristics of Mechanical Ventilation System of Double Lungs with Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure Model

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dongkai; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    In recent studies on the dynamic characteristics of ventilation system, it was considered that human had only one lung, and the coupling effect of double lungs on the air flow can not be illustrated, which has been in regard to be vital to life support of patients. In this article, to illustrate coupling effect of double lungs on flow dynamics of mechanical ventilation system, a mathematical model of a mechanical ventilation system, which consists of double lungs and a bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP) controlled ventilator, was proposed. To verify the mathematical model, a prototype of BIPAP system with a double-lung simulators and a BIPAP ventilator was set up for experimental study. Lastly, the study on the influences of key parameters of BIPAP system on dynamic characteristics was carried out. The study can be referred to in the development of research on BIPAP ventilation treatment and real respiratory diagnostics. PMID:27660646

  10. Cigarette smoke ventilation decreases prostaglandin inactivation in rat and hamster lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Maennistoe, J.; Uotila, P.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of cigarette smoke on the metabolism of exogenous PGE2 and PGF2 alpha were investigated in isolated rat and hamster lungs. When isolated lungs from animals were ventilated with cigarette smoke during pulmonary infusion of 100 nmol of PGE2 or PGF2 alpha, the amounts of the 15-keto-metabolites in the perfusion effluent were decreased. Pre-exposure of animals to cigarette smoke daily for 3 weeks did not change the metabolism of PGE2 when the lungs were ventilated with air. Cigarette smoke ventilation of lungs from pre-exposed animals caused, however, a similar decrease in the metabolism of PGE2 as in animals not previously exposed to smoke. After pulmonary injection of 10 nmol of /sup 14/C-PGE2 the radioactivity appeared more rapidly in the effluent during cigarette smoke ventilation suggesting inhibition of the PGE2 uptake mechanism. In rat lungs pulmonary vascular pressor responses to PGE2 and PGF2 alpha were inhibited by smoke ventilation.

  11. Accuracy and feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D MR imaging in the assessment of lung perfusion: comparison with Tc-99 MAA perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Akkoclu, A; Degirmenci, B; Cooper, R A; Sengun, B; Gulcu, A; Osma, E; Ucan, E S

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate findings of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion scintigraphy in cases where there was a suspicion of abnormal pulmonary vasculature, and to evaluate the usefulness of MRI in the detection of perfusion deficits of the lung. In all, 17 patients with suspected abnormality of the pulmonary vasculature underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. T1-weighted 3D fast-field echo pulse sequences were obtained (TR/TE 3.3/1.58 ms; flip angle 30 degrees; slice thickness 12 to 15 mm). The dynamic study was acquired in the coronal plane following administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine. A total of 8 to 10 sections repeated 20 to 25 times at intervals of 1s were performed. Perfusion lung scintigraphy was carried out a maximum of 48 h before the MR examination in all cases. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the clinical data and results of other imaging methods, reviewed all coronal sections. MR perfusion images were independently assessed in terms of segmental or lobar perfusion defects in the 85 lobes of the 17 individuals, and the findings were compared with the results of scintigraphy. Of the 17 patients, 8 were found to have pulmonary emboli, 2 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with emphysema, 2 bullous emphysema, 2 Takayasu arteritis and 1 had a hypoplastic pulmonary artery. Pulmonary perfusion was completely normal in 2 cases. In 35 lobes, perfusion defects were detected using both methods, in 4 with MR alone and in 9 only with scintigraphy. There was good agreement between MRI and scintigraphy findings (kappa=0.695). Pulmonary perfusion MRI is a new alternative to scintigraphy in the evaluation of pulmonary perfusion for various lung disorders. In addition, this technique allows measurement and quantification of pulmonary perfusion abnormalities.

  12. Assessment of branch pulmonary artery stenosis in children after repair of tetralogy of Fallot using lung perfusion scintigraphy comparison with echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Chien, Kuang-Jen; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Huang, Ta-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Liang; Weng, Ken-Pen; Lin, Chu-Chuan; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Wu, Ming-Ting; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the usefulness of lung perfusion scintigraphy and echocardiogram in the evaluation of the branch pulmonary arteries stenosis in children with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). From February 2006 to November 2008, 74 children (mean age 7.8 years, range 1–18 years) who underwent repair of TOF at ages from 10 months to 13 years were suspected to have unilateral or bilateral branch pulmonary artery stenosis. In all patients, cardiac angiography was performed to confirm the diagnosis of branch pulmonary artery stenosis. Lung perfusion scintigraphy and two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography were performed in all patients to compare their abilities to diagnose branch pulmonary artery stenosis. Of the 74 patients, 51 cases were found to have branch pulmonary artery stenosis by cardiac angiography. There was agreement between the scintigraphic and angiographic findings in 44 (86%) patients and there were discrepancies in 11 (15%) patients. The positive predictive value of our lung perfusion scintigraphy in detecting the branch pulmonary artery stenosis was 92 %. The positive and negative likelihood ratios of lung perfusion scintigraphy were 4.96 and 0.17, respectively. There was conformity between the echocardiographic and angiographic findings in 40 (78%) patients with discrepancies in 16 (21%) patients. The positive predictive value of our echocardiography in detecting the branch pulmonary artery stenosis was 89%. The positive and negative likelihood ratios of echocardiography were 3.61 and 0.28, respectively. Lung perfusion scintigraphy is a valuable, non-invasive screening tool in the assessment of branch pulmonary artery stenosis in children after TOF.

  13. Prophylactic erythropoietin exacerbates ventilation-induced lung inflammation and injury in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Polglase, Graeme R; Barton, Samantha K; Melville, Jacqueline M; Zahra, Valerie; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Tolcos, Mary; Moss, Timothy J M

    2014-05-01

    Ventilation-induced lung injury (VILI) of preterm neonates probably contributes to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Erythropoietin (EPO) has been suggested as a therapy for BPD. The aim of this study was to determine whether prophylactic administration of EPO reduces VILI in preterm newborn lambs. Lambs at 126 days of gestation (term is 147 days) were delivered and ventilated with a high tidal volume strategy for 15 min to cause lung injury, then received gentle ventilation until 2 h of age. Lambs were randomized to receive intravenous EPO (5000 IU kg(-1): Vent+EPO; n = 6) or phosphate-buffered saline (Vent; n = 7) soon after birth: unventilated controls (UVC; n = 8) did not receive ventilation or any treatment. Physiological parameters were recorded throughout the experimental procedure. Samples of lung were collected for histological and molecular assessment of inflammation and injury. Samples of liver were collected to assess the systemic acute phase response. Vent+EPO lambs received higher F IO 2, P aO 2 and oxygenation during the first 10 min than Vent lambs. There were no differences in physiological indices beyond this time. Total lung injury score, airway wall thickness, inflammation and haemorrhage were higher in Vent+EPO lambs than in Vent lambs. Lung inflammation and early markers of lung and systemic injury were elevated in ventilated lambs relative to unventilated lambs; EPO administration further increased lung inflammation and markers of lung and systemic injury. Prophylactic EPO exacerbates VILI, which may increase the incidence and severity of long-term respiratory disease. More studies are required before EPO can be used for lung protection in preterm infants.

  14. 4D CT lung ventilation images are affected by the 4D CT sorting method

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Johnston, Eric; Maxim, Peter G.; Diehn, Maximilian; Eclov, Neville; Barquero, Cristian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) ventilation imaging is a novel promising technique for lung functional imaging. The current standard 4D CT technique using phase-based sorting frequently results in artifacts, which may deteriorate the accuracy of ventilation imaging. The purpose of this study was to quantify the variability of 4D CT ventilation imaging due to 4D CT sorting. Methods: 4D CT image sets from nine lung cancer patients were each sorted by the phase-based method and anatomic similarity-based method, designed to reduce artifacts, with corresponding ventilation images created for each method. Artifacts in the resulting 4D CT images were quantified with the artifact score which was defined based on the difference between the normalized cross correlation for CT slices within a CT data segment and that for CT slices bordering the interface between adjacent CT data segments. The ventilation variation was quantified using voxel-based Spearman rank correlation coefficients for all lung voxels, and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) for the spatial overlap of low-functional lung volumes. Furthermore, the correlations with matching single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images (assumed ground truth) were evaluated for three patients to investigate which sorting method provides higher physiologic accuracy. Results: Anatomic similarity-based sorting reduced 4D CT artifacts compared to phase-based sorting (artifact score, 0.45 ± 0.14 vs 0.58 ± 0.24, p = 0.10 at peak-exhale; 0.63 ± 0.19 vs 0.71 ± 0.31, p = 0.25 at peak-inhale). The voxel-based correlation between the two ventilation images was 0.69 ± 0.26 on average, ranging from 0.03 to 0.85. The DSC was 0.71 ± 0.13 on average. Anatomic similarity-based sorting yielded significantly fewer lung voxels with paradoxical negative ventilation values than phase-based sorting (5.0 ± 2.6% vs 9.7 ± 8.4%, p = 0.05), and improved the correlation with SPECT ventilation regionally. Conclusions

  15. An alternative method to achieve one-lung ventilation by surgical pneumothorax in difficult lung isolation patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Pin-Hung; Hsu, Po-Kai

    2016-04-01

    It is challenging to establish one-lung ventilation in difficult airway patients. Surgical pneumothorax under spontaneous breathing to obtain well-collapsed lung is a feasible method for thoracic surgery. A 76-year-old man with right empyema was scheduled for decortication. The patient had limited mouth opening due to facial cellulitis extending from the left cheek to neck. Generally, lung isolation is achieved by double-lumen endotracheal tube or bronchial blocker. Double-lumen tube insertion is difficult for patients with limited mouth opening and right-side placement of bronchial blocker usually causes insufficient deflation. We introduce an alternative lung isolation technique by surgical pneumothorax under spontaneous breathing simply with an endotracheal tube placement. This technique has never been applied into the management of difficult one-lung ventilation. By this method, we provide an ideal surgical condition with safer, less time-consuming, and less skill-demanding anesthesia. It would be an alternative choice for management of one-lung ventilation in the difficult lung isolation patient.

  16. MO-A-BRD-05: Evaluation of Composed Lung Ventilation with 4DCT and Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Du, K; Bayouth, J; Reinhardt, J; Christensen, G; Zhao, B; Ding, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Regional pulmonary function can be derived using fourdimensional computed tomography (4DCT) combined with deformable image registration. However, only peak inhale and exhale phases have been used thus far while the lung ventilation during intermediate phases is not considered. In our previous work, we have investigated the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of lung ventilation and its dependence on respiration effort. In this study, composed ventilation is introduced using all inspiration phases and compared to direct ventilation. Both methods are evaluated against Xe-CT derived ventilation. Methods: Using an in-house tissue volume preserving deformable image registration, unlike the direct ventilation method, which computes from end expiration to end inspiration, Jacobian ventilation maps were computed from one inhale phase to the next and then composed from all inspiration steps. The two methods were compared in both patients prior to RT and mechanically ventilated sheep subjects. In addition, they wereassessed for the correlation with Xe-CT derived ventilation in sheep subjects. Annotated lung landmarks were used to evaluate the accuracy of original and composed deformation field. Results: After registration, the landmark distance for composed deformation field was always higher than that for direct deformation field (0IN to 100IN average in human: 1.03 vs 1.53, p=0.001, and in sheep: 0.80 vs0.94, p=0.009), and both increased with longer phase interval. Direct and composed ventilation maps were similar in both sheep (gamma pass rate 87.6) and human subjects (gamma pass rate 71.9),and showed consistent pattern from ventral to dorsal when compared to Xe-CT derived ventilation. Correlation coefficient between Xe-CT and composed ventilation was slightly better than the direct method but not significant (average 0.89 vs 0.85, p=0.135). Conclusion: More strict breathing control in sheep subjects may explain higher similarity between direct and composed ventilation

  17. Lung Perfusion and Ventilation During Cardiopulmonary Bypass Reduces Early Structural Damage to Pulmonary Parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Claudia Regina da Costa; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo Sa; Benicio, Anderson; Negri, Elnara Marcia; Bini, Filipe Minussi; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Melo, Marcos Francisco Vidal; Carmona, Maria Jose Carvalho

    2016-04-01

    It is unclear whether maintaining pulmonary perfusion and ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) reduces pulmonary inflammatory tissue injury compared with standard CPB where the lungs are not ventilated and are minimally perfused. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that maintenance of lung perfusion and ventilation during CPB decreases regional lung inflammation, which may result in less pulmonary structural damage. Twenty-seven pigs were randomly allocated into a control group only submitted to sternotomy (n = 8), a standard CPB group (n = 9), or a lung perfusion group (n = 10), in which lung perfusion and ventilation were maintained during CPB. Hemodynamics, gas exchanges, respiratory mechanics, and systemic interleukins (ILs) were determined at baseline (T0), at the end of 90 minutes of CPB (T90), and 180 minutes after CPB (T180). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) ILs were obtained at T0 and T180. Dorsal and ventral left lung tissue samples were examined for optical and electron microscopy. At T90, there was a transient reduction in PaO2/FIO2 in CPB (126 ± 64 mm Hg) compared with the control and lung perfusion groups (296 ± 46 and 244 ± 57 mm Hg; P < 0.001), returning to baseline at T180. Serum ILs were not different among the groups throughout the study, whereas there were significant increases in BAL IL-6 (P < 0.001), IL-8 (P < 0.001), and IL-10 (P < 0.001) in both CPB and lung perfusion groups compared with the control group. Polymorphonuclear counts within the lung tissue were smaller in the lung perfusion group than in the CPB group (P = 0.006). Electron microscopy demonstrated extrusion of surfactant vesicles into the alveolar spaces and thickening of the alveolar septa in the CPB group, whereas alveolar and capillary histoarchitecture was better preserved in the lung perfusion group. Maintenance of lung perfusion and ventilation during CPB attenuated early histologic signs of pulmonary inflammation and injury compared with standard CPB

  18. Clinical application of dual-source CT in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer: correlation with perfusion scintigraphy and pulmonary function tests.

    PubMed

    Fraioli, F; Serra, G; Liberali, S; Fiorelli, A; Liparulo, V; Zaccagna, F; Ciccariello, G; Catalano, C; Passariello, R

    2011-09-01

    This study was done to assess the diagnostic potential of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) in the functional evaluation of lung cancer patients undergoing surgical resection. The CT data were compared with pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy and pulmonary function tests (PFTs). All patients were evaluated with DSCT, scintigraphy and PFTs. The DSCT scan protocol was as follows: two tubes (80 and 140 kV; Care Dose protocol); 70 cc of contrast material (5 cc/s); 5- to 6-s scan time; 0.6 mm collimation. After the automatic calculation of lung perfusion with DSCT and quantification of air volumes and emphysema with dedicated software applications, the perfusional CT studies were compared with scintigraphy using a visual score for perfusion defects; CT air volumes and emphysema were compared with PFTs. The values of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of DSCT compared with perfusion scintigraphy as the reference standard were: 0.88, 0.84, 0.90, 0.93 and 0.88, respectively. The McNemar test did not identify significant differences either between the two imaging techniques (p=0.07) or between CT and PFTs (p=0.09). DSCT is a robust and promising technique that provides important and accurate information on lung function.

  19. Antiinflammatory effect of sevoflurane in open lung surgery with one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Potočnik, Iztok; Novak-Janković, Vesna; Šostarič, Maja; Jerin, Ales; Štupnik, Tomaž; Skitek, Milan; Markovič-Božič, Jasmina; Klokočovnik, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    Aim To prospectively assess the antiinflammatory effect of volatile anesthetic sevoflurane in patients undergoing open lung surgery with one lung ventilation (OLV). Methods This prospective, randomized study included 40 patients undergoing thoracic surgery with OLV (NCT02188407). The patients were randomly allocated into two equal groups that received either propofol or sevoflurane. Four patients were excluded from the study because after surgery they received blood transfusion or non-steroid antiinflammatory drugs. Inflammatory mediators (interleukins 6, 8, and 10, C-reactive protein [CRP], and procalcitonin) were measured perioperatively. The infiltration of the nonoperated lung was assessed on chest x-rays and the oxygenation index was calculated. The major postoperative complications were counted. Results Interleukin 6 levels were significantly higher in propofol than in sevoflurane group (P = 0.014). Preoperative CRP levels did not differ between the groups (P = 0.351) and in all patients they were lower than 20 mg/L, but postoperative CRP was significantly higher in propofol group (31 ± 6 vs 15 ± 7 ng/L; P = 0.035); Pre- and postoperative procalcitonin was within the reference range (<0.04 µg/L) in both groups. The oxygenation index was significantly lower in propofol group (339 ± 139 vs 465 ± 140; P = 0.021). There was no significant difference between the groups in lung infiltrates (P = 0.5849). The number of postoperative adverse events was higher in propofol group, but the difference was not-significant (5 vs 1; P = 0.115). Conclusion The study suggests an antiinflammatory effect of sevoflurane in patients undergoing thoracotomy with OLV. PMID:25559834

  20. The role of endocrine mechanisms in ventilator-associated lung injury in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Penesova, A; Galusova, A; Vigas, M; Vlcek, M; Imrich, R; Majek, M

    2012-07-01

    The critically ill subjects are represented by a heterogeneous group of patients suffering from a life-threatening event of different origin, e.g. trauma, cardiopulmonary failure, surgery or sepsis. The majority of these patients are dependent on the artificial lung ventilation, which means a life-saving chance for them. However, the artificial lung ventilation may trigger ventilation-associated lung injury (VALI). The mechanical ventilation at higher volumes (volutrauma) and pressure (barotrauma) can cause histological changes in the lungs including impairments in the gap and adherens junctions and desmosomes. The injured lung epithelium may lead to an impairment of the surfactant production and function, and this may not only contribute to the pathophysiology of VALI but also to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Other components of VALI are atelectrauma and toxic effects of the oxygen. Collectively, all these effects may result in a lung inflammation associated with a subsequent profibrotic changes, endothelial dysfunction, and activation of the local and systemic endocrine responses such as the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The present review is aimed to describe some of the pathophysiologic aspects of VALI providing a basis for novel therapeutic strategies in the critically ill patients.

  1. Atelectasis Induced by Thoracotomy Causes Lung Injury during Mechanical Ventilation in Endotoxemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kun Young; Kim, Jin Mo; Quinn, Deborah A.; Hales, Charles A.; Seo, Jeong Wook

    2008-01-01

    Atelectasis can impair arterial oxygenation and decrease lung compliance. However, the effects of atelectasis on endotoxemic lungs during ventilation have not been well studied. We hypothesized that ventilation at low volumes below functional residual capacity (FRC) would accentuate lung injury in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-pretreated rats. LPS-pretreated rats were ventilated with room air at 85 breaths/min for 2 hr at a tidal volume of 10 mL/kg with or without thoracotomy. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was applied to restore FRC in the thoracotomy group. While LPS or thoracotomy alone did not cause significant injury, the combination of endotoxemia and thoracotomy caused significant hypoxemia and hypercapnia. The injury was observed along with a marked accumulation of inflammatory cells in the interstitium of the lungs, predominantly comprising neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemistry showed increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in mononuclear cells accumulated in the interstitium in the injury group. Pretreatment with PEEP or an iNOS inhibitor (1400 W) attenuated hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lung. In conclusion, the data suggest that atelectasis induced by thoracotomy causes lung injury during mechanical ventilation in endotoxemic rats through iNOS expression. PMID:18583875

  2. Atelectasis induced by thoracotomy causes lung injury during mechanical ventilation in endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Kwon, Kun Young; Kim, Jin Mo; Quinn, Deborah A; Hales, Charles A; Seo, Jeong Wook

    2008-06-01

    Atelectasis can impair arterial oxygenation and decrease lung compliance. However, the effects of atelectasis on endotoxemic lungs during ventilation have not been well studied. We hypothesized that ventilation at low volumes below functional residual capacity (FRC) would accentuate lung injury in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-pretreated rats. LPS-pretreated rats were ventilated with room air at 85 breaths/min for 2 hr at a tidal volume of 10 mL/kg with or without thoracotomy. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was applied to restore FRC in the thoracotomy group. While LPS or thoracotomy alone did not cause significant injury, the combination of endotoxemia and thoracotomy caused significant hypoxemia and hypercapnia. The injury was observed along with a marked accumulation of inflammatory cells in the interstitium of the lungs, predominantly comprising neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemistry showed increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in mononuclear cells accumulated in the interstitium in the injury group. Pretreatment with PEEP or an iNOS inhibitor (1400 W) attenuated hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lung. In conclusion, the data suggest that atelectasis induced by thoracotomy causes lung injury during mechanical ventilation in endotoxemic rats through iNOS expression.

  3. Injury and repair in the very immature lung following brief mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Hooper, Stuart B; Allison, Beth J; Wallace, Megan J; Harding, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) of very premature infants contributes to lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the effects of which can be long-lasting. Little is currently known about the ability of the very immature lung to recover from ventilator-induced lung injury. Our objective was to determine the ability of the injured very immature lung to repair in the absence of continued ventilation and to identify potential mechanisms. At 125 days gestational age (days GA, 0.85 of term), fetal sheep were partially exposed by hysterotomy under anesthesia and aseptic conditions; they were intubated and ventilated for 2 h with an injurious MV protocol and then returned to the uterus to continue development. Necropsy was performed at either 1 day (short-term group, 126 days GA, n = 6) or 15 days (long-term group, 140 days GA, n = 5) after MV; controls were unventilated (n = 7-8). At 1 day after MV, lungs displayed signs of injury, including hemorrhage, disorganized elastin and collagen deposition in the distal airspaces, altered morphology, significantly reduced secondary septal crest density, and decreased airspace. Bronchioles had thickened epithelium with evidence of injury and sloughing. Relative mRNA levels of early response genes (connective tissue growth factor, cysteine-rich 61, and early growth response-1) and proinflammatory cytokines [interleukins (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β] were not different between groups 1 day after MV. At 15 days after MV, lung structure was normal with no evidence of injury. We conclude that 2 h of MV induces severe injury in the very immature lung and that these lungs have the capacity to repair spontaneously in the absence of further ventilation.

  4. Effects of ventilation strategy on distribution of lung inflammatory cell activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Leukocyte infiltration is central to the development of acute lung injury, but it is not known how mechanical ventilation strategy alters the distribution or activation of inflammatory cells. We explored how protective (vs. injurious) ventilation alters the magnitude and distribution of lung leukocyte activation following systemic endotoxin administration. Methods Anesthetized sheep received intravenous endotoxin (10 ng/kg/min) followed by 2 h of either injurious or protective mechanical ventilation (n = 6 per group). We used positron emission tomography to obtain images of regional perfusion and shunting with infused 13N[nitrogen]-saline and images of neutrophilic inflammation with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). The Sokoloff model was used to quantify 18F-FDG uptake (Ki), as well as its components: the phosphorylation rate (k3, a surrogate of hexokinase activity) and the distribution volume of 18F-FDG (Fe) as a fraction of lung volume (Ki = Fe × k3). Regional gas fractions (fgas) were assessed by examining transmission scans. Results Before endotoxin administration, protective (vs. injurious) ventilation was associated with a higher ratio of partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) (351 ± 117 vs. 255 ± 74 mmHg; P < 0.01) and higher whole-lung fgas (0.71 ± 0.12 vs. 0.48 ± 0.08; P = 0.004), as well as, in dependent regions, lower shunt fractions. Following 2 h of endotoxemia, PaO2/FiO2 ratios decreased in both groups, but more so with injurious ventilation, which also increased the shunt fraction in dependent lung. Protective ventilation resulted in less nonaerated lung (20-fold; P < 0.01) and more normally aerated lung (14-fold; P < 0.01). Ki was lower during protective (vs. injurious) ventilation, especially in dependent lung regions (0.0075 ± 0.0043/min vs. 0.0157 ± 0.0072/min; P < 0.01). 18F-FDG phosphorylation rate (k3) was twofold higher with injurious ventilation and accounted for most of

  5. Partial liquid ventilation shows dose-dependent increase in oxygenation with PEEP and decreases lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Suh, G Y; Chung, M P; Park, S J; Koh, Y; Kang, K W; Kim, H; Han, J; Rhee, C H; Kwon, O J

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) during partial liquid ventilation (PLV) and to investigate if lung damage associated with mechanical ventilation can be reduced by PLV. Twenty-two New-Zealand white rabbits were ventilated in pressure-controlled mode maintaining constant tidal volume (10 mL/kg). Lung injury was induced by repeated saline lavage (PaO2 < 100 mm Hg). Two incremental PEEP steps maneuvers (IPSMs) from 2 to 10 cm H2O in 2 cm H2O steps were performed sequentially. The control group received the first IPSM in the supine position and were turned prone for the second IPSM. In the PLV group (n = 7), 12 mL/kg of perfluorodecalin was instilled after lung injury before the two IPSMs. The early prone group (n = 7) received both IPSMs in the prone position. Parameters of gas exchange, lung mechanics, and hemodynamics as well as pathology were examined. During the first IPSM, the PLV group showed a significant increase in PaO2 after instillation of perfluorodecalin (P < .05) and then showed a dose-dependent increase in PaO2 with PEER. The control and EP groups showed improvement in PaO2 only at higher PEEP, eventually showing no intergroup differences at PEEP of 10 cm H2O. During the second IPSM only the PLV group retained its ability to increase PaO2 to the level obtained during the first IPSM (P < .05 compared with control and EP groups). During the first IPSM all three groups showed increasing trend in static compliance (Cst) with PEEP peaking at PEEP of 8 cm H2O. During the second IPSM, only the PLV group showed increase in static compliance with PEEP (P < .05 compared with other groups). Lung histology revealed significantly less hyaline membrane formation in the PLV group (P < .05). PLV shows dose-dependent increase in oxygenation with PEEP and may reduce lung damage associated with mechanical ventilation.

  6. Mechanism of Reduced Lung Injury by High Frequency Nasal Ventilation in a Preterm Lamb Model of Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rehan, Virender K.; Fong, Jeanette; Lee, Robert; Sakurai, Reiko; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Dahl, Mar Janna; Lane, Robert H.; Albertine, Kurt H.; Torday, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the potentially beneficial effects of the “gentler” modes of ventilation on chronic lung disease (CLD) of the premature infant is not known. We have previously demonstrated that alveolar Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein-Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptorγ (PTHrP-PPARγ) signaling is critically important in alveolar formation, and this signaling pathway is disrupted in hyperoxia- and/or volutrauma-induced neonatal rat lung injury. Whether the same paradigm is also applicable to CLD, resulting from prolonged intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV), and whether differential effects of the mode of ventilation on the PTHrP-PPARγ signaling pathway explain the potential benefits of the “gentler” modes of ventilation are not known. Using a well-established preterm lamb model of neonatal CLD, we tested the hypothesis that ventilatory support using high-frequency nasal ventilation (HFNV) promotes alveolar PTHrP-PPARγ signaling, whereas IMV inhibits it. Preterm lambs managed by HFNV or IMV for 21 days following preterm delivery at 132-day gestation were studied by Western hybridization and immunofluorescence labeling for key markers of alveolar homeostasis and injury/repair. In lambs managed by IMV, the abundance of key homeostatic alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal markers was reduced, whereas it was significantly increased in the HFNV group, providing a potential molecular mechanism by which “gentler” modes of ventilation reduce neonatal CLD. PMID:21814155

  7. Abnormal ventilation scans in middle-aged smokers. Comparison with tests of overall lung function

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, S.J.; Cunningham, D.A.; Lavender, J.P.; Gibellino, F.; Connellan, S.J.; Pride, N.B.

    1985-07-01

    The uniformity of regional ventilation during tidal breathing has been assessed using continuous inhalation of krypton-81m in 43 male, lifelong nonsmokers and 46 male, current cigarette smokers (mean daily consumption 24.1 cigarettes/day) between 44 and 61 yr of age and with mild or no respiratory symptoms. All subjects had normal chest radiographs. The results of the ventilation scans were compared with tests of overall lung function (spirometry, maximal expiratory flow-volume curves, and single-breath N2 test). Diffuse abnormalities of the ventilation scan were found in 19 (41%) of the 46 smokers but in none of the nonsmokers. Focal abnormalities were found in 7 smokers and 3 nonsmokers. Smokers showed the expected abnormalities in overall lung function (reduced FEV1 and VC, increased single-breath N2 slope, and closing volume), but in individual smokers there was only a weak relation between the severity of abnormality of overall lung function and an abnormal ventilation scan. Abnormal scans could be found when overall lung function was normal and were not invariably found when significant abnormalities in FEV1/VC or N2 slope were present. There was no relation between the presence of chronic expectoration and an abnormal scan. The prognostic significance of an abnormal ventilation scan in such smokers remains to be established.

  8. MULTI-FREQUENCY OSCILLATORY VENTILATION IN THE PREMATURE LUNG: EFFECTS ON GAS EXCHANGE, MECHANICS, AND VENTILATION DISTRIBUTION

    PubMed Central

    Kaczka, David W.; Herrmann, Jacob; Zonneveld, C. Elroy; Tingay, David G.; Lavizzari, Anna; Noble, Peter B.; Pillow, J. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the theoretical benefits of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) in preterm infants, systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials do not confirm improved outcomes. We hypothesized that oscillating a premature lung with multiple frequencies simultaneously would improve gas exchange compared to traditional single-frequency oscillatory ventilation (SFOV). The goal of this study was to develop a novel method for HFOV, termed ‘multi-frequency oscillatory ventilation’ (MFOV), which relies on a broadband flow waveform more suitable for the heterogeneous mechanics of the immature lung. Methods Thirteen intubated preterm lambs were randomized to either SFOV or MFOV for 1 hour, followed by crossover to the alternative regimen for 1 hour. The SFOV waveform consisted of a pure sinusoidal flow at 5 Hz, while the customized MFOV waveform consisted of a 5 Hz fundamental with additional energy at 10 and 15 Hz. Per standardized protocol, mean pressure at airway opening (P̅ao) and inspired O2 fraction were adjusted as needed, and root mean square of the delivered oscillatory volume waveform (Vrms) was adjusted 15-minute intervals. A ventilatory cost function for SFOV and MFOV was defined as VC=(Vrms2PaCO2)Wt−1, where Wt denotes body weight. Results Averaged over all time points, MFOV resulted in significantly lower VC (246.9±6.0 vs. 363.5±15.9 mL2 mmHg kg−1) and P̅ao (12.8±0.3 vs. 14.1±0.5 cmH2O) compared to SFOV, suggesting more efficient gas exchange and enhanced lung recruitment at lower mean airway pressures. Conclusions Oscillation with simultaneous multiple frequencies may be a more efficient ventilator modality in premature lungs compared to traditional single-frequency HFOV. PMID:26495977

  9. Clinical implications of increased lung uptake of /sup 201/Tl during exercise scintigraphy 2 weeks after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, R.S.; Watson, D.D.; Carabello, B.A.; Holt, N.D.; Beller, G.A.

    1982-05-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical significance of increased lung /sup 201/Tl uptake during submaximal exercise myocardial scintigraphy performed 2 weeks after acute myocardial infarction, 61 patients underwent submaximal exercise testing (target heart rate, 120 beats/min), multigated blood pool imaging at rest and coronary angiography before hospital discharge. Thallium lung uptake on the initial anterior projection image was graded qualitatively by comparing the intensity of /sup 201/Tl activity in the lungs with that in the mediastinum. In 39 patients (64 percent), it was normal (equal to mediastinal activity) and in 22 (36 percent), it was increased (greater than mediastinal activity). Compared with patients with normal lung uptake, those with increased uptake had a greater prevalence of prior infarction (13 versus 36 percent, probability (p) less than 0.05), less global cardiac reserve as assessed by the four level New York Heart Association classification (p less than 0.05), more advanced Killip class in the coronary care unit (p less than 0.05), a higher Norris coronary prognostic index (2.6 +/- 1.9 versus 4.6 +/- 2.3 (mean +/- standard deviation), p less than 0.01), failure to achieve the target heart rate because of dyspnea, fatigue or angina (36 versus 86 percent, p less than 0.01), a greater prevalence of exercise-induced S-T segment depression (18 versus 45 percent, p less than 0.05), a greater number of anterior /sup 201/Tl myocardial defects (p less than 0.05); a lower radionuclide ejection fraction at rest (50.4 +/- 6.1 versus 39.6 +/- 9.3 percent, p less than 0.01) and a greater number of asynergic left ventricular segments (p less than 0.05). Thus, the occurrence of increased lung /sup 201/Tl uptake during submaximal exercise scintigraphy in the early postinfarction period is frequent and appears to be a marker of severe and functionally more important coronary artery disease associated with left ventricular dysfunction.

