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Sample records for lupus erythematodes aseptic

  1. Association of autoimmune hepatitis and systemic lupus erythematodes: A case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Beisel, Claudia; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Teufel, Andreas; Lohse, Ansgar W

    2014-01-01

    Liver test abnormalities have been described in up to 60% of patients with systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE) at some point during the course of their disease. Prior treatment with potentially hepatotoxic drugs or viral hepatitis is commonly considered to be the main cause of liver disease in SLE patients. However, in rare cases elevated liver enzymes may be due to concurrent autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). To distinguish whether the patient has primary liver disease with associated autoimmune clinical and laboratory features resembling SLE - such as AIH - or the elevation of liver enzymes is a manifestation of SLE remains a difficult challenge for the treating physician. Here, we present six female patients with complex autoimmune disorders and hepatitis. Patient charts were reviewed in order to investigate the complex relationship between SLE and AIH. All patients had coexisting autoimmune disease in their medical history. At the time of diagnosis of AIH, patients presented with arthralgia, abdominal complaints, cutaneous involvement and fatigue as common symptoms. All patients fulfilled the current diagnostic criteria of both, AIH and SLE. Remission of acute hepatitis was achieved in all cases after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to this case study a literature review was conducted. PMID:25253972

  2. Chronic aseptic meningitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lancman, M E; Mesropian, H; Granillo, R J

    1989-08-01

    Chronic aseptic meningitis is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. It may occur early in the course of the disease and sometimes may be the initial symptom. We report a patient with chronic aseptic meningitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed several ischemic lesions and an appearance which was compatible with chronic inflammation of the ependyma of the lateral ventricles.

  3. [Terbinafine : Drug-induced lupus erythematodes and triggering of psoriatic skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Mayser, P

    2016-09-01

    Based on the technical information that oral terbinafine must be used with caution in patients with pre-existing psoriasis or lupus erythematosus, the literature was summarized. Terbinafine belongs to the drugs able to induce subcutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE)-with a relatively high risk. The clinical picture of terbinafine-induced SCLE may be highly variable and can also include erythema exsudativum multiforme-like or bullous lesions. Thus, differentiation of terbinafine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis may be difficult. Therefore, terbinafine should be prescribed with caution in patients who show light sensitivity, arthralgias, positive antinuclear antibodies or have a history of SLE or SCLE. Case reports include wide-spread, but mostly nonlife-threatening courses, which did not require systemic therapy with steroids or antimalarials in every case. Terbinafine is also able to induce or to aggravate psoriasis. The latency period seems to be rather short (<4 weeks). Terbinafine therefore is not first choice if a systemic therapy with antimycotics is indicated in a patient with psoriasis or psoriatic diathesis. Azole derivatives according to the guidelines may be used as an alternative. PMID:27455869

  4. [Aseptic necrosis of the temporomandibular joint in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Grinin, V M; Maksimovskiĭ, Iu M; Nasonova, V A

    1999-01-01

    A total of 285 patients with verified systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were examined. They complained of painful temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) and/or limited mobility of the mandible. Eight patients with chronic arthritis of the TMJ and a shortened (by 3-4 mm) mandibular branch were detected. In 4 female patients aged 25-38 with SLE lasting for about 5.5 years, unilateral signs of myoarticular dysfunction of the TMJ, flattening and decrease of the articular head without erosion and destruction, subcortical round foci with uneven internal contours were found in the central or median part of the head, with the compact bone above the foci thinned and the articular surface flattened; this prompted us to regard these changes as avascular necrosis (AN) of the joint. Shortening of the mandibular branch was caused by deformation of the neck of the articular process and its declination backwards. The detected changes in the TMJ were not accompanied by involvement of other joints. All these 4 patients with SLE and TMJ AN suffered from cerebropathy with epileptic attacks (frequent in 2 patients), Raynaud's syndrome, and bright capillaries of the palms and soles; 2 patients developed clinical picture of the antiphospholipid syndrome. Computer tomography and magnetic resonance findings validating the development of TMJ AN in?

  5. Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    What is lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can ... vessels, and brain. There are several kinds of lupus Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common ...

  6. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    Syphilitic aseptic meningitis is a complication of untreated syphilis. It involves inflammation of the tissues covering the ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete bacteria Treponema pallidum . Syphilis has three main ...

  7. Evaluation of ENA-6 Profile by ELISA Immunoassay in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematodes.

    PubMed

    Aganovic-Musinovic, Izeta; Karamehic, Jasenko; Zecevic, Lamija; Gavrankapetanovic, Faris; Avdagic, Nesina; Zaciragic, Asija; Jukic, Tomislav; Grcic, Nerima; Svrakic, Suvada

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur in 3-5% of the population. Study included 30 patients with clinically diagnosed SLE and 30 healthy controls (American college of Rheumatology, 1997). SLE was diagnosed according to criteria issued in 1997 by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). The aim of this study was to evaluate concentration values of each antigen of ENA-6 profile in SLE, to investigate possible correlation between the concentration of Sm antibodies and CIC, and to test their use as possible immunobiological markers in SLE. Furthermore, the aim of our study was to determine whether there is a correlation between Sm antibodies and CIC and SLE activity. The results revealed that all of these ENA-6 and Sm antibodies as biomarkers complement diagnoses of active SLE but their use as solo markers does not allow classifying patients with SLE. Our study has shown that based on calculations from ROC curves, Sm/RNP was clearly a very important marker for diagnosis of SLE (cut off ≥ 9.56 EU, AUC 0,942). The high incidence of Scl-70 (10%) reactivity suggests that ELISA monitoring of this antibody produces more false positive results than other multiplex assay. An important conclusion that can be drawn from the results of our study is that laboratory tests are no more effective than clinical examination for detecting disease relapse, but are helpful in the confirmation of SLE activity.

  8. Evaluation of ENA-6 Profile by ELISA Immunoassay in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematodes

    PubMed Central

    Aganovic-Musinovic, Izeta; Karamehic, Jasenko; Zecevic, Lamija; Gavrankapetanovic, Faris; Avdagic, Nesina; Zaciragic, Asija; Jukic, Tomislav; Grcic, Nerima; Svrakic, Suvada

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur in 3−5% of the population. Study included 30 patients with clinically diagnosed SLE and 30 healthy controls (American college of Rheumatology, 1997). SLE was diagnosed according to criteria issued in 1997 by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). The aim of this study was to evaluate concentration values of each antigen of ENA-6 profile in SLE, to investigate possible correlation between the concentration of Sm antibodies and CIC, and to test their use as possible immunobiological markers in SLE. Furthermore, the aim of our study was to determine whether there is a correlation between Sm antibodies and CIC and SLE activity. The results revealed that all of these ENA-6 and Sm antibodies as biomarkers complement diagnoses of active SLE but their use as solo markers does not allow classifying patients with SLE. Our study has shown that based on calculations from ROC curves, Sm/RNP was clearly a very important marker for diagnosis of SLE (cut off ≥ 9.56 EU, AUC 0,942). The high incidence of Scl-70 (10%) reactivity suggests that ELISA monitoring of this antibody produces more false positive results than other multiplex assay. An important conclusion that can be drawn from the results of our study is that laboratory tests are no more effective than clinical examination for detecting disease relapse, but are helpful in the confirmation of SLE activity. PMID:23097694

  9. Considering syphilis in aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Sarup; Chadwick, David; Chawla, Girish

    2009-12-01

    Clinicians need to consider syphilis in the differential diagnosis of macular or papular rashes with neurological conditions, particularly aseptic meningitis, as early diagnosis and treatment lead to a better prognosis. PMID:20095316

  10. Lupus - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - lupus ... The following organizations are good resources for information on systemic lupus erythematosus : The Lupus Foundation of America -- www.lupus.org The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal ...

  11. Aseptic technique in microgravity.

    PubMed

    McCuaig, K

    1992-11-01

    Within the next decade, the United States will launch a space station into low Earth orbit as a preliminary step toward a manned mission to Mars. Provision of asepsis in the unique microgravity environment, essential in operative and invasive procedures, is addressed. An assessment of conventional terrestrial aseptic methods and possible modifications for a microgravity environment was done during the microgravity portion of parabolic flight on NASA KC-135 aircraft. During 110 parabolas on three flight days, a "surgical team" (surgeon, scrub nurse and circulating nurse) using a life size mannequin fastened to a prototype surgical "work station" (operating table), evaluated open and closed gloving (ten parabolas), skin preparation (six parabolas), surgical scrub methods (24 parabolas), gowning (22 parabolas) and draping (48 parabolas). Evaluated were povidone iodine solution, 1 percent povidone iodine detergent, Chloroxylenol with detergent, wet prep soap sponge, a water insoluble iodophor polymer (DuraPrep, 3M), disposable towels, disposable and reusable gowns, large and small disposable drapes with and without adhesive edges, disposable latex surgeon's gloves with and without packaging modifications and restraint mechanisms (tether, swiss seat, waist and foot restraint devices, fairfield and wire clamps and clips). Ease of use, provision of restraint for supplies and personnel and waste disposal were assessed. The literature was reviewed and its relevance to the space environment discussed, including risk factors, environmental contamination, immune status and microbiology. The microgravity environment, limited water supply and restricted operating area mandated that modifications of fabrication and packaging of supplies and technique be made to create and preserve asepsis. Material must meet stringent flammability and off-gassing standards. Either a chlorhexidine or povidone iodine detergent prepackaged brush and sponge would provide an adequate scrub plus

  12. Aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis.

    PubMed

    Irani, David N

    2008-08-01

    Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system, respectively. The number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal central nervous system infections, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with noninfectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis. This article reviews some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus is placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses, which as a group account for most aseptic meningitis cases and many focal infections of the spinal cord.

  13. Management of aseptic tibial nonunion.

    PubMed

    Hak, David J

    2011-09-01

    Tibial nonunion remains a significant clinical challenge despite advances in surgical management. New techniques to help manage tibial nonunion include extracorporeal shock wave therapy and percutaneous application of bone marrow aspirate. Management strategies vary based on the type of nonunion: aseptic or infected, and atrophic or hypertrophic. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been shown to be as effective as surgical management in patients with stable hypertrophic nonunion. New fixation options include locked plates and intramedullary compression nails. Novel methods of external fixation have been developed for bone graft harvest from the intramedullary canal. Several biologic adjuncts also are available, including bone marrow aspirates, stem cells, and bone morphogenetic protein. PMID:21885702

  14. ANTT: a standard approach to aseptic technique.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Stephen; Clare, Simon

    Aseptic technique is the most commonly performed infection prevention procedure in healthcare; it is also probably the most critical. This article looks at the aseptic non touch technique (ANTT) model for reducing healthcare-associated infections (HCAI). It outlines the principles of ANTT and the approach to practice, and discusses the challenges health professionals still face in reducing HCAIs.

  15. Basics of sterile compounding: aseptic processing.

    PubMed

    Akers, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses factors that affect the assurance of sterility of an aseptic process operation and balances what is required/practiced in the pharmaceutical industry via the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European aseptic processing guidelines and what is required/practiced in compounding pharmacies via the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) General Chapter <797>. PMID:25902628

  16. Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head after pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Kawtar; Rachidi, Wafae; Janani, Saadia; Mkinsi, Ouafa

    2016-01-01

    A documented case of beginning aseptic necrosis of the femoral head associated with pregnancy together with a review of the literature about this rare complication of pregnancy is presented. The known risk factors of osteonecrosis are; steroid use, alcoholism, organ transplantation, especially after kidney transplant or bone marrow transplantation bone, systemic lupus erythematosus, dyslipidemia especially hypertriglyceridemia, dysbaric decompression sickness, drepanocytosis and Gaucher's disease. Among the less established factors, we mention procoagulations abnormalities, HIV infection, chemotherapy. We report a case of osteonecrosis of femoral head after pregnancy. PMID:27795792

  17. Aseptic laboratory techniques: plating methods.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Erin R

    2012-05-11

    Microorganisms are present on all inanimate surfaces creating ubiquitous sources of possible contamination in the laboratory. Experimental success relies on the ability of a scientist to sterilize work surfaces and equipment as well as prevent contact of sterile instruments and solutions with non-sterile surfaces. Here we present the steps for several plating methods routinely used in the laboratory to isolate, propagate, or enumerate microorganisms such as bacteria and phage. All five methods incorporate aseptic technique, or procedures that maintain the sterility of experimental materials. Procedures described include (1) streak-plating bacterial cultures to isolate single colonies, (2) pour-plating and (3) spread-plating to enumerate viable bacterial colonies, (4) soft agar overlays to isolate phage and enumerate plaques, and (5) replica-plating to transfer cells from one plate to another in an identical spatial pattern. These procedures can be performed at the laboratory bench, provided they involve non-pathogenic strains of microorganisms (Biosafety Level 1, BSL-1). If working with BSL-2 organisms, then these manipulations must take place in a biosafety cabinet. Consult the most current edition of the Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) as well as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for Infectious Substances to determine the biohazard classification as well as the safety precautions and containment facilities required for the microorganism in question. Bacterial strains and phage stocks can be obtained from research investigators, companies, and collections maintained by particular organizations such as the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). It is recommended that non-pathogenic strains be used when learning the various plating methods. By following the procedures described in this protocol, students should be able to: Perform plating procedures without contaminating media. Isolate single bacterial colonies by the streak

  18. Aseptic Laboratory Techniques: Plating Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Erin R.

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms are present on all inanimate surfaces creating ubiquitous sources of possible contamination in the laboratory. Experimental success relies on the ability of a scientist to sterilize work surfaces and equipment as well as prevent contact of sterile instruments and solutions with non-sterile surfaces. Here we present the steps for several plating methods routinely used in the laboratory to isolate, propagate, or enumerate microorganisms such as bacteria and phage. All five methods incorporate aseptic technique, or procedures that maintain the sterility of experimental materials. Procedures described include (1) streak-plating bacterial cultures to isolate single colonies, (2) pour-plating and (3) spread-plating to enumerate viable bacterial colonies, (4) soft agar overlays to isolate phage and enumerate plaques, and (5) replica-plating to transfer cells from one plate to another in an identical spatial pattern. These procedures can be performed at the laboratory bench, provided they involve non-pathogenic strains of microorganisms (Biosafety Level 1, BSL-1). If working with BSL-2 organisms, then these manipulations must take place in a biosafety cabinet. Consult the most current edition of the Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) as well as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for Infectious Substances to determine the biohazard classification as well as the safety precautions and containment facilities required for the microorganism in question. Bacterial strains and phage stocks can be obtained from research investigators, companies, and collections maintained by particular organizations such as the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). It is recommended that non-pathogenic strains be used when learning the various plating methods. By following the procedures described in this protocol, students should be able to: ● Perform plating procedures without contaminating media. ● Isolate single bacterial colonies by the

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus

    MedlinePlus

    Disseminated lupus erythematosus; SLE; Lupus; Lupus erythematosus; Butterfly rash - SLE; Discoid lupus ... Mouth sores. Sensitivity to sunlight. Skin rash: A "butterfly" rash in about half the people with SLE. ...

  20. Quantitative risk modeling in aseptic manufacture.

    PubMed

    Tidswell, Edward C; McGarvey, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Expedient risk assessment of aseptic manufacturing processes offers unique opportunities for improved and sustained assurance of product quality. Contemporary risk assessments applied to aseptic manufacturing processes, however, are commonly handicapped by assumptions and subjectivity, leading to inexactitude. Quantitative risk modeling augmented with Monte Carlo simulations represents a novel, innovative, and more efficient means of risk assessment. This technique relies upon fewer assumptions and removes subjectivity to more swiftly generate an improved, more realistic, quantitative estimate of risk. The fundamental steps and requirements for an assessment of the risk of bioburden ingress into aseptically manufactured products are described. A case study exemplifies how quantitative risk modeling and Monte Carlo simulations achieve a more rapid and improved determination of the risk of bioburden ingress during the aseptic filling of a parenteral product. Although application of quantitative risk modeling is described here purely for the purpose of process improvement, the technique has far wider relevance in the assisted disposition of batches, cleanroom management, and the utilization of real-time data from rapid microbial monitoring technologies. PMID:17089696

  1. Lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Neerja; Chiang, Lo-Ku; Rifkin, Ian R

    2006-03-01

    Lupus nephritis is one of the more serious manifestations of the systemic autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and is associated with considerable morbidity and even mortality. Treatment remains problematic, particularly in terms of controlling the underlying disease process while at the same time preventing unacceptable side effects of therapy. In recent years, clinical trials have started to define optimum regimens of the immunosuppressive agents presently in use. The etiology and pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis still are understood incompletely. Nevertheless, insights gained from basic science research in both animals and human beings now are being translated into newer therapies that have the potential to be safer and more specific than those currently available.

  2. Treating Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Investigator Grants, Fellowships and Career Development Awards & Prizes Peer-Reviewed Grant Program LIFELINE Grant Program 2015 ... Postal Code: Spam Control Text: Please leave this field empty Get social Facebook Twitter Instgram Lupus.org ...

  3. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus infective endocarditis in a lupus patient with Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gen-Min; Chang, Feng-Yee; Wang, Wen-Been

    2015-03-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis is the most widely encountered aseptic endocarditis among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Due to the deformed cardiac valves, secondary infective endocarditis should be considered in lupus patients with acute refractory heart failure and fever of unknown origin. The case is reported of a woman with lupus and Libman-Sacks endocarditis who had concurrent coagulase-negative Staphylococcus infective endocarditis that resulted in cerebral septic emboli and acute pulmonary edema. She underwent valve replacement surgery for acute heart failure, and gradually recovered with antibiotic treatment.

  4. Variations in aseptic technique and implications for infection control.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Anne Marie

    Healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs) are a serious concern, costing the NHS 1 billion pounds a year and causing 5000 deaths annually despite increased funding. A contributing factor is the variety of aseptic techniques in use in different hospitals and even within a single hospital. These cause problems for healthcare workers as well as increasing the risk of HAI. This article examines a number of traditional approaches to aseptic technique, highlighting their differences and the implications for infection control. It concludes that improvement in aseptic technique could be achieved by implementation of a single unified approach to aseptic technique that can be standardized and audited annually, such as the aseptic non-touch technique (ANTT), which has been recommended for adoption throughout the UK. It ends with suggestions for measures that could be introduced and strengthened to improve aseptic technique, and ultimately reduce the rate of HAI.

  5. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. Method This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. Results 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). Interpretation In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties. PMID:25267502

  6. Boundary and airlock design issues in aseptic facilities.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M R; Robinson, J E

    1991-01-01

    As more potentially hazardous biopharmaceutical and powder derivative products are being processed aseptically, the term "containment" in aseptic facility design must take on a broader definition. Contamination control must address not only protection of the product, but the protection of aseptic facility workers and of the surrounding environment as well. This paper will focus on design issues related to the physical boundaries (walls, ceilings, doors, etc.) that separate aseptic areas from other spaces within a facility with particular emphasis on the design of airlocks as "control points" for contamination control.

  7. Control of the aseptic processing environment.

    PubMed

    Frieben, W R

    1983-11-01

    Methods used by industry with applications to hospital pharmacy for maintaining an aseptic environment in production of sterile pharmaceutical products are discussed. A major source of product contamination is airborne microorganisms. The laminar-airflow workbench with a high-efficiency particulate air filter provides an ultraclean environment for preparation of sterile products. However, the workbench does not guarantee sterility of products and is not effective if not properly installed and maintained or if the operator uses poor aseptic technique. The laminar-airflow workbench should be tested for leaks, airflow velocity, and airflow patterns when installed, and the workbench should be checked periodically thereafter. The workbench should be placed in a cleanroom where traffic and air disturbances that might affect the laminar airflow are eliminated. A major source of airborne microbial contamination in cleanrooms is people. Personnel movement through an area and presence of personnel without lint-free, nonshedding protective garments increase the levels of microbial contaminants in an area. The transport of nonsterile products (bottles, boxes, paper products) into a cleanroom should be minimized. The cleanroom itself should be sanitized and should be immaculate. Microbial or particulate monitoring should be conducted in the cleanroom using a quantitative method, and corrective-action limits should be set. Hospital pharmacists should examine industrial sterile-processing techniques and apply them to the preparation of sterile products.

  8. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  9. Lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Tuffanelli, D.L.

    1981-02-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is a multisystem disease. Genetic predisposition, altered immunity, hormones, drugs, viruses, and ultraviolet light all may play a role in etiology. A wide range of cutaneous lesions occur, and variants such as subacute cutaneous LE, complement-deficient LE, and neonatal LE have recently been emphasized. Management of the LE patient, including appropriate diagnostic studies and therapy relevant to the dermatologist, is discussed in the review.

  10. [Systemic lupus erythematosus in the pregnant patient. Implications for anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Pastor Tomás, E; Guillén Antón, J; Vaquerizo Gareta, A; Lirola Grajales, P; Martínez García, R; Cuartero Lobera, J

    2001-03-01

    A 28-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus and a history of aseptic meningitis, digestive bleeding due to thrombopenia and deep venous thrombosis underwent elective cesarean for transverse presentation at 35 weeks. Preoperative blood work-up showed an antinuclear antibody titre that was slightly positive and steroid treatment was started. Surgery operation was performed with general anesthesia. The outcome was satisfactory even though serious complications can develop during the management of anesthesia in such patients. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic, multisystemic disease that mainly affects women of childbearing age. Antibodies and immunocomplexes play a fundamental role. Given the multiorgan involvement in this disease, preoperative study of the lupus patient should assess all such involvement, including maternal-fetal risk, as well as consider the drug and anesthetic management to be applied. Among the clinical signs that can affect management of anesthesia are the following: aseptic meningitis, high blood pressure, pericarditis, pneumonitis and recurrent venous thrombosis. Anemia, thrombopenia and significantly altered coagulation events are common.

  11. [Benign recurring aseptic meningitis. What requires our attention?].

    PubMed

    Kruis, T; Kredel, L; Nassir, M; Godbersen, M; Schneider, T

    2016-02-01

    Benign recurrent aseptic meningitis (BRAM) or Mollaret's meningitis is a rare disease characterized by recurrent episodes of aseptic meningitis followed by spontaneous recovery. Disease courses over several years have been reported. In most cases, BRAM is caused by HSV-2, less frequently by other viruses or autoimmune diseases. In up to 10 %, the aetiology remains unclear. We present a case of idiopathic BRAM and discuss clinical findings, diagnosis and therapeutic options of this rare illness.

  12. Aseptic practice recommendations for circulating operating theatre nurses.

    PubMed

    Aholaakko, Teija-Kaisa; Metsälä, Eija

    Aseptic practices prevent exposure of a surgical wound to microbes, operating theatre environment and personnel. The circulating nurse assists the operating theatre personnel and supervises aseptic practices preventing surgical site infections. In the absence of analytical tools, few studies exist on intraoperative nursing-related aseptic practices. This study introduces recommendations to assess the role of the circulating nurse in aseptic practices. The authors used international recommendations and research findings to construct a 20-item self-report instrument with a demonstrated reliability across the scale. The authors structured the scale based on three phases: establishment; maintenance; and disestablishment of a sterile operating field. The tool was tested among operating theatre and day surgery nurses, and compared the differences in the mean acceptance rates of aseptic practice recommendations based on background characteristics. College-level nurses and nurses with 15 or more years' work experience accepted the recommendations at higher levels than bachelor-level nurses and nurses with less work experience. Continual assessment of the evidence base and comprehensive evaluation represent important components in further developing the tool. A reasonable number of items covering clinical practice are necessary for assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of aseptic practices, and a larger response rate is needed to validate the tool in future.

  13. Aseptic Meningitis with Craniopharyngioma Resection: Consideration after Endoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jenny X.; Alkire, Blake C.; Lam, Allen C.; Curry, William T.; Holbrook, Eric H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives While bacterial meningitis is a concerning complication after endoscopic skull base surgery, the diagnosis can be made without consideration for aseptic meningitis. This article aims to (1) present a patient with recurrent craniopharyngioma and multiple postoperative episodes of aseptic meningitis and (2) discuss the diagnosis and management of aseptic meningitis. Design Case report and literature review. Results A 65-year-old female patient with a symptomatic craniopharyngioma underwent transsphenoidal resection. She returned postoperatively with symptoms concerning for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and bacterial meningitis. Lumbar puncture demonstrated mildly elevated leukocytes with normal glucose levels. Cultures were sterile and she was discharged on antibiotics. She returned 18 days postoperatively with altered mental status and fever. Again, negative CSF cultures suggested aseptic meningitis. Radiological and intraoperative findings were now concerning for widespread cerebrovascular vasospasm due to leaked craniopharyngioma fluids. In the following months, her craniopharyngioma recurred and required multiple surgical resections. Days after her last operation, she returned with mental status changes and a sterile CSF culture. She was diagnosed with recurrent aseptic meningitis and antibiotics were discontinued. The patient experienced near complete resolution of symptoms. Conclusions Consideration of aseptic meningitis following craniopharyngioma resection is critical to avoid unnecessary surgical re-exploration and prolonged courses of antibiotics. PMID:27722072

  14. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Synonym(s): Lupus - Neurological Sequelae, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... health problems and have a normal lifespan with periodic doctor visits and treatments with various drugs. What ...

  15. Living Well with Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Investigator Grants, Fellowships and Career Development Awards & Prizes Peer-Reviewed Grant Program LIFELINE Grant Program 2015 ... following a specific diet or nutrition plan for my lupus? How do I explain lupus to others? ...

  16. What Is Lupus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... better about themselves Remain more active. Pregnancy and Contraception for Women With Lupus Women with lupus can ... harmful to an unborn baby may want reliable birth control. Recent studies have shown that oral contraceptives (birth ...

  17. Stroke Secondary to Aseptic Meningitis After Endovascular Treatment of a Giant Aneurysm with Parent Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Doenmez, Halil Mavili, Ertugrul Ikizceli, Tuerkan; Durak, Ahmet Candan; Kurtsoy, Ali

    2009-07-15

    Aseptic meningitis related to hydrogel-coated coils is a known complication, but it is extremely rare after platinum bare coil aseptic meningitis. Here we report the development of aseptic meningitis causing brain stem and cerebellar infarct in a patient with a giant aneurysm treated with bare platinum coils. We conclude that aneurysm size is an important factor affecting the occurrence of aseptic meningitis associated with stroke.

  18. Ibuprofen-induced aseptic meningoencephalitis confirmed by drug challenge.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ancillo, A; Gil-Adrados, A C; Jurado-Palomo, J

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is a diagnostic challenge. The major causative agents are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (particularly ibuprofen), antibiotics, intravenous immunoglobulin, and OKT3 monoclonal antibodies. DIAM is more frequently observed in patients with autoimmune diseases. A 36-year-old woman was attended in our department 3 months after being diagnosed with aseptic meningoencephalitis. She had had 2 episodes in 9 months. Neurological symptoms were associated with ibuprofen. A challenge with acetylsalicylic acid was negative, whereas a drug challenge with ibuprofen was positive. Thirty minutes after ingesting 50 mg of ibuprofen, she experienced general malaise and progressively developed chills, fever (39.5 degrees C), headache, and nuchal rigidity. Lumbar puncture showed normal glucose and high protein levels. Neutrophilic pleocytosis was observed at the first admission; lymphocytosis was predominant in the second and third episodes. DIAM is a rare and severe hypersensitivity reaction. Drug challenge enabled us to make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:21995183

  19. Detection of enteroviruses in pediatric patients with aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Olfat G; Abdelhamid, Nehal

    2015-02-01

    Aseptic meningitis is an acute viral infection of the central nervous system that occurs most frequently in infants and young children. This study was conducted on 100 pediatric patients with ages range from 1.5 months to 6 years. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens were obtained with criteria of aseptic CNS infections as documented by pleocytosis, negative Gram stain and negative bacterial culture. Clinical and CSF findings of the affected children were analyzed and CSF specimens were submitted to viral culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques to determine the enteroviral etiology. Fifty six percent patients had positive PCR results for the enteroviral genome, compared with 20% by virus culture. We can conclude that PCR is a rapid, reliable and sensitive diagnostic tool for the detection of enteroviral infections. A positive EV-PCR result may affect clinical decision making and may significantly alter the medical care offered to infected patients.

  20. Aseptic nonunion of the tibia treated by intramedullary osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gualdrini, G; Rollo, G; Montanari, A; Zinghi, G F

    1996-01-01

    The authors report 52 cases of aseptic nonunion of the tibia treated by intramedullary osteosynthesis. The means of synthesis used were the Küntscher nail, the Eiffel Tower Rush nail, and the Grosse-Kempf nail. Which means of synthesis was used depended on the site and the features of the nonunion. Healing occurred in all of the cases after an average of 5 months. Mean follow-up was 4.5 years.

  1. Aseptic peritonitis in patients on maintenance peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, V C; Kamadana, M R; Ing, T S; Daugirdas, J T; Viol, G W; Robinson, J A; Geis, W P; Hano, J E

    1979-01-01

    An 'epidemic' of aseptic peritonitis occurred in our peritoneal dialysis unit, affecting 5 of 20 patients. Acute and convalescent viral titers were normal in all 5. The peritoneal fluid of the affected patients was not tested for endotoxin, but endotoxin was found in subsequent dialysis fluids from two machines in the unit. This endotoxin might have been the causative agent of this outbreak. Rapid recovery ensued in all patients following peritoneal lavage. PMID:503270

  2. [Clinical, epidemiological, and etiological studies of aseptic meningitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Shinichi; Neshige, Shuichiro; Himeno, Takahiro; Hara, Naoyuki; Yoshimoto, Takeshi; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Takao, Shinichi; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    From summer to autumn, we noted the occurrence of a small epidemic of aseptic meningitis in adults. Over the last 10 years, we have encountered 203 male (mean age, 34.6 ± 15.0 years) and 157 female (mean age, 35.6 ± 16.3 years) patients with aseptic meningitis. We could identify the causative virus in 17 (81%) of 21 cases during the abovementioned months in 2012. Identification rates of the virus in the stool, cerebrospinal fluid, throat swab, and serum samples were 71%, 67%, 42%, and 5%, respectively. The etiological viruses included enteroviruses in all cases, such as echovirus type 9 (E9) in 9 cases, echovirus type 6 (E6) in 4 cases, coxsackievirus type A9 in 1 case, and unknown type of enterovirus in 3 cases. No differences in the clinical manifestations and laboratory findings were noted between E9 meningitis and E6 meningitis. In addition, we countered 14 cases of mumps meningitis, 7 cases of varicella-zoster virus meningitis and 6 cases of herpes simplex meningitis during the last 10 years; these cases did not occur as an epidemic, but occurred sporadically. Cases of mumps meningitis were noted in all seasons, and cases of varicella-zoster virus meningitis were only noted from summer to winter. The etiology of epidemic aseptic meningitis in adults could be mainly due to enterovirus infection, and its prognosis was benign.

  3. A Case of Bilateral Aseptic Necrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Diana; Trăistaru, Rodica; Kamal, C K; Alexandru, D O; Mogoantă, L; Grecu, D C

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is a disease whose etiology is not completely elucidated and generally affects young adults aged between 30 and 50 years. In a significant number of patients bilateral disease occurs, which makes detection in its early stages constitute an important objective. We present the case of a male patient, aged 23 years, with the following risk factors: smoking and chronic alcohol consumption, who is diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the left femoral head, ARCO stage IV, and in just six months after the diagnosis and hip arthroplasty, he suffers an injury which leads to the same diagnosis in the contralateral hip. We want to emphasize that for all patients with a high index of suspicion there should be an MRI examination, because the plane radiographs or CT are most often not relevant in detecting early signs of this condition. Diagnosis of aseptic necrosis of the femoral head in the early stages is a necessity in order to obtain an optimal result of conservative treatment.

  4. A Case of Bilateral Aseptic Necrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    KAMAL, DIANA; TRĂISTARU, RODICA; KAMAL, C.K.; ALEXANDRU, D.O.; MOGOANTĂ, L.; GRECU, D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is a disease whose etiology is not completely elucidated and generally affects young adults aged between 30 and 50 years. In a significant number of patients bilateral disease occurs, which makes detection in its early stages constitute an important objective. We present the case of a male patient, aged 23 years, with the following risk factors: smoking and chronic alcohol consumption, who is diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the left femoral head, ARCO stage IV, and in just six months after the diagnosis and hip arthroplasty, he suffers an injury which leads to the same diagnosis in the contralateral hip. We want to emphasize that for all patients with a high index of suspicion there should be an MRI examination, because the plane radiographs or CT are most often not relevant in detecting early signs of this condition. Diagnosis of aseptic necrosis of the femoral head in the early stages is a necessity in order to obtain an optimal result of conservative treatment. PMID:26788359

  5. Viral etiology of aseptic meningitis among children in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseininasab, Ali; Alborzi, Abdolvahab; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar; Jamalidoust, Marzieh; Moeini, Mahsa; Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Abbasian, Amin; Kadivar, Mohamad Rahim

    2011-05-01

    Aseptic meningitis refers to a clinical syndrome of meningeal inflammation in which bacteria cannot be identified in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The viral etiology and the epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory characteristics of aseptic meningitis among children aged 2 months to 15 years in Shiraz, southern Iran were determined. From May 2007 to April 2008, 65 patients were admitted to the hospital with aseptic meningitis. Seven viruses, non-polio human enteroviruses, mumps virus, herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpes virus type 6 (HHV-6), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Viruses were detected in 30 (46.2%) patients in whom non-polio human enterovirus and mumps virus were detected in 13 (43.3%) and 11 (36.7%), respectively. The remaining 6 (20%) of the cases were caused by HSV, VZV, HCMV, and HHV-6. Haemophilus influenzae and non-polio human enterovirus were detected in one patient simultaneously. Viral meningitis was found to be more frequent during spring and summer. The majority (66.6%) of the patients were treated in the hospital for 10 days and had received antibiotics in the case of bacterial meningitis. Rapid diagnosis of viral meningitis using PCR testing of CSF can help shorten hospitalization, and avoid the unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  6. Hypertrophic discoid lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Farley-Loftus, Rachel; Elmariah, Sarina B; Ralston, Jonathan; Kamino, Hideko; Franks, Andrew G

    2010-11-15

    Hypertrophic discoid lupus erythematosus is a distinct form of chronic cutaneous (discoid) lupus, which is characterized by hyperkeratotic plaques that typically are observed over the face, arms, and upper trunk. We present the case of a 43-year-old man with verrucous plaques that were distributed symmetrically over the face, who initially was treated with oral antibiotics and topical glucocorticoids for acne vulgaris. A biopsy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of hypertrophic discoid lupus erythematosus. The clinical and histopathologic features of this clinical variant are reviewed.

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, S J; Friedlander, A H; Swerdloff, M

    1980-04-01

    A case of osteomyelitis of the mandible in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus is described. Both the disease process and the treatment modalities must be understood for correct management. PMID:6928895

  8. [Aseptic bone flap osteonecrosis following cranioplasty after decompressive cranietomy].

    PubMed

    Smoll, Nicolas R; Stienen, Martin N; Schaller, Karl; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2013-06-19

    This case report discusses a case of aseptic osteonecrosis in a cranioplasty bone flap after decompressive craniectomy, which is a known, but rare complication after autologous cranioplasty. We suggest that the pathophysiology of cranial bone flap necrosis may have a similar pathophysiology to free flap necrosis/failure. The key suggested problem causing the osteonecrosis is vessel thrombosis within the smaller vessels of the bone flap due to the prothrombotic effects of the factors released during drilling of the bone flap. Suspicious local findings like wound dehiscence or fluid leakage should lead to a head computed tomography in order to discuss a prophylactic artificial second cranioplasty if necessary. PMID:23773942

  9. [Cell therapy for aseptic necrosis of femoral head].

    PubMed

    Toguchida, Junya; Aoyama, Tomoki; Goto, Koji; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Kasai, Yasunari

    2011-12-01

    As the clinical application of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), we have engaged in the development of cell transplantation therapy for aseptic necrosis of femoral head. Based on the results obtained by in vitro and in vivo preclinical experiments, we established the protocol for the clinical trial combining MSC with vascularized bone grafts. The protocol was approved by IRB on November 25, 2007, and the first case was operated on February 22, 2008. Since then 10 cases have been successfully treated and were followed at least 24 months with satisfactory results.

  10. Lupus vulgaris: difficulties in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Julia; Caccetta, Tony Philip; Tait, Clare

    2013-05-01

    Lupus vulgaris is one of the most common forms of cutaneous tuberculosis. It presents a diagnostic challenge due to its paucibacillary nature. This is a report of a case of a delayed diagnosis of lupus vulgaris, presenting as perianal and peristomal plaques, followed by a review of the diagnostic tools for lupus vulgaris and their limitations.

  11. Lupus vulgaris of external nose.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar; Ranganna, B Usha

    2008-12-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of cutaneous tuberculosis which commonly involve trunk and buttocks. Lupus vulgaris affecting nose and face, are rarely reported in India. This study reports an unusual case of lupus vulgaris involving the external nose that showed dramatic outcome after six months of anti- tubercular treatment.

  12. Performance analysis of exam gloves used for aseptic rodent surgery.

    PubMed

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-05-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP-PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham 'exertion' activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP-PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP-PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries. PMID:26045458

  13. Performance analysis of exam gloves used for aseptic rodent surgery.

    PubMed

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-05-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP-PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham 'exertion' activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP-PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP-PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries.

  14. Performance Analysis of Exam Gloves Used for Aseptic Rodent Surgery

    PubMed Central

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP–PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham ‘exertion’ activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP–PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP–PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries. PMID:26045458

  15. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pathological assessment of periprosthetic tissues is important, not only for diagnosis, but also for understanding the pathobiology of implant failure. The host response to wear particle deposition in periprosthetic tissues is characterised by cell and tissue injury, and a reparative and inflammatory response in which there is an innate and adaptive immune response to the material components of implant wear. Physical and chemical characteristics of implant wear influence the nature of the response in periprosthetic tissues and account for the development of particular complications that lead to implant failure, such as osteolysis which leads to aseptic loosening, and soft-tissue necrosis/inflammation, which can result in pseudotumour formation. The innate response involves phagocytosis of implant-derived wear particles by macrophages; this is determined by pattern recognition receptors and results in expression of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors promoting inflammation and osteoclastogenesis; phagocytosed particles can also be cytotoxic and cause cell and tissue necrosis. The adaptive immune response to wear debris is characterised by the presence of lymphoid cells and most likely occurs as a result of a cell-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to cell and tissue components altered by interaction with the material components of particulate wear, particularly metal ions released from cobalt-chrome wear particles. Cite this article: Professor N. A. Athanasou. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:162–168. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.55.BJR-2016-0086. PMID:27146314

  16. Psoriasiform lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Padmavathy, L; Rao, L Lakshmana; Ethirajan, N; Dhanlaklshmi, M

    2008-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in both developing and developed countries. Cutaneous Tuberculosis constitutes a minor proportion of extra-pulmonary manifestations of Tuberculosis. Lupus Vulgaris (LV) is one of the clinical variants of Cutaneous Tuberculosis. A case of a large plaque type psoriasiform lesion of lupus vulgaris on the thigh, of 15 years' duration, in an 18-year-old girl is reported. This case highlights the ignorance level among the patients and consequent failure to avail proper anti-tuberculous treatment despite campaign in print and audio visual media.

  17. 77 FR 21783 - Guidance on Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... the same title was announced in the Federal Register on September 30, 2011 (76 FR 60847), and Docket... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance on Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic... guidance entitled ``Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission...

  18. 76 FR 60847 - Draft Guidance on Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance on Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic... guidance entitled ``Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography... is announcing the availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Media Fills for Validation of...

  19. Doxycycline inhibits bone resorption by human interface membrane cells from aseptically loose hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Ong, S M; Taylor, G J S

    2003-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) may have a role in the process of aseptic loosening. Doxycycline has been shown to inhibit MMPs. Our aim was to investigate the potential pharmacological effect of doxycycline on aseptic loosening. We used radiolabelled mouse calvariae cultured with human interface membrane cells from aseptically loosened hips. Bone resorption was confirmed in this model. The effect of doxycycline was assessed by culturing dead radiolabelled bone discs with cells from the interface membrane with doxycycline. The control group consisted of the same culture system without doxycycline. Supernatant 45calcium and the total 45calcium remaining in the bone discs at the completion of the culture were used to measure osteolysis. We found that doxycycline can inhibit osteolysis at the interface membrane of aseptically loosened hips. This may have therapeutic implications for the treatment of patients with aseptic loosening of total joint replacements. PMID:12729128

  20. Genetics Home Reference: systemic lupus erythematosus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions systemic lupus erythematosus systemic lupus erythematosus Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease that causes ...

  1. S.L.E. Lupus Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Strategies for Speaking with Your Lupus Doctor Traveling Smart with Lupus 21st Century Cures A Year’s Worth ... Kickoff 2009 Camp Sunshine 2009 ING New York City Marathon 2009 Life Without Lupus® Gala 2010 Camp ...

  2. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  3. Cloning higher plants from aseptically cultured tissues and cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    A review of aseptic culture methods for higher plants is presented, which focuses on the existing problems that limit or prevent the full realization of cloning plants from free cells. It is shown that substantial progress in clonal multiplication has been made with explanted stem tips or lateral buds which can be stimulated to produce numerous precocious axillary branches. These branches can then be separated or subdivided and induced to root in order to yield populations of genetically and phenotypically uniorm plantlets. Similarly, undifferentiated calluses can sometimes be induced to form shoots and/or roots adventitiously. Although the cell culture techniques required to produce somatic embryos are presently rudimentary, steady advances are being made in learning how to stimulate formation of somatic or adventive embryos from totipotent cells grown in suspension cultures. It is concluded that many problems exist in the producing and growing of totipotent or morphogenetically competent cell suspensions, but the potential benefits are great.

  4. Aseptic Laboratory Techniques: Volume Transfers with Serological Pipettes and Micropipettors

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Erin R.

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms are everywhere - in the air, soil, and human body as well as on inanimate surfaces like laboratory benches and computer keyboards. The ubiquity of microbes creates a copious supply of potential contaminants in a laboratory. To ensure experimental success, the number of contaminants on equipment and work surfaces must be minimized. Common among many experiments in microbiology are techniques involving the measurement and transfer of cultures containing bacterial cells or viral particles. To do so without contacting non-sterile surfaces or contaminating sterile media requires (1) preparing a sterile workspace, (2) precisely setting and accurately reading instruments for aseptic transfer of liquids, and (3) properly manipulating instruments, cultures flasks, bottles and tubes within a sterile field. Learning these procedures calls for training and practice. At first, actions should be slow, deliberate, and controlled with the goal being for aseptic technique to become second nature when working at the bench. Here we present the steps for measuring volumes using serological pipettes and micropipettors within a sterile field created by a Bunsen burner. Volumes range from microliters (μl) to milliliters (ml) depending on the instrument used. Liquids commonly transferred include sterile broth or chemical solutions as well as bacterial cultures and phage stocks. By following these procedures, students should be able to: •Work within the sterile field created by the Bunsen burner flame. •Use serological pipettes without compromising instrument sterility.• Aspirate liquids with serological pipettes, precisely reading calibrated volumes by aligning the meniscus formed by the liquid to the graduation marks on the pipette. •Keep culture bottles, flasks, tubes and their respective caps sterile during liquid transfers. •Identify different applications for plastic versus glass serological pipettes. •State accuracy limitations for micropipettors.

  5. Hand hygiene and aseptic technique in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Al-Damouk, M; Pudney, E; Bleetman, A

    2004-02-01

    Hand hygiene and simple aseptic measures before invasive procedures are effective in reducing rates of healthcare-associated infection. The perceived urgency of a clinical situation in the emergency department, however, may influence medical staff's compliance with good practice in infection control. The aims of this prospective, single-blinded, observational study were twofold. First, to assess doctors' compliance with good practice in hand hygiene between patient episodes and asepsis during invasive procedures in the emergency department. Second, to assess the effect of clinical urgency on compliance with good practice in hand hygiene and asepsis during invasive procedures. Good practice standards for asepsis in invasive procedures and hand hygiene between patient episodes were compiled from a literature search. Doctors' compliance with these standards was observed in two emergency departments (UK and New Zealand). Observed clinical cases were classified as immediate, urgent and non-urgent based on the triage system. There was poor compliance with good practice guidelines for asepsis in invasive procedures in both centres. Staff achieved high compliance with the guidelines in only 27% of cases in the UK and 58% of cases in New Zealand. Clinical urgency did not appear to adversely affect compliance with aseptic good practice. Hand hygiene between patient consultations was very low at 14% in the UK and 12% in New Zealand. Asepsis and hand hygiene was poor in both the UK and New Zealand emergency departments. There may be a need for some compromise in standards of asepsis in very sick patients due to the urgency of the clinical situation. Compliance in all situations especially non-urgent procedures needs to be improved.

  6. Biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, Joseph M; Liu, Chau-Ching; Kao, Amy H; Manzi, Susan

    2012-04-01

    The urgent need for lupus biomarkers was demonstrated in September 2011 during a Workshop sponsored by the Food and Drug Administration: Potential Biomarkers Predictive of Disease Flare. After 2 days of discussion and more than 2 dozen presentations from thought leaders in both industry and academia, it became apparent that highly sought biomarkers to predict lupus flare have not yet been identified. Even short of the elusive biomarker of flare, few biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) diagnosis, monitoring, and stratification have been validated and employed for making clinical decisions. This lack of reliable, specific biomarkers for SLE hampers proper clinical management of patients with SLE and impedes development of new lupus therapeutics. As such, the intensity of investigation to identify lupus biomarkers is climbing a steep trajectory, lending cautious optimism that a validated panel of biomarkers for lupus diagnosis, monitoring, stratification, and prediction of flare may soon be in hand.

  7. Comparison of Aseptic Compounding Errors Before and After Modified Laboratory and Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Owora, Arthur H.; Kirkpatrick, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether aseptic compounding errors were reduced at the end of the third professional year after modifying pharmacy practice laboratories and implementing an institutional introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE). Design. An aseptic compounding laboratory, previously occurring during the third-year spring semester, was added to the second-year spring semester. An 80-hour institutional IPPE was also added in the summer between the second and third years. Instructors recorded aseptic compounding errors using a grading checklist for second-year and third-year student assessments. Third-year student aseptic compounding errors were assessed prior to the curricular changes and for 2 subsequent years for students on the Oklahoma City and Tulsa campuses of the University of Oklahoma. Assessment. Both third-year cohorts committed fewer aseptic technique errors than they did during their second years, and the probability was significantly lower for students on the Oklahoma City campus. The probability of committing major aseptic technique errors was significantly lower for 2 consecutive third-year cohorts after the curricular changes. Conclusion. The addition of second-year aseptic compounding laboratory experiences and third-year institutional IPPE content reduced instructor-assessed errors at the end of the third year. PMID:26889070

  8. Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus: Diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Lauren G.; Werth, Victoria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus encompasses a wide range of dermatologic manifestations, which may or may not be associated with the development of systemic disease. Cutaneous lupus is divided into several subtypes, including acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus includes discoid lupus erythematosus, lupus erythematosus profundus, chilblain cutaneous lupus, and lupus tumidus. Diagnosis of these diseases requires proper classification of the subtype, through a combination of physical exam, laboratory studies, histology, antibody serology, and occasionally direct immunofluorescence, while ensuring to exclude systemic disease. Treatment of cutaneous lupus consists of patient education on proper sun protection along with appropriate topical and systemic agents. Systemic agents are indicated in cases of widespread, scarring, or treatment-refractory disease. In this review, we discuss issues in classification and diagnosis of the various subtypes of CLE, as well as provide an update on therapeutic management. PMID:24238695

  9. Lung and lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mukta, V; Jayachandran, K

    2011-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is chronic, postprimary, paucibacillary cutaneous tuberculosis found in individuals with moderate immunity and high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Eighty percent of the lesions are on the head and neck. We present the case of a 38 year old lady who was admitted with complaints of worsening breathlessness and low grade fever of one month duration. Examination showed multiple, nontender skin ulcers on bilateral lumbar areas, two oozing serosanguinous discharge and others scarred in the centre. Respiratory system examination and chest X-ray revealed right sided pleural effusion. On investigation, pleural fluid was tuberculous in nature. Skin biopsy from the edge of ulcer was also suggestive of tuberculosis. Patient is doing well on antituberculous drugs. This case highlights the importance of cutaneous manifestations of systemic disease and is an example of the unusual presentation of lupus vulgaris in a case of pleural effusion.

  10. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  11. Apoptosis in chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus, discoid lupus, and lupus profundus

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz-Corral, Claudia Ileana; Vega-Memíje, María Elisa; Martínez-Luna, Eduwiges; Cuevas-González, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez-Carreón, Alma Angélica; de la Rosa, Juan José Bollain-y-Goytia; del Muro, Felipe de Jesús Torres; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lupus erythematosus is a multisystemic disease that is characterized by autoantibody production and immune complex deposition in such tissues as the mucosa, joints, the central nervous system, and skin. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus is categorized as acute, subacute, and chronic. Chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus comprises discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and lupus profundus (LP). Aim: To analyze the expression of proapoptotic molecules in patients with lupus erythematosus discoid and lupus profundus. Material and methods: Descriptive study, the study groups comprised 10 cases of LP and 10 cases of DLE, and a control. Skin samples of cases and controls were processed for immunohistochemistry and by TUNEL technique. The database and statistical analysis was performed (statistical test X2) SPSS (Chicago, IL, USA). Results: Apoptotic features were broadly distributed along the skin biopsies in epidermal keratinocytes as well as at dermis. By immunohistochemistry the expression of Fas receptor and Fas-L was higher in the skin of lupus patients compared with controls. We also noted differences in Fas-L, -Fas, and -Bax proteins expression intensity in discoid lupus erythematosus patients in the epidermis, and hair follicles. Conclusions: Fas and Fas-L are expressed similarly in LP and DLE. PMID:26261624

  12. SLE - Rituximab in lupus.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Robert

    2003-01-01

    B cells are essential to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The chimeric monoclonal antibody rituximab depletes B cells by targeting the pan-B-cell surface marker CD20. Preliminary experience with this agent in SLE and other autoimmune diseases has been encouraging. Controlled trials in SLE will be necessary to determine whether rituximab is useful therapy in this disease, and will teach us more about the roles of B cells in its pathogenesis.

  13. [Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head in young adults].

    PubMed

    Vasey, H M

    1984-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is a well-defined entity. The underlying diseases originate from very different types of pathological conditions. Alcoholism, cortisone therapy, gout or hyperuricemia, sickle cell anaemia and others all lead, through various pathways, to the impairment of the medullary blood flow. In many instances, a compartment syndrome can be demonstrated in the femoral head. Death of the osteocytes follows bone marrow necrosis. Revascularisation originates in the periphery of the necrotic segment. Vascular buds and fibroblasts invade the medullary space. New bone is laid over the necrotic trabeculae. Mechanical failure results from changes in the bony framework at three different levels. The subchondral boneplate may be weakened by the process of revascularisation, the necrotic trabeculae may fail because of diminished stiffness and strength, and overloading has been demonstrated at the junction between dead and living bone. Elevation of the intramedullary pressure is the first objective sign of impending or established bone necrosis. Scintigraphy with Technetium 99 m - Sulphur colloid can now show the early stages of marrow necrosis. Roentgenographic changes only appear in a later phase of the disease. Aseptic necrosis must be considered as involving both hips, unless proven otherwise. Attention given to the "silent hip" may allow salvage and prevent the occurrence of osteo-arthritic changes leaving merely unilateral disease. As long as the geometrical shape of the femoral head is maintained operation may well prove useful. The aim at this stage is to prevent collapse. It is impossible to know in the early stages whether mechanical failure will occur, but there is general agreement that the femoral head will eventually undergo deformation. A spherical epiphysis is therefore considered a success. All the conservative methods aim to decompress the medullary cavity. Core biopsy, curettage, bone grafting and intertrochanteric osteotomy all have

  14. Molecular identification of human enteroviruses associated with aseptic meningitis in Yunnan province, Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanju; Zhou, Xi; Liu, Jiansheng; Xia, Longhui; Pan, Yue; Chen, Junying; Luo, Na; Yin, Jianzhong; Ma, Shaohui

    2016-01-01

    Human enteroviruses (EVs) are the major causative agents of aseptic meningitis. In this study, a total of 524 children were admitted to the children Kunming hospital (continental China) for aseptic meningitis manifestations in 2009 and 2010. An EV infection was diagnosed in 85/524 children (16.2 %) and the viruses detected were assigned to 16 serotypes. Most serotypes belonged to the enterovirus B species. Echovirus 9 was predominant (24.7 %), followed by coxsackievirus B5 (23.5 %) and then echovirus 30 (16.5 %). Echovirus 9 was firstly identified as the predominant serotype in sporadic aseptic meningitis which occurred in Yunnan, Southwest China. This work indicates the need to perform large-scale surveillance to gain a better insight into the epidemiology of enteroviruses associated with aseptic meningitis in China. PMID:27652088

  15. Dual infection with hepatitis A and E virus presenting with aseptic meningitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Naha, Kushal; Karanth, Suman; Prabhu, Mukhyaprana; Sidhu, Manpreet Singh

    2012-07-01

    We report the case of a young male who presented with features of aseptic meningitis and elevated serum liver enzymes, but no symptoms or signs suggestive of an acute hepatitis. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with dual infection with hepatitis A and E viruses, and recovered completely with symptomatic therapy. Isolated aseptic meningitis, unaccompanied by hepatitic features is an unusual presentation of a hepatotrophic viral infection, and is yet to be reported with hepatitis A and E virus co-infection.

  16. Pregnancy and Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Andrea G; Garovic, Vesna D

    2015-09-01

    The management of lupus nephritis in pregnancy presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for providers. Pregnancy creates a series of physiologic changes in the immune system and kidney that may result in an increased risk of disease flare and adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, such as preeclampsia, fetal loss, and preterm delivery. Conception should be delayed until disease is in remission to ensure the best pregnancy outcomes. Maternal disease activity and fetal well-being should be monitored closely by an interdisciplinary team, including obstetricians, rheumatologists, and nephrologists throughout pregnancy. Careful attention must be paid to the dosing and potential teratogenicity of medications.

  17. Pregnancy and Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Andrea G; Garovic, Vesna D

    2015-09-01

    The management of lupus nephritis in pregnancy presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for providers. Pregnancy creates a series of physiologic changes in the immune system and kidney that may result in an increased risk of disease flare and adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, such as preeclampsia, fetal loss, and preterm delivery. Conception should be delayed until disease is in remission to ensure the best pregnancy outcomes. Maternal disease activity and fetal well-being should be monitored closely by an interdisciplinary team, including obstetricians, rheumatologists, and nephrologists throughout pregnancy. Careful attention must be paid to the dosing and potential teratogenicity of medications. PMID:26573551

  18. Pre-Clinical Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Bourn, Rebecka; James, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is often preceded by immune dysregulation and clinical manifestations below the threshold for SLE classification. This review discusses current and evolving concepts about the pre-classification period of SLE, including clinical and mechanistic observations, and potential avenues for early identification and intervention. Recent findings Although incomplete lupus erythematosus (ILE) involves fewer clinical manifestations than SLE, ILE can cause organ damage and mortality. Common clinical features in ILE include antinuclear antibody seropositivity, polyarthritis, immunologic manifestations, and hematological disorders. Despite having lower disease activity and damage scores than SLE patients, ILE patients may develop pulmonary arterial hypertension or renal, neurological, or peripheral vascular damage. The recently proposed SLICC SLE classification criteria could shift the period considered “preclinical SLE”. Murine studies suggest that the balance of T helper/T regulatory cells, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity, and plasmacytoid dendritic cell pathways may be valuable targets for early intervention. Summary Advances in our understanding of early SLE, including stages before clinical features are fully developed, will improve our ability to identify individuals at high risk of classification for potential prevention trials, provide necessary information to improve diagnostic testing, and perhaps identify novel targets for directed therapeutics in clinical SLE. PMID:26125103

  19. Transient Life-Threatening Cerebral Edema in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Matt T.; Lavigne, Catherine; Sorond, Farzaneh; Bermas, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system symptoms occur in a substantial portion of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. However, coma is a rare presentation and is usually secondary to complications such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, seizure, or ischemia. Here, we present a 49-year-old woman with lupus erythematosus and a history of recurrent aseptic meningitis and mild subarachnoid hemorrhage who presented with altered mental status and lethargy that progressed rapidly over hours to the herniation syndrome of coma, extensor posturing, and unilateral pupillary dilation. Spinal fluid showed massive protein elevation (>1600), and head computed tomography revealed global cerebral edema. The clinical and radiologic findings rapidly reversed with intravenous corticosteroids and mannitol within 24 hours, and her mental status improved to baseline. Her course was complicated by 2 episodes of recurrent encephalopathy when corticosteroids were tapered; these resolved after resuming high dosing. Because of ongoing pancytopenia, chemotherapy immunosuppression was delayed, and instead she received intravenous immunoglobulin with improvement in the pancytopenia. She remained cognitively intact during subsequent corticosteroid tapering. Rapid development of coma in lupus patients may be due to a primary process of the disease impacting blood brain barrier integrity. Although rare, this potentially fatal complication may be reversible with acute corticosteroid administration. PMID:19455059

  20. Unusually severe varicella zoster (VZV) virus viral (aseptic) meningitis in an unimmunized, immunocompetent host with chickenpox.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Warren-Favorito, Heather; Mickail, Nardeen

    2011-01-01

    Chickenpox is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV) and may be more severe in adults than in children. Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations of chickenpox and VZV are uncommon, for example, encephalitis and cerebellar ataxis. Viral (aseptic) meningitis is a rare CNS complication of VZV. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile in VZV viral (aseptic) meningitis is indistinguishable from other causes of viral meningitis. The clue to most of the diagnoses of VZV aseptic meningitis is based on the temporal relationship between antecedent or concomitant chickenpox. Chickenpox is a clinical diagnosis based on the appearance and distribution of the rash. The rash of chickenpox is vesicular/pruritic and typically appears in crops over 3 successive days. VZV vesicles are fragile, superficial, and surrounded by a erythematous halo. Common nonspecific laboratory findings in chickenpox include leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum transaminases (serum glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase/serum glutamate-pyruvate transaminase). The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is not highly elevated in chickenpox. In VZV aseptic meningitis, the CSF shows a lymphocytic pleocytosis with normal protein, glucose, and lactic acid levels. CSF red blood cells are not a feature of VZV meningitis. We present the case of a healthy unimmunized adult who was hospitalized with chickenpox complicated by VZV aseptic meningitis with an unusually severe headache and nuchal rigidity that occurred during hospitalization.

  1. Flexible walled container having membrane fitment for use with aseptic filling apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Reiss, R.J.; Rica, A.F.

    1984-05-01

    There is disclosed an aseptic flexible walled container having a rigid fitment member cooperative with an aseptic filling apparatus and including a neck, outer flanges surrounding the neck, a frangible membrane and an outer end rim receptive of an hermetically sealed lid. The neck is formed with an internal chamferred seating shoulder for fluid-tight engagement with a fill tube. One outer flange cooperates with clamping jaws of the aseptic filling apparatus for detachably sealing the fitment to a sterilizing chamber and placing it in position for insertion of the filling tube which ruptures the membrane and permits the aseptic introduction of product to the container's interior. The other outer flange is secured to an opening in a wall of the flexible container. The joined fitment and container are presterilized prior to filling. Selected materials for the multi-ply container walls and the fitment permit the container to withstand gamma ray and other sterilization treatment, heat and pressure while maintaining required strength. After the container is aseptically filled, such as with flowable food product, the fill tube is withdrawn and a lid is hermetically sealed onto the rim of the fitment. A heat shield adjacent a container wall surrounds the fitment to protect the container from excessive heat generated by the associated filling apparatus during filling.

  2. Epratuzumab for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wallace, D J; Goldenberg, D M

    2013-04-01

    Epratuzumab (EMab, UCB, Immunomedics) is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting CD22 that is being studied in clinical trials for patients with a variety of rheumatic and hematologic conditions, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An overview of its mechanism of action is followed by a summary of completed lupus studies, and a preview of studies in progress. The agent clearly has anti-inflammatory activity and is a potentially useful agent in the management of autoimmune disorders.

  3. Lupus Erythematosus Panniculitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gondane, Swati; Kothiwala, Rajkumar; Dangi, Sapna; Meherda, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    A case of lupus erythematosus (LE) panniculitis in pregnancy without any lesions of discoid LE or systemic LE is being reported. There were no systemic symptoms. Her ANA, anti-dsDNA, anti-Ro/SSA, and anti-La/SSB antibodies were within normal limits. Diagnosis of lupus panniculitis was considered on clinical and histopathological grounds. The condition responded favorably to systemic steroid therapy. PMID:26677307

  4. Early Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sams, Wiley M.

    1966-01-01

    Cutaneous disorders which manifest themselves on the exposed parts are more likely than are hidden lesions to cause the patient to seek professional services promptly. Usually he consults his family physician or the community dermatologist. The physician who first sees the patient is dependent upon his own resources for management and diagnosis. A background of experience, a measure of energy and an inquisitive attitude are the necessary ingredients for successful management. The difficulties involved in differentiating early lupus erythematosus and polymorphic light eruptions cannot be invariably resolved even with the most complete review. The course of the disorder and the response to environmental factors supply important clues. Investigative work, especially in the field of immunology, offers hope for the solution of some of our problems. PMID:5909872

  5. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, Jill P; Clancy, Robert M

    2003-09-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes, although quite rare, provide an excellent opportunity to examine disease from bench to bedside. During the past year numerous publications have reported basic and clinical research. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in more than 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with conduction abnormalities in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with congenital heart block was at or below one in 50. Although the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease, and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors from the scavenging macrophages, and transdifferentiation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroblast scarring phenotype. Cross-reactivity of anti-52-kD SSA/Ro antibodies with a serotoninergic cardiac receptor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)4, has been suggested but remains unconfirmed. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to grow, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late-onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements that identify first-degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. Reassuringly, most children with neonatal lupus syndromes do not

  6. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  7. Aseptic loosening of the patellar component at the cement-implant interface.

    PubMed

    Rath, N K; Dudhniwala, A G; White, S P; Forster, M C

    2012-12-01

    We present four cases of aseptic loosening at the implant-cement interface following patellar resurfacing. All patients initially had good results, but then presented with onset of a new anterior knee pain. The radiographs including flexed lateral and skyline view of the knee were normal in all the cases. After carefully ruling out infection, aseptic loosening at the cement-implant interface was diagnosed on further investigation. Aseptic loosening of the patellar button at the implant-cement interface can be difficult to diagnose with standard knee radiographs. During flexed lateral radiograph of the knee and the skyline view radiograph of the patellofemoral joint, the patella is compressed on the femur and thereby reducing the loose patellar button. This phenomenon has not been previously described. Patients presenting with new onset of knee pain after an initial good results following patellar resurfacing require further investigation to exclude loosening at the cement-implant interface as plain radiographs can be misleading.

  8. District nurses' and aseptic technique: where did it all go wrong?

    PubMed

    Unsworth, John

    2011-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about whether it is possible to perform aseptic procedures within a community setting. Hallett (2000) has described how community nurses often have a fatalistic view about whether such procedures can really be performed at home. At the same time there has been an increase in the number of patients being cared for at home who need interventions which must adhere to the principles of asepsis. While it has been acknowledged for some time that community nurses must be resourceful and adapt the procedure, the view that community nurses cannot really perform aseptic procedures is a fairly new phenomenon. This article explores the reasons why concerns about the performance of aseptic procedures in the community may have arisen and what steps can be taken to address these concerns to ensure that care at home is both safe and effective.

  9. Improved aseptic technique can reduce variable contamination rates of ward-prepared parenteral doses.

    PubMed

    Austin, P; Elia, M

    2013-02-01

    Aseptic techniques are required to manipulate central venous lines and prepare intravenous doses. This study aimed to examine whether different aseptic techniques affect the contamination rates of intravenous doses prepared on hospital wards. Syringes of tryptic soy broth test media prepared by one pharmacy operator and five nurses were assessed for contamination. The pharmacy operator achieved lower contamination than the nurses (0.0% vs 6.9%; Fisher's exact test, P < 0.001). Contamination differed significantly between nurses (∼2-17% of syringes; binary logistic regression, P = 0.018). In conclusion, appropriate training and experience in aseptic techniques should be embedded into routine clinical practice to reduce contamination rates.

  10. Recurrent aseptic meningitis in association with Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Kikuchi Fujimoto disease (KFD), or histiocytic necrotising lymphadenitis, is a benign and self-limiting condition characterised by primarily affecting the cervical lymph nodes. Recurrent aseptic meningitis in association with KFD is extremely rare and remains a diagnostic challenge. Case presentation We report a 28-year-old man who presented 7 episodes of aseptic meningitis associated with KFD over the course of 7 years. Histopathological findings of enlarged lymph nodes led to the diagnosis of KFD. The patient’s headache and lymphadenopathy spontaneously resolved without any sequelae. Conclusions A diagnosis of KFD should be considered when enlarged cervical lymph nodes are observed in patients with recurrent aseptic meningitis. A long-term prognosis remains uncertain, and careful follow-up is preferred. PMID:23020225

  11. Etiology of aseptic meningitis and clinical characteristics in immune-competent adults.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Hyun; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Jeong-Min; Park, Kwang-Ryul; Youn, Young Chul; Shin, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Viral meningitis is the most common cause of aseptic meningitis. Use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has increased the ability to determine the etiology of viral meningitis. This study used PCR analysis to evaluate the etiology of aseptic meningitis in 177 previously healthy adults over a 5-year period, as well as analyzing the clinical characteristics, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings, and prognosis according to each etiology. The most frequent cause of aseptic meningitis was enterovirus (EV), followed by varicella zoster virus (VZV). Patients with EV meningitis were significantly younger than those with VZV meningitis. The percentage of lymphocytes in white blood cell counts and protein concentrations in the CSF differed significantly among patients with EV, VZV and meningitis of undetermined etiology. Younger age and lower percentage of lymphocyte and protein level in CSF analysis may be suggestive of EV meningitis. Further prospective studies are warranted to identify the correlations between the clinical characteristics and the etiologies of meningitis.

  12. Aseptic necrosis in compressed air tunnel workers using current OSHA decompression schedules.

    PubMed

    Kindwall, E P; Nellen, J R; Spiegelhoff, D R

    1982-10-01

    Aseptic necrosis (dysbaric osteonecrosis) was discovered in two compressed air tunnel workers who had used the present Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) decompression tables for compressed air tunneling at pressures greater than 36 pounds per square inch gauge (psig). A roentgenographic study was made of 21 men who had worked at pressures up to 43 psig using the OSHA schedules. Bone scanning was also included. Seven of the men (33%) were found to have aseptic necrosis involving the shoulders, hips or distal femoral shafts and proximal tibia. It became evident that the present OSHA schedules caused not only an unacceptable incidence of decompression sickness but also aseptic necrosis at pressures over 36 psig. New interim tables that are more conservative and that use either air or oxygen as a breathing gas during decompression are undergoing laboratory and worksite evaluation.

  13. Lupus, discoid on a child's face (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The round or disk shaped (discoid) rash of lupus produces red, raised patches with scales. The pores ( ... The majority (approximately 90%) of individuals with discoid lupus have only skin involvement as compared to more ...

  14. How Does Lupus Affect the Blood?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Investigator Grants, Fellowships and Career Development Awards & Prizes Peer-Reviewed Grant Program LIFELINE Grant Program 2015 ... common symptoms of lupus? How can I manage my fatigue? How is lupus diagnosed? What is photosensitivity? ...

  15. [Disseminated lichenoid form of lupus vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Bork, K

    1985-12-01

    The disseminated forms of skin tuberculosis are extremely uncommon and can occur as acute miliary tuberculosis with skin involvement, which is a severe disease with a rapid course, or as slowly developing lupus vulgaris, i.e., "postexanthematic lupus vulgaris" or "lupus vulgaris disseminatus". A 61-year-old female patient developed unusual lichenoid brownish lesions caused by disseminated lupus vulgaris, which were confined to the right leg. The patient had no other signs of tuberculosis.

  16. Thalidomide in cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Pelle, Michelle T; Werth, Victoria P

    2003-01-01

    For nearly 50 years, thalidomide has struggled between success and controversy. After causing an epidemic of phocomelia and other birth defects during the 1960s, affecting thousands of neonates, thalidomide was used as a sedative in selective disorders including leprosy. The potent anti-inflammatory properties of thalidomide were serendipitously discovered while treating patients with erythema nodosum leprosum, and the drug is now approved by the US FDA for the treatment of this disease. Subsequently, the immunosuppressant effects of thalidomide, including the complex modulation of many cytokines, have been recognized. One promising application of thalidomide has been the treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Among the largest series reviewed, the drug has been found to ameliorate cutaneous lupus erythematosus in 90% of patients, on average. Remission is achieved in approximately 15-20% of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus at doses between 50-400 mg daily. Contraceptive concerns and the recognized neuropathic effects of thalidomide limit the use of the drug in patients with cutaneous lupus. Physicians who prescribe thalidomide in the US must be registered with the drug manufacturer. With appropriate control of drug access and close physician monitoring, thalidomide provides a needed therapeutic option for the treatment of refractory cases of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

  17. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Grace K.; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus is centered upon formulating a regimen of topical and systemic therapies designed to reduce disease activity and minimize cosmetic damage. Sun avoidance and sunscreen are important preventative measures proven to minimize cutaneous lupus erythematosus exacerbations. Limited disease is typically managed with topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Antimalarial therapy is the gold standard of systemic therapy. Many other treatments have been studied in patients with recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and their use must be evaluated based on individual risk-benefit concerns. R-salbutamol and pulsed dye laser therapy have proven to be effective topical alternatives. Additional systemic agents include retinoids, immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, biologics, and other experimental therapies with novel modes of action. According to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria for evaluating the strength of evidence supporting an individual treatment measure, no therapy for cutaneous lupus erythematosus has achieved Level 1 status. This demonstrates the need for randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of all cutaneous lupus erythematosus interventions in order to meet increasing standards and demand for evidence-based practice. PMID:23320123

  18. Feasibility of raw glycerol conversion into single cell oil by zygomycetes under non-aseptic conditions.

    PubMed

    Moustogianni, Anna; Bellou, Stamatia; Triantaphyllidou, Irene-Eva; Aggelis, George

    2015-04-01

    The use of plant oils as feedstock for the biodiesel manufacture has many drawbacks, thus, the interest has turned to single cell oil (SCO) as an alternative. However, the production of SCO is still too expensive, mainly due to the low oil productivity and the high cost of medium sterilization required. In this work raw glycerol was converted into SCO by oleaginous Zygomycetes under non-aseptic conditions on selective (i.e., containing essential oils and/or antibiotics) nitrogen limited media. The obtained data showed that although bacterial populations inhibited the fungal growth, lipid accumulation remained unaffected by the presence of bacteria in the growth medium compared to control experiments (conducted under aseptic conditions). Therefore, a two-stage process was developed in which growth was performed under aseptic conditions (1st stage) followed by lipid accumulation performed under non-aseptic conditions (2nd stage) in the presence of thyme essential oil as an antibacterial agent. Large amounts of lipids were accumulated inside the mycelia, yielding around 13% wt/wt of oil per glycerol consumed.

  19. Feasibility of raw glycerol conversion into single cell oil by zygomycetes under non-aseptic conditions.

    PubMed

    Moustogianni, Anna; Bellou, Stamatia; Triantaphyllidou, Irene-Eva; Aggelis, George

    2015-04-01

    The use of plant oils as feedstock for the biodiesel manufacture has many drawbacks, thus, the interest has turned to single cell oil (SCO) as an alternative. However, the production of SCO is still too expensive, mainly due to the low oil productivity and the high cost of medium sterilization required. In this work raw glycerol was converted into SCO by oleaginous Zygomycetes under non-aseptic conditions on selective (i.e., containing essential oils and/or antibiotics) nitrogen limited media. The obtained data showed that although bacterial populations inhibited the fungal growth, lipid accumulation remained unaffected by the presence of bacteria in the growth medium compared to control experiments (conducted under aseptic conditions). Therefore, a two-stage process was developed in which growth was performed under aseptic conditions (1st stage) followed by lipid accumulation performed under non-aseptic conditions (2nd stage) in the presence of thyme essential oil as an antibacterial agent. Large amounts of lipids were accumulated inside the mycelia, yielding around 13% wt/wt of oil per glycerol consumed. PMID:25335774

  20. Magnetic thermometry in the aseptic processing of foods containing particulates (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiron, Kenneth; Litchfield, Bruce

    1997-04-01

    Aseptic processing of foods has many advantages over canning, including higher efficiency, lighter packaging, better taste, and higher nutritional value. Aseptic processing is different from canning where the food and container are sterilized together. Instead, a thin stream of food is heated and the packaging is independently sterilized before the food is placed in the package. However, no aseptic processes have been successfully filed with the FDA for foods containing sizable solid particles because of uncertainties in the thermal sterilization of the particles (e.g., soup). We have demonstrated that by inserting small paramagnetic particles in the interior of the simulated and real food particles, the local temperature can be measured. With this information, any questions about the adequate sterilization of the particles can be resolved. The measurements were done by directing the food stream through a magnetic field and sensing the voltages induced in a pickup coil by the motion of the magnetized particles. Details of the equipment design and data analysis will be discussed along with an introduction to the aseptic processing of foods.

  1. Improving Quality of Refrigerated Potato Strips by Near-Aseptic Packaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of hot water blanching and near-aseptic packaging on the shelf-life of refrigerated potato strips was investigated based on quality; microbial, textural and color. Potato strips were first blanched at low temperature (60 °C) for 10- or 20-min, and then second blanched at high temperature ...

  2. Overview of neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benay

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal lupus (NL) is defined by the presentation of the fetus and the newborn who possess autoantibodies received from the mother. It is the dysfunction of the maternal immune system that leads to the production of autoantibodies to anti-Sjögren syndrome-A, anti-Sjögren syndrome-B, and anti-ribonuclear protein antigens. These antibodies are shared through the placenta and produce bodily changes in the fetal skin and heart, as well as potential changes in other body systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most dangerous manifestation of NL that can occur in utero or after birth. This article will provide an overview the presentation of NL and current therapies. Prenatal steroids have been the mainstay of therapy to try to reverse first- and second-degree congenital heart block and to prevent progression to a more advanced stage. New therapies are combining steroids with intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. This article will provide guidelines for practitioners so they can consider NL as a differential diagnosis when presented with cutaneous lesions, congenital heart block, or abnormal findings in the hematologic, hepatobiliary, neurologic, and musculoskeletal systems.

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Arvind; Gordon, Caroline; Crow, Mary K; Touma, Zahi; Urowitz, Murray B; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Hughes, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can affect many organs, including the skin, joints, the central nervous system and the kidneys. Women of childbearing age and certain racial groups are typically predisposed to developing the condition. Rare, inherited, single-gene complement deficiencies are strongly associated with SLE, but the disease is inherited in a polygenic manner in most patients. Genetic interactions with environmental factors, particularly UV light exposure, Epstein-Barr virus infection and hormonal factors, might initiate the disease, resulting in immune dysregulation at the level of cytokines, T cells, B cells and macrophages. Diagnosis is primarily clinical and remains challenging because of the heterogeneity of SLE. Classification criteria have aided clinical trials, but, despite this, only one drug (that is, belimumab) has been approved for use in SLE in the past 60 years. The 10-year mortality has improved and toxic adverse effects of older medications such as cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoids have been partially offset by newer drugs such as mycophenolate mofetil and glucocorticoid-sparing regimes. However, further improvements have been hampered by the adverse effects of renal and neuropsychiatric involvement and late diagnosis. Adding to this burden is the increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease in SLE together with the risk of infection made worse by immunosuppressive therapy. Challenges remain with treatment-resistant disease and symptoms such as fatigue. Newer therapies may bring hope of better outcomes, and the refinement to stem cell and genetic techniques might offer a cure in the future. PMID:27306639

  4. Lupus erythematosus revisited.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Annegret; Wenzel, Joerg; Bijl, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease with clinical manifestations of differing severity. The exact pathomechanisms and interactions resulting in the inflammatory and immunological processes of this heterogeneous disease remain elusive. Approaches in the understanding of the pathomechanisms revealed that the clinical expression of LE is predisposed by susceptibility genes and that various environmental factors are responsible for an abnormal immune response. Several studies demonstrated that ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors in the pathogenesis of the disease. Standardized photoprovocation in patients with LE has been shown to be a safe and efficient model for evaluating the underlying pathomechanisms which lead to the production of autoantibodies and immune complexes. In particular, interferons were defined as important players in the early activation of the immune system and were observed to play a specific role in the immunological interface between the innate and the adaptive immune system. Abnormalities or disturbances in the different processes of cell death, such as apoptosis or necrosis, have also been recognized as crucial in the pathogenesis of LE. Although each process is different and characterized by unique features, the processes are interrelated and result in a complex disease.

  5. Is Sterile Better Than Aseptic? Comparing the Microbiology of Acellular Dermal Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gabriel M.; Nasser, Ahmed E.; Phillips, Brett T.; Gersch, Robert P.; Fourman, Mitchell S.; Lilo, Sarit E.; Fritz, Jason R.; Khan, Sami U.; Dagum, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Postoperative infections are a major complication associated with tissue-expander-based breast reconstruction. The use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in this surgery has been identified as a potential reservoir of infection, prompting the development of sterile ADM. Although aseptic and sterile ADMs have been investigated, no study has focused on the occurrence and clinical outcome of bacterial colonization before implantation. Methods: Samples of aseptic AlloDerm, sterile Ready-To-Use AlloDerm, and AlloMax were taken before implantation. These samples were incubated in Tryptic soy broth overnight before being streaked on Trypticase soy agar, MacConkey agar, and 5% blood agar plates for culture and incubated for 48 hours. Culture results were cross-referenced with patient outcomes for 1 year postoperatively. Results: A total of 92 samples of ADM were collected from 63 patients. There were 15 cases of postoperative surgical site infection (16.3%). Only 1 sample of ADM (AlloMax) showed growth of Escherichia coli, which was likely a result of contamination. That patient did not develop any infectious sequelae. Patient outcomes showed no difference in the incidence of seroma or infection between sterile and aseptic ADMs. Conclusions: This study evaluates the microbiology of acellular dermal matrices before use in breast reconstruction. No difference was found in the preoperative bacterial load of either aseptic or sterile ADM. No significant difference was noted in infection or seroma formation. Given these results, we believe aseptic processing used on ADMs is equivalent to sterile processing in our patient cohort in terms of clinical infection and seroma occurrence postoperatively. PMID:27482500

  6. Heat transfer and lethality considerations in aseptic processing of liquid/particle mixtures: a review.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, H S; Awuah, G B; Simpson, B K

    1997-04-01

    Consumer awareness and demand for nutritious yet inexpensive food products call for innovative processing techniques that have both safety and quality as primary objectives. These challenges appear to have been met by aseptic processing techniques, especially for liquid and high-acid foods. However, the extension of aseptic processing principles to low-acid foods containing discrete particles in viscous sauces has not been approved by regulatory agencies, particularly in North America. This apparent limitation is due primarily to the lack of adequate temperature monitoring devices to keep track of particles in dynamic motion, as well as to the residence time distribution of particles flowing in the continuous heat-hold-cool sections of the aseptic processing system. These problems have prompted active research to describe the phenomenal behavior of particulates through sound mathematical modeling and computer simulators. The accuracy of mathematical models depends heavily on how accurate input parametric values are. These parameters include the thermophysical properties of the carrier fluid and particles, as well as the aseptic processing system characteristics in relation to residence time distribution and the fluid-to-particle interfacial heat transfer coefficient. Apparently, several contradictory findings have been reported in the literature with respect to the effect of various processing parameters on the above-mentioned input parametric values. The need therefore arises for more collaborative studies involving the industry and academia. This review brings to perspective, the current status on the aseptic processing of particulate foods with respect to the critical processing parameters which affect the fluid-to-particle convective heat transfer coefficient associated with particulate laden products. PMID:9143820

  7. Cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Elaine V; La Cava, Antonio

    2009-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies that can form immune complexes and deposit in tissues, causing inflammation and organ damage. There is evidence that interferons and some interleukins can have an active role in the pathogenesis of SLE and can contribute significantly to the immune imbalance in the disease, whereas the role of some cytokines (such as TNF) is still debated. This review discusses the activity of several cytokines in SLE, their effects on the immune cells in relation to the disease pathogenesis, and the promise and limitations of cytokine-based therapies in clinical trials for lupus patients.

  8. Lupus pernio without systemic involvement

    PubMed Central

    Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan; Vora, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology that can affect the pulmonary, reticulo-endothelial, skin, gastrointestinal, cardiac, musculo – skeletal, endocrine or central nervous system. Exclusive cutaneous involvement is very rare in sarcoidosis. Lupus pernio is a variant of cutaneous sarcoidosis presenting with erythematous to violaceous nodules and plaques located symmetrically over the nose, cheeks, ears and digits. We present a case of lupus pernio which showed rapid improvement with topical steroids and has yet not developed any systemic involvement even after 6 years of regular follow up. PMID:24350015

  9. Lupus nephritis reoccurs following transplantation in the lupus prone mouse.

    PubMed

    Hamar, P; Wang, M; Godo, M; Kokeny, G; Rosivall, L; Ouyang, N; Heemann, U

    2010-02-01

    The incidence and pathomechanism of recurrent lupus nephritis (RLN) after transplantation is not clearly understood. Burning out of the autoimmune process or local immunoregulatory mechanisms in the kidney may be responsible for the low incidence of recurrence. These mechanisms cannot be investigated in human subjects, due to post-transplant immunosuppression. To investigate the pathomechanisms of RLN, male and female kidneys were transplanted from FAS deficient lupus prone (LPR) or control (FAS intact) MRL mice into either LPR or MRL recipients. Urinary protein and blood urea were assessed. Double negative (DN) lymphocyte proliferation was determined by flow cytometry. Two months after transplantation inflammatory infiltration of the glomerular, vascular and interstitial compartments were determined. Renal function as demonstrated by blood urea levels was normal in MRL recipients, but elevated in LPR recipients, independent of the donor strain. Paralleling functional results, inflammatory infiltration was mild or absent in MRL recipients of MRL grafts, and mild to moderate in MRL recipients of LPR grafts, suggesting that kidney removal from the autoimmune (LPR) environment significantly reduced inflammation. Graft infiltration was most severe in LPR recipients: grafts were similarly inflamed independent of the donor. All LPR recipients had significantly less CD4+ Th cells versus MRL mice. Transplantation of LPR grafts into MRL recipients reduced CD4+ Th cell percentage, accompanied by a slight induction of lupus autoantibody production. Our results demonstrate that lupus nephritis is not kidney specific in the LPR model with recurrence after transplantation in the absence of immunosuppression.

  10. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P; Rupel, A; Clancy, R M

    2004-01-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes (NLS), while quite rare, carry significant mortality and morbidity in cases of cardiac manifestations. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in > 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with congenital heart block (CHB) in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with CHB was at or below 1 in 50. While the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors (e.g., TGFbeta) from the scavenging macrophages and modulation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroflast scarring phenotype. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to expand, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements which identify first degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. In order to achieve advances at both the bench and bedside, national research registries established in the US and Canada are critical.

  11. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine. The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management. The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine. The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to

  12. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department.

    PubMed

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine.The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department.A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management.The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine.The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to viral agents or

  13. Successful treatment of severe refractory lupus hepatitis with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Y; Saito, T; Takada, K; Kawahata, K; Kohsaka, H

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus-related hepatitis, known as lupus hepatitis, is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus, and is usually subclinical with mild abnormalities of serum liver enzymes. While cases with clinically significant and refractory lupus hepatitis are uncommon, treatment options for lupus hepatitis are to be established. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old man with progressive lupus hepatitis accompanied by autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Lupus hepatitis of this patient was refractory to tacrolimus, azathioprine and cyclophosphamide, but was successfully treated by mycophenolate mofetil. Mycophenolate mofetil might be an effective therapeutic option for refractory lupus hepatitis.

  14. Disseminated lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Garg, Taru; Ramchander; Shrihar, Rashmi; Gupta, Tanvi Pal; Aggarwal, Shilpi

    2011-01-01

    follicular plugging and multiple epithelioid cell granulomas, rimmed by lymphocytes in the deeper portion of the dermis, mainly peri-appendageal. Stain for acid-fast bacteria was negative. Cultures from the skin lesions were negative. The patient was diagnosed as having lupus vulgaris with multiple lesions of varying morphology at different sites with pulmonary tuberculosis and healed lymph node involvement.

  15. Disseminated lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Garg, Taru; Ramchander; Shrihar, Rashmi; Gupta, Tanvi Pal; Aggarwal, Shilpi

    2011-01-01

    follicular plugging and multiple epithelioid cell granulomas, rimmed by lymphocytes in the deeper portion of the dermis, mainly peri-appendageal. Stain for acid-fast bacteria was negative. Cultures from the skin lesions were negative. The patient was diagnosed as having lupus vulgaris with multiple lesions of varying morphology at different sites with pulmonary tuberculosis and healed lymph node involvement. PMID:21548522

  16. Irradiated or aseptically prepared frozen dairy desserts: acceptability to bone marrow transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Dong, F M; Hashisaka, A E; Rasco, B A; Einstein, M A; Mar, D R; Aker, S N

    1992-06-01

    Sterile ice cream and frozen yogurt were offered to immunosuppressed patients recovering from bone marrow transplantation. To obtain sterile products, two of the dairy desserts (prepackaged ice cream and frozen yogurt bars) were exposed to 40 kGy of cobalt 60 irradiation. Four different flavors of ice cream were aseptically prepared under a laminar airflow hood using commercially sterilized ingredients. A commercially sterile, frozen milk-based drink on the low-microbial menu served as the control. Ratings of the seven products by 17 patients indicated that a frozen vanilla milk-based drink and aseptically prepared chocolate ice cream were highly acceptable to recovery immunosuppressed patients who have difficulty eating most foods. However, the seven desserts received higher ratings from a sensory panel of healthy individuals than from the patient panel, confirming that new foods for the low-microbial diet should be "market-tested" by the targeted patient population before inclusion in the menu.

  17. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST.

  18. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2014-10-29

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST.

  19. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST. PMID:25361559

  20. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST. PMID:25355742

  1. [Blepharitis--rare in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Gyl, Fekete; Anna-Adrien, Csiszár; Oanţă, A; Irimie, M; Edit, Fekete Júlia

    2008-01-01

    Chronic lupus erythematosus often appear on the face, ears, and scalp. In exchange eyelids involvement as a chronic blepharitis is rare. We describe six cases of discoid lupus erythematosus with lesions on the face and ears who have eyelids involvement, too. Blepharitis is a rare involvement of the chronic lupus erythematosus and in case that is isolated, the diagnosis is belated and can lead to complications. The involvement of the lower eyelids is more frequently especially theirs lateral third.

  2. Dissecting complex epigenetic alterations in human lupus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipak R; Richardson, Bruce C

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic relapsing autoimmune disease that primarily afflicts women, and both a genetic predisposition and appropriate environmental exposures are required for lupus to develop and flare. The genetic requirement is evidenced by an increased concordance in identical twins and by the validation of at least 35 single-nucleotide polymorphisms predisposing patients to lupus. Genes alone, though, are not enough. The concordance of lupus in identical twins is often incomplete, and when concordant, the age of onset is usually different. Lupus is also not present at birth, but once the disease develops, it typically follows a chronic relapsing course. Thus, genes alone are insufficient to cause human lupus, and additional factors encountered in the environment and over time are required to initiate the disease and subsequent flares. The nature of the environmental contribution, though, and the mechanisms by which environmental agents modify the immune response to cause lupus onset and flares in genetically predisposed people have been controversial. Reports that the lupus-inducing drugs procainamide and hydralazine are epigenetic modifiers, that epigenetically modified T cells are sufficient to cause lupus-like autoimmunity in animal models, and that patients with active lupus have epigenetic changes similar to those caused by procainamide and hydralazine have prompted a growing interest in how epigenetic alterations contribute to this disease. Understanding how epigenetic mechanisms modify T cells to contribute to lupus requires an understanding of how epigenetic mechanisms regulate gene expression. The roles of DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs in lupus pathogenesis will be reviewed here. PMID:23374884

  3. Renal infarction due to lupus vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Varalaxmi, B; Sandeep, P; Sridhar, A V S S N; Raveendra, P; Kishore, C Krishna; Ram, R; Kumar, V Siva

    2015-08-01

    In the ISN/RPS 2003 classification of lupus nephritis (LN) renal vascular lesions are not mentioned. We present a patient with postpartum lupus vasculopathy. The renal biopsy in our patient showed concentric intimal thickening with narrowed lumen. No inflammatory changes were found. It also revealed immunoglobulin and complement deposition on the wall of the arteriole. These changes indicate lupus vasculopathy. The glomeruli revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis, with wire loops and cellular crescent in one glomerulus. The patient showed improvement with immunosuppression.

  4. Risk factors for aseptic loosening of Müller-type straight stems

    PubMed Central

    Gersbach, Silke; Butscher, Andre; Ilchmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Even small differences in design variables for the femoral stem may influence the outcome of a hip arthroplasty. We performed a risk factor analysis for aseptic loosening of 4 different versions of cemented Müller-type straight stems with special emphasis on design modifications (2 shapes, MSS or SL, and 2 materials, CoNiCrMo (Co) or Ti-6Al-7Nb (Ti)). Methods We investigated 828 total hip replacements, which were followed prospectively in our in-house register. All stems were operated in the same setup, using Sulfix-6 bone cement and a second-generation cementing technique. Demographic and design-specific risk factors were analyzed using an adjusted Cox regression model. Results The 4 versions showed marked differences in 15-year stem survival with aseptic loosening as the endpoint: 94% (95% CI: 89–99) for MSS Co, 83% (CI: 75–91) for SL Co, 81% (CI: 76–87) for MSS Ti and 63% (CI: 56–71) for SL Ti. Cox regression analysis showed a relative risk (RR) for aseptic loosening of 3 (CI: 2–5) for stems made of Ti and of 2 (CI: 1–2) for the SL design. The RR for aseptic stem loosening increased to 8 (CI: 4–15) when comparing the most and the least successful designs (MSS Co and SL Ti). Interpretation Cemented Müller-type straight stems should be MSS-shaped and made of a material with high flexural strength (e.g. cobalt-chrome). The surface finish should be polished (Ra < 0.4 µm). These technical aspects combined with modern cementing techniques would improve the survival of Müller-type straight stems. This may be true for all types of cemented stems. PMID:23799347

  5. Varicella Zoster Aseptic Meningitis: Report of an Atypical Case and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Walid; Elzouki, Abdel-Naser; Husain, Ahmed; Osman, Lubna

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 15 Final Diagnosis: Varicella Zoster aseptic meningitis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Lumber punctur Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Neurologic complications can occur with varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, usually after vesicular exanthem. A review of the literature revealed 3 cases of viral meningitis associated with 6th nerve palsy but without significantly increased intracranial pressure. Case Report: We report a case of a previously healthy 15-year-old girl with aseptic meningitis as a result of reactivated-VZV infection with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure and reversible 6th cranial nerve palsy but without exanthema. Diagnosis was made by detection of VZV-DNA in cerebrospinal fluid using polymerase chain reaction and documented high intracranial pressure. Full recovery was achieved after a course of acyclovir and acetazolamide. Conclusions: This case demonstrates that VZV may be considered in cases of aseptic meningitis in immunocompetent individuals, even without exanthema, and it may increase the intracranial pressure, leading to symptoms, and causing reversible neurological deficit. PMID:26342350

  6. Aseptic meningitis outbreak caused by echovirus 30 in two regions in Bulgaria, May-August 2012.

    PubMed

    Mladenova, Z; Buttinelli, G; Dikova, A; Stoyanova, A; Troyancheva, M; Komitova, R; Stoycheva, M; Pekova, L; Parmakova, K; Fiore, L

    2014-10-01

    An aseptic meningitis outbreak emerged in two regions in Bulgaria in 2012 and echovirus 30 (E30) was established as the aetiological agent by cell culture isolation, serological test, and molecular-based techniques. A total of 157 patients with aseptic meningitis were investigated, of which 117 were confirmed as having E30-associated disease. Molecular analysis of 12 E30 isolates revealed 99-100% nucleotide and amino-acid identity between them and a close correlation with a Greek strain involved in an E30 outbreak in 2012. Children aged 5-14 years were mainly affected, which could reflect the absence of E30 epidemics in Bulgaria for a period of 11 years. The first case with E30 isolation (a 2-year-old patient from Plovdiv) was notified at the end of April 2012. This was most likely the index case, from which the spread of the virus started, causing sporadic cases first, which later led to an aseptic meningitis outbreak facilitated by person-to-person viral transmission.