  10. Perioperative lung-protective ventilation strategy reduces postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing thoracic and major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications is strongly associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged postoperative hospital stays. Although protective lung ventilation is commonly used in the intensive care unit, low tidal volume ventilation in the operating room is not a routine strategy. Low tidal volume ventilation, moderate positive end-expiratory pressure, and repeated recruitment maneuvers, particularly for high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, can reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Facilitating perioperative bundle care by combining prophylactic and postoperative positive-pressure ventilation with intraoperative lung-protective ventilation may be helpful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26885294

  11. Ventilator-associated pneumonia and ICU mortality in severe ARDS patients ventilated according to a lung-protective strategy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) may contribute to the mortality associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to determine the incidence, outcome, and risk factors of bacterial VAP complicating severe ARDS in patients ventilated by using a strictly standardized lung-protective strategy. Methods This prospective epidemiologic study was done in all the 339 patients with severe ARDS included in a multicenter randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind trial of cisatracurium besylate in severe ARDS patients. Patients with suspected VAP underwent bronchoalveolar lavage to confirm the diagnosis. Results Ninety-eight (28.9%) patients had at least one episode of microbiologically documented bacterial VAP, including 41 (41.8%) who died in the ICU, compared with 74 (30.7%) of the 241 patients without VAP (P = 0.05). After adjustment, age and severity at baseline, but not VAP, were associated with ICU death. Cisatracurium besylate therapy within 2 days of ARDS onset decreased the risk of ICU death. Factors independently associated with an increased risk to develop a VAP were male sex and worse admission Glasgow Coma Scale score. Tracheostomy, enteral nutrition, and the use of a subglottic secretion-drainage device were protective. Conclusions In patients with severe ARDS receiving lung-protective ventilation, VAP was associated with an increased crude ICU mortality which did not remain significant after adjustment. PMID:22524447

  12. Successful one-lung ventilation in a patient with the Fontan circulation undergoing thoracoscopic procedure.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovic, Draginja; Ramzy, Wassim; Vitale, Salvatore; Malekan, Ramin; Warsy, Irfan

    2014-12-01

    Over the course of the past 4 decades, the survival of patients with the Fontan circulation has improved and today they often present for noncardiac surgery anesthesia care. In patients with the Fontan circulation, pulmonary blood flow is passive and anesthetic management is directed at reducing pulmonary vascular resistance and maintaining adequate cardiac output. One-lung ventilation can have unfavorable effects on the Fontan circulation due to hypoxia, hypercarbia, and increased airway pressure. We present a case of successful one-lung ventilation in a patient with the Fontan circulation and describe the perioperative anesthetic management.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging provides sensitive in vivo assessment of experimental ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kuethe, Dean O.; Filipczak, Piotr T.; Hix, Jeremy M.; Gigliotti, Andrew P.; Estépar, Raúl San José; Washko, George R.; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2016-01-01

    Animal models play a critical role in the study of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). One limitation has been the lack of a suitable method for serial assessment of acute lung injury (ALI) in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess ALI in real time in rat models of VILI. Sprague-Dawley rats were untreated or treated with intratracheal lipopolysaccharide or PBS. After 48 h, animals were mechanically ventilated for up to 15 h to induce VILI. Free induction decay (FID)-projection images were made hourly. Image data were collected continuously for 30 min and divided into 13 phases of the ventilatory cycle to make cinematic images. Interleaved measurements of respiratory mechanics were performed using a flexiVent ventilator. The degree of lung infiltration was quantified in serial images throughout the progression or resolution of VILI. MRI detected VILI significantly earlier (3.8 ± 1.6 h) than it was detected by altered lung mechanics (9.5 ± 3.9 h, P = 0.0156). Animals with VILI had a significant increase in the Index of Infiltration (P = 0.0027), and early regional lung infiltrates detected by MRI correlated with edema and inflammatory lung injury on histopathology. We were also able to visualize and quantify regression of VILI in real time upon institution of protective mechanical ventilation. Magnetic resonance lung imaging can be utilized to investigate mechanisms underlying the development and propagation of ALI, and to test the therapeutic effects of new treatments and ventilator strategies on the resolution of ALI. PMID:27288491

  14. Bio-inspired, efficient, artificial lung employing air as the ventilating gas.

    PubMed

    Potkay, Joseph A; Magnetta, Michael; Vinson, Abigail; Cmolik, Brian

    2011-09-07

    Artificial lungs have recently been utilized to rehabilitate patients suffering from lung diseases. However, significant advances in gas exchange, biocompatibility, and portability are required to realize their full clinical potential. Here, we have focused on the issues of gas exchange and portability and report a small-scale, microfabricated artificial lung that uses new mathematical modeling and a bio-inspired design to achieve oxygen exchange efficiencies much larger than current devices, thereby enabling air to be utilized as the ventilating gas. This advancement eliminates the need for pure oxygen required by conventional artificial lung systems and is achieved through a device with feature sizes and structure similar to that in the natural lung. This advancement represents a significant step towards creating the first truly portable and implantable artificial lung systems for the ambulatory care of patients suffering from lung diseases.

  15. Role of Strain Rate in the Pathogenesis of Ventilator-Induced Lung Edema.

    PubMed

    Protti, Alessandro; Maraffi, Tommaso; Milesi, Marta; Votta, Emiliano; Santini, Alessandro; Pugni, Paola; Andreis, Davide T; Nicosia, Francesco; Zannin, Emanuela; Gatti, Stefano; Vaira, Valentina; Ferrero, Stefano; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2016-09-01

    Lungs behave as viscoelastic polymers. Harms of mechanical ventilation could then depend on not only amplitude (strain) but also velocity (strain rate) of lung deformation. Herein, we tested this hypothesis. Laboratory investigation. Animal unit. Thirty healthy piglets. Two groups of animals were ventilated for 54 hours with matched lung strains (ratio between tidal volume and functional residual capacity) but different lung strain rates (ratio between strain and inspiratory time). Individual strains ranged between 0.6 and 3.5 in both groups. Piglets ventilated with low strain rates had an inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratio of 1:2-1:3. Those ventilated with high strain rates had much lower inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratios (down to 1:9). Respiratory rate was always 15 breaths/min. Lung viscoelastic behavior, with ventilator setting required per protocol, was "quantified" as dynamic respiratory system hysteresis (pressure-volume loop [in Joules]) and stress relaxation (airway pressure drop during an end-inspiratory pause [in cm H2O]). Primary outcome was the occurrence of pulmonary edema within 54 hours. On average, the two study groups were ventilated with well-matched strains (2.1 ± 0.9 vs 2.1 ± 0.9; p = 0.864) but different strain rates (1.8 ± 0.8 vs 4.6 ± 1.5 s; p < 0.001), dynamic respiratory system hysteresis (0.6 ± 0.3 vs 1.4 ± 0.8 J; p = 0.001), and stress relaxation (3.1 ± 0.9 vs 5.0 ± 2.3 cm H2O; p = 0.008). The prevalence of pulmonary edema was 20% among piglets ventilated with low strain rates and 73% among those ventilated with high strain rates (p = 0.010). High strain rate is a risk factor for ventilator-induced pulmonary edema, possibly because it amplifies lung viscoelastic behavior.

  16. Cytokine & chemokine response in the lungs, pleural fluid and serum in thoracic surgery using one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thoracic surgery mandates usually a one-lung ventilation (OLV) strategy with the collapse of the operated lung and ventilation of the non-operated lung. These procedures trigger a substantial inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to analyze the cytokine and chemokine reaction in both lungs, pleural space and blood in patients undergoing lung resection with OLV with special interest in the chemokine growth-regulated peptide alpha (GROα) which is the human equivalent to the rat cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1). Methods Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of both the collapsed, operated and the ventilated, non-operated lung, respectively, pleural space drainage fluid and blood was collected and the concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1RA and GROα were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 15 patients. Results Substantial inter-individual differences in the BAL fluid between patients in cytokine and chemokine levels occurred. In the pleural fluid and the blood these inter-individual differences were less pronounced. Both sides of the lung were affected and showed a significant increase in IL-6 and IL-1RA concentrations over time but not in GROα concentrations. Except for IL-6, which increased more in the collapsed, operated lung, no difference between the collapsed, operated and the ventilated, non-operated lung occurred. In the blood, IL-6 and IL-1RA increased early, already at the end of surgery. GROα was not detectable. In the pleural fluid, both cytokine and chemokine concentrations increased by day one. The increase was significantly higher in the pleural fluid compared to the blood. Conclusion The inflammatory response of cytokines affects both the collapsed, operated and the ventilated, non-operated lungs. The difference in extent of response underlines the complexity of the inflammatory processes during OLV. In contrast to the cytokines, the chemokine GROα concentrations did not react in the

  17. Open lung approach with low tidal volume mechanical ventilation attenuates lung injury in rats with massive brain damage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ideal ventilation strategy for patients with massive brain damage requires better elucidation. We hypothesized that in the presence of massive brain injury, a ventilation strategy using low (6 milliliters per kilogram ideal body weight) tidal volume (VT) ventilation with open lung positive end-expiratory pressure (LVT/OLPEEP) set according to the minimal static elastance of the respiratory system, attenuates the impact of massive brain damage on gas-exchange, respiratory mechanics, lung histology and whole genome alterations compared with high (12 milliliters per kilogram ideal body weight) VT and low positive end-expiratory pressure ventilation (HVT/LPEEP). Methods In total, 28 adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: 1) no brain damage (NBD) with LVT/OLPEEP; 2) NBD with HVT/LPEEP; 3) brain damage (BD) with LVT/OLPEEP; and 4) BD with HVT/LPEEP. All animals were mechanically ventilated for six hours. Brain damage was induced by an inflated balloon catheter into the epidural space. Hemodynamics was recorded and blood gas analysis was performed hourly. At the end of the experiment, respiratory system mechanics and lung histology were analyzed. Genome wide gene expression profiling and subsequent confirmatory quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for selected genes were performed. Results In NBD, both LVT/OLPEEP and HVT/LPEEP did not affect arterial blood gases, as well as whole genome expression changes and real-time qPCR. In BD, LVT/OLPEEP, compared to HVT/LPEEP, improved oxygenation, reduced lung damage according to histology, genome analysis and real-time qPCR with decreased interleukin 6 (IL-6), cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (CINC)-1 and angiopoietin-4 expressions. LVT/OLPEEP compared to HVT/LPEEP improved overall survival. Conclusions In BD, LVT/OLPEEP minimizes lung morpho-functional changes and inflammation compared to HVT/LPEEP. PMID:24693992

  18. Automated lung outline reconstruction in ventilation-perfusion scans using principal component analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Serpen, G; Iyer, R; Elsamaloty, H M; Parsai, E I

    2003-03-01

    The present work addresses the development of an automated software-based system utilized in order to create an outline reconstruction of lung images from ventilation-perfusion scans for the purpose of diagnosing pulmonary embolism. The proposed diagnostic software procedure would require a standard set of digitized ventilation-perfusion scans in addition to correlated chest X-rays as key components in the identification of an ideal template match used to approximate and reconstruct the outline of the lungs. These reconstructed lung images would then be used to extract the necessary PIOPED-compliant features which would warrant a pulmonary embolism diagnosis. In order to evaluate this issue, two separate principal component analysis (PCA) algorithms were employed independently, including Eigenlungs, which was adapted from the Eigenfaces method, and an artificial neural network. The results obtained through MATLAB(TM) simulation indicated that lung outline reconstruction through the PCA approach carries significant viability.

  19. Comparative imaging of differential pulmonary blood flow in patients with congenital heart disease: magnetic resonance imaging versus lung perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Roman, Kevin S; Kellenberger, Christian J; Farooq, Saqba; MacGowan, Christopher K; Gilday, David L; Yoo, Shi-Joon

    2005-03-01

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is considered the gold standard to assess differential pulmonary blood flow while magnetic resonance (MR) has been shown to be an accurate alternative in some studies. The purpose of the study was to assess the accuracy of phase contrast magnetic resonance (PC-MR) in measuring pulmonary blood flow ratio compared with lung perfusion scintigraphy in patients with complex pulmonary artery anatomy or pulmonary hypertension and to document reasons for discrepant results. We identified 25 cases of congenital heart disease between January 2000 and 2003, in whom both techniques of assessing pulmonary blood flow were performed within a 6-month period without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention. The study group included cases with branch pulmonary artery stenosis, intracardiac shunts, single ventricle circulation, pulmonary venous anomalies and conotruncal defects. The mean age at study was 5.7 years (range 0.33-12) with a mean weight of 20.3 kg (range 6.5-53.6). The two methods were compared using a Bland-Altman analysis, and the Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated using the lung scan as the gold standard. Discrepant results were examined by reviewing the source images to elucidate reasons for error by MR. Bland-Altman analysis comparing right pulmonary artery (RPA) blood flow percentage, as measured by each modality, showed a mean difference of 1.43+/-9.8 (95% limits of agreement: -17.8, 20.6) with a correlation coefficient of r=0.84, P<0.0001. In six (24%) cases a large difference (>10%) was found with a mean difference between techniques of 17.9%. The reasons for discrepant results included MR artifacts, dephasing owing to turbulent flow, site of data acquisition and lobar lung collapse. When using PC-MR to assess pulmonary blood flow ratio, important technical errors occur in a significant proportion of patients who have abnormal pulmonary artery anatomy or pulmonary hypertension. If these technical errors are avoided

  20. Effects of unilateral PEEP on biomechanics of both lungs during independent lung ventilation in patients anaesthetised for thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Trela-Stachurska, Katarzyna; Nestorowicz, Andrzej; Kotlińska-Hasiec, Edyta; Sawulski, Sławomir; Dąbrowski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous independent lung ventilation (ILV) is the treatment of choice for unilateral pathology of lung parenchyma. Numerous studies have documented the improved blood oxygenation and clinical efficacy of this procedure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ILV on the selected biomechanical parameters of the lungs. The study involved ASA I-II patients undergoing thoracic surgery in the lateral decubitus position under the standard conditions of general anaesthesia with the thoracic cavity closed. ILV with equal separation of the tidal volume was performed with a prototype volume separator, using incremental a PEEP of 0-15 cm H₂O in the dependent lung. Peak pressures, dynamic compliance and airway resistance of both lungs were evaluated. The study included 36 patients. In all of the patients, a PEEP of 5-15 cm H₂O in one lung increased its peak pressures, dynamic compliance and resistances, and variably affected the biomechanical parameters of the other lung. Irrespective of patient positioning on the right or left side, the highest compliance was recorded at a PEEP of 10 cm H₂O. In ILV, peak pressures and airway resistances are higher in the dependent lung compared to compliances in the non-dependent lung. ILV with a PEEP of 5-15 cm H₂O increases the biomechanical parameters of the dependent lung while variably influencing the parameters in the non-dependent lung.

  1. Positive End-Expiratory Pressure and Variable Ventilation in Lung-Healthy Rats under General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Luciana M.; Ávila, Mariana B.; Cruz, Luis Felipe S.; Ribeiro, Gabriel C. M.; Spieth, Peter M.; Reske, Andreas A.; Amato, Marcelo; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Zin, Walter A.; Carvalho, Alysson R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Variable ventilation (VV) seems to improve respiratory function in acute lung injury and may be combined with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in order to protect the lungs even in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that VV in combination with moderate levels of PEEP reduce the deterioration of pulmonary function related to general anesthesia. Hence, we aimed at evaluating the alveolar stability and lung protection of the combination of VV at different PEEP levels. Design Randomized experimental study. Setting Animal research facility. Subjects Forty-nine male Wistar rats (200–270 g). Interventions Animals were ventilated during 2 hours with protective low tidal volume (VT) in volume control ventilation (VCV) or VV and PEEP adjusted at the level of minimum respiratory system elastance (Ers), obtained during a decremental PEEP trial subsequent to a recruitment maneuver, and 2 cmH2O above or below of this level. Measurements and Main Results Ers, gas exchange and hemodynamic variables were measured. Cytokines were determined in lung homogenate and plasma samples and left lung was used for histologic analysis and diffuse alveolar damage scoring. A progressive time-dependent increase in Ers was observed independent on ventilatory mode or PEEP level. Despite of that, the rate of increase of Ers and lung tissue IL-1 beta concentration were significantly lower in VV than in VCV at the level of the PEEP of minimum Ers. A significant increase in lung tissue cytokines (IL-6, IL-1 beta, CINC-1 and TNF-alpha) as well as a ventral to dorsal and cranial to caudal reduction in aeration was observed in all ventilated rats with no significant differences among groups. Conclusions VV combined with PEEP adjusted at the level of the PEEP of minimal Ers seemed to better prevent anesthesia-induced atelectasis and might improve lung protection throughout general anesthesia. PMID:25383882

  2. [Synopsis of computed tomography, scintigraphy and bronchoscopy in the diagnosis of bronchial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Beyer-Enke, S A; Clorius, J; Becker, H; Goerich, J; Probst, G; van Kaick, G

    1988-08-01

    In 87 patients with histologically proven bronchogenic carcinoma, computerised tomography (CT) and bronchoscopy were performed to assess the accuracy of CT in detecting bronchial stenosis. Whereas patent airways and mainstem stenosis were recognised in 85% of the cases, the overall accuracy was only 57%. Furthermore, the results of both methods were compared to scintigraphy (ventilation, perfusion) to evaluate the functional impairment due to altered lung morphology and bronchial stenosis. With an increasing number of CT-diagnosed atelectatic or infiltrated segments an almost linear decrease in ventilation and perfusion values was observed. In comparison, bronchoscopy-diagnosed tumour stenosis resulted in decreased ventilation and perfusion data only if the lesion was centrally located.

  3. Protective ventilation reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth in lung tissue in a porcine pneumonia model.

    PubMed

    Sperber, Jesper; Nyberg, Axel; Lipcsey, Miklos; Melhus, Åsa; Larsson, Anders; Sjölin, Jan; Castegren, Markus

    2017-08-31

    Mechanical ventilation with positive end expiratory pressure and low tidal volume, i.e. protective ventilation, is recommended in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the effect of protective ventilation on bacterial growth during early pneumonia in non-injured lungs is not extensively studied. The main objectives were to compare two different ventilator settings on Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth in lung tissue and the development of lung injury. A porcine model of severe pneumonia was used. The protective group (n = 10) had an end expiratory pressure of 10 cm H2O and a tidal volume of 6 ml x kg(-1). The control group (n = 10) had an end expiratory pressure of 5 cm H2O and a tidal volume of 10 ml x kg(-1). 10(11) colony forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were inoculated intra-tracheally at baseline, after which the experiment continued for 6 h. Two animals from each group received only saline, and served as sham animals. Lung tissue samples from each animal were used for bacterial cultures and wet-to-dry weight ratio measurements. The protective group displayed lower numbers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (p < 0.05) in the lung tissue, and a lower wet-to-dry ratio (p < 0.01) than the control group. The control group deteriorated in arterial oxygen tension/inspired oxygen fraction, whereas the protective group was unchanged (p < 0.01). In early phase pneumonia, protective ventilation with lower tidal volume and higher end expiratory pressure has the potential to reduce the pulmonary bacterial burden and the development of lung injury.

  4. CT opacity in the lungs was preceded by increased MDP activity on bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Song, Le; Zhang, Weifang; Zhang, Yanyan

    2014-11-01

    Elevated 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake in the left lung was demonstrated in a 41-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Lung infection was considered because the patient also had fever and pancytopenia. However, the thoracic CT performed the next day did not reveal abnormality which could explain the cause of left lung MDP activity. The repeated thoracic CTs weeks later demonstrated multiple ground-glass opacity in the left lung.

  5. Teaching Ventilation/Perfusion Relationships in the Lung

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenny, Robb W.

    2008-01-01

    This brief review is meant to serve as a refresher for faculty teaching respiratory physiology to medical students. The concepts of ventilation and perfusion matching are some of the most challenging ideas to learn and teach. Some strategies to consider in teaching these concepts are, first, to build from simple to more complex by starting with a…

  6. Teaching Ventilation/Perfusion Relationships in the Lung

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenny, Robb W.

    2008-01-01

    This brief review is meant to serve as a refresher for faculty teaching respiratory physiology to medical students. The concepts of ventilation and perfusion matching are some of the most challenging ideas to learn and teach. Some strategies to consider in teaching these concepts are, first, to build from simple to more complex by starting with a…

  7. Mechanical ventilation injury and repair in extremely and very preterm lungs.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Hooper, Stuart B; Zahra, Valerie; Wallace, Megan; Harding, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Extremely preterm infants often receive mechanical ventilation (MV), which can contribute to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). However, the effects of MV alone on the extremely preterm lung and the lung's capacity for repair are poorly understood. To characterise lung injury induced by MV alone, and mechanisms of injury and repair, in extremely preterm lungs and to compare them with very preterm lungs. Extremely preterm lambs (0.75 of term) were transiently exposed by hysterotomy and underwent 2 h of injurious MV. Lungs were collected 24 h and at 15 d after MV. Immunohistochemistry and morphometry were used to characterise injury and repair processes. qRT-PCR was performed on extremely and very preterm (0.85 of term) lungs 24 h after MV to assess molecular injury and repair responses. 24 h after MV at 0.75 of term, lung parenchyma and bronchioles were severely injured; tissue space and myofibroblast density were increased, collagen and elastin fibres were deformed and secondary crest density was reduced. Bronchioles contained debris and their epithelium was injured and thickened. 24 h after MV at 0.75 and 0.85 of term, mRNA expression of potential mediators of lung repair were significantly increased. By 15 days after MV, most lung injury had resolved without treatment. Extremely immature lungs, particularly bronchioles, are severely injured by 2 h of MV. In the absence of continued ventilation these injured lungs are capable of repair. At 24 h after MV, genes associated with injurious MV are unaltered, while potential repair genes are activated in both extremely and very preterm lungs.

  8. The effect of positive end expiratory pressure on the respiratory profile during one-lung ventilation for thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Leong, L M C; Chatterjee, S; Gao, F

    2007-01-01

    Summary In this randomised controlled trial we examined the effects of four different levels of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP at 0, 5, 8 or 10 cmH(2)O), added to the dependent lung, on respiratory profile and oxygenation during one lung ventilation. Forty-six patients were recruited to receive one of the randomised PEEP levels during one lung ventilation. We did not find significant differences in lung compliance, intra-operative or postoperative oxygenation amongst the four different groups. However, the physiological deadspace to tidal volume ventilation ratio was significantly lower in the 8 cmH(2)O PEEP group compared with the other levels of PEEP (p < 0.0001). We concluded that the use of PEEP (< or =10 cmH(2)O) during one lung ventilation does not clinically improve lung compliance, intra-operative or postoperative oxygenation despite a statistically significant reduction in the physiological deadspace to tidal volume ratio.

  9. Non-invasive ventilation in prone position for refractory hypoxemia after bilateral lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Serra, Eugenio; Barbieri, Stefania; Persona, Paolo; Rea, Federico; Loy, Monica; Ori, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Temporary graft dysfunction with gas exchange abnormalities is a common finding during the postoperative course of a lung transplant and is often determined by the post-reimplantation syndrome. Supportive measures including oxygen by mask, inotropes, diuretics, and pulmonary vasodilators are usually effective in non-severe post-reimplantation syndromes. However, in less-responsive clinical pictures, tracheal intubation with positive pressure ventilation, or non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV), is necessary. We report on the clinical course of two patients suffering from refractory hypoxemia due to post-reimplantation syndrome treated with NIV in the prone and Trendelenburg positions. NIV was well tolerated and led to resolution of atelectactic areas and dishomogeneous lung infiltrates. Repeated turning from supine to prone under non invasive ventilation determined a stable improvement of gas exchange and prevented a more invasive approach. Even though NIV in the prone position has not yet entered into clinical practice, it could be an interesting option to achieve a better match between ventilation and perfusion. This technique, which we successfully applied in lung transplantation, can be easily extended to other lung diseases with non-recruitable dorso-basal areas.

  10. A General Approach to the Evaluation of Ventilation-Perfusion Ratios in Normal and Abnormal Lungs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Peter D.

    1977-01-01

    Outlines methods for manipulating multiple gas data so as to gain the greatest amount of insight into the properties of ventilation-perfusion distributions. Refers to data corresponding to normal and abnormal lungs. Uses a two-dimensional framework with the respiratory gases of oxygen and carbon dioxide. (CS)

  11. Measurement of lung volume and ventilation distribution with an ultrasonic flow meter in healthy infants.

    PubMed

    Schibler, A; Hall, G L; Businger, F; Reinmann, B; Wildhaber, J H; Cernelc, M; Frey, U

    2002-10-01

    Small airway disease in infants is characterised by abnormal lung volume and uneven ventilation distribution. An inert tracer gas washin/washout technique using a pulsed ultrasonic flow meter is presented to measure functional residual capacity (FRC) and ventilation distribution in spontaneously breathing and unsedated infants. With a pulsed ultrasound sent through the main stream of the flow meter, flow, volume and MM of the breathing gas can be calculated. Sulphur hexafluoride was used as a tracer gas. In a mechanical lung model (volume range 53-188 mL) and in 12 healthy infants (aged 38.3+/-9.2 days; mean+/-SD) accuracy and reproducibility of the technique was assessed. Indices of ventilation distribution such as alveolar-based mean dilution number (AMDN) and pulmonary clearance delay (PCD) were calculated. Mean error of volume measurement in the lung model was 0.58% (coefficient of variance (CV) 1.3%). FRC was in the low predicted range for normal infants (18.0+/-2.0 mL x kg(-1)) and highly reproducible (5.5+/-1.7% intra-subject CV). AMDN was 1.63+/-0.15 and PCD was 52.9+/-11.1%. Measurement of functional residual capacity and ventilation distribution using a sulphur hexafluoride washin/washout and an ultrasonic flow meter proved to be highly accurate and reproducible in a lung model and in healthy, spontaneously breathing and unsedated infants.

  12. Rap1 mediates protective effects of iloprost against ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Birukova, Anna A.; Fu, Panfeng; Xing, Junjie

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) has been shown to attenuate vascular constriction, hyperpermeability, inflammation, and acute lung injury. However, molecular mechanisms of PGI2 protective effects on pulmonary endothelial cells (EC) are not well understood. We tested a role of cAMP-activated Epac-Rap1 pathway in the barrier protective effects of PGI2 analog iloprost in the murine model of ventilator-induced lung injury. Mice were treated with iloprost (2 μg/kg) after onset of high tidal volume ventilation (30 ml/kg, 4 h). Bronchoalveolar lavage, histological analysis, and measurements of Evans blue accumulation were performed. In vitro, microvascular EC barrier function was assessed by morphological analysis of agonist-induced gap formation and monitoring of Rho pathway activation and EC permeability. Iloprost reduced bronchoalveolar lavage protein content, neutrophil accumulation, capillary filtration coefficient, and Evans blue albumin extravasation caused by high tidal volume ventilation. Small-interfering RNA-based Rap1 knockdown inhibited protective effects of iloprost. In vitro, iloprost increased barrier properties of lung microvascular endothelium and alleviated thrombin-induced EC barrier disruption. In line with in vivo results, Rap1 depletion attenuated protective effects of iloprost in the thrombin model of EC permeability. These data describe for the first time protective effects for Rap1-dependent signaling against ventilator-induced lung injury and pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:19850733

  13. A General Approach to the Evaluation of Ventilation-Perfusion Ratios in Normal and Abnormal Lungs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Peter D.

    1977-01-01

    Outlines methods for manipulating multiple gas data so as to gain the greatest amount of insight into the properties of ventilation-perfusion distributions. Refers to data corresponding to normal and abnormal lungs. Uses a two-dimensional framework with the respiratory gases of oxygen and carbon dioxide. (CS)

  14. Lung hypoplasia in newborn rabbits with a diaphragmatic hernia affects pulmonary ventilation but not perfusion.

    PubMed

    Flemmer, Andreas W; Thio, Marta; Wallace, Megan J; Lee, Katie; Kitchen, Marcus J; Kerr, Lauren; Roehr, Charles C; Fouras, Andreas; Carnibella, Richard; Jani, Jaccques C; DeKoninck, Philip; Te Pas, Arjan B; Pearson, James T; Hooper, Stuart B

    2017-09-01

    BackgroundA congenital diaphragmatic hernia (DH) can result in severe lung hypoplasia that increases the risk of morbidity and mortality after birth; however, little is known about the cardiorespiratory transition at birth.MethodsUsing phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography, we examined the cardiorespiratory transition at birth in rabbit kittens with DHs. Surgery was performed on pregnant New Zealand white rabbits (n=18) at 25 days' gestation to induce a left-sided DH. Kittens were delivered at 30 days' gestation, intubated, and ventilated to achieve a tidal volume (Vt) of 8 ml/kg in control and 4 ml/kg in DH kittens while they were imaged.ResultsFunctional residual capacity (FRC) recruitment and Vt in the hypoplastic left lung were markedly reduced, resulting in a disproportionate distribution of FRC into the right lung. Following lung aeration, relative pulmonary blood flow (PBF) increased equally in both lungs, and the increase in pulmonary venous return was similar in both control and DH kittens.ConclusionThese findings indicate that nonuniform lung hypoplasia caused by DH alters the distribution of ventilation away from hypoplastic and into normally grown lung regions. During transition, the increase in PBF and pulmonary venous return, which is vital for maintaining cardiac output, is not affected by lung hypoplasia.

  15. [99mTc-octreotide receptor scintigraphy in NCI-H446 small cell lung cancer nude mice model].

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zuo, Shuyao; Wang, Xufu; Liu, Xinfeng; Wang, Guoming; Wu, Fengyu

    2015-01-01

    For highly aggressive small cell lung cancer (SCLC), early diagnosis is important for its prognosis, but the current inspection methods are more limited, with poor specificity of the traditional imaging methods, and the high cost of PET/CT, difficult to popularization and application. SCLC is kind of neuroendocrine tumors, high expression of somatostatin receptors, which is the cornerstone of its early molecular imaging diagnosis. The aim of this study is to observe the biodistribution and metabolism of 99mTc-octreotide in normal and the human SCLC bearing nude mice. Dynamic and static scintigraphy at 0.5 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h were performed in both normal and tumor bearing nude mice after intravenous injection of 99mTc-octreotide. The technique of drawing region of interest (ROI) was used to obtain the averaged pixel counts and the activity-time (A-T) curve of brain, heart, lung, liver, kidney, tumor, respectively. ① The biodistribution study in normal nude mice showed highest uptake in kidney and liver, lower in lung and heart, lowest in brain. Most 99mTc-octreotide was excreted via kidney. ② All tumors were displayed clearly at 3 h postinjection of 99mTc-octreotide. The averaged T/N ratio at 0.5 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h postinjection of 99mTc-octreotide was 1.163 ± 0.03, 2.08 ± 0.12, 3.03 ± 0.23, 2.689 ± 0.31, respectively (F=51.69, P<0.000,1). The radioactivity of tumor was lower than liver, and similar with the lung. The curve of tumor showed a radioactivity peak at 2 min-3 min postinjection. 99mTc-octreotide receptor imaging on nude mice bearing SCLC shares high positive rate, especially at 3 h postinjection.

  16. The effects of prolonged inspiratory time during one-lung ventilation: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Kim, W H; Ahn, H J; Kim, J A; Yang, M K; Lee, C H; Lee, J H; Kim, Y R; Choi, J W

    2013-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of a prolonged inspiratory time on gas exchange in subjects undergoing one-lung ventilation for thoracic surgery. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to Group I:E = 1:2 or Group I:E = 1:1. Arterial blood gas analysis and respiratory mechanics measurements were performed 10 min after anaesthesia induction, 30 and 60 min after initiation of one-lung ventilation, and 15 min after restoration of conventional two-lung ventilation. The mean (SD) ratio of the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen after 60 min of one-lung ventilation was significantly lower in Group I:E = 1:2 compared with Group I:E = 1:1 (27.7 (13.2) kPa vs 35.2 (22.1) kPa, respectively, p = 0.043). Mean (SD) physiological dead space-to-tidal volume ratio after 60 min of one-lung ventilation was significantly higher in Group I:E = 1:2 compared with Group I:E = 1:1 (0.46 (0.04) vs 0.43 (0.04), respectively, p = 0.008). Median (IQR [range]) peak inspiratory pressure was higher in Group I:E = 1:2 compared with Group I:E = 1:1 after 60 min of one-lung ventilation (23 (22-25 [18-29]) cmH2O vs 20 (18-21 [16-27]) cmH2O, respectively, p < 0.001) and median (IQR [range]) mean airway pressure was lower in Group I:E = 1:2 compared with Group I:E = 1:1 (10 (8-11 [5-15]) cmH2O vs 11 (10-13 [5-16]) cmH2O, respectively, p < 0.001). We conclude that, compared with an I:E ratio of 1:2, an I:E ratio of 1:1 resulted in a modest improvement in oxygenation and decreased shunt fraction during one-lung ventilation.