  7. Aseptic versus Sterile Acellular Dermal Matrices in Breast Reconstruction: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Shaun D.; Neumeister, Michael W.; Cederna, Paul S.; Momoh, Adeyiza O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: As the use of acellular dermal matrices in breast reconstruction has become more commonplace and efforts are made to improve on postoperative outcomes, the method of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) processing (aseptic versus sterile) has become a subject of interest. This article provides an updated overview of the critical aspects of ADM processing in addition to application of ADMs in single- and two-stage breast reconstruction, a review of the morbidity associated with ADM use, and alternatives. Methods: A literature review was performed in PubMed identifying recent systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and head-to-head comparisons on aseptically processed ADM and sterile-processed ADM in implant-based breast reconstruction. Results: Recent meta-analyses have shown a 2- to 3-fold increase in infections and tissue expander/implant explantation rates and a 3- to 4-fold increase in seroma formation compared with non-ADM reconstruction techniques. Comparisons of aseptic and sterile ADMs in multiple studies have shown no significant difference in infection rates and equivocal findings for other specific complications such as seroma formation. Conclusions: Current evidence on the impact of processing techniques that improve ADM sterility on postoperative morbidity in implant breast reconstruction is unclear. Deficiencies of the available data highlight the need for well-designed, multicenter, randomized controlled studies that will aid in optimizing outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction. PMID:27536502

  8. A Rare Complication of Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole: Drug Induced Aseptic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pinky; Stromich, Jeremiah; Cohen, Mallory; Wainaina, Jane Njeri

    2016-01-01

    Drug induced aseptic meningitis is a rare but challenging diagnosis, most commonly reported with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is a sulfonamide that is widely used in clinical practice for the treatment and prophylaxis of various infections. Drug induced aseptic meningitis, when seen with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, occurs predominantly in patients with some degree of immune compromise and is less commonly seen in immune competent individuals. The patient often exhibits the classic symptoms of meningitis. Early diagnosis is important, since the cessation of the antibiotic leads to rapid clinical improvement. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole induced aseptic meningitis has been underreported to FDA/MED-WATCH program. Here we report two cases of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole: an immune competent individual and immune compromised individual, both of which presented with signs of meningitis and a negative infectious workup. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is an uncommon and mysterious adverse reaction to a commonly used antibiotic. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute signs and symptoms of meningitis especially after infectious causes have been ruled out. PMID:27579194

  9. A Rare Complication of Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole: Drug Induced Aseptic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Stromich, Jeremiah; Cohen, Mallory; Wainaina, Jane Njeri

    2016-01-01

    Drug induced aseptic meningitis is a rare but challenging diagnosis, most commonly reported with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is a sulfonamide that is widely used in clinical practice for the treatment and prophylaxis of various infections. Drug induced aseptic meningitis, when seen with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, occurs predominantly in patients with some degree of immune compromise and is less commonly seen in immune competent individuals. The patient often exhibits the classic symptoms of meningitis. Early diagnosis is important, since the cessation of the antibiotic leads to rapid clinical improvement. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole induced aseptic meningitis has been underreported to FDA/MED-WATCH program. Here we report two cases of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole: an immune competent individual and immune compromised individual, both of which presented with signs of meningitis and a negative infectious workup. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is an uncommon and mysterious adverse reaction to a commonly used antibiotic. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute signs and symptoms of meningitis especially after infectious causes have been ruled out. PMID:27579194

  10. Genotyping of human parechoviruses in Iranian young children with aseptic meningitis and sepsis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Pooneh; Naser, Hakimeh Mahdian; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Sohrabi, Amir; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Motamedirad, Mahdieh; Bahramali, Golnaz; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2013-12-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeV) are classified into 14 genotypes. HPeV1 and HPeV2 are the most prevalent genotypes in young children, which have been associated with mild to severe diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the involvement of HPeVs in aseptic meningitis and sepsis-like illness in Iran. Viral RNA was extracted from 148 cerebrospinal fluid samples from children <8 years old with primary diagnosis of aseptic meningitis and/or sepsis-like illness. Specific HPeV, HEV real-time PCR and HPeV typing were done to identify the infection rate of these viruses. HPeV and HEV were detected in 64 (43.24 %), 31 (20.94 %) of 148 patients with 10 (6.75 %) coinfection. VP1/VP3 junction region was successfully sequenced from 12 of the HPeV-positive specimens, and all of them were identified as HPeV1. HPeV was more prevalent than HEV in both aseptic meningitis and sepsis-like illness, so further studies are needed to understand the disease burden of HPeV infections, and clinical manifestations especially in specific illnesses of possible viral etiology. Direct detection of these viruses leads to reduce hospitalization and use of antibiotic, which are often followed by other complications in neonates and young children.

  11. Lupus Panniculitis as an Initial Manifestation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu-Kun; Wang, Fang; Chen, Wen-Na; Xu, Rui; Wang, Zhuo; Jiang, Yuan-Wen; Luo, Di-Qing; Han, Jian-De

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lupus erythematosus panniculitis (LEP) is a variant of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CCLE). Reported cases of LEP lesions before the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were very rare; only 9 cases have been reported, to the best of our knowledge. We now describe the case of a 19-year-old male patient, with an overall review of the English literature. In the earliest stage of the present case, nodules and ulcers involved his left leg and face, with no other accompanied symptoms. The skin lesions disappeared after treatment with methylprednisolone, 16 mg/d for 1 month. Seven months after discontinuing methylprednisolone, the cutaneous nodules and ulcers on his back recurred and were accompanied by fever, hair loss, and polyarthritis. Blood tests revealed leucopenia, positive antinuclear antibody and Smith antibody, and proteinuria. Histopathological findings were most consistent with LEP. This was followed sequentially by the diagnosis of SLE. The patient improved again after treatment with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Patients with LEP should have regular follow-ups because the development of SLE is possible. Early diagnosis and proper treatment is pivotal to improve the prognosis of such patients. PMID:27100438

  12. Probabilistic exposure assessment model to estimate aseptic-UHT product failure rate.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Laure; Albert, Isabelle; Magras, Catherine; Johnson, Nicholas Brian; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic-Ultra-High-Temperature (UHT) products are manufactured to be free of microorganisms capable of growing in the food at normal non-refrigerated conditions at which the food is likely to be held during manufacture, distribution and storage. Two important phases within the process are widely recognised as critical in controlling microbial contamination: the sterilisation steps and the following aseptic steps. Of the microbial hazards, the pathogen spore formers Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus cereus are deemed the most pertinent to be controlled. In addition, due to a relatively high thermal resistance, Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are considered a concern for spoilage of low acid aseptic-UHT products. A probabilistic exposure assessment model has been developed in order to assess the aseptic-UHT product failure rate associated with these three bacteria. It was a Modular Process Risk Model, based on nine modules. They described: i) the microbial contamination introduced by the raw materials, either from the product (i.e. milk, cocoa and dextrose powders and water) or the packaging (i.e. bottle and sealing component), ii) the sterilisation processes, of either the product or the packaging material, iii) the possible recontamination during subsequent processing of both product and packaging. The Sterility Failure Rate (SFR) was defined as the sum of bottles contaminated for each batch, divided by the total number of bottles produced per process line run (10(6) batches simulated per process line). The SFR associated with the three bacteria was estimated at the last step of the process (i.e. after Module 9) but also after each module, allowing for the identification of modules, and responsible contamination pathways, with higher or lower intermediate SFR. The model contained 42 controlled settings associated with factory environment, process line or product formulation, and more than 55 probabilistic inputs corresponding to inputs with variability

  13. Probabilistic exposure assessment model to estimate aseptic-UHT product failure rate.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Laure; Albert, Isabelle; Magras, Catherine; Johnson, Nicholas Brian; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic-Ultra-High-Temperature (UHT) products are manufactured to be free of microorganisms capable of growing in the food at normal non-refrigerated conditions at which the food is likely to be held during manufacture, distribution and storage. Two important phases within the process are widely recognised as critical in controlling microbial contamination: the sterilisation steps and the following aseptic steps. Of the microbial hazards, the pathogen spore formers Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus cereus are deemed the most pertinent to be controlled. In addition, due to a relatively high thermal resistance, Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are considered a concern for spoilage of low acid aseptic-UHT products. A probabilistic exposure assessment model has been developed in order to assess the aseptic-UHT product failure rate associated with these three bacteria. It was a Modular Process Risk Model, based on nine modules. They described: i) the microbial contamination introduced by the raw materials, either from the product (i.e. milk, cocoa and dextrose powders and water) or the packaging (i.e. bottle and sealing component), ii) the sterilisation processes, of either the product or the packaging material, iii) the possible recontamination during subsequent processing of both product and packaging. The Sterility Failure Rate (SFR) was defined as the sum of bottles contaminated for each batch, divided by the total number of bottles produced per process line run (10(6) batches simulated per process line). The SFR associated with the three bacteria was estimated at the last step of the process (i.e. after Module 9) but also after each module, allowing for the identification of modules, and responsible contamination pathways, with higher or lower intermediate SFR. The model contained 42 controlled settings associated with factory environment, process line or product formulation, and more than 55 probabilistic inputs corresponding to inputs with variability

  14. Pharmacologic management of neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Kivity, Shaye; Baker, Britain; Arango, Maria-Teresa; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus affects above 50% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and may span from mild symptoms to acute devastating life-threatening ones. Owing to the clinical variability, most pharmacological data rely on small, uncontrolled trials and case reports. The mainstay of therapy relies on immune-suppression by glucocorticoids, in adjunction with cyclophosphamide or anti-B-cell therapy, in moderate to severe cases. In selected scenarios (e.g., chorea) intravenous immunoglobulin or plasmapheresis may be effective. Anticoagulation is warranted if anti-phospholipid antibodies are present. In parallel there may be a need for symptomatic treatment such as anti-epileptic or anti-depressive treatments, etc. In the future, more studies addressed to assess pathogenesis and preferred treatments of specific manifestations are needed in order to personalize treatments.

  15. The Many Faces of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    El-Gabalawy, Hani

    1990-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multisystem disorder that presents itself in several different ways. Arthritis, dermatitis, nephritis, and pleuropericarditis are the most common features initially. Various hematologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations are also seen during the course of the disease. Anti-nuclear antibodies are the hallmark of lupus but are nonspecific and detectable in many other disorders. Once the diagnosis is established, the severity of the disease needs to be determined, in particular the extent of major organ involvement. The level of disease activity should be repeatedly estimated using clinical and laboratory parameters. Therapeutic decisions are based on disease severity and activity. Aggressive suppression of major organ inflammation and reduction of long-term toxicity are the main goals of therapy. PMID:21233973

  16. Epigenetics in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, GONG; ZUO, XIAOXIA

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease, with mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. Previous studies have proposed that genes and environments are required for lupus to develop and flare. It has been found that epigenetics have a significant influence on SLE. The present review will concentrate on epigenetics in SLE. There are a number of studies reporting that autoreactive T cells and B cells in patients with SLE have evidence of altered patterns of DNA methylation, modifications of histones and microRNA (miRNA). Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are another type of noncoding RNAs, which have an important role in epigenetics. lncRNAs may possibly become a new hotspot in SLE. PMID:26893827

  17. Fatigue in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Grace E; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease often characterized by fatigue, with significant effects on physical functioning and wellbeing. The definition, prevalence and factors associated with fatigue, including physical activity, obesity, sleep, depression, anxiety, mood, cognitive dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency, pain, effects of medications and comorbidities, as well as potential therapeutic options of fatigue in the systemic lupus erythematosus population are reviewed. Due to variability in the reliability and validity of various fatigue measures used in clinical studies, clinical trial data have been challenging to interpret. Further investigation into the relationships between these risk factors and fatigue, and improved measures of fatigue, may lead to an improvement in the management of this chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:22737181

  18. Malignancies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Mruganka; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Gordon, Caroline; Clarke, Ann E; Bernatsky, Sasha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to underline important advancements in the understanding of cancer risks in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, there is an increased risk of specific kinds of malignancy. For example, the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is increased several-fold in SLE versus the general population. In addition, heightened risks for lung cancer, thyroid cancer and cervical dysplasia in SLE have been found. Some have postulated that immunosuppressive drugs play a role, as well as other important mediators, such as lupus disease activity itself. One new frontier being explored is the significant finding of a decreased risk of certain nonhematologic cancers (e.g., breast, ovarian, endometrial and prostate) in SLE. The reasons for this are currently under study. PMID:19643208

  19. The BCL2 -938C>A Promoter Polymorphism Is Associated with Risk for and Time to Aseptic Loosening of Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Patrick; Wedemeyer, Christian; Fuest, Lena; Kurscheid, Gina; Gehrke, Thorsten; Klenke, Stefanie; Jäger, Marcus; Kauther, Max D; Bachmann, Hagen S

    2016-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major cause of revision surgery of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Only few host factors affecting aseptic loosening have been identified until now, although they are urgently needed to identify and possibly treat those patients at higher risk for aseptic loosening. To determine whether the functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.-938C>A (rs2279115), located in the promoter region of the BCL2 gene has an impact on aseptic loosening of THA we genotyped and analyzed 234 patients suffering from aseptic loosening and 231 patients after primary THA. The polymorphism is associated with risk for aseptic loosening with the CC genotype at highest risk for aseptic loosening, Odds Ratio CC vs. AA 1.93, 95%CI 1.15-3.25, p = 0.013. In contrast, low risk AA genotype carriers that still developed aseptic loosening showed a significantly shorter time to aseptic loosening than patients carrying the C allele (p = 0.004). These results indicate that the BCL2 -938C>A polymorphism influences the occurrence and course of aseptic loosening and suggests this polymorphism as an interesting candidate for prospective studies and analyses in THA registers.

  20. Infections and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Skare, Thelma Larocca; Dagostini, Jéssica Scherer; Zanardi, Patricia Imai; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the incidence of infections in a population of systemic lupus erythematosus individuals and the characteristics of infections regarding original site, as well as to study the possible associations between infections and treatment. Methods An analytical retrospective study using data from medical charts of systemic lupus erythematosus patients from a single university hospital. A total of 144 patients followed up for five years were included. Data collected comprised age of patients and age at onset of lupus, sex and ethnicity, disease duration before the study period, medications, cumulative dose of prednisone, occurrence of infections and their original site. Results The most frequent infections were urinary tract infections (correlated to use of prednisone − p<0.0001 and cyclophosphamide − p=0.045), upper airways infections (correlated to use of prednisone − p=0.0004, mycophenolate mofetil − p=0.0005, and cyclosporine − p=0.025), and pneumonia (associated to prednisone − p=0.017). Conclusion Prednisone was the drug more often associated with presence of infections, pointing to the need for a more judicious management of this drug. PMID:27074234

  1. Sporotrichoid lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Anshul; Tiwari, Siddhi; Mathur, Deepak K; Bhargava, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common presentation of cutaneous tuberculosis in India and can present as papular, nodular, plaque, ulcerative, vegetating, and tumid forms. Unusual variants include the frambesiform, gangrenous, ulcerovegetating, lichen simplex chronicus, myxomatous, and sporotrichoid types. We describe a rare sporotrichoid presentation of lupus vulgaris on the leg of a 28-year-old female of 12 years duration.

  2. Discoid lupus erythematosus presenting as unilateral blepharitis.

    PubMed

    Au, Leon

    2006-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of unilateral blepharitis that did not respond to conventional treatment. Punch biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of discoid lupus erythematosus. Unilateral blepharitis as the only presenting sign of discoid lupus erythematosus is uncommon but should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with asymmetric blepharitis.

  3. Lupus vulgaris with squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motswaledi, Mojakgomo Hendrick; Doman, Chantal

    2007-12-01

    Tuberculosis is still a significant problem in developing countries. Cutaneous forms of tuberculosis account for approximately 10% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of true infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or because of tuberculids. Tuberculids are immunological reactions to haematogenously spread antigenic components of M. tuberculosis. True cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of inoculation or haematogenous spread of M. tuberculosis to the skin. Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of true cutaneous tuberculosis. Other forms of true cutaneous tuberculosis are tuberculous chancre, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, scrofuloderma, periorificial tuberculosis and miliary tuberculosis of the skin. Lupus vulgaris is usually chronic and progressive. It occurs in patients with moderate to high immunity against M. tuberculosis as evidenced by strongly positive tuberculin test. Long-standing cases of lupus vulgaris may be complicated by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We describe a patient who had undiagnosed lupus vulgaris for 35 years until she developed SCC on the lesion of lupus vulgaris.

  4. Legal, ethical, and procedural bases for the use of aseptic techniques to implant electronic devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    animals often mask the signs of infection to avoid attracting predators (Wobeser 2006). Guidance specific to sterilization of electronic devices for implantation is limited in the wildlife record (Burger et al. 1994; Mulcahy 2003). Few biologists have been formally trained in aseptic technique, but most biologists know that electronic devices should be treated in some way to reduce the chance for infection of the host animal by bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi. Most biologists (73%) who implant devices into fishes believe aseptic techniques are important (Wagner and Cooke 2005). However, I maintain that many biologists find it difficult to place the concept of asepsis into practice in their work because of confusion about what constitutes aseptic technique, a lack of surgical knowledge and training, the perception of increased costs, or the belief that aseptic surgeries are impractical or unnecessary for their application. Some have even argued that, while compromising surgical techniques in the field might result in complications or mortalities, the money saved would allow for a compensatory increase in sample size (Anderson and Talcott 2006). In this paper I define aseptic surgical techniques, document the legal and professional guidance for performing aseptic surgeries on wild animals, and present options for sterilizing electronic devices and surgical instruments for field use.

  5. An echovirus 18-associated outbreak of aseptic meningitis in Taiwan: epidemiology and diagnostic and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Huey-Pin; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Wu, Feng-Ling; Kuo, Pin-Hwa; Wang, Shih-Min; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Su, Ih-Jen; Wang, Jen-Ren

    2011-09-01

    In 2006, an outbreak of aseptic meningitis was noted in Taiwan. From January to October 2006, a total of 3283 specimens collected from patients with viral infection, including 173 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples, were examined for virus isolation and identification. Overall, 339 enterovirus (EV)-positive cases were identified by virus culture: echovirus 18 (E18) formed the majority (27.4 %, 93 cases), followed by coxsackievirus B2 (13.8 %, 47 cases) and coxsackievirus A2 (10.8 %, 37 cases). The manifestations of the 93 E18 cases were aseptic meningitis (44.1 %), viral exanthema (23.6 %), acute tonsillitis (15.1 %), acute pharyngitis (14.0 %), acute gastritis (11.8 %), herpangina (7.5 %) and bronchopneumonia (5.3 %). Of 107 E18 isolates identified, 100, 62.5 and 19 % were obtained following culture in RD, MRC-5 and A549 cells, respectively. E18 was identified most frequently from throat swabs (67.2 %) and less frequently from stool samples (15.9 %) and CSF (16.8 %). The detection rate of E18 was 78.2 % from CSF, 50 % from stool samples and 22.9 % from throat swabs. Phylogenetic relationships among the E18 strains were examined. Analysis of the partial VP1 gene showed 3.7-23.8 % variation in sequence compared with sequences from GenBank and, notably, the amino acid change V152S was detected in a protruding loop within the VP1 protein. These results indicate that a genetic variant of E18 was circulating and caused an outbreak of aseptic meningitis in Taiwan in 2006. PMID:21546563

  6. Regulation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Proteins by Osteoblasts in Titanium Nanoparticle-Induced Aseptic Loosening Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Hou, Yanhua; Fu, Na; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Li, Guo; Peng, Qiang; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    Titanium (Ti)-wear particles, formed at the bone-implant interface, are responsible for aseptic loosening, which is a main cause of total joint replacement failure. There have been many studies on Ti particle-induced function changes in mono-cultured osteoblasts and synovial cells. However, little is known on extracellular matrix remodeling displayed by osteoblasts when in coexistence with Synovial cells. To further mimic the bone-implant interface environment, we firstly established a nanoscaled-Ti particle-induced aseptic loosening system by co-culturing osteoblasts and Synovial cells. We then explored the impact of the Synovial cells on Ti particle-engulfed osteoblasts in the mimicked flamed niche. The matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases expression levels, two protein families which are critical in osseointegration, were examined under induction by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. It was found that the co-culture between the osteoblasts and Synovial cells markedly increased the migration and proliferation of the osteoblasts, even in the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts. Importantly, the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts, induced by TNF-alpha after the co-culture, enhanced the release of the matrix metalloproteinases and reduced the expressions of lysyl oxidases. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling at the protein level was further assessed by investigations on gene expression of the matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases, which also suggested that the regulation started at the genetic level. Our research work has therefore revealed the critical role of multi cell-type interactions in the extracellular matrix remodeling within the peri-prosthetic tissues, which provides new insights on aseptic loosening and brings new clues about incomplete osseointegration between the implantation materials and their surrounding bones. PMID:26502645

  7. An echovirus 18-associated outbreak of aseptic meningitis in Taiwan: epidemiology and diagnostic and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Huey-Pin; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Wu, Feng-Ling; Kuo, Pin-Hwa; Wang, Shih-Min; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Su, Ih-Jen; Wang, Jen-Ren

    2011-09-01

    In 2006, an outbreak of aseptic meningitis was noted in Taiwan. From January to October 2006, a total of 3283 specimens collected from patients with viral infection, including 173 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples, were examined for virus isolation and identification. Overall, 339 enterovirus (EV)-positive cases were identified by virus culture: echovirus 18 (E18) formed the majority (27.4 %, 93 cases), followed by coxsackievirus B2 (13.8 %, 47 cases) and coxsackievirus A2 (10.8 %, 37 cases). The manifestations of the 93 E18 cases were aseptic meningitis (44.1 %), viral exanthema (23.6 %), acute tonsillitis (15.1 %), acute pharyngitis (14.0 %), acute gastritis (11.8 %), herpangina (7.5 %) and bronchopneumonia (5.3 %). Of 107 E18 isolates identified, 100, 62.5 and 19 % were obtained following culture in RD, MRC-5 and A549 cells, respectively. E18 was identified most frequently from throat swabs (67.2 %) and less frequently from stool samples (15.9 %) and CSF (16.8 %). The detection rate of E18 was 78.2 % from CSF, 50 % from stool samples and 22.9 % from throat swabs. Phylogenetic relationships among the E18 strains were examined. Analysis of the partial VP1 gene showed 3.7-23.8 % variation in sequence compared with sequences from GenBank and, notably, the amino acid change V152S was detected in a protruding loop within the VP1 protein. These results indicate that a genetic variant of E18 was circulating and caused an outbreak of aseptic meningitis in Taiwan in 2006.

  8. Solvent effect in the polyethylene recovery from multilayer postconsumer aseptic packaging.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Reyes, Alejandro; Núñez-Pineda, Alejandra; Barrera-Díaz, Carlos; Varela-Guerrero, Víctor; Martínez-Barrera, Gonzalo; Cuevas-Yañez, Erick

    2015-04-01

    Polyethylene films were separated and recovered from polyethylene-aluminum composites derived from recycling multilayer postconsumer aseptic packaging. A brief study about the separation process by dissolving PE-aluminum (PE-Al) composites into a series of organic solvents with a combination of time and temperature is presented. Through this procedure, 56% polyethylene is recovered from this kind of composites in optimized conditions. DSC and TGA studies were performed to determine the thermal stability of recovered polyethylene films and to establish a comparison with a PE reference commercial product, demonstrating that recovered polyethylene films kept their thermal properties.

  9. Solvent effect in the polyethylene recovery from multilayer postconsumer aseptic packaging.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Reyes, Alejandro; Núñez-Pineda, Alejandra; Barrera-Díaz, Carlos; Varela-Guerrero, Víctor; Martínez-Barrera, Gonzalo; Cuevas-Yañez, Erick

    2015-04-01

    Polyethylene films were separated and recovered from polyethylene-aluminum composites derived from recycling multilayer postconsumer aseptic packaging. A brief study about the separation process by dissolving PE-aluminum (PE-Al) composites into a series of organic solvents with a combination of time and temperature is presented. Through this procedure, 56% polyethylene is recovered from this kind of composites in optimized conditions. DSC and TGA studies were performed to determine the thermal stability of recovered polyethylene films and to establish a comparison with a PE reference commercial product, demonstrating that recovered polyethylene films kept their thermal properties. PMID:25681948

  10. Toll-like receptors and aseptic loosening of hip endoprosthesis-a potential to respond against danger signals?

    PubMed

    Lähdeoja, Tuomas; Pajarinen, Jukka; Kouri, Vesa-Petteri; Sillat, Tarvo; Salo, Jari; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial remnants and subclinical biofilms residing on prosthesis surfaces have been speculated to play a role in hip implant loosening by opsonizing otherwise relatively inert wear particles. The innate immune system recognizes these microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) using Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Our objective was to evaluate the possible presence of TLRs in aseptic synovial membrane-like interface tissue. Bacterial culture-negative, aseptic (n = 4) periprosthetic synovial membrane-like tissue was compared to osteoarthritis synovial membrane (n = 5) for the presence of cells positive for all known human functional TLRs, stained using specific antibodies by immunohistochemistry, and evaluated using morphometry. In comparison to osteoarthtritic synovium, the number of TLR-positive cells was found to be increased in the aseptic setting, reflecting the considerable macrophage infiltration to the tissues investigated. Thus aseptic periprosthetic tissue seems to be very reactive to PAMPs. It has been recently recognized that TLR do not only respond to traditional PAMPs, but also to endogenous alarmings or danger signals released from necrotic and activated cells. Alarming-TLR interaction in the periprosthetic tissue might be a novel mechanism of aseptic loosening of endoprosthesis.

  11. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Marzano, A V; Tavecchio, S; Menicanti, C; Crosti, C

    2014-06-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus (DI-LE) is defined as an entity characterized by clinical manifestations and immunopathological serum findings similar to those of idiopathic lupus but which is temporally related to drug exposure and resolves after withdrawal of the implicated drug. Similarly to idiopathic lupus, DI-LE can be divided into systemic LE, subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE), chronic cutaneous LE (CCLE) and cutaneous LE tumidus. DI-SCLE is the most frequent variant of drug-induced cutaneous LE and presents mainly with annular-polycyclic lesions; the clinical picture is often widespread, with involvement of the lower legs that are usually spared in idiopathic SCLE. ANA and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are typically present, whereas antihistone antibodies are uncommonly found. We have recently addressed the question whether DI-SCLE differs significantly from its idiopathic counterpart by virtue of clinical features and, based on our findings, we have suggested that the frequent occurrence of malar rash and bullous, erythema multiforme-like and vasculitic manifestations can be regarded as the hallmark of DI-SCLE. In contrast, the histology is not a useful diagnostic criterion for DI-SCLE, considering that the typical pattern of lichenoid interface dermatitis is seen only in the early stage of disease and tissue eosinophilia does not represent a differentiating histopathological feature. DI-CCLE and DI-LE tumidus, albeit possibly misdiagnosed, are rarely observed and are characterized by classic discoid lesions and erythematous-oedematous plaques on sun exposed areas, respectively. Management of DI-LE is based on the discontinuation of the offending drug; topical and/or systemic corticosteroids and other immunomodulating/immunosuppressive agents should be reserved for resistant cases.

  12. Belimumab in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita

    2016-01-01

    Belimumab is the only approved biological agent for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is a fully humanized IgG1γ monoclonal antibody directed against soluble B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS). It is indicated as an add-on therapy for the treatment of adult patients with active, autoantibody-positive SLE, who are receiving standard therapy. Belimumab is generally well-tolerated, common adverse effects include infections, infusion reactions, hypersensitivity, headache, nausea, and fatigue. Psychiatric events including suicidal tendency, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and malignancies too have been reported. Apart from SLE, the drug is also being tried for other autoimmune disorders. PMID:27688447

  13. Belimumab in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ankita

    2016-01-01

    Belimumab is the only approved biological agent for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is a fully humanized IgG1γ monoclonal antibody directed against soluble B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS). It is indicated as an add-on therapy for the treatment of adult patients with active, autoantibody-positive SLE, who are receiving standard therapy. Belimumab is generally well-tolerated, common adverse effects include infections, infusion reactions, hypersensitivity, headache, nausea, and fatigue. Psychiatric events including suicidal tendency, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and malignancies too have been reported. Apart from SLE, the drug is also being tried for other autoimmune disorders.

  14. Belimumab in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ankita

    2016-01-01

    Belimumab is the only approved biological agent for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is a fully humanized IgG1γ monoclonal antibody directed against soluble B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS). It is indicated as an add-on therapy for the treatment of adult patients with active, autoantibody-positive SLE, who are receiving standard therapy. Belimumab is generally well-tolerated, common adverse effects include infections, infusion reactions, hypersensitivity, headache, nausea, and fatigue. Psychiatric events including suicidal tendency, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and malignancies too have been reported. Apart from SLE, the drug is also being tried for other autoimmune disorders. PMID:27688447

  15. Belimumab in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Andreia; Morais, Sandra A; Isenberg, David A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is one of the most challenging autoimmune disorders with a complex pathophysiology and diverse clinical presentation. Many drugs have been used to treat SLE with suboptimal results, especially in patients with moderate-to-severe disease. Belimumab is the first biological drug to be approved for the treatment of SLE in more than 50 years. This monoclonal antibody blocks B-cell activating factor, a cytokine important for B-cell differentiation and survival. In this review we focus on the activity of belimumab in patients with SLE and discuss the controversies of its use. PMID:26509047

  16. Cross-fostering in gray wolves (Canis lupus lupus).

    PubMed

    Scharis, Inger; Amundin, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Cross-fostering in canids, with captive-bred pups introduced into endangered wild populations, might aid conservation efforts by increasing genetic diversity and lowering the risk of inbreeding depression. The gray wolf (Canis lupus lupus) population in Scandinavia suffers from severe inbreeding due to a narrow genetic base and geographical isolation. This study aimed at evaluating the method to cross-foster wolf pups from zoo-born to zoo-born litters. The following was assessed: female initial acceptance of foster pups, growth rate in relation to age difference between foster pups and pups in recipient litters and survival over the first 33 weeks. The study included four litters added by two foster pups in each. The age differences between the foster pups and the recipient litters were 2-8 days. After augmentation, all four females accepted the foster pups, demonstrated by her moving the entire litter to a new den site. Growth rate was dependent on the age difference of the pups in the foster litters, with a considerably slower growth rate in the 8 days younger pups. However, these pups later appeared to be at no disadvantage. Foster pups had a higher survival rate than females' pups, however, the causes of death were probably not kin or non-kin related. The results indicate that cross-fostering works in gray wolves and that this might be a plausible way to increase genetic variation in the wild population. PMID:25773058

  17. The stellar population of the Lupus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Joanne; Hartigan, Patrick; Krautter, Joachim; Kelemen, Janos

    1994-01-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of the H alpha emission stars in the Lupus dark cloud complex. We estimate the effective temperatures of the stars from their spectral types and calculate the reddening towards each object from the (R-I) colors. From these data, we derive mass and age distributions for the Lupus stars using a new set of pre-main sequence evolutionar tracks. We compare the results for the Lupus stars with those for a similar population of young stellar objects in Taurus-Auriga and Chamaeleon and with the initial mass function for field stars in the solar neighborhood. From the H-R diagrams, Lupus appears to contain older stars than Taurus. The Lupus dark clouds form a greater proportion of low mass stars than the Taurus complex. Also, the proportion of low mass stars in Lupus is higher than that predicted by the Miller-Scalo initial mass function, and the lowest mass stars in Lupus are less active than similar T Tauri stars in other regions.

  18. Immunopathogenesis of environmentally induced lupus in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, V M; Satoh, M; Richards, H B; Yoshida, H; Shaw, M; Jennette, J C; Reeves, W H

    1999-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune syndrome defined by clinical and serologic features, including arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and certain autoantibodies such as anti-nuclear ribonucleoprotein (nRNP)/Smith antigen (Sm), DNA, and ribosomal P. Although lupus is considered primarily a genetic disorder, we recently demonstrated the induction of a syndrome strikingly similar to spontaneous lupus in many nonautoimmune strains of mice exposed to the isoprenoid alkane pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane), a component of mineral oil. Intraperitoneal injection of pristane leads to the formation of lipogranulomas consisting of phagocytic cells that have engulfed the oil and collections of lymphocytes. Subsequently, pristane-treated BALB/c and SJL mice develop autoantibodies characteristic of SLE, including anti-nRNP/Sm, antiribosomal P, anti-Su, antichromatin, anti-single-stranded DNA, and anti-double-stranded DNA. This is accompanied by a severe glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition, mesangial or mesangiocapillary proliferation, and proteinuria. All inbred mice examined appear to be susceptible to this novel form of chemically induced lupus. Pristane-induced lupus is the only inducible model of autoimmunity associated with the clinical syndrome as well as with the characteristic serologic abnormalities of SLE. Defining the immunopathogenesis of pristane-induced lupus in mice may provide insight into the causes of spontaneous (idiopathic) lupus and also may lead to information concerning possible risks associated with the ingestion or inhalation of mineral oil and exposure to hydrocarbons in the environment. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10502537

  19. Lupus vulgaris in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and persistent IgG deficiency.

    PubMed

    Düzgün, N; Duman, M; Sonel, B; Peksari, Y; Erdem, C; Tokgöz, G

    1997-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed a persistent, acquired hypogammaglobulinaemia with IgG deficiency. The hypogammaglobulinaemia was probably a complication of high dose corticosteroid treatment. The serum IgG level remained subnormal despite intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Lupus vulgaris, which developed on the nasal cartilage in this patient with SLE, is not an expected finding. This patient is probably the first reported case of SLE associated with lupus vulgaris.

  20. Childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, D M R; Gomes, R Cunha; Aikawa, N E; Campos, L M A; Romiti, R; Silva, C A

    2014-11-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has rarely been described in pediatric lupus population and the real prevalence of childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has not been reported. From January 1983 to November 2013, 303 childhood-onset SLE (c-SLE) patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Childreńs Institute of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina Universidade da Universidade de São Paulo, three of them (1%) diagnosed as childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. All three cases presented tense vesiculobullous lesions unassociated with lupus erythematosus lesions, with the median duration of 60 days (30-60). All patients fulfilled bullous systemic lupus erythematosus criteria. Two had nephritis and serositis and presented specific autoantibodies. The histological pattern demonstrated subepidermal blisters with neutrophils-predominant infiltrates within the upper dermis. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) showed deposits of IgG and complement along the epidermal basement membrane, in the presence or absence of IgA and/or IgM. A positive indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin demonstrating dermal binding was observed in two cases. All of them had moderate/severe disease activity at diagnosis with median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) of 18 (14-24). Two patients received dapsone and one with severe nephritis received immunosuppressive drugs. In conclusion, in the last 30 years the prevalence of bullous lupus in childhood-onset lupus population was low (1%) in our tertiary University Hospital. A diagnosis of SLE should always be considered in children with recurrent tense vesiculobullous lesions with or without systemic manifestations.

  1. BCG vaccine-induced lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Izumi, A K; Matsunaga, J

    1982-03-01

    A case of intradermal BCG vaccination was complicated by a lupus-like tuberculosis cutis progressive for over 30 years. The patient had been vaccinated twice with BCG in the affected site. A review of other BCG vaccine-induced cases of lupus vulgaris indicates that the incidence of this complication is markedly increased following multiple BCG vaccinations, but is rare following a single BCG vaccination. In our patient a skin biopsy specimen was characteristic for lupus vulgaris. Acid-fast stains from the tissue and cultures from the affected site were negative. The patient was successfully treated with rifampin.

  2. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vijay K; Aggarwal, Kamal; Jain, Sarika; Singh, Sunita

    2009-07-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis occurring in previously sensitized individuals with a high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Various forms including plaque, ulcerative, hypertrophic, vegetative, papular, and nodular forms have been described. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a very large hypertrophic lupus vulgaris lesion over left side of chest since 22 years. Histopathological examination showed granulomatous infiltration without caseation necrosis. The Mantoux reaction was strongly positive. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris of such a giant size and that too at an unusual site is extremely rare and hence is being reported.

  3. Concurrent Kimura disease and lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Fang, Fang; Sun, Ying; Wang, Songlan; Mao, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Kimura disease is a rare chronic inflammatory disorder with peripheral eosinophilia and elevated serum IgE and is also frequently complicated by nephropathy. Methods: We report a rare case of Kimura disease concomitant with lupus nephritis in a 72-year old male patient with recurrent unexplained lymphadenopathy, renal lesions, and immunologic abnormalities. Results: The patient was successfully managed with gamma immunoglobulin, intravenous pulse methylprednisolone therapy, hydroxychloroquine, and prednisone. Conclusion: This is the first report of a case of Kimura disease concomitant with lupus nephritis and highlights the importance of considering lupus nephritis as a possible concurrent disease in patients with Kimura disease that have immunologic abnormalities. PMID:27741124

  4. [Cutaneous lupus erythematosus, a multidimensional entity].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Flores, Silvia; Tinoco-Fragoso, Fátima; Hernández-Molina, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Skin lesions caused by systemic lupus erythematosus are among the most frequent manifestations of this disease. These lesions show great variability in both their clinical and histological expression, making their understanding and study difficult. Patients presenting with cutaneous lupus do not necessarily have serious systemic complications, but they do have significant morbidity from impact on quality of life given the extent of the lesions, chronic tendency, and the risk of scarring; hence the importance of establishing a fast and effective treatment. This paper addresses the different varieties of specific injuries attributed to lupus erythematosus, correlation with systemic activity, quality of life, and the treatments available.

  5. Intravenous Immunoglobulin with Enhanced Polyspecificity Improves Survival in Experimental Sepsis and Aseptic Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Roumenina, Lubka; Pashov, Anastas; Dimitrov, Jordan; Hadzhieva, Maya; Lindig, Sandro; Voynova, Elisaveta; Dimitrova, Petya; Ivanovska, Nina; Bockmeyer, Clemens; Stefanova, Zvetanka; Fitting, Catherine; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; von Gunten, Stephan; Kaveri, Srini; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Bauer, Michael; Vassilev, Tchavdar

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause for death worldwide. Numerous interventional trials with agents neutralizing single proinflammatory mediators have failed to improve survival in sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndromes. This failure could be explained by the widespread gene expression dysregulation known as “genomic storm” in these patients. A multifunctional polyspecific therapeutic agent might be needed to thwart the effects of this storm. Licensed pooled intravenous immunoglobulin preparations seemed to be a promising candidate, but they have also failed in their present form to prevent sepsis-related death. We report here the protective effect of a single dose of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity in three models of sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammation. The modification of the pooled immunoglobulin G molecules by exposure to ferrous ions resulted in their newly acquired ability to bind some proinflammatory molecules, complement components and endogenous “danger” signals. The improved survival in endotoxemia was associated with serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, diminished complement consumption and normalization of the coagulation time. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity have a clinical potential in sepsis and related systemic inflammatory syndromes. PMID:26701312

  6. Suitability of different construction materials for use in aseptic processing environments decontaminated with gaseous hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Unger, Beatriz; Rauschnabel, Uta; Düthorn, Berthold; Kottke, Volker; Hertel, Christian; Rauschnabel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the behavior of different materials towards the microbial inactivation kinetic of gaseous hydrogen peroxide. Samples of 49 materials potentially used in aseptic processing environments were inoculated with 106 spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC #12980 and exposed to defined periods using a reproducible hydrogen peroxide bio-decontamination cycle. The inactivation characteristic of each material was investigated by means of repeated D-value calculations. The results demonstrate that different materials show highly variable performance regarding the inactivation pattern of spores on each particular surface. Not only the chemical composition of the material but also differences in manufacturing processes and surface treatments were found to have an effect on the resistance of the test organisms. From the data obtained it is concluded that some correlation exists between the calculated D-values and roughness as well as wettability of the materials. Best- and worst-case materials were identified, and the dependence of specific decontamination characteristics on material properties was investigated. It is suggested to integrate studies regarding the inactivation characteristics of incorporated materials into the construction process of new aseptic processing systems bio-decontaminated with hydrogen peroxide. PMID:17933208

  7. Design of conservative simulated particles for validation of a multiphase aseptic process.

    PubMed

    Jasrotia, A K S; Simunovic, J; Sandeep, K P; Palazoglu, T K; Swartzel, K R

    2008-06-01

    Simulated food particles with conservative (fast moving and slow heating) properties are required for validation of multiphase aseptic processing for production of shelf-stable low-acid foods. The validation process requires simulated particles to contain residence time tags, thermosensitive implants, and/or bioloads for temperature detection, time-temperature integration, and bactericidal efficacy confirmation. Conservative particle design (CPD) software was used to determine the wall thickness required for conservative behavior of such particles made with polypropylene (PP) and polymethylpentene (PMP) of wall thickness 1 mm (0.0393 inches) and 2 mm (0.0787 inches) containing tube inserts. Thermocouples were inserted in the simulated and real food particles and the particles were heated up to 127 degrees C under pressurized (24 psi) conditions. Based on the heating rates of the real and simulated particles, an appropriate simulated particle was identified for each type of real food particle. This would allow a food processor to use these designed particles with an appropriate tube insert (diameter) to validate an aseptic process for a multiphase food containing any or all the above tested food materials.

  8. Is Gelsolin a Biomarker for Aseptic Loosening After Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Bettin, Clayton C; Sisson, William B; Kerkhof, Anita L; Mihalko, William M

    2015-01-01

    Gelsolin (GSN) has been implicated in inflammatory reactions in asthmatic patients and may be a marker for acute or chronic reactions in synovial tissue. Detection of increased levels of GSN in synovial fluid could differentiate between aseptic loosening (low GSN) and hypersensitivity reaction (high GSN). Synovial fluid from both knees of 7 cadaver specimens with unilateral TKA was analyzed using ELISA for GSN levels. Components were explanted after spiral CT scans to determine wear patterns and loosening. Results were compared to synovial fluid from 7 consecutive TKA revisions for aseptic failure. Average GSN levels for cadaver native and well-functioning TKA knees were 24,534±10,437 ng/mL and 38,430±30,907 ng/mL, respectively (p=0.314). Average GSN level for revision patients was 53,294±19,868 ng/mL, significantly higher than cadaver well-functioning TKAs (p=0.006). The patient with the highest level of GSN at time of revision surgery showed significant metallosis at the time of surgery. PMID:26852641

  9. Dynamic ultrasonography: a cadaveric model for evaluating aseptic loosening of total ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Paul M; Downey, Michael W; Fortenbaugh, David; Kirchner, John

    2013-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary method of failure in total ankle replacements. Currently, loosening is defined by morphologic changes in osseous architecture determined by plain radiography. The loss of bone noted at diagnosis presents difficulties in future ankle revisions. A method by which early aseptic loosening could be detected before bony deformation or reaction could lead to improved patient outcomes. A cadaveric fresh frozen ankle specimen (mid-tibia to include the foot) was used in the present study. An anterior approach to the ankle was performed. A total ankle prosthesis was implanted in the standard fashion (Salto Talaris, Tornier). The initial cuts were made for a size 1 ankle, and a size 1 ankle was implanted. Dynamic ultrasonography was used to evaluate the bone-implant interface. The prosthesis was removed, and sequential removal of bone was performed at the interface of the medial tibial tray until visible motion was seen with flexion and extension. The reimplanted prosthesis was then re-evaluated using dynamic ultrasonography and dynamic and static fluoroscopy. In the loose prosthesis model, dynamic ultrasonography was able to determine the motion at the bone-prosthesis interface. Dynamic ultrasonography might be a useful tool in the evaluation of early loosening in a total ankle arthroplasty model.

  10. Potential application of quantitative microbiological risk assessment techniques to an aseptic-UHT process in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Laure; Albert, Isabelle; Johnson, Nicholas Brian; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2013-04-01

    Aseptic ultra-high-temperature (UHT)-type processed food products (e.g., milk or soup) are ready to eat products which are consumed extensively globally due to a combination of their comparative high quality and long shelf life, with no cold chain or other preservation requirements. Due to the inherent microbial vulnerability of aseptic-UHT product formulations, the safety and stability-related performance objectives (POs) required at the end of the manufacturing process are the most demanding found in the food industry. The key determinants to achieving sterility, and which also differentiates aseptic-UHT from in-pack sterilised products, are the challenges associated with the processes of aseptic filling and sealing. This is a complex process that has traditionally been run using deterministic or empirical process settings. Quantifying the risk of microbial contamination and recontamination along the aseptic-UHT process, using the scientifically based process quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA), offers the possibility to improve on the currently tolerable sterility failure rate (i.e., 1 defect per 10,000 units). In addition, benefits of applying QMRA are (i) to implement process settings in a transparent and scientific manner; (ii) to develop a uniform common structure whatever the production line, leading to a harmonisation of these process settings, and; (iii) to bring elements of a cost-benefit analysis of the management measures. The objective of this article is to explore how QMRA techniques and risk management metrics may be applied to aseptic-UHT-type processed food products. In particular, the aseptic-UHT process should benefit from a number of novel mathematical and statistical concepts that have been developed in the field of QMRA. Probabilistic techniques such as Monte Carlo simulation, Bayesian inference and sensitivity analysis, should help in assessing the compliance with safety and stability-related POs set at the end of the manufacturing

  11. Central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lin, K-L; Chen, C-L; Wong, A May-Kuen; Huang, J-L

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal lupus is a rare and acquired autoimmune disease. Central nervous system abnormalities are potential manifestations in neonatal lupus. Through a systematic literature review, we analyzed the clinical features of previously reported neonatal lupus cases where central nervous system abnormalities had been identified. Most reported neonatal lupus patients with central nervous system involvement were neuroimaging-determined and asymptomatic. Only seven neonatal lupus cases were identified as having a symptomatic central nervous system abnormality which caused physical disability or required neurosurgery. A high percentage of these neurosymptomatic neonatal lupus patients had experienced a transient cutaneous skin rash and had no maternal history of autoimmune disease before pregnancy.

  12. Lupus cystitis in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: risk factors and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koh, J H; Lee, J; Jung, S M; Ju, J H; Park, S-H; Kim, H-Y; Kwok, S-K

    2015-10-01

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics of lupus cystitis and determine the risk factors and clinical outcomes of lupus cystitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We retrospectively reviewed 1064 patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital in Seoul, Korea, from 1998 to 2013. Twenty-four patients had lupus cystitis. Lupus cystitis was defined as unexplained ureteritis and/or cystitis as detected by imaging studies, cystoscopy, or bladder histopathology without urinary microorganisms or stones. Three-fourths of patients with lupus cystitis had concurrent lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV). The initial symptoms were gastrointestinal in nature for most patients (79.2%). High-dose methylprednisolone was initially administered to most patients (91.7%) with lupus cystitis. Two patients (8.3%) died of urinary tract infections. Sixty-five age- and sex-matched patients with SLE who were admitted with other manifestations were included as the control group. Patients with lupus cystitis showed a lower C3 level (p = 0.031), higher SLE Disease Activity Index score (p = 0.006), and higher ESR (p = 0.05) upon admission; more frequently had a history of LMV prior to admission (p < 0.001); and less frequently had a history of neuropsychiatric lupus (p = 0.031) than did patients with SLE but without lupus cystitis. The occurrence of lupus cystitis was associated with a history of LMV (OR, 21.794; 95% CI, 4.061-116.963). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years, and the cumulative one-year mortality rate was 20%. Complications developed in 33.3% of patients with lupus cystitis and were related to survival (log-rank p = 0.021). Our results suggest that the possibility of lupus cystitis should be considered when a patient with SLE and history of LMV presents with gastrointestinal symptoms or lower urinary tract symptoms. Development of complications in patients with lupus cystitis can be fatal. Thus, intensive treatment

  13. [Salmonella enteritidis arthritis complicating systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Marzouk, S; El Aoud, S; Hriz, H; Jallouli, M; Zribi, W; Bahloul, Z

    2013-12-01

    Septic arthritis due to Salmonella in systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of septic arthritis by Salmonella enteritidis which occurred during the evolution of systemic lupus erythematosus. A 23-year-old man was diagnosed as suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus. This diagnosis was taken on the basis of general symptoms, skin lesions, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and glomerulonephritis (class III). He was treated with three methylprednisolone boli related by high-dose regimen of prednisolone. A month and a half later, he presented fever with monoarthritis of the left elbow without any other new sign of underlying systemic disease. Bacteriological examinations isolated S. enteritidis. The patient improved with antibiotics and joint lavage. Feverish monoarthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus should be suspect to be septic arthritis. Appropriate treatment should be promptly instituted to improve the prognosis.

  14. CO observations of dark clouds in Lupus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. C.; Cohen, R.; May, J.

    1986-01-01

    C-12O observations covering 170 square degrees toward the southern T Association Lupus have revealed the presence of an extended physically related complex of dark clouds which have recently formed low mass stars. The estimated mass of the clouds (about 30,000 solar masses) is comparable to that of the nearby Ophiuchus dust clouds. The Lupus clouds are projected onto a gap between two subgroups of the Scorpio-Centaurus OB association suggesting that this long accepted subgrouping may require reinterpretation.

  15. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as morbid jealousy.

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, A.; Carney, M. W.; Denman, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    A patient fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus and presenting with morbid jealousy is described. There was evidence of cerebral lupus. Her physical and mental symptoms responded to a combination of chlorpromazine and steroids. The morbid mental process was probably caused by her physical condition while the content of her disordered thought and behaviour was determined by her introverted premorbid personality, religiosity, unhappy childhood experiences and frustrated desire for children. PMID:7413541

  16. Lupus mastitis: a mimicker of breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Warne, Richard Roger; Taylor, Donna; Segal, Amanda; Irish, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of lupus mastitis which was initially diagnosed following an incisional biopsy of a breast lump, with similar pathology found 2 years later after an ultrasound guided biopsy of the same lump. The woman had been diagnosed 7 years before with systemic lupus erythematosus. The radiological and pathological features are presented in this report with discussion of similar cases in the literature. PMID:22669997

  17. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Laurent; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Malmström, Vivianne; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3–18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all), but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1–2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are affected by

  18. Genetics of Lupus Nephritis: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Melissa E.; James, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease marked by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies, immune dysregulation, and chronic inflammation that may lead to increased morbidity and early mortality from end-organ damage. Over half of all SLE patients will develop lupus nephritis. Genetic association studies have identified more than fifty polymorphisms that contribute to lupus nephritis pathogenesis, including genetic variants associated with altered programmed cell death (PCD) and defective immune clearance of PCD debris. These variants may support the generation of autoantibody-containing immune complexes that contribute to lupus nephritis. Genetic variants associated with lupus nephritis also affect the initial phase of innate immunity and the amplifying, adaptive phase of the immune response. Finally, genetic variants associated with the kidney-specific effector response may influence end-organ damage and the progression to end-stage renal disease and death. This review discusses genetic insights of key pathogenic processes and pathways that may lead to lupus nephritis, as well as the clinical implications of these findings as they apply to recent advances in biologic therapies. PMID:26573543

  19. Targeting cancer with a lupus autoantibody#

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James E.; Chan, Grace; Liu, Yanfeng; Hegan, Denise C.; Dalal, Shibani; Dray, Eloise; Kwon, Youngho; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Xiaohua; Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Geiger, Erik; Liu, Yilun; Gera, Joseph; Sweasy, Joann B.; Sung, Patrick; Rockwell, Sara; Nishimura, Robert N.; Weisbart, Richard H.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is distinct among autoimmune diseases due to its association with circulating autoantibodies reactive against host DNA. The precise role that anti-DNA antibodies play in SLE pathophysiology remains to be elucidated, and potential applications of lupus autoantibodies in cancer therapy have not previously been explored. Here we report the unexpected finding that a cell-penetrating lupus autoantibody, 3E10, has potential as a targeted therapy for DNA-repair deficient malignancies. We find that 3E10 preferentially binds DNA single-strand tails, inhibits key steps in DNA single-strand and double-strand break repair, and sensitizes cultured tumor cells and human tumor xenografts to DNA-damaging therapy, including doxorubicin and radiation. Moreover, we demonstrate that 3E10 alone is synthetically lethal to BRCA2-deficient human cancer cells and selectively sensitizes such cells to low dose doxorubicin. Our results establish an approach to cancer therapy that we expect will be particularly applicable to BRCA2-related malignancies such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. In addition, our findings raise the possibility that lupus autoantibodies may be partly responsible for the intrinsic deficiencies in DNA repair and the unexpectedly low rates of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers observed in SLE patients. In summary, this study provides the basis for the potential use of a lupus anti-DNA antibody in cancer therapy and identifies lupus autoantibodies as a potentially rich source of therapeutic agents. PMID:23100628

  20. The Role of Autophagy in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linlin; Law, Helen Ka Wai

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by the generation of immune responses to self-antigens. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and severe complications in SLE patients. Though the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis has been studied extensively, unresolved questions are still left and new therapeutic methods are needed for disease control. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process through which cytoplasmic constituents can be degraded in lysosome and reused. Autophagy plays vital roles in maintaining cell homeostasis and is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In particular, autophagy can affect almost all parts of the immune system and is involved in autoimmune diseases. Based on genetic analysis, cell biology, and mechanism studies of the classic and innovative therapeutic drugs, there are growing lines of evidence suggesting the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis. In the present review, we summarize the recent publications investigating the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis and provide a new perspective towards the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. PMID:26506346

  1. Molecular studies of lupus nephritis kidneys.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Anne; Bethunaickan, Ramalingam; Berthier, Celine; Sahu, Ranjit; Zhang, Weijia; Kretzler, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Lupus nephritis is a devastating complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for which current therapies are insufficiently effective. Histologic evaluation of renal biopsies is a poor predictor of therapeutic response or outcome. Integrated immunologic, genomic and proteomic approaches may yield new insights into disease pathogenesis and thereby improve therapeutic strategies for lupus nephritis. Given the lack of sequential biopsies from humans, it also remains essential to study informative animal models of disease. Cross-species analyses can identify cells or pathways that are relevant to human disease and can be further studied in mouse models. Using a systems biology approach in which we compare molecular data from kidneys of three different mouse models of lupus nephritis with data from human lupus biopsies, we have found that inflammatory events escalate rapidly around the time of proteinuria onset. This is followed by hypoxia and metabolic stress, and by tubular and endothelial dysfunction. The failure of complete reversal of these abnormalities may increase the sensitivity of the kidney to further insult. We further found that renal macrophages and dendritic cells are key players in lupus nephritis both in mouse models and humans and that macrophages display a hybrid molecular profile that reflects incomplete resolution of inflammation and excessive tissue remodeling. Finally, our studies have suggested several new biomarkers for disease stage that can now be tested longitudinally in human SLE patients.

  2. 75 FR 35492 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... Federal Register of March 29, 2005 (70 FR 15868), FDA announced the availability of a draft guidance... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and...

  3. 77 FR 38305 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... a notice published in the Federal Register of June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35492), FDA announced the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment; Withdrawal of Guidance AGENCY: Food...

  4. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Lütfi; Önem, Soner; Özgen, Metin; Sayarlıoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by several immunological abnormalities. We wish to communicate the case of a patient with SLE and lupus nephritis (LN) who developed pseudothrombocytopenia. Pseudothrombocytopenia can occur in patients with SLE and LN and should be considered when diagnosing patients with thrombocytopenia without bleeding.

  5. Hydroxychloroquine and pregnancy on lupus flares in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Koh, J H; Ko, H S; Kwok, S-K; Ju, J H; Park, S-H

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnancies with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and identified lupus flare predictors during pregnancy. Additionally, we examined lupus activity and pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients who continued, discontinued or underwent no hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) treatment during pregnancy. We retrospectively analyzed 179 pregnancies in 128 SLE patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Korea, between 1998 and 2012 and then assessed the clinical profiles and maternal and fetal outcomes. Overall, 90.5% of pregnancies resulted in a successful delivery and were divided into two groups: those who experienced lupus flares (80 pregnancies, 44.7%) and those who did not (99 pregnancies, 55.3%). Increased preeclampsia, preterm births, low birth weight, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and low 1-minute Apgar scores occurred in pregnancies with lupus flares compared to pregnancies in quiescent disease. Lupus flares were predicted by HCQ discontinuation, a history of lupus nephritis, high pre-pregnancy serum uric acid and low C4 levels. Our study indicates that achieving pre-pregnancy remission and continuing HCQ treatment during pregnancy are important for preventing lupus flares.

  6. Humor in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Cristiano S.; Li, Rui; Lawrie, Sarah; Bar-Or, Amit; Clarke, Ann E.; Da Costa, Deborah; Banerjee, Devi; Bernatsky, Sasha; Lee, Jennifer L.; Pineau, Christian A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Humor has neurophysiological effects influencing the release of cortisol, which may have a direct impact on the immune system. Laughter is associated with a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines both in the general population and in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to explore the effects of humor on serum cytokines [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6)] and cortisol levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), after a standard intervention (120 min of visual comedy). Material and Methods We enrolled 58 females with SLE from consecutive patients assessed in the Montreal General Hospital lupus clinic. The subjects who consented to participate were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention (watching 120 min of comedy) or control group (watching a 120 min documentary). Measurements of cytokine and serum cortisol levels as well as 24-h urine cortisol were taken before, during, and after the interventions. We compared serum cytokine levels and serum and 24-h urine cortisol levels in the humor and control groups and performed regression analyses of these outcomes, adjusting for demographics and the current use of prednisone. Results There were no significant differences between the control and humor groups in demographics or clinical variables. Baseline serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and B-cell activating factor were also similar in both groups. There was no evidence of a humor effect in terms of decreasing cytokine levels, although there was some suggestion of lowered cortisol secretion in the humor group based the 24-h urinary cortisol levels in a subgroup. Conclusion In contrast to what has been published for RA, we saw no clear effects of humor in altering cytokine levels in SLE, although interesting trends were seen for lower cortisol levels after humor intervention compared with the control group. PMID:27708912

  7. Innovative food processing technology using ohmic heating and aseptic packaging for meat.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ruri; Fukuoka, Mika; Hamada-Sato, Naoko

    2014-02-01

    Since the Tohoku earthquake, there is much interest in processed foods, which can be stored for long periods at room temperature. Retort heating is one of the main technologies employed for producing it. We developed the innovative food processing technology, which supersede retort, using ohmic heating and aseptic packaging. Electrical heating involves the application of alternating voltage to food. Compared with retort heating, which uses a heat transfer medium, ohmic heating allows for high heating efficiency and rapid heating. In this paper we ohmically heated chicken breast samples and conducted various tests on the heated samples. The measurement results of water content, IMP, and glutamic acid suggest that the quality of the ohmically heated samples was similar or superior to that of the retort-heated samples. Furthermore, based on the monitoring of these samples, it was observed that sample quality did not deteriorate during storage.

  8. Innovative food processing technology using ohmic heating and aseptic packaging for meat.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ruri; Fukuoka, Mika; Hamada-Sato, Naoko

    2014-02-01

    Since the Tohoku earthquake, there is much interest in processed foods, which can be stored for long periods at room temperature. Retort heating is one of the main technologies employed for producing it. We developed the innovative food processing technology, which supersede retort, using ohmic heating and aseptic packaging. Electrical heating involves the application of alternating voltage to food. Compared with retort heating, which uses a heat transfer medium, ohmic heating allows for high heating efficiency and rapid heating. In this paper we ohmically heated chicken breast samples and conducted various tests on the heated samples. The measurement results of water content, IMP, and glutamic acid suggest that the quality of the ohmically heated samples was similar or superior to that of the retort-heated samples. Furthermore, based on the monitoring of these samples, it was observed that sample quality did not deteriorate during storage. PMID:24200557

  9. Spontaneous ureteral rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Pennebaker, J.B.; Harisdangkul, V.; Songcharoen, S.

    1983-08-01

    A patient with known systemic lupus erythematosus had fever and symptoms of a lower urinary tract infection. Bone scintigraphy showed left ureteral perforation and necrosis with no demonstrable nephrolithiasis. It is speculated that this episode was due to lupus vasculitis.

  10. Shoot growth in aseptically cultivated daylily and haplopappus plantlets after a 5-day spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Levine, H G; Krikorian, A D

    1992-01-01

    Plantlets of daylily (Hemerocallis cv. Autumn Blaze) regenerated from cell suspensions, and 4 clonal populations of Haplopappus gracilis were aseptically cultivated aboard the Shuttle "Discovery" during a 5-day mission within NASA's Plant Growth Unit (PGU) apparatus. Daylily was selected as a representative herbaceous perennial monocotyledon and the haplopappus clones represented an annual dicotyledon. The latter included 4 strains with different physiological and morphological characteristics: two aseptic seedling clones (each generated from a single seedling) and two tissue culture-derived lines. Mean daily growth rates for the primary shoots of all plantlets averaged 4.13 mm day-1 (SD = 2.20) for the flight experiment and 4.68 mm day-1 (SD = 2.59) for the ground control. Comparable growth rates calculated by summing both the primary and secondary shoots for all plantlets were 5.94 mm day-1 (SD = 2.89) for the flight experiment and 6.38 mm day-1 (SD = 3.71) for the control. Statistically significant differences existed between: (1) flight vs control primary shoot growth (the controls growing more than plantlets subjected to spaceflight conditions), (2) the different populations (the daylily gaining more shoot material than any of the haplopappus populations and the haplopappus seedling clones outperforming the tissue culture-derived haplopappus lines), and (3) the individual Plant Growth Chambers contained within the PGU. The data suggest that some spaceflight-associated factor(s) increased the tendency for primary shoot apices to degrade or senesce, resulting in the release of apical dominance and permitting the emergence of axillary branches, which subsequently partially compensated for the reduced primary axis growth. In addition to spaceflight-associated factors, the physiologically diverse nature of the experimental material as well as environmental heterogeneities within the culture apparatus contributed to the variation in growth results. The findings

  11. Establishing and Monitoring an Aseptic Workspace for Building the MOMA Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalime, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) is an instrument suite on the ESA ExoMars 2018 Rover, and the Mass Spectrometer (MOMA-MS) is being built at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). As MOMA-MS is a life-detection instrument and it thus falls in the most stringent category of Planetary Protection (PP) biological cleanliness requirements. Less than 0.03 sporem2 is allowed in the instrument sample path. In order to meet these PP requirements, MOMA-MS must be built and maintained in a low bioburden environment. The MOMA-MS project at GSFC maintains three cleanrooms with varying levels of bioburden control. The Aseptic Assembly Cleanroom has the highest level of control, applying three different bioburden reducing methods: 70 IPA, 7.5 Hydrogen Peroxide, and Ultra-Violet C light. The three methods are used in rotation and each kills microbes by a different mechanism, reducing the likelihood of microorganisms developing resistance to all three. The Integration and Mars Chamber Cleanrooms use less biocidal cleaning, with the option to deploy extra techniques as necessary. To support the monitoring of cleanrooms and verification that MOMA-MS hardware meets PP requirements, a new Planetary Protection lab was established that currently has the capabilities of standard growth assays for spore or vegetative bacteria, rapid bioburden analysis that detects Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), plus autoclave and DHMR verification. The cleanrooms are monitored both for vegetative microorganisms and by rapid ATP assay, and a clear difference in bioburden is observed between the aseptic the other cleanroom.

  12. Shoot growth in aseptically cultivated daylily and haplopappus plantlets after a 5-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. G.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1992-01-01

    Plantlets of daylily (Hemerocallis cv. Autumn Blaze) regenerated from cell suspensions, and 4 clonal populations of Haplopappus gracilis were aseptically cultivated aboard the Shuttle "Discovery" during a 5-day mission within NASA's Plant Growth Unit (PGU) apparatus. Daylily was selected as a representative herbaceous perennial monocotyledon and the haplopappus clones represented an annual dicotyledon. The latter included 4 strains with different physiological and morphological characteristics: two aseptic seedling clones (each generated from a single seedling) and two tissue culture-derived lines. Mean daily growth rates for the primary shoots of all plantlets averaged 4.13 mm day-1 (SD = 2.20) for the flight experiment and 4.68 mm day-1 (SD = 2.59) for the ground control. Comparable growth rates calculated by summing both the primary and secondary shoots for all plantlets were 5.94 mm day-1 (SD = 2.89) for the flight experiment and 6.38 mm day-1 (SD = 3.71) for the control. Statistically significant differences existed between: (1) flight vs control primary shoot growth (the controls growing more than plantlets subjected to spaceflight conditions), (2) the different populations (the daylily gaining more shoot material than any of the haplopappus populations and the haplopappus seedling clones outperforming the tissue culture-derived haplopappus lines), and (3) the individual Plant Growth Chambers contained within the PGU. The data suggest that some spaceflight-associated factor(s) increased the tendency for primary shoot apices to degrade or senesce, resulting in the release of apical dominance and permitting the emergence of axillary branches, which subsequently partially compensated for the reduced primary axis growth. In addition to spaceflight-associated factors, the physiologically diverse nature of the experimental material as well as environmental heterogeneities within the culture apparatus contributed to the variation in growth results. The findings

  13. Detection of early stage changes associated with adipogenesis using Raman spectroscopy under aseptic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Adam; Ashton, Lorna; Yang, Xuebin B.; Goodacre, Royston; Smith, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is growing interest in the development of methods capable of non‐invasive characterization of stem cells prior to their use in cell‐based therapies. Raman spectroscopy has previously been used to detect biochemical changes commensurate with the osteogenic, cardiogenic, and neurogenic differentiation of stem cells. The aim of this study was to characterize the adipogenic differentiation of live adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) under aseptic conditions. ASCs were cultured in adipogenic or basal culture medium for 14 days in customized culture flasks containing quartz windows. Raman spectra were acquired every 3 days. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify spectral changes in the cultures over time. Adipogenic differentiation was confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the marker genes PPARγ and ADIPOQ and Oil red O staining performed. PCA demonstrated that lipid associated spectral features varied throughout ASC differentiation with the earliest detection of the lipid associated peak at 1,438 cm−1 after 3 days of induction. After 7 days of culture there were clear differences between the spectra acquired from ASCs in adipogenic or basal culture medium. No changes were observed in the spectra acquired from undifferentiated ASCs. Significant up‐regulation in the expression of both PPARγ and ADIPOQ genes (P < 0.001) was observed after 14 days of differentiation as was prominent Oil red O staining. However, the Raman sampling process resulted in weaker gene expression compared with ASCs that had not undergone Raman analysis. This study demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy can be used to detect biochemical changes associated with adipogenic differentiation in a non‐invasive and aseptic manner and that this can be achieved as early as three days into the differentiation process. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the International Society for

  14. Imaging and histopathological aspects in aseptic osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Trăistaru, Magdalena Rodica; Kamal, Diana; Kamal, Kamal Constantin; Rogoveanu, Otilia Constantina; Popescu, Mihai; Bondari, Simona; Alexandru, Dragoş Ovidiu; Ionovici, Nina; Grecu, Dan Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic osteonecrosis causes various clinical manifestations, depending on its location, but has in common a histopathological and radiological substrate. Aseptic osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a condition whose pathogenesis remains unclear despite many theories developed so far, and the discovery of numerous risk factors. The objective of this study is to emphasize the role of imaging techniques and correlating histology and immunohistochemistry methods in order to more accurately stage the disease. This retrospective study was performed on a total of 103 patients with clinical and radiological suspicion of unilateral or bilateral osteonecrosis. For the diagnosis criteria, we used clinical information, pelvic X-ray images, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). For the inclusion of patients in a disease stage, we used the Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) classification system. For patients diagnosed at an advanced stage, who underwent hip arthroplasty, we harvested biological material necessary for the histopathological study. There were differences in the appearance and extent of the lesion on the histological samples compared to macroscopic examination and even those obtained through imaging means, particularly for patients in evolutionary stage III. Aspects such as the extension of the area of fibrosis, bone tissue remodeling, the density of the newly formed vascular network and degree of impairment of the cartilage, are determined more accurately using histology and immunohistochemistry techniques. Before classifying patients in a certain stage, after correlating clinical and imaging data, histopathological aspects have to be considered, particularly in patients in stages III and IV, in which total hip arthroplasty could be delayed.

  15. Macrophage response in patients diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the femoral head presenting different risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Diana; Trăistaru, Rodica; Kamal, Constantin Kamal; Alexandru, Dragoş Ovidiu; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Grecu, Dan Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is a condition caused by partial or total interruption of blood supply to the femoral head. The diminished blood supply causes necrosis of the cellular elements and of the bone marrow, followed by the collapse of the bone structure, events that ultimately lead to the destruction of the bone tissue, the appearance of local pain and loss of function in the affected coxofemoral joint. The importance of this condition is that it mainly affects young adults aged 30-50 years, active from a socio-professional standpoint, and increased life expectancy. The material studied to achieve CD68 immunostaining was represented by bone fragments from the area of necrosis and from the adjacent areas of the femoral heads, harvested from 39 patients when performing hip arthroplasty surgery. The patients were diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the femoral head and hospitalized in the Clinic of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Emergency County Hospital of Craiova, Romania, from June 2014 to January 2015. The 39 patients included in the study were divided into four categories according to presented risk factors (alcohol, alcohol and smoking, trauma, corticosteroids). All the 39 cases had positive immunostaining for CD68, macrophage being highlighted both in the area of necrosis and in the adjacent areas. We noted significant differences in the number and arrangement of macrophages in patients presenting different risk factors. The highest number of macrophages was present in patients presenting a risk factor corticosteroids, and the lowest number of macrophages was found in patients who had trauma as the main risk factor.

  16. Prospective study on the chemokine CXCL13 in neuroborreliosis and other aseptic neuroinfections.

    PubMed

    Pícha, D; Moravcová, L; Smíšková, D

    2016-09-15

    The study evaluates the clinical significance of CXCL13 (leukocyte chemoattractant synthesized in CSF ) in Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) and other aseptic CNS infections. 244 patients with symptoms of neuroinfection and/or LNB were divided into groups: A - patients with LNB-positive antibodies in serum and CSF (96) or CSF only (14); B - patients with aseptic non-borrelial neuroinfections (82); C - negative controls (52). Group A was divided into A1-A4 according to pleocytosis in CSF and AIIgG positivity. The highest CSF CXCL13 concentrations (max. 81,287.60pg/ml; median 1766.90pg/ml) were in A1 (positive AI, pleocytosis) and A3 (negative AIIgG, pleocytosis; max. 7201,60pg/ml, median 56.22pg/ml). A2 (positive AI without pleocytosis) and A4 (negative AI without pleocytosis) had low CXCL13 levels - A2 max. 650.50pg/ml (median<7.80pg/ml); A4 max. 118.56pg/ml (median<7.8pg/ml). In B the median was 28.10pg/ml (max. 595.87pg/ml). In C the CXCL13 concentrations were the lowest (max. 83.83pg/ml; median<7.80pg/ml). The lowest cut-off was 29pg/ml (sensitivity 90.0%, specificity 72.2%), the highest one 400pg/ml (sensitivity 59.6%, specificity 94.0%). The group differences of serum CXCL13 were insignificant. The highest concentrations were at the beginning of the disease. In LNB CXCL13 correlates better with the CSF pleocytosis than AI positivity.

  17. Prospective study on the chemokine CXCL13 in neuroborreliosis and other aseptic neuroinfections.

    PubMed

    Pícha, D; Moravcová, L; Smíšková, D

    2016-09-15

    The study evaluates the clinical significance of CXCL13 (leukocyte chemoattractant synthesized in CSF ) in Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) and other aseptic CNS infections. 244 patients with symptoms of neuroinfection and/or LNB were divided into groups: A - patients with LNB-positive antibodies in serum and CSF (96) or CSF only (14); B - patients with aseptic non-borrelial neuroinfections (82); C - negative controls (52). Group A was divided into A1-A4 according to pleocytosis in CSF and AIIgG positivity. The highest CSF CXCL13 concentrations (max. 81,287.60pg/ml; median 1766.90pg/ml) were in A1 (positive AI, pleocytosis) and A3 (negative AIIgG, pleocytosis; max. 7201,60pg/ml, median 56.22pg/ml). A2 (positive AI without pleocytosis) and A4 (negative AI without pleocytosis) had low CXCL13 levels - A2 max. 650.50pg/ml (median<7.80pg/ml); A4 max. 118.56pg/ml (median<7.8pg/ml). In B the median was 28.10pg/ml (max. 595.87pg/ml). In C the CXCL13 concentrations were the lowest (max. 83.83pg/ml; median<7.80pg/ml). The lowest cut-off was 29pg/ml (sensitivity 90.0%, specificity 72.2%), the highest one 400pg/ml (sensitivity 59.6%, specificity 94.0%). The group differences of serum CXCL13 were insignificant. The highest concentrations were at the beginning of the disease. In LNB CXCL13 correlates better with the CSF pleocytosis than AI positivity. PMID:27538636

  18. Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. Common symptoms include fatigue , hair loss, sensitivity to the sun (photosensitivity), painful and swollen joints, ... when taking a deep breath Sun or light sensitivity Hair loss Purple or pale fingers or toes ...

  19. Lupus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Wolf; abbrev. Lup, gen. Lupi; area 334 sq. deg.) A southern constellation which lies between Centaurus and Scorpius, and culminates at midnight in early May. It has long been associated with a wild animal, though the identification with a wolf dates from comparatively recent times. It is usually shown on early celestial charts as a wolf impaled on a thyrsus (staff) held by Chiron, the centau...

  20. Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... scalp, or ears. photosensitivity: This means sensitivity to ultraviolet rays, like the ones that come from the sun ... wear lots of sunscreen and protective clothing because ultraviolet rays can bring on a flare. Smoking, drinking, and ...

  1. Lupus vulgaris: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Wozniacka, Anna; Schwartz, Robert A; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Borun, Marta; Arkuszewska, Cecylia

    2005-04-01

    Although there has been a steady decline in the incidence of tuberculosis in recent years, it persists in some regions, and where AIDS is especially prevalent, the number of new cases has been increasing. Thus, cutaneous tuberculosis has re-emerged in areas with a high incidence of HIV infection and multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris has been and remains the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis. Cutaneous manifestations of disseminated tuberculosis are unusual, being seen in less than 0.5% of cases. Scrofuloderma, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis and lupus vulgaris comprise most cutaneous tuberculosis cases. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is derived from an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis and is employed beneficially as a relatively safe vaccination in Poland and other countries in which the prevalence of tuberculosis is high. However, BCG vaccination may produce complications, including disseminated BCG and lupus vulgaris, the latter seen in one of our two patients in whom lupus vulgaris at the inoculation site followed a second vaccination with BCG 12 years after the initial one. A similar phenomenon has been described after immunotherapy with BCG vaccination. Re-infection (secondary) inoculation cutaneous tuberculosis may also occur as a result of BCG vaccination, producing either lupus vulgaris or tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, probably depending upon the patient's degree of cell-mediated immunity. However, most lupus vulgaris cases are not associated with vaccination with BCG, as occurred in our first patient. For those who do develop lupus vulgaris, it can be persistent for a long period, in some cases for many decades. In the second patient we describe a lengthy duration and cutaneous reactivation at distant sites after more than 40 years.

  2. Pyomyositis in childhood-systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Blay, Gabriela; Ferriani, Mariana P L; Buscatti, Izabel M; França, Camila M P; Campos, Lucia M A; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    Pyomyositis is a pyogenic infection of skeletal muscle that arises from hematogenous spread and usually presents with localized abscess. This muscle infection has been rarely reported in adult-onset systemic lupus erythematous and, to the best of our knowledge, has not been diagnosed in pediatric lupus population. Among our childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematous population, including 289 patients, one presented pyomyositis. This patient was diagnosed with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematous at the age of 10 years-old. After six years, while being treated with prednisone, azathioprine and hydroxychloroquine, she was hospitalized due to a 30-day history of insidious pain in the left thigh and no apparent trauma or fever were reported. Her physical examination showed muscle tenderness and woody induration. Laboratory tests revealed anemia, increased acute phase reactants and normal muscle enzymes. Computer tomography of the left thigh showed collection on the middle third of the vastus intermedius, suggesting purulent stage of pyomyositis. Treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotic was initiated, leading to a complete clinical resolution. In conclusion, we described the first case of pyomyositis during childhood in pediatric lupus population. This report reinforces that the presence of localized muscle pain in immunocompromised patients, even without elevation of muscle enzymes, should raise the suspicion of pyomyositis. A prompt antibiotic therapy is strongly recommended. PMID:27267338

  3. Pyomyositis in childhood-systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Blay, Gabriela; Ferriani, Mariana P L; Buscatti, Izabel M; França, Camila M P; Campos, Lucia M A; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    Pyomyositis is a pyogenic infection of skeletal muscle that arises from hematogenous spread and usually presents with localized abscess. This muscle infection has been rarely reported in adult-onset systemic lupus erythematous and, to the best of our knowledge, has not been diagnosed in pediatric lupus population. Among our childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematous population, including 289 patients, one presented pyomyositis. This patient was diagnosed with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematous at the age of 10 years-old. After six years, while being treated with prednisone, azathioprine and hydroxychloroquine, she was hospitalized due to a 30-day history of insidious pain in the left thigh and no apparent trauma or fever were reported. Her physical examination showed muscle tenderness and woody induration. Laboratory tests revealed anemia, increased acute phase reactants and normal muscle enzymes. Computer tomography of the left thigh showed collection on the middle third of the vastus intermedius, suggesting purulent stage of pyomyositis. Treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotic was initiated, leading to a complete clinical resolution. In conclusion, we described the first case of pyomyositis during childhood in pediatric lupus population. This report reinforces that the presence of localized muscle pain in immunocompromised patients, even without elevation of muscle enzymes, should raise the suspicion of pyomyositis. A prompt antibiotic therapy is strongly recommended.

  4. Environment and lupus-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Zandman-Goddard, G; Solomon, M; Rosman, Z; Peeva, E; Shoenfeld, Y

    2012-03-01

    Clinical manifestations of lupus are encountered in a variety of disease entities, including isolated cutaneous lupus, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, mixed connective tissue disease, drug-induced lupus, overlap syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). While each entity has been recognized as a specific disease with its own diverse clinical and serological pattern, one could argue that many findings are common. Could it be that all of these entities actually represent a spectrum of one disease? Could it be that rather than the genetic predisposition and hence controlled factors that govern this spectrum of diseases, that environmental factors associated with SLE could also play a role in the different entities of this spectrum? The traditional environmental triggers in SLE include sunlight and ultraviolet (UV) light, infections, smoking, and medications including biologics such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) blockers. In this review, we update and further substantiate these traditional factors in the various lupus-related syndromes. We will also discuss the association with vaccine exposure, industrial estrogens, and other factors.

  5. Premature vascular damage in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mariana J

    2009-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease associated with a striking increase in the risk of premature cardiovascular (CV) complications due to accelerated atherosclerosis. Traditional CV risk factors seem to be less important predictors of CV events than the presence of active SLE. Immune dysregulation characteristic of lupus appears to play the dominant role in atherogenesis. While both SLE-specific and non-specific mechanisms have been proposed to play a prominent role in the induction of premature vascular damage in this disease, the exact etiology remains unclear. We have proposed that an imbalance between vascular damage and repair likely induced by Interferon- could play a prominent role in the induction of accelerated atherosclerosis in SLE. This review summarizes some of the proposed mechanisms that may promote accelerated vascular damage in lupus and explores potential targets for CV risk prevention in this patient population.

  6. Clinical outcome measures for Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Joerg; Werth, Victoria P.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus is a clinically heterogeneous group of rare skin diseases that only rarely have been subjected to controlled clinical trials. This may be have been partly due to a lack of suitable validated outcome instruments. Recently the FDA mandated that organ specific trials for lupus erythematosus need to use a combination of different outcome measures. The patient’s condition needs to be assessed in terms of quality of life, the patient’s global response and organ specific instruments that measure activity of the disease as well as damage due to the disease. For the skin the only formally validated and published instrument is currently the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosis Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI). This paper discusses the background of the development of the CLASI as well as issues related to its use and interpretation in the context of clinical research of CLE. PMID:20693208

  7. The Complement System in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, Daniel J; Hebert, Lee A

    2015-09-01

    The complement system is composed of a family of soluble and membrane-bound proteins that historically has been viewed as a key component of the innate immune system, with a primary role of providing a first-line defense against microorganisms. Although this role indeed is important, complement has many other physiological roles, including the following: (1) influencing appropriate immune responses, (2) disposing of waste in the circulation (immune complexes, cellular debris), and (3) contributing to damage of self-tissue through inflammatory pathways. These three roles are believed to be significant factors in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, particularly its renal manifestation (lupus nephritis), contributing both protective and damaging effects. In this review, we provide an overview of the human complement system and its functions, and discuss its intricate and seemingly contradictory roles in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

  8. [Neonatal lupus syndrome: Literature review].

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Georgin-Lavialle, S; Levesque, K; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Le Guern, V; Le Bidois, J; Bessières, B; Brouzes, C; Le Mercier, D; Villain, E; Maltret, A; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal lupus syndrome is associated with transplacental passage of maternal anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. Children display cutaneous, hematological, liver or cardiac features. Cardiac manifestations include congenital heart block (CHB); endocardial fibroelastosis and dilated cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of CHB in newborns of anti-Ro/SSA positive women with known connective tissue disease is between 1 and 2% and the risk of recurrence is around 19%. Skin and systemic lesions are transient, whereas CHB is definitive and associated with significant morbidity and a mortality of 18%. A pacemaker must be implanted in 2/3 of cases. Myocarditis may be associated or appear secondly. Mothers of children with CHB are usually asymptomatic or display Sjogren's syndrome or undifferentiated connective tissue disease. In anti-Ro/SSA positive pregnant women, fetal echocardiography should be performed at least every 2 weeks from the 16th to 24th week gestation. An electrocardiogram should be performed for all newborn babies. The benefit of fluorinated corticosteroid therapy for CHB detected in utero remains unclear. Maternal use of hydroxychloroquine may be associated with a decreased recurrent CHB risk in a subsequent offspring. A prospective study is actually ongoing to confirm these findings.

  9. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sete, Manuela Rubim Camara; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Sztajnbok, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that periodontal disease is a disease characterized by inflammation influenced by infectious factors, such as SLE, it is plausible to suggest that SLE would influence periodontal disease and vice versa. However, this issue is not yet fully elucidated and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association, as deregulation mainly in innate immune system, with action of phagocytic cells and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 in both conditions' pathogenesis, leading to tissue destruction. However, studies assessing the relationship between these diseases are scarce, and more studies focused on common immunological mechanisms should be conducted to further understanding. PMID:27267530

  10. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sete, Manuela Rubim Camara; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Sztajnbok, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that periodontal disease is a disease characterized by inflammation influenced by infectious factors, such as SLE, it is plausible to suggest that SLE would influence periodontal disease and vice versa. However, this issue is not yet fully elucidated and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association, as deregulation mainly in innate immune system, with action of phagocytic cells and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 in both conditions' pathogenesis, leading to tissue destruction. However, studies assessing the relationship between these diseases are scarce, and more studies focused on common immunological mechanisms should be conducted to further understanding.

  11. Review of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Hicks, John; Bullard, Daniel C

    2006-01-01

    While murine models of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis have been available for sometime, it is only recently that immune and inflammatory mechanisms and molecular genetics have been extensively investigated. Genes involved in murine and human lupus nephritis have been discovered and provide insight into this disease process and provide avenues for molecular-targeted therapy. Immune modulation of murine nephritis has provided insight into novel therapy that may attenuate this disease or halt disease progression. With the advances in understanding the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis using translational research modalities, including electron microscopy, and molecular genetics, many "designer" therapies have become available for clinical use and for clinical investigational trials. This paper reviews autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models, candidate genes involved in lupus nephritis, adhesion molecules implicated in murine lupus-like nephritis, immune modulation of murine lupus-like nephritis, and novel and potential therapy for immune complex glomerulonephritis.

  12. Lupus vulgaris: unusual presentations over the face.

    PubMed

    Khandpur, S; Reddy, B S N

    2003-11-01

    Lupus vulgaris (LV) is the most common morphological variant of cutaneous tuberculosis. However, the occurrence of bizarre clinical presentations over atypical sites often leads to misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment causing significant morbidity. This report seeks to highlight two unusual cases of lupus vulgaris occurring on the face of immunocompetent women and remarkably mimicking periorbital cellulitis and basal cell carcinoma, respectively. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). With four-drug antitubercular therapy, both patients had a dramatic response.

  13. Ofatumumab treatment in lupus nephritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Haarhaus, Malena Loberg; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is frequently used in systemic lupus erythematosus; however, side effects such as infusion-related reactions limit its use. In this case report, we describe, for the first time, treatment with ofatumumab in four patients with lupus nephritis. The treatment was well tolerated in three of the patients, and a reduction of proteinuria was seen in all cases. This emphasizes the importance of alternative B-cell-depleting therapies in patients with an initial good response to rituximab, but who develop side effects. PMID:27478595

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Is it one disease?

    PubMed

    Rivas-Larrauri, Francisco; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic disease with a variety of clinical presentations. Monogenic predisposing conditions to the development of this disease have been described. As examples, an impaired expression of interferon-α regulated genes or complement deficiencies have been reported in patients with SLE, with particular clinical presentations. Those defects present particular presentations and a different severity, making an argument that lupus is not a single disease but many. Treatment could be individualized depending on the underlying defect generating the subtype of the disease.

  15. A case of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome associated with aseptic meningitis in an 8-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Inatomi, Jun; Yokoyama, Yoshiki; Sekine, Takashi; Igarashi, Takashi

    2008-04-01

    Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome is a disorder in which excessive natriuresis and subsequent hyponatremic dehydration occur in patients with intracranial diseases. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome often develops in patients with severe neurosurgical disorders, such as hydrocephalus, cerebral infarction, and tuberculous meningitis. Here, we report on the case of an 8-year-old boy with cerebral salt-wasting syndrome associated with aseptic meningitis. He showed mild developmental retardation and had a history of convulsion. Four days after his admission, cerebral salt-wasting syndrome abruptly started: natriuresis and hyponatremia gradually improved over 10 days. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on cerebral salt-wasting syndrome associated with clinically benign aseptic meningitis.

  16. Controlled Human Malaria Infection of Tanzanians by Intradermal Injection of Aseptic, Purified, Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Shekalaghe, Seif; Rutaihwa, Mastidia; Billingsley, Peter F.; Chemba, Mwajuma; Daubenberger, Claudia A.; James, Eric R.; Mpina, Maximillian; Ali Juma, Omar; Schindler, Tobias; Huber, Eric; Gunasekera, Anusha; Manoj, Anita; Simon, Beatus; Saverino, Elizabeth; Church, L. W. Preston; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Plowe, Christopher; Venkatesan, Meera; Sasi, Philip; Lweno, Omar; Mutani, Paul; Hamad, Ali; Mohammed, Ali; Urassa, Alwisa; Mzee, Tutu; Padilla, Debbie; Ruben, Adam; Lee Sim, B. Kim; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) by mosquito bite has been used to assess anti-malaria interventions in > 1,500 volunteers since development of methods for infecting mosquitoes by feeding on Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) gametocyte cultures. Such CHMIs have never been used in Africa. Aseptic, purified, cryopreserved Pf sporozoites, PfSPZ Challenge, were used to infect Dutch volunteers by intradermal injection. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess safety and infectivity of PfSPZ Challenge in adult male Tanzanians. Volunteers were injected intradermally with 10,000 (N = 12) or 25,000 (N = 12) PfSPZ or normal saline (N = 6). PfSPZ Challenge was well tolerated and safe. Eleven of 12 and 10 of 11 subjects, who received 10,000 and 25,000 PfSPZ respectively, developed parasitemia. In 10,000 versus 25,000 PfSPZ groups geometric mean days from injection to Pf positivity by thick blood film was 15.4 versus 13.5 (P = 0.023). Alpha-thalassemia heterozygosity had no apparent effect on infectivity. PfSPZ Challenge was safe, well tolerated, and infectious. PMID:25070995

  17. Surveillance of aseptic central nervous system infections in Poland: is it meeting its objectives?

    PubMed

    Stefanoff, P; Rogalska, J; Zajkowska, J; Czerska, M; Seroka, W; Czarkowski, M P

    2011-01-01

    In Poland, a surveillance system capturing generic information on both diagnosed and undiagnosed aseptic central nervous system infections (ACI) has been in operation since 1966. This study evaluates to what extent the ACI surveillance is able to meet its objectives to monitor ACI trends and to detect signals of public health importance such as enteroviral outbreaks, tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) endemic foci, poliovirus appearance or emergence of new neurotropic viruses. Between 2004 and 2008, aetiology was established for 17% of ACI cases. Of the 1,994 reported ACI cases, 232 (11.6%) were diagnosed with TBE virus, 46 (2.3%) with enterovirus, 35 (1.8%) with herpesvirus, and 32 (1.6%) had other viral causes such as Epstein Barr virus or adenovirus. The system's performance varied between the provinces, with the frequency of suspected ACI cases referred for viral aetiology investigation in 2008 ranging from 1.98 to 285.4 samples per million inhabitants. The sensitivity of physicians' reporting, estimated as the proportion of hospitalised ACI cases reported to the surveillance system, was 48% nationally, with vast regional differences (range 30–91%). To conclude, the ACI surveillance system in Poland does currently not meet its objectives, due to limited availability of aetiological diagnosis and microbiological confirmation and to regional differences in reporting sensitivity. PMID:21801691

  18. [Clinical, epidemiological and etiological studies of adult aseptic meningitis: Report of 13 cases with mumps meningitis].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Shinichi; Yoshimoto, Takeshi; Shiga, Yuji; Kanaya, Yuhei; Neshige, Shuichiro; Himeno, Takahiro; Kono, Ryuhei; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    We experienced 13 cases (29.8 ± 7.0 years) of mumps meningitis and 365 cases of adult aseptic meningitis during 11 years from 2004 to 2014. A small epidemic of mumps occurred for 3-4 years, and the incidence rate of adult mumps meningitis coincided with the epidemic without seasonal fluctuation. Parotitis was observed in 8 of the 13 mumps meningitis patients (61.5%) and orchitis in 2 of 7 male patients (28.6%). There were no differences in clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and outcome between patients with adult mumps meningitis and those with echovirus 9 meningitis (9 patients), except for the low frequency of nausea/vomiting and a high percentage of mononuclear cells of the cerebrospinal fluid in those with mumps. Eight patients had contact with persons with mumps before the symptomatic stage of meningitis. Only one patient had received mumps vaccination in childhood. On the basis of the values of the anti-mumps IgM and IgG antibodies, we speculated primary infection and the re-infection of mumps in 6 and 2 patients, respectively. Moreover, second vaccine failure was suggested in the vaccinated patient.

  19. [Simultaneous determination of various aseptics and sweeteners in milk and dairy products].

    PubMed

    Song, Ge; Jiang, Jindou; Zhang, Qiumei

    2010-03-01

    A method for simultaneous determination of acesulfame, benzoic acid, sodium saccharin, sorbic acid, and aspartame in milk and dairy products using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed. The proteins in milk and dairy products were mostly eliminated by the precipitators. Three aseptics and two sweeteners were separated on a C18 column with the mobile phase of methanol-0.05 mol/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate under gradient elution. With a diode array detector, acesulfame, benzoic acid, and sorbic acid were detected at 230 nm and sodium saccharin and aspartame were detected at 210 nm. The recoveries were 96.0% - 103.5% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) in the range of 1.93% - 2.76%. The detection limits of acesulfame, benzoic acid, sodium saccharin, sorbic acid and aspartame were 1.0, 1.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 microg/g, respectively. This method can be used for the routine analysis of these additives in milk and dairy products.

  20. Subacute aseptic meningitis as neurological manifestation of primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Rosario; Valeria Saddi, Maria

    2006-10-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammatory infiltration and secondary chronic dysfunction of exocrine glands. Systemic (extraglandular) manifestations of the disease occur in one-third of the patients, including a wide spectrum of peripheral and central neurological disorders. We report a case of subacute afebrile aseptic meningitis (AM) as neurological manifestation of primary SS. The neurological symptomatology presented gradual onset and progression, including diplopia, mild headache, pain and stiffness of the neck. The clinical examination pointed out xerostomia and xerophthalmia. Diagnosis of SS was confirmed by Schirmer's tear test and histopathology of the labial salivary glands. The neurological involvement was highlighted by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain which displayed an increased diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed moderate pleocytosis with prevalence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and increased protein level but no evidence of Ig intrathecal synthesis. A cycle of intravenous steroid therapy led to a complete disappearance of the neurological symptomatology and to normalization of the CSF inflammatory pattern. Given the unusual presentation of this case of AM, which resembled the characteristics of a chronic meningitis rather than those of an acute form, in patients affected by SS we must stress the importance of cephalic symptoms such as headaches and cervical stiffness (even if mild and without fever) as possible signs of central neurological involvement of the disease.

  1. Flow-through ultrasonic emulsification combined with static micromixing for aseptic production of microspheres by solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sergio; Rudolf, Beat; Merkle, Hans P; Gander, Bruno

    2005-10-01

    Final sterilisation of drug-loaded polymeric microspheres is problematic as dry heat or steam sterilisation are not applicable, and gamma-irradiation may result in radiolytic scission of the polymer chains, and potentially damage the bioactive compound. Therefore, aseptic production is the method of choice to obtain a sterile product. A novel process for the production of microspheres is introduced based on the principle of double emulsion-solvent extraction. The process uses a flow-through ultrasonic cell for the preparation of the primary emulsion, in combination with a static micromixer for the production of the double emulsion. Because of its small scale, the equipment is readily accommodated in a laminar air-flow cabinet or an isolator. Thanks to the low technical complexity and easy handling of the process, only minimal manual interventions is required. Finally, the possibility for in-place cleaning and sterilisation makes the equipment and process well suited for aseptic microsphere preparation. Microspheres were prepared from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and bovine serum albumin (BSA) served as model protein for microencapsulation. The BSA-in-PLGA (w/o) emulsions produced by the ultrasonic flow-through cell exhibited mean droplet sizes of <700 nm. Further processing into microspheres of 15-40 microm mean diameter resulted in approx. 70% BSA encapsulation efficiency. Batch-to-batch reproducibility was excellent. Microsphere batches produced under aseptic conditions to assure product sterility exhibited no microbial contamination when examined by a simplified sterility test. The presented technology offers great potential for aseptic microsphere production for batch-sizes suitable, e.g. for clinical investigations. Complete validation of product sterility would, however, demand more extended tests. PMID:16009542

  2. A survey of aseptic precautions and needle type for paediatric caudal block in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Fahy, C J; Costi, D A; Cyna, A M

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional survey was designed to evaluate the current practice of anaesthetists in Australia and New Zealand with regard to aseptic technique and needle type during the performance of single-shot caudal blocks. Professional bodies suggest that full aseptic precautions be taken during the administration of caudal or epidural blocks. It has been suggested that using an intravenous cannula or a styletted needle may obviate the occurrence of epidermoid tumours. A total of 202 members of the Society for Paediatric Anaesthesia in New Zealand and Australia were invited to participate in this internet-based survey. Eighty-four responses were received. Most respondents used some form of antiseptic handwash (81%), wore sterile gloves (85.7%), used antiseptic skin preparation (100%) and draped the site (57.1%). When performing caudal blocks, 43.1% used unstyletted needles, 27.2% used styletted spinal needles and 29.6% used intravenous cannulas. However, 11.9% did not wash hands, 10.7% did not wear gloves and 42.9% did not drape the site. Three respondents reported neither handwashing, wearing gloves or draping, instead only using an alcohol swab for skin preparation. The majority of respondents in our region appear to use some level of aseptic precautions, albeit to a variable degree. Published recommendations may either be perceived as overly cautious or as ambiguous in that they do not specify caudal practice as distinct from other epidural blocks. There is a need for clearer professional guidance to support a minimum level of aseptic precaution for single-shot caudal epidural blocks.