  17. Detectability of regional lung ventilation with flat-panel detector-based dynamic radiography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the ability of breathing chest radiography using flat-panel detector (FPD) to quantify relative local ventilation. Dynamic chest radiographs during respiration were obtained using a modified FPD system. Imaging was performed in three different positions, ie, standing and right and left decubitus positions, to change the distribution of local ventilation. We measured the average pixel value in the local lung area. Subsequently, the interframe differences, as well as difference values between maximum inspiratory and expiratory phases, were calculated. The results were visualized as images in the form of a color display to show more or less x-ray translucency. Temporal changes and spatial distribution of the results were then compared to lung physiology. In the results, the average pixel value in each lung was associated with respiratory phase. In all positions, respiratory changes of pixel value in the lower area were greater than those in the upper area (P < 0.01), which was the same tendency as the regional differences in ventilation determined by respiratory physiology. In addition, in the decubitus position, it was observed that areas with large respiratory changes in pixel value moved up in the vertical direction during expiration, which was considered to be airway closure. In conclusion, breathing chest radiography using FPD was shown to be capable of quantifying relative ventilation in local lung area and detecting regional differences in ventilation and timing of airway closure. This method is expected to be useful as a new diagnostic imaging modality for evaluating relative local ventilation.

  18. Design of a new variable-ventilation method optimized for lung recruitment in mice.

    PubMed

    Thammanomai, Apiradee; Hueser, Lauren E; Majumdar, Arnab; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2008-05-01

    Variable ventilation (VV), characterized by breath-to-breath variation of tidal volume (Vt) and breathing rate (f), has been shown to improve lung mechanics and blood oxygenation during acute lung injury in many species compared with conventional ventilation (CV), characterized by constant Vt and f. During CV as well as VV, the lungs of mice tend to collapse over time; therefore, the goal of this study was to develop a new VV mode (VV(N)) with an optimized distribution of Vt to maximize recruitment. Groups of normal and HCl-injured mice were subjected to 1 h of CV, original VV (VV(O)), CV with periodic large breaths (CV(LB)), and VV(N), and the effects of ventilation modes on respiratory mechanics, airway pressure, blood oxygenation, and IL-1beta were assessed. During CV and VV(O), normal and injured mice showed regional lung collapse with increased airway pressures and poor oxygenation. CV(LB) and VV(N) resulted in a stable dynamic equilibrium with significantly improved respiratory mechanics and oxygenation. Nevertheless, VV(N) provided a consistently better physiological response. In injured mice, VV(O) and VV(N), but not CV(LB), were able to reduce the IL-1beta-related inflammatory response compared with CV. In conclusion, our results suggest that application of higher Vt values than the single Vt currently used in clinical situations helps stabilize lung function. In addition, variable stretch patterns delivered to the lung by VV can reduce the progression of lung injury due to ventilation in injured mice.

  19. Lung stress and strain during mechanical ventilation: any difference between statics and dynamics?

    PubMed

    Protti, Alessandro; Andreis, Davide T; Monti, Massimo; Santini, Alessandro; Sparacino, Cristina C; Langer, Thomas; Votta, Emiliano; Gatti, Stefano; Lombardi, Luciano; Leopardi, Orazio; Masson, Serge; Cressoni, Massimo; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2013-04-01

    Tidal volume (VT) and volume of gas caused by positive end-expiratory pressure (VPEEP) generate dynamic and static lung strains, respectively. Our aim was to clarify whether different combinations of dynamic and static strains, resulting in the same large global strain, constantly produce lung edema. Laboratory investigation. Animal unit. Twenty-eight healthy pigs. After lung computed tomography, 20 animals were ventilated for 54 hours at a global strain of 2.5, either entirely dynamic (VT 100% and VPEEP 0%), partly dynamic and partly static (VT 75-50% and VPEEP 25-50%), or mainly static (VT 25% and VPEEP 75%) and then killed. In eight other pigs (VT 25% and VPEEP 75%), VPEEP was abruptly zeroed after 36-54 hours and ventilation continued for 3 hours. Edema was diagnosed when final lung weight (balance) exceeded the initial weight (computed tomography). Mortality, lung mechanics, gas exchange, pulmonary histology, and inflammation were evaluated. All animals ventilated with entirely dynamic strain (VT 825±424 mL) developed pulmonary edema (lung weight from 334±38 to 658±99 g, p<0.01), whereas none of those ventilated with mainly static strain (VT 237±21 mL and VPEEP 906±114 mL, corresponding to 19±1 cm H2O of positive end-expiratory pressure) did (from 314±55 to 277±46 g, p=0.65). Animals ventilated with intermediate combinations finally had normal or largely increased lung weight. Smaller dynamic and larger static strains lowered mortality (p<0.01), derangement of lung mechanics (p<0.01), and arterial oxygenation (p<0.01), histological injury score (p=0.03), and bronchoalveolar interleukin-6 concentration (p<0.01). Removal of positive end-expiratory pressure did not result in abrupt increase in lung weight (from 336±36 to 351±77 g, p=0.51). Lung edema forms (possibly as an all-or-none response) depending not only on global strain but also on its components. Large static are less harmful than large dynamic strains, but not because the former merely

  20. Airway pressure release ventilation in morbidly obese surgical patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Testerman, George M; Breitman, Igal; Hensley, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Morbidly obese patients with body mass index greater than 40 kg/m(2) and respiratory failure requiring critical care services are increasingly seen in trauma and acute care surgical centers. Baseline respiratory pathophysiology including decreased pulmonary compliance with dependent atelectasis and abnormal ventilation-perfusion relationships predisposes these patients to acute lung injury (ALI) and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as well as prolonged stays in the intensive care unit. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is an increasingly used alternative mode for salvage therapy in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure that also provides lung protection from ventilator-induced lung injury. APRV provides the conceptual advantage of an "open lung" approach to ventilation that may be extended to the morbidly obese patient population with ALI and ARDS. We discuss the theoretical benefits and a recent clinical experience of APRV ventilation in the morbidly obese patient with respiratory failure at a Level I trauma, surgical critical care, and acute care surgery center.

  1. Improved OCT imaging of lung tissue using a prototype for total liquid ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used for imaging subpleural alveoli in animal models to gain information about dynamic and morphological changes of lung tissue during mechanical ventilation. The quality of OCT images can be increased if the refraction index inside the alveoli is matched to the one of tissue via liquid-filling. Thereby, scattering loss can be decreased and higher penetration depth and tissue contrast can be achieved. Until now, images of liquid-filled lungs were acquired in isolated and fixated lungs only, so that an in vivo measurement situation is not present. To use the advantages of liquid-filling for in vivo imaging of small rodent lungs, it was necessary to develop a liquid ventilator. Perfluorodecalin, a perfluorocarbon, was selected as breathing fluid because of its refraction index being similar to the one of water and the high transport capacity for carbon dioxide and oxygen. The setup is characterized by two independent syringe pumps to insert and withdraw the fluid into and from the lung and a custom-made control program for volume- or pressure-controlled ventilation modes. The presented results demonstrate the liquid-filling verified by optical coherence tomography and intravital microscopy (IVM) and the advantages of liquid-filling to OCT imaging of subpleural alveoli.

  2. Effect of caffeine on respiratory muscle strength and lung function in prematurely born, ventilated infants.

    PubMed

    Kassim, Zainab; Greenough, Anne; Rafferty, Gerrard F

    2009-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether caffeine administration increased respiratory muscle function and if this was associated with lung function improvement in prematurely born infants being weaned from mechanical ventilation. Respiratory muscle function was assessed by measurement of the maximum pressures generated during occlusions at end inspiration (Pemax) and end expiration (Pimax) and lung function by measurement of lung volume (functional residual capacity (FRC)) and respiratory system compliance (CRS) and resistance (RRS) in 18 infants with a median gestational age of 28 (range 24-36) weeks. Measurements were made immediately prior to caffeine administration (baseline) and 6 h later. Six hours after caffeine administration compared to baseline, the median Pemax (p = 0.017), Pimax (p = 0.004), FRC (p < 0.001), CRS (p = 0.002) and RRS (p = 0.004) had significantly improved. Our results suggest that caffeine administration facilitates weaning of prematurely born infants from mechanical ventilation by improving respiratory muscle strength.

  3. Quantitative analysis of changes in blood concentrations and 'presumed effect-site concentration' of sevoflurane during one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Matsuse, S; Hara, Y; Ohkura, T; Yahagi, N

    2012-10-01

    During one-lung ventilation, ventilation-perfusion mismatch decreases the arterial concentration of inhaled anaesthetics due to the arterial-to-venous concentration difference. This study tested the hypothesis that in humans, the 'presumed effect-site concentration' (taken as the mid-point between the arterial and superior jugular venous concentrations) of inhaled anaesthetic falls during one-lung (vs two-lung) ventilation. Four patients scheduled for elective prostatectomy (two-lung ventilation) and four patients for elective thoracotomy (one-lung ventilation) were randomly selected and assigned to receive sevoflurane (vaporiser-dial setting, 1.5%). Sevoflurane concentrations were measured periodically from radial artery and superior jugular vein (via a catheter advanced cephalad from the jugular vein). During one-lung ventilation, the end-expiratory sevoflurane concentration was stable at ∼1.3% but the mean (SD) presumed effect-site concentration declined initially from 58 (6.7) to 43 (4.7) μg.ml(-1) (p=0.011) before slowly recovering. A period of insufficient depth of anaesthesia is thus a risk during one-lung ventilation.

  4. Ventilation/perfusion lung scan in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Helal, Badia; Jaïs, Xavier; Girerd, Barbara; Price, Laura C; Günther, Sven; Savale, Laurent; Dorfmüller, Peter; Parent, Florence; Sitbon, Olivier; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Montani, David

    2012-07-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD), a rare form of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), requires histological proof for definitive diagnosis; however, lung biopsy is not recommended in PAH. Recent conjoint European Respiratory Society/European Society of Cardiology guidelines suggest that nonmatched perfusion defects on ventilation/perfusion (V'/Q') lung scanning in PAH patients may suggest PVOD. The aim of our study was to evaluate V'/Q' lung scans in a large cohort of PVOD and idiopathic or heritable PAH patients. V'/Q' lung scans from 70 patients with idiopathic or heritable PAH and 56 patients with confirmed or highly probable PVOD were reviewed in a double-blind manner. The vast majority of V'/Q' lung scans were normal or without significant abnormalities in both groups. No differences in ventilation or perfusion lung scans were observed between PAH and PVOD patients (all p>0.05). Furthermore, no differences were observed between confirmed (n=31) or highly probable PVOD (n=25). Nonmatched perfusion defects were found in seven (10%) idiopathic PAH patients and four (7.1%) PVOD patients (p>0.05). Nonmatched perfusion defects were rarely seen in a large cohort of idiopathic or heritable PAH and PVOD patients. Future recommendations should be amended according to these results suggesting that V'/Q' lung scanning is not useful in discriminating PVOD from idiopathic PAH.

  5. Effect of partial liquid ventilation on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema after experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, N R; Kozlowski, J K; Gust, R; Shapiro, S D; Schuster, D P

    2000-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with two different dosages of the perfluorocarbon LiquiVent (perflubron) on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema formation after oleic acid (OA)-induced acute lung injury in dogs. We used imaging with positron emission tomography to measure fractional pulmonary blood flow, lung water concentration (LWC), and the pulmonary transcapillary escape rate (PTCER) of (68)Ga-labeled transferrin at 5 and 21 h after lung injury in five dogs undergoing conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV), five dogs undergoing low-dose PLV (perflubron at 10 ml/kg), and four dogs undergoing high dose PLV (perflubron at 30 ml/kg). A positive end-expiratory pressure of 7.5 cm H(2)O was used in all dogs. After OA (0.08 ml/kg)- induced lung injury, there were no significant differences or trends for PTCER or LWC at any time when the PLV groups were compared with the CMV group. However, lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity was significantly lower in the combined PLV group than in the CMV group (p = 0.016). We conclude that after OA-induced lung injury, the addition of PLV to CMV does not directly attenuate pulmonary vascular leak or lung water accumulation. Rather, the benefits of such treatment may be due to modifications of the inflammatory response.

  6. Detrimental role of the airway mucin Muc5ac during ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, M; McNamee, EN; Brodsky, KS; Aherne, CM; Faigle, M; Downey, GP; Colgan, SP; Evans, CM; Schwartz, DA; Eltzschig, HK

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with high morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. At present, the functional contribution of airway mucins to ALI is unknown. We hypothesized that excessive mucus production could be detrimental during lung injury. Initial transcriptional profiling of airway mucins revealed a selective and robust induction of MUC5AC upon cyclic mechanical stretch exposure of pulmonary epithelia (Calu-3). Additional studies confirmed time- and stretch-dose-dependent induction of MUC5AC transcript or protein during cyclic mechanical stretch exposure in vitro or during ventilator-induced lung injury in vivo. Patients suffering from ALI showed a 58-fold increase in MUC5AC protein in their bronchoalveolar lavage. Studies of the MUC5AC promoter implicated nuclear factor κB in Muc5ac induction during ALI. Moreover, mice with gene-targeted deletion of Muc5ac−/− experience attenuated lung inflammation and pulmonary edema during injurious ventilation. We observed that neutrophil trafficking into the lungs of Muc5ac−/− mice was selectively attenuated. This implicates that endogenous Muc5ac production enhances pulmonary neutrophil trafficking during lung injury. Together, these studies reveal a detrimental role for endogenous Muc5ac production during ALI and suggest pharmacological strategies to dampen mucin production in the treatment of lung injury. PMID:23187315

  7. Choosing the frequency of deep inflation in mice: balancing recruitment against ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Allen, Gilman B; Suratt, Benjamin T; Rinaldi, Lisa; Petty, Joseph M; Bates, Jason H T

    2006-10-01

    Low tidal volume (Vt) ventilation is protective against ventilator-induced lung injury but can promote development of atelectasis. Periodic deep inflation (DI) can open the lung, but if delivered too frequently may cause damage via repeated overdistention. We therefore examined the effects of varying DI frequency on lung mechanics, gas exchange, and biomarkers of injury in mice. C57BL/6 males were mechanically ventilated with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 2 cmH2O for 2 h. One high Vt group received a DI with each breath (HV). Low Vt groups received 2 DIs after each hour of ventilation (LV) or 2 DIs every minute (LVDI). Control groups included a nonventilated surgical sham and a group receiving high Vt with zero PEEP (HVZP). Respiratory impedance was measured every 4 min, from which tissue elastance (H) and damping (G) were derived. G and H rose progressively during LV and HVZP, but returned to baseline after hourly DI during LV. During LVDI and HV, G and H remained low and gas exchange was superior to that of LV. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein was elevated in HV and HVZP but was not different between LV and LVDI. Lung tissue IL-6 and IL-1beta levels were elevated in HVZP and lower in LVDI compared with LV. We conclude that frequent DI can safely improve gas exchange and lung mechanics and may confer protection from biotrauma. Differences between LVDI and HV suggest that an optimal frequency range of DI exists, within which the benefits of maintaining an open lung outweigh injury incurred from overdistention.

  8. Unilateral hyperlucent lung in a child caused by a foreign body identified with v/q scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Balink, Hans; Collins, James; Korsten-Meijer, Astrid G W; Rottier, Bart L

    2012-09-01

    A 5-year-old girl presented with episodes of coughing, inspiratory stridor, and occasionally squeaking breath sounds. There was no history of a foreign body aspiration. Initially, she was diagnosed with allergic asthma. However, signs and symptoms continued despite a trial of inhaled corticosteroids. A chest radiograph showed a hyperlucent right lung, mainly in the upper lobe, with decreased vascular markings compatible with Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome, or foreign body aspiration. V/Q imaging showed markedly diminished right lung ventilation and perfusion, especially in the upper lobe, with a hot spot in the area of the right bronchus. At bronchoscopy, a pistachio nutshell was removed from the right main bronchus.

  9. A gamma scintigraphy study to investigate lung deposition and clearance of inhaled amikacin-loaded liposomes in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Weers, Jeffry; Metzheiser, Beth; Taylor, Glyn; Warren, Simon; Meers, Paul; Perkins, Walter R

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhalation of a liposomal formulation of amikacin in healthy male volunteers in terms of pulmonary deposition, clearance, and safety following nebulization with a commercial jet nebulizer. Amikacin was encapsulated in liposomes comprised of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterol via a proprietary manufacturing process (20 mg/mL final amikacin concentration). The liposomes were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc using the tin chloride labeling method. A nominal dose of 120 mg of drug product was loaded into a PARI LC STAR nebulizer, aerosolized using a PARI Boy compressor where subjects inhaled for 20 min. Lung deposition was determined by gamma scintigraphy in three healthy male volunteers at the following time points (0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post-administration). Total lung deposition, expressed as a percentage of the emitted dose, was 32.3 +/- 3.4%. The time-dependent retention of radiolabeled liposomes was biphasic with an initial rapid reduction in counts, followed by a slower phase to 48 h. The overall mean retention at 24 and 48 h was 60.4 and 38.3% of the initial dose deposited, respectively. The observed clearance of radiolabel is consistent with clearance of amikacin following aerosol delivery to rats. There were no clinically significant changes in laboratory parameters, vital signs, or ECG. No adverse events including cough or bronchospasm were reported. Inhalation of a single nominal dose of 120 mg liposomal amikacin results in prolonged retention of drug-loaded liposomes in the lungs of healthy volunteers. The treatment was well tolerated.

  10. The accessory role of the diaphragmaticus muscle in lung ventilation in the estuarine crocodile Crocodylus porosus.

    PubMed

    Munns, Suzanne L; Owerkowicz, Tomasz; Andrewartha, Sarah J; Frappell, Peter B

    2012-03-01

    Crocodilians use a combination of three muscular mechanisms to effect lung ventilation: the intercostal muscles producing thoracic movement, the abdominal muscles producing pelvic rotation and gastralial translation, and the diaphragmaticus muscle producing visceral displacement. Earlier studies suggested that the diaphragmaticus is a primary muscle of inspiration in crocodilians, but direct measurements of the diaphragmatic contribution to lung ventilation and gas exchange have not been made to date. In this study, ventilation, metabolic rate and arterial blood gases were measured from juvenile estuarine crocodiles under three conditions: (i) while resting at 30°C and 20°C; (ii) while breathing hypercapnic gases; and (iii) during immediate recovery from treadmill exercise. The relative contribution of the diaphragmaticus was then determined by obtaining measurements before and after transection of the muscle. The diaphragmaticus was found to make only a limited contribution to lung ventilation while crocodiles were resting at 30°C and 20°C, and during increased respiratory drive induced by hypercapnic gas. However, the diaphragmaticus muscle was found to play a significant role in facilitating a higher rate of inspiratory airflow in response to exercise. Transection of the diaphragmaticus decreased the exercise-induced increase in the rate of inspiration (with no compensatory increases in the duration of inspiration), thus compromising the exercise-induced increases in tidal volume and minute ventilation. These results suggest that, in C. porosus, costal ventilation alone is able to support metabolic demands at rest, and the diaphragmaticus is largely an accessory muscle used at times of elevated metabolic demand.

  11. Successful Lung Transplantation Using a Deceased Donor Mechanically Ventilated for Ten Months.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shin; Miyoshi, Kentaroh; Sugimoto, Seiichiro; Yamane, Masaomi; Kobayashi, Motomu; Oto, Takahiro

    2017-08-01

    A successful outcome after lung transplant was achieved using lungs donated from a teenage boy who underwent prolonged mechanical ventilation. The donor experienced hypoxic brain damage and was declared brain dead 324 days after tracheal intubation. At the time of referral, the donor's lungs revealed diffuse radiologic infiltration and atelectasis but excellent function, with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio of 450. The lungs were transplanted to a 10-year-old girl with bronchiolitis obliterans. She developed grade 2 primary graft dysfunction, but recovered quickly. She is doing well and has not experienced any other critical adverse events 12 months after lung transplantation. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of methacholine on peripheral lung mechanics and ventilation heterogeneity in asthma.

    PubMed

    Downie, Sue R; Salome, Cheryl M; Verbanck, Sylvia; Thompson, Bruce R; Berend, Norbert; King, Gregory G

    2013-03-15

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) and multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) are noninvasive tests that are potentially sensitive to peripheral airways, with MBNW indexes being especially sensitive to heterogeneous changes in ventilation. The objective was to study methacholine-induced changes in the lung periphery of asthmatic patients and determine how changes in FOT variables of respiratory system reactance (Xrs) and resistance (Rrs) and frequency dependence of resistance (Rrs5-Rrs19) can be linked to changes in ventilation heterogeneity. The contributions of air trapping and airway closure, as extreme forms of heterogeneity, were also investigated. Xrs5, Rrs5, Rrs19, Rrs5-Rrs19, and inspiratory capacity (IC) were calculated from the FOT. Ventilation heterogeneity in acinar and conducting airways, and trapped gas (percent volume of trapped gas at functional residual capacity/vital capacity), were calculated from the MBNW. Measurements were repeated following methacholine. Methacholine-induced airway closure (percent change in forced vital capacity) and hyperinflation (change in IC) were also recorded. In 40 mild to moderate asthmatic patients, increase in Xrs5 after methacholine was predicted by increases in ventilation heterogeneity in acinar airways and forced vital capacity (r(2) = 0.37, P < 0.001), but had no correlation with ventilation heterogeneity in conducting airway increase or IC decrease. Increases in Rrs5 and Rrs5-Rrs19 after methacholine were not correlated with increases in ventilation heterogeneity, trapped gas, hyperinflation, or airway closure. Increased reactance in asthmatic patients after methacholine was indicative of heterogeneous changes in the lung periphery and airway closure. By contrast, increases in resistance and frequency dependence of resistance were not related to ventilation heterogeneity or airway closure and were more indicative of changes in central airway caliber than of heterogeneity.

  13. Tracheal gas insufflation-pressure control versus volume control ventilation. A lung model study.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, H; Kacmarek, R M; Ritz, R; Hess, D

    1996-03-01

    Tracheal gas insufflation (TGI) has been recommended as an adjunct to mechanical ventilation in the presence of elevated Pa CO2. Based on our initial clinical experience with continuous flow TGI and pressure control ventilation (PCV), we were concerned about elevation in peak airway pressure as TGI was applied. In a lung model, we evaluated the effects of continuous flow TGI during both PCV and volume control ventilation (VCV). A single compartment lung model was configured with an artificial trachea into which an 8-mm endotracheal tube was positioned. TGI was established with a 16-G catheter positioned 2 cm beyond the tip of the endotracheal tube. Ventilation was provided by a Puritan-Bennett 7200ae ventilator with PCV 20 cm H2O or VCV with a tidal volume (VTt) similar to that with PCV. A rate of 15 breaths/min and PEEP of 10 cm H2O were used throughout. Inspiratory times (TI) of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 s were used with TGI of 0, 4, 8, and 12 L/min. Lung model compliance (ml/cm H2O) and resistance (cm H2O/L/s) combinations of 20/20, 20/5, and 50/20 were used. Auto-PEEP, VT, and peak alveolar and airway opening pressures increased as TGI and Ti increased, regardless of lung mechanics settings (p<0.01). All increases were greater with VCV than PCV (p<0.05). Continuous flow TGI with both PCV and VT-uncorrected VCV may result in marked increases in Vt and system pressures, especially at long TI.

  14. High‐frequency oscillatory ventilation versus conventional ventilation: hemodynamic effects on lung and heart

    PubMed Central

    Smailys, Andrea; Mitchell, Jamie R.; Doig, Christopher J.; Tyberg, John V.; Belenkie, Israel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract High‐frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may improve gas exchange in patients who are inadequately ventilated by conventional mechanical ventilation (CV); however, the hemodynamic consequences of switching to HFOV remain unclear. We compared the effects of CV and HFOV on pulmonary vascular conductance and left ventricular (LV) preload and performance at different airway and filling pressures. In anesthetized dogs, we measured LV dimensions, aortic and pulmonary artery (PA) flow, and mean airway (AW) and pericardial pressures. Catheter‐tip pressure manometers measured aortic, LV, left atrial, and PA pressures. The pericardium and chest were closed. At LV end‐diastolic pressure (PLVED) = 5 mmHg and 12 mmHg, PEEP was varied (6 cm H2O, 12 cm H2O, and 18 cm H2O) during CV. Then, at airway pressures equal to those during CV, HFOV was applied at 4 Hz, 10 Hz, and 15 Hz. Increased AW decreased pulmonary vascular conductance. As cardiac output increased, conductance increased. At PLVED = 12 mmHg, conductance was greatest during HFOV at 4 Hz. LV preload (i.e., ALV, our index of end‐diastolic volume) was similar during HFOV and CV for all conditions. At PLVED = 12 mmHg, SWLV was similar during CV and HFOV, but, at PLVED = 5 mmHg and AW 10 cm H2O, SWLV was lower during HFOV than CV. Compared to pulmonary vascular conductance at higher frequencies, at PLVED = 12 mmHg, conductance was greater at HFOV of 4 Hz. Effects of CV and HFOV on LV preload and performance were similar except for decreased SWLV at PLVED = 5 mmHg. These observations suggest the need for further studies to assess their potential clinical relevance. PMID:24760513

  15. Effects of Different Tidal Volume Ventilation on Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chao; Wang, Jinzhu; Li, Li; Li, Haina; Li, Lu; Su, Qianqian; Che, Lu; Liu, Lanping; Di, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the effects of different tidal volume (VT) ventilation on paraquat-induced acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) in piglets. Material/Methods We developed ALI/ARDS models in piglets by intraperitoneal injection of paraquat (PQ). The piglets were randomly divided into three groups: small VT group (VT=6 ml/kg, n=6), middle VT group (VT=10 ml/kg, n=6), and large VT group (VT=15 ml/kg, n=6), with the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) set as 10 cmH2O. The hemodynamics were monitored by pulse-indicated continuous cardiac output (PiCCO) and the airway pressure changes and blood gas analysis indexes were recorded at different time points. The pathological changes were observed by lung puncture. Results The piglets showed ALI/ARDS in 4.5±0.8 hours after PQ intraperitoneal injection. PH, PaO2 and oxygenation indexes in the three groups all decreased after modeling success compared with baseline, and PaCO2 increased significantly. PH in the small VT group decreased most obviously after ventilation for 6 hours. PaO2 and oxygenation indexes in the small VT group showed the most obvious increase after ventilation for 2 hours and were much higher than the other two groups after ventilation for 6 hours. PaCO2 increased gradually after mechanical ventilation and the small VT group showed most obvious increase. The ELWI increased obviously after ventilation for 2 hours and then the small VT group clearly decreased. PIP and plateau pressure (Pplat) in the small VT group decreased gradually and in the middle and large VT group they increased after ventilation. The lung histopathology showed that the large VT group had the most severe damage and the small VT group had only minimal damage. Conclusions Small tidal volume ventilation combined with PEEP could alleviate the acute lung injury induced by paraquat and improve oxygenation. PMID:25671690

  16. Alarming hypoxemia during one-lung ventilation in a patient with respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Anis S; Taha, Samar K; Yaacoub, Chadi I

    2003-04-01

    To report a patient with respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD) who developed severe hypoxemia during one-lung ventilation (OLV). A 27-yr-old female, ex-smoker presented with productive cough and dyspnea of 18-month duration. The chest x-ray revealed diffuse abnormalities involving both lungs consisting of interstitial emphysema with irregular shadowing. Preoperative PaO(2) was 88 mmHg and pulmonary function tests showed moderate obstructive disease. The patient underwent right open lung biopsy. After induction of anesthesia, a left double lumen tube was inserted and its position verified with auscultation and fibreoptic bronchoscopy. Upon initiation of OLV, the patient developed severe hypoxemia and the PaO(2) dropped from 500 mmHg during two-lung ventilation (TLV) to 50 mmHg. Hypoxemia was readily corrected by resuming TLV. The severe hypoxemia during OLV in this patient with RB-ILD may be attributed to impaired hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Other causes were not excluded. Caution is warranted when initiating OLV in these patients.

  17. Histopathological changes and mRNA expression in lungs of horses after inhalation anaesthesia with different ventilation strategies.

    PubMed

    Hopster, K; Jacobson, B; Hopster-Iversen, C; Rohn, K; Kästner, S B R

    2016-08-01

    Inappropriate mechanical ventilation can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of inhalation anaesthesia and ventilation with and without recruitment (RM) and PEEP titration on alveolar integrity in horses. Twenty-three horses were divided into 4 groups (group OLC ventilated with OLC, group IPPV ventilated with intermittent positive pressure ventilation, group NV non-ventilated, and group C non-anaesthetized control group). After sedation with xylazine and induction with diazepam and ketamine anaesthetized horses were under isoflurane anaesthesia for 5.5h. The horses were euthanized and tissue samples of the dependent and non-dependent lung areas were collected. Histopathological examinations of the lung tissue as well as relative quantification of mRNA of IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS, MMP1 and MMP9 by PCR were performed. Horses of group OLC had significantly less alveolar congestion and atelectasis but greater alveolar overdistension compared to groups NV and IPPV. In groups OLC and group IPPV an increase in IL-1β/6 and MMP1/9 was detected compared to groups NV and C. In conclusion, in breathing spontaneously or IPPV-ventilated horses a higher degree of atelectasis was detected, whereas in OLC-ventilated horses a higher degree of overdistention was present. Elevated levels in IL and MMP might be early signs of VILI in ventilated horses.

  18. Application of CO2 waveform in the alveolar recruitment maneuvers of hypoxemic patients during one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chunshan; Yu, Junma; Liu, Qi; Wu, Chao; Lu, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deterioration of gas exchange during one-lung ventilation (OLV) is caused by both total collapse of the nondependent lung and partial collapse of the dependent lung. Alveolar recruitment maneuver improves lung function during general anesthesia. The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is an indirect relationship between the changes of CO2 expirogram and the selective lung recruitment. To further improve the oxygenation and gas exchange, we compare adjust setting of ventilated parameters based on CO2 expirogram and a preset setting of ventilated parameters during OLV in patients undergoing right-side thoracic surgery. Thirty patients met the requirements criteria that were studied at 3 time points: during two-lung ventilation (TLV), during OLV with preset ventilation parameters (OLV-PP), and during OLV with adjustable ventilation parameters (OLV-AP) that are in accordance with CO2 expirogram. Adjustable ventilation parameters such as tidal volume (VT), respiratory rate (RR), positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and the ratio of inspiratory to expiratory were adjusted by utilizing the phase III slopes of CO2 expirogram, which together with the relationship between the changes of CO2 expirogram and the selective lung recruitment. During OLV, the phase III slopes of CO2 expirogram in patients with pulse oxymetry (SpO2) decreased less than 93% after the OLV-PP, and were absolutely different from that during TLV. After OLV-AP, the phase III slopes of CO2 expirogram and SpO2 were similar to those during TLV. During OLV, however, parameters of ventilation setting in both OLV-PP and OLV-AP are obviously different. This study indicates that alveolar recruitment by utilizing CO2 expirogram probably improves SpO2 level during one-lung ventilation. PMID:27310989

  19. Application of CO2 waveform in the alveolar recruitment maneuvers of hypoxemic patients during one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chunshan; Yu, Junma; Liu, Qi; Wu, Chao; Lu, Yao

    2016-06-01

    Deterioration of gas exchange during one-lung ventilation (OLV) is caused by both total collapse of the nondependent lung and partial collapse of the dependent lung. Alveolar recruitment maneuver improves lung function during general anesthesia. The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is an indirect relationship between the changes of CO2 expirogram and the selective lung recruitment. To further improve the oxygenation and gas exchange, we compare adjust setting of ventilated parameters based on CO2 expirogram and a preset setting of ventilated parameters during OLV in patients undergoing right-side thoracic surgery.Thirty patients met the requirements criteria that were studied at 3 time points: during two-lung ventilation (TLV), during OLV with preset ventilation parameters (OLV-PP), and during OLV with adjustable ventilation parameters (OLV-AP) that are in accordance with CO2 expirogram. Adjustable ventilation parameters such as tidal volume (VT), respiratory rate (RR), positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and the ratio of inspiratory to expiratory were adjusted by utilizing the phase III slopes of CO2 expirogram, which together with the relationship between the changes of CO2 expirogram and the selective lung recruitment.During OLV, the phase III slopes of CO2 expirogram in patients with pulse oxymetry (SpO2) decreased less than 93% after the OLV-PP, and were absolutely different from that during TLV. After OLV-AP, the phase III slopes of CO2 expirogram and SpO2 were similar to those during TLV. During OLV, however, parameters of ventilation setting in both OLV-PP and OLV-AP are obviously different.This study indicates that alveolar recruitment by utilizing CO2 expirogram probably improves SpO2 level during one-lung ventilation.