  3. Thrombocytopenia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jin-Hee; Soh, Moon-Seung; Ahn, Young-Hwan; Um, Yoo-Jin; Jung, Ju-Yang; Suh, Chang-Hee; Kim, Hyoun-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to examine the clinical characteristics and prognosis according to severity of thrombocytopenia and response to treatment for thrombocytopenia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We retrospectively evaluated 230 SLE patients with thrombocytopenia, and reviewed their clinical data and laboratory findings. Thrombocytopenia was defined as platelet counts under 100,000/mm3, and patients were divided into 3 thrombocytopenia groups according to severity: mild (platelet counts >50,000/mm3), moderate (>20,000/mm3, ≤50,000/mm3), and severe (≤20,000/mm3). Clinical characteristics, treatments, and prognoses were compared among the groups. Furthermore, complete remission of thrombocytopenia was defined as platelet counts >100,000/mm3 after treatment. There was no significant difference in clinical or laboratory findings among the groups according to severity of thrombocytopenia. However, hemorrhagic complications were more frequent in severe thrombocytopenia (P < 0.001) and mortality was also higher (P = 0.001). Complete remission was achieved in 85.2% of patients. The clinical characteristics and modality of treatment did not differ between the patients with and without complete remission. Mortality in patients with complete remission (1.5%) was significantly lower than in those without complete remission (29.4%, P < 0.001). Survival was significantly higher in patients with complete remission from thrombocytopenia (odds ratio = 0.049, 95% confidence interval: 0.013–0.191, P < 0.001). The severity of thrombocytopenia in SLE patients can be a useful independent prognostic factor to predict survival. Moreover, complete remission of thrombocytopenia after treatment is an important prognostic factor. The severity of thrombocytopenia and response to treatment should be closely monitored to predict prognosis in SLE patients. PMID:26871854

  4. Herpes simplex virus type 2-associated recurrent aseptic (Mollaret’s) meningitis in genitourinary medicine clinic: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Foul, Ahmad K; Buhary, Thajunisha M; Gayed, Sedki L

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cases of idiopathic recurrent benign aseptic meningitis were first described by Mollaret. Today, herpes simplex virus (HSV) is considered the cause of most cases of Mollaret’s meningitis. Case report A 40-year-old male was referred to our genitourinary medicine clinic with recurrent genital herpetic lesions. He had HSV-2-positive genital ulcers 8 years earlier. One year after the first infection, he developed severe recurrent attacks of headache associated with meningitis symptoms. The results of all radiological and biochemical tests were normal, but the patient reported a correlation between his attacks and genital herpes flare-ups. We diagnosed the patient with Mollaret’s meningitis and started him on continuous suppressive acyclovir therapy, which resulted in marked clinical improvement. Discussion Mollaret’s meningitis is a rare form of idiopathic recurrent aseptic meningitis that has a sudden onset, short duration, and spontaneous remission with unpredictable recurrence. We believe that the presence of concurrent or recurrent mucocutaneous herpetic lesions can aid its diagnosis, prior to which, affected patients usually have many unnecessary investigations and treatments. Therefore, detailed sexual history should be sought in all patients with aseptic meningitis, and clinicians should also ask about history of recurrent headaches in all patients with recurrent herpetic anogenital lesions. Continuous suppressive acyclovir therapy may reduce the frequency and severity of attacks and can dramatically improve lifestyle. PMID:24623993

  5. Establishment of an operating room committee and a training program to improve aseptic techniques for rodent and large animal surgery.

    PubMed

    Héon, Hélène; Rousseau, Nathalie; Montgomery, Jane; Beauregard, Gilles; Choiniére, Manon

    2006-11-01

    Investigators of our research facility generally accept the concept of asepsis as an important component of adequate surgical care for animals. However, they experience difficulties putting it into practice, especially in the case of rodents. The reasons for this are inconvenience, cost, and lack of training. To better assist investigators in the implementation of aseptic surgical techniques in their laboratories, we have created an Operating Room (OR) Committee modeled after OR committees found in human hospitals. A reconstructive surgeon, a veterinarian, a research scientist, a nurse involved in the training of OR personnel, interns, graduate students, and an animal health technician were chosen as committee members in light of their OR and animal care expertise. The first task of the OR Committee was to establish institutional guidelines for aseptic surgery, taking into account the costs imposed on research budgets by these procedures. The OR Committee also supports a complete training program in aseptic surgery techniques, which consists of lectures, a training manual, videos, and a practical course. Furthermore, when experimental procedures require specialized equipment, the OR Committee collaborates with researchers to develop strategies to achieve asepsis. This OR Committee and the training program proved to be important tools to promote and improve the quality of animal care during surgery.

  6. Comparison of the roles of IL-1, IL-6, and TNFalpha in cell culture and murine models of aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Taki, Naoya; Tatro, Joscelyn M; Lowe, Robert; Goldberg, Victor M; Greenfield, Edward M

    2007-05-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNF, are considered to be major mediators of osteolysis and ultimately aseptic loosening. This study demonstrated that synergistic interactions among these cytokines are required for the in vitro stimulation of osteoclast differentiation by titanium particles. In contrast, genetic knock out of these cytokines or their receptors does not protect murine calvaria from osteolysis induced by titanium particles. Thus, the extent of osteolysis was not substantially altered in single knock out mice lacking either the IL-1 receptor or IL-6. Osteolysis also was not substantially altered in double knock out mice lacking both the IL-1 receptor and IL-6 or in double knock out mice lacking both TNF receptor-1 and TNF receptor-2. The differences between the in vivo and the cell culture results make it difficult to conclude whether the pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to aseptic loosening. One alternative is that in vivo experiments are more physiological and that therefore the current results do not support a role for the pro-inflammatory cytokines in aseptic loosening. We however favor the alternative that, in this case, the cell culture experiments can be more informative. We favor this alternative because the role of the pro-inflammatory cytokines may be obscured in vivo by compensation by other cytokines or by the low signal to noise ratio found in measurements of particle-induced osteolysis.

  7. Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Lupus Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... W. Clark NIAMS For our readers who have lupus or are the loved ones of someone with ...

  8. Lupus: When the Body Attacks Itself | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Lupus Lupus: When the Body Attacks Itself Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents fast facts 1 Lupus occurs when the body's immune system attacks the ...

  9. Should I Be Following a Specific Diet or Nutrition Plan for My Lupus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lupus 15 Questions - Nervous System Issues 15 Questions - Healthy Eating 15 Questions - Strategies for Restful Sleep 15 Questions - ... with lupus Should I be following a specific diet or nutrition plan for my lupus? There is ...

  10. Topical calcineurin inhibitors in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lampropoulos, Christos E; D’Cruz, David P

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) encompasses a variety of lesions that may be refractory to systemic or topical agents. Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) are the most common lesions in clinical practice. The topical calcineurin inhibitors, tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, have been used to treat resistant cutaneous lupus since 2002 and inhibit the proliferation and activation of T-cells and suppress immune-mediated cutaneous inflammation. This article reviews the mechanism of action, efficacy, adverse effects, and the recent concern about their possible carcinogenic effect. Although the total number of patients is small and there is only one relevant randomized controlled study, the data are encouraging. Many patients, previously resistant to systemic agents or topical steroids, improved after four weeks of treatment. DLE and SCLE lesions were less responsive, reflecting the chronicity of the lesions, although more than 50% of patients still showed improvement. Topical calcineurin inhibitors may be a safe and effective alternative to topical steroids for CLE although the only approved indication is for atopic dermatitis. PMID:20421909

  11. Environmental Factors, Toxicants and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Anselm; Tay, Sen Hee

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an immune-complex-mediated multi-systemic autoimmune condition of multifactorial etiology, which mainly affects young women. It is currently believed that the onset of SLE and lupus flares are triggered by various environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. Various environmental agents and toxicants, such as cigarette smoke, alcohol, occupationally- and non-occupationally-related chemicals, ultraviolet light, infections, sex hormones and certain medications and vaccines, have been implicated to induce SLE onset or flares in a number case series, case-control and population-based cohort studies and very few randomized controlled trials. Here, we will describe some of these recognized environmental lupus triggering and perpetuating factors and explain how these factors potentially bias the immune system towards autoimmunity through their interactions with genetic and epigenetic alterations. Further in-depth exploration of how potentially important environmental factors mechanistically interact with the immune system and the genome, which trigger the onset of SLE and lupus flares, will certainly be one of the plausible steps to prevent the onset and to decelerate the progress of the disease. PMID:25216337

  12. Lupus nephritis: a nucleosome waste disposal defect?

    PubMed

    Berden, Jo H M; Grootscholten, Cecile; Jürgen, W C Dieker; van der Vlag, Johan

    2002-01-01

    Formation of anti-nuclear autoantibodies is a cardinal characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In recent years the nucleosome has been identified as the major autoantigen, since nucleosome specific T cells have been identified, which also drive the formation of anti-dsDNA and anti-histone antibodies. Nucleosome specific autoantibodies are present in a large majority of SLE patients and lupus mice. Nucleosomes are formed during apoptosis by organized cleavage of chromatin. These nucleosomes together with other lupus autoantigens cluster in apoptotic bodies at the surface of apoptotic cells. Systemic release of these autoantigens is normally prevented by swift removal of apoptotic cels. However, if the rate of apoptosis overflows the removal capacity and/or the cleaning machinery is reduced, nucleosomes are released. Furthermore, during apoptosis autoantigens can be modified, which makes them more immunogenic. Nucleosomes also play a pivotal role in the evolution of tissue lesions, especially glomerulonephritis. In lupus nephritis nucleosomes, anti-nucleosome autoantibodies and nucleosome/Ig complexes have been identified in the glomerular immune deposits. Via their cationic histone part nucleosomes can bind to heparan sulfate, a strong anionic constituent of the glomerular basement membrane.

  13. Systemic lupus erythematosus and Raynaud's phenomenon*

    PubMed Central

    Heimovski, Flavia Emilie; Simioni, Juliana A.; Skare, Thelma Larocca

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus seem to belong to different serological and clinical subgroups of the disease. Genetic background can cause the appearance of these subgroups. OBJECTIVE To determine whether Brazilian patients who have systemic lupus erythematosus and Raynaud's phenomenon differ from those who do not. METHODS Retrospective analysis of 373 medical records of systemic lupus erythematosus patients studied for demographic, clinical and serological data. A comparative analysis was performed of individuals with and without RP. RESULTS There was a positive association between Raynaud's phenomenon and age at diagnosis (p=0.02), presence of anti-Sm (p=0.01) antibodies and anti-RNP (p<0.0001). Furthermore, a negative association was found between Raynaud's phenomenon and hemolysis (p=0.01), serositis (p=0.01), glomerulonephritis (p=0.0004) and IgM aCL (p=0.004) antibodies. CONCLUSION Raynaud's phenomenon patients appear to belong to a systemic lupus erythematosus subset with a spectrum of clinical manifestations located in a more benign pole of the disease. PMID:26734864

  14. Record high Wolf, Canis lupus, pack density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Tracy, S.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents a year-around Wolf (Canis lupus) density of 18.2/100 km2 and a summer density of 30.8/100 km2, in a northeastern Minnesota Wolf pack. The previous record was a summer density of 14.1/100 km2, for a Wolf pack on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

  15. Record high wolf, Canis lupus, pack density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Tracy, S.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents a year-around wolf (Canis lupus) density of 18.2/100 m2 and summer density of 30.8/100 km2, in a northeastern Minnesota wolf pack. The previous record was a summer density of 14.1/100 km2, for a wolf pack on Vancouver Island, BC, Canada.

  16. Thyroid disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, K L; Wang, F

    1986-01-01

    Of 319 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), nine had thyrotoxicosis, three had hypothyroidism, and two had thyroiditis. This prevalence seems greater than that of similar thyroid disorders seen in the general population. It is suggested that patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders may develop SLE or vice versa. This association requires confirmation by prospective study. PMID:3740982

  17. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura preceding systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Simeon-Aznar, C P; Cuenca-Luque, R; Fonollosa-Pla, V; Bosch-Gil, J A

    1992-01-01

    The case of a patient admitted with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura nine years after developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reported. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with SLE has been described on other occasions, but in most patients the diagnosis of SLE precedes that of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The unusual sequence and the chronological separation of the two diseases is emphasised. PMID:1575591

  18. Induction of lupus autoantibodies by adjuvants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satoh, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Behney, K.M.; Mizutani, A.; Akaogi, J.; Nacionales, D.C.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Reeves, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the hydrocarbon oil pristane induces lupus specific autoantibodies in non-autoimmune mice. We investigated whether the capacity to induce lupus-like autoimmunity is a unique property of pristane or is shared by other adjuvant oils. Seven groups of 3-month-old female BALB/cJ mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of pristane, squalene (used in the adjuvant MF59), incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), three different medicinal mineral oils, or saline, respectively. Serum autoantibodies and peritoneal cytokine production were measured. In addition to pristane, the mineral oil Bayol F (IFA) and the endogenous hydrocarbon squalene both induced anti-nRNP/Sm and -Su autoantibodies (20% and 25% of mice, respectively). All of these hydrocarbons had prolonged effects on cytokine production by peritoneal APCs. However, high levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF?? production 2-3 months after intraperitoneal injection appeared to be associated with the ability to induce lupus autoantibodies. The ability to induce lupus autoantibodies is shared by several hydrocarbons and is not unique to pristane. It correlates with stimulation of the production of IL-12 and other cytokines, suggesting a relationship with a hydrocarbon's adjuvanticity. The potential to induce autoimmunity may complicate the use of oil adjuvants in human and veterinary vaccines. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Lupus Family Registry and Repository

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Astrid; Sevier, Sydney; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Aberle, Teresa; Cooney, Carisa M.; Grether, Anya; James, Ellen; Ning, Jared; Tesiram, Joanne; Morrisey, Jean; Powe, Tiny; Drexel, Mark; Daniel, Wes; Namjou, Bahram; Ojwang, Joshua O.; Nguyen, Kim L.; Cavett, Joshua W.; Te, Jeannie L.; James, Judith A.; Scofield, R. Hal; Moser, Kathy; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Carson, Craig W.; Quintero-del-Rio, Ana I.; Ballesteros, Maria del Carmen; Punaro, Marilynn G.; Karp, David R.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Weisman, Michael; Merrill, Joan T.; Rivera, Roberto; Petri, Michelle A.; Albert, Daniel A.; Espinoza, Luis R.; Utset, Tammy O.; Shaver, Timothy S.; Arthur, Eugene; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Bruner, Gail R.

    2011-01-01

    The Lupus Family Registry and Repository (LFRR) was established with the goal of assembling and distributing materials and data from families with one or more living members diagnosed with SLE, in order to address SLE genetics. In the present article, we describe the problems and solutions of the registry design and biometric data gathering; the protocols implemented to guarantee data quality and protection of participant privacy and consent; and the establishment of a local and international network of collaborators. At the same time, we illustrate how the LFRR has enabled progress in lupus genetics research, answering old scientific questions while laying out new challenges in the elucidation of the biologic mechanisms that underlie disease pathogenesis. Trained staff ascertain SLE cases, unaffected family members and population-based controls, proceeding in compliance with the relevant laws and standards; participant consent and privacy are central to the LFRR’s effort. Data, DNA, serum, plasma, peripheral blood and transformed B-cell lines are collected and stored, and subject to strict quality control and safety measures. Coded data and materials derived from the registry are available for approved scientific users. The LFRR has contributed to the discovery of most of the 37 genetic associations now known to contribute to lupus through 104 publications. The LFRR contains 2618 lupus cases from 1954 pedigrees that are being studied by 76 approved users and their collaborators. The registry includes difficult to obtain populations, such as multiplex pedigrees, minority patients and affected males, and constitutes the largest collection of lupus pedigrees in the world. The LFRR is a useful resource for the discovery and characterization of genetic associations in SLE. PMID:20864496

  20. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Olowu, Wasiu

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the initial clinicolaboratory manifestations and short-term outcome in a series of Nigerian children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: A nonrandomized prospective study of consecutive cases of childhood-onset SLE. Baseline and follow-up clinicolaboratory data were collected and analyzed. Each patient was followed up for 12 months. RESULTS: Eleven children were studied. There were seven girls (F:M, 1.75). Mean ages at lupus onset and diagnosis were 10.0 +/- 2.53 years and 11.2 +/- 2.53 years, respectively. Mean time at onset of renal disease following SLE symptoms onset was 1.22 +/- 0.93 years. All cases were misdiagnosed prior to presentation; diagnosis was delayed in nine patients. Lupus activity was mild, moderate and severe in two, five and four patients, respectively. Hypertension (n = 5), nephrotic syndrome (n = 6), microerythrocyturia (n = 6) and acute renal failure (n = 7) were associated morbidities. Of the 27 presenting clinical features, 17 were nondiagnostic, while 10 were diagnostic. Fever (n = 9) was a major nondiagnostic symptom; major diagnostic manifestations were lupus nephritis (n = 11), arthritis (n = 10) and serositis (n = 7). Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome was diagnosed in three. The glomerular lesions were nonproliferative (n = 1), focal (n = 3) and diffuse (n = 7) proliferative lupus nephritis. Complete remission rate at end-point was 71.4%. Fourteen percent of the patients relapsed. Renal survival and mortality rates were 86.0% and 30.0%, respectively. CONCLUSION: In this study, severe renal and extrarenal comorbidities were common; mortality rate was also high. High frequency of misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis were probably responsible for these. PMID:17668644

  1. Transmission of seasonal outbreak of childhood enteroviral aseptic meningitis and hand-foot-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Sue K; Park, Boyoung; Ki, Moran; Kim, Ho; Lee, Kwan; Jung, Cheoll; Sohn, Young Mo; Choi, Sung-Min; Kim, Doo-Kwun; Lee, Dong Seok; Ko, Joon Tae; Kim, Moon Kyu; Cheong, Hae-Kwan

    2010-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the modes of transmission of aseptic meningitis (AM) and hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) using a case-control and a case-crossover design. We recruited 205 childhood AM and 116 HFMD cases and 170 non-enteroviral disease controls from three general hospitals in Gyeongju, Pohang, and Seoul between May and August in both 2002 and 2003. For the case-crossover design, we established the hazard and non-hazard periods as week one and week four before admission, respectively. In the case-control design, drinking water that had not been boiled, not using a water purifier, changes in water quality, and contact with AM patients were significantly associated with the risk of AM (odds ratio [OR]=2.8, 2.9, 4.6, and 10.9, respectively), while drinking water that had not been boiled, having a non-water closet toilet, changes in water quality, and contact with HFMD patients were associated with risk of HFMD (OR=3.3, 2.8, 6.9, and 5.0, respectively). In the case-crossover design, many life-style variables such as contact with AM or HFMD patients, visiting a hospital, changes in water quality, presence of a skin wound, eating out, and going shopping were significantly associated with the risk of AM (OR=18.0, 7.0, 8.0, 2.2, 22.3, and 3.0, respectively) and HFMD (OR=9.0, 37.0, 11.0, 12.0, 37.0, and 5.0, respectively). Our findings suggest that person-to-person contact and contaminated water could be the principal modes of transmission of AM and HFMD. PMID:20436701

  2. Aseptic meningitis caused by Leptospira spp diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eliete Caló; Blanco, Roberta Morozetti; Yasuda, Paulo Hideki

    2010-12-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the pathogenic Leptospira spp. The clinical presentations are diverse, ranging from undifferentiated fever to fulminant disease including meningeal forms. The neurological leptospirosis forms are usually neglected. The aim of this study was to investigate leptospirosis as the cause of aseptic meningitis using different diagnostic techniques including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thirty-nine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients presenting with meningeal abnormalities, predominance of lymphocytes and negative results by traditional microbiological tests were processed by leptospiral culture, anti-leptospiral antibody response and PCR. Leptospira spp DNA was detected in 23 (58.97%) of the CSF samples. Anti-leptospiral antibodies were found in 13 (33.33%) CSF samples. Twelve CSF samples were positive by PCR assay and negative by microscopic agglutination test (MAT) assay. Two CSF samples were positive by MAT and negative by PCR. The positive and negative agreement between both tests was 11 and 14, respectively. CSF samples from six cases of unknown diagnosis were positive by PCR assay. Eight cases showed positive results using PCR and MAT. Leptospirosis could be detected by PCR assay from the 3rd-26th day after illness onset. The sensitivity of the PCR was assessed with confirmed cases of leptospirosis (by MAT) and found to be 89.5%. All CSFs were negative by culture. PCR was found to be a powerful tool for diagnosing meningitis cases of leptospirosis. We recommend that it may be used as a supplementary diagnostic tool, especially in the early stages of the disease, when other diagnostic techniques such as serology are not sensitive.

  3. Tissue engineering chamber promotes adipose tissue regeneration in adipose tissue engineering models through induced aseptic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhangsong; Dong, Ziqing; Chang, Qiang; Zhan, Weiqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Shengchang; Lu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering chamber (TEC) makes it possible to generate significant amounts of mature, vascularized, stable, and transferable adipose tissue. However, little is known about the role of the chamber in tissue engineering. Therefore, to investigate the role of inflammatory response and the change in mechanotransduction started by TEC after implantation, we placed a unique TEC model on the surface of the groin fat pads in rats to study the expression of cytokines and tissue development in the TEC. The number of infiltrating cells was counted, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression levels in the chamber at multiple time points postimplantation were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tissue samples were collected at various time points and labeled for specific cell populations. The result showed that new adipose tissue formed in the chamber at day 60. Also, the expression of MCP-1 and VEGF in the chamber decreased slightly from an early stage as well as the number of the infiltrating cells. A large number of CD34+/perilipin- perivascular cells could be detected at day 30. Also, the CD34+/perilipin+ adipose precursor cell numbers increased sharply by day 45 and then decreased by day 60. CD34-/perilipin+ mature adipocytes were hard to detect in the chamber content at day 30, but their number increased and then peaked at day 60. Ki67-positive cells could be found near blood vessels and their number decreased sharply over time. Masson's trichrome showed that collagen was the dominant component of the chamber content at early stage and was replaced by newly formed small adipocytes over time. Our findings suggested that the TEC implantation could promote the proliferation of adipose precursor cells derived from local adipose tissue, increase angiogenesis, and finally lead to spontaneous adipogenesis by inducing aseptic inflammation and changing local mechanotransduction.

  4. Cytokine mRNA profiles in mononuclear cells in acute aseptic meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Navikas, V; Haglund, M; Link, J; He, B; Lindqvist, L; Fredrikson, S; Link, H

    1995-01-01

    Cytokines are important modulators of inflammation and immune responses. Using in situ hybridization with radiolabelled cDNA oligonucleotide probes, we studied the expression of mRNA encoding the cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), lymphotoxin, and perforin in mononuclear cells (MNC) from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with acute aseptic meningoencephalitis (AM) and from blood of healthy controls. Patients in the acute phase of AM had elevated numbers of IFN-gamma mRNA-expressing cells in the blood compared with that of controls and higher numbers of IFN-gamma mRNA-expressing cells in their CSF compared with that of convalescent-phase patients, which is in accordance with the antiviral effects of this cytokine. Upregulation of IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 was found in convalescent-phase patients, which is consistent with the longstanding B-cell response found in AM. TGF-beta and perforin were upregulated in both stages of AM, while the numbers of blood and CSF MNC expressing cytokine mRNA of the TNF family (TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin) did not differ between patients with AM and controls. An even higher elevation in CSF was noticed for MNC expressing most of the cytokines, particularly IL-4 and TGF-beta, reflecting the autonomy of the immune response in the CSF. The definition of cytokine profiles in AM, a self-limiting and benign disease, provides a foundation for future comparisons with other infectious and inflammatory nervous system diseases. PMID:7890425

  5. T Tauri Disk Lifetime in the Lupus Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Bertout, C.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study, we derived individual distances for a sample of pre-main sequence stars that define the comoving association of young stars in the Lupus star-forming region. Here, we use these new distances to investigate the mass and age distributions of Lupus T Tauri stars and derive the average disk lifetime in the Lupus association based on an empirical disk model.

  6. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-08-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus.

  7. Environmental exposures, epigenetic changes and the risk of lupus.

    PubMed

    Somers, E C; Richardson, B C

    2014-05-01

    A dose-dependent combination of environmental exposures, estrogenic hormones and genetic predisposition is thought to be required for lupus to develop and flare, but how the environment modifies the immune system in genetically predisposed people is unclear. Current evidence indicates that environmental agents that inhibit DNA methylation can convert normal antigen-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes into autoreactive, cytotoxic, pro-inflammatory cells that are sufficient to cause lupus-like autoimmunity in animal models, and that the same changes in DNA methylation characterize CD4+ T cells from patients with active lupus. Environmental agents implicated in inhibiting T-cell DNA methylation include the lupus-inducing drugs procainamide and hydralazine, as well as diet, and agents causing oxidative stress, such as smoking, UV light exposure, and infections, which have been associated with lupus onset or disease activity. Other studies demonstrate that demethylated T cells cause only anti-DNA antibodies in mice lacking a genetic predisposition to lupus, but are sufficient to cause lupus-like autoimmunity in genetically predisposed mice and likely people, and that estrogens augment the disease. Collectively, these studies suggest that environmental agents that inhibit DNA methylation, together with lupus genes and estrogens or endocrine disruptors, combine in a dose-dependent fashion to cause lupus flares.

  8. [Systemic lupus erythematous and CD24v].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Uscanga, Rubén Darío; Carsolio-Trujano, Margarita; Herrera-Sánchez, Diana Andrea; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel; Irazoque-Palacios, Fedra; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Martínez-Aguilar, Nora; Chima-Galán, María Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: el lupus eritematoso sistémico es un padecimiento autoinmunitario, de origen multifactorial, con predisposición genética; más de 100 genes participan en su etiopatogenia. El gen de CD24 puede mediar varias funciones, como su actividad coestimuladora en la expansión clonal de las células T. El polimorfismo de un simple nucleótido de CD24, que resulta en un reemplazo no conservador de alanina a valina (CD24v), que precede inmediatamente al sitio de anclaje GPI (posición ω-1), condiciona la pérdida de actividad de CD24. Se ha descrito que CD24v está asociado con esclerosis múltiple y lupus eritematoso sistémico en otras poblaciones. Objetivo: encontrar la existencia de CD24v en pacientes mexicanos con lupus eritematoso sistémico. Material y método: estudio de genotipificación de CD24v en el que se incluyeron 64 sujetos, 32 casos con lupus eritematoso sistémico: 28 mujeres y 4 hombres; y 32 controles: 9 mujeres y 23 hombres; todos eran pacientes con lupus eritematoso sistémico del Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, del ISSSTE, atendidos en los servicios de Inmunología Clínica y Reumatología. Resultados: de los casos, 19 pacientes tenían genotipo homocigoto silvestre, 12 con genotipo heterocigotos y sólo un paciente mostró el polimorfismo en estado homocigoto. De los controles, 17 sujetos mostraron genotipos heterocigotos silvestres, 14 eran heterocigotos y sólo en uno se encontró que era homocigoto polimórfico. Se obtuvo una razón de momios de 0.84 y chi cuadrada de 0.17, por lo que no hubo diferencia estadísticamente significativa. Conclusiones: se demostró que no hay diferencia estadísticamente significativa entre pacientes con lupus eritematoso sistémico y controles respecto a la existencia de CD24v.

  9. Usefulness of inflammatory biomarkers in discriminating between bacterial and aseptic meningitis in hospitalized children from a population with low vaccination coverage

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Jacek; Avonts, Dirk; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Michalak, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most frequent pathogens responsible for meningitis beyond the neonatal period. Aseptic meningitis is a disabling condition, but bacterial meningitis if left untreated is 100% fatal. The aim of the study was to analyze the usefulness of biochemical and hematological parameters in distinguishing between bacterial and non-bacterial meningitis in children with meningitis from a population with low rates of vaccination against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis. Material and methods This study is a retrospective chart review of children hospitalized with meningitis. In patients with aseptic and bacterial meningitis the following parameters were compared: C-reactive protein, D-dimers, fibrinogen, glucose level, and leukocyte level, and in cerebrospinal fluid, protein, glucose, and leukocyte concentrations were analyzed. Number of points in the Bacterial Meningitis Score (BMS) was calculated. The predictive value of each parameter to distinguish between bacterial and aseptic meningitis was evaluated. Results In total, 129 patients were included in the study: 65 diagnosed with bacterial meningitis and 64 with aseptic meningitis. Bacterial and aseptic meningitis were statistically significantly different based on each analyzed parameter (p < 0.000001). Among children with aseptic meningitis 42 (66%) scored 0 points in the BMS, while all the children with bacterial meningitis had at least one point. Conclusions In children with meningitis inflammatory biomarkers differ statistically significantly depending on the etiology – bacterial or aseptic. Serum concentration of C-reactive protein higher than 80 mg/dl is a useful marker of bacterial etiology of meningitis. A high Bacterial Meningitis Score is indicative for bacterial meningitis. PMID:27186188

  10. Anastrozole-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Juliya; Patel, Mital; Miller, Michael; Burris, Katy

    2016-08-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE) has been associated with numerous drugs, but there are limited reports of its association with aromatase inhibitor anastrozole. We report the case of a patient undergoing treatment with anastrozole for breast cancer who presented with clinical, serological, and histological evidence consistent with DI-SCLE. Her condition quickly began to improve after the use of anastrozole was discontinued and hydroxychloroquine therapy was initiated. Cases such as ours as well as several others that implicate antiestrogen drugs in association with DI-SCLE seem to be contradictory to studies looking at the usefulness of treating systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with antiestrogen therapy. Further research on this relationship is warranted. PMID:27622265

  11. Anastrozole-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Juliya; Patel, Mital; Miller, Michael; Burris, Katy

    2016-08-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE) has been associated with numerous drugs, but there are limited reports of its association with aromatase inhibitor anastrozole. We report the case of a patient undergoing treatment with anastrozole for breast cancer who presented with clinical, serological, and histological evidence consistent with DI-SCLE. Her condition quickly began to improve after the use of anastrozole was discontinued and hydroxychloroquine therapy was initiated. Cases such as ours as well as several others that implicate antiestrogen drugs in association with DI-SCLE seem to be contradictory to studies looking at the usefulness of treating systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with antiestrogen therapy. Further research on this relationship is warranted.

  12. Giant lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Sacchidanand, S; Sharavana, S; Mallikarjun, M; Nataraja, H V

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis continues to be an important public health problem even with the availability of highly effective anti-tuberculous drugs. It constitutes 0.1% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis that occurs in previously sensitized individuals with a moderate degree of immunity against tubercle bacilli. The different types of lupus vulgaris include plaque, ulcerative, vegetative, papular and nodular, and tumor forms. A 40-year-old man presented with large multiple plaques over right upper limb, right side of chest and back, and right lower limb for the past 30 years. Histopathology showed numerous noncaseating granulomas with Langhan's type of giant cells. The Mantoux test showed strong positivity and there was excellent response to anti-tuberculous treatment. This case is being reported because of its extreme chronicity of 30 years duration, unusually large size and multiplicity of lesions.

  13. Systemic lupus erythematous revealed by cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Amel, Rezgui; Monia, Karmani; Anis, Mzabi; Fatma, Ben Fredj; Chadia, Laouani

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection have been described as exacerbing systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). The role of CMV in starting off SLE remains object of debate. We report a severe presentation of SLE revealed by CMV infection with hemophogocytic syndrome. A 22 old women without a history of systemic disease developed a cutaneous eruption with fever and myalgia persistant for 2 weeks. Laboratory studies revealed a CMV serology supporting acute CMV infection, with positive antinuclear antidody, anti ds DNA, elevated liver functions tests, pancytopenia. Further exams revealed an hemophagocytic syndrome and a lupus nephritis. While receiving antiviral and corticosteroid therapy, the patient developed seizures related to a cerebral vasculitis. The outcome was favorable when intravenous immunoglobulins were associated. This observation showed that CMV infection in patients with SLE is often serious and difficult to diagnose and to treat, especially when SLE is not yet recognized. So we suggest all patients with recent SLE have routine testing for CMV immunity. PMID:27800096

  14. Psoriasiform lupus vulgaris with 30 years duration.

    PubMed

    Reich, Adam; Kobierzycka, Monika; Cisło, Maria; Schwartz, Robert A; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2006-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is a progressive form of cutaneous tuberculosis occurring in a person with a moderate to high degree of immunity. It is the most common type of cutaneous tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris can be mimicked by several other skin conditions, and a 69-y-old female is described with an extremely long history of extensive infiltrative skin lesions with abundant scaling. The lesions were localized on the right arm and forearm, and on the right lateral surface of the chest. The diascopic test was positive. Moreover, a large atrophic scar was seen in the region of right cubital fossa resulting in contracture of the right elbow joint. The histopathology strongly suggested the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The final diagnosis of tuberculosis was confirmed by PCR examination. A polychemotherapeutic regimen (ethambutol 1250 mg/d, rifampicin 600 mg/d and isoniazid 300 mg/d) was successfully employed for the treatment of skin lesions.

  15. Acquired enophthalmos with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Park, K R; Seo, M R; Ryu, H J; Chi, M J; Baek, H J; Choi, H J

    2016-01-01

    Ocular involvement sometimes occurs with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but enophthalmos with SLE is rare. We report a case of enophthalmos with SLE. A 25-year-old male was admitted for two weeks of fever, sore throat, arthralgia, chest pain and right arm weakness with pain. We diagnosed him with SLE with malar rash, arthritis, pleural effusion, proteinuria, leukopenia, positive antinuclear antibody, anti-dsDNA, and lupus anticoagulant. The patient was prescribed high-dose prednisolone and hydroxychloroquine 400 mg. One week after discharge, he complained about a sensation of a sunken right eye. CT showed right enophthalmos, a post-inflammatory change and chronic inflammation. Proteinuria increased to 3.8 g/day after the patient stopped taking prednisolone. Cyclophosphamide therapy was administered for three months without improvement. We decided to restart prednisolone and change cyclophosphamide to mycophenolate mofetil. Proteinuria decreased but enophthalmos remains as of this reporting.

  16. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Barbie, David A; Mangi, Abeel A; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2004-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease with an obscure etiology, although associations with allergy, the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome, and connective tissue disease have been reported. We present the case of a 37-year-old woman with a history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who presented with refractory nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Imaging studies were significant for bowel wall thickening and ascites, while laboratory studies revealed a positive antinuclear antibody (ANA), a positive anti-double stranded (DS) DNA antibody, low complement, and proteinuria. Exploratory laparotomy with gastric and small bowel biopsies established the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. In addition, the patient met clinical criteria for the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Previous studies have described eosinophilic gastroenteritis in patients with scleroderma, polymyositis, or dermatomyositis. This is the first report to our knowledge of an individual with eosinophilic gastroenteritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:15492606

  17. Ultraviolet radiation and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Barbhaiya, M; Costenbader, K H

    2014-05-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is among the environmental factors that have been proposed and studied in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). While it is known that UV radiation exposure may exacerbate pre-existing lupus, it remains unclear whether UV exposure is a risk factor for the development of SLE. Experimental studies show a significant immunomodulatory role for UV radiation, but strong epidemiologic data regarding its role in triggering SLE onset are lacking. Further studies are needed to assess the role of UV radiation in relation to development of incident SLE, yet they are challenging to design due to difficulties in accurate exposure assessment, the heterogeneous nature of SLE, and the challenge of assessing photosensitivity, a feature of SLE, which often precedes its diagnosis.

  18. Lupus Nephritis: An Overview of Recent Findings

    PubMed Central

    de Zubiria Salgado, Alberto; Herrera-Diaz, Catalina

    2012-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) since it is the major predictor of poor prognosis. In susceptible individuals suffering of SLE, in situ formation and deposit of immune complexes (ICs) from apoptotic bodies occur in the kidneys as a result of an amplified epitope immunological response. IC glomerular deposits generate release of proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules causing inflammation. This leads to monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells chemotaxis. Subsequent release of proteases generates endothelial injury and mesangial proliferation. Presence of ICs promotes adaptive immune response and causes dendritic cells to release type I interferon. This induces maturation and activation of infiltrating T cells, and amplification of Th2, Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes. Each of them, amplify B cells and activates macrophages to release more proinflammatory molecules, generating effector cells that cannot be modulated promoting kidney epithelial proliferation and fibrosis. Herein immunopathological findings of LN are reviewed. PMID:22536486

  19. Study of the Frequency of Herpesvirus Infections Among Patients Suspected Aseptic Meningitis in the West of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akya, Alisha; Ahmadi, Kamal; Zehtabian, Shahram; Salimi, Afsaneh; Elahi, Azam; Madani, Sayed Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aseptic meningitis is the most common type of meningitis and is characterized by meningeal inflammation that is not linked to identifiable bacterial pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of aseptic meningitis caused by herpesviruses, namely herpes simplex types I and II (HSV-1, HSV-2), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Patients and Methods: A total of 196 CSF samples were collected from patients with suspected meningitis. All samples were smear- and culture-negative for bacterial pathogens. The biochemical and cytological findings of CSF samples were also recorded. DNA was extracted from samples and PCR with specific primers was carried out to detect viruses. Results: The 196 samples derived from 100 (52%) men and 96 (48%) women ranging in age from one day to 86 years with an average age of 32.3 ± 25.3 years. Of them, 8 (4.08%) samples yielded positive results, including 5 (2.55%) cases of VZV infection and 3 (1.53%) cases of HSV-1 infection. No cases of HSV-2, CMV or EBV infection were detected. CSF protein and glucose levels among positive cases were all in the normal range. Conclusions: The results indicate a considerable rate of herpesvirus infection in patients with aseptic meningitis, and that VZV is the most common herpesvirus to cause infection followed by HSV-1. Our results also showed that a moderate increase in the WBC count and predominance of lymphocytes can be valuable clues in diagnosing viral meningitis. Given the different approaches of drug therapy in bacterial and viral meningitis, use of molecular methods is necessary in hospitals to rapidly discriminate between them. PMID:26568804

  20. Aseptic Raman spectroscopy can detect changes associated with the culture of human dental pulp stromal cells in osteoinductive culture

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Adam; Ashton, Lorna; Yang, Xuebin B.; Goodacre, Royston; Tomlinson, Matthew J.; Smith, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet need for the non-invasive characterisation of stem cells to facilitate the translation of cell-based therapies. Raman spectroscopy has proven utility in stem cell characterisation but as yet no method has been reported capable of taking repeated Raman measurements of living cells aseptically over time. The aim of this study was to determine if Raman spectroscopy could be used to monitor changes in a well characterised cell population (human dental pulp stromal cells (DPSCs)) by taking repeated Raman measurements from the same cell populations in osteoinductive culture over time and under aseptic conditions. DPSCs were isolated from extracted premolar teeth from 3 consenting donors. Following in vitro expansion, DPSCs were maintained for 28 days in osteo-inductive medium. Raman spectra were acquired from the cells at days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14 and 28. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out to assess if there was any temporal spectral variation. At day 28, osteoinduction was confirmed using alizarin red staining and qRT-PCR for alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Alizarin red staining was positive in all samples at day 28 and significant increases in alkaline phosphatase (p < 0.001) and osteocalcin (p < 0.05) gene expression were also observed compared with day 0. PCA of the Raman data demonstrated trends in PC1 from days 0–10, influenced by protein associated features and PC2 from days 10–28, influenced by DNA/RNA associated features. We conclude that spectroscopy can be used to monitor changes in Raman signature with time associated with the osteoinduction of DPSCs using repeated measurements via an aseptic methodology. PMID:26374253

  1. Complement in Lupus Nephritis: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lihua; Cunningham, Patrick N.; Quigg, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder caused by loss of tolerance to self-antigens, the production of autoantibodies and deposition of complement-fixing immune complexes (ICs) in injured tissues. SLE is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and targeted organs, with lupus nephritis being one of the most serious complications. The complement system consists of three pathways and is tightly controlled by a set of regulatory proteins to prevent injudicious complement activation on host tissue. The involvement of the complement system in the pathogenesis of SLE is well accepted; yet, its exact role is still not clear. Summary Complement plays dual roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. On the one hand, the complement system appears to have protective features in that hereditary homozygous deficiencies of classical pathway components, such as C1q and C4, are associated with an increased risk for SLE. On the other hand, IC-mediated activation of complement in affected tissues is clearly evident in both experimental and human SLE along with pathological features that are logical consequences of complement activation. Studies in genetically altered mice have shown that lack of complement inhibitors, such as complement factor H (CFH) or decay-accelerating factor (DAF) accelerates the development of experimental lupus nephritis, while treatment with recombinant protein inhibitors, such as Crry-Ig, CR2-Crry, CR2-DAF and CR2-CFH, ameliorates the disease development. Complement-targeted drugs, including soluble complement receptor 1 (TP10), C1 esterase inhibitor and a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody (eculizumab), have been shown to inhibit complement safely, and are now being investigated in a variety of clinical conditions. Key Messages SLE is an autoimmune disorder which targets multiple systems. Complement is centrally involved and plays dual roles in the pathogenesis of SLE. Studies from experimental lupus models and clinical

  2. Recurrent congenital heart block in neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Maria C; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Albert, Dimpna; Ferrer, Queralt; Girona, Josep

    2007-07-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is the main complication of neonatal lupus (NL) and is strongly associated with the presence of anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. The recurrence of CHB in subsequent pregnancies in mothers with these antibodies is uncommon, occurring in approximately 15% of cases. We describe here a case of recurrent CHB in a previously asymptomatic mother with Sjögren syndrome and discuss the current strategies for the prevention and treatment of CHB in NL.

  3. Update on systemic lupus erythematosus pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Iozza, Irene; Cianci, Stefano; Di Natale, Angela; Garofalo, Giovanna; Giacobbe, Anna Maria; Giorgio, Elsa; De Oronzo, Maria Antonietta; Politi, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) still face significant risks when embarking on a pregnancy. Improvements in the field of pathophysiology, in diagnosis and a greater number of therapeutic options in the treatment of SLE, have made the medical community regard these patients with less trepidation. Despite these advances, however, the risk of significant morbidity to both the mother and the fetus still exists. The interaction of lupus and pregnancy is very complex: the consensus is that pregnancy can worsen the lupus disease process, even if this is not predictable, and pregnancy can mimic the clinical manifestations of lupus, particularly preeclampsia/eclampsia. More specifically, pregnancy is associated in 50 to 60% of cases with a clinical flare manifesting as renalor hematological symptoms. Severe flares are uncommon (10%) and the risk of maternal death is now2 to 3%. The risk of the fetus remains high, however with increased risk of spontaneous fetal wastage and premature births, by 4.8 and 6.8 times, respectively. It is well documented that antiphospholipid syndrome and antiphospholipid antibodies are strongly associated with fetal wastage. Low-dose aspirin orheparin improves fetal outcome in these cases. Timing a pregnancy to coincide with a period of disease quiescence for at least 6 months strongly increases the chances for a healthy and uneventful pregnancy for both mother and baby. Close surveillance, with monitoring of blood pressure, proteinuria and placental blood flow by doppler studies helps the early diagnosis and treatment of complications such as preeclampsia andfoetal distress. Women with SLE frequently need treatment throughout pregnancy based on hydroxychloroquine, lowdose steroids and azathioprine. This update, based on previous available literature, should inform rheumatologists, obstetricians and neonatologists who guide patients in their reproductive decisions. PMID:22439065

  4. Clinical characteristics of cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Szczęch, Justyna; Rutka, Maja; Samotij, Dominik; Zalewska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lupus erythematosus (LE) shows a wide variety of clinical manifestations, skin involvement being one of the most important. Aim To analyze the clinical presentation of cutaneous variants of lupus erythematosus in terms of skin lesion spectrum and extracutaneous involvement. Material and methods A total of 64 patients with cutaneous LE (CLE) were included. The study was based on the “Core Set Questionnaire” developed by the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE). Clinical severity of skin lesions was evaluated with the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI). All results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results Fifteen (23.4%) patients had an acute CLE (ACLE), 26 (40.6%) subacute CLE (SCLE) and 21 (32.8%) chronic CLE (CCLE). Two (3.2%) individuals only demonstrated urticarial vasculitis as a cutaneous manifestation of LE and these patients were excluded. Patients with ACLE were characterized by the earliest onset of the disease (mean age of 31.9 ±15.0 years; p < 0.001). On average, 4.8 ±1.8 criteria of systemic LE were found in the ACLE group compared to 2.7 ±1.3 criteria in SCLE and 2.5 ±1.5 criteria in CCLE (p < 0.001). The highest activity of skin lesions according to CLASI was found in the SCLE group (p = 0.002). On the other hand, the most severe skin damage was observed in CCLE (p < 0.01). Conclusions Each variant of CLE differs significantly from the others in respect of various aspects of clinical manifestations. Due to a number of different variants of LE skin lesions, a unified classification of CLE still remains a challenge. PMID:26985173

  5. What is new in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Rúa-Figueroa Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a heterogeneous rheumatic systemic disease with extremely varied clinical manifestations and a diverse pathogenesis, as illustrated in this review on the most relevant new knowledge related to the disease. Topics such as anemia, pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk assessment, antiphospholipid syndrome, prediction of damage and recent advances in treatment, including tolerogenic and biological agents, are discussed. Relevant contributions regarding classical therapies such as corticosteroid and antimalarials and their optimal use, as well as the roll of vitamin D, are also referred.

  6. Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Miziara, Ivan Dieb; Mahmoud, Ali; Chagury, Azis Arruda; Alves, Ricardo Dourado

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE) is an autoantibody-mediated disease with subepidermal blisters. It is a rare form of presentation of SLE that occurs in less than 5% of cases of lupus. Case Report: A 27-year-old, female, FRS patient reported the appearance of painful bullous lesions in the left nasal wing and left buccal mucosa that displayed sudden and rapid growth. She sought advice from emergency dermatology staff 15 days after onset and was hospitalized with suspected bullous disease. Intravenous antibiotics and steroids were administered initially, but the patient showed no improvement during hospitalization. She displayed further extensive injuries to the trunk, axillae, and vulva as well as disruption of the bullous lesions, which remained as hyperemic scars. Incisional biopsy of a lesion in the left buccal mucosa was performed, and pathological results indicated mucositis with extensive erosion and the presence of a predominantly neutrophilic infiltrate with degeneration of basal cells and apoptotic keratinocytes. Under direct immunofluorescence, the skin showed anti-IgA, anti-IgM, and anti-IgG linear fluorescence on the continuous dermal side of the cleavage. Indirect immunofluorescence of the skin showed conjugated anti-IgA, was anti-IgM negative, and displayed pemphigus in conjunction with anti-IgG fluorescence in the nucleus of keratinocytes, consistent with a diagnosis of bullous lupus erythematosus. Discussion: BSLE is an acquired autoimmune bullous disease caused by autoantibodies against type VII collagen or other components of the junctional zone, epidermis, and dermis. It must be differentiated from the secondary bubbles and vacuolar degeneration of the basement membrane that may occur in acute and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. PMID:25992032

  7. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Deborah M.; Kamphuis, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that can involve any organ system with a wide range of disease manifestations, and can lead to significant morbidity and even mortality. This article reviews the epidemiology, common clinical features, complications of disease, and briefly discusses the available treatment options. In addition, important medical and psychosocial issues relevant to the pediatrician caring for children and adolescents with SLE are discussed. PMID:22560574

  8. Renal glycosphingolipid metabolism is dysfunctional in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Nowling, Tamara K; Mather, Andrew R; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Hernández-Corbacho, María José; Powers, Thomas W; Jones, E Ellen; Snider, Ashley J; Oates, Jim C; Drake, Richard R; Siskind, Leah J

    2015-06-01

    Nearly one half of patients with lupus develop glomerulonephritis (GN), which often leads to renal failure. Although nephritis is diagnosed by the presence of proteinuria, the pathology of nephritis can fall into one of five classes defined by different forms of tissue injury, and the mechanisms involved in pathogenesis are not completely understood. Glycosphingolipids are abundant in the kidney, have roles in many cellular functions, and were shown to be involved in other renal diseases. Here, we show dysfunctional glycosphingolipid metabolism in patients with lupus nephritis and MRL/lpr lupus mice. Specifically, we found that glucosylceramide (GlcCer) and lactosylceramide (LacCer) levels are significantly higher in the kidneys of nephritic MRL/lpr lupus mice than the kidneys of non-nephritic lupus mice or healthy controls. This elevation may be, in part, caused by altered transcriptional regulation and/or activity of LacCer synthase (GalT5) and neuraminidase 1, enzymes that mediate glycosphingolipid metabolism. We show increased neuraminidase 1 activity early during the progression of nephritis (before significant elevation of GlcCer and LacCer in the kidney). Elevated levels of urinary LacCer were detected before proteinuria in lupus mice. Notably, LacCer levels were higher in the urine and kidneys of patients with lupus and nephritis than patients with lupus without nephritis or healthy controls. Together, these results show early and significant dysfunction of the glycosphingolipid metabolic pathway in the kidneys of lupus mice and patients with lupus nephritis and suggest that molecules in this pathway may serve as early markers in lupus nephritis.

  9. A case of aseptic meningitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus in a traveller returning from the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Jeurissen, A; Strauven, T

    2011-06-01

    We here report the case of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) meningitis in a previously healthy young women returning from a trip to the Philippines. JEV is a mosquito-borne encephalitic flavivirus pathogen, which is endemic in South East and Eastern Asia. Our patient presented with aseptic meningitis and recovered well under supportive therapy. Although the chance of a traveller getting symptomatic JEV infection is extremely low, clinicians and microbiologist should be aware of patients contracting this emerging infectious disease, especially in the light of the increasing international travel.

  10. [Lupus nephritis: up-to-date].

    PubMed

    Karras, A

    2015-02-01

    Renal involvement is frequent during natural history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has a major prognostic value in this systemic disease. Screening for renal symptoms, such as proteinuria, micro-haematuria or renal failure must be performed at initial diagnosis and repeated during subsequent follow-ups. Any significant abnormality of these parameters may reveal active glomerulonephritis (GN) and should lead to a renal biopsy, which will significantly impact the therapeutic choices. Proliferative GN, defined as class III or IV by the actual histo-pathological classification, is the most severe form of SLE-associated nephropathy and can lead to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in up to 60% of cases, according to ethnicity and follow-up duration. Standard induction treatment of active proliferative GN includes corticosteroids combined with an immunosuppressive drug, which can either be cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Even though, recent biotherapies have not yet proved their efficacy in the field of lupus nephritis, new protocols are expected, aiming higher remission rates and avoidance of high-dose corticosteroids regimens. When remission is achieved in proliferative GN, a maintenance therapy is required to decrease the risk of relapse, using either azathioprine or MMF. Immunosuppressive drugs are responsible for an increased risk of infectious or neoplastic complications but cardiovascular disease is actually one of the main causes of mortality among lupus patients, especially for patients with SLE-related kidney disease, well before reaching ESRD.

  11. Filaments in the Lupus molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Pezzuto, S.; Elia, D.; André, P.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Tremblin, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Hill, T.; Molinari, S.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Palmeirim, P.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of ˜1.5 × 1021 cm-2 and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.

  12. Vaccination, atherosclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, J F; Pereira, R M R; Shoenfeld, Y

    2009-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, leading to the formation of pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative lipids that generate an immune response. Several antigens have been shown to activate the immune response and affect the development of atherogenesis. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune and inflammatory disease strongly associated with premature development of atherosclerotic plaques. Modulation of the immune system could represent a useful approach to prevent and/or treat atherosclerosis. A vaccination-based approach might be a useful, effective tool in the modern arsenal of cardiovascular therapies and could be used on a large scale at a low cost. In non-systemic lupus erythematosus populations, vaccines against oxidized low-density lipoprotein, beta-2-glycoprotein I, heat shock proteins, lipoproteins, cholesterol, molecules involved in cholesterol metabolism, and other molecules (CD99, vascular endothelial growth factor-receptor, and interleukin-2) have been tested, with promising results. However, there are no studies of vaccination against atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  13. Lupus thrombocytopenia: clinical implications and prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, P; Giannouli, S; Zintzaras, E; Tzioufas, A; Voulgarelis, M

    2005-01-01

    Methods: 632 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Fifty patients with thrombocytopenia were included as cases and matched with 100 control patients. Clinical manifestations at first thrombocytopenic episode were recorded. Classification criteria at diagnosis, basic immunological profiles, disease activity (ECLAM), and end organ damage (SLICC) were recorded. Results: 29/50 (58%) had thrombocytopenia at diagnosis of lupus. Haemorrhagic manifestations were associated with the degree of thrombocytopenia (p<0.001). Anticardiolipin antibodies were not related to the degree of thrombocytopenia or the severity of haemorrhagic manifestations. Megakaryocytes were normal or increased in 26/28 (93%) bone marrow specimens, indicating peripheral platelet destruction. Patients with high disease activity were more thrombocytopenic than controls (OR = 2.61, 95% CI 1.13 to 5.96, p = 0.009). Patients with low C3 or CH50 were more likely to be thrombocytopenic (OR = 2.36, 95% CI 1.05 to 5.26, p = 0.029). Median SLICC for lupus patients with thrombocytopenia was 2 (range 0–11) compared with 1 (range 0–12) for controls (p<0.001). No deaths occurred during thrombocytopenic episodes. Conclusions: Thrombocytopenia is not directly associated with end organ damage and mortality, but defines a subgroup of patients with higher morbidity and is thus a major complication of systemic lupus erythematosus, affecting overall prognosis. PMID:16100344

  14. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in juvenile onset neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, M; Saunders, D; Brown, S; Ramsden, L; Martin, N; Moraitis, E; Pilkington, C A; Brogan, P A; Eleftheriou, D

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the abnormalities identified with conventional MRI in children with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE). This was single-centre (Great Ormond Street Hospital, London) retrospective case series of patients with juvenile NPSLE seen in 2003-2013. Brain MR images of the first episode of active NPSLE were reviewed. All patients fulfilled the 1999 ACR case definitions for NPSLE syndromes. Presenting neuropsychiatric manifestations, immunological findings and treatment are reported. Results are expressed as median and ranges or percentages. Fisher's exact test was used to identify clinical predictors of abnormal MRI. A total of 27 patients (22 females), median age 11 years (4-15), were identified. Presenting clinical symptoms included the following: headaches (85.1 %), mood disorder/depression (62.9 %), seizures (22.2 %), acute psychosis (18.5 %), cognitive dysfunction (14.8 %), movement disorder (14.8 %), acute confusional state (14.8 %), aseptic meningitis (7.4 %), demyelinating syndrome (3.7 %), myelopathy (3.7 %), dysautonomia (3.7 %) and cranial neuropathy (3.7 %). The principal MR findings were as follows: (1) absence of MRI abnormalities despite signs and symptoms of active NPSLE (59 %); (2) basilar artery territory infarction (3 %); (3) focal white matter hyperintensities on T2-weighted imaging (33 %); (4) cortical grey matter lesions (3 %); and (5) brain atrophy (18.5 %). The presence of an anxiety disorder strongly associated with abnormal MRI findings (p = 0.008). In over half the children with NPSLE, no conventional MRI abnormalities were observed; white matter hyperintensities were the most commonly described abnormalities. Improved MR techniques coupled with other alternative diagnostic imaging modalities may improve the detection rate of brain involvement in juvenile NPSLE. PMID:27527090

  15. Antibody against chromatin assembly factor-1 is a novel autoantibody specifically recognized in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Doe, K; Nozawa, K; Hiruma, K; Yamada, Y; Matsuki, Y; Nakano, S; Ogasawara, M; Nakano, H; Ikeda, T; Ikegami, T; Fujishiro, M; Kawasaki, M; Ikeda, K; Amano, H; Morimoto, S; Ogawa, H; Takamori, K; Sekigawa, I; Takasaki, Y

    2014-09-01

    Autoantibodies to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) are specifically, if rarely, present in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patient sera. Even SLE patients lacking PCNA reactivity often show reaction to PCNA-binding protein. Here, immunoreactivity to chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1), an essential molecule for DNA replication and a PCNA-binding protein, was compared for the sera of SLE patients, normal healthy controls (NHCs) and other disease controls, and in autoimmune sera reactive to standard autoantigens, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. CAF1 and IRF1 expression in SLE and NHC peripheral mononuclear cells were compared by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Serum interferon-γ-inducing protein-10 and anti-double-stranded (ds)DNA antibody levels were measured by ELISA. Increased CAF-1 autoimmune reactivity was recognized in SLE or serum anti-dsDNA antibody-positive patients. Significantly greater central nervous system (CNS) involvement (aseptic meningitis) and serum anti-dsDNA antibody titers were present more often in anti-CAF-1 antibody-positive than antibody-negative SLE patients. IFN-γ positively regulated CAF-1 expression in vitro and was associated with anti-CAF-1 antibody production in SLE. Thus, a novel anti-CAF-1 autoantibody is frequently found in patients with SLE and is a useful biomarker for diagnosis, especially in cases with CNS involvement. Aberrant IFN-γ regulation appears to play an important role in anti-CAF-1 antibody production in SLE.

  16. Lupus erythematosus--a case of facial swelling.

    PubMed

    Loescher, A; Edmondson, H D

    1988-04-01

    A case is reported of acute facial swelling following tooth extraction that failed to respond in a normal manner. The patient developed systemic signs and symptoms ultimately revealing the diagnosis of lupus erythematosus. The possibility of soft tissue lesions arising in some forms of lupus is emphasised by this report. PMID:3163493

  17. T-cell-directed therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Nandkumar, P; Furie, R

    2016-09-01

    Drug development for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has largely focused on B-cell therapies. A greater understanding of the immunopathogenesis of SLE coupled with advanced bioengineering has allowed for clinical trials centered on other targets for SLE therapy. The authors discuss the benefits and shortcomings of focusing on T-cell-directed therapies in SLE and lupus nephritis clinical trials.

  18. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome: How to manage pregnancy?].

    PubMed

    Guettrot-Imbert, G; Le Guern, V; Morel, N; Vauthier, D; Tsatsaris, V; Pannier, E; Piette, J-C; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus patients is a common situation that remains associated with higher maternal and fetal mortality/morbidity than in the general population. Complications include lupus flares, obstetrical complications (fetal loss, in utero growth retardation, prematurity) and neonatal lupus syndrome. The association with antiphospholipid antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome increases the risk of obstetrical complications. Improving the care of these pregnancies depends upon a systematic pregnancy planning, ideally during a preconception counseling visit and a multidisciplinary approach (internist/rheumatologist, obstetrician and anesthetist). The absence of lupus activity, the use of appropriate medications during pregnancy adjusted to the patient's medical history and risk factors, and a regular monitoring are the best tools for a favorable outcome for these high-risk pregnancies. The aim of this review article is to perform an update on the medical care of pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome to reduce the risk of complications and to ensure the best maternal and fetal prognosis.

  19. Treatment of young patients with lupus nephritis using calcineurin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Aizawa-Yashiro, Tomomi; Watanabe, Shojiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the management of lupus nephritis, together with earlier renal biopsy and selective use of aggressive immunosuppressive therapy, have contributed to a favorable outcome in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Nevertheless, we believe that a more effective and less toxic treatment is needed to attain an optimal control of the activity of lupus nephritis. Recent published papers and our experiences regarding treatment of young patients with lupus nephritis using calcineurin inhibitors are reviewed. Although it has been reported that intermittent monthly pulses of intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVCY) are effective for preserving renal function in adult patients, CPA is a potent immunosuppressive agent that induces severe toxicity, including myelo- and gonadal toxicity, and increases the risk of secondary malignancy. Thus, treatment for controlling lupus nephritis activity, especially in children and adolescents, remains challenging. Cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (Tac) are T-cell-specific calcineurin inhibitors that prevent the activation of helper T cells, thereby inhibiting the transcription of the early activation genes of interleukin (IL)-2 and suppressing T cell-induced activation of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Therefore, both drugs, which we believe may be less cytotoxic, are attractive therapeutic options for young patients with lupus nephritis. Recently, a multidrug regimen of prednisolone (PDN), Tac, and mycophenolate mofetile (MMF) has been found effective and relatively safe in adult lupus nephritis. Since the mechanisms of action of MMF and Tac are probably complementary, multidrug therapy for lupus nephritis may be useful. We propose as an alternative to IVCY, a multidrug therapy with mizoribine, which acts very similarly to MMF, and Tac, which has a different mode of action, combined with PDN for pediatric-onset lupus nephritis. We also believe that a multidrug therapy including CsA and

  20. Anti-chromatin antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: a useful marker for lupus nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, R; Vinas, O; Ramos-Casals, M; Font, J; Garcia-Carrasco, M; Siso, A; Ramirez, F; Machuca, Y; Vives, J; Ingelmo, M; Burlingame, R

    2003-01-01

    Background: Anti-chromatin antibodies have recently been described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and it has been suggested that their presence is associated with lupus nephritis. Objective: To assess the prevalence and clinical associations of these antibodies in SLE. Methods: The presence of anti-chromatin antibodies in 100 patients with SLE was investigated by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To determine the specificity of these antibodies, 100 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, 30 with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), 10 with systemic sclerosis, and 100 normal controls were also tested. Results: Positive levels were detected in 69/100 (69%) patients with SLE. In contrast, they were found in only 8/100 (8%) of those with primary Sjögren's syndrome, in 1/10 (10%) with systemic sclerosis, in 2/30 (7%) with primary APS, and in none of the 100 healthy controls. Patients with anti-chromatin antibodies had a twofold higher prevalence of lupus nephropathy than those without these antibodies (58% v 29%, p<0.01). A significant correlation was found between the levels of anti-chromatin antibodies and disease activity score as measured by the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM; p=0.011). Conclusions: The measurement of anti-chromatin antibodies appears to be a useful addition to the laboratory tests that can help in the diagnosis and treatment of SLE. These antibodies are both sensitive and specific for SLE, and are a useful marker for an increased risk of lupus nephritis. PMID:12695155

  1. C2 Deficiency DEVELOPMENT OF LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Day, Noorbibi K.; Geiger, H.; McLean, R.; Michael, A.; Good, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The study of serum from a patient with C2 deficiency is described. The patient had an episode of pneumococcal meningitis at 5 mo of age with seizures and transient hemiparesis and apparent purpuric skin lesions. He was first admitted to the University of Minnesota Hospitals at 10 yr of age following the discovery of proteinuria accidentally by his mother. Since then he has been admitted repeatedly to this hospital with numerous clinical findings including arthralgia, recurrent abdominal pain, proteinuria, membranous nephropathy, malar butterfly rash, seizures, personality aberrations, and recurrent fever. In June 1971, the patient developed positive DNA and DNP antibodies and positive LE cells. When the C profile was studied before and after recognition of lupus, C1q, C1s, and C4 dropped. C3 levels were elevated as were C5, C6, and C7, C3 proactivator had been reduced in the patient even before he developed lupus. Also because of a traumatic renal biopsy leading to a perirenal hematoma, he required surgery and a blood transfusion. 1 h after blood transfusion, a C2 titer of 23 hemolytic units was detected. Almost immediately levels of C3, C5, C6, and C7 dropped, C8 and C9 remained elevated. The addition of C2 from normal blood permitted dramatic activation of C3. These findings support the view that the rare deficiency in production of C2 predisposes to serious susceptibility to infection, vascular and mesenchymal disease as well as to renal disease and a lupus syndrome. Images PMID:4578155

  2. Bone health, vitamin D and lupus.

    PubMed

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Andréu, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is high. This is likely due to photoprotection measures in addition to intrinsic factors of the disease. Low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of low bone mineral density and fracture. Vitamin D deficiency could also have undesirable effects on patients' immune response, enhancing mechanisms of loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Vitamin D levels should be periodically monitored and patients should be treated with the objective of reaching vitamin D levels higher than 30-40 ng/ml. PMID:25488287

  3. Leadership in wolf, Canis lupus, packs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David

    2000-01-01

    I examine leadership in Wolf (Canis lupus) packs based on published observations and data gathered during summers from 1986 to 1998 studying a free-ranging pack of Wolves on Ellesmere Island that were habituated to my presence. The breeding male tended to initiate activities associated with foraging and travel, and the breeding female to initiate, and predominate in, pup care and protection. However, there was considerable overlap and interaction during these activities such that leadership could be considered a joint function. In packs with multiple breeders, quantitative information about leadership is needed.

  4. Annular lupus vulgaris mimicking tinea cruris.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young Soo; Shin, Won Woong; Kim, Yong Ju; Song, Hae Jun; Oh, Chil Hwan

    2010-05-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infrequent form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It is often clinically and histopathologically confused with various cutaneous disorders. A 36-year-old man attended our clinic with slowly progressive, asymptomatic, annular skin lesions on both the thighs and buttocks for 10 years. He consulted with many physicians and was improperly treated with an oral antifungal agent for several months under the diagnosis of tinea cruris, but no resolution of his condition was observed. A diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was made based on the histopathologic examination and the polymerase chain reaction assay. Anti-tuberculosis therapy was administered and the lesions started to regress.

  5. Cytokine disturbances in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Noam; Stohl, William

    2011-07-06

    The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is complex, and the resulting disease manifestations are heterogeneous. Cytokine dysregulation is pervasive, and their protein and gene expression profiles may serve as markers of disease activity and severity. Importantly, biologic agents that target specific cytokines may represent novel therapies for SLE. Four cytokines (IL-6, TNFα, IFNα, and BLyS) are being evaluated as therapeutic targets in SLE. The present review will examine the roles of each of these cytokines in murine and human SLE, and will summarize results from clinical trials of agents that target these cytokines.

  6. Lupus as a paraneoplastic manifestation of cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    González Amores, Yolanda; Hernando Rebollar, Sofía; Casado Bernabeu, Aida

    2016-05-01

    Tumors originating in the digestive system, like those in other areas, whether solid or otherwise, may present with extradigestive manifestations in the setting of a paraneoplastic syndrome. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune condition most commonly involving women of childbearing age. On occasion it represents a paraneoplastic manifestation heralding a primary tumor. Cancer suspicion is therefore a key element for newly diagnosed SLE cases with nonstandard epidemiology even in the absence of suggestive symptoms, and digestive tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26925842

  7. Cerebral ultrasound findings in neonatal lupus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zuppa, A A; Gallini, F; De Luca, D; Luciano, R; Frezza, S; de Turris, P L; Tortorolo, G

    2004-01-01

    A prospective study was performed enrolling 11 newborns with neonatal lupus syndrome (NLS) and 22 control newborns to investigate cerebral ultrasound (US) anomalies and their relationship with clinical neurological signs and laboratory findings. Cerebral US detected a significantly higher incidence in the study group of both subependymal pseudocysts (SEPC) and subependymal hemorrhage (SEH), neither of which correlated to autoantibody levels. All infants had completely normal neurological examinations both at birth and follow-up. The etiopathogenesis of central nervous system findings in NLS is discussed. US evaluation identified minimal anomalies compatible with favorable outcome: further studies are necessary to investigate the possible long-term sequelae, pathogenesis and spectrum of cerebral US findings.

  8. Bone health, vitamin D and lupus.

    PubMed

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Andréu, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is high. This is likely due to photoprotection measures in addition to intrinsic factors of the disease. Low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of low bone mineral density and fracture. Vitamin D deficiency could also have undesirable effects on patients' immune response, enhancing mechanisms of loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Vitamin D levels should be periodically monitored and patients should be treated with the objective of reaching vitamin D levels higher than 30-40 ng/ml.

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE.

  10. Lupus erythematosus: considerations about clinical, cutaneous and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Moura Filho, Jucélio Pereira; Peixoto, Raiza Luna; Martins, Lívia Gomes; de Melo, Sillas Duarte; de Carvalho, Ligiana Leite; Pereira, Ana Karine F. da Trindade C.; Freire, Eutilia Andrade Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory disease with multifactorial etiology. Although clinical manifestations are varied, the skin is an important target-organ, which contributes to the inclusion of skin lesions in 4 out of the 17 new criteria for the diagnosis of the disease, according to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics. The cutaneous manifestations of lupus are pleomorphic. Depending on their clinical characteristics, they can be classified into Acute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus and Intermittent Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus. Treatment is based on preventive measures, reversal of inflammation, prevention of damage to target organs and relief of adverse events due to pharmacological therapy. The most commonly used treatment options are topical, systemic and surgical treatment, as well as phototherapy. The correct handling of the cases depends on a careful evaluation of the morphology of the lesions and the patient's general status, always taking into consideration not only the benefits but also the side effects of each therapeutic proposal. PMID:24626656

  11. Epidermal injury promotes nephritis flare in lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kaitlyn L; Reed, Tamra J; Wolf, Sonya J; Lowe, Lori; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Kahlenberg, J Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is clinically characterized by episodes of flare and remission. In patients, cutaneous exposure to ultraviolet light has been proposed as a flare trigger. However, induction of flare secondary to cutaneous exposure has been difficult to emulate in many murine lupus models. Here, we describe a system in which epidermal injury is able to trigger the development of a lupus nephritis flare in New Zealand Mixed (NZM) 2328 mice. 20-week old NZM2328 female mice underwent removal of the stratum corneum via duct tape, which resulted in rapid onset of proteinuria and death when compared to sham-stripped littermate control NZM2328 mice. This was coupled with a drop in serum C3 concentrations and dsDNA antibody levels and enhanced immune complex deposition in the glomeruli. Recruitment of CD11b(+)CD11c(+)F4/80(high) macrophages and CD11b(+)CD11c(+)F4/80(low) dendritic cells was noted prior to the onset of proteinuria in injured mice. Transcriptional changes within the kidney suggest a burst of type I IFN-mediated and inflammatory signaling which is followed by upregulation of CXCL13 following epidermal injury. Thus, we propose that tape stripping of lupus-prone NZM2328 mice is a novel model of lupus flare induction that will allow for the study of the role of cutaneous inflammation in lupus development and how crosstalk between dermal and systemic immune systems can lead to lupus flare.

  12. The Protective Effect of Bafilomycin A1 Against Cobalt Nanoparticle-Induced Cytotoxicity and Aseptic Inflammation in Macrophages In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songhua; Liu, Fan; Zeng, Zhaoxun; Yang, Huilin; Jiang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Co ions released due to corrosion of Co nanoparticles (CoNPs) in the lysosomes of macrophages may be a factor in the particle-induced cytotoxicity and aseptic inflammation accompanying metal-on-metal (MOM) hip prosthesis failure. Here, we show that CoNPs are easily dissolved under a low pH, simulating the acidic lysosomal environment. We then used bafilomycin A1 to change the pH inside the lysosome to inhibit intracellular corrosion of CoNPs and then investigated its protective effects against CoNP-induced cytotoxicity and aseptic inflammation on murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. XTT {2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide} assays revealed that bafilomycin A1 can significantly decrease CoNP-induced cytotoxicity in RAW264.7 cells. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed that bafilomycin A1 can significantly decrease the subtoxic concentration of CoNP-induced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6), but has no effect on anti-inflammatory cytokines (transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-10) in RAW264.7 cells. We studied the protective mechanism of bafilomycin A1 against CoNP-induced effects in RAW264.7 cells by measuring glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase levels and employed scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometer assays to observe the ultrastructural cellular changes. The changes associated with apoptosis were assessed by examining the pAKT and cleaved caspase-3 levels using Western blotting. These data strongly suggested that bafilomycin A1 can potentially suppress CoNP-induced cytotoxicity and aseptic inflammation by inhibiting intracellular corrosion of CoNPs and that the reduction in Co ions released from CoNPs may play an important role in downregulating oxidative stress in RAW264.7 cells.

  13. Do we still need renal biopsy in lupus nephritis?

    PubMed

    Haładyj, Ewa; Cervera, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    The natural course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by periods of disease activity and remissions. Prolonged disease activity results in cumulative organ damage. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and devastating manifestations of SLE. In the era of changing therapy to less toxic regimens, some authors have stated that if mycophenolate mofetil can be used for the induction and maintenance treatment in all histological classes of lupus nephritis, renal biopsy can be omitted. This article aims to answer the question of what brings the bigger risk: renal biopsy or its abandonment.

  14. The systematic status of the Italian wolf Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowak, R.M.; Federoff, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the past, the gray wolf Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758, has been recognized in Italy as either the subspecies lupus or italicus. It has also been postulated that this population has undergone introgression from the domestic dog Canis familiaris. In order to clarify these issues, multistatistical analyses were made of 10 skull measurements of 34 full grown male wolves from the Italian Peninsula, 91 other male Eurasian wolves, and 20 domestic dogs. The analyses, together with other morphological evidence and prior genetic research, support recognition of the Italian wolf as a separate subspecies, Canis lupus italicus. The same evidence indicates that the subspecies has not been affected through hybridization with the domestic dog.

  15. Anti-DNA autoantibodies and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Blatt, N B; Glick, G D

    1999-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease that affects most of the organs and tissues of the body, causing glomerulonephritis, arthritis, and cerebritis. SLE can be fatal with nephritis, in particular, predicting a poor outcome for patients. In this review, we highlight what has been learned about SLE from the study of mouse models, and pay particular attention to anti-DNA autoantibodies, both as pathological agents of lupus nephritis and as DNA-binding proteins. We summarize the current approaches used to treat SLE and discuss the targeting of anti-DNA autoantibodies as a new treatment for lupus nephritis.

  16. [Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as Stevens-Johnson syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bellakhal, S; Ben Kaab, B; Teyeb, Z; Souissi, A; Derbel, F; Douggui, M-H

    2015-09-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are life-threatening dermatological conditions. Their most common cause is medication. However, in a small proportion of patients these dermatological conditions could be the first presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus. We now describe a 34-year-old patient who presented with manifestations of Stevens-Johnson as a first feature of systemic lupus erythematosus. Systemic lupus erythematosus reveled by Stevens-Johnson syndrome has been infrequently reviewed in the previous literature. This diagnosis should be considered when cutaneous adverse drug reactions occur without clear drug causality.

  17. Do we still need renal biopsy in lupus nephritis?

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    The natural course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by periods of disease activity and remissions. Prolonged disease activity results in cumulative organ damage. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and devastating manifestations of SLE. In the era of changing therapy to less toxic regimens, some authors have stated that if mycophenolate mofetil can be used for the induction and maintenance treatment in all histological classes of lupus nephritis, renal biopsy can be omitted. This article aims to answer the question of what brings the bigger risk: renal biopsy or its abandonment. PMID:27407281

  18. Clinical perspectives on lupus genetics: advances and opportunities.

    PubMed

    James, Judith A

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies have led to an expansion in the identification of regions containing confirmed genetic risk variants within complex human diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Many of the strongest SLE genetic associations can be divided into groups based on their potential roles in different processes implicated in lupus pathogenesis, including ubiquitination, DNA degradation, innate immunity, cellular immunity, lymphocyte development, and antigen presentation. Recent advances have also shown several genetic associations with SLE subphenotypes and subcriteria. Many areas for further exploration remain to move lupus genetic studies toward clinically informative end points.

  19. [Pay close attention to drug-induced lupus].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min-Jie; Ni, Zhao-Hui

    2008-05-01

    Drug-induced lupus (DIL) is a lupus-like illness that has been recognized as a side effect of over 80 drugs since its first description in association with sulfadiazine in 1945. The epidemiology and clinical course of idiopathic systemic lupus erythematosus and DIL differ markedly, and prognosis is generally favorable in the latter although occasional life-threatening cases have been reported in the literature. Constant pharmacovigilance is crucial for prompt diagnosis and cessation of offending therapy, hence achieving the best outcome. This review discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of DIL so as to call for vigilance of medical workers. PMID:18471407

  20. Anti-TNF-α and hydralazine drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Maria Victória; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Oliveira, Fernanda Brandão de; Pockstaller, Mercedes Prates; Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Azulay, David Rubem

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced lupus is a rare drug reaction featuring the same symptoms as idiopathic lupus erythematosus. Recently, with the introduction of new medicines in clinical practice, an increase in the number of illness-triggering implicated drugs has been reported, with special emphasis on anti-TNF-α drugs. In the up-to-date list, almost one hundred medications have been associated with the occurrence of drug-induced lupus. The authors present two case reports of the illness induced respectively by hydralazine and infliximab, addressing the clinical and laboratorial characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment.

  1. Targeted therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Grech, P; Khamashta, Ma

    2013-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem disorder characterised by loss of tolerance to endogenous nuclear antigens and autoantibody formation. Recent insight into the immunopathogenesis of lupus has provided the foundation for a novel class of agents which target specific, dysregulated components of the immune system. Efforts have focused predominantly on B-cell depleting therapies, of which belimumab was the first to demonstrate success in phase III studies and thus receive marketing authorisation. Off-label prescribing of rituximab in refractory cases is common and supported by uncontrolled studies, which suggest a favourable risk:benefit profile. However, two placebo-controlled trials failed to show benefit, possibly because of inappropriate patient selection and other aspects of trial methodology. Inhibition of dysregulated co-stimulatory signals and cytokines are other therapeutic strategies currently under investigation. Some candidate drugs failed to meet primary endpoints in early-phase clinical trials, yet demonstrated clinical benefit when alternative assessment criteria were applied or specific patient sub-groups analysed. Well-designed studies of greater size and duration are needed to clarify the therapeutic utility of these agents. Future immunomodulatory strategies targeting interferon-alpha, T cells, oxidative stress and epigenetic abnormalities may reduce multisystem disease activity and prolong survival in this complex and heterogeneic disease. PMID:23963429

  2. Why lupus patients use alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Leong, K P; Pong, L Y; Chan, S P

    2003-01-01

    It is unclear whether patients use alternative medicine because of psychological distress associated with their disease or philosophical congruence with this form of treatment. Therefore, we have studied why patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) employ alternative medicine. We interviewed 192 consecutive Chinese SLE outpatients in a tertiary-care rheumatology centre. We recorded their demographic data, usage of traditional Chinese medication, the predominant form of alternative medicine in this group, and the Rheumatology Attitudes Index score. We distinguished two types of alternative medicine users: those who use it with intent to treat SLE (disease-specific users; 73 users, 38.0%) and those who use it for cultural and other reasons (general-health users; 55 users, 28.6%). Users regarded their disease as mild compared to nonusers. Disease-specific users were distinguished from nonusers by having Chinese as a first language (odds ratio, 2.14-8.83), greater learned helplessness (odds ratio, 1.02-1.29), and an earlier age of diagnosis (odds ratio, 0.92-0.98 for older age). In conclusion, the majority of our lupus patients have used alternative medicine. The motivations of general-health and disease-specific users are different. The patients' first language and perceived helplessness influenced the disease-specific users, while general-health users were subject to neither of these. PMID:14514127

  3. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154–CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater. PMID:15180894

  4. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154-CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater.

  5. Lupus vulgaris: unusual presentation on face.

    PubMed

    Pilani, A; Vora, R V

    2014-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is a variant of cutaneous tuberculosis. As the disease has potential to mutilate when left untreated, leaving deforming scars and disfigurement, an early diagnosis is of paramount importance. Though the common type is plaque type, rarely mutilating and vegetative forms also are found. A 28 year old female, labourer presented with progressive annular plaque over right side of cheek extending upto right lower lid and ala of nose. There were two satellite plaques near the right side of giant lesion. On diascopy apple jelly nodule was seen. There was no regional lymhadenopathy. Histopathological examination showed many granulomas in upper dermis extending to deep dermis comprising of epitheloid cells with langhans' type of giant cells, lymphocytic infiltration & focal necrosis suggestive of lupus vulgaris. The consequences of failing to make an early diagnosis can be disastrous for the patients, as the progression of the disease can lead to necrosis, destruction of bones and cartilage leading to permanent deformity. Thus it is vital for clinicians to have a high index of suspicion of such atypical forms and take biopsy samples for histological and bacteriological studies.

  6. Bromocriptine treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Walker, S E

    2001-01-01

    Prolactin, a peptide hormone, acts as a cytokine. It has been hypothesized that bromocriptine, a dopamine analog that suppresses pituitary secretion of prolactin, suppresses circulating prolactin and, through this mechanism, has the potential to suppress autoimmune disease. This rationale has been applied to the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype autoimmune illness that occurs spontaneously in animal models such as the F1 hybrid NZBxNZW mouse, and in humans. Treatment with bromocriptine was effective in treating some induced and spontaneous autoimmune disease in experimental models. Bromocriptine did slow the course of SLE in NZBxNZW mice when treatment was started before the appearance of clinical disease. In addition, bromocriptine was effective in treating established disease in this model. In three separate clinical trials, bromocriptine showed evidence that it had a therapeutic effect in treating human lupus. Bromocriptine is currently considered an unproven therapy for SLE. Its use is entirely experimental. The fact that bromocriptine was effective in treating NZBxNZW mice, the beneficial therapeutic effects in human trials, and the low toxicity of the drug form a solid rationale for undertaking further therapeutic trials.

  7. Identification of Candidate Predictors of Lupus Flare.

    PubMed

    Crow, Mary K; Olferiev, Mikhail; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, the prototype systemic autoimmune disease, is characterized by extensive self-reactivity, inflammation, and organ system damage. Sustained production of type I interferon is seen in many patients and contributes to immune dysregulation. Disease activity fluctuates with periods of relative quiescence or effective management by immunosuppressive drugs, followed by disease flares. Tissue damage accumulates over time, with kidneys and cardiovascular system particularly affected. Identification of the underlying molecular mechanisms that precede clinical exacerbations, allowing prediction of future flare, could lead to therapeutic interventions that prevent severe disease. We generated gene expression data from a longitudinal cohort of lupus patients, some showing at least one period of severe flare and others with relatively stable disease over the period of study. Candidate predictors of future clinical flare were identified based on analysis of differentially expressed gene transcripts between the flare and non-flare groups at a time when all patients had relatively quiescent clinical disease activity. Our results suggest the hypothesis that altered regulation of genome stability and nucleic acid fidelity may be important molecular precursors of future clinical flare, generating endogenous nucleic acid triggers that engage intracellular mechanisms that mimic a chronic host response to viral infection.

  8. Natural autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Matsiota, P; Druet, P; Dosquet, P; Guilbert, B; Avrameas, S

    1987-01-01

    We have tested the sera of 25 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for antibody activity against a panel of six antigens: DNA, TNP, actin, tubulin, myosin, albumin. Eluates from renal biopsy tissue were also tested. Sera from patients with lupus nephritis were found to contain high titres of IgA antibodies directed against the antigens of the panel, and marked IgG anti-DNA and anti-TNP antibody activity. The IgG anti-TNP antibodies isolated from SLE serum by affinity chromatography on a TNP-immunoadsorbent, were also found to possess anti-DNA activity. Kidney eluates obtained from biopsy specimens of SLE patients contained IgG antibodies strictly specific for DNA in three out of the nine patients tested, while three eluates from the remaining six patients reacted with DNA and TNP and three with DNA and all the other antigens of the panel. These results strongly suggest that in SLE sera there are at least three populations of circulating anti-DNA antibodies: those strictly specific for DNA, those recognizing DNA and TNP and those recognizing DNA and other macromolecules. Furthermore, because six out of nine of the eluates contained antibodies with an absolute or restricted specificity for DNA, this suggests that these antibodies are more often pathogenic than the polyspecific ones recognizing DNA and other macromolecules. PMID:3498588

  9. Metal is not inert: role of metal ions released by biocorrosion in aseptic loosening--current concepts.

    PubMed

    Cadosch, Dieter; Chan, Erwin; Gautschi, Oliver P; Filgueira, Luis

    2009-12-15

    Metal implants are essential therapeutic tools for the treatment of bone fractures and joint replacements. The metals and metal alloys used in contemporary orthopedic and trauma surgery are well tolerated by the majority of patients. However, complications resulting from inflammatory and immune reactions to metal implants have been well documented. This review briefly discusses the different mechanisms of metal implant corrosion in the human body, which lead to the release of significant levels of metal ions into the peri-implant tissues and the systemic blood circulation. Additionally, this article reviews the effects of the released ions on bone metabolism and the immune system and discusses their involvement in the pathophysiological mechanisms of aseptic loosening and metal hypersensitivity in patients with metal implants.

  10. A microwave-powered sterilizable interface for aseptic access to bioreactors that are vulnerable to microbial contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, J. E.; Michalek, W. F.; Wheeler, R. R. Jr; Dahl, R.; Lunsford, T. D.; Garmon, F. C.; Sauer, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Novel methods and apparatus that employ the rapid heating characteristics of microwave irradiation to facilitate the aseptic transfer of nutrients, products, and other materials between microbially sensitive systems and the external environment are described. The microwave-sterilizable access port (MSAP) consists of a 600-W magnetron emitting at a frequency of 2.45 GHz, a sterilization chamber with inlet and outlet flow lines, and a specimen transfer interface. Energy is routed to the sterilization chamber via a coaxial transmission line where small quantities of water couple strongly with the incident radiation to produce a superheated vapor phase. The efficiency of energy transfer is enhanced through the use of microwave susceptors within the sterilization chamber. Mating surfaces are thermally sterilized through direct contact with the hot gas. Efficacy has been demonstrated using the thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus.

  11. Data on the cost effective surface sterilization method for C.carandas (L.) seeds and callus induction from aseptic seedling

    PubMed Central

    Bhadane, Bhushan S.; Patil, Ravindra H.

    2016-01-01

    Surface sterilization of explant is an important and most sensitive step in plant tissue culture. Inappropriate concentrations of sterilants have lethal effect in cell division and it restricts growth and development of explant. Therefore, suitable concentration, combinations and duration of exposure of sterilant is essential to raise in vitro cultures successfully. This data demonstrates use of various sterilizing agents for aseptic plantlet germination from seed of Carissa carandas (Apocynaceae). The present dataset provides information in support of cost-effective explant sterilization potential of benzalkonium chloride containing commercial bleach (Lizol) and its comparison with traditionally used surface sterilants in plant tissue culture i.e. 0.1% HgCl2 alone and in combination with 70% alcohol. The data on callogenic response using MS medium supplemented with plant growth regulators is also shared. PMID:27222851

  12. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Haydary, J.; Susa, D.; Dudáš, J.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of aseptic packages was carried out in a laboratory flow reactor. ► Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields was obtained. ► Composition of the pyrolysis products was estimated. ► Secondary thermal and catalytic decomposition of tars was studied. ► Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  13. Genetic characterization of a Coxsackie A9 virus associated with aseptic meningitis in Alberta, Canada in 2010

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An unusually high incidence of aseptic meningitis caused by enteroviruses was noted in Alberta, Canada between March and October 2010. Sequence based typing was performed on the enterovirus positive samples to gain a better understanding of the molecular characteristics of the Coxsackie A9 (CVA-9) strain responsible for most cases in this outbreak. Methods Molecular typing was performed by amplification and sequencing of the VP2 region. The genomic sequence of one of the 2010 outbreak isolates was compared to a CVA-9 isolate from 2003 and the prototype sequence to study genetic drift and recombination. Results Of the 4323 samples tested, 213 were positive for enteroviruses (4.93%). The majority of the positives were detected in CSF samples (n = 157, 73.71%) and 81.94% of the sequenced isolates were typed as CVA-9. The sequenced CVA-9 positives were predominantly (94.16%) detected in patients ranging in age from 15 to 29 years and the peak months for detection were between March and October. Full genome sequence comparisons revealed that the CVA-9 viruses isolated in Alberta in 2003 and 2010 were highly homologous to the prototype CVA-9 in the structural VP1, VP2 and VP3 regions but divergent in the VP4, non-structural and non-coding regions. Conclusion The increase in cases of aseptic meningitis was associated with enterovirus CVA-9. Sequence divergence between the prototype strain of CVA-9 and the Alberta isolates suggests genetic drifting and/or recombination events, however the sequence was conserved in the antigenic regions determined by the VP1, VP2 and VP3 genes. These results suggest that the increase in CVA-9 cases likely did not result from the emergence of a radically different immune escape mutant. PMID:23521862

  14. Sensitivity to Change and Minimal Important Differences of the LupusQoL in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    McElhone, Kathleen; Abbott, Janice; Sutton, Chris; Mullen, Montana; Lanyon, Peter; Rahman, Anisur; Yee, Chee‐Seng; Akil, Mohammed; Bruce, Ian N.; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Gordon, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Objective As a health‐related quality of life (HRQOL) measure, the LupusQoL is a reliable and valid measure for adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study evaluates the responsiveness and minimal important differences (MIDs) for the 8 LupusQoL domains. Methods Patients experiencing a flare were recruited from 9 UK centers. At each of the 10 monthly visits, HRQOL (LupusQoL, Short Form 36 health survey [SF‐36]), global rating of change (GRC), and disease activity using the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group 2004 index were assessed. The responsiveness of the LupusQoL and the SF‐36 was evaluated primarily when patients reported an improvement or deterioration on the GRC scale and additionally with changes in physician‐reported disease activity. MIDs were estimated as mean changes when minimal change was reported on the GRC scale. Results A total of 101 patients were recruited. For all LupusQoL domains, mean HRQOL worsened when patients reported deterioration and improved when patients reported an improvement in GRC; SF‐36 domains showed comparable responsiveness. Improvement in some domains of the LupusQoL/SF‐36 was observed with a decrease in disease activity, but when disease activity worsened, there was no significant change. LupusQoL MID estimates for deterioration ranged from −2.4 to −8.7, and for improvement from 3.5 to 7.3; for the SF‐36, the same MID estimates were −2.0 to −11.1 and 2.8 to 10.9, respectively. Conclusion All LupusQoL domains are sensitive to change with patient‐reported deterioration or improvement in health status. For disease activity, some LupusQoL domains showed responsiveness when there was improvement but none for deterioration. LupusQoL items were derived from SLE patients and provide the advantage of disease‐specific domains, important to the patients, not captured by the SF‐36. PMID:26816223

  15. Childhood systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, and rheumatic fever and neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, P

    1995-09-01

    Studies on the long-term outcome of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus not only give us survival figures but also uncover flaws in our treatment strategies and reveal both disease-associated and other factors that affect prognosis. Among the latter, compliance with treatment and socioeconomic factors are noteworthy. The pathogenesis of neonatal lupus is under active investigation, and new approaches are being developed. This review also draws attention to a number of vasculitis syndromes that are common in adults but very rarely reported in children. Poststreptococcal reactive arthritis has been described as a new entity; however, such patients should probably receive the same attention as patients with rheumatic fever to avoid recurrences of the disease and cardiac sequelae.

  16. Inhibition of C5a receptor alleviates experimental CNS lupus.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Alexander; Hack, Bradley; Bai, Tao; Brorson, James R; Quigg, Richard J; Alexander, Jessy J

    2010-04-15

    To investigate the role of C5a generated on complement activation in brain, the lupus model, MRL/lpr mice were treated with C5a receptor(R) antagonist (ant). Neutrophil infiltration, ICAM, TNF-alpha and iNOS mRNA expression, neuronal apoptosis and the expression of p-JNK, pSTAT1 and p-Erk were reduced and p-Akt increased on C5aR inhibition in MRL/lpr brains. MRL/lpr serum caused increased apoptosis in neurons showing that lupus had a direct effect on these cells. C5aRant pretreatment prevented the lupus serum induced loss of neuronal cells. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that C5a/C5aR signaling plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CNS lupus.

  17. Breeding season of wolves, Canis lupus, in relation to latitude

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2002-01-01

    A significant relationship was found between Wolf (Canis lupus) breeding dates and latitudes between 12 deg. and 80 deg. N, with Wolves breeding earlier at lower latitudes, probably because of differences in seasonality.

  18. Breeding season of Wolves, Canis lupus, in relation to latitude

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2002-01-01

    A significant relationship was found between Wolf (Canis lupus) breeding dates and latitudes between 12?? and 80??N, with Wolves breeding earlier at lower latitudes, probably because of differences in seasonality.

  19. First record of coccidiosis in Wolves, Canis Lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Mech L.; Kurtz, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Three 4-month-old Wolf (Canis lupus) pups in the Superior National Forest of Minnesota died during August and September 1997, apparently from coccidiosis. This appears to be the first record of coccidiosis in Wolves.

  20. Inhibition of C5a receptor alleviates experimental CNS lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Alexander; Hack, Bradley; Bai, Tao; Brorson, James R.; Quigg, Richard J.; Alexander, Jessy J.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the role of C5a generated on complement activation in brain, the lupus model, MRL/lpr mice were treated with C5a receptor(R) antagonist (ant). Neutrophil infiltration, ICAM, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression, neuronal apoptosis and the expression of p-JNK, pSTAT1 and p-Erk were reduced and p-Akt increased on C5aR inhibition in MRL/lpr brains. MRL/lpr serum caused increased apoptosis in neurons showing that lupus had a direct effect on these cells. C5aRant pretreatment prevented the lupus serum induced loss of neuronal cells. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that C5a/C5aR signaling plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CNS lupus. PMID:20207017

  1. Generation of self-peptides to treat systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Briand, Jean-Paul; Schall, Nicolas; Muller, Sylviane

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are attracting increasing attention as therapeutics. Despite their potential, however, only a few selected peptides have been able to enter in clinical trials for chronic autoimmune diseases and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in particular. Here, we describe and discuss a series of assays, which may help in characterizing valuable candidate peptides that were applied in our laboratory to develop the lupus P140 peptide program. The different steps of selection include the choice of the initial autoantigen, the design, synthesis and purification of peptides, their preliminary screen by measuring cytokines produced ex vivo by T cells and their binding to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecules, their capacity to lower peripheral cell hyperproliferation in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice, and, as a final step, their ability to slow down the development of lupus disease in model animals.

  2. Lupus in a patient with cystinosis: is it drug induced?

    PubMed

    Eroglu, F K; Besbas, N; Ozaltin, F; Topaloglu, R; Ozen, S

    2015-11-01

    A 9-year-old girl with a diagnosis of cystinosis since 2 years of age, on cysteamine therapy, presented with complaints of serositis and arthritis, and laboratory tests revealed high antinuclear antibody titers with hypocomplementemia. Kidney biopsy was not consistent with lupus nephritis. With prednisolone treatment her complaints resolved and creatinine level decreased, but on follow-up, serological features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) continued. Six years after cessation of prednisolone, lupus features were reactivated, with positive antihistone antibodies and ANCA. Coincidence of cystinosis and SLE is very rare, and to the best of our knowledge this is the fourth case reported in the literature. Physicians should be aware that cystinosis patients may have some autoimmune manifestations with features of true or drug-induced lupus. In the light of this case, pathophysiology and treatment are discussed.