  20. Independent lung ventilation combined with HFOV for a patient suffering from tracheo-gastric roll fistula.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Maki; Sakai, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Ikuo; Muraoka, Akihiro; Aizawa, Miyuki; Igarashi, Kaigen; Okazaki, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    This case report describes the difficult respiratory management of an esophageal cancer patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) caused by a postoperative tracheogastric roll fistula. A single-lumen tracheal tube could not seal the fistula, and therefore a double-lumen tracheal tube (DLT) for the left side was used. Although the proximal cuff of the DLT failed to seal the fistula, independent lung ventilation (ILV) improved blood gas levels. During right thoracotomy, the left lung was ventilated conventionally with 5 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and in addition, high-frequency oscillation ventilation (HFOV) to the right lung was employed. This combination allowed the maintenance of adequate oxygenation, and the HFOV to the right lung decreased the PaCO2 level during surgery without interruption of the surgical field. These techniques provided the opportunity to successfully remove a necrotic gastric roll and achieve closure of the fistula using an intercostal muscle flap. This report documents and discusses the difficulty of performing appropriate anesthetic management of a patient with these complex complications after esophageal surgery.

  1. Effect of endotracheal suction on lung dynamics in mechanically-ventilated paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Brenda; Futter, Merle; Argent, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Endotracheal suctioning is performed regularly in ventilated infants and children to remove obstructive secretions. The effect of suctioning on respiratory mechanics is not known. This study aimed to determine the immediate effect of endotracheal suctioning on dynamic lung compliance, tidal volume, and airway resistance in mechanically-ventilated paediatric patients by means of a prospective observational clinical study. Lung mechanics were recorded for five minutes before and five minutes after a standardised suctioning procedure in 78 patients intubated with endotracheal tubes < or = 4.0 mm internal diameter. Twenty-four patients with endotracheal tube leaks > or = 20% were excluded from analysis. There was a significant overall decrease in dynamic compliance (p < 0.001) and mechanical expired tidal volume (p = 0.03) following suctioning with no change in the percentage endotracheal tube leak (p = 0.41). The change in dynamic compliance was directly related to both endotracheal tube and catheter sizes. There was no significant change in expiratory or inspiratory airway resistance following suctioning (p > 0.05). Although the majority of patients (68.5%) experienced a drop in dynamic compliance following suctioning, dynamic compliance increased in 31.5% of patients after the procedure. This study demonstrates that endotracheal suctioning frequently causes an immediate drop in dynamic compliance and expired tidal volume in ventilated children with variable lung pathology, intubated with small endotracheal tubes, probably indicating loss of lung volume caused by the suctioning procedure. There is no evidence that suctioning reduces airway resistance.

  2. Bixin protects mice against ventilation-induced lung injury in an NRF2-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shasha; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Quijada, Hector; Wondrak, Georg T.; Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a therapeutic intervention widely used in the clinic to assist patients that have difficulty breathing due to lung edema, trauma, or general anesthesia. However, MV causes ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), a condition characterized by increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier that results in edema, hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, leading to exacerbated lung inflammation and oxidative stress. This study explored the feasibility of using bixin, a canonical NRF2 inducer identified during the current study, to ameliorate lung damage in a murine VILI model. In vitro, bixin was found to activate the NRF2 signaling pathway through blockage of ubiquitylation and degradation of NRF2 in a KEAP1-C151 dependent manner; intraperitoneal (IP) injection of bixin led to pulmonary upregulation of the NRF2 response in vivo. Remarkably, IP administration of bixin restored normal lung morphology and attenuated inflammatory response and oxidative DNA damage following MV. This observed beneficial effect of bixin derived from induction of the NRF2 cytoprotective response since it was only observed in Nrf2+/+ but not in Nrf2−/− mice. This is the first study providing proof-of-concept that NRF2 activators can be developed into pharmacological agents for clinical use to prevent patients from lung injury during MV treatment. PMID:26729554

  3. Mechanical Ventilation Induces an Inflammatory Response in Preinjured Lungs in Late Phase of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Wei; Zhou, Quanjun; Yao, Shanglong; Deng, Qingzhu; Wang, Tingting; Wu, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) may amplify the lung-specific inflammatory response in preinjured lungs by elevating cytokine release and augmenting damage to the alveolar integrity. In this study, we test the hypothesis that MV exerts different negative impacts on inflammatory response at different time points of postlung injury. Basic lung injury was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery in rats. Physiological indexes including blood gases were monitored during MV and samples were assessed following each experiment. Low V T (tidal volume) MV caused a slight increase in cytokine release and tissue damage at day 1 and day 4 after sepsis induced lung injury, while cytokine release from the lungs in the two moderately ventilated V T groups was amplified. Interestingly, in the two groups where rats received low V T MV, we found that infiltration of inflammatory cells was only profound at day 4 after CLP. Marked elevation of protein leakage indicated a compromise in alveolar integrity in rats that received moderate V T MV at day 4 following CLP, correlating with architectural damage to the alveoli. Our study indicates that preinjured lungs are more sensitive to mechanical MV at later phases of sepsis, and this situation may be a result of differing immune status.

  4. Nitric oxide and endothelin-1 release after one-lung ventilation during thoracoabdominal esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Lund, M; Ny, L; Malmström, R E; Lundberg, J O; Öst, Å; Björnstedt, M; Lundell, L; Tsai, J A

    2013-01-01

    One-lung ventilation (OLV) is applied during esophagectomy to improve exposure during the thoracic part of the operation. Collapse of lung tissue, shunting of pulmonary blood flow, and changes in alveolar oxygenation during and after OLV may possibly induce an ischemia-reperfusion response in the lung, which may affect the pulmonary endothelium. Such a reaction might thereby contribute to the frequently occurring respiratory complications among these patients. In this small trial, 30 patients were randomized to either OLV (n= 16) or two-lung ventilation (TLV, n= 14) during esophagectomy. Central venous and arterial plasma samples were taken before and after OLV/TLV for analysis of nitrite and a metabolite of nitric oxide (NO), and also during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 10th postoperative day for analysis of endothelin, another endothelium-derived vasoactive mediator. Lung biopsies were taken before and after OLV or TLV, and analyzed regarding immunofluorescence for isoform of NO synthase, a protein upregulated during inflammatory response and also vascular congestion. No changes in lung isoform of NO synthase immunofluorescence or vascular congestion were registered after neither OLV nor TLV. Plasma nitrite and endothelin levels were similar in the two study groups. We conclude that OLV does not seem to have any influence on key regulators of pulmonary vascular tone and inflammation, i.e. NO and endothelin. From this perspective, OLV seems to be a safe method, which defends its clinical position to facilitate surgical exposure during thoracoabdominal esophagectomy.

  5. Gene expression profile in newborn rat lungs after two days of recovery of mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dénervaud, Valérie; Gremlich, Sandrine; Trummer-Menzi, Eliane; Schittny, Johannes C; Roth-Kleiner, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Preterm infants having immature lungs often require respiratory support, potentially leading to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Conventional BPD rodent models based on mechanical ventilation (MV) present outcome measured at the end of the ventilation period. A reversible intubation and ventilation model in newborn rats recently allowed discovering that different sets of genes modified their expression related to time after MV. In a newborn rat model, the expression profile 48 h after MV was analyzed with gene arrays to detect potentially interesting candidates with an impact on BPD development. Rat pups were injected P4-5 with 2 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). One day later, MV with 21 or 60% oxygen was applied during 6 h. Animals were sacrified 48 h after end of ventilation. Affymetrix gene arrays assessed the total gene expression profile in lung tissue. In fully treated animals (LPS + MV + 60% O(2)) vs. controls, 271 genes changed expression significantly. All modified genes could be classified in six pathways: tissue remodeling/wound repair, immune system and inflammatory response, hematopoiesis, vasodilatation, and oxidative stress. Major alterations were found in the MMP and complement system. MMPs and complement factors play a central role in several of the pathways identified and may represent interesting targets for BPD treatment/prevention.Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease occurring in ~30% of preterm infants born less than 30 wk of gestation (1). Its main risk factors include lung immaturity due to preterm delivery, mechanical ventilation (MV), oxygen toxicity, chorioamnionitis, and sepsis. The main feature is an arrest of alveolar and capillary formation (2). Models trying to decipher genes involved in the pathophysiology of BPD are mainly based on MV and oxygen application to young mammals with immature lungs of different species (3). In newborn rodent models, analyses of lung structure and gene and protein

  6. Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Turner, W A; Bearg, D W; Brennan, T

    1995-01-01

    This chapter begins with an overview of the history of ventilation guidelines, which has led to the guidelines that are in effect today. Of particular interest is the most recent return in the past 5 years to ventilation rates that more closely reflect a mean or average of the range of guidelines that have existed over the past century. OSHA's and the EPA's recognition of the need to operate ventilation systems in buildings in an accountable manner is also of note. Of even more interest is the resurgence of the concept of minimum mixing and once-through ventilation air that has been pursued in parts of Northern Europe for the past 10 years, and in a school that is being designed with this concept in New Hampshire. In addition, the design concept of equipping office buildings with low pressure drop high efficiency particle filtration to remove fine particles from all of the air that is supplied to the occupants is being used increasingly in the U.S. This chapter also presents an overview of the various types of ventilation systems found in homes and commercial office buildings and the common indoor air quality problems that may be associated with them. It also offers an overview of common HVAC evaluation techniques that can be used to determine if a ventilation system is performing in a manner that makes sense for the use of the space and the needs of the occupants. Are the occupants receiving a reasonable supply of outdoor air? Is the air that they receive of reasonable quality? Are obvious pollutants being exhausted? Ventilation systems have become extremely complex and more difficult to run and maintain over the past 40 years. This trend will continue to drive the need for professionally maintained HVAC equipment that is serviced and run by individuals who are accountable for the quality of the air that the system delivers.

  7. Are there benefits or harm from pressure targeting during lung-protective ventilation?

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Neil R; Sessler, Curtis N

    2010-02-01

    Mechanically, breath design is usually either flow/volume-targeted or pressure-targeted. Both approaches can effectively provide lung-protective ventilation, but they prioritize different ventilation parameters, so their responses to changing respiratory-system mechanics and patient effort are different. These different response behaviors have advantages and disadvantages that can be important in specific circumstances. Flow/volume targeting guarantees a set minute ventilation but sometimes may be difficult to synchronize with patient effort, and it will not limit inspiratory pressure. In contrast, pressure targeting, with its variable flow, may be easier to synchronize and will limit inspiratory pressure, but it provides no control over delivered volume. Skilled clinicians can maximize benefits and minimize problems with either flow/volume targeting or pressure targeting. Indeed, as is often the case in managing complex life-support devices, it is operator expertise rather than the device design features that most impacts patient outcomes.

  8. Pulmonary ventilation and perfusion abnormalities and ventilation perfusion imbalance in children with pulmonary atresia or extreme tetralogy of Fallot

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdle, S.C.; Human, D.G.; Mann, M.D. )

    1990-08-01

    Xenon-133 lung ventilation and perfusion scans were done preoperatively after cardiac catheterization and cineangiocardiography in 19 children; 6 had pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and hypoplastic right ventricle, 4 pulmonary atresia with associated complex univentricular heart, and 9 extreme Tetralogy of Fallot. The four patients with discrepancies in the sizes of the left and right pulmonary arteries on angiography had marked asymmetry of pulmonary perfusion and ventilation-perfusion imbalance on scintigraphy. Similar degrees of asymmetry and imbalance were present in 6 of the 15 children with equal-size pulmonary vessels. Asymmetry of pulmonary perfusion and ventilation-perfusion imbalance were associated with a poor prognosis.

  9. [Mechanical ventilation to treat acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to descending necrotizing mediastinitis. Role of dynamic axial computed tomography of the lung].

    PubMed

    Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro; Hernández, Glenn; Rojas, Gonzalo; Aparicio, Rodrigo; Castillo, Luis

    2003-02-01

    Lung computed tomography (CT) is being used increasingly to assess lung morphology in patients on mechanical ventilation. Lung CT under known levels of airway pressure (dynamic CT) can also assess the response of lung parenchyma to ventilatory therapy. We report a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to descending necrotizing mediastinitis, in whom lung dynamic CT oriented ventilatory management. Independent lung ventilation improved gas exchange and helped patient recovery.

  10. Lung ventilation during treadmill locomotion in a semi-aquatic turtle, Trachemys scripta.

    PubMed

    Landberg, Tobias; Mailhot, Jeffrey D; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2009-10-01

    It is reasonable to presume that locomotion should have a mechanical effect on breathing in turtles. The turtle shell is rigid, and when the limbs protract and retract, air in the lungs should be displaced. This expectation was met in a previous study of the green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas; breathing completely ceased during terrestrial locomotion (Jackson and Prange, 1979. J Comp Physiol 134:315-319). In contrast, another study found no direct effect of locomotion on ventilation in the terrestrial box turtle, Terrapene carolina (Landberg et al., 2003. J Exp Biol 206:3391-3404). In this study we measured lung ventilation during treadmill locomotion in a semi-aquatic turtle, the red-eared slider, Trachemys scripta. Sliders breathed almost continuously during locomotion and during brief pauses between locomotor bouts. Tidal volume was relatively small (approximately 1 mL) during locomotion and approximately doubled during pauses. Minute ventilation was, however, not significantly smaller during locomotion because breath frequency was higher than that during the pauses. We found no consistent evidence for phase coupling between breathing and locomotion indicating that sliders do not use locomotor movements to drive breathing. We also found no evidence for a buccal-pump mechanism. Sliders, like box turtles, appear to use abdominal musculature to breathe during locomotion. Thus, locomotion affects lung ventilation differently in the three turtle species studied to date: the terrestrial Te. carolina shows no measurable effect of locomotion on ventilation; the semi-aquatic Tr. scripta breathes with smaller tidal volumes during locomotion; and the highly aquatic C. mydas stops breathing completely during terrestrial locomotion. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Novel One Lung Ventilation Strategy (OLV) for a Patient with Complete Unilateral Endobronchial Obstruction Causing Hypoxic Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kanitkar, Amaraja; Lee, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 67 Final Diagnosis: Lung cancer Symptoms: Short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Mechanical ventilation Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: Mechanical ventilation strategies for one lung ventilation (OLV) differ from conventional modalities in that it can adapt to greater degrees of ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch. We present a case of cancer causing complete unilateral endobronchial obstruction with refractory hypoxia that improved with OLV strategy. Case Report: Our patient was an elderly male, admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) on mechanical ventilation with worsening hypoxic respiratory failure secondary to lung mass and post-obstructive atelectasis. The patient developed refractory hypoxia on high conventional ventilator settings. Chest x-ray (CXR) showed opacification on left lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift. Bronchoscopy revealed complete obstruction of the left main stem bronchus by a fungating mass. OLV strategy was then implemented. The patient had improved hypoxia despite unchanged CXR. Conclusions: We propose that ventilating a patient with a complete unilateral endobronchial obstruction is physiologically similar to ventilating a patient with OLV. In such cases, OLV strategies may improve refractory hypoxia by minimizing V/Q mismatch and should be considered. PMID:28126982

  12. SU-E-J-120: Comparing 4D CT Computed Ventilation to Lung Function Measured with Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, B; Chen, Q

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate ventilation parameters computed from 4D CT to ventilation, profusion, and gas exchange measured with hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI for a set of lung cancer patients. Methods: Hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI lung scans were acquired for lung cancer patients, before and after radiation therapy, measuring ventilation, perfusion, and gas exchange. In the standard clinical workflow, these patients also received 4D CT scans before treatment. Ventilation was computed from 4D CT using deformable image registration (DIR). All phases of the 4D CT scan were registered using a B-spline deformable registration. Ventilation at the voxel level was then computed for each phase based on a Jacobian volume expansion metric, yielding phase sorted ventilation images. Ventilation based upon 4D CT and Xe-129 MRI were co-registered, allowing qualitative visual comparison and qualitative comparison via the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Analysis shows a weak correlation between hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI and 4D CT DIR ventilation, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.17 to 0.22. Further work will refine the DIR parameters to optimize the correlation. The weak correlation could be due to the limitations of 4D CT, registration algorithms, or the Xe-129 MRI imaging. Continued development will refine parameters to optimize correlation. Conclusion: Current analysis yields a minimal correlation between 4D CT DIR and Xe-129 MRI ventilation. Funding provided by the 2014 George Amorino Pilot Grant in Radiation Oncology at the University of Virginia.

  13. Coupling Effect of Double Lungs on a VCV Ventilator with Automatic Secretion Clearance Function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Bolun; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing

    2017-02-16

    For patients with mechanical ventilation, secretions in airway are harmful and sometimes even mortal, it's of great significance to clear secretion timely and efficiently. In this paper, a new secretion clearance method for VCV (volume-controlled ventilation) ventilator is put forward, and a secretion clearance system with a VCV ventilator and double lungs is designed. Furthermore, the mathematical model of the secretion clearance system is built and verified via experimental study. Finally, to illustrate the influence of key parameters of respiratory system and secretion clearance system on the secretion clearance characteristics, coupling effects of two lungs on VCV secretion clearance system are studied by an orthogonal experiment, it can be obtained that rise of tidal volume adds to efficiency of secretion clearance while effect of area, compliance and suction pressure on efficiency of secretion clearance needs further study. Rise of compliance improves bottom pressure of secretion clearance while rise of area, tidal volume and suction pressure decreases bottom pressure of secretion clearance. This paper can be referred to in researches of secretion clearance for VCV.

  14. Lung matrix and vascular remodeling in mechanically ventilated elastin haploinsufficient newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Hilgendorff, Anne; Parai, Kakoli; Ertsey, Robert; Navarro, Edwin; Jain, Noopur; Carandang, Francis; Peterson, Joanna; Mokres, Lucia; Milla, Carlos; Preuss, Stefanie; Alcazar, Miguel Alejandre; Khan, Suleman; Masumi, Juliet; Ferreira-Tojais, Nancy; Mujahid, Sana; Starcher, Barry; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Bland, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Elastin plays a pivotal role in lung development. We therefore queried if elastin haploinsufficient newborn mice (Eln(+/-)) would exhibit abnormal lung structure and function related to modified extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Because mechanical ventilation (MV) has been linked to dysregulated elastic fiber formation in the newborn lung, we also asked if elastin haploinsufficiency would accentuate lung growth arrest seen after prolonged MV of neonatal mice. We studied 5-day-old wild-type (Eln(+/+)) and Eln(+/-) littermates at baseline and after MV with air for 8-24 h. Lungs of unventilated Eln(+/-) mice contained ∼50% less elastin and ∼100% more collagen-1 and lysyl oxidase compared with Eln(+/+) pups. Eln(+/-) lungs contained fewer capillaries than Eln(+/+) lungs, without discernible differences in alveolar structure. In response to MV, lung tropoelastin and elastase activity increased in Eln(+/+) neonates, whereas tropoelastin decreased and elastase activity was unchanged in Eln(+/-) mice. Fibrillin-1 protein increased in lungs of both groups during MV, more in Eln(+/-) than in Eln(+/+) pups. In both groups, MV caused capillary loss, with larger and fewer alveoli compared with unventilated controls. Respiratory system elastance, which was less in unventilated Eln(+/-) compared with Eln(+/+) mice, was similar in both groups after MV. These results suggest that elastin haploinsufficiency adversely impacts pulmonary angiogenesis and that MV dysregulates elastic fiber integrity, with further loss of lung capillaries, lung growth arrest, and impaired respiratory function in both Eln(+/+) and Eln(+/-) mice. Paucity of lung capillaries in Eln(+/-) newborns might help explain subsequent development of pulmonary hypertension previously reported in adult Eln(+/-) mice.

  15. Lung Ultrasound in Early Diagnosis of Neonatal Ventilator Associated Pneumonia before Any Radiographic or Laboratory Changes

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Ibrahim, Mostafa; Bioumy, Nouran; El-Sharkawy, Sonya

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal pneumonia is reported to be the primary cause of neonatal respiratory failure and one of the common causes of neonatal hospitalization and death in developing countries. Chest X-ray was considered the gold standard for diagnosis of neonatal pneumonia. Lung ultrasonography has been described as a valuable noninvasive tool for the diagnosis of many neonatal pulmonary diseases. We report a case of ventilation associated neonatal pneumonia with very early diagnosis using lung ultrasound before any significant radiographic changes in chest X-ray or laboratory findings suggestive of infection. PMID:27891280

  16. Skeletal Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, I. Ross

    1979-01-01

    Skeletal scintigraphy, using phosphates or diphosphonates labeled with technetium 99m, is a sensitive method of detecting bone abnormalities. The most important and most frequent role of bone scanning is evaluating the skeletal areas in patients who have a primary cancer, especially a malignant condition that has a tendency to spread to bone areas. The bone scan is superior to bone radiographs in diagnosing these abnormalities; 15 percent to 25 percent of patients with breast, prostate or lung cancer, who have normal roentgenograms, also have abnormal scintigrams due to metastases. The majority of bone metastases appear as hot spots on the scan and are easily recognized. The incidence of abnormal bone scans in patients with early stages (I and II) of breast cancer varies from 6 percent to 26 percent, but almost invariably those patients with scan abnormalities have a poor prognosis and should be considered for additional therapies. Progression or regression of bony lesions can be defined through scanning, and abnormal areas can be identified for biopsy. The incidence of metastases in solitary scan lesions in patients with known primary tumors varies from 20 percent to 64 percent. Bone scintigraphy shows positive uptake in 95 percent of cases with acute osteomyelitis. Stress fractures and trauma suspected in battered babies can be diagnosed by scanning before there is radiological evidence. The procedure is free from acute or long-term side effects and, except in cases of very young patients, sedation is seldom necessary. Although the test is sensitive, it is not specific and therefore it is difficult to overemphasize the importance of clinical, radiographic, biochemical and scanning correlation in each patient. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:390886

  17. Single-port thoracoscopic surgery for pneumothorax under two-lung ventilation with carbon dioxide insufflation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kook Nam; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Dong Kyu; Kim, Heezoo; Lim, Sang Ho; Choi, Young Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of single-port thoracoscopic surgery and two-lung ventilation reduced the invasiveness of minor thoracic surgery. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of single-port thoracoscopic bleb resection for primary spontaneous pneumothorax using two-lung ventilation with carbon dioxide insufflation. Methods Between February 2009 and May 2014, 130 patients underwent single-port thoracoscopic bleb resection under two-lung ventilation with carbon dioxide insufflation. Access was gained using a commercial multiple-access single port through a 2.5-cm incision; carbon dioxide gas was insufflated through a port channel. A 5-mm thoracoscope, articulating endoscopic devices, and flexible endoscopic staplers were introduced through a multiple-access single port for bulla resection. Results The mean time from endotracheal intubation to incision was 29.2±7.8 minutes, the mean operative time was 30.9±8.2 minutes, and the mean total anesthetic time was 75.5±14.4 minutes. There were no anesthesia-related complications or wound problems. The chest drain was removed after a mean of 3.7±1.4 days and patients were discharged without complications 4.8±1.5 days from the operative day. During a mean 7.5±10.1 months of follow-up, there were five recurrences (3.8%) in operated thorax. Conclusions The anesthetic strategy of single-lumen intubation with carbon dioxide gas insufflation can be a safe and feasible option for single-port thoracoscopic bulla resection as it represents the least invasive surgical option with the potential advantages of reducing operative time and one-lung ventilation-related complications without diminishing surgical outcomes. PMID:27293823

  18. Optimizing lung aeration at birth using a sustained inflation and positive pressure ventilation in preterm rabbits

    PubMed Central

    te Pas, Arjan B.; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Lee, Katie; Wallace, Megan J.; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Hooper, Stuart B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A sustained inflation (SI) facilitates lung aeration, but the most effective pressure and duration are unknown. We investigated the effect of gestational age (GA) and airway liquid volume on the required inflation pressure and SI duration. Methods: Rabbit kittens were delivered at 27, 29, and 30 d gestation, intubated and airway liquid was aspirated. Either no liquid (control) or 30 ml/kg of liquid was returned to the airways. Lung gas volumes were measured by plethysmography and phase-contrast X-ray-imaging. Starting at 22 cmH2O, airway pressure was increased until airflow commenced and pressure was then held constant. The SI was truncated when 20 ml/kg air had entered the lung and ventilation continued with intermittent positive pressure ventilation (iPPV). Results: Higher SI pressures and longer durations were required in 27-d kittens compared to 30-d kittens. During iPPV, 27-d kittens needed higher pressures and had lower functional residual capacity (FRC) compared to 30-d kittens. Adding lung liquid increased SI duration, reduced FRC, and increased resistance and pressures during iPPV in 29- and 30-d kittens. Conclusion: Immature kittens required higher starting pressures and longer SI durations to achieve a set inflation volume. Larger airway liquid volumes adversely affected lung function during iPPV in older but not young kittens. PMID:26991259

  19. Local tissue-weight-based nonrigid registration of lung images with application to regional ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, a new nonrigid image registration method is presented to align two volumetric lung CT datasets with an application to estimate regional ventilation. Instead of the sum of squared intensity difference (SSD), we introduce the sum of squared tissue volume difference (SSTVD) as the similarity criterion to take into account the variation of intensity due to respiration. This new criterion aims to minimize the local difference of tissue volume inside the lungs between two images scanned in the same session or over short periods of time, thus preserving the tissue weight of the lungs. Our approach is tested using a pair of volumetric lung datasets acquired at 15% and 85% of vital capacity (VC) in a single scanning session. The results show that the new SSTVD predicts a smaller registration error and also yields a better alignment of structures within the lungs than the normal SSD similarity measure. In addition, the regional ventilation derived from the new method exhibits a much more improved physiological pattern than that of SSD.

  20. Influence of mechanical ventilation and sepsis on redox balance in diaphragm, myocardium, limb muscles, and lungs.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Rojas, Yeny; Martínez-Caro, Leticia; Vila-Ubach, Monica; Nin, Nicolas; Ferruelo, Antonio; Esteban, Andrés; Lorente, José A; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV), using high tidal volumes (V(T)), causes lung (ventilator-induced lung injury [VILI]) and distant organ injury. Additionally, sepsis is characterized by increased oxidative stress. We tested whether MV is associated with enhanced oxidative stress in sepsis, the commonest underlying condition in clinical acute lung injury. Protein carbonylation and nitration, antioxidants, and inflammation (immunoblotting) were evaluated in diaphragm, gastrocnemius, soleus, myocardium, and lungs of nonseptic and septic (cecal ligation and puncture 24 hours before MV) rats undergoing MV (n = 7 per group) for 150 minutes using 3 different strategies (low V(T) [V(T) = 9 mL/kg], moderate V(T) [V(T) = 15 mL/kg], and high V(T) [V(T) = 25 mL/kg]) and in nonventilated control animals. Compared with nonventilated control animals, in septic and nonseptic rodents (1) diaphragms, limb muscles, and myocardium of high-V(T) rats exhibited a decrease in protein oxidation and nitration levels, (2) antioxidant levels followed a specific fiber-type distribution in slow- and fast-twitch muscles, (3) tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) levels were higher in respiratory and limb muscles, whereas no differences were observed in myocardium, and (4) in lungs, protein oxidation was increased, antioxidants were rather decreased, and TNF-α remained unmodified. In this model of VILI, oxidative stress does not occur in distant organs or skeletal muscles of rodents after several hours of MV with moderate-to-high V(T), whereas protein oxidation levels were increased in the lungs of the animals. Inflammatory events were moderately expressed in skeletal muscles and lungs of the MV rats. Concomitant sepsis did not strongly affect the MV-induced effects on muscles, myocardium, or lungs in the rodents.

  1. Lung Functional and Biologic Responses to Variable Ventilation in Experimental Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Samary, Cynthia S; Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Cintia L; Huhle, Robert; Santos, Raquel S; Ornellas, Debora S; Felix, Nathane S; Capelozzi, Vera L; Schanaider, Alberto; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Rocco, Patricia R M; Silva, Pedro L

    2016-07-01

    The biologic effects of variable ventilation may depend on the etiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome. We compared variable and conventional ventilation in experimental pulmonary and extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome. Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study. University research laboratory. Twenty-four Wistar rats. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide administered intratracheally (pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome, n = 12) or intraperitoneally (extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome, n = 12). After 24 hours, animals were randomly assigned to receive conventional (volume-controlled ventilation, n = 6) or variable ventilation (n = 6). Nonventilated animals (n = 4 per etiology) were used for comparison of diffuse alveolar damage, E-cadherin, and molecular biology variables. Variable ventilation was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated tidal volume values (n = 600; mean tidal volume = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation (normal distribution). After randomization, animals were ventilated for 1 hour and lungs were removed for histology and molecular biology analysis. Variable ventilation improved oxygenation and reduced lung elastance compared with volume-controlled ventilation in both acute respiratory distress syndrome etiologies. In pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome, but not in extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome, variable ventilation 1) decreased total diffuse alveolar damage (median [interquartile range]: volume-controlled ventilation, 12 [11-17] vs variable ventilation, 9 [8-10]; p < 0.01), interleukin-6 expression (volume-controlled ventilation, 21.5 [18.3-23.3] vs variable ventilation, 5.6 [4.6-12.1]; p < 0.001), and angiopoietin-2/angiopoietin-1 ratio (volume-controlled ventilation, 2.0 [1.3-2.1] vs variable ventilation, 0.7 [0.6-1.4]; p < 0.05) and increased relative

  2. Quantifying the roles of tidal volume and PEEP in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Seah, Adrian S; Grant, Kara A; Aliyeva, Minara; Allen, Gilman B; Bates, Jason H T

    2011-05-01

    Management of patients with acute lung injury (ALI) rests on achieving a balance between the gas exchanging benefits of mechanical ventilation and the exacerbation of tissue damage in the form of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Optimizing this balance requires an injury cost function relating injury progression to the measurable pressures, flows, and volumes delivered during mechanical ventilation. With this in mind, we mechanically ventilated naive, anesthetized, paralyzed mice for 4 h using either a low or high tidal volume (Vt) with either moderate or zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). The derecruitability of the lung was assessed every 15 min in terms of the degree of increase in lung elastance occurring over 3 min following a recruitment maneuver. Mice could be safely ventilated for 4 h with either a high Vt or zero PEEP, but when both conditions were applied simultaneously the lung became increasingly unstable, demonstrating worsening injury. We were able to mimic these data using a computational model of dynamic recruitment and derecruitment that simulates the effects of progressively increasing surface tension at the air-liquid interface, suggesting that the VILI in our animal model progressed via a vicious cycle of alveolar leak, degradation of surfactant function, and increasing tissue stress. We thus propose that the task of ventilating the injured lung is usefully understood in terms of the Vt-PEEP plane. Within this plane, non-injurious combinations of Vt and PEEP lie within a "safe region", the boundaries of which shrink as VILI develops.

  3. Protective ventilation strategies in the management of phosgene-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Parkhouse, Duncan A; Brown, Roger F; Jugg, Bronwen J; Harban, Fraser M; Platt, Jan; Kenward, Christopher E; Jenner, John; Rice, Paul; Smith, Adam J

    2007-03-01

    Phosgene is a chemical widely used in the plastics industry and has been used in warfare. It produces a life-threatening pulmonary edema within hours of exposure, to which no specific antidote exists. This study aims to examine the pathophysiological changes seen with low tidal volume ventilation (protective ventilation (PV)) strategies compared to conventional ventilation (CV), in a model of phosgene-induced acute lung injury. Anesthetized pigs were instrumented and exposed to phosgene (concentration x time (Ct), 2,350 mg x min x m(-3)) and then ventilated with intermittent positive pressure ventilation (tidal volume (TV) = 10 ml x kg(-1); positive end expiratory pressure, 3 cm H2O; frequency, 20 breaths x min(-1); fractional concentration of inspired oxygen, 0.24), monitored for 6 hours after exposure, and then randomized into treatment groups: CV, PV (A) or (B) (TV, 8 or 6 ml x kg(-1); positive end expiratory pressure, 8 cm H2O; frequency, 20 or 25 breaths x min(-1); fractional concentration of inspired oxygen, 0.4). Pathophysiological parameters were measured for up to 24 hours. The results show that PV resulted in improved oxygenation, decreased shunt fraction, and mortality, with all animals surviving to 24 hours compared to only three of the CV animals. Microscopy confirmed reduced hemorrhage, neutrophilic infiltration, and intra-alveolar edema.

  4. Breathing in a box: constraints on lung ventilation in giant pterosaurs.

    PubMed

    Geist, Nicholas R; Hillenius, Willem J; Frey, Eberhard; Jones, Terry D; Elgin, Ross A

    2014-12-01

    Pterosaurs were the first vertebrates to achieve active flight, with some derived forms reaching enormous size. Accumulating fossil evidence confirms earlier indications that selection for large size in these flying forms resulted in a light, yet strong skeleton characterized by fusion of many bones of the trunk. However, this process also added mechanical constraints on the mobility of the thorax of large pterosaurs that likely limited the options available for lung ventilation. We present an alternative hypothesis to recent suggestions of an avian-like mechanism of costosternal pumping as the primary means of aspiration. An analysis of the joints among the vertebrae, ribs, sternum, and pectoral girdle of large pterosaurs indicates limited mobility of the ribcage and sternum. Comparisons with modes of lung ventilation in extant amniotes suggests that the stiffened thorax, coupled with mobile gastralia and prepubic bones, may be most consistent with an extracostal mechanism for lung ventilation in large pterodactyloids, perhaps similar to a crocodile-like visceral displacement system.

  5. Lung ventilation studies with technetium-99m Pseudogas

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, W.M.; Sullivan, P.J.; Lomas, F.E.; Evans, V.A.; McLaren, C.J.; Arnot, R.N.

    1986-06-01

    Technetium-99m Pseudogas is an ultrafine near monodisperse aerosol of 0.12-microgram diam particle size. This report describes initial clinical experiences with 27 patients referred for investigation of suspected pulmonary embolism, and in whom Pseudogas ventilation images were compared with a high quality commercial aerosol. An additional group of ten patients with severe COPD was examined in a comparative trial of Pseudogas with 81mKr. Pseudogas was better than a conventional aerosol in reaching a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism using a simple blinded comparison with coded images. In addition, bronchial deposition was minimal unless COPD was severe. Moderately well patients had no difficulty inhaling the necessary activity in one or two breaths, and even severely ill and frail aged persons could accomplish the passive breathing maneuver in less than a minute. Clearance of Pseudogas was directly to the systemic circulation with a half-time of 10 min in normal subjects extending up to 100 min in patients with airways disease.

  6. Manual ventilation and open suction procedures contribute to negative pressures in a mechanical lung model

    PubMed Central

    Nakstad, Espen Rostrup; Opdahl, Helge; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Borchsenius, Fredrik; Skjønsberg, Ole Henning

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Removal of pulmonary secretions in mechanically ventilated patients usually requires suction with closed catheter systems or flexible bronchoscopes. Manual ventilation is occasionally performed during such procedures if clinicians suspect inadequate ventilation. Suctioning can also be performed with the ventilator entirely disconnected from the endotracheal tube (ETT). The aim of this study was to investigate if these two procedures generate negative airway pressures, which may contribute to atelectasis. Methods The effects of device insertion and suctioning in ETTs were examined in a mechanical lung model with a pressure transducer inserted distal to ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm internal diameter (ID). A 16 Fr bronchoscope and 12, 14 and 16 Fr suction catheters were used at two different vacuum levels during manual ventilation and with the ETTs disconnected. Results During manual ventilation with ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm ID, and bronchoscopic suctioning at moderate suction level, peak pressure (PPEAK) dropped from 23, 22 and 24.5 cm H2O to 16, 16 and 15 cm H2O, respectively. Maximum suction reduced PPEAK to 20, 17 and 11 cm H2O, respectively, and the end-expiratory pressure fell from 5, 5.5 and 4.5 cm H2O to –2, –6 and –17 cm H2O. Suctioning through disconnected ETTs (open suction procedure) gave negative model airway pressures throughout the duration of the procedures. Conclusions Manual ventilation and open suction procedures induce negative end-expiratory pressure during endotracheal suctioning, which may have clinical implications in patients who need high PEEP (positive end-expiratory pressure). PMID:28725445

  7. Manual ventilation and open suction procedures contribute to negative pressures in a mechanical lung model.

    PubMed

    Nakstad, Espen Rostrup; Opdahl, Helge; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Borchsenius, Fredrik; Skjønsberg, Ole Henning

    2017-01-01

    Removal of pulmonary secretions in mechanically ventilated patients usually requires suction with closed catheter systems or flexible bronchoscopes. Manual ventilation is occasionally performed during such procedures if clinicians suspect inadequate ventilation. Suctioning can also be performed with the ventilator entirely disconnected from the endotracheal tube (ETT). The aim of this study was to investigate if these two procedures generate negative airway pressures, which may contribute to atelectasis. The effects of device insertion and suctioning in ETTs were examined in a mechanical lung model with a pressure transducer inserted distal to ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm internal diameter (ID). A 16 Fr bronchoscope and 12, 14 and 16 Fr suction catheters were used at two different vacuum levels during manual ventilation and with the ETTs disconnected. During manual ventilation with ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm ID, and bronchoscopic suctioning at moderate suction level, peak pressure (PPEAK) dropped from 23, 22 and 24.5 cm H2O to 16, 16 and 15 cm H2O, respectively. Maximum suction reduced PPEAK to 20, 17 and 11 cm H2O, respectively, and the end-expiratory pressure fell from 5, 5.5 and 4.5 cm H2O to -2, -6 and -17 cm H2O. Suctioning through disconnected ETTs (open suction procedure) gave negative model airway pressures throughout the duration of the procedures. Manual ventilation and open suction procedures induce negative end-expiratory pressure during endotracheal suctioning, which may have clinical implications in patients who need high PEEP (positive end-expiratory pressure).

  8. A simple classification model for hospital mortality in patients with acute lung injury managed with lung protective ventilation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lisa M; Calfee, Carolyn S; Matthay, Michael A; Brower, Roy G; Thompson, B Taylor; Checkley, William

    2011-12-01

    Despite improvements in the care of critically ill patients, hospital mortality rate for acute lung injury remains high at approximately 40%. We developed a classification rule to stratify mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury according to hospital mortality and compared this rule with the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III prediction. We used data of 2,022 participants in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network trials to build a classification rule based on 54 variables collected before randomization. We used a classification tree approach to stratify patients according to hospital mortality using a training subset of 1800 participants and estimated expected prediction errors using tenfold crossvalidation. We validated our classification tree using a subset of 222 participants not included in model building and calculated areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves. We identified combinations of age (>63 yrs), blood urea nitrogen (>15 mg/dL), shock, respiratory rate (>21 breaths/min), and minute ventilation (>13.9 L/min) as important predictors of hospital mortality at 90 days. The classification tree had a similar expected prediction error in the training set (28% vs. 26%; p = .18) and areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve in the validation set (0.71 vs. 0.73; p = .71) as did a model based on Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III. Our tree-based classification rule performed similarly to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III in stratifying patients according to hospital mortality, is simpler to use, contains risk factors that may be specific to acute lung injury, and identified minute ventilation as a potential novel predictor of death in patients with acute lung injury.

  9. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Activated Protein Kinase 2 Regulates Actin Polymerization and Vascular Leak in Ventilator Associated Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Damarla, Mahendra; Hasan, Emile; Boueiz, Adel; Le, Anne; Pae, Hyun Hae; Montouchet, Calypso; Kolb, Todd; Simms, Tiffany; Myers, Allen; Kayyali, Usamah S.; Gaestel, Matthias; Peng, Xinqi; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Damico, Rachel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation, a fundamental therapy for acute lung injury, worsens pulmonary vascular permeability by exacting mechanical stress on various components of the respiratory system causing ventilator associated lung injury. We postulated that MK2 activation via p38 MAP kinase induced HSP25 phosphorylation, in response to mechanical stress, leading to actin stress fiber formation and endothelial barrier dysfunction. We sought to determine the role of p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector MK2 on HSP25 phosphorylation and actin stress fiber formation in ventilator associated lung injury. Wild type and MK2−/− mice received mechanical ventilation with high (20 ml/kg) or low (7 ml/kg) tidal volumes up to 4 hrs, after which lungs were harvested for immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and lung permeability assays. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation resulted in significant phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, MK2, HSP25, actin polymerization, and an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability in wild type mice as compared to spontaneous breathing or low tidal volume mechanical ventilation. However, pretreatment of wild type mice with specific p38 MAP kinase or MK2 inhibitors abrogated HSP25 phosphorylation and actin polymerization, and protected against increased lung permeability. Finally, MK2−/− mice were unable to phosphorylate HSP25 or increase actin polymerization from baseline, and were resistant to increases in lung permeability in response to HVT MV. Our results suggest that p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector MK2 mediate lung permeability in ventilator associated lung injury by regulating HSP25 phosphorylation and actin cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:19240800

  10. Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in the PIOPED study. Part II. Evaluation of the scintigraphic criteria and interpretations.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, A; Sostman, H D; Coleman, R E; Juni, J E; Thrall, J; McKusick, K A; Froelich, J W; Alavi, A

    1993-07-01

    This article presents an evaluation of the criteria used for categorical interpretation of the ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scans performed in the PIOPED study. In addition, the correlation of percent probability estimates with the actual frequency of pulmonary embolism (PE) is presented. Cases which met the PIOPED criteria for various diagnostic categories were selected by computerized search of the detailed scan descriptions that had been done as part of the study. The process by which the scans were described was detailed in Part I of this report. Most of the criteria appropriately categorized V/Q scans which satisfied them. However, we recommend that three criteria should be reconsidered: 1. A single moderate perfusion defect is appropriately categorized as intermediate, rather than as low probability. 2. Extensive matched V/Q abnormalities are appropriate for low probability, provided that the chest radiograph is clear. On the other hand, single-matched defects may be better categorized as intermediate probability. Although due to the small number of cases with this finding, no definite, statistically founded recommendation can be made. 3. Two segmental mismatches may not be the optimum threshold for high probability, and in some cases should be considered for intermediate probability. However, due to the small number of cases with this finding, no definite, statistically founded recommendation can be made. We suggest that the revised criteria resulting from these adjustments should now be used for the interpretation of V/Q scans.

  11. Home kitchen ventilation, cooking fuels, and lung cancer risk in a prospective cohort of never smoking women in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Kim, Christopher; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Barone-Adesi, Francesco; Zhang, Yawei; Hosgood, H Dean; Ma, Shuangge; Shu, Xiao-ou; Ji, Bu-Tian; Chow, Wong-Ho; Seow, Wei Jie; Bassig, Bryan; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Indoor air pollution (IAP) caused by cooking has been associated with lung cancer risk in retrospective case-control studies in developing and rural countries. We report the association of cooking conditions, fuel use, oil use, and risk of lung cancer in a developed urban population in a prospective cohort of women in Shanghai. A total of 71,320 never smoking women were followed from 1996 through 2009 and 429 incident lung cancer cases were identified. Questionnaires collected information on household living and cooking practices for the three most recent residences and utilization of cooking fuel and oil, and ventilation conditions. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated the association for kitchen ventilation conditions, cooking fuels, and use of cooking oils for the risk of lung cancer by hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Ever poor kitchen ventilation was associated with a 49% increase in lung cancer risk (HR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.15-1.95) compared to never poor ventilation. Ever use of coal was not significantly associated. However, ever coal use with poor ventilation (HR: 1.69; 95% CI: 1.22-2.35) and 20 or more years of using coal with poor ventilation (HR: 2.03; 95% CI: 1.35-3.05) was significantly associated compared to no exposure to coal or poor ventilation. Cooking oil use was not significantly associated. These results demonstrate that IAP from poor ventilation of coal combustion increases the risk of lung cancer and is an important public health issue in cities across China where people may have lived in homes with inadequate kitchen ventilation. © 2014 UICC.

  12. Common Lung Microbiome Identified among Mechanically Ventilated Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ashley D.; Zhang, Yan; Barber, Robert C.; Minshall, Christian T.; Huebinger, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    The examination of the pulmonary microbiome in patients with non-chronic disease states has not been extensively examined. Traditional culture based screening methods are often unable to identify bacteria from bronchoalveolar lavage samples. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies allows for a culture-independent molecular based analysis to determine the microbial composition in the lung of this patient population. For this study, the Ion Torrent PGM system was used to assess the microbial complexity of culture negative bronchoalveolar lavage samples. A group of samples were identified that all displayed high diversity and similar relative abundance of bacteria. This group consisted of Hydrogenophaga, unclassified Bacteroidetes, Pedobacter, Thauera, and Acinetobacter. These bacteria may be representative of a common non-pathogenic pulmonary microbiome associated within this population of patients. PMID:27898681

  13. Lung Injury in Asphyxiated Newborn Pigs Resuscitated from Cardiac Arrest - The Impact of Supplementary Oxygen, Longer Ventilation Intervals and Chest Compressions at Different Compression-to-Ventilation Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Dannevig, Ingrid; Solevåg, Anne L; Saugstad, Ola D; Nakstad, Britt

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Non-specific lung inflammatory events caused by severe asphyxia may be intensified by the way we resuscitate the newly born. Assessing lung injury is potentially important because if alternative resuscitation approaches induces similar inflammatory responses or less lung injury. then we may choose the resuscitation approach that is most gentle, and easiest to perform and learn. We investigated the levels of lung inflammatory markers by comparing different ventilation, chest compression and inhaled oxygen fraction strategies in resuscitation of newly born pigs at cardiac arrest. Materials and Methodology: Progressive asphyxia in newborn pigs was induced until asystole occurred. With current resuscitation guidelines as a reference group, pigs were randomized to receive initial ventilation before chest compressions for 30s, 60s or 90s, or to compression-to-ventilation ratios 3:1or 9:3, or to resuscitation using pure oxygen or air. We analysed inflammatory markers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), IL8 and TNFα, and lung tissue qPCR for genes matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)2, MMP9, TNFα and ICAM-1. Results: BAL-levels of TNFα and IL8 tended to be higher in the 30s group compared to 60s group (p = 0.028 and p = 0.023, respectively) as was gene expression in lung tissue of ICAM-1 and MMP2 (p=0.012 and p=0.043, respectively). MMP2 expression was slightly higher in the 30s group compared to 90s group (p = 0.020). No differences were found between pigs resuscitated with C:V ratio 9:3 and 3:1 or pure oxygen versus air. Conclusion: Compared to current guidelines, with respect to lung injury, resuscitation with longer initial ventilation should be considered. Longer series of chest compressions did not change the lung inflammatory response, neither did the use of air instead of pure oxygen in severely asphyxiated pigs resuscitated from asystole. PMID:23115599

  14. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Siva, Shankar; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Callahan, Jason; MacManus, Michael P.; Shaw, Mark; Plumridge, Nikki; Hicks, Rodney J.; Steinfort, Daniel; Ball, David L.; Hofman, Michael S.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r{sup 2}=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r{sup 2}=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET

  15. Helical Tomotherapy Planning for Lung Cancer Based on Ventilation Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; McLawhorn, Robert; Altes, Tallisa A.; Lange, Eduard de; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng Ke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of lung ventilation-based treatment planning, computed tomography and hyperpolarized (HP) helium-3 (He-3) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ventilation images of 6 subjects were coregistered for intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning in Tomotherapy. Highly-functional lungs (HFL) and less-functional lungs (LFL) were contoured based on their ventilation image intensities, and a cylindrical planning-target-volume was simulated at locations adjacent to both HFL and LFL. Annals of an anatomy-based plan (Plan 1) and a ventilation-based plan (Plan 2) were generated. The following dosimetric parameters were determined and compared between the 2 plans: percentage of total/HFL volume receiving {>=}20 Gy, 15 Gy, 10 Gy, and 5 Gy (TLV{sub 20}, HFLV{sub 20}, TLV{sub 15}, HFLV{sub 15}, TLV{sub 10}, HFLV{sub 10}, TLV{sub 5}, HFLV{sub 5}), mean total/HFL dose (MTLD/HFLD), maximum doses to all organs at risk (OARs), and target dose conformality. Compared with Plan 1, Plan 2 reduced mean HFLD (mean reduction, 0.8 Gy), MTLD (mean reduction, 0.6 Gy), HFLV{sub 20} (mean reduction, 1.9%), TLV{sub 20} (mean reduction, 1.5%), TLV{sub 15} (mean reduction, 1.7%), and TLV{sub 10} (mean reduction, 2.1%). P-values of the above comparisons are less than 0.05 using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. For HFLV{sub 15}, HFLV{sub 10}, TLV{sub 5}, and HTLV{sub 5}, Plan 2 resulted in lower values than plan 1 but the differences are not significant (P-value range, 0.063-0.219). Plan 2 did not significantly change maximum doses to OARs (P-value range, 0.063-0.563) and target conformality (P = 1.000). HP He-3 MRI of patients with lung disease shows a highly heterogeneous ventilation capacity that can be utilized for functional treatment planning. Moderate but statistically significant improvements in sparing functional lungs were achieved using helical tomotherapy plans.

  16. Electrical impedance tomography compared to positron emission tomography for the measurement of regional lung ventilation: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Richard, JC; Pouzot, C; Gros, A; Tourevieille, C; Lebars, D; Lavenne, F; Frerichs, I; Guérin, C

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Electrical impedance tomography (EIT), which can assess regional lung ventilation at the bedside, has never been compared with positron-emission tomography (PET), a gold-standard to quantify regional ventilation. This experiment systematically compared both techniques in injured and non-injured lungs. Methods The study was performed in six mechanically ventilated female piglets. In normal lungs, tidal volume (VT) was randomly changed to 6, 8, 10 and 15 ml/kg on zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP), then, at VT 10 ml/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was randomly changed to 5, 10 and 15 cmH2O. Afterwards, acute lung injury (ALI) was subsequently created in three animals by injecting 3 ml/kg hydrochloric acid into the trachea. Then at PEEP 5 cmH2O, VT was randomly changed to 8 and 12 ml/kg and PEEP of 10 and 15 cmH2O applied at VT 10 ml/kg. EIT and PET examinations were performed simultaneously. EIT ventilation (VTEIT) and lung volume (VL) were measured in the anterior and posterior area of each lung. On the same regions of interest, ventilation (VPET) and aerated lung volume (VAatten) were determined with PET. Results On ZEEP, VTEIT and VPET significantly correlated for global (VTEIT = VPET - 2E-13, R2 = 0.95, P < 0.001) and regional (VTEIT = 0.81VPET+7.65, R2 = 0.63, P < 0.001) ventilation over both conditions. For ALI condition, corresponding R2 were 0.91 and 0.73 (P < 0.01). Bias was = 0 and limits of agreement were -37.42 and +37.42 ml/min for global ventilation over both conditions. These values were 0.04 and -29.01 and +29.08 ml/min, respectively, for regional ventilation. Significant correlations were also found between VL and VAatten for global (VL = VAatten+1E-12, R2 = 0.93, P < 0.0001) and regional (VL = 0.99VAatten+0.92, R2 = 0.65, P < 0.001) volume. For ALI condition, corresponding R2 were 0.94 (P < 0.001) and 0.54 (P < 0.05). Bias was = 0 and limits of agreement ranged -38.16 and +38.16 ml for global ventilation over both

  17. Barotrauma and microvascular injury in lungs of nonadult rabbits: effect of ventilation pattern.

    PubMed

    Peevy, K J; Hernandez, L A; Moise, A A; Parker, J C

    1990-06-01

    To study the pulmonary microvascular injury produced by ventilation barotrauma, the isolated perfused lungs of 4 to 6-wk-old New Zealand white rabbits were ventilated by one of the following methods: peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) 23 cm H2O, gas flow rate 1.1 L/min (group 1); PIP 27 cm H2O, gas flow rate 6.9 L/min (group 2); PIP 50 cm H2O, gas flow rate 1.9 L/min (group 3); or PIP 53 cm H2O, gas flow rate 8.3 L/min (group 4). Microvascular permeability was assessed using the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) before and 5, 30, and 60 min after a 15-min period of ventilation. Baseline Kfc was not significantly different between groups. A significant increase over the baseline Kfc was noted at 60 min in group 2 and in all postventilation Kfc values in groups 3 and 4 (p less than .05). Group 1 Kfc values did not change significantly after ventilation. At all post-ventilation times, values for Kfc were significantly greater in groups 3 and 4 than in group 1 (p less than .05). Group 4 Kfc values were significantly greater than those in group 2 at 5 and 30 min postventilation. These data indicate that high PIP, and to a lesser extent, high gas flow rates cause microvascular injury in the compliant nonadult lung and suggest that the combination of high PIP and high gas flow rates are the most threatening to microvascular integrity.

  18. Ventilation/perfusion lung scan probability category distributions in university and community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lowe, V J; Bullard, A G; Coleman, R E

    1995-12-01

    The criteria used in the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) study for the interpretation of ventilation/perfusion scans are widely used and the probability of pulmonary embolism is determined from these criteria. The prevalence of pulmonary embolism in the PIOPED study was 33%. To investigate the similarity of patient populations who have ventilation/perfusion scans at one of the medical centers that participated in the PIOPED study and a small community hospital, the authors evaluated the probability category distributions of lung scans at the two institutions. They retrospectively interpreted 54 and 49 ventilation/perfusion lung scans selected from January, 1991, to June, 1992, at Duke University Medical Center and at Central Carolina Hospital, respectively. Studies were interpreted according to the PIOPED criteria. The percentage of studies assigned to each category at Duke University Medical Center and Central Carolina Hospital were 17% and 27% normal or very low probability, 31% and 59% low probability, 39% and 10% intermediate probability, and 13% and 4% high probability, respectively. The different distribution of probability categories between university and community hospitals suggests that the prevalence of disease may also be different. The post-test probability of pulmonary embolism is related to the prevalence of disease and the sensitivity and specificity of the ventilation/perfusion scan. Because these variables may differ in community hospital settings, the post-test probability of pulmonary embolism as determined by data from the PIOPED study should only be used in institutions with similar populations. Clinical management based upon the results of the PIOPED study may not be applicable to patients who have ventilation/perfusion scans performed in a community hospital.

  19. Short women with severe sepsis-related acute lung injury receive lung protective ventilation less frequently: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lung protective ventilation (LPV) has been shown to improve survival and the duration of mechanical ventilation in acute lung injury (ALI) patients. Mortality of ALI may vary by gender, which could result from treatment variability. Whether gender is associated with the use of LPV is not known. Methods A total of 421 severe sepsis-related ALI subjects in the Consortium to Evaluate Lung Edema Genetics from seven teaching hospitals between 2002 and 2008 were included in our study. We evaluated patients' tidal volume, plateau pressure and arterial pH to determine whether patients received LPV during the first two days after developing ALI. The odds ratio of receiving LPV was estimated by a logistic regression model with robust and cluster options. Results Women had similar characteristics as men with the exception of lower height and higher illness severity, as measured by Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score. 225 (53%) of the subjects received LPV during the first two days after ALI onset; women received LPV less frequently than men (46% versus 59%, P < 0.001). However, after adjustment for height and severity of illness (APACHE II), there was no difference in exposure to LPV between men and women (P = 0.262). Conclusions Short people are less likely to receive LPV, which seems to explain the tendency of clinicians to adhere to LPV less strictly in women. Strategies to standardize application of LPV, independent of differences in height and severity of illness, are necessary. PMID:22044724

  20. [Clinical research on supplementing Qi and activating blood circulation herbs on lung protection in acute lung injury ventilation patients].

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Yang, Ming-hui; Dou, Yong-qi; Liu, Yi

    2014-11-01

    To study the supplementing Qi and activating blood circulation herbs on lung protection in acute lung injury (ALI) ventilation patients. 67 cases of ALI patients were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. Routine treatment was for 32 cases of control group while treatment with adding supplementing Qi and activating blood circulation herbs was for 35 cases of treatment group, by 60 mL per time for 14 consecutive days with each day three times. Hemodynamics, changes of arterial blood gas, assay of pdymorphonuclears (PMN) value and the image of bronchoscopes between two groups in T0, T3, T7 and T14 were compared. PMN, HR, SVR, PaO2 , PO2/FiO2 and pH of treatment group were significantly improved compared with control group during T0, T3, T7 and T14 (P <0. 05). The compared differences were remarkable on hemodynamics, changes of arterial blood gas and assay of PMN value between treatment group and control group. The image of bronchoscopes in treatment group was improved significantly. The intervention of supplementing Qi and activating blood circulation herbs can effectively protect the lung function from ALI patients who received ventilation.

  1. Conventional mechanical ventilation of healthy lungs induced pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Brégeon, Fabienne; Roch, Antoine; Delpierre, Stéphane; Ghigo, Eric; Autillo-Touati, Amapola; Kajikawa, Osamu; Martin, Thomas R; Pugin, Jérôme; Portugal, Henry; Auffray, Jean-Pierre; Jammes, Yves

    2002-08-30

    We investigated the potential inflammatory reaction induced by mechanical ventilation (MV) using 10 ml/kg tidal volume and no positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in control (C, n = 8), spontaneously breathing (SB, n = 12) and mechanically ventilated (MV, n = 12) rabbits with normal lungs. After 6 h (MV and SB groups) or immediately (C group), lungs were removed for measurement of wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio and for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Pulmonary mechanics were also studied. MV animals developed a modest but significant (P < 0.01) impairment of arterial blood oxygenation and had higher W/D lung weight ratio than C ones. In MV group, BAL macrophage count was greater (P < 0.05) than in SB one. MV induced an upregulation of MCP-1, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta gene transcription (mRNAs), without significant elevation of the corresponding protein cytokines in the BAL supernatant, except for MCP-1 (P < 0.05). These data suggest that MV, even using moderate tidal volume, elicits a pro-inflammatory stimulus to the lungs.

  2. Lung Protective Ventilation (ARDSNet) versus APRV: Ventilatory Management in a Combined Model of Acute Lung and Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Stephen W.; Leonard, Kenji L.; Falls, Randall K.; Mageau, Ronald P.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Hollowell, Joseph P.; Trainor, Wayne E.; Kanaan, Hilal A.; Hickner, Robert C.; Sawyer, Robert G.; Poulin, Nathaniel R.; Waibel, Brett H.; Toschlog, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Concomitant lung/brain traumatic injury, results in significant morbidity and mortality. Lung protective ventilation (ARDSNet) has become the standard for managing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); however, the resulting permissive hypercapnea may compound traumatic brain injury (TBI). Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) offers an alternative strategy for management of this patient population. APRV was hypothesized to retard the progression of acute lung/brain injury to a greater degree than ARDSNet in a swine model. Methods Yorkshire swine were randomized to ARDSNet, APRV, or sham. Ventilatory settings and pulmonary parameters, vitals, blood gases, quantitative histopathology, and cerebral microdialysis were compared between groups using chi-square, Fisher’s exact, Student’s t-test, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and mixed effects repeated measures modeling. Results 22 swine (17 male, 5 female), weighing 25±6.0kg, were randomized to APRV (n=9), ARDSNet (n=12), or sham (n=1). PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) ratio dropped significantly while intracranial pressure increased significantly for all three groups immediately following lung and brain injury. Over time, peak inspiratory pressure, mean airway pressure, and P/F ratio significantly increased, while total respiratory rate significantly decreased within the APRV group compared to the ARDSNet group. Histopathology did not show significant differences between groups in overall brain or lung tissue injury; however, cerebral microdialysis trends suggested increased ischemia within the APRV group compared to ARDSNet over time. Conclusion Previous studies have not evaluated the effects of APRV in this population. While our macroscopic parameters and histopathology did not observe a significant difference between groups, microdialysis data suggest a trend toward increased cerebral ischemia associated with APRV over time. Additional and future studies should focus on extending the time interval for observation to

  3. [Application of lung recruitment maneuver in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome ventilated by proportional assist ventilation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Rong; Li, Na; Hu, Jinhui; Zha, Li; Zhu, Hongli; Zheng, Guofang; Zhao, Yuxiang; Feng, Zhichun

    2014-10-01

    To understand the effect of lung recruitment maneuver (LRM) with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on oxygenation and outcomes in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ventilated by proportional assist ventilation (PAV). From January 2012 to June 2013, thirty neonates with a diagnosis of RDS who required mechanical ventilation were divided randomly into LRM group (n=15, received an LRM and surport by PAV) and control group (n=15, only surport by PAV). There were no statistically significant differences in female (7 vs. 6); gestational age [(29.3±1.2) vs. (29.5±1.1) weeks]; body weight[(1,319±97) vs. (1,295±85) g]; Silverman Anderson(SA) score for babies at start of ventilation (7.3±1.2 vs. 6.9±1.4); initial FiO2 (0.54±0.12 vs. 0.50±0.10) between the two groups (all P>0.05). LRM entailed increments of 0.2 cmH2O (1 cmH2O=0.098 kPa) PEEP every 5 minutes, until fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2)=0.25. Then PEEP was reduced and the lung volume was set on the deflation limb of the pressure/volume curve.When saturation of peripheral oxygen fell and FiO2 rose, we reincremented PEEP until SpO2 became stable. The related clinical indicators of the two group were observed. The doses of surfactant administered (1.1±0.3 vs. 1.5±0.5, P=0.027), Lowest FiO2 (0.29±0.05 vs. 0.39±0.06, P=0.000), time to lowest FiO2[ (103±18) vs. (368±138) min, P=0.000] and O2 dependency [(7.6±1.0) vs.( 8.8±1.3) days, P=0.021] in LRM group were lower than that in control group (all P<0.05). The maximum PEEP during the first 12 hours of life [(8.4±0.8) vs. (6.8±0.8) cmH2O, P=0.000] in LRM group were higher than that in control group (P<0.05). FiO2 levels progressively decreased (F=35.681, P=0.000) and a/AO2 Gradually increased (F=37.654, P=0.000). No adverse events and no significant differences in the outcomes were observed. LRM can reduce the doses of pulmonary surfactant administered, time of the respiratory support and the oxygen therapy in preterm

  4. Home kitchen ventilation, cooking fuels, and lung cancer risk in a prospective cohort of never smoking women in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christopher; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Barone-Adesi, Francesco; Zhang, Yawei; Hosgood, H. Dean; Ma, Shuangge; Shu, Xiao-ou; Ji, Bu-Tian; Chow, Wong-Ho; Seow, Wei Jie; Bassig, Bryan; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Indoor air pollution (IAP) caused by cooking has been associated with lung cancer risk in retrospective case-control studies in developing and rural countries. We report the association of cooking conditions, fuel use, oil use and risk of lung cancer in a developed urban population in a prospective cohort of women in Shanghai. A total of 71,320 never smoking women were followed from 1996 through 2009 and 429 incident lung cancer cases were identified. Questionnaires collected information on household living and cooking practices for the women’s three most recent residences and utilization of cooking fuel and oil, and ventilation conditions. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated the association for kitchen ventilation conditions, cooking fuels, and use of cooking oils for the risk of lung cancer by hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Ever poor kitchen ventilation was associated with a 49% increase in lung cancer risk (HR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.15–1.95) compared to never poor ventilation. Ever use of coal was not significantly associated. However, ever coal use with poor ventilation (HR: 1.69; 95% CI: 1.22–2.35) and twenty or more years of using coal (HR: 2.03; 95% CI: 1.35–3.05) was significantly associated compared to no exposure to coal or poor ventilation. Cooking oil use was not significantly associated. These results demonstrate that IAP from poor ventilation of coal combustion increases the risk of lung cancer and is an important public health issue in cities across China where people may have lived in homes with inadequate kitchen ventilation. PMID:24917360

  5. Impact of ventilation frequency and parenchymal stiffness on flow and pressure distribution in a canine lung model.

    PubMed

    Amini, Reza; Kaczka, David W

    2013-12-01

    To determine the impact of ventilation frequency, lung volume, and parenchymal stiffness on ventilation distribution, we developed an anatomically-based computational model of the canine lung. Each lobe of the model consists of an asymmetric branching airway network subtended by terminal, viscoelastic acinar units. The model allows for empiric dependencies of airway segment dimensions and parenchymal stiffness on transpulmonary pressure. We simulated the effects of lung volume and parenchymal recoil on global lung impedance and ventilation distribution from 0.1 to 100 Hz, with mean transpulmonary pressures from 5 to 25 cm H2O. With increasing lung volume, the distribution of acinar flows narrowed and became more synchronous for frequencies below resonance. At higher frequencies, large variations in acinar flow were observed. Maximum acinar flow occurred at first antiresonance frequency, where lung impedance achieved a local maximum. The distribution of acinar pressures became very heterogeneous and amplified relative to tracheal pressure at the resonant frequency. These data demonstrate the important interaction between frequency and lung tissue stiffness on the distribution of acinar flows and pressures. These simulations provide useful information for the optimization of frequency, lung volume, and mean airway pressure during conventional ventilation or high frequency oscillation (HFOV). Moreover our model indicates that an optimal HFOV bandwidth exists between the resonant and antiresonant frequencies, for which interregional gas mixing is maximized.