  3. Prey escaping wolves, Canis lupus, despite close proximity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    We describe attacks by wolf (Canis lupus) packs in Minnesota on a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and a moose (Alces alces) in which wolves were within contact distance of the prey but in which the prey escaped.

  4. For Parents of Children and Teens Living with Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... image and felt increases in negative mood, negative self-esteem, and depressive symptoms. Podcasts | Sep. 11, 2012 Parents ... among children with lupus. Magazine | Jul. 01, 2010 Self-Esteem Survival Skills How to Stay Upbeat When Dealing ...

  5. Intravenous Immunoglobulin in the Management of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wenderfer, Scott E.; Thacker, Trisha

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis is complex, involving innate and adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses. Autoantibodies in particular have been shown to be critical in the initiation and progression of renal injury, via interactions with both Fc-receptors and complement. One approach in the management of patients with lupus nephritis has been the use of intravenous immunoglobulin. This therapy has shown benefit in the setting of many forms of autoantibody-mediated injury; however, the mechanisms of efficacy are not fully understood. In this paper, the data supporting the use of immunoglobulin therapy in lupus nephritis will be evaluated. In addition, the potential mechanisms of action will be discussed with respect to the known involvement of complement and Fc-receptors in the kidney parenchyma. Results are provocative and warrant additional clinical trials. PMID:23056926

  6. Non-invasive imaging to monitor lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Serkova, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can affect multiple different organs, including the kidneys and central nervous system (CNS). Conventional radiological examinations in SLE patients include volumetric/ anatomical computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US). The utility of these modalities is limited, however, due to the complexity of the disease. Furthermore, standard CT and MRI contrast agents are contraindicated in patients with renal impairment. Various radiologic methods are currently being developed to improve disease characterization in patients with SLE beyond simple anatomical endpoints. Physiological non-contrast MRI protocols have been developed to assess tissue oxygenation, glomerular filtration, renal perfusion, interstitial diffusion, and inflammation-driven fibrosis in lupus nephritis (LN) patients. For neurological symptoms, vessel size imaging (VSI, an MRI approach utilizing T2-relaxing iron oxide nanoparticles) has shown promise as a diagnostic tool. Molecular imaging probes (mostly for MRI and nuclear medicine imaging) have also been developed for diagnosing SLE with high sensitivity, and for monitoring disease activity. This paper reviews the challenges in evaluating disease activity in patients with LN and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE). We describe novel MRI and positron-emission tomography (PET) molecular imaging protocols using targeted iron oxide nanoparticles and radioactive ligands, respectively, for detection of SLE-associated inflammation. PMID:26309728

  7. [Relationship between Obesity, Adipokines and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Urrego, Tomas; Vásquez, Gloria M; Gómez-Puerta, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a pro-inflammatory state characterized by phenotypic changes in macrophages, alterationson cytokines balance, and increasing expression of regulatory molecules of the immune system derived from adipocytes and adipose tissue macrophages - also known as adipokines. Currently, leptin, adiponectin and resistin are, among others, one of the most known adipokines. Theseadipokinesmight play a possible role in systemic lupus erythematosus pathogenesis, by promotingdifferent pro-inflammatory conditions. Adipokines represent a possible treatment target in patients with lupus. PMID:27419894

  8. Thrombosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Al-Homood, Ibrahim A.

    2012-01-01

    Thrombosis is a well-known clinical entity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and it is multifactorial. The most important risk factor is the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APLAs). However, approximately 40% of adults with SLE who are negative for APL A are diagnosed with thrombosis, indicating the importance of other risk factors. Thus, the thrombosis risk factors should be evaluated extensively and regularly and treated aggressively in every patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22900201

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus with membranous glomerulonephritis and uterine vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Feriozzi, S; Muda, A O; Amini, M; Faraggiana, T; Ancarani, E

    1997-02-01

    We report a case of lupus vasculitis with uterine localization and concurrent membranous nephropathy. Immunofluorescence study suggested the occurrence of an immune complex nephropathy and a pauci-immune pathogenesis of vasculitis. Our case points out the event of tissue damage in two organs mediated by different pathogenetic mechanisms. In addition, uterine vasculitis without pregnancy may be observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus nephritis.

  10. A kinematic study of the Lupus star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Bertout, C.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the southern star-forming region located in Lupus that constitutes one of the richest associations of T Tauri stars. Based on the convergent point (CP) method combined with a k-NN analysis we identify 109 pre-main sequence stars in this region that define the Lupus association of comoving stars, and derive individual distances for all group members.

  11. Lupus vulgaris of external nose--a case report.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, J S; Naveen, K N; Prasad, K C; Santhosh, S G; Hegde, J S

    2013-02-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common morphological variant of cutaneous tuberculosis accounting for approximately 59% of cases of cutaneous tuberculosis in India. We present a case of lupus vulgaris of external nose diagnosed early and treated with CAT-3 RNTCP regimen for six months without any nasal deformity except for a small scar over the dorsum of the nose. Patient followed up for one year after completion of the prescribed regimen, there being no recurrence of the lesion.

  12. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  13. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  14. Phenotypic associations of genetic susceptibility loci in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Elena; Nadig, Ajay; Richardson, Bruce C; Freedman, Barry I; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Niewold, Timothy B; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Ziegler, Julie T; Langefeld, Carl D; Alarcón, Graciela S; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle; Brown, Elizabeth E; Kimberly, Robert P; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Merrill, Joan T; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Martin, Javier; Park, So-Yeon; Bang, So-Young; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Moser, Kathy L; Vyse, Timothy J; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gaffney, Patrick M; Tsao, Betty P; Jacob, Chaim O; Harley, John B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Sawalha, Amr H

    2011-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease. A number of genetic loci that increase lupus susceptibility have been established. This study examines if these genetic loci also contribute to the clinical heterogeneity in lupus. Materials and methods 4001 European-derived, 1547 Hispanic, 1590 African-American and 1191 Asian lupus patients were genotyped for 16 confirmed lupus susceptibility loci. Ancestry informative markers were genotyped to calculate and adjust for admixture. The association between the risk allele in each locus was determined and compared in patients with and without the various clinical manifestations included in the ACR criteria. Results Renal disorder was significantly correlated with the lupus risk allele in ITGAM (p=5.0×10−6, OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.35) and in TNFSF4 (p=0.0013, OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.25). Other significant findings include the association between risk alleles in FCGR2A and malar rash (p=0.0031, OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.33), ITGAM and discoid rash (p=0.0020, OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.33), STAT4 and protection from oral ulcers (p=0.0027, OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.96) and IL21 and haematological disorder (p=0.0027, OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.22). All these associations are significant with a false discovery rate of <0.05 and pass the significance threshold using Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Significant associations were found between lupus clinical manifestations and the FCGR2A, ITGAM, STAT4, TNSF4 and IL21 genes. The findings suggest that genetic profiling might be a useful tool to predict disease manifestations in lupus patients in the future. PMID:21719445

  15. Mood Disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, John G.; Su, Li; Urowitz, Murray B.; Romero-Diaz, Juanita; Gordon, Caroline; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bernatsky, Sasha; Clarke, Ann E.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Merrill, Joan T.; Isenberg, David A.; Rahman, Anisur; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Petri, Michelle; Bruce, Ian N.; Dooley, M. A.; Fortin, Paul; Gladman, Dafna D.; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Steinsson, Kristjan; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Khamashta, Munther A.; Aranow, Cynthia; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Fessler, Barri J.; Manzi, Susan; Nived, Ola; Sturfelt, Gunnar K.; Zoma, Asad A.; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Lim, S. Sam; Kalunian, Kenneth C.; Inanc, Murat; Kamen, Diane L.; Peschken, Christine A.; Jacobsen, Soren; Askanase, Anca; Theriault, Chris; Thompson, Kara; Farewell, Vernon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency, clinical and autoantibody associations and outcome of mood disorders in a multi-ethnic/racial, prospective, inception cohort of SLE patients. Methods Patients were assessed annually for mood disorders (4 types as per DSM-IV) and 18 other neuropsychiatric (NP) events. Global disease activity (SLEDAI-2K), SLICC/ACR damage index (SDI) and SF-36 subscale, mental (MCS) and physical (PCS) component summary scores were collected. Time to event, linear and ordinal regressions and multi-state models were used as appropriate. Results Of 1,827 SLE patients, 88.9% were female, 48.9% Caucasian, mean ± SD age 35.1±13.3 years, disease duration 5.6±4.8 months and follow-up 4.73±3.45 years. Over the study 863 (47.2%) patients had 1,627 NP events. Mood disorders occurred in 232/1827 (12.7%) patients and 98/256 (38.3%) events were attributed to SLE. The estimated cumulative incidence of any mood disorder after 10 years was 17.7% (95%CI=[15.1%,20.2%]). There was a greater risk of mood disorder in patients with concurrent NP events (p ≤ 0.01) and lower risk with Asian race/ethnicity (p=0.01) and immunosuppressive drugs (p=0.003). Mood disorders were associated with lower mental health subscale and MCS scores but not with SLEDAI-2K, SDI scores or lupus autoantibodies. Antidepressants were used in 168/232 (72.4%) patients with depression. 126/256 (49.2%) mood disorders resolved in 117/232 (50.4%) patients. Conclusion Mood disorders, the second most frequent NP event in SLE patients, have a negative impact on HRQoL and improve over time. The lack of association with global SLE disease activity, cumulative organ damage and lupus autoantibodies emphasize their multifactorial etiology and a role for non-lupus specific therapies. PMID:25778456

  16. Towards new avenues in the management of lupus glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mok, C C

    2016-04-01

    Renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) carries substantial morbidity and mortality. Conventional immunosuppressive agents (cyclophosphamide and azathioprine) have suboptimal efficacy and substantial toxicity. Mycophenolate mofetil has emerged as an alternative agent for both induction and maintenance therapy in lupus nephritis because of its reduced gonadal toxicity, despite its failure to demonstrate superiority over cyclophosphamide in pivotal studies. The calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus has equivalent efficacy to cyclophosphamide and mycophenolate mofetil for inducing remission of lupus nephritis. Although rituximab has shown promise in refractory lupus nephritis, combining rituximab with mycophenolate mofetil as initial therapy offers no additional benefit. Considerable interethnic variation is evident in the efficacy and tolerability of the various immunosuppressive regimens, which necessitates individualized treatment and comparison of the efficacy of new regimens across different ethnic groups. For example, low-dose combinations of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil seem to be more effective than pulse cyclophosphamide as induction therapy in Chinese patients. The same regimen has also been used successfully to treat refractory proliferative and membranous lupus nephritis in patients of various ethnic groups. Finally, novel serum and urinary biomarkers are being validated for diagnosis, prognostic stratification and early recognition of flares in lupus nephritis. PMID:26729459

  17. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Primary Care Approach to Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nguyet-Cam Vu; Ghetu, Maria V; Bieniek, Marzena L

    2016-08-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that affects many systems, including the skin, musculoskeletal, renal, neuropsychiatric, hematologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and reproductive systems. Family physicians should be familiar with the manifestations of lupus to aid in early diagnosis, monitoring patients with mild disease, recognizing warning signs that require referral to a rheumatologist, and helping to monitor disease activity and treatment in patients with moderate to severe disease. The American College of Rheumatology has 11 classification criteria for lupus. If a patient meets at least four criteria, lupus can be diagnosed with 95% specificity and 85% sensitivity. All patients with lupus should receive education, counseling, and support. Hydroxychloroquine is the cornerstone of treatment because it reduces disease flares and other constitutional symptoms. Low-dose glucocorticoids can be used to treat most manifestations of lupus. The use of immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents depends on the body systems affected. Patients with mild disease that does not involve major organ systems can be monitored by their family physician. Patients with increased disease activity, complications, or adverse effects from treatment should be referred to a rheumatologist. To optimize treatment, it is important that a rheumatologist coordinate closely with the patient's family physician to improve chronic care as well as preventive health services. PMID:27548593

  18. Lupus Nephritis: The Evolving Role of Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rovin, Brad H.; Parikh, Samir V.

    2014-01-01

    Immune complex accumulation in the kidney is the hallmark of lupus nephritis and triggers a series of events that result in kidney inflammation and injury. Cytotoxic agents and corticosteroids are standard of care for lupus nephritis treatment, but are associated with considerable morbidity and suboptimal outcomes. Recently, there has been interest in using novel biologic agents and small molecules to treat lupus nephritis. These therapies can be broadly categorized as anti-inflammatory (laquinamod, anti–tumor necrosis factor–like weak inducer of apotosis, anti-C5, and retinoids), antiautoimmunity (anti-CD20, anti–interferon α, and costimulatory blockers), or both (anti–interleukin 6 and proteasome inhibitors). Recent lupus nephritis clinical trials applied biologics or small molecules of any category to induction treatment, seeking short-term end points of complete renal response. These trials in general have not succeeded. When lupus nephritis comes to clinical attention during the inflammatory stage of the disease, the autoimmune stage leading to kidney inflammation will have been active for some time. The optimal approach for using novel therapies may be to initially target kidney inflammation to preserve renal parenchyma, followed by suppression of autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss novel lupus nephritis therapies and how they fit into a combinatorial treatment strategy based on the pathogenic stage. PMID:24411715

  19. Drug-induced lupus: Including anti-tumour necrosis factor and interferon induced.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Fernández, S; Ahijón-Lana, M; Isenberg, D A

    2014-05-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a syndrome with clinical and serological features similar to systemic lupus erythematosus that is temporally related to continuous drug exposure and which resolves after discontinuation of this drug. More than 90 drugs, including biological modulators such as tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors and interferons, have been identified as likely 'culprits'. While there are no standard diagnostic criteria for drug-induced lupus erythematosus, guidelines that can help to distinguish drug-induced lupus erythematosus from systemic lupus erythematosus have been proposed and several different patterns of drug-induced lupus erythematosus are emerging. Distinguishing drug-induced lupus erythematosus from systemic lupus erythematosus is important because the prognosis of drug-induced lupus erythematosus is usually good when the drug is withdrawn. This review discusses the differences between drug-induced lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus, the mechanisms of action of drug-induced lupus erythematosus and drugs that are usually associated with drug-induced lupus erythematosus, with particular focus on the biological treatments.

  20. Major gastrointestinal manifestations in lupus patients in Asia: lupus enteritis, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and protein-losing gastroenteropathy.

    PubMed

    Chng, H H; Tan, B E; Teh, C L; Lian, T Y

    2010-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and may be due to the disease itself, side-effects of medications, or non-SLE causes. However, GI manifestations of lupus attract far less attention than the other major organ involvements, are infrequently reviewed and rarely documented in published lupus databases or cohort studies including those from countries in Asia. According to three reports from two countries in Asia, the cumulative prevalence of SLE GI manifestations range from 3.8% to 18%. In this review, we focus on three major GI manifestations in patients from Asian countries: lupus enteritis, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and protein-losing gastroenteropathy, for which early recognition improves outcome and reduces morbidity and mortality. PMID:20947549

  1. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Diagnostic Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Vivek; Anil, Rahul; Aristy, Sary

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with complaints of rapid cognitive decline and new onset leukopenia. The patient had a 17-year history of refractory seizures. Detailed review of symptoms and investigations revealed the patient met American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient had high titer ANA with a strongly positive dsDNA. Immunosuppressive therapy with hydroxychloroquine and mycophenolate mofetil led to significant improvement in cognition and seizures. Neuropsychiatric SLE should be considered a potential differential diagnosis for patients presenting with seizures or cognitive decline. Moreover, neuropsychiatric manifestations especially seizures are an early event in the disease course of SLE. Hence, we believe that early diagnosis of SLE by neuropsychiatric manifestations will not only lead to better control of CNS symptoms but early immunosuppressive therapy could control the progression of the underlying autoimmune disease. PMID:27635183

  2. Integrative neuroscience approach to neuropsychiatric lupus

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Elizabeth L.; Rey, Carson; Huerta, Tomás S.; Huerta, Patricio T.

    2016-01-01

    We present a succinct review of our approach to study the interactions between the DNA-reactive antibodies that cross-react with the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, denoted DNRABs, and their brain targets in subjects with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE). We have analyzed the DNRAB-based brain symptomatology in mouse models of NPSLE by using an integrative neuroscience approach, which includes behavioral assessment coupled with electrophysiological studies of neural networks and synaptic connections in target brain regions, such as the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Our results suggest a framework for understanding the interactions between immune factors and neural networks. PMID:26467973

  3. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Diagnostic Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Vivek; Anil, Rahul; Aristy, Sary

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with complaints of rapid cognitive decline and new onset leukopenia. The patient had a 17-year history of refractory seizures. Detailed review of symptoms and investigations revealed the patient met American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient had high titer ANA with a strongly positive dsDNA. Immunosuppressive therapy with hydroxychloroquine and mycophenolate mofetil led to significant improvement in cognition and seizures. Neuropsychiatric SLE should be considered a potential differential diagnosis for patients presenting with seizures or cognitive decline. Moreover, neuropsychiatric manifestations especially seizures are an early event in the disease course of SLE. Hence, we believe that early diagnosis of SLE by neuropsychiatric manifestations will not only lead to better control of CNS symptoms but early immunosuppressive therapy could control the progression of the underlying autoimmune disease.

  4. New therapies for systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Goldblatt, F; Isenberg, D A

    2005-01-01

    In the past 40 years, prognosis for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has improved, with 10-year survival now approximately 90%. This is due probably to a combination of earlier disease diagnosis and diagnosis of milder disease, due in part to availability of multiple serological tests for SLE, use of steroids and other immunosuppressive agents, and availability of renal dialysis and transplantation. Despite this, however, the potential for significant morbidity and mortality remains in the group of patients with partially responsive or treatment resistant disease. More recently, advancements in the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of SLE have translated to the development of novel therapies, offering possible alternatives to this patient cohort. Discussion of these pharmacological options and ongoing research forms the basis of this review. PMID:15807843

  5. Mechanisms of Dyslipoproteinemias in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Borba, Eduardo F.; Carvalho, Jozelio F.; Bonfá, Eloísa

    2006-01-01

    Autoimmunity and inflammation are associated with marked changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in SLE. Autoantibodies and cytokines are able to modulate lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, a key enzyme in lipid metabolism, with a consequent “lupus pattern” of dyslipoproteinemia characterized by elevated levels of very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL) and triglycerides (TG) and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) levels. This pattern favors an enhanced LDL oxidation with a subsequent deleterious foam cell formation. Autoantibodies and immunocomplexes may aggravate this oxidative injury by inducing accumulation and deposition of oxLDL in endothelial cells. Drugs and associated diseases usually magnify the close interaction of these factors and further promote the proatherogenic environment of this disease. PMID:17162363

  6. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  7. Lupus vulgaris in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Bakshi, S K

    2013-01-01

    With the estimated global burden of TB being 8.8 million incident cases and 1.1 million deaths from TB in HIV-negative cases and additional 0.35 million deaths in HIV-associated cases,1 the total number of cutaneous TB cases ( < 1-2 % of total cases) becomes significant. With the WHO setting up public-private mix partnerships and a millenium development goal of a 50% reduction in the total number of incident cases, the case detection and reporting of unusual cutaneous TB cases becomes very important. We present a case of lupus vulgaris in a young girl with rapid progression of a large plaque with hypertrophic features in the periphery. The case is unusual due to its rapid progression, unusual site and extensive giant form which have never been reported previously.

  8. New biologic therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui Jen; Gordon, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogenous multi-systemic autoimmune disease that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Rituximab is one of the earliest biologic therapies used in SLE. It performed well in off-label studies but failed to demonstrate efficacy in randomised controlled trials. Abatacept is a biologic developed for inflammatory arthritis but has shown promise in SLE. Belimumab is the first biologically approved therapy in fifty years for treatment of SLE. The development of biological therapies for SLE parallels the increasing understanding of the immunopathogenesis of SLE and looks promising. New drugs in development are those targeting the co-stimulatory modulation, cytokines and the B and T cells. Of interest are epratuzumab, the interferon antagonists and peptide-based therapies.

  9. Infection and Lupus: Which Causes Which?

    PubMed

    Doaty, Sarah; Agrawal, Harsh; Bauer, Erin; Furst, Daniel E

    2016-03-01

    Infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). Dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immune systems increases the risk of infection in patients with SLE. Infectious agents have also been theorized to play a role in the pathogenesis of SLE. This article summarizes our current knowledge of the infectious risk SLE patients face as a result of their underlying disease including abnormal phagocytes and T cells as well as the increased risk of infection associated with immunosuppressive agents used to treat disease. Pathogens thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of disease including EBV, CMV, human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), and tuberculosis will also be reviewed, as well as the pathologic potential of microbial amyloids and the microbiome. PMID:26951251

  10. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Neuroretinitis.

    PubMed

    Santra, Gouranga; Das, Indrani

    2015-10-01

    Neuroretinitis is the inflammation of retina and optic nerve. It is associated with optic disc edema accompanied by peripapillary or macular hard exudates. A 17 yr old female presented with headache and nausea of five days duration. She had periorbital edema and mild splenomegaly. Neurological assessment was non-contributory. She was found to have pancytopenia, albuminuria and a high ESR. Thereafter she developed blurring of vision of both eyes. Opthalmological examination showed it to be due to bilateral neuroretinitis. ANA and anti-ds DNA were strongly positive. Renal biopsy with immunofluorescence study revealed diffuse global proliferative lupus nephritis with active lesions [class IV-G (A)]. She was diagnosed as a case of SLE presenting with neuroretinitis. PMID:27608700

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus: An update for ophthalmologists.

    PubMed

    Papagiannuli, Efrosini; Rhodes, Benjamin; Wallace, Graham R; Gordon, Caroline; Murray, Philip I; Denniston, Alastair K

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a life-threatening multisystem inflammatory condition that may affect almost any part of the eye. We provide an update for the practicing ophthalmologist comprising a systematic review of the recent literature presented in the context of current knowledge of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition. We review recent advances in the understanding of the influence of genetic and environmental factors on the development of SLE. Recent changes in the diagnostic criteria for SLE are considered. We assess the potential for novel molecular biomarkers to find a clinical application in disease diagnosis and stratification and in the development of therapeutic agents. We discuss limited forms of SLE and their differentiation from other collagen vascular disorders and review recent evidence underlying the use of established and novel therapeutics in this condition, including specific implications regarding monitoring for ocular toxicity associated with antimalarials.

  12. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Diagnostic Conundrum.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Vivek; Anil, Rahul; Aristy, Sary

    2016-10-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with complaints of rapid cognitive decline and new onset leukopenia. The patient had a 17-year history of refractory seizures. Detailed review of symptoms and investigations revealed the patient met American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient had high titer ANA with a strongly positive dsDNA. Immunosuppressive therapy with hydroxychloroquine and mycophenolate mofetil led to significant improvement in cognition and seizures. Neuropsychiatric SLE should be considered a potential differential diagnosis for patients presenting with seizures or cognitive decline. Moreover, neuropsychiatric manifestations especially seizures are an early event in the disease course of SLE. Hence, we believe that early diagnosis of SLE by neuropsychiatric manifestations will not only lead to better control of CNS symptoms but early immunosuppressive therapy could control the progression of the underlying autoimmune disease. PMID:27635183

  13. Breaking Immunological Tolerance in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Pieterse, Elmar; van der Vlag, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a fairly heterogeneous autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that mainly affects women in the childbearing age. SLE is a prototype type III hypersensitivity reaction in which immune complex depositions cause inflammation and tissue damage in multiple organs. Two distinct cell death pathways, apoptosis and NETosis, gained a great deal of interest among scientists, since both processes seem to be deregulated in SLE. There is growing evidence that histone modifications induced by these cell death pathways exert a central role in the induction of autoimmunity. In the current review, we discuss how abnormalities in apoptosis, NETosis, and histone modifications may lead to a break of immunological tolerance in SLE. PMID:24782867

  14. [Evaluation of systemic lupus erythematosus activity during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Olesińska, Marzena; Wiesik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Chwalińska-Sadowska, Hanna

    2007-07-01

    Pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered a high-risk pregnancy. It is complicated by preeclampsia, premature labour and miscarriage more frequently than in the general population. Improved prognosis depends on low disease activity during conception and on appropriate medical care (SLE activity monitoring, selection of therapy safe for the mother and the developing foetus, advances in neonatology). Because symptoms of physiological pregnancy and SLE exacerbation are similar, their correct interpretation is essential for skin lesions, arthralgias, arterial hypertension or results of laboratory tests: proteinuria, thrombocytopenia or leucopenia observed in the patient. In order to standardise the assessment of SLE activity during pregnancy, scores of this activity are used. In the past, scores validated on non-pregnant populations (including male patients) were used: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM), European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurment (ECLAM). Only recently have SLE activity scores been introduced that are specific for pregnant women: Lupus Activity Index In Pregnancy (LAI-P), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pregnancy Disease Activity Index (SLEPDAI), modified--Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (m-SLAM) and a visual three-grade score modified--Physician Global Assessment (m-PGA). So far, only scores LAI-P and m-PGA have been validated. According to the LAI-P score, clinical data are divided into 4 groups. Group 1 includes mild clinical symptoms, group 2--symptoms of involvement of internal organs, group 3 pertains to modifications of treatment and group 4 to laboratory parameters. Point values are ascribed to individual parameters depending on their intensity.

  15. Sensory neuronopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multi-system connective tissue disorder. Peripheral neuropathy is a known and underestimated complication in systemic lupus erythematosus. Ganglionopathy manifests when neuronal cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglion are involved. Autoimmune disorders are a known etiology, with systemic lupus erythematosus being a rare cause. Case presentation A 32-year-old South Asian woman presented with oral ulceration involving her lips following initiation of treatment for a febrile illness associated with dysuria. She had a history of progressively worsening numbness over a period of 4 months involving both the upper and lower limbs symmetrically while sparing the trunk. Her vibration sense was impaired, and her reflexes were diminished. For the past 4 years, she had had a bilateral, symmetrical, non-deforming arthritis involving the upper and lower limbs. Her anti-nuclear antibody and anti-double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid status were positive. Although her anti-Ro antibodies were positive, she did not have clinical features suggestive of Sjögren syndrome. Nerve conduction studies revealed sensory neuronopathy. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus complicated by sensory neuronopathy was made. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin resulted in clinical and electrophysiological improvement. Conclusion Peripheral neuropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus can, by itself, be a disabling feature. Nerve conduction studies should be considered when relevant. Neuropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus should be given greater recognition, and rarer forms of presentation should be entertained in the differential diagnosis when the clinical picture is atypical. Intravenous immunoglobulin may have role in treatment of sensory neuronopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24884917

  16. What Black Women Should Know about Lupus: Ideas for Community Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Lupus is a serious health problem that mainly affects young women between the ages of 15 and 44. Although people of all races may get lupus, black women have three times higher rates of incidence, prevalence, and mortality than white women. With early detection and proper treatment, most people with lupus can lead a normal life. This kit is…

  17. Delayed diagnosis in a case of lupus vulgaris with unusual localization.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Can; Gerceker, Bengu; Ozdemir, Fezal; Kazandi, Alican

    2004-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis, and the usual sites of involvement are the head and neck. We present a forty-six-year-old woman with lupus vulgaris on the external surface of the left leg and foot, an unusual site. Based on histopathological and clinical features, this case was diagnosed as lupus vulgaris with unusual localization.

  18. Satisfaction with control of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: physician and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Neelufar; Lobosco, Steve; Lu, Peng; Roughley, Adam; Alperovich, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patient satisfaction with disease control of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an important component of medical management. This analysis evaluated patient and physician satisfaction with disease control of SLE, factors associated with satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and the degree of physician–patient concordance of these parameters. Patients and methods Data were extracted from the US Adelphi Real World Lupus Disease Specific Programme®, a cross-sectional survey of 50 rheumatologists, 25 nephrologists, and their patients with non-nephritis SLE (NNSLE) or lupus nephritis (LN). Results Physicians reported moderate or severe disease activity in 25.0% of patients with NNSLE and in 50.5% of patients with LN, and were satisfied with disease control in 78.6% (132/168) and 73.8% (152/206) of patients, respectively. For patients, 75.8% (75/99) with NNSLE were satisfied with their current treatment, compared with 65.5% (74/113) with LN. Physician–patient agreement (70.7%) on the level of satisfaction was “slight” (kappa =0.1445) for NNSLE; patients were more frequently dissatisfied than physicians with regard to joint tenderness, fatigue, anxiety, pain on movement, malar rash, and photosensitivity. Physician–patient agreement (71.4%) on the level of satisfaction was “fair” (kappa =0.3695) for LN; patients expressed greater dissatisfaction than physicians for headache, photosensitivity, and anxiety, whereas physicians were more dissatisfied with regard to joint swelling, kidney function, and blood pressure control. In general, patients with NNSLE or LN who were dissatisfied (or whose physicians were dissatisfied) were more likely to have joint swelling, joint stiffness, malar rash, hair loss, depression, and fatigue, have moderate or severe disease, or to be currently experiencing disease flare. Conclusion These data highlight the patient and physician dissatisfaction with real-world disease control of SLE. PMID:27784995

  19. [A case report of childhood systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with lupus cystitis].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Rumiko; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Katakura, Shigeki; Mori, Masaaki; Aihara, Yuhkoh; Yokota, Shumpei

    2006-06-01

    The patient was a 13-year-old girl. In August 2000, she presented with a fever, together with diarrhea, vomiting, arthralgia, nasal bleeding and malaise, and was examined by another physician. Because her platelet count was low, and there were positive reactions for anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-DNA antibodies and platelet-associated IgG, idiopathic thrombopenic purpura, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was suspected. From January 2001, when she caught measles, she reported abdominal pain, and urinalysis indicated urinary protein and occult blood, and the left kidney was found hydronephrotic. At the same time left ureter stenosis and dilatation were demonstrated. Symptoms were disappeared by hydration and treatment with NSAIDs, but 2 months later fever and erythematous patches seen on both cheeks led to the proper diagnosis of SLE, and she was admitted to our hospital. Intravenous pyelography revealed hydronephrosis on left kidney, constriction and dilatation of the left ureter, and intracystic endoscopy showed erythema at the orifice of the left ureter. The pathological examination indicated the presence of vasculitis, and finally lupus cystitis was diagnosed. Intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVCY)-pulse therapy was introduced to a total of 8 times over the period of a year, and maintenance therapy with predonisolone and azathioprin was also used. After completion of the IVCY-pulse therapy, the hydronephrosis and constriction of the ureter were disappeared. No side effects of IVCY-pulses were observed, and the patient is now in remission. We reported a case of childhood SLE complicated with lupus cystitis and successfully treated by IVCY-pulse therapy and maintenance predonisolone and azathioprin.

  20. Hair dye treatment use and clinical course in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and cutaneous lupus.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Alonso, J; Sabio, J M; Pérez-Alvarez, F; Reche, I; Hidalgo, C; Jáimez, L

    2002-01-01

    The etiological role of hair dye treatment (HDT), some of them such as permanent hair dyes containing aromatic amines, in the development of SLE has been previously ruled out. However, the possible influence of HDT use on the course and prognosis of lupus patients has been assessed only in one short-term study. Since HDT is very extensive among the population, the knowledge of this possible negative effect may be very important. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the long-term influence of several HDTs on the course and clinical severity of patients with both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cutaneous lupus (CL). In this longitudinal case series study, 91 SLE patients and 22 CL patients were prospectively studied from October 1988 to May 2000. They were divided into three groups: (a) non-HDT users--patients who have never used HDT (n = 65); (b) P-HDT users--HDT permanent type users, alone or in combination with other types of HDT (n = 28); (c) non P-HDT--users of other treatments different from permanent tinting (bleach, lowlights, etc; n = 20). In each patient we determined: (1) number of flares/year in SLE patients and worsening of cutaneous lesions for CL; (2) Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) damage index; (3) predominant damaged organs/systems according to the HDT use and type of HDT; and (4) subjective impression about the disease evolution in relation to HDT use. No significant differences were found with respect to flares/year and SLICC/ACR damage index between the study groups. Non-HDT group presented more renal involvement and serositis than both HDT-user groups. No patient related the HDT use to the worsening of his disease. Therefore, in this study no evidence of an association between the long-term use of several types of HDT and the clinical activity and course of SLE and CL was found.

  1. Hair dye treatment use and clinical course in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and cutaneous lupus.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Alonso, J; Sabio, J M; Pérez-Alvarez, F; Reche, I; Hidalgo, C; Jáimez, L

    2002-01-01

    The etiological role of hair dye treatment (HDT), some of them such as permanent hair dyes containing aromatic amines, in the development of SLE has been previously ruled out. However, the possible influence of HDT use on the course and prognosis of lupus patients has been assessed only in one short-term study. Since HDT is very extensive among the population, the knowledge of this possible negative effect may be very important. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the long-term influence of several HDTs on the course and clinical severity of patients with both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cutaneous lupus (CL). In this longitudinal case series study, 91 SLE patients and 22 CL patients were prospectively studied from October 1988 to May 2000. They were divided into three groups: (a) non-HDT users--patients who have never used HDT (n = 65); (b) P-HDT users--HDT permanent type users, alone or in combination with other types of HDT (n = 28); (c) non P-HDT--users of other treatments different from permanent tinting (bleach, lowlights, etc; n = 20). In each patient we determined: (1) number of flares/year in SLE patients and worsening of cutaneous lesions for CL; (2) Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) damage index; (3) predominant damaged organs/systems according to the HDT use and type of HDT; and (4) subjective impression about the disease evolution in relation to HDT use. No significant differences were found with respect to flares/year and SLICC/ACR damage index between the study groups. Non-HDT group presented more renal involvement and serositis than both HDT-user groups. No patient related the HDT use to the worsening of his disease. Therefore, in this study no evidence of an association between the long-term use of several types of HDT and the clinical activity and course of SLE and CL was found. PMID:12195784

  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus and thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura: a refractory case without lupus activity.

    PubMed

    Garcia Boyero, Raimundo; Mas Esteve, Eva; Mas Esteve, Maria; Millá Perseguer, M Magdalena; Marco Buades, Josefa; Beltran Fabregat, Juan; Cañigral Ferrando, Guillermo; Belmonte Serrano, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has been infrequently reported. Usually, patients with TTP have more SLE activity and frequent renal involvement. Here we present a case of TTP associated to low-activity SLE. The absence of renal and major organ involvement increased the difficulty in making the initial diagnosis. ADAMTS13 activity in plasma in this patient was very low, as seen in other similar cases. The evolution of the patient was poor, needing plasma exchanges and immunosuppressive therapy, including the use of rituximab.

  3. [Lipid profile in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with special focus on lipoprotein(a) in lupus nephritis].

    PubMed

    Kiss, Emese; Fazekas, Brigitta; Tarr, Tünde; Muszbek, László; Zeher, Margit; Szegedi, Gyula

    2004-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial polysystemic autoimmune disorder. Although life expectance in SLE has been improved by adequate immune suppressive therapy, the importance of chronic renal failure has not been reduced. Among late complications of the disease accelerated atherosclerosis attempts increasing attention. Dyslipoproteinemia and increased concentration of lipoproteins are important risk factors of atherosclerotic cardiovascular complication in SLE. Serum lipid parameters of 50 patients with lupus were examined in the present work. Thirty patients had histologically proven lupus nephritis (LN+), while the other group did not have renal involvement (LN-). Serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-C and apolipoprotein B (apoB) concentrations were significantly higher in the lupus nephritis (LN+) group. On the other hand, HDL-C and apoAI levels were also elevated in patients with LN. As a consequence of that, LDL-C/HDL-C and the apoB/apoAI ratios did not differ between patients with or without kidney involvement. This concluded the authors to measure the concentration of lipoprotein (a) in SLE patients, as Lp(a) is known to be an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis. Results indicated a significantly increased Lp(a) concentration in patients with lupus nephritis as compared to the LN- group. All but 2 patients without kidney involvement had lower than 100 mg/L Lp(a) concentration, while 27% of patients with lupus nephritis has an Lp(a) level between 100-300 mg/L. Further more, Lp(a) concentration was higher than 300 mg/L in 13% of the LN+ group. In a good correlation of these observations patients with nephritis suffered more frequently from deep venous thrombosis and ischaemic heart disease. The frequencies of hypertension and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus were slightly elevated in patients with nephritis. Present results suggest the importance of elevated lipoprotein (a) concentration in patients with lupus nephritis

  4. Aseptic non-touch technique and catheter-related bloodstream infection in children receiving parenteral nutrition at home

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Victoria; Hughes, Anna; Hill, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Parenteral nutrition (PN) at home is an acceptable form of delivering long-term PN for children with intestinal failure. Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is one of the serious complications of long-term PN and can lead to increasing morbidity and mortality. Using aseptic non-touch technique (ANTT) was proven to decrease the incidence of CRBSI in hospital patients. In this study we aimed to review the incidence of CRBSI in children receiving PN at home in our institution using the ANTT and a simplified training programme for parents and carers. Methods We retrospectively collected clinical and microbiological data on all children with intestinal failure (IF) who were on treatment with PN at home under our specialist IF rehabilitation service between November 2012 and November 2013. Results Thirty-five children were included, 16 of whom did not have any infection recorded during the study period. The overall CRBSI rate was 1.3 infections per 1000 line-days, with Staphylococcus being the commonest organism. Twenty-one children did not require catheter change and the overall catheter changes were 1.8 per 1000 line-days. Conclusion In this article, we report a low incidence of CRBSI in a single institution by using the principle of ANTT for accessing central venous catheters combined with a simplified, nurse-led, two-week standardised training programme for parents of children going home on PN. PMID:26279849

  5. Surgical treatment of an aseptic fistulized acromioclavicular joint cyst: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Murena, Luigi; D'angelo, Fabio; Falvo, Daniele A; Vulcano, Ettore

    2009-01-01

    An acromioclavicular joint cyst is an uncommonly reported condition, which seems to result from a massive rotator cuff tear and degenerative osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint. We present the case of an 81-year-old man affected by an acromioclavicular joint cyst, associated to a massive rotator cuff tear, proximal migration of the humeral head and osteoarthritis of the gleno-humeral joint. The mass was 7 x 2.5 cm in size and the overlying skin presented a fistula that drained clear synovial-like fluid. Plain X-ray examination of the left shoulder showed proximal migration of the humeral head migration and osteoarthritis of the gleno-humeral joint, and further MRI evaluation confirmed the clinical diagnosis of a complete rotator cuff tear and observed a large subcutaneous cyst in communication with the degenerative acromioclavicular joint. The patient underwent surgical excision of the cyst and lateral resection of the clavicle to prevent disease recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an acromioclavicular joint cyst complicated by an aseptic fistula resulting from multiple aspirations. PMID:19918423

  6. The development of invertase activity in slices of the root of Beta vulgaris L. washed under aseptic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, J. S. D.; MacDonald, I. R.; Knight, A. H.

    1965-01-01

    1. When disks of root tissue from sugar or red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) are washed in running aerated tap water the sucrose contained in them disappears and glucose and fructose are formed. 2. Invertase activity in the disks has been measured by a polarimetric method. Freshly cut tissue has a very low activity, but a considerable increase occurs during the first 3–4 days of washing, the final activity being sufficient to hydrolyse the sucrose contained in the disk within a few hours. 3. Disks of red beet have been cut and shaken in water under aseptic conditions. Sucrose breakdown and invertase development still took place. Microbial contamination is therefore not responsible. 4. Trisaccharides that appear in sugar-beet disks during the washing process have been isolated and identified; their formation also suggests that a higher-plant invertase is acting. 5. The significance of these results is discussed in relation to protein synthesis in washed storage-tissue slices, and the occurrence of high invertase activity in growing plant cells. PMID:14342226

  7. An Unusual Case of Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Presenting as Mononucleosis-like Syndrome and Acute Aseptic Meningoencephalitis. Report of a Case and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Clinical presentation of primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes a wide spectrum of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a symptomatic and severe illness. Central nervous system involvement should be always considered as a severe clinical form of primary HIV infection. Physicians should be aware to the broad clinical spectrum of primary HIV infection. We report a case of a female with diagnosis of mononucleosis-like syndrome and acute aseptic meningoencephalitis during primary HIV infection.

  8. An Unusual Case of Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Presenting as Mononucleosis-like Syndrome and Acute Aseptic Meningoencephalitis. Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Marcelo; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Clinical presentation of primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes a wide spectrum of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a symptomatic and severe illness. Central nervous system involvement should be always considered as a severe clinical form of primary HIV infection. Physicians should be aware to the broad clinical spectrum of primary HIV infection. We report a case of a female with diagnosis of mononucleosis-like syndrome and acute aseptic meningoencephalitis during primary HIV infection. PMID:25374871

  9. [Bacteriological control of blood preservation, production of infusion solutions and dry human plasma under conditions of aseptic work and possible sources of their contamination].

    PubMed

    Bosković, S; Lucić, N; Aganović, N; Grbić, E

    1975-01-01

    In premises for blood conservation, production of dry human plasma and infusion solutions "notwithstanding the permanent measures for desinfection, new bacterial contamination occurs from time to time and whose source are the casings and material originating from non-sterile environment. Bacteriological control, which has primarily a preventive character, enables a due forecast for measures to be undertaken by the appropriate desinfection of the working surfaces and air, satisfactory conditions of aseptic work can be maintained. General hygiene should be paid attention to as well as mechanical cleansing of premises, avoidance of groups for lunch-time etc., since the treatment by desinfectors would not be sufficient for maintenance of aseptic working conditions. In order to prevent the transmission of bacterial contamination, premises for blood conservation should be strictly separated from other operations and also prevent the unnecessary movements of personnel through corridors. The results of the bacteriological control of the personnel show that greater attention should be paid to their health care since the workers there work in closed aseptic systems and thus avoid them as a bacteria transmittors in respect to danger of blood and dry human plasma contamination. It is also necessary to efficiently educate the personnel for work in aseptic conditions and also increase their elementary knowledge from bacteriology and hygiene. The bacterial skin-flora on the spot of donor's venepuncture also presents a certain danger for blood contamination. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the most optimal manner of skin desinfecate together with the most appropriate means having a fast bactericidal and fungicidal action. It would also be useful, on the basis of further test, to suggest certain standard for an allowed number of conditionally pathogenic and saprophytic microorganisms which would be used by the instutions performing the blood transfusion and production of

  10. The United States to Africa lupus prevalence gradient revisited

    PubMed Central

    Gilkeson, GS; James, JA; Kamen, DL; Knackstedt, TJ; Maggi, DR; Meyer, AK; Ruth, NM

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease that has a significantly higher prevalence, morbidity and mortality in African Americans compared with Americans of European descent. The pathogenesis of lupus is unclear but appears to be a result of environmental factors interacting with a genetically susceptible host. Despite the high disease load of SLE in African Americans, there is the perception that lupus is relatively rare in Africa. This prevalence gradient suggests that comparative studies of related cohorts from the two continents may provide insight into the genetic/environmental interactions that result in the development of lupus. To define if a lupus gradient exists, we began a study of autoimmunity prevalence utilizing two unique cohorts. The first is the Gullah population of the Sea Islands of South Carolina, who are unique in their low genetic admixture and their known ancestral heritage. The second is the population of young women served by the West Africa Fistula Foundation in Bo, Sierra Leone. Anthropologic studies indicate a direct ancestral link between the Gullah population and Sierra Leoneans. Since it is impossible to perform an epidemiologic study of lupus in Sierra Leone at this time, we assessed the prevalence of lupus serum autoantibodies, serologic evidence of specific infections and levels of serum 25-OH vitamin D in young women in the two cohorts who have no known relatives with lupus. Our results indicate similar prevalence of serum antinuclear antibodies in the two cohorts, though there was a significantly increased prevalence of antiphospholipid and anti-Sm antibodies in the Sierra Leone cohort. Seropositivity to common viral infections was significantly higher in women from Sierra Leone, while serum 25-OH vitamin D levels were markedly lower in the Gullah population. These data suggest that the prevalence of autoimmunity is similar in the two populations, but that there are significant environmental differences

  11. Lupus-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-like microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Daniel; Blake, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Recently reported cases of lupus complicated by a thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)-like syndrome suggest a survival benefit to early treatment with plasma exchange. The following is a report of the eighth such case in the last ten years. A 44-year-old lady known for lupus presented with the nephrotic syndrome and a renal biopsy was consistent with class 4G lupus nephritis. She was given high-dose steroids and cytotoxic therapy, but her induction therapy was complicated by the classic pentad of TTP. She was subsequently treated with another course of high-dose steroids, a different cytotoxic agent, and plasma exchange, with clinical resolution shortly thereafter. Similar to seven recently reported cases of microangiopathy in lupus, this lady’s TTP-like syndrome improved dramatically after initiation of plasma exchange, despite not having a severely deficient ADAMTS13. This has implications on both current clinical practice and on the pathogenesis of TTP-like syndromes in lupus. PMID:26558190

  12. [Lupus vulgaris manifestation as a destructive nose and facial tumor].

    PubMed

    Haller, D; Reisser, C

    2009-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most frequent manifestation of cutaneous tuberculosis, but in Europe it is limited to isolated cases. Mainly immunocompetent individuals are affected by this result of an endogenous reinfection on a lymphogenous-less frequently hematogenous-pathway. Lupus vulgaris has been observed to develop in more than 50% of all patients who already suffer from other manifestations of tuberculosis. The development of a squamous cell carcinoma in the lupus vulgaris is a rare complication; therefore, lupus vulgaris is deemed a facultative precancerosis.A 68-year-old female Serbo-Croatian patient presented with an extensive ulcerative nose and facial tumor. Her anamnesis included a squamous cell carcinoma of the nose that had been excised alio loco 3 years before. Further examinations revealed enlarged cervical lymphoma on both sides, and pulmonary metastases were also suspected. The tumor biopsy revealed a necrotic, granulomatous inflammation. No acid-fast rods were seen on Ziehl-Neelsen stain. The tuberculous origin of this ulcerative skin tumor-the lupus vulgaris-as an endogenous reinfection of pulmonary tuberculosis manifestation was confirmed by the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in polymerase chain reaction and the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonies in the bacterial culture (skin biopsy and bronchial secretion). The skin tumor as well as the pulmonary manifestation were successfully treated with combined tuberculostatic therapy and showed a dramatic response within 3 months.

  13. Interferon-alpha: a therapeutic target in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Crow, Mary K

    2010-02-01

    The long history of elevated interferon (IFN)-alpha in association with disease activity in patients who have systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has assumed high significance in the past decade, with accumulating data strongly supporting broad activation of the type I IFN pathway in cells of patients who have lupus, and association of IFN pathway activation with significant clinical manifestations of SLE and increased disease activity based on validated measures. In addition, a convincing association of IFN pathway activation with the presence of autoantibodies specific for RNA-binding proteins has contributed to delineation of an important role for Toll-like receptor activation by RNA-containing immune complexes in amplifying innate immune system activation and IFN pathway activation. Although the primary triggers of SLE and the IFN pathway remain undefined, rapid progress in lupus genetics is helping define lupus-associated genetic variants with a functional relationship to IFN production or response in patients. Together, the explosion of data and understanding related to the IFN pathway in SLE have readied the lupus community for translation of those insights to improved patient care. Patience will be needed to allow collection of clinical data and biologic specimens across multiple clinical centers required to support testing of IFN activity, IFN-inducible gene expression and chemokine gene products as candidate biomarkers. Meanwhile, promising clinical trials are moving forward to test the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody inhibitors of IFN-alpha. Other therapeutic approaches to target the IFN pathway may follow close behind.