  6. IMPACT OF VENTILATION FREQUENCY AND PARENCHYMAL STIFFNESS ON FLOW AND PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION IN A CANINE LUNG MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Reza; Kaczka, David W.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the impact of ventilation frequency, lung volume, and parenchymal stiffness on ventilation distribution, we developed an anatomically-based computational model of the canine lung. Each lobe of the model consists of an asymmetric branching airway network subtended by terminal, viscoelastic acinar units. The model allows for empiric dependencies of airway segment dimensions and parenchymal stiffness on transpulmonary pressure. We simulated the effects of lung volume and parenchymal recoil on global lung impedance and ventilation distribution from 0.1 to 100 Hz, with mean transpulmonary pressures from 5 to 25 cmH2O. With increasing lung volume, the distribution of acinar flows narrowed and became more synchronous for frequencies below resonance. At higher frequencies, large variations in acinar flow were observed. Maximum acinar flow occurred at first antiresonance frequency, where lung impedance achieved a local maximum. The distribution of acinar pressures became very heterogeneous and amplified relative to tracheal pressure at the resonant frequency. These data demonstrate the important interaction between frequency and lung tissue stiffness on the distribution of acinar flows and pressures. These simulations provide useful information for the optimization of frequency, lung volume, and mean airway pressure during conventional ventilation or high frequency oscillation (HFOV). Moreover our model indicates that an optimal HFOV bandwidth exists between the resonant and antiresonant frequencies, for which interregional gas mixing is maximized. PMID:23872936

  7. Ventilation/perfusion SPECT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an evaluation by reference to symptoms, spirometric lung function and emphysema, as assessed with HRCT.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Jonas; Ekberg, Marie; Jonson, Björn; Bozovic, Gracijela; Bajc, Marika

    2011-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation which is not fully reversible. Despite the heterogeneity of COPD, its diagnosis and staging is currently based solely on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)). FEV(1) does not explain the underlying pathophysiology of airflow limitation. The relationship between FEV(1), symptoms and emphysema extent is weak. Better diagnostic tools are needed to define COPD. Tomographic lung scintigraphy [ventilation/perfusion single photon emission tomography (V/P SPECT)] visualizes regional V and P. In COPD, relations between V/P SPECT, spirometry, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and symptoms have been insufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to investigate how lung function imaging and obstructive disease grading undertaken using V/P SPECT correlate with symptoms, spirometric lung function and degree of emphysema assessed with HRCT in patients with COPD. Thirty patients with stable COPD were evaluated with the Medical Research Council dyspnoea questionnaire (MRC) and the clinical COPD questionnaire (CCQ). Spirometry was performed. The extent of emphysema was assessed using HRCT. V/P SPECT was used to assess V/P patterns, total reduction in lung function and degree of obstructive disease. The total reduction in lung function and degree of obstructive disease, assessed with V/P SPECT, significantly correlated with emphysema extent (r = 0.66-0.69, p < 0.0001) and spirometric lung function (r = 0.62-0.74, p < 0.0005). The correlation between emphysema extent and spirometric lung function was weaker. No correlation between MRC, CCQ and objective measurements was found. V/P SPECT is sensitive to early changes in COPD. V/P SPECT also has the possibility to identify comorbid disease. V/P SPECT findings show a significant correlation with emphysema extent and spirometric lung function. We therefore recommend that scintigraphic signs of COPD, whenever found, should be reported. V

  8. Role of 99mTc-octreotide acetate scintigraphy in suspected lung cancer compared with 18F-FDG dual-head coincidence imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Zizheng; Yao, Weixuan; Xie, Hong; Xu, Jie; Tian, Li

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of tomographic (99m)Tc-octreotide acetate (hereafter, (99m)Tc-octreotide) scintigraphy in the detection of patients with suspected lung cancer in comparison with that of (18)F-FDG dual-head coincidence imaging (DHC). Forty-four consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary neoplasms underwent tomographic (99m)Tc-octreotide scintigraphy and (18)F-FDG coincidence imaging using the same gantry. The region of interest was drawn on the entire primary lesion. The tumor-to-normal tissue tracer values for both (99m)Tc-octreotide and (18)F-FDG were determined using region of interests and expressed as T/N(r) and T/N(m), respectively. Final diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic analysis or clinical follow-up. Thirty-one of the 44 patients had lung cancer-6 with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 25 with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thirteen of the 44 patients had benign lung lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of (99m)Tc-octreotide were 100%, 75.7%, 90.1%, and 100%, respectively, and of (18)F-FDG DHC were 100%, 46.1%, 83.8%, and 100%, respectively. In the 31 patients with malignant tumors, all 38 abnormal lymph nodes in 20 patients showed abnormal high focal uptake of (18)F-FDG; only 7 patients with 10 regional lymph adenopathies showed moderate uptake of (99m)Tc-octreotide. Thirteen patients with 39 distant sites of abnormal uptake visualized (imaging stage IV) with (99m)Tc-octreotide included 2 patients with brain metastases, 6 patients with pleural invasion and multiple bone metastasis, 2 patients with contralateral internal lung metastasis and pleural invasion, and 3 patients with only multiple bone metastasis. The final diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology or clinical follow-up. The sensitivity of (99m)Tc-octreotide for the detection of lung cancer at the primary lesion was comparable with that of (18)F-FDG coincidence imaging. Tomographic

  9. Prediction of arterial oxygen tension during one-lung ventilation: analysis of preoperative and intraoperative variables.

    PubMed

    Guenoun, Thierry; Journois, Didier; Silleran-Chassany, Jacqueline; Frappier, Jerôme; D'attellis, Nicola; Salem, Antoinette; Safran, Denis

    2002-04-01

    To determine whether currently available preoperative and intraoperative variables related to arterial oxygen tension (PaO(2)) can be used as predictors for low PaO(2) during one-lung ventilation (OLV). A prospective cohort study. Primary university hospital. Adult patients (n = 92) undergoing thoracic surgery requiring OLV. Preoperative and intraoperative data, including past medical history, physical examination, and usual preoperative and intraoperative tests, were collected and used as explanatory variables for PaO(2) during OLV by univariate and multivariate analysis. A stepwise logistic regression including the same independent variables was used to identify patients who should be expected to develop arterial hypoxemia (PaO(2) <70 mmHg). Arterial blood gas samples were analyzed 15 minutes after the onset of OLV and after thoracotomy to determine the lowest PaO(2) value during OLV. Preoperative (age, hematocrit, relative perfusion of the nondependent lung) and intraoperative (PaO(2) during 2-lung ventilation and mean arterial pressure at the lowest PaO(2)) variables were identified as independent factors affecting PaO(2) in OLV. PaO(2) during 2-lung ventilation was the only independent variable accounting for arterial hypoxemia when multivariate logistic regression was performed. The PaO(2) during OLV can be predicted using routinely available preoperative and intraoperative data. From a clinical point of view, this study failed to identify patients at risk of arterial hypoxemia when OLV is instituted because mainly intraoperative independent variables are involved in the decrease of PaO(2) in this situation. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  10. Efficiency of lung ventilation for people performing wind instruments.

    PubMed

    Brzęk, Anna; Famuła, Anna; Kowalczyk, Anna; Plinta, Ryszard

    Wind instruments musicians are particularly prone to excessive respiratory efforts. Prolonged wind instruments performing may lead to changes in respiratory tracts and thus to respiratory muscles overload. It may result in decreasing lung tissue pliability and, as a consequence, in emphysema. Aim of the research has been to describe basic spirometric parameters for wind players and causes of potential changes. Slow and forced spirometry with the use of Micro Lab Viasys (Micro Medical, Great Britain) was conducted on 31 wind musicians (group A). A survey concerning playing time and frequency, weight of instruments, and education on diaphragmatic breathing was conducted. The control group included 34 healthy persons at similar age (group B). The results were statistically described using Excel and Statistica programmes. The respiratory parameters were within the range of physiological norms and forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) exceeded in both groups the values of 100%. Forced vital capacity and expiratory vital capacity (EVC) values were significantly lower in the group of musicians than in the control group (p < 0.001). In 45% the group A used diaphragmatic breathing, in 31% of examinees mixed respiratory tract was observed. The significant discrepancy of individual parameters was obtained regarding age and the length of time when performing wind instrument. Spirometric parameters relative to standards may prove a good respiratory capacity. Peak expiratory flow (PEF) and FEV1 may indicate that a proper technique of respiration during performance was acquired. The length of time when performing wind instrument may influence parameters of dynamic spirometry. Med Pr 2016;67(4):427-433. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  11. Establishment of an experimental human lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPC-A-1BM with high bone metastases potency by (99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shunfang; Dong, Qianggang; Yao, Ming; Shi, Meiping; Ye, Jianding; Zhao, Langxiang; Su, Jianzhong; Gu, Weiyong; Xie, Wenhui; Wang, Kankan; Du, Yanzhi; Li, Yao; Huang, Yan

    2009-04-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most common clinical phenomena of late stage lung cancer. A major impediment to understanding the pathogenesis of bone metastasis has been the lack of an appropriate animal and cell model. This study aims to establish human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with highly bone metastases potency with (99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy. The human lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells SPC-A-1 were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of NIH-Beige-Nude-XID (NIH-BNX) immunodeficient mice. The metastatic lesions of tumor-bearing mice were imaged with (99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy on a Siemens multi-single photon emission computed tomography. Pinhole images were acquired on a GZ-B conventional gamma camera with a self-designed pinhole collimator. The mice with bone metastasis were sacrificed under deep anesthesia, and the lesions were resected. Bone metastatic cancer cells in the resected lesions were subjected for culture and then reinoculated into the NIH-BNX mice through left cardiac ventricle. The process was repeated for eight cycles to obtain a novel cell subline SPC-A-1BM. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to compare the gene expression differences in the parental and SPC-A-1BM cells. The bone metastasis sites were successfully revealed by bone scintigraphy. The established bone metastasis cell line SPC-A-1BM had a high potential to metastasize in bone, including mandible, humerus, thoracic vertebra, lumbar, femur, patella, ilium and cartilage rib. The expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor gene family, Bcl-2 and cell adhesion-related genes ECM1, ESM1, AF1Q, SERPINE2 and FN1 were examined. Gene expression difference was found between parental and bone-seeking metastasis cell SPC-A-1BM, which indicates SPC-A-1BM has metastatic capacity vs. its parental cells. SPC-A-1BM is a bone-seeking metastasis human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Bone scintigraphy may be used as an accurate, sensitive, noninvasive tool to detect

  12. Effects of carbonic anhydrase inhibition on ventilation-perfusion matching in the dog lung.

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, E R; Robertson, H T; Hlastala, M P

    1993-01-01

    Lung carbonic anhydrase (CA) permits rapid pH responses when changes in regional ventilation or perfusion alter airway and alveolar PCO2. These pH changes affect airway and vascular resistances and lung compliance to optimize the balance of regional ventilation (VA) and perfusion (Q) in the lung. To test the hypothesis that these or other CA-dependent mechanisms contribute to VA/Q matching, we administered acetazolamide (25 mg/kg intravenously) to six anesthetized and paralyzed dogs and measured VA/Q relationships before and after CA inhibition by the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Four other groups of dogs were studied to control for possible confounding effects of time under anesthesia and nonselective CA inhibition by acetazolamide: (a) saline placebo as a control for duration of anesthesia, (b) 4% CO2 inhalation to mimic systemic CO2 retention, (c) 1 mg/kg benzolamide (a selective renal CA inhibitor) or 0.5 meq/kg HCl to mimic systemic metabolic acidosis, and (d) 500 mg/kg 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (an inhibitor of red cell band 3 protein) to mimic the respiratory acidosis arising from an intracapillary block to rapid mobilization of plasma HCO3- in CO2 exchange. Acetazolamide increased VA/Q mismatch and reduced arterial PO2 measured at equilibrium but these did not occur in the control group. There was no deterioration in VA/Q matching when systemic respiratory acidosis produced either by CO2 inhalation or 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate or metabolic acidosis (benzolamide or HCl) were imposed to mimic the effects of acetazolamide apart from its inhibition of lung CA. These results support the concept that lung CA subserves VA/Q matching in the normal lung. Images PMID:8349809

  13. Combined bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial lung biopsy: safety and yield in ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Bulpa, P A; Dive, A M; Mertens, L; Delos, M A; Jamart, J; Evrard, P A; Gonzalez, M R; Installé, E J

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and diagnostic yield of bedside bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) combined with fibrescopic transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) in determining the aetiology of pulmonary infiltrates in mechanically ventilated patients. The records of 38 mechanically ventilated patients who underwent BAL/TBLB to investigate unexplained pulmonary infiltrates were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: immunocompetent (group 1: n = 22; group 1a: n = 11, late acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); group 1b: n = 11, no ARDS) and immunocompromised (group 2, n=16). The procedure allowed a diagnosis in 28 patients (74%), inducing therapeutic modification in 24 (63%) and confirmation of clinical diagnosis in four (11%). In groups 1a, 1b and 2, diagnosis was obtained in 11 out of 11 (fibroproliferation), seven out of 11 and 10 out of 16 patients, and therapy changed in 11 out of 11 (administration of steroids), six out of 11 and seven out of 16 patients, respectively. Pneumothorax occurred in nine patients (four of group 1a), bleeding in four (<35 mL), and transient hypotension in two. No fatalities were procedure-related. Combined bronchoalveolar lavage/transbronchial lung biopsy is of diagnostic and therapeutic value in mechanically ventilated patients with unexplained pulmonary infiltrates, excluding those with late acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although complications are to be expected, the benefits of the procedure appear to exceed the risks in patients in whom a histological diagnosis is deemed necessary.

  14. Comparison of lung scintigraphy with multi-slice spiral computed tomography in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Fang, Wei; Lv, Bin; Lu, Jin-Guo; Xiong, Chang-Ming; Ni, Xin-Hai; He, Zuo-Xiang

    2009-07-01

    To compare the diagnostic efficacy of lung perfusion scans combined with ventilation (V/Q) scans and/or chest radiography (CR) with contrast-enhanced multislice spiral CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE). Eighty-two consecutive patients with suspected PE underwent CTPA, lung perfusion scan, and CR. Of them, 28 patients underwent V/Q scans. The final diagnosis was made using a composite reference test. The overall sensitivity and specificity were 89.2% and 92.1% for V/Q scan or perfusion scan combined with CR, and 97.3% and 97.4% for CTPA. For the 28 patients with V/Q scan, the sensitivity and specificity were 91.7% and 92.9% for V/Q scan, and 91.7% and 100.0% for CTPA. The segmental agreement rate between perfusion scan and CTPA was 69.5% (kappa = 0.30, P < 0.05). The perfusion scan revealed significantly more subsegmental abnormalities than CTPA (59 vs. 10, chi2 test, P < 0.05). V/Q scan, perfusion scan combined with CR and CTPA all show high efficacy in diagnosing PE. V/Q scan or perfusion scan combined with CR is as accurate as CTPA.

  15. Effect on lung function of mounthpiece ventilation in Steinert disease. A case report.

    PubMed

    Annunziata, Anna; Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Esquinas, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    In patients with muscular dystrophies both muscle length tension relationship changes and muscle elasticity and plasticity are decreased, resulting in impaired inspiratory muscle function and decreased vital capacity. Furthermore, the loss of deep breathing further increases the risk of alveolar collapse, hypoventilation and atelectasias. In this case report, a stable improvement of vital capacity after treatment with mounthpiece ventilation (MPV), was observed, suggesting that not invasive ventilation (NIV) might help to maintai lung and chest wall compliance, prevent hypoventilation and atelectasias which in turn may slow down the development of the restrictive respiratory pattern. The improvement of vital capacity may have a positive impact on alveolar ventilation by reducing the time with SaO2 values below 90%. This case illustrates that MPV is an effective method to improve respiratory function in patients non-tolerant of nasal mask and a valid alternative option for those who need NIV support for the most part of the day. Furthermore, the use of MPV, alone or combined with other interfaces, improves the quality of life of the neuromuscular patients and promotes a greater adherence to mechanical ventilation.

  16. Correlation between the clinical pretest probability score and the lung ventilation and perfusion scan probability

    PubMed Central

    Bhoobalan, Shanmugasundaram; Chakravartty, Riddhika; Dolbear, Gill; Al-Janabi, Mazin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Aim of the study was to determine the accuracy of the clinical pretest probability (PTP) score and its association with lung ventilation and perfusion (VQ) scan. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 510 patients who had a lung VQ scan between 2008 and 2010 were included in the study. Out of 510 studies, the number of normal, low, and high probability VQ scans were 155 (30%), 289 (57%), and 55 (11%), respectively. Results: A total of 103 patients underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scan in which 21 (20%) had a positive scan, 81 (79%) had a negative scan and one (1%) had an equivocal result. The rate of PE in the normal, low-probability, and high-probability scan categories were: 2 (9.5%), 10 (47.5%), and 9 (43%) respectively. A very low correlation (Pearson correlation coefficient r = 0.20) between the clinical PTP score and lung VQ scan. The area under the curve (AUC) of the clinical PTP score was 52% when compared with the CTPA results. However, the accuracy of lung VQ scan was better (AUC = 74%) when compared with CTPA scan. Conclusion: The clinical PTP score is unreliable on its own; however, it may still aid in the interpretation of lung VQ scan. The accuracy of the lung VQ scan was better in the assessment of underlying pulmonary embolism (PE). PMID:24379532

  17. The effects of open lung ventilation on respiratory mechanics and haemodynamics in atelectatic infants after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Cui, Q; Zhou, H; Zhao, R; Liu, J; Yang, X; Zhu, H; Zheng, Q; Gu, C; Yi, D

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) frequently occurs in infants after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery and it sometimes develops into acute respiratory distress syndrome in critically ill infants, which can be life threatening. This study investigated the effects of open lung ventilation on the haemodynamics and respiratory mechanics of 64 infants (34 males; 30 females) with a mean +/- SD age of 8.3 +/- 0.3 months who developed ALI following CPB surgery. Open lung ventilation significantly improved the respiratory mechanics and oxygenation parameters of the infants, including the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO(2)), the ratio of PaO(2)/FiO(2) (fraction of inspired oxygen), peak inspiratory pressure, static compliance and airway resistance. It is concluded that open lung ventilation can greatly improve oxygenation and respiratory mechanics in infants with ALI following CPB surgery.

  18. Investigation of four-dimensional computed tomography-based pulmonary ventilation imaging in patients with emphysematous lung regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian; von Berg, Jens; Blaffert, Thomas; Loo, Billy W., Jr.; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-04-01

    A pulmonary ventilation imaging technique based on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has advantages over existing techniques. However, physiologically accurate 4D-CT ventilation imaging has not been achieved in patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 4D-CT ventilation imaging by correlating ventilation with emphysema. Emphysematous lung regions are less ventilated and can be used as surrogates for low ventilation. We tested the hypothesis: 4D-CT ventilation in emphysematous lung regions is significantly lower than in non-emphysematous regions. Four-dimensional CT ventilation images were created for 12 patients with emphysematous lung regions as observed on CT, using a total of four combinations of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms: surface-based (DIRsur) and volumetric (DIRvol), and two metrics: Hounsfield unit (HU) change (VHU) and Jacobian determinant of deformation (VJac), yielding four ventilation image sets per patient. Emphysematous lung regions were detected by density masking. We tested our hypothesis using the one-tailed t-test. Visually, different DIR algorithms and metrics yielded spatially variant 4D-CT ventilation images. The mean ventilation values in emphysematous lung regions were consistently lower than in non-emphysematous regions for all the combinations of DIR algorithms and metrics. VHU resulted in statistically significant differences for both DIRsur (0.14 ± 0.14 versus 0.29 ± 0.16, p = 0.01) and DIRvol (0.13 ± 0.13 versus 0.27 ± 0.15, p < 0.01). However, VJac resulted in non-significant differences for both DIRsur (0.15 ± 0.07 versus 0.17 ± 0.08, p = 0.20) and DIRvol (0.17 ± 0.08 versus 0.19 ± 0.09, p = 0.30). This study demonstrated the strong correlation between the HU-based 4D-CT ventilation and emphysema, which indicates the potential for HU-based 4D-CT ventilation imaging to achieve high physiologic accuracy. A further study is needed to confirm these results.

  19. Novel One Lung Ventilation Strategy (OLV) for a Patient with Complete Unilateral Endobronchial Obstruction Causing Hypoxic Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Kanitkar, Amaraja; Lee, Sarah J

    2017-01-27

    BACKGROUND Mechanical ventilation strategies for one lung ventilation (OLV) differ from conventional modalities in that it can adapt to greater degrees of ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch. We present a case of cancer causing complete unilateral endobronchial obstruction with refractory hypoxia that improved with OLV strategy. CASE REPORT Our patient was an elderly male, admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) on mechanical ventilation with worsening hypoxic respiratory failure secondary to lung mass and post-obstructive atelectasis. The patient developed refractory hypoxia on high conventional ventilator settings. Chest x-ray (CXR) showed opacification on left lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift. Bronchoscopy revealed complete obstruction of the left main stem bronchus by a fungating mass. OLV strategy was then implemented. The patient had improved hypoxia despite unchanged CXR. CONCLUSIONS We propose that ventilating a patient with a complete unilateral endobronchial obstruction is physiologically similar to ventilating a patient with OLV. In such cases, OLV strategies may improve refractory hypoxia by minimizing V/Q mismatch and should be considered.

  20. Mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome: The open lung revisited.

    PubMed

    Amado-Rodríguez, L; Del Busto, C; García-Prieto, E; Albaiceta, G M

    2017-02-23

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is still related to high mortality and morbidity rates. Most patients with ARDS will require ventilatory support. This treatment has a direct impact upon patient outcome and is associated to major side effects. In this regard, ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) is the main concern when this technique is used. The ultimate mechanisms of VALI and its management are under constant evolution. The present review describes the classical mechanisms of VALI and how they have evolved with recent findings from physiopathological and clinical studies, with the aim of analyzing the clinical implications derived from them. Lastly, a series of knowledge-based recommendations are proposed that can be helpful for the ventilator assisted management of ARDS at the patient bedside. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  1. [Parameters of controlled mechanical lung ventilation and external respiratory function during thoracoscopic surgeries in children of different age groups].

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, N M; Tsypin, L E; Geodakian, O S; Demakhin, A A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to estimate the parameters of mechanical ventilation and respiratory function during videotorachoscopic surgeries in children. 73 anesthesias were conducted in children aged 5 to 16 years of age. During the study, a detailed monitoring of respiratory function and parameters of mechanical ventilation was carried out. Indicators reflecting the lung function remained stable in all phases of the study. Parameters of mechanical ventilation during the study varied. Changes in PIP and MAP were similar in all age groups. The maximum changes of compliance were in the third group. One-lung ventilation is safe under certain conditions: increasing FiO2 from 0.5 to 1, the reduction of tidal volume up to 5-5.3 ml/kg, the use of a size or a half size smaller cuffed endotracheal tubes for intubation of the right and left main bronchus compared to those for tracheal intubation. For the intubation of the right main bronchus the endotracheal tube with the Murphy eye should be used, for the means ventilation of the upper lobe of the right lung. If the minute volume of breathing is adequate and there is no preoperative hypercapnia, the elimination of CO2 for one-lung ventilation is not disrupted and the tension of CO2 in arterial blood increases.

  2. Effects of reduced tidal volume ventilation on pulmonary function in mice before and after acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Thammanomai, Apiradee; Majumdar, Arnab; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the influence of load impedance on ventilator performance and the resulting effects of reduced tidal volume (Vt) on lung physiology during a 30-min ventilation of normal mice and 10 min of additional ventilation following lavage-induced injury at two positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels. Respiratory mechanics were regularly monitored, and the lavage fluid was tested for the soluble E-cadherin, an epithelial cell adhesion molecule, and surfactant protein (SP) B. The results showed that, due to the load dependence of the delivered Vt from the small-animal ventilator: 1) uncontrolled ventilation in normal mice resulted in a lower delivered Vt (6 ml/kg at 3-cmH(2)O PEEP and 7 ml/kg at 6-cmH(2)O PEEP) than the prescribed Vt (8 ml/kg); 2) at 3-cmH(2)O PEEP, uncontrolled ventilation in normal mice led to an increase in lung parenchymal functional heterogeneity, a reduction of SP-B, and an increase in E-cadherin; 3) at 6-cmH(2)O PEEP, ventilation mode had less influence on these parameters; and 4) in a lavage model of acute respiratory distress syndrome, delivered Vt decreased to 4 ml/kg from the prescribed 8 ml/kg, which resulted in severely compromised lung function characterized by increases in lung elastance, airway resistance, and alveolar tissue heterogeneity. Furthermore, the low Vt ventilation also resulted in poor survival rate independent of PEEP. These results highlight the importance of delivering appropriate Vt to both the normal and injured lungs. By leaving the Vt uncompensated, it can significantly alter physiological and biological responses in mice.

  3. Therapeutic effect of inhaled budesonide (Pulmicort® Turbuhaler) on the inflammatory response to one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Ju, N Y; Gao, H; Huang, W; Niu, F F; Lan, W X; Li, F; Gao, W

    2014-01-01

    This prospective, double-blind trial was designed to evaluate the effect of inhaled budesonide on lung function and the inflammatory response to one-lung ventilation. One hundred patients scheduled for lobectomy were allocated randomly to pre-operative nebulised budesonide or saline. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected from either the collapsed or the ventilated lung both before one-lung ventilation and 30 min after re-expansion of the lung. The concentrations of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytokines were determined. Budesonide treatment, compared with saline, reduced both peak (mean (SD) 3.7 (0.4) vs 2.5 (0.2) kPa) and plateau (mean (SD) 3.1 (0.2) vs 2.2 (0.1) kPa, respectively, p < 0.001 for both) ventilatory pressures. Thirty minutes after re-expansion, lung compliance increased in the budesonide group compared with saline (57.5 (4.1) vs 40.1 (3.5) ml.cmH(2) O(-1), respectively p < 0.001). Budesonide also reduced the concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but increased interleukin-10 30 min after re-expansion (p < 0.05 for all measures). Pre-operative nebulisation of budesonide may be effective in improving ventilatory mechanics and reducing the inflammatory response to one-lung ventilation during thoracic surgery.

  4. Stable Small Animal Mechanical Ventilation for Dynamic Lung Imaging to Support Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.

    2011-11-08

    Pulmonary computational fluid dynamics models require 3D images to be acquired over multiple points in the dynamic breathing cycle, with no breath holds or changes in ventilatory mechanics. With small animals, these requirements result in long imaging times ({approx}90 minutes), over which lung mechanics, such as compliance, can gradually change if not carefully monitored and controlled. These changes, caused by derecruitment of parenchymal tissue, are manifested as an upward drift in peak inspiratory pressure or by changes in the pressure waveform and/or lung volume over the course of the experiment. We demonstrate highly repeatable mechanical ventilation in anesthetized rats over a long duration for pulmonary CT imaging throughout the dynamic breathing cycle. We describe significant updates to a basic commercial ventilator that was acquired for these experiments. Key to achieving consistent results was the implementation of periodic deep breaths, or sighs, of extended duration to maintain lung recruitment. In addition, continuous monitoring of breath-to-breath pressure and volume waveforms and long-term trends in peak inspiratory pressure and flow provide diagnostics of changes in breathing mechanics.

  5. Evaluation of pulmonary perfusion in lung regions showing isolated xenon-133 ventilation washout defects

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, D.L.; Sood, K.B.; Shirazi, P.; Pal, I. )

    1990-08-01

    Xenon-133 washout phase imaging is often used to help determine whether the etiology of a perfusion defect is embolic or due to pulmonary parenchymal pathology, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study was designed to evaluate the pulmonary blood flow patterns associated with isolated defects on xenon washout images. Scintigraphic lung studies were reviewed until 100 cases with abnormal ventilation results were obtained. Ventilation abnormalities were compared with the corresponding perfusion scan results at the same anatomic site. Of the 208 individual lung regions with xenon abnormalities, 111 showed isolated washout defects (that is, with normal washin). Ninety-four of these 111 sites showed either normal perfusion or a small, nonsegmental corresponding perfusion defect. Three segmental perfusion defects were noted in association with isolated xenon retention. In each of these cases, however, the patient was felt actually to have pulmonary embolism. Thus, it is recommended that, for interpretation of scintigraphic images in the assessment of pulmonary embolism, lung pathology associated with isolated xenon retention not be considered a potential cause for large or segmental perfusion defects.

  6. Correlation of measures of regional lung ventilation from 4DCT vs. hyperpolarized helium-3 MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Miller, Wilson; Christensen, Gary; Reinhardt, Joseph; Benedict, Stanley; Libby, Bruce; Sheng, Ke

    2012-03-01

    Radiation induced pulmonary diseases can change the tissue material properties of lung parenchyma and the mechanics of the respiratory system. Recent advances in multi-detector-row CT (MDCT), 4DCT respiratory gating methods, and image processing techniques enable us to follow and measure those changes noninvasively during radiation therapy at a regional level. This study compares the 4DCT based ventilation measurement with the results from hyperpolarized helium-3 MR using the cumulative distribution function maps and the relative overlap (RO) statistic. We show that the similarity between the two measurements increases as the increase of the B-Spline grid spacing and Laplacian weighting which result a smoother ventilation map. The best similarity is found with weighting of 0.5 for linear elasticity and B-Spline grid spacing of 32 mm. Future work is to improve the lung image registration algorithm by incorporating hyperpolarized helium-3 MR information so as to improve its physiological modeling of the lung tissue deformation.

  7. Ibuprofen Protects Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury by Downregulating Rho-Kinase Activity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Chou, Hsiu-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Background. Ventilator-induced lung injury-(VILI-) induced endothelial permeability is regulated through the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Ibuprofen inhibits Rho activation in animal models of spinal-cord injury and Alzheimer's disease. The study aims to investigate ibuprofen effects on high tidal volume associated VILI. Methods. Twenty-eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive a ventilation strategy with three different interventions for 2 h: (1) a high-volume zero-positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (HVZP) group; (2) an HVZP + ibuprofen 15 mg/kg group; and (3) an HVZP + ibuprofen 30 mg/kg group. A fourth group without ventilation served as the control group. Rho-kinase activity was determined by ratio of phosphorylated ezrin, radixin, and moesin (p-ERM), substrates of Rho-kinase, to total ERM. VILI was characterized by increased pulmonary protein leak, wet-to-dry weight ratio, cytokines level, and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF-H1), RhoA activity, p-ERM/total ERM, and p-myosin light chain (MLC) protein expression. Results. Ibuprofen pretreatment significantly reduced the HVZP ventilation-induced increase in pulmonary protein leak, wet-to-dry weight ratio, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid interleukin-6 and RANTES levels, and lung GEF-H1, RhoA activity, p-ERM/total ERM, and p-MLC protein expression. Conclusion. Ibuprofen attenuated high tidal volume induced pulmonary endothelial hyperpermeability. This protective effect was associated with a reduced Rho-kinase activity. PMID:25019086

  8. Feasibility of weaning and direct extubation from open lung high-frequency ventilation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Alice; De Jaegere, Anne; van der Lee, Johanna; van Kaam, Anton

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency ventilation (HFV) is increasingly used in preterm infants, but data on weaning and extubation are limited. We aimed to establish if weaning the continuous distending pressure (CDP) below 8 cm H2O and the Fio2 below 0.30 is feasible in preterm infants on open lung HFV and if these settings result in successful extubation. Retrospective cohort study. Neonatal intensive care unit in a university hospital. Preterm infants ventilated and directly extubated from HFV between January 2003 and August 2005. Data on patient characteristics, ventilator settings, gas exchange, respiratory support after extubation and the number of patients failing extubation (i.e., reintubation within 48 hr) were retrospectively collected. Two hundred fourteen infants, accounting for 242 ventilation periods, were included in the study. The CDP, but not the Fio2, decreased significantly in the 24-hr period before extubation, resulting in a mean CDP of 6.8 +/- 1.6 cm H2O and a mean Fio2 of 0.25 at the time of extubation. At these settings, 193 (90%) infants were successfully extubated. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that birth weight was the only independent variable positively associated with successful extubation. This study shows that weaning the CDP below 8 cm H2O with an Fio2 below 0.30 is feasible during open lung HFV and extubation at these settings can be successful in preterm infants. In our series, a 90% success rate was observed. The value of this approach should be prospectively compared with conventional weaning and extubation strategies.

  9. A comparative study of two- versus one-lung ventilation for needlescopic bleb resection.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Kim, H K; Kang, D-Y; Lee, D-K; Choi, Y H; Lim, S H

    2011-05-01

    This prospective study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of two-lung (TL) ventilation with low tidal volume anaesthesia compared with one-lung (OL) ventilation for needlescopic bleb resection. Patients with spontaneous pneumothorax that underwent bleb resection with a 2-mm thoracoscope were enrolled. During the operation, the tidal volume was set at 4.0 mL·kg⁻¹ in the TL group and 8.0 mL·kg⁻¹ in the OL group; the respiration rate was set at 23 and 12 breaths·min⁻¹, respectively, at the same inspiratory oxygen fraction (50%). A total of 108 patients (55 patients in the TL group and 53 in the OL group) were included in this study. Airway pressure was significantly lower in the TL group (mean ± sd 8.0 ± 3.3 versus 24.0 ± 3.9 mmHg in the OL group; p<0.001). The time from endotracheal intubation to the incision was 17.1 ± 4.0 min in the TL group and 35.3 ± 7.6 min in the OL group, which was significantly different (p<0.001). However, the operation time was not different in comparisons between the two groups. Therefore, the total anaesthesia time was significantly longer in the OL group (77.9 ± 21.6 versus 64.9 ± 14.7 min in the TL group; p = 0.002). Needlescopic bleb resection using TL ventilation anaesthesia with low tidal volume was technically feasible, cost-effective and time-saving compared with OL ventilation anaesthesia.

  10. The matching of ventilation and perfusion in the lung of the Tegu lizard, Tupinambis nigropunctatus.

    PubMed

    Hlastala, M P; Standaert, T A; Pierson, D J; Luchtel, D L

    1985-06-01

    Ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) distribution was evaluated in the Tegu lizard, Tupinambis nigropunctatus, using the multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) in order to define the limitations to gas exchange in the large chambered unicameral lung. The lizards (0.52-1.1 kg) were anesthetized with halothane and ventilated. Body temperature was maintained at 35 degrees C. Arterial and sinus venosus PO2 averaged 79.4 +/- 5.9 and 47.3 +/- 6.4 torr while breathing air and 232.1 +/- 31 and 64.8 +/- 11.5 torr while breathing oxygen. VA/Q distributions were broad and right-to-left shunt averaged 21% while breathing air and 27% while breathing oxygen. Gas exchange was significantly impaired due to the presence of both shunt and VA/Q heterogeneity. The walls of the lung enclose a large axial air chamber. Microscopic examination revealed approximately three generations of septa which subdivided the wall into tubular-shaped gas-exchange chambers. Wall thickness averages 2.8 mm at the anterior end of the lung, 2.1 mm in the middle portion of the lung and 1.4 mm at the posterior end. The thickness of the blood-air barrier (epithelial-basal lamina-endothelial cell layer) ranged from 0.35 to 0.90 micron. Although this barrier is slightly thicker than in the mammalian lung (0.1-0.5 micron), it is unlikely to be a source of diffusion limitation in gas exchange at rest.

  11. One-lung versus two-lung ventilation in the closed-chest anesthetized dog: a comparison of cardiopulmonary parameters.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, S L; Duke, T; Walsh, P J; Remedios, A M; Walker, D; Ferguson, J G

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate cardiopulmonary effects of one-lung ventilation (OLV) versus two-lung ventilation (TLV) in closed-chest anesthetized dogs. Controlled, randomized experiment. Fourteen, 2- to 7-year-old adult dogs, weighing 23 +/- 6 kg. The dogs were anesthetized with acepromazine, morphine, thiopental, and halothane in oxygen, ventilated, and paralyzed with vecuronium. Tidal volume was 10 mL/kg. Respiratory rate was set to maintain end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) at 40 +/- 2 mm Hg before instrumentation then not changed. The left bronchus of 7 dogs was obstructed with a Univent bronchial blocker (Fuji Systems Corp, Tokyo, Japan). Blood gas analysis and hemodynamic measurements were taken at predetermined intervals for 1 hour in the TLV group and at baseline and following bronchial obstruction in the OLV group. Shunt fraction was not significantly different between groups, but in OLV shunt increased from baseline at 5 minutes. Arterial oxygen (PaO2) decreased after baseline in OLV compared with TLV. Arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) increased with OLV and decreased with TLV. In OLV, systemic vascular resistance was variable and decreased compared with TLV. Cardiac index increased over time in both groups but was not affected by treatment. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and diastolic arterial pressure increased with OLV compared with TLV but did not change over time. This study shows that OLV statistically decreases oxygen tension and transiently increases shunt fraction, but with 100% O2 it appears to be a feasible procedure with minimal cardiopulmonary side effects in healthy dogs. OLV is a feasible procedure in anesthetized dogs to better facilitate thoracic procedures such as bronchopleural fistula repair and thoracoscopy.

  12. Lung ventilation strategies for acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changsong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chi, Chunjie; Guo, Libo; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Nana; Wang, Weiwei; Pi, Xin; Sun, Bo; Lian, Ailing; Shi, Jinghui; Li, Enyou

    2016-03-09

    To identify the best lung ventilation strategy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we performed a network meta-analysis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Web of Science were searched, and 36 eligible articles were included. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP], the hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality were 0.624 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.419-0.98) for lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning and 0.572 (0.34-0.968) for pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning had the greatest potential to reduce mortality, and the possibility of receiving the first ranking was 61.6%. Permissive hypercapnia, recruitment maneuver, and low airway pressures were most likely to be the worst in terms of all-cause mortality. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP, pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning ventilation are associated with lower mortality in ARDS patients. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning ventilation and lower tidal volumes with pressure-volume (P-V) static curve-guided individual PEEP are potential optimal strategies for ARDS patients.

  13. Lung ventilation strategies for acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changsong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chi, Chunjie; Guo, Libo; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Nana; Wang, Weiwei; Pi, Xin; Sun, Bo; Lian, Ailing; Shi, Jinghui; Li, Enyou

    2016-01-01

    To identify the best lung ventilation strategy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we performed a network meta-analysis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Web of Science were searched, and 36 eligible articles were included. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP], the hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality were 0.624 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.419–0.98) for lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning and 0.572 (0.34–0.968) for pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning had the greatest potential to reduce mortality, and the possibility of receiving the first ranking was 61.6%. Permissive hypercapnia, recruitment maneuver, and low airway pressures were most likely to be the worst in terms of all-cause mortality. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP, pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning ventilation are associated with lower mortality in ARDS patients. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning ventilation and lower tidal volumes with pressure-volume (P–V) static curve-guided individual PEEP are potential optimal strategies for ARDS patients. PMID:26955891

  14. Lung ventilation injures areas with discrete alveolar flooding, in a surface tension-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Wu (吴右), You; Kharge, Angana Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    With proteinaceous-liquid flooding of discrete alveoli, a model of the edema pattern in the acute respiratory distress syndrome, lung inflation over expands aerated alveoli adjacent to flooded alveoli. Theoretical considerations suggest that the overexpansion may be proportional to surface tension, T. Yet recent evidence indicates proteinaceous edema liquid may not elevate T. Thus whether the overexpansion is injurious is not known. Here, working in the isolated, perfused rat lung, we quantify fluorescence movement from the vasculature to the alveolar liquid phase as a measure of overdistension injury to the alveolar-capillary barrier. We label the perfusate with fluorescence; micropuncture a surface alveolus and instill a controlled volume of nonfluorescent liquid to obtain a micropunctured-but-aerated region (control group) or a region with discrete alveolar flooding; image the region at a constant transpulmonary pressure of 5 cmH2O; apply five ventilation cycles with a positive end-expiratory pressure of 0–20 cmH2O and tidal volume of 6 or 12 ml/kg; return the lung to a constant transpulmonary pressure of 5 cmH2O; and image for an additional 10 min. In aerated areas, ventilation is not injurious. With discrete alveolar flooding, all ventilation protocols cause sustained injury. Greater positive end-expiratory pressure or tidal volume increases injury. Furthermore, we determine T and find injury increases with T. Inclusion of either plasma proteins or Survanta in the flooding liquid does not alter T or injury. Inclusion of 2.7–10% albumin and 1% Survanta together, however, lowers T and injury. Contrary to expectation, albumin inclusion in our model facilitates exogenous surfactant activity. PMID:25080924

  15. [The influence of occupational exposure and smoking on lung ventilation of coke oven workers].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-bo; Yi, Ji-hu; Wei, Yang-zhou; Wang, Lin-chao; Jiang, Chang-zheng; Wu, Tang-chun

    2005-04-01

    To study the influence of occupational exposure and smoking on lung ventilation function of coke oven workers. Environmental monitoring was performed on the top, side and bottom of some coke ovens. Lung ventilation function test was performed in 234 coke oven workers. The poison concentration in environment had such tendency as it was the highest on the top, then the side, and the lowest at the bottom. The standardized forced expiratory volume in the 1st second (FEV(1), 90.8% +/- 8.6%) and forced expiratory rate (FEV(1)%, 95.4% +/- 12.4%) of those coke oven workers who smoked were significantly lower than those non-smoking workers (100.9% +/- 14.3%, 108.9% +/- 17.6%); among those smoking workers, the partial correlation coefficients between forced vital capacity (FVC) and benzene soluble, benzopyrene, and smoking index were -0.249, -0.187 and -0.368 respectively; and the coefficients between FEV(1) and the three aspects were -0.255, -0.191 and -0.388; and the coefficients between FEV(1)% and them were -0.131, -0.107 and -0.065. Among those non-smoking workers, the coefficients between benzene solubles and FVC, FEV(1) and FEV(1)% were -0.154, -0.052 and -0.176, and between benzopyrene and them were -0.121, -0.037 and -0.159. The lung ventilation function of coke oven workers has certain negative correlation with both occupational exposure and smoking.

  16. Dynamic ventilation 3He MRI for the quantification of disease in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Kyriazis, Angelos; Rodriguez, I; Nin, N; Izquierdo-Garcia, J L; Lorente, J A; Perez-Sanchez, J M; Pesic, J; Olsson, L E; Ruiz-Cabello, J

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary diseases are known to be largely inhomogeneous. To evaluate such inhomogeneities, we are testing an image-based method to measure gas flow in the lung regionally. Dynamic, spin-density-weighted hyperpolarized (3)He MR images performed during slow inhalation of this gas were analyzed to quantify regional inflation rate. This parameter was measured in regions of interest (ROIs) that were defined by a rectangular grid that covered the entire rat lung and grew dynamically with it during its inflation. We used regional inflation rate to quantify elastase-induced emphysema and to differentiate healthy (n = 8) from elastase-treated (n = 9) rat lungs as well as healthy from elastase-treated areas of one rat unilaterally treated with elastase in the left lung. Emphysema was also assessed by gold standard morphological and well-established hyperpolarized (3)He MRI diffusion measurements. Mean values of regional inflation rates were significantly different for healthy and elastase-treated animals and correlated well with the apparent diffusion coefficient of (3)He and morphological measurements. The image-based biomarker inflation rate may be useful for the assessment of regional lung ventilation.

  17. Application of the open-lung concept during positive-pressure ventilation reduces pulmonary inflammation in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    van Kaam, Anton H; Dik, Willem A; Haitsma, Jack J; De Jaegere, Anne; Naber, Birgitta A; van Aalderen, Wim M; Kok, Joke H; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2003-01-01

    It has been shown that application of the open-lung concept (OLC) during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) attenuates pulmonary inflammation. We hypothesized that this attenuation could also be achieved by applying the OLC during positive-pressure ventilation (PPV). After repeated whole-lung lavage, newborn piglets were assigned to one of three ventilation groups: (1) PPV(OLC); (2) HFOV(OLC), or (3) conventional PPV (PPV(CON)). After a ventilation period of 5 h, analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed a reduced influx of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, interleukin 8, and thrombin activity in both OLC groups as compared with the PPV(CON) group. There were no differences in tumor necrosis factor alpha levels. We conclude that application of the OLC during PPV reduces pulmonary inflammation as compared with conventional PPV and that the magnitude of this reduction is comparable to that of HFOV.

  18. The Effects of Lung Protective Ventilation or Hypercapnic Acidosis on Gas Exchange and Lung Injury in Surfactant Deficient Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hummler, Helmut D.; Banke, Katharina; Wolfson, Marla R.; Buonocore, Giuseppe; Ebsen, Michael; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Fuchs, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background Permissive hypercapnia has been shown to reduce lung injury in subjects with surfactant deficiency. Experimental studies suggest that hypercapnic acidosis by itself rather than decreased tidal volume may be a key protective factor. Objectives To study the differential effects of a lung protective ventilatory strategy or hypercapnic acidosis on gas exchange, hemodynamics and lung injury in an animal model of surfactant deficiency. Methods 30 anesthetized, surfactant-depleted rabbits were mechanically ventilated (FiO2 = 0.8, PEEP = 7cmH2O) and randomized into three groups: Normoventilation-Normocapnia (NN)-group: tidal volume (Vt) = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 40 mmHg; Normoventilation-Hypercapnia (NH)-group: Vt = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg by increasing FiCO2; and a Hypoventilation-Hypercapnia (HH)-group: Vt = 4.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg. Plasma lactate and interleukin (IL)-8 were measured every 2 h. Animals were sacrificed after 6 h to perform bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), to measure lung wet-to-dry weight, lung tissue IL-8, and to obtain lung histology. Results PaO2 was significantly higher in the HH-group compared to the NN-group (p<0.05), with values of the NH-group between the HH- and NN-groups. Other markers of lung injury (wet-dry-weight, BAL-Protein, histology-score, plasma-IL-8 and lung tissue IL-8) resulted in significantly lower values for the HH-group compared to the NN-group and trends for the NH-group towards lower values compared to the NN-group. Lactate was significantly lower in both hypercapnia groups compared to the NN-group. Conclusion Whereas hypercapnic acidosis may have some beneficial effects, a significant effect on lung injury and systemic inflammatory response is dependent upon a lower tidal volume rather than resultant arterial CO2 tensions and pH alone. PMID:26840779

  19. Postmortem and ex vivo carbon monoxide ventilation reduces injury in rat lungs transplanted from non-heart-beating donors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Boming; Stewart, Paul W; Egan, Thomas M

    2013-08-01

    We sought to determine whether ventilation of lungs after death in non-heart-beating donors with carbon monoxide during warm ischemia and ex vivo lung perfusion and after transplant would reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury and improve lung function. One hour after death, Sprague-Dawley rats were ventilated for another hour with 60% oxygen (control group) or 500 ppm carbon monoxide in 60% oxygen (CO-vent group; n=6/group). Then, lungs were flushed with 20 mL cold Perfadex, stored cold for 1 hour, then warmed to 37 °C in an ex vivo lung perfusion circuit perfused with Steen solution. At 37 °C, lungs were ventilated for 15 minutes with alveolar gas with or without 500 ppm carbon monoxide, then perfusion-cooled to 20 °C, flushed with cold Perfadex and stored cold for 2 hours. The left lung was transplanted using a modified cuff technique. Recipients were ventilated with 60% oxygen with or without carbon monoxide. One hour after transplant, we measured blood gases from the left pulmonary vein and aorta, and wet-to-dry ratio of both lungs. The RNA and protein extracted from graft lungs underwent real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, and measurement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carbon monoxide ventilation begun 1 hour after death reduced wet/dry ratio after ex vivo lung perfusion. After transplantation, the carbon monoxide-ventilation group had better oxygenation; higher levels of tissue cyclic guanosine monophosphate, heme oxidase-1 expression, and p38 phosphorylation; reduced c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation; and reduced expression of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β messenger RNA. Administration of carbon monoxide to the deceased donor and non-heart-beating donor lungs reduces ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat lungs transplanted from non-heart-beating donors. Therapy to the deceased donor via the airway may improve post-transplant lung function. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for

  20. Evaluation of two-way protein fluxes across the alveolo-capillary membrane by scintigraphy in rats: effect of lung inflation.

    PubMed

    de Prost, Nicolas; Dreyfuss, Didier; Saumon, Georges

    2007-02-01

    Pulmonary microvascular and alveolar epithelial permeability were evaluated in vivo by scintigraphic imaging during lung distension. A zone of alveolar flooding was made by instilling a solution containing 99mTc-albumin in a bronchus. Alveolar epithelial permeability was estimated from the rate at which this tracer left the lungs. Microvascular permeability was simultaneously estimated measuring the accumulation of (111)In-transferrin in lungs. Four levels of lung distension (corresponding to 15, 20, 25, and 30 cmH2O end-inspiratory airway pressure) were studied during mechanical ventilation. Computed tomography scans showed that the zone of alveolar flooding underwent the same distension as the contralateral lung during inflation with gas. Increasing lung tissue stretch by ventilation at high airway pressure immediately increased microvascular, but also alveolar epithelial, permeability to proteins. The same end-inspiratory pressure threshold (between 20 and 25 cmH2O) was observed for epithelial and endothelial permeability changes, which corresponded to a tidal volume between 13.7 +/- 4.69 and 22.2 +/- 2.12 ml/kg body wt. Whereas protein flux from plasma to alveolar space ((111)In-transferrin lung-to-heart ratio slope) was constant over 120 min, the rate at which 99mTc-albumin left air spaces decreased with time. This pattern can be explained by changes in alveolar permeability with time or by a compartment model including an intermediate interstitial space.

  1. Mechanical ventilation-associated lung fibrosis in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a significant contributor to poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Benitez, Nuria E; Laffey, John G; Parotto, Matteo; Spieth, Peter M; Villar, Jesús; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S

    2014-07-01

    One of the most challenging problems in critical care medicine is the management of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Increasing evidence from experimental and clinical studies suggests that mechanical ventilation, which is necessary for life support in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, can cause lung fibrosis, which may significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality. The role of mechanical stress as an inciting factor for lung fibrosis versus its role in lung homeostasis and the restoration of normal pulmonary parenchymal architecture is poorly understood. In this review, the authors explore recent advances in the field of pulmonary fibrosis in the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, concentrating on its relevance to the practice of mechanical ventilation, as commonly applied by anesthetists and intensivists. The authors focus the discussion on the thesis that mechanical ventilation-or more specifically, that ventilator-induced lung injury-may be a major contributor to lung fibrosis. The authors critically appraise possible mechanisms underlying the mechanical stress-induced lung fibrosis and highlight potential therapeutic strategies to mitigate this fibrosis.

  2. In Vivo Testing of Extracorporeal Membrane Ventilators: iLA-Activve Versus Prototype I-Lung.

    PubMed

    Kischkel, Sabine; Bergt, Stefan; Brock, Beate; von Grönheim, Johan; Herbst, Anne; Epping, Marc-Jonas; Matheis, Georg; Novosel, Esther; Schneider, Joerg; Warnke, Philipp; Podbielski, Andreas; Roesner, Jan P; Lelkes, Peter I; Vollmar, Brigitte

    A side-by-side comparison of the decarboxylation efficacy of two pump-driven venovenous extracorporeal lung assist devices, i.e., a first prototype of the new miniaturized ambulatory extracorporeal membrane ventilator, I-lung versus the commercial system iLA-activve for more than a period of 72 hours in a large animal model. Fifteen German Landrace pigs were anesthetized and underwent mechanical hypoventilation to induce severe hypercapnia. Decarboxylation was accomplished by either the I-lung or the iLA-activve via a double lumen catheter in the jugular vein. Sham-operated pigs were not connected to extracorporeal devices. Cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic parameters were continuously monitored, combined with periodic arterial blood sampling for subsequent clinical blood diagnostics, such as gas exchange, hemolysis, coagulation parameters, and cytokine profiles. At the termination of the studies, lung tissue was harvested and examined histologically for pulmonary morphology and leukocyte tissue infiltration. Both extracorporeal devices showed high and comparable efficacy with respect to carbon dioxide elimination for more than 72 hours and were not associated with either bleeding events or clotting disorders. Pigs of both groups showed cardiovascular and hemodynamic stability without marked differences to sham-operated animals. Groups also did not differ in terms of inflammatory and metabolic parameters. We established a preclinical in vivo porcine model for comparative long-term testing of I-lung and iLA-activve. The I-lung prototype proved to be safe and feasible, providing adequate decarboxylation without any adverse events. Once translated into the clinical treatment, the new miniaturized and transportable I-lung device might represent a promising tool for treating awake and mobilized patients with decompensated pulmonary disorders.

  3. SU-E-J-90: Lobar-Level Lung Ventilation Analysis Using 4DCT and Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Du, K; Bayouth, J; Patton, T; Reinhardt, J; Gerard, S; Christensen, G; Zhao, B; Pan, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess regional changes in human lung ventilation and mechanics using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deformable image registration. This work extends our prior analysis of the entire lung to a lobe-based analysis. Methods: 4DCT images acquired from 20 patients prior to radiation therapy (RT) were used for this analysis. Jacobian ventilation and motion maps were computed from the displacement field after deformable image registration between the end of expiration breathing phase and the end of inspiration breathing phase. The lobes were manually segmented on the reference phase by a medical physicist expert. The voxel-by-voxel ventilation and motion magnitude for all subjects were grouped by lobes and plotted into cumulative voxel frequency curves respectively. In addition, to eliminate the effect of different breathing efforts across subjects, we applied the inter-subject equivalent lung volume (ELV) method on a subset of the cohort and reevaluated the lobar ventilation. Results: 95% of voxels in the lung are expanding during inspiration. However, some local regions of lung tissue show far more expansion than others. The greatest expansion with respiration occurs within the lower lobes; between exhale and inhale the median expansion in lower lobes is approximately 15%, while the median expansion in upper lobes is 10%. This appears to be driven by a subset of lung tissues within the lobe that have greater expansion; twice the number of voxels in the lower lobes (20%) expand by > 30% when compared to the upper lobes (10%). Conclusion: Lung ventilation and motion show significant difference on the lobar level. There are different lobar fractions of driving voxels that contribute to the major expansion of the lung. This work was supported by NIH grant CA166703.

  4. Is the predicted postoperative FEV1 estimated by planar lung perfusion scintigraphy accurate in patients undergoing pulmonary resection? Comparison of two processing methods.

    PubMed

    Caglar, Meltem; Kara, Murat; Aksoy, Tamer; Kiratli, Pinar Ozgen; Karabulut, Erdem; Dogan, Riza

    2010-07-01

    Estimation of postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) with radionuclide lung scintigraphy is frequently used to define functional operability in patients undergoing lung resection. We conducted a study to outline the reliability of planar quantitative lung perfusion scintigraphy (QLPS) with two different processing methods to estimate the postoperative lung function in patients with resectable lung disease. Forty-one patients with a mean age of 57 +/- 12 years who underwent either a pneumonectomy (n = 14) or a lobectomy (n = 27) were included in the study. QLPS with Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin was performed. Both three equal zones were generated for each lung [zone method (ZM)] and more precise regions of interest were drawn according to their anatomical shape in the anterior and posterior projections [lobe mapping method (LMM)] for each patient. The predicted postoperative (ppo) FEV1 values were compared with actual FEV1 values measured on postoperative day 1 (pod1 FEV1) and day 7 (pod 7 FEV1). The mean of preoperative FEV1 and ppoFEV1 values was 2.10 +/- 0.57 and 1.57 +/- 0.44 L, respectively. The mean of Pod1FEV1 (1.04 +/- 0.30 L) was lower than ppoFEV1 (p < 0.0001) but increased on day 7 (1.31 +/- 0.32 L) (p < 0.0001); however, it never reached the predicted values. Zone and LMMs estimated mean ppoFEV1 as 1.56 +/- 0.45 and 1.57 +/- 0.44 L, respectively. Both methods overestimated the actual value by 50% (ZM), 51% (LMM) and 19% (ZM), 20% (LMM) for pod 1 and pod 7, respectively. This overestimation was more pronounced in patients with chronic lung disease and hilar tumors. No significant differences were observed between ppoFEV1 values estimated by ZM or by LMM (p > 0.05). PpoFEV1 values predicted by both the zone and LMMs overestimated the actual measured lung volumes in patients undergoing pulmonary resection in the early postoperative period. LMM is not superior to ZM.

  5. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kipritidis, John Keall, Paul J.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r{sup -}{sub Inter

  6. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kipritidis, John; Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r¯Inter=0.52±0

  7. Assisted Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dries, David J

    2016-01-01

    Controlled Mechanical Ventilation may be essential in the setting of severe respiratory failure but consequences to the patient including increased use of sedation and neuromuscular blockade may contribute to delirium, atelectasis, and diaphragm dysfunction. Assisted ventilation allows spontaneous breathing activity to restore physiological displacement of the diaphragm and recruit better perfused lung regions. Pressure Support Ventilation is the most frequently used mode of assisted mechanical ventilation. However, this mode continues to provide a monotonous pattern of support for respiration which is normally a dynamic process. Noisy Pressure Support Ventilation where tidal volume is varied randomly by the ventilator may improve ventilation and perfusion matching but the degree of support is still determined by the ventilator. Two more recent modes of ventilation, Proportional Assist Ventilation and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA), allow patient determination of the pattern and depth of ventilation. Proposed advantages of Proportional Assist Ventilation and NAVA include decrease in patient ventilator asynchrony and improved adaptation of ventilator support to changing patient demand. Work of breathing can be normalized with these modes as well. To date, however, a clear pattern of clinical benefit has not been demonstrated. Existing challenges for both of the newer assist modes include monitoring patients with dynamic hyperinflation (auto-positive end expiratory pressure), obstructive lung disease, and air leaks in the ventilator system. NAVA is dependent on consistent transduction of diaphragm activity by an electrode system placed in the esophagus. Longevity of effective support with this technique is unclear.

  8. [Measurement of the Minimum Pressure in the Bronchial Cuff during One-lung Ventilation Using a Capnometer].

    PubMed

    Okubo, Haruka; Kawasaki, Takashi; Shibayama, Aiko; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2015-08-01

    It is recommended to avoid overinflation of the bronchial cuff, leading to ischemic pressure damages to the respiratory mucosa and bronchial rupture. We investigated the minimum bronchial cuff pressure of 35 Fr double lumen tubes (DLTs) during one lung ventilation using a capnometer. We studied 50 patients who were scheduled to undergo thoracic surgery. General anesthesia was induced and the patients were intubated with 35 Fr left DLT. With a fiberoptic bronchoscope, the DLT was positioned appropriately. The bronchial cuff was inflated first with air 3-3.5 ml. Lung isolation was confirmed by auscultation. Measurements were performed with the patient in the lateral position. Ventilating one lung isolatedly for 5 minutes, we confirmed non ventilated condition with a capnometer displaying flat line. The bronchial cuff was deflated 0.5-ml steps just before displaying the respiratory pattern by the capnogram. The bronchial cuff pressure and volume were recorded at this point The minimum pressures of bronchial cuff (volume) for one lung ventilation are for male 5.46 ± 0.6 cmH2O (2.33?0.1 ml) and for female 1.5?0.5 cmH20 (1.09 ± 0.3 ml). These values are smaller than the recommended value (< 25 cmH2O). There was no case in which the collapse of the operated lung was insufficient. In this study, the bronchial pressure higher than 12 cmH2O was not necessary for one lung ventilation. If high intracuff pressure is necessary to seal the bronchus, there are possibilities of the incompatibility of the size of DLT and the herniation of the bronchial cuff to the proximal side. The method of confirmation of OLV using a capnometer can display the non ventilated condition on the monitor objectively. We can thus decrease troubles during operations.

  9. Effects of arginine vasopressin on oxygenation and haemodynamics during one-lung ventilation in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Hüter, L; Schwarzkopf, K; Preussler, N P; Gaser, E; Bauer, R; Schubert, H; Schreiber, T

    2008-03-01

    In a case of arterial hypotension during one-lung ventilation, haemodynamic support may be required to maintain adequate mean arterial pressure. Arginine vasopressin, a potent systemic vasoconstrictor with limited effects on the pulmonary artery pressure, has not been studied in this setting. Twelve female pigs were anaesthetised and ventilated and arterial, central venous and pulmonary artery catheters were inserted. A left-sided double lumen tube was placed via tracheostomy and one-lung ventilation was initiated. The animals were in the left lateral position, with the left lung ventilated and right lung collapsed. Respiratory and haemodynamic values were recorded before and during a continuous infusion of arginine vasopressin sufficient to double the mean arterial pressure. The arginine vasopressin caused a decrease in cardiac output (3.8+/-1.1 vs. 2.7+/-0.7 l/min, P <0.001) and mixed-venous oxygen tension (39.1+/-5.8 vs. 34.4+/-5 mmHg, P=0.003). Pulmonary artery pressure was unchanged (24+/-2 vs. 24+/-3 mmHg, P=0.682). There was no effect of the arginine vasopressin on arterial oxygen tension (226+/-106 vs. 231+/-118 mmHg, P=0.745). However, there was a significant decrease in shunt fraction (28.3+/-6.2 vs. 24.3+/-7.8%, P=0.043) and a significant proportional increase in perfusion of the ventilated lung (78.8+/-9.5 vs. 85.5+/-7.9%, P=0.036). In our animal model of one-lung ventilation, doubling mean arterial pressure by infusion of arginine vasopressin significantly affected global haemodynamics, but had no influence on systemic arterial oxygen tension.

  10. Effects of MMP-9 inhibition by doxycycline on proteome of lungs in high tidal volume mechanical ventilation-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although mechanical ventilation (MV) is a major supportive therapy for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, it may result in side effects including lung injury. In this study we hypothesize that MMP-9 inhibition by doxycycline might reduce MV-related lung damage. Using a proteomic approach we identified the pulmonary proteins altered in high volume ventilation-induced lung injury (VILI). Forty Wistar rats were randomized to an orally pretreated with doxycycline group (n = 20) or to a placebo group (n = 20) each of which was followed by instrumentation prior to either low or high tidal volume mechanical ventilation. Afterwards, animals were euthanized and lungs were harvested for subsequent analyses. Results Mechanical function and gas exchange parameters improved following treatment with doxycycline in the high volume ventilated group as compared to the placebo group. Nine pulmonary proteins have shown significant changes between the two biochemically analysed (high volume ventilated) groups. Treatment with doxycycline resulted in a decrease of pulmonary MMP-9 activity as well as in an increase in the levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation endproduct, apoliporotein A-I, peroxiredoxin II, four molecular forms of albumin and two unnamed proteins. Using the pharmacoproteomic approach we have shown that treatment with doxycycline leads to an increase in levels of several proteins, which could potentially be part of a defense mechanism. Conclusion Administration of doxycycline might be a significant supportive therapeutic strategy in prevention of VILI. PMID:20205825

  11. Activation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway by Mechanical Ventilation Is Associated with Ventilator-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Healthy Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Francisco; Casula, Milena; Flores, Carlos; Blanch, Lluís; Quilez, María Elisa; Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Kacmarek, Robert M.; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) with high tidal volumes (VT) can cause or aggravate lung damage, so-called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). The relationship between specific mechanical events in the lung and the cellular responses that result in VILI remains incomplete. Since activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been suggested to be central to mechanisms of lung healing and fibrosis, we hypothesized that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a role during VILI. Methodology/Principal Findings Prospective, randomized, controlled animal study using adult, healthy, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals (n = 6/group) were randomized to spontaneous breathing or two strategies of MV for 4 hours: low tidal volume (VT) (6 mL/kg) or high VT (20 mL/kg). Histological evaluation of lung tissue, measurements of WNT5A, total β-catenin, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41) β-catenin, matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) protein levels by Western blot, and WNT5A, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41) β-catenin, MMP-7, and AXIN2 immunohistochemical localization in the lungs were analyzed. High-VT MV caused lung inflammation and perivascular edema with cellular infiltrates and collagen deposition. Protein levels of WNT5A, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41) β-catenin, MMP-7, cyclin D1, VEGF, and AXIN2 in the lungs were increased in all ventilated animals although high-VT MV was associated with significantly higher levels of WNT5A, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41) β-catenin, MMP-7, cyclin D1, VEGF, and AXIN2 levels. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is modulated very early by MV in lungs without preexistent lung disease, suggesting that activation of this pathway could play an important role in both VILI and lung repair. Modulation of this pathway might represent a therapeutic option for prevention and/or management of VILI. PMID:21935365

  12. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced pulmonary fibrosis in healthy lungs.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jesús; Cabrera, Nuria E; Valladares, Francisco; Casula, Milena; Flores, Carlos; Blanch, Lluís; Quilez, María Elisa; Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Kacmarek, Robert M; Slutsky, Arthur S

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) with high tidal volumes (V(T)) can cause or aggravate lung damage, so-called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). The relationship between specific mechanical events in the lung and the cellular responses that result in VILI remains incomplete. Since activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been suggested to be central to mechanisms of lung healing and fibrosis, we hypothesized that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a role during VILI. Prospective, randomized, controlled animal study using adult, healthy, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals (n = 6/group) were randomized to spontaneous breathing or two strategies of MV for 4 hours: low tidal volume (V(T)) (6 mL/kg) or high V(T) (20 mL/kg). Histological evaluation of lung tissue, measurements of WNT5A, total β-catenin, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41) β-catenin, matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) protein levels by Western blot, and WNT5A, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41) β-catenin, MMP-7, and AXIN2 immunohistochemical localization in the lungs were analyzed. High-V(T) MV caused lung inflammation and perivascular edema with cellular infiltrates and collagen deposition. Protein levels of WNT5A, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41) β-catenin, MMP-7, cyclin D1, VEGF, and AXIN2 in the lungs were increased in all ventilated animals although high-V(T) MV was associated with significantly higher levels of WNT5A, non-phospho (Ser33/37/Thr41) β-catenin, MMP-7, cyclin D1, VEGF, and AXIN2 levels. Our findings demonstrate that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is modulated very early by MV in lungs without preexistent lung disease, suggesting that activation of this pathway could play an important role in both VILI and lung repair. Modulation of this pathway might represent a therapeutic option for prevention and/or management of VILI.

  13. The estimation of administered activity of krypton-81m for lung ventilation studies.

    PubMed

    Dudley, N J; Griffith, K; McGill, G P; Rogers, A T

    1995-04-01

    Measurement or estimation of the activity of krypton-81m administered to a patient during lung ventilation imaging is difficult, due to the short half-life and continuous delivery via pipework, and no satisfactory method exists. Calculations based on generator activity have the disadvantages that this activity may not be accurately known and that not all activity eluted is inhaled by the patient. The aim of this study was to develop a simple method for estimating the administered activity from the number of counts in each patient image. A formula based on the ratio of counts in 81mKr and technetium-99m lung ventilation and perfusion images was developed and reduced so that administered activity could be directly calculated from the total 81mKr counts, the 99mTc count rate, the administered activity of 99mTc and a constant representing the ratio of counts expected from equal activities of each radioisotope. The formula allows a direct calculation from the image acquisition data following an initial set of experimental work to establish the constant for a particular gamma camera and collimator system.

  14. Mechanical ventilation enhances lung inflammation and caspase activity in a model of mouse pneumovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bem, Reinout A; van Woensel, Job B M; Bos, Albert P; Koski, Amy; Farnand, Alex W; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F; Martin, Thomas R; Matute-Bello, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Severe infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children can progress to respiratory distress and acute lung injury (ALI). Accumulating evidence suggests that mechanical ventilation (MV) is an important cofactor in the development of ALI by modulating the host immune responses to bacteria. This study investigates whether MV enhances the host response to pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a mouse pneumovirus that has been used as a model for RSV infection in humans. BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with diluted clarified lung homogenates from mice infected with PVM strain J3666 or uninfected controls. Four days after inoculation, the mice were subjected to 4 h of MV (tidal volume, 10 ml/kg) or allowed to breathe spontaneously. When compared with that of mice inoculated with PVM only, the administration of MV to PVM-infected mice resulted in increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid concentrations of the cytokines macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, MIP-1alpha (CCL3), and IL-6; increased alveolar-capillary permeability to high molecular weight proteins; and increased caspase-3 activity in lung homogenates. We conclude that MV enhances the activation of inflammatory and caspase cell death pathways in response to pneumovirus infection. We speculate that MV potentially contributes to the development of lung injury in patients with RSV infection.

  15. Renal Scintigraphy

    MedlinePlus

    ... size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Renal Scintigraphy Sponsored by ...

  16. Distribution of ventilation/perfusion ratios in pulmonary embolism: an adjunct to the interpretation of ventilation/perfusion lung scans.

    PubMed

    Itti, Emmanuel; Nguyen, Séverine; Robin, Fabrice; Desarnaud, Serge; Rosso, Jean; Harf, Alain; Meignan, Michel

    2002-12-01

    Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) by visual interpretation of ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scans is limited by the high percentages of patients classified in the intermediate- and low-probability categories. This study proposes a quantitative analysis of the distribution of V/Q ratios to better identify patients with PE. We studied 99 consecutive patients who underwent dual-isotope (81m)Kr/(99m)Tc-macroaggregate V/Q scanning and arterial blood gas analysis within 48 h. The 8-view V/Q scans were visually analyzed by 2 observers according to the revised criteria of the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) (normal scan or low, intermediate, or high probability of PE). Quantitative analysis of the posterior-view distribution histogram of V/Q ratios was performed using dedicated software. Briefly, regions of interest were drawn around the lungs on the matched V/Q images, smooth filtering was applied, normalized regional V/Q ratios were calculated within each pixel, and a distribution histogram was built. Patients with normal scans (n = 16) had a predominance of V/Q ratios (63.3% +/- 13.0%) between 0.8 and 1.2. They had only 9.8% +/- 5.8% of ratios > 1.2, and the remaining 26.9% +/- 7.5% of ratios were <0.8. By contrast, patients with PE (n = 34) were characterized by a significant increase (15.5 +/- 10.0%, P = 0.04) in high V/Q ratios (>1.2) and a significant increase (34.5% +/- 8.2%, P = 0.003) in low V/Q ratios (<0.8). Interestingly, a similar pattern was found in patients with a high PIOPED probability of PE, 21.3% +/- 11.0% and 37.5% +/- 9.2%, respectively. Within the nondiagnostic group (intermediate- + low-probability scans, n = 58), 17 patients were finally diagnosed with PE. Analysis of the distribution histogram in this group allowed the identification of 5 patients with PE (specificity, 78%). A quantitative approach to lung scan interpretation, based on the distribution histogram of V/Q ratios, may be helpful for categorizing

  17. Collateral Ventilation to Congenital Hyperlucent Lung Lesions Assessed on Xenon-Enhanced Dynamic Dual-Energy CT: an Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Namkug; Park, Seung Il; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan

    2011-01-01

    Objective We wanted to evaluate the resistance to collateral ventilation in congenital hyperlucent lung lesions and to correlate that with the anatomic findings on xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Materials and Methods Xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT was successfully and safely performed in eight children (median age: 5.5 years, 4 boys and 4 girls) with congenital hyperlucent lung lesions. Functional assessment of the lung lesions on the xenon map was done, including performing a time-xenon value curve analysis and assessing the amplitude of xenon enhancement (A) value, the rate of xenon enhancement (K) value and the time of arrival value. Based on the A value, the lung lesions were categorized into high or low (A value > 10 Hounsfield unit [HU]) resistance to collateral ventilation. In addition, the morphologic CT findings of the lung lesions, including cyst, mucocele and an accessory or incomplete fissure, were assessed on the weighted-average CT images. The xenon-enhanced CT radiation dose was estimated. Results Five of the eight lung lesions were categorized into the high resistance group and three lesions were categorized into the low resistance group. The A and K values in the normal lung were higher than those in the low resistance group. The time of arrival values were delayed in the low resistance group. Cysts were identified in five lesions, mucocele in four, accessory fissure in three and incomplete fissure in two. Either cyst or an accessory fissure was seen in four of the five lesions showing high resistance to collateral ventilation. The xenon-enhanced CT radiation dose was 2.3 ± 0.6 mSv. Conclusion Xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT can help visualize and quantitate various degrees of collateral ventilation to congenital hyperlucent lung lesions in addition to assessing the anatomic details of the lung. PMID:21228937

  18. Short-term outcomes of cadaveric lung transplantation in ventilator-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chen, Jin-Shing; Ko, Wen-Je; Huang, Shu-Chien; Kuo, Shuenn-Wen; Huang, Pei-Ming; Chi, Nai-Hsin; Chang, Chin-Chih; Chen, Robert J; Lee, Yung-Chie

    2009-01-01

    Survival after cadaveric lung transplantation (LTx) in respiratory failure recipients who were already dependent on ventilation support prior to transplantation is poor, with a relatively high rate of surgical mortality and morbidity. In this study, we sought to describe the short-term outcomes of bilateral sequential LTx (BSLTx) under extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support in a consecutive series of preoperative respiratory failure patients. Between July 2006 and July 2008, we performed BSLTx under venoarterious (VA) ECMO support in 10 respiratory failure patients with various lung diseases. Prior to transplantation, 6 patients depended on invasive mechanical ventilation support and the others (40%) needed noninvasive positive pressure ventilation to maintain adequate gas exchange. Their mean age was 40.9 years and the mean observation period was 16.4 months. Except for 1 ECMO circuit that had been set up in the intensive care unit for pulmonary crisis 5 days prior to transplantation, most ECMO (90%) circuits were set up in the operating theater prior to pneumonectomy of native lung during transplantation. Patients were successfully weaned off ECMO circuits immediately after transplantation in 8 cases, and within 1 day (1/10 patients) and after 9 days (1/10 patients) due to severe reperfusion lung edema following transplantation. The mean duration of ECMO support in those successfully weaned off in the operating theater (n = 8) was 7.8 hours. The average duration of intensive care unit stay (n = 10) was 43.1 days (range, 35 to 162 days) and hospital stay (n = 10) was 70 days (range, 20 to 86 days). Although 4 patients (40%) had different degrees of complicated postoperative courses unrelated to ECMO, all patients were discharged home postoperatively. The mean forced vital capacity and the forced expiratory volume in 1 second both increased significantly postoperatively. The cumulative survival rates at 3 months and at 12 months post

  19. Simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging of ventilation distribution and gas uptake in the human lung using hyperpolarized xenon-129

    PubMed Central

    Mugler, John P.; Altes, Talissa A.; Ruset, Iulian C.; Dregely, Isabel M.; Mata, Jaime F.; Miller, G. Wilson; Ketel, Stephen; Ketel, Jeffrey; Hersman, F. William; Ruppert, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Despite a myriad of technical advances in medical imaging, as well as the growing need to address the global impact of pulmonary diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, on health and quality of life, it remains challenging to obtain in vivo regional depiction and quantification of the most basic physiological functions of the lung—gas delivery to the airspaces and gas uptake by the lung parenchyma and blood—in a manner suitable for routine application in humans. We report a method based on MRI of hyperpolarized xenon-129 that permits simultaneous observation of the 3D distributions of ventilation (gas delivery) and gas uptake, as well as quantification of regional gas uptake based on the associated ventilation. Subjects with lung disease showed variations in gas uptake that differed from those in ventilation in many regions, suggesting that gas uptake as measured by this technique reflects such features as underlying pathological alterations of lung tissue or of local blood flow. Furthermore, the ratio of the signal associated with gas uptake to that associated with ventilation was substantially altered in subjects with lung disease compared with healthy subjects. This MRI-based method provides a way to quantify relationships among gas delivery, exchange, and transport, and appears to have significant potential to provide more insight into lung disease. PMID:21098267

  20. Risk of recurrence in patients with pulmonary embolism: predictive role of D-dimer and of residual perfusion defects on lung scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Poli, Daniela; Cenci, Caterina; Antonucci, Emilia; Grifoni, Elisa; Arcangeli, Chiara; Prisco, Domenico; Abbate, Rosanna; Miniati, Massimo

    2013-02-01

    The stratification of recurrence risk after a first episode of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important topic of research, especially in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). Elevated D-dimer levels and residual vein obstruction (RVO) at compression ultrasonography have been studied as predictors of recurrence after withdrawing oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT). It is still unknown if residual perfusion defects (PD) on lung scintigraphy are related to recurrent PE. In the present study, we evaluated the association of PD with PE recurrence. The relationship between PD, elevated D-dimer levels, and RVO was also investigated. We prospectively followed 236 consecutive patients who survived a first episode of objectively confirmed PE, with or without deep-vein thrombosis. After at least three months of OAT, treatment was withdrawn in 139 patients. D-dimer levels were evaluated at one month of OAT withdrawal, RVO was measured, and perfusion lung scan (P-scan) was performed to evaluate PD. During follow-up, 20 patients experienced a recurrent episode of VTE. Elevated D-dimer levels were significantly associated with VTE recurrence, (p=0.003). RVO was present in 22% of the patients with recurrence and in 7.5% of those without (p=0.07). No significant association was found between PD >10% and VTE recurrence, D-dimer, or RVO. In conclusion, we confirmed the positive predictive value of elevated D-dimer levels for recurrent VTE. Residual PD on lung scintigraphy are neither predictive of recurrence nor related to D-dimer levels or RVO.

  1. SU-D-BRB-01: 4D-CT Lung Ventilation Images Vary with 4D-CT Sorting Techniques.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Kabus, S; Lorenz, C; Johnston, E; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Keall, P

    2012-06-01

    4D-CT ventilation imaging is a novel promising technique for lung functional imaging and has potential as a biomarker for radiation pneumonitis, but has not been validated in human subjects. The current 4D- CT technique with phase-based sorting results in artifacts at an alarmingly high frequency (90%), which may introduce variations into ventilation calculations. The purpose of this study was to quantify the variability of 4D- CT ventilation imaging to 4D-CT sorting techniques. Two 4D-CT images were generated from the same data set by: (1) phase-based; (2) anatomic similarity- and abdominal displacement-based sorting for five patients. Two ventilation image sets (V_phase and V_anat) were then calculated by deformable image registration of peak-exhale and peak-inhale4D-CT images and quantification of regional volume change based on Hounsfield unit change. The variability of 4D-CT ventilation imaging wasquantified using the voxel-based Spearman rank correlation coefficients and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) for the spatial overlap of segmented low- functional lung regions. The relationship between the abdominal motionrange variation and ventilation variation was also assessed using linearregression. Furthermore, the correlations between V_phase or V_anat and SPECT ventilation images (assumed ground-truth) were compared. In general, displacement- and anatomic similarity-based sorting reduced 4D- CT artifacts compared to phase-based sorting. The voxel-based correlationsbetween V_phase and V_anat were only moderate (range, 0.57-0.77). The DSCs for the low-functional lung regions were moderate to substantial (0.58-0.70). The relationship between the motion range variation and ventilation variation was strong on average (R2=0.79±0.25), suggesting that ventilation variations are related to 4D-CT artifacts. Vanat was found to improve correlations with SPECT ventilation images compared to V_phase. 4D-CT ventilation images vary markedly with 4D-CT sorting techniques. 4

  2. Use of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Ventilation Imaging to Correlate Lung Dose and Function With Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao, Zhongxing; Guerrero, Thomas; Martel, Mary K.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based ventilation is an emerging imaging modality that can be used in the thoracic treatment planning process. The clinical benefit of using ventilation images in radiation treatment plans remains to be tested. The purpose of the current work was to test the potential benefit of using ventilation in treatment planning by evaluating whether dose to highly ventilated regions of the lung resulted in increased incidence of clinical toxicity. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment 4DCT data were used to compute pretreatment ventilation images for 96 lung cancer patients. Ventilation images were calculated using 4DCT data, deformable image registration, and a density-change based algorithm. Dose–volume and ventilation-based dose function metrics were computed for each patient. The ability of the dose–volume and ventilation-based dose–function metrics to predict for severe (grade 3+) radiation pneumonitis was assessed using logistic regression analysis, area under the curve (AUC) metrics, and bootstrap methods. Results: A specific patient example is presented that demonstrates how incorporating ventilation-based functional information can help separate patients with and without toxicity. The logistic regression significance values were all lower for the dose–function metrics (range P=.093-.250) than for their dose–volume equivalents (range, P=.331-.580). The AUC values were all greater for the dose–function metrics (range, 0.569-0.620) than for their dose–volume equivalents (range, 0.500-0.544). Bootstrap results revealed an improvement in model fit using dose–function metrics compared to dose–volume metrics that approached significance (range, P=.118-.155). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study that attempts to correlate lung dose and 4DCT ventilation-based function to thoracic toxicity after radiation therapy. Although the results were not significant at the .05 level, our data suggests

  3. Hyperpolarized 3He MR imaging of the lung: effect of subject immobilization on the occurrence of ventilation defects.

    PubMed

    Mata, Jaime; Altes, Talissa; Knake, Jeffrey; Mugler, John; Brookeman, James; de Lange, Eduard

    2008-02-01

    To investigate immobilization-induced ventilation defects when performing hyperpolarized (3)He (H(3)He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung. Twelve healthy subjects underwent MRI of the lungs after inhalation of H(3)He gas at three time points: 1) immediately after having been positioned supine on the MRI scanner table, 2) at 45 minutes while remaining supine, 3) and immediately thereafter after having turned prone. All image sets were reviewed in random order by three independent, blinded readers who recorded number, location, and size of H(3)He ventilation defects. Scores were averaged for each time point and comparisons were made to determine change in number, location, and size of ventilation defects with time and positioning of the subject in the scanner. At baseline supine, there were small numbers of defects in the dependent (posterior) and nondependent (anterior) portions of the lung (P = .625). At 45 minutes, there was a significant increase in the mean number of ventilation defects/slice (VDS) for the dependent (P = .005) and a decrease for the nondependent lung portions (P = .021). After subjects turned prone, mean VDS for posterior defects decreased significantly (P = .011), whereas those for anterior defects increased (P = .010). Most defects were less than 3 cm in diameter. It was found that immobilization of the subject for an extended period led to increased number of H(3)He ventilation defects in the dependent portions of the lung. Therefore, after a subject is positioned in the scanner, H(3)He MR imaging should be performed quickly to avoid the occurrence of the immobilization-induced ventilation defects and possible overestimation of disease.

  4. Hyperpolarized 3He MR imaging of the lung: Effect of subject immobilization on the occurrence of ventilation defects

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Jaime; Altes, Talissa; Knake, Jeffrey; Mugler, John; Brookeman, James; de Lange, Eduard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate immobilization-induced ventilation defects when performing hyperpolarized 3He (H3He) MRI of the lung. Methods and Materials Twelve healthy subjects underwent MRI of the lungs following inhalation of H3He gas at three time points: 1) immediately after having been positioned supine on the MR scanner table, 2) at 45 minutes while remaining supine, 3) and immediately thereafter after having turned prone. All image sets were reviewed in random order by three independent, blinded readers who recorded number, location and size of H3He ventilation defects. Scores were averaged for each time point and comparisons were made to determine change in number, location and size of ventilation defects with time and positioning of the subject in the scanner. Results At baseline supine there were small numbers of defects in the dependent (posterior) and non-dependent (anterior) portions of the lung (p=0.625). At 45 minutes there was a significant increase in the mean number of ventilation defects/slice (VDS) for the dependent (p=0.005) and a decrease for the non-dependent lung portions (p=0.021). After subjects turned prone, mean VDS for posterior defects decreased significantly (p=0.011) while those for anterior defects increased (p=0.010). Most defects were less than 3 cm in diameter. Conclusion It was found that immobilization of the subject for an extended period of time led to increased number of H3He ventilation defects in the dependent portions of the lung. Therefore, after a subject is positioned in the scanner, H3He MR imaging should be performed quickly to avoid the occurrence of the immobilization-induced ventilation defects, and possible overestimation of disease. PMID:18206626

  5. Absence of TNF-α enhances inflammatory response in the newborn lung undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Harald; Pritzke, Tina; Oak, Prajakta; Kossert, Melina; Biebach, Luisa; Förster, Kai; Koschlig, Markus; Alvira, Cristina M; Hilgendorff, Anne

    2016-05-15

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), characterized by impaired alveolarization and vascularization in association with lung inflammation and apoptosis, often occurs after mechanical ventilation with oxygen-rich gas (MV-O2). As heightened expression of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α has been described in infants with BPD, we hypothesized that absence of TNF-α would reduce pulmonary inflammation, and attenuate structural changes in newborn mice undergoing MV-O2 Neonatal TNF-α null (TNF-α(-/-)) and wild type (TNF-α(+/+)) mice received MV-O2 for 8 h; controls spontaneously breathed 40% O2 Histologic, mRNA, and protein analysis in vivo were complemented by in vitro studies subjecting primary pulmonary myofibroblasts to mechanical stretch. Finally, TNF-α level in tracheal aspirates from preterm infants were determined by ELISA. Although MV-O2 induced larger and fewer alveoli in both, TNF-α(-/-) and TNF-α(+/+) mice, it caused enhanced lung apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3/-6/-8), infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils, and proinflammatory mediator expression (IL-1β, CXCL-1, MCP-1) in TNF-α(-/-) mice. These differences were associated with increased pulmonary transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, decreased TGF-β inhibitor SMAD-7 expression, and reduced pulmonary NF-κB activity in ventilated TNF-α(-/-) mice. Preterm infants who went on to develop BPD showed significantly lower TNF-α levels at birth. Our results suggest a critical balance between TNF-α and TGF-β signaling in the developing lung, and underscore the critical importance of these key pathways in the pathogenesis of BPD. Future treatment strategies need to weigh the potential benefits of inhibiting pathologic cytokine expression against the potential of altering key developmental pathways.

  6. Continuous on-line measurements of respiratory system, lung and chest wall mechanics during mechanic ventilation.

    PubMed

    Kárason, S; Søndergaard, S; Lundin, S; Stenqvist, O

    2001-08-01

    We present a concept of on-line, manoeuvre-free monitoring of respiratory mechanics during dynamic conditions, displaying calculated alveolar pressure/volume curves continuously and separating lung and chest wall mechanics. Prospective observational study. Intensive care unit of a university hospital. Ten ventilator-treated patients with acute lung injury. Different positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and tidal volumes, low flow inflation. Previously validated methods were used to present a single-value dynostatic compliance for the whole breath and a dynostatic volume-dependent initial, middle and final compliance within the breath. A high individual variation of respiratory mechanics was observed. Reproducibility of repeated measurements was satisfactory (coefficients of variations for dynostatic volume-dependent compliance: < or =9.2% for total respiratory system, < or =18% for lung). Volume-dependent compliance showed a statistically significant pattern of successively decreasing compliance from the initial segment through the middle and final parts within each breath at all respiratory settings. This pattern became more prominent with increasing PEEP and tidal volume, indicating a greater distension of alveoli. No lower inflection point (LIP) was seen in patients with respiratory rate 20/min and PEEP at 4 cmH2O. A trial with low flow inflation in four of the patients showed formation of a LIP in three of them and an upper inflection in one. The monitoring concept revealed a constant pattern of successively decreasing compliance within each breath, which became more prominent with increasing PEEP and tidal volume. The monitoring concept offers a simple and reliable method of monitoring respiratory mechanics during ongoing ventilator treatment.

  7. CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Lung Biopsy with Novel Steerable Biopsy Canula: Ex-Vivo Evaluation in Ventilated Porcine Lung Explants

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Philipp J. Fabel, Michael; Bolte, Hendrik; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Jahnke, Thomas; Heller, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Biederer, Juergen

    2010-08-15

    The purpose was to evaluate ex-vivo a prototype of a novel biopsy canula under CT fluoroscopy-guidance in ventilated porcine lung explants in respiratory motion simulations. Using an established chest phantom for porcine lung explants, n = 24 artificial lesions consisting of a fat-wax-Lipiodol mixture (approx. 70HU) were placed adjacent to sensible structures such as aorta, pericardium, diaphragm, bronchus and pulmonary artery. A piston pump connected to a reservoir beneath a flexible silicone reconstruction of a diaphragm simulated respiratory motion by rhythmic inflation and deflation of 1.5 L water. As biopsy device an 18-gauge prototype biopsy canula with a lancet-like, helically bended cutting edge was used. The artificial lesions were punctured under CT fluoroscopy-guidance (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; 30mAs/120 kV/5 mm slice thickness) implementing a dedicated protocol for CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy. The mean-diameter of the artificial lesions was 8.3 {+-} 2.6 mm, and the mean-distance of the phantom wall to the lesions was 54.1 {+-} 13.5 mm. The mean-displacement of the lesions by respiratory motion was 14.1 {+-} 4.0 mm. The mean-duration of CT fluoroscopy was 9.6 {+-} 5.1 s. On a 4-point scale (1 = central; 2 = peripheral; 3 = marginal; 4 = off target), the mean-targeted precision was 1.9 {+-} 0.9. No misplacement of the biopsy canula affecting adjacent structures could be detected. The novel steerable biopsy canula proved to be efficient in the ex-vivo set-up. The chest phantom enabling respiratory motion and the steerable biopsy canula offer a feasible ex-vivo system for evaluating and training CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy adapted to respiratory motion.

  8. Automatic delineation of functional lung volumes with (68)Ga-ventilation/perfusion PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Siva, Shankar; Callahan, Jason; Claudic, Yannis; Bourhis, David; Steinfort, Daniel P; Hicks, Rodney J; Hofman, Michael S

    2017-10-10

    Functional volumes computed from (68)Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) PET/CT, which we have shown to correlate with pulmonary function test parameters (PFTs), have potential diagnostic utility in a variety of clinical applications, including radiotherapy planning. An automatic segmentation method would facilitate delineation of such volumes. The aim of this study was to develop an automated threshold-based approach to delineate functional volumes that best correlates with manual delineation. Thirty lung cancer patients undergoing both V/Q PET/CT and PFTs were analyzed. Images were acquired following inhalation of Galligas and, subsequently, intravenous administration of (68)Ga-macroaggreted-albumin (MAA). Using visually defined manual contours as the reference standard, various cutoff values, expressed as a percentage of the maximal pixel value, were applied. The average volume difference and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were calculated, measuring the similarity of the automatic segmentation and the reference standard. Pearson's correlation was also calculated to compare automated volumes with manual volumes, and automated volumes optimized to PFT indices. For ventilation volumes, mean volume difference was lowest (- 0.4%) using a 15%max threshold with Pearson's coefficient of 0.71. Applying this cutoff, median DSC was 0.93 (0.87-0.95). Nevertheless, limits of agreement in volume differences were large (- 31.0 and 30.2%) with differences ranging from - 40.4 to + 33.0%. For perfusion volumes, mean volume difference was lowest and Pearson's coefficient was highest using a 15%max threshold (3.3% and 0.81, respectively). Applying this cutoff, median DSC was 0.93 (0.88-0.93). Nevertheless, limits of agreement were again large (- 21.1 and 27.8%) with volume differences ranging from - 18.6 to + 35.5%. Using the 15%max threshold, moderate correlation was demonstrated with FEV1/FVC (r = 0.48 and r = 0.46 for ventilation and perfusion images

  9. [High-frequency ventilation. I. Distribution of alveolar pressure amplitudes during high frequency oscillation in the lung model].

    PubMed

    Theissen, J; Lunkenheimer, P P; Niederer, P; Bush, E; Frieling, G; Lawin, P

    1987-09-01

    The pattern of intrapulmonary pressure distribution was studied during high-frequency ventilation in order to explain the inconsistent results reported in the literature. Methods. Pressure and flow velocity (hot-wire anemometry) were measured in different lung compartments: 1. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of dried pig lungs; 2. In emphysema-simulating airbags sealed to the isolated bronchial trees of dried pig lungs; and 3. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of freshly excised pig lungs. Results. 1. The pressure amplitudes change from one area to another and depending on the exciting frequency. 2. High-frequency oscillation is associated with an increase in pressure amplitude when the exciting frequency rises, whereas with conventional high-frequency jet ventilation the pressure amplitude is more likely to decrease with frequency. 3. During high-frequency jet ventilation the local pressure amplitude changes with the position of the tube in the trachea rather than with the exciting frequency. 4. When the volume of the measuring chamber is doubled the resulting pressure amplitude falls to half the control value. 5. The pressure amplitude and mean pressure measured in the transalveolar chamber vary more or less independently from the peak flow velocity. High-frequency ventilation is thus seen to be a frequency-dependant, inhomogeneous mode of ventilation that can essentially be homogenized by systematically changing the exciting frequency. The frequency-dependant response to different lung areas to excitation is likely to result from an intrabronchially-localized aerodynamic effect rather than the mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma.

  10. The effects of exogenous surfactant administration on ventilation-induced inflammation in mouse models of lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) is an essential supportive therapy for acute lung injury (ALI); however it can also contribute to systemic inflammation. Since pulmonary surfactant has anti-inflammatory properties, the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of exogenous surfactant administration on ventilation-induced systemic inflammation. Methods Mice were randomized to receive an intra-tracheal instillation of a natural exogenous surfactant preparation (bLES, 50 mg/kg) or no treatment as a control. MV was then performed using the isolated and perfused mouse lung (IPML) set up. This model allowed for lung perfusion during MV. In experiment 1, mice were exposed to mechanical ventilation only (tidal volume =20 mL/kg, 2 hours). In experiment 2, hydrochloric acid or air was instilled intra-tracheally four hours before applying exogenous surfactant and ventilation (tidal volume =5 mL/kg, 2 hours). Results For both experiments, exogenous surfactant administration led to increased total and functional surfactant in the treated groups compared to the controls. Exogenous surfactant administration in mice exposed to MV only did not affect peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), lung IL-6 levels and the development of perfusate inflammation compared to non-treated controls. Acid injured mice exposed to conventional MV showed elevated PIP, lung IL-6 and protein levels and greater perfusate inflammation compared to air instilled controls. Instillation of exogenous surfactant did not influence the development of lung injury. Moreover, exogenous surfactant was not effective in reducing the concentration of inflammatory cytokines in the perfusate. Conclusions The data indicates that exogenous surfactant did not mitigate ventilation-induced systemic inflammation in our models. Future studies will focus on altering surfactant composition to improve its immuno-modulating activity. PMID:24256698

  11. Measurement of ventilation- and perfusion-mediated cooling during laser ablation in ex vivo human lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Vietze, Andrea; Koch, Franziska; Laskowski, Ulrich; Linder, Albert; Hosten, Norbert

    2011-11-01

    Perfusion-mediated tissue cooling has often been described in the literature for thermal ablation therapies of liver tumors. The objective of this study was to investigate the cooling effects of both perfusion and ventilation during laser ablation of lung malignancies. An ex vivo lung model was used to maintain near physiological conditions for the specimens. Fourteen human lung lobes containing only primary lung tumors (non-small cell lung cancer) were used. Laser ablation was carried out using a Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and laser fibers with 30 mm diffusing tips. Continuous invasive temperature measurement in 10 mm distance from the laser fiber was performed. Laser power was increased at 2 W increments starting at 10 W up to a maximum power of 12-20 W until a temperature plateau around 60 °C was reached at one sensor. Ventilation and perfusion were discontinued for 6 min each to assess their effects on temperature development. The experiments lead to 25 usable temperature profiles. A significant temperature increase was observed for both discontinued ventilation and perfusion. In 6 min without perfusion, the temperature rose about 5.5 °C (mean value, P<0.05); without ventilation it increased about 7.0 °C (mean value, P<0.05). Ventilation- and perfusion-mediated tissue cooling are significant influencing factors on temperature development during thermal ablation. They should be taken into account during the planning and preparation of minimally invasive lung tumor treatment in order to achieve complete ablation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exogenous surfactant preserves lung function and reduces alveolar Evans blue dye influx in a rat model of ventilation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, S J; Vazquez de Anda, G; Gommers, D; Neggers, S J; Sorm, V; Böhm, S H; Lachmann, B

    1998-08-01

    Changes in pulmonary edema infiltration and surfactant after intermittent positive pressure ventilation with high peak inspiratory lung volumes have been well described. To further elucidate the role of surfactant changes, the authors tested the effect of different doses of exogenous surfactant preceding high peak inspiratory lung