  14. Apoptosis and the thymic microenvironment in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Y; Taguchi, N; Shultz, L; Boyd, R L; Naiki, M; Ansari, A A; Gershwin, M E

    1999-11-01

    The thymus of New Zealand black (NZB) mice undergoes premature involution. In addition, cultured thymic epithelial cells from NZB mice undergo accelerated preprogrammed degeneration. NZB mice also have distinctive and well-defined abnormalities of thymic architecture involving stromal cells, defined by staining with monoclonal antibodies specific for the thymic microenvironment. We took advantage of these findings, as well as our large panel of monoclonal antibodies which recognize thymic stroma, to study the induction of apoptosis in the thymus of murine lupus and including changes of epithelial architecture. We studied NZB, MRL/lpr, BXSB/Yaa, C3H/gld mice and BALB/c and C57BL/6 as control mice. Apoptosis was studied both at basal levels and following induction with either dexamethasone or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The apoptotic cells were primarily found in the thymic cortex, and the frequency of apoptosis in murine lupus was less than 20% of controls. Moreover, all strains of murine lupus had severe abnormalities of the cortical network. These changes were not accentuated by dexamethasone treatment in cultured thymocytes. However, the thymus in murine lupus was less susceptible to LPS-induced apoptosis than control mice. Finally we note that the number of thymic nurse cells (TNC) was lowest in NZB mice. Our findings demonstrate significant abnormalities in the induction of apoptosis and the formation of TNC-like epithelial cells in SLE mice, and suggest that the abnormalities of the thymic microenvironment have an important role in the pathogenesis of murine lupus.

  15. The features of skin inflammation induced by lupus serum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lena; Xu, Guangqion; Dou, Hui; Deng, Guo-Min

    2016-04-01

    We recently developed a model of lupus serum-induced skin inflammation, which was used to study the pathogenesis of skin injury in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We further characterized the features of lupus serum-induced skin inflammation. This skin inflammation was evident within 3h and lasted for at least two weeks. The skin inflammation was characterized by an influx of monocytic, CD11b+cells and by a scarcity of T and B lymphocytes. Depletion of IgG from the serum abrogated the skin inflammatory response. The skin inflammation was related to lupus patients' skin history but not to SLE disease activity and type of autoantibody. The expression of TNFR1, NF-kB and MCP-1 was increased locally in skin lesions. The TLR9 ligand and lupus serum act synergistically to trigger skin inflammation. These findings suggest that this novel model is valuable for the study of the pathogenesis and therapy of skin injury in SLE.

  16. Risk factors of systemic lupus erythematosus flares during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Cruz-Dominguez, Pilar; Navarro, Carmen; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Saavedra, Miguel A

    2014-12-01

    This review examines the risk factors for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) flares during pregnancy. In preconception, anti-DNA, hypocomplementemia, previous thrombosis, triple antiphospholipid (aPL) antibody positivity, active lupus nephritis and discontinuation of medications such as hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine are factors associated with pregnancy failure. During pregnancy, SLE flares are associated with aPL antibodies, synergic changes of pregnancy on Th1 and TH2 cytokines, other cytokines and chemokines that interact with hormones such as estrogen and prolactin that amplify the inflammatory effect. From the clinical point of view, SLE activity at pregnancy onset, thrombocytopenia, lupus nephritis, arterial hypertension, aPL syndromes, preeclampsia is associated with lupus flares and fetal complications. In puerperium, the risk factors of flares are similar to pregnancy. Hyperactivity of immune system, autoantibodies, hyperprolactinemia, active lupus nephritis, decrease in TH2 cytokines with increase in TH1 cytokines probably participate in SLE flare. The SLE flares during pregnancy make the difference between an uncomplicated pregnancy and pregnancy with maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors leads the best treatment strategies to reduce flares and fetal complications in SLE patients.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of lupus nephritis flares--an update.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Ben; Monahan, Marianne; Appel, Gerald B

    2012-12-01

    Relapses or flares of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are frequent and observed in 27-66% of patients. SLE flares are defined as an increase in disease activity, in general, requiring alternative treatment or intensification of therapy. A renal flare is indicated by an increase in proteinuria and/or serum creatinine concentration, abnormal urine sediment or a reduction in creatinine clearance rate as a result of active disease. The morbidity associated with renal flares is derived from both the kidney damage due to lupus nephritis and treatment-related toxic effects. Current induction treatment protocols achieve remission in the majority of patients with lupus nephritis; however, few studies focus on treatment interventions for renal flares in these patients. The available data, however, suggest that remission can be induced again in a substantial percentage of patients experiencing a lupus nephritis flare. Lupus nephritis flares are independently associated with an increased risk of deterioration in renal function; prevention of renal flares might, therefore, also decrease long-term morbidity and mortality. Appropriate immunosuppressive maintenance therapy might lead to a decrease in the occurrence of renal and extrarenal flares in patients with SLE, and monitoring for the early detection and treatment of renal flares could improve their outcomes.

  18. Strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate/ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene composites: A new class of artificial joint components with enhanced biological efficacy to aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhipeng; Huang, Bingxue; Li, Yiwen; Tian, Meng; Li, Li; Yu, Xixun

    2016-04-01

    To enhance implant stability and prolong the service life of artificial joint component, a new approach was proposed to improve the wear resistance of artificial joint component and endow artificial joint component with the biological efficacy of resistance to aseptic loosening. Strontium calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) were interfused in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by a combination of liquid nitrogen ball-milling and flat-panel curing process to prepare the SCPP/UHMWPE composites. The micro-structure, mechanical characterization, tribological characterization and bioactivities of various SCPP/UHMWPE composites were investigated. The results suggested that this method could statistically improve the wear resistance of UHMWPE resulting from a good SCPP particle dispersion. Moreover, it is also observed that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites-wear particles could promote the production of OPG by osteoblasts and decrease the production of RANKL by osteoblasts, and then increase the OPG/RANKL ratio. This indicated that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites had potential efficacy to prevent and treat aseptic loosening. Above all, the SCPP/UHMWPE composites with a suitable SCPP content would be the promising materials for fabricating artificial joint component with ability to resist aseptic loosening. PMID:26838880

  19. Strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate/ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene composites: A new class of artificial joint components with enhanced biological efficacy to aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhipeng; Huang, Bingxue; Li, Yiwen; Tian, Meng; Li, Li; Yu, Xixun

    2016-04-01

    To enhance implant stability and prolong the service life of artificial joint component, a new approach was proposed to improve the wear resistance of artificial joint component and endow artificial joint component with the biological efficacy of resistance to aseptic loosening. Strontium calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) were interfused in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by a combination of liquid nitrogen ball-milling and flat-panel curing process to prepare the SCPP/UHMWPE composites. The micro-structure, mechanical characterization, tribological characterization and bioactivities of various SCPP/UHMWPE composites were investigated. The results suggested that this method could statistically improve the wear resistance of UHMWPE resulting from a good SCPP particle dispersion. Moreover, it is also observed that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites-wear particles could promote the production of OPG by osteoblasts and decrease the production of RANKL by osteoblasts, and then increase the OPG/RANKL ratio. This indicated that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites had potential efficacy to prevent and treat aseptic loosening. Above all, the SCPP/UHMWPE composites with a suitable SCPP content would be the promising materials for fabricating artificial joint component with ability to resist aseptic loosening.

  20. Comparison of the roles of IL-1, IL-6, and TNFα in cell culture and murine models of aseptic loosening1

    PubMed Central

    Taki, Naoya; Tatro, Joscelyn M.; Lowe, Robert; Goldberg, Victor M.; Greenfield, Edward M.

    2007-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNF, are considered to be major mediators of osteolysis and ultimately aseptic loosening. This study demonstrated that synergistic interactions among these cytokines are required for the in vitro stimulation of osteoclast differentiation by titanium particles. In contrast, genetic knock out of these cytokines or their receptors does not protect murine calvaria from osteolysis induced by titanium particles. Thus, the extent of osteolysis was not substantially altered in single knock out mice lacking either the IL-1 receptor or IL-6. Osteolysis also was not substantially altered in double knock out mice lacking both the IL-1 receptor and IL-6 or in double knock out mice lacking both TNF receptor-1 and TNF receptor-2. The differences between the in vivo and the cell culture results make it difficult to conclude whether the pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to aseptic loosening. One alternative is that in vivo experiments are more physiological and that therefore the current results do not support a role for the pro-inflammatory cytokines in aseptic loosening. We however favor the alternative that, in this case, the cell culture experiments can be more informative. We favor this alternative because the role of the pro-inflammatory cytokines may be obscured in vivo by compensation by other cytokines or by the low signal to noise ratio found in measurements of particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:17236833

  1. Feasibility of aseptic processing of a low-acid multiphase food product (salsa con queso) using a continuous flow microwave system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Coronel, P; Simunovic, J; Sandeep, K P

    2007-04-01

    Aseptic processing of a low-acid multiphase food product using a continuous flow microwave heating system can combine the advantages of an aseptic process along with those of microwave heating. Dielectric properties of 2 different brands of 1 such product (salsa con queso) were measured under continuous flow conditions at a temperature range of 20 to 130 degrees C. At 915 MHz, the dielectric constant ranged from 58.7 at 20 degrees C to 41.3 at 130 degrees C with dielectric loss factor ranging from 41.0 at 20 degrees C to 145.5 at 130 degrees C. The loss tangent at 915 MHz ranged from 0.61 at 20 degrees C to 3.52 at 130 degrees C. The temperature profiles at the outlet during processing of salsa con queso in a 5-kW microwave unit showed a narrow temperature distribution between the center and the wall of the tube. The study showed the feasibility of aseptic processing of salsa con queso using a continuous flow microwave system.

  2. Novel Autoantigens Associated with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Sachiko; Adnan, Endy; Ishizaki, Jun; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Tanaka, Yuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Suemori, Koichiro; Shudou, Masachika; Okura, Takafumi; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Yasukawa, Masaki; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by production of a variety of autoantibodies. Although anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies contribute to the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN), they are not sufficient for diagnosis and evaluation of disease activity. To obtain other autoantibodies associated with LN, we screened autoantigens reacting with the sera of LN patients by using an N-terminal biotinylated protein library created from a wheat cell-free protein production system. We screened 17 proteins that showed higher positive signals in the active phase than in the inactive phase of SLE, and higher positive signals in the serum of SLE patient with nephritis than in that of patient without nephritis. Of these, two LN-associated autoantigens, ribosomal RNA-processing protein 8 (RRP8) and spermatid nuclear transition protein 1 (TNP1) were identified by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence of renal tissues. Circulating anti-RRP8 and anti-TNP1 autoantibodies were recognized and deposited as an immune complex (IC) in glomeruli. IC was deposited preferentially in glomeruli rather than in other organs in C57BL/6 mice injected with RRP8 or TNP1. ELISA analysis of sera from patients with various rheumatic diseases demonstrated reactivity for RRP8 and TNP1 in 20% and 14.7% of SLE patients, respectively, whereas there was little or no reactivity in patients with other rheumatic diseases. Among SLE patients, 63.6% and 45.5% of those with LN were positive for anti-RRP8 and anti-TNP1 antibodies, compared with 12.5% and 9.4% of SLE patients without nephritis, respectively. Both proteins are cationic, and their respective antibodies did not cross-react with dsDNA. These proteins released from apoptotic cells form ICs with each autoantibody, and their ICs may become trapped at anionic sites in the glomerular basement membrane, leading to deposition in glomeruli. These autoantibodies may be useful for prediction of LN in subsets of SLE patients who

  3. Update on anti-phospholipid antibodies in SLE: the Hopkins' Lupus Cohort.

    PubMed

    Petri, M

    2010-04-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies are common in patients in the Hopkins' Lupus Cohort: 47% have anti-cardiolipin, 32.5% anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I and 26% lupus anticoagulant (by dRVVT confirmatory testing). Systemic lupus erythematosus patients with the lupus anticoagulant at baseline have a 50% chance of a deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolus in the next 20 years. Anti-phospholipid antibodies differ in their association with thrombosis: the lupus anticoagulant is most strongly associated with arterial and venous thrombosis and is the only anti-phospholipid antibody associated with myocardial infarction. Anti-phospholipid antibodies are not associated with atherosclerosis.

  4. [A case of systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with jaundice and lupus pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takako; Tominaga, Sizuo; Okouchi, Akiko; Kudo, Makoto; Katoh, Kiyoshi; Shoda, Masataka; Fujino, Masayuki A

    2005-02-01

    A 27-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital for acute hepatitis in April 2002. She had been suffering from low grade fever and fatigue for a week. She also presented with dyspnea. On admission, ALT and AST were 857 U/l and 473 U/l respectively. Urine protein was 2 g/day. Chest radiograph showed bilateral infiltrative shadow and pleural effusion. She developed jaundice and her level of total bilirubin was increased to 9.6 mg/dl on May 9. Antibodies to hepatitis viruses were not detected. Testing for antimitochondrial antibodies, antismooth muscle antibodies, and antiribosomal P antibodies showed all negative. However, antinuclear antibodies were positive at titer 1:160 and anti-double stranded DNA antibodies were 130 U/ml. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made and oral administration of 60 mg/day prednisolon was started on May 10. Serum levels of ALT, AST and bilirubin were reduced to within normal range and pulmonary lesions were also improved. We conclude that this is a rare case of systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with acute hepatitis and jaundice.

  5. Complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies distinguish drug-induced lupus from systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, R L; Teodorescu, M; Beutner, E H; Plunkett, R W

    2004-01-01

    The immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody (ANA) test has been widely used to monitor autoimmune disease, but its value for diagnostic purposes is compromised by low specificity and high prevalence in disease-free individuals. The capacity of autoantibodies to fix serum complement proteins when bound to antigen is an important effector function because this property is associated with acute and chronic inflammatory processes. The current study evaluates the complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies (CANA) in three well-defined and clinically-related patient groups: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), drug-induced lupus (DIL) and drug-induced autoimmunity (DIA). Of 20 patients diagnosed with SLE, 90% displayed complement-fixing ANA while this feature was present in only two of 18 patients with DIL and no patients with DIA without associated disease even though the mean ANA titres were similar among these patient groups. CANA was significantly correlated with anti-Sm activity. Because SLE but not DIL or DIA can be a life-threatening disease associated with complement consumption in vivo, these results demonstrate that measurement of CANA is a diagnostically useful tool and may have immunopathologic implications.

  6. Acute lupus pneumonitis followed by intestinal pseudo-obstruction in systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    JI, CAIHONG; YU, XING; WANG, YONG; SHI, LUFENG

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IpsO) and acute lupus pneumonitis (ALP) are uncommon severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study reports the case of a 26-year-old female who presented with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting as initial symptoms. Computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed the jejunal wall was thickened and streaky, mimicking the presentation of intestinal obstruction. Following emergency surgery, the patient's general condition was aggravated, with evident limb erythematous rashes. A series of laboratory examinations revealed SLE, and combined with patient's medical history IpsO was diagnosed, with a disease Activity Index score of 10. During the therapeutic period, high fever, dyspnea and oxygen saturation (SaO2) reductions were detected, and CT scans indicated lung infiltration, excluding other causes through a comprehensive infectious work-up and a bronchoalveolar lavage examination. ALP was confirmed and treated with high-dose methylprednisolone and gamma globulin supplement. The patient responded well and was discharged in 2 weeks. In the one-year tapering period and after stopping corticosteroids, the patient recovered well with no relapse detected. In conclusion, the manifestation of IpsO in SLE is rare and represents a challenge for the surgeon to establish the correct diagnosis and avoid inappropriate surgical intervention. ALP may be the consequence of emergency surgery, and immediate high-dose glucocorticoid therapy is recommended. PMID:27347044

  7. Lupus vulgaris in a pediatric patient: a clinicohistopathological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Afsar, F Sule; Afsar, Ilhan; Diniz, Gulden; Asilsoy, Suna; Sorguc, Yelda

    2008-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis which usually occurs in patients previously sensitized to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We present a case of a 10-year-old boy who was diagnosed as lupus vulgaris clinically and histopathologically. He had well demarcated, irregularly bordered, pink, infiltrated plaques on his left cheek showing apple-jelly appearance on diascopy. The histopathological examination showed tuberculoid granulomas with Langhans type giant cells. The Mantoux reactivity was in normal limits, and no acid-fast bacilli was found in the lesion, either by direct stained smears or by culture. The lesions showed marked improvement on anti-tuberculosis treatment. We want to emphasize that histopathological examination has diagnostic value in lupus vulgaris in correlation with clinical appearance, when direct analysis or culture is negative.

  8. Radiologic findings in late-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Braunstein, E.M.; Weissman, B.N.; Sosman, J.L.; Schur, P.H.

    1983-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus in the elderly has a different clinical and serologic course from that in young patients. Radiographic findings in patients in whom the diagnosis was made after age 50 were compared with findings in younger patients to see if the radiologic patterns are also different. The only significant radiographic difference between the two groups was that the older group had a greater incidence of soft-tissue swelling of the hands and wrists (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in osteopenia, erosion, soft-tissue calcification, alignment abnormalities, or intrathoracic findings. Of 24 patients over age 50, two developed lymphoma and another developed multiple myeloma. The data agree with clinical observations that there is a higher incidence of arthritis in late-onset lupus, but clinical findings of increased incidence of pleuropericardial disease are not confirmed radiographically. The coincidence of hematologic malignancy with late-onset lupus in this series is noteworthy.

  9. The Soul of Lupus with ALMA (SOLA) Project Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M.; de Gregorio, I.; Team SOLA

    2015-12-01

    The SOLA (Soul of Lupus with ALMA) project is conducting comprehensive studies of the Lupus Molecular Clouds and their star formation processes. Our goal is to exploit ALMA and other facilities over a wide wavelength range to establish a prototypical low-mass star forming scenario based on the Lupus region. We focus mainly on 10-104 au scale physics, kinematics, density, and temperature, together with detailed modelling of radiative transfer. Our unique source catalog so far contains more than 700 sources at various evolutionary stages and we have obtained complementary data with Mopra, APEX, etc. In the poster, we will report the latest status of SOLA and the expected outcome in observing runs in the near future, including ALMA Cycle 3.

  10. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Hosenpud, J.D.; Montanaro, A.; Hart, M.V.; Haines, J.E.; Specht, H.D.; Bennett, R.M.; Kloster, F.E.

    1984-08-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in young patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is well documented; however, the prevalence of coronary involvement is unknown. Accordingly, 26 patients with systemic lupus were selected irrespective of previous cardiac history to undergo exercise thallium-201 cardiac scintigraphy. Segmental perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of the 26 studies (38.5 percent). Five patients had reversible defects suggesting ischemia, four patients had persistent defects consistent with scar, and one patient had both reversible and persistent defects in two areas. There was no correlation between positive thallium results and duration of disease, amount of corticosteroid treatment, major organ system involvement or age. Only a history of pericarditis appeared to be associated with positive thallium-201 results (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that segmental myocardial perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Whether this reflects large-vessel coronary disease or small-vessel abnormalities remains to be determined.

  11. Peptide-based immunotherapy of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Monneaux, Fanny; Muller, Sylviane

    2004-01-01

    Current drug-based therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are non-specific and often counterbalanced by adverse effects. Current research aims at developing specific treatments that target deleterious cells only and not the whole immune system. This strategy requires the identification of sequences derived from major lupus autoantigens, responsible for the activation of autoreactive B and T cells. This review summarizes the identification and characterization of peptides, which are able to modulate T cells ex vivo, and describes the promising results obtained after administration of some of these peptides in lupus mice. Although these therapeutic trials are encouraging, the precise mode of action of peptide-based immunotherapy is still elusive. Here, we discuss the possible mechanisms leading to T-cell tolerance induction and the feasibility of extending the success of peptide-based therapy from animal models to human.

  12. Recent advances in cytokines in cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mikita, Naoya; Ikeda, Takaharu; Ishiguro, Mariko; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2011-09-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) includes a broad spectrum of diseases from a cutaneous-limited type to a systemic type. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease which affects multiple organs. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) includes skin symptoms seen in SLE and cutaneous-limited LE. Although immune abnormalities, as well as heritable, hormonal and environmental factors, are involved in the pathology of LE, the actual pathogenesis is still unclear. Recently, the involvement of various cytokines has been shown in the pathogenesis of LE. Moreover, some trials with biological agents targeted specific cytokines are also ongoing for SLE. In this article, we review the contributions of major cytokines such as interferon, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-18 to LE, especially SLE and CLE.

  13. Co-stimulatory molecules as targets for treatment of lupus.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Joan T

    2013-09-01

    Co-stimulatory molecules help to regulate interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus. Both work in murine models and some early studies in human lupus support further examination of these molecules as therapeutic targets. Complexities of lupus clinical trial variables may have hampered progress in this area but recent developments in the field may make interventional trials more feasible in the near future. To date biologics which provide direct blockade of interactions between CD40 and CD154, B7RP-1 and ICOS, and CD80 or CD86 with CD28 have been assessed in multicenter clinical trials. These data will be reviewed and critiqued.

  14. Statistical considerations for stopping systemic lupus erythematosus clinical trials earlier.

    PubMed

    Lew, Robert A; Liang, Matthew H; Doros, Gheorghe

    2015-12-04

    Group sequential designs are used to potentially shorten randomized clinical trials and thereby reduce subject burden, improve safety, and save time and resources. Clinical trials comparing treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) might adopt such designs if the ordinal outcome scales for SLE, such as the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index, were more like continuous outcome scales with interval properties. After describing the basic features of sequential trials and highlighting some major issues in their design, we propose approaches that mitigate these issues. In particular, high-speed computing has accelerated advances in sequential design, making available a variety of designs that can be implemented with minimal technical support. The challenge now is to understand the concepts behind such flexible designs and then to apply them to improve studies of SLE.

  15. Lupus arthropathy: a case series of patients with rhupus.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Andrés; Quintana, Gerardo; Rondón, Federico; Restrepo, José Félix; Sánchez, Alvaro; Matteson, Eric L; Iglesias, Antonio

    2006-03-01

    Among the clinical manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an arthropathy, which is usually nonerosive. In many cases the joint involvement is mild. A subset of patients have deforming, nonerosive Jaccoud's arthropathy, and a minority have an arthropathy with clinical findings similar to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that has been called "rhupus." We report our series of eight patients (seven female, one male) with rhupus arthropathy. Patients were between the ages of 17 and 38 years (average: 30.3 years) at disease onset. All had deforming or Jaccoud's arthropathy, and three had erosive disease. The arthritis was typically the first disease manifestation. Other symptoms of lupus including vasculitis and glomerulonephritis appeared after an average of 2.8 years. All had positive antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor. Rhupus arthritis is not a combination of RA and SLE, but should be regarded as a variant of the arthropathy of lupus.

  16. Total lymphoid irradiation in refractory systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Gross, D.J.; Braverman, A.; Weshler, Z.; Fuks, Z.; Slavin, S.; Eliakim, M.

    1986-07-01

    In two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, conventional therapy was considered to have failed because of persistent disease activity and unacceptable side effects. Both were treated with total lymphoid irradiation without clinical benefit, despite adequate immunosuppression as documented by markedly reduced numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte-dependent proliferative responses in vitro. The first patient developed herpes zoster, gram-negative septicemia, neurologic symptoms, and deterioration of lupus nephritis. The second patient developed massive bronchopneumonia, necrotic cutaneous lesions, and progressive nephritis and died 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. These observations, although limited to two patients, indicate that total lymphoid irradiation in patients with severe systemic lupus erythematosus should be regarded as strictly experimental.

  17. Btk inhibition treats TLR7/IFN driven murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andrew T; Pereira, Albertina; Fu, Kai; Samy, Eileen; Wu, Yin; Liu-Bujalski, Lesley; Caldwell, Richard; Chen, Yi-Ying; Tian, Hui; Morandi, Federica; Head, Jared; Koehler, Ursula; Genest, Melinda; Okitsu, Shinji L; Xu, Daigen; Grenningloh, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is expressed in a variety of immune cells and previous work has demonstrated that blocking Btk is a promising strategy for treating autoimmune diseases. Herein, we utilized a tool Btk inhibitor, M7583, to determine the therapeutic efficacy of Btk inhibition in two mouse lupus models driven by TLR7 activation and type I interferon. In BXSB-Yaa lupus mice, Btk inhibition reduced autoantibodies, nephritis, and mortality. In the pristane-induced DBA/1 lupus model, Btk inhibition suppressed arthritis, but autoantibodies and the IFN gene signature were not significantly affected; suggesting efficacy was mediated through inhibition of Fc receptors. In vitro studies using primary human macrophages revealed that Btk inhibition can block activation by immune complexes and TLR7 which contributes to tissue damage in SLE. Overall, our results provide translational insight into how Btk inhibition may provide benefit to a variety of SLE patients by affecting both BCR and FcR signaling.

  18. IL-17-producing T cells in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Apostolidis, S A; Crispín, J C; Tsokos, G C

    2011-02-01

    Significant evidence implicates interleukin-17 (IL-17) in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), particularly in the development of tissue damage. IL-17 production and IL-17-producing CD4+ and CD3 + CD4-CD8- cells are increased in patients with SLE. IL-17-producing cells are present in the inflamed kidney tissues from patients with lupus nephritis. In lupus-prone mice, IL-17 production appears to be involved in the expression of disease pathology and pharmacologic or genetic manipulation of its production results in suppression of the disease. It becomes obvious that the use of biologics including humanized anti-IL-17 antibodies or decoy IL-17 receptors deserve clinical consideration. Similarly, the development of drugs that suppress the production of IL-17 is in order.

  19. Sweet syndrome associated with hydralazine-induced lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Cartee, Todd V; Chen, Suephy C

    2012-03-01

    Sweet syndrome (SS) is a distinctive but poorly understood clinical syndrome, which likely represents an immunologic reaction pattern to a wide range of underlying or preceding conditions, including viral illnesses, inflammatory bowel disease, and malignancies. We report the case of a patient who presented with an acute eruption that was clinically and histologically consistent with SS. The patient also met diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus with serositis, stomatitis, positive antinuclear antibody (ANA), and positive anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies. Additionally, positive antihistone antibodies and exposure to hydralazine supported the specific diagnosis of drug-induced lupus erythematosus, and we concluded that his SS was a manifestation of hydralazine-induced lupus. We also briefly review the precedence for this unusual dual diagnosis in the literature.

  20. Psychiatric disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, G A; Nehall, J E; Simeon, D T

    1996-06-01

    The symptoms of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) may include altered mental function. The present study sought to determine whether the psychiatric disorders are due to the disease itself or to the stress of having a chronic disease. Forty-five SLE patients attending outpatient clinics at the Port-of-Spain General Hospital in Trinidad were compared with two control groups: patients with chronic debilitating diseases similar to SLE in terms of chronicity and treatment (n = 44) and non-diseased individuals (n = 48). The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM III-R was used to identify psychiatric disorders. Both the SLE and the chronic illness groups had more psychiatric illness (44% and 39%, respectively) when compared with the non-diseased controls (2%) (p < 0.001). Major depression was the most common diagnosis among both diseased groups. However, psychotic illnesses (schizophrenic-type psychosis and bipolar disorders) were more prevalent in the SLE group (11.1% vs 0%, p = 0.02). These results indicate that major depression in SLE may be related more to the effects of a chronic illness than to SLE itself. However, the occurrence of psychotic symptoms may be related to SLE disease and needs further study.

  1. Quantity Discrimination in Wolves (Canis lupus)

    PubMed Central

    Utrata, Ewelina; Virányi, Zsófia; Range, Friederike

    2012-01-01

    Quantity discrimination has been studied extensively in different non-human animal species. In the current study, we tested 11 hand-raised wolves (Canis lupus) in a two-way choice task. We placed a number of food items (one to four) sequentially into two opaque cans and asked the wolves to choose the larger amount. Moreover, we conducted two additional control conditions to rule out non-numerical properties of the presentation that the animals might have used to make the correct choice. Our results showed that wolves are able to make quantitative judgments at the group, but also at the individual level even when alternative strategies such as paying attention to the surface area or time and total amount are ruled out. In contrast to previous canine studies on dogs (Canis familiaris) and coyotes (Canis latrans), our wolves’ performance did not improve with decreasing ratio, referred to as Weber’s law. However, further studies using larger quantities than we used in the current set-up are still needed to determine whether and when wolves’ quantity discrimination conforms to Weber’s law. PMID:23181044

  2. Intestinal Dysbiosis Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Milani, Christian; López, Patricia; Cuervo, Adriana; Arboleya, Silvia; Duranti, Sabrina; Turroni, Francesca; González, Sonia; Suárez, Ana; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ventura, Marco

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototypical systemic autoimmune disease in humans and is characterized by the presence of hyperactive immune cells and aberrant antibody responses to nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens, including characteristic anti–double-stranded DNA antibodies. We performed a cross-sectional study in order to determine if an SLE-associated gut dysbiosis exists in patients without active disease. A group of 20 SLE patients in remission, for which there was strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, was recruited, and we used an optimized Ion Torrent 16S rRNA gene-based analysis protocol to decipher the fecal microbial profiles of these patients and compare them with those of 20 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. We found diversity to be comparable based on Shannon’s index. However, we saw a significantly lower Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio in SLE individuals (median ratio, 1.97) than in healthy subjects (median ratio, 4.86; P < 0.002). A lower Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio in SLE individuals was corroborated by quantitative PCR analysis. Notably, a decrease of some Firmicutes families was also detected. This dysbiosis is reflected, based on in silico functional inference, in an overrepresentation of oxidative phosphorylation and glycan utilization pathways in SLE patient microbiota. PMID:25271284

  3. Quantity Discrimination in Wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Utrata, Ewelina; Virányi, Zsófia; Range, Friederike

    2012-01-01

    Quantity discrimination has been studied extensively in different non-human animal species. In the current study, we tested 11 hand-raised wolves (Canis lupus) in a two-way choice task. We placed a number of food items (one to four) sequentially into two opaque cans and asked the wolves to choose the larger amount. Moreover, we conducted two additional control conditions to rule out non-numerical properties of the presentation that the animals might have used to make the correct choice. Our results showed that wolves are able to make quantitative judgments at the group, but also at the individual level even when alternative strategies such as paying attention to the surface area or time and total amount are ruled out. In contrast to previous canine studies on dogs (Canis familiaris) and coyotes (Canis latrans), our wolves' performance did not improve with decreasing ratio, referred to as Weber's law. However, further studies using larger quantities than we used in the current set-up are still needed to determine whether and when wolves' quantity discrimination conforms to Weber's law. PMID:23181044

  4. Successful modulation of murine lupus nephritis with tuftsin-phosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bashi, Tomer; Blank, Miri; Ben-Ami Shor, Dana; Fridkin, Mati; Versini, Mathilde; Gendelman, Omer; Volkov, Alexander; Barshak, Iris; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-05-01

    In areas where helminths infections are common, autoimmune diseases are rare. Treatment with helminths and ova from helminths, improved clinical findings of inflammatory bowel disease, multiple-sclerosis and rheumatoid-arthritis. The immunomodulatory functions of some helminths were attributed to the phosphorylcholine (PC) moiety. We aimed to decipher the tolerogenic potential of Tuftsin-PC (TPC) compound in mice genetically prone to develop lupus. Lupus prone NZBXW/F1 mice received subcutaneously TPC (5 μg/1 ml), 3 times a week starting at 14 weeks age. Autoantibodies were tested by ELISA, T-regulatory-cells by FACS, cytokines profile by RT-PCR and cytokines protein levels by DuoSet ELISA. Glomerulonephritis was addressed by detection of proteinuria, and immunoglobulin complex deposition in the mesangium of the kidneys of the mice by immunofluorescence. Our results show that TPC attenuated the development of glomerulonephritis in lupus prone mice, in particular, it ameliorated proteinuria (p < 0.02), and reduced immunoglobulin deposition in the kidney mesangium. TPC also enhanced the expression of TGFβ and IL-10 (p < 0.001), and inhibited the production of IFNγ and IL-17 (p < 0.03). TPC Significantly enhanced the expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs) phenotype in the treated mice. These data indicate that TPC hampered lupus development in genetically lupus prone mice which was exemplified by moderate glomerulonephritis, attenuation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhancement of anti-inflammatory cytokines expression, as well as Tregs expansion. Our results propose harnessing novel natural therapy for lupus patients.

  5. Endothelial progenitor cells: a new player in lupus?

    PubMed

    Haque, Sahena; Alexander, M Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N

    2012-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a greatly increased risk of cardiovascular disease. There is growing interest in the link between vascular damage and lupus-specific inflammatory factors. Impaired endothelial repair could account for the endothelial dysfunction in this patient group. This review describes the contribution that endothelial progenitor cells could play in the pathogenesis of premature vascular damage in this disease. The methods of isolation, detection, and characterization of endothelial progenitor cells, together with their potential role in repair of the endothelium and as a therapeutic target in SLE, are discussed. PMID:22356717

  6. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  7. HMGB1: a smoking gun in lupus nephritis?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a prototypic alarmin that is released from activated and dying cells. Because of its proinflammatory activities, HMGB1 could mediate key events in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, a possibility supported by elevations of HMGB1 in patient blood and increased expression in renal biopsies. The biology of HMGB1 is complicated, however, and its activity is dependent on redox state as well as binding to other molecules such as cytokines. Defining more precisely the role of HMGB1 in lupus will require treatment studies to block the activity of this alarmin in animal models and ultimately patients. PMID:22423653

  8. Vitamin D and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed

    Watad, Abdulla; Neumann, Shana G; Soriano, Alessandra; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the contribution of vitamin D deficiency to autoimmunity. Several studies have shown an association between low levels of vitamin D and autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Vitamin D receptor ligands can mediate immunosuppressive effects. It has been suggested that low levels of this hormone contribute to the immune activation in lupus and other autoimmune diseases. This review updates and summarizes the literature on the association between vitamin D and SLE, and discusses the various correlations between vitamin D and SLE activity, clinical expressions, serology, and gene polymorphisms of vitamin D receptors.

  9. Vitamin D and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed

    Watad, Abdulla; Neumann, Shana G; Soriano, Alessandra; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the contribution of vitamin D deficiency to autoimmunity. Several studies have shown an association between low levels of vitamin D and autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Vitamin D receptor ligands can mediate immunosuppressive effects. It has been suggested that low levels of this hormone contribute to the immune activation in lupus and other autoimmune diseases. This review updates and summarizes the literature on the association between vitamin D and SLE, and discusses the various correlations between vitamin D and SLE activity, clinical expressions, serology, and gene polymorphisms of vitamin D receptors. PMID:27228639

  10. A highlight from the LUPUS 2014 meeting: eight great ideas

    PubMed Central

    Buyon, Jill P; Cohen, Phillip; Merrill, Joan T; Gilkeson, Gary; Kaplan, Mariana; James, Judith; McCune, W Joseph; Bernatsky, Sasha; Elkon, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This review describes eight ‘great ideas’ regarding bench-to-bedside considerations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented at the second international LUPUS meeting in Quebec, September 2014. The topics included: correcting the impaired clearance of apoptotic fragments; optimisation of clinical trial design: the PERFECT (Pre Evaluation Reducing Frighteningly Elevated Coverable Targets) study; lipidomics and metabolomics in SLE; importance of the inflammasome; identification and treatment of asymptomatic autoimmunity: prevention of SLE; combining low doses of hydroxychloroquine and quinacrine for long-term maintenance therapy of SLE; reducing emergency room visits and the critical relevance of the autoantigen. PMID:26167290

  11. Infection in systemic lupus erythematosus: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Lisa; Perl, Andras

    2010-01-01

    Infectious agents have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Common viruses, such as the Epstein-Barr virus, transfusion transmitted virus, parvovirus and cytomegalovirus, have an increased prevalence in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. They may contribute to disease pathogenesis through triggering autoimmunity via structural or functional molecular mimicry, encoding proteins that induce cross-reactive immune responses to self antigens or modulate antigen processing, activation, or apoptosis of B and T cells, macrophages or dendritic cells. Alternatively, some infectious agents, such as malaria, Toxoplasma gondii and Helicobacter pylori, may have a protective effect. Vaccinations may play dual roles by protecting against friend and foe alike. PMID:20209114

  12. Practice and Educational Gaps in Lupus, Dermatomyositis, and Morphea.

    PubMed

    Fett, Nicole M; Fiorentino, David; Werth, Victoria P

    2016-07-01

    Patients with skin-predominant lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, and morphea should be evaluated, treated, and followed by dermatologists who can take primary responsibility for their care. Many academic centers have specialized centers with dermatologists who care for these patients. Patients with skin-predominant lupus erythematosus should be followed regularly with laboratory tests to detect significant systemic disease. Antibody tests can help determine the risks for individual patients. Patients with morphea rarely progress to systemic disease, but therapies can be helpful in treating and preventing progression of disease. PMID:27363879

  13. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  14. Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Baenas, Diego F; Diehl, Fernando A; Haye Salinas, María J; Riva, Verónica; Diller, Ana; Lemos, Pablo A

    2016-01-01

    Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease, or histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, is an infrequent idiopathic disorder. It has been associated with autoimmune disorders, of which systemic lupus erythematosus is the most outstanding. The basis of its diagnosis relies on the histological examination of lymph nodes, which typically reveals necrosis surrounded by histiocytes with crescentic nucleus, immunoblasts and plasma cells, and absence of neutrophils. We report the case of a 27-year-old Argentinian female patient without any relevant past medical history to demonstrate the correlation between Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:27418858

  15. 18F-FDG microPET imaging differentiates between septic and aseptic wound healing after orthopedic implant placement

    PubMed Central

    Odekerken, Jim C E; Brans, Boudewijn T; Welting, Tim J M; Walenkamp, Geert H I M

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose 18F-FDG PET is a widely used tool for molecular imaging of oncological, cardiovascular, and neurological disorders. We evaluated 18F-FDG microPET as an implant osteomyelitis imaging tool using a Staphylococcus aureus-induced peroperative implant infection in rabbits. Methods Intramedullary titanium nails were implanted in contaminated and uncontaminated (control) proximal right tibiae of rabbits. Tibiae were quantitatively assessed with microPET for 18F-FDG uptake before and sequentially at 1, 3, and 6 weeks after surgery. Tracer uptake was assessed in soft tissue and bone in both treatment groups with an additional comparison between the operated and unoperated limb. MicroPET analysis was combined with radiographic assessment and complementary histology of the tibiae. Results At the first postoperative week, the 18F-FDG uptake in the contaminated implant group was significantly higher than the preoperative measurement, without a significant difference between the contaminated and uncontaminated tibiae. From the third postoperative week onward, 18F-FDG uptake allowed discrimination between osteomyelitis and postoperative aseptic bone healing, as well as quantification of the infection at distinct locations around the implant. Interpretation 18F-FDG-based microPET imaging allows differentiation between deep infection and undisturbed wound healing after implantation of a titanium intramedullary nail in this rabbit model. Furthermore, our results indicate that 18F-FDG PET may provide a tool in human clinical diagnostics and for the evaluation of antimicrobial strategies in animal models of orthopedic implant infection. PMID:24673540

  16. Treatment of humeral shaft aseptic nonunions in elderly patients with opposite structural allograft, BMP-7, and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Murena, Luigi; Canton, Gianluca; Vulcano, Ettore; Surace, Michele Francesco; Cherubino, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Humeral shaft aseptic nonunions occur in 2% to 10% of patients managed conservatively and 10% to 15% of patients treated surgically. The complex muscular and neurovascular anatomy of the upper limb makes the surgical approach to the fracture site demanding and risky, especially when previous surgeries have been attempted. The clinical consequence of atrophic humeral shaft nonunions is a severe functional limitation that may significantly affect activities of daily living, especially in the elderly. The surgical treatment of humeral shaft nonunions is challenging for orthopedic surgeons. Patients with atrophic nonunions require both a stable fixation and enhancement of the biologic response because of the weak biologic reaction observed at the fracture site. The gold standard of treatment in elderly patients has not been described. Nonetheless, older age and comorbidities are associated with potentially malignant nonunions. This study reports the authors' experience using opposite cortical allograft combined with bone morphogenetic protein 7 and mesenchymal stem cells to treat humeral shaft atrophic nonunions in 2 elderly patients. The nonunion site healed at 4 months (patient 1) and 8 months (patient 2) postoperatively, with full return to activities of daily living and no pain. Neither patient reported complications of the radial nerve, which is at high risk of injury during this type of surgery. The only reported complication (patient 2) was an intraoperative longitudinal partial distal humeral fracture, probably caused by compression screw overtightening. The use of a locking plate and opposite cortical allograft, combined with BMP-7 and mesenchymal stem cells, represents a safe and effective treatment for malignant nonunions in older patients. PMID:24679209

  17. Circulating microparticles in systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup

    2012-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease presenting with a wide array of clinical manifestations and an elusive pathogenesis. A characteristic feature in SLE is the occurrence of autoantibodies against chromatin, double-stranded DNA, and RNA-binding ribonucleoproteins. Observations of defective clearance of dying cells in SLE combined with the generation and exposure of nuclear autoantigens during apoptosis have led to the hypothesis that improperly cleared apoptotic debris constitutes a source of autoantigens capable of triggering autoimmune disease. In blood, circulating, heterogeneous subcellular microparticles (MPs) are released from cells and platelets constitutively and upon cellular activation or apoptosis. Such MPs may reflect the state of their parental cells and tissues, and could serve as markers of pathology. Particular in SLE MPs may serve as carriers of autoantigens and constituents of immune complexes (ICs). The purposes of this PhD thesis were to develop and apply qualitative and quantitative methods to characterize circulating MPs with respect to numbers, cellular origins and composition in a large cohort of well-characterized SLE patients compared to healthy and disease controls and to explore associations with clinical, biochemical and serological parameters. The PhD thesis consists of a review and three papers. In the first paper we show that SLE patients have significantly decreased numbers of annexin V binding MPs and MPs from platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells using flow cytometry. Two morphologically distinguishable populations of annexin V non-binding MPs were increased in the SLE patients. The annexin V non-binding MPs of most likely cellular origin were associated with the presence of lupus nephritis, markers of increased disease activity and levels of endothelial cell-derived MPs. In the second paper we present the development of a proteomic method to characterize the protein composition of purified

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus associated with Wells' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yin, Geng; Xie, Qibing

    2012-04-01

    Wells' syndrome is a multifaceted dermatosis with a wide morphological spectrum, ranging from characteristic cellulitis-like erythema and papula to an unusual presentation of vesicles and pustules. The most important elements for diagnosis are erythemal plaques and histological picture of eosinophilic infiltration of the dermis with 'flame figures' (Plotz et al., in Hautarzt 51:182-186, 2000). Because of its original description as a distinct entity, it has come to be regarded as an abnormal eosinophilic response to a number of causative agents such as herpes simplex virus 2(HSV-2) and toxocara (Ludwig et al., in J Am Acad Dermatol 48:S60-S61, 2003; Bassukas et al., in Cases J 1:356, 2008). Concurrence of WS and malignant diseases as colon cancer, trachea squamous carcinoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma or angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy has been reported (Hirsch et al., in J Dtsch Dermatol Ges 3:530-531, 2005; Renner et al., in Acta Derm Venereol 87:525-528, 2007). Autoimmune diseases, including Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are multi-system disorders of unknown cause and are commonly characterized by protean cutaneous manifestations. To date, few autoimmne disease was found associated with WS except four previous reports of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) and one case of ulcerative colitis (Fujimoto et al., in Clin Exp Dermatol, 2010; Sakaria et al., in J Gastroenterol 42:250-252, 2007). The coexistence of SLE and WS in one patient was not found in literature and our case is the first. Here we described the rare combination and discussed the treatment strategy for this condition.

  19. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-08-15

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. PMID:27450756

  20. Severe Jaccoud's arthropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Mittermayer B; Galvão, Verena; Ribeiro, Daniel Sá; Santos, Willer D; da Hora, Priscila R; Mota, Anna Paula; Pimenta, Emanuela; Oliveira, Isabela; Atta, Ajax M; Reis, Mitermayer G; Reis, Eliana A G; Lins, Carolina

    2015-10-01

    Jaccoud's arthropathy (JA) is a clinical situation nowadays present mostly in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is characterized by the presence of joint deformities such as "swan neck," ulnar deviation and "Z-thumb" resembling rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but that are passively correctable and without bone erosion on plain radiographs. From our cohort of SLE patients with JA, we selected a subgroup with a more severe form of this arthropathy and looked at their clinical and laboratory profile as well as studied the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings or ultrasound (US) obtained from the hand with most evident deformities. Seven SLE patients with a severe form of JA were identified. All seven patients have "swan neck," ulnar deviation and "Z-thumb" deformities. Two out of seven had "mutilans-type JA" and four had fixed deformities in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints. The MRI of the hand with more evident deformity clinically performed in six cases and US performed in one case showed mild synovitis in five and moderate synovitis in two patients, mild flexor tenosynovitis in six and severe tenosynovitis in one. Only two small bone erosions were observed in the second and third MCP joints of one patient with moderate synovitis. Severe JA compromises the functional capacity of the joints and imposes the risk of misdiagnosis of RA. With the improvement of the survival rate of SLE and the lack of specific prophylactic or therapeutical measures for JA, it is reasonable to assume that more and more cases of severe JA are going to be identified. PMID:26310503

  1. [A lupus-vulgaris like atypical mycobacteriosis caused by Mycobacterium xenopi (lupus xenopi)].

    PubMed

    Kiehl, P; Eicher, U; Vakilzadeh, F

    1992-09-01

    A case of lupus-vulgaris-like infection caused by Mycobacterium xenopi in a 62-year-old immunocompetent female patient is presented. A large cutaneous infiltration was seen in the right periorbital region. Histological examination revealed a granulomatous reaction of epithelioid cells and giant cells. M. xenopi was isolated from biopsy material and tuberculosis could be excluded. Isoniazid was effective in healing the lesion within a year. Such infections are well known for other mycobacteria but to our knowledge had not yet been described for M. xenopi. The characteristics of human infections with M. xenopi are summarized in a review of the literature and criteria for the diagnosis of atypical cutaneous mycobacterioses are proposed.

  2. Heart involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome and neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Tincani, A; Rebaioli, C B; Taglietti, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2006-10-01

    Cardiac involvement is one of the main complications substantially contributing to the morbidity and mortality of patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases. All the anatomical heart structures can be affected, and multiple pathogenic mechanisms have been reported. Non-organ-specific autoantibodies have been implicated in immune complex formation and deposition as the initial triggers for inflammatory processes responsible for Libman-Sacks verrucous endocarditis, myocarditis and pericarditis. Anti-phospholipid antibodies have been associated with thrombotic events in coronary arteries, heart valve involvement and intra-myocardial vasculopathy in the context of primary and secondary anti-phospholipid syndrome. Antibodies-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antigens play a major pathogenic role in affecting the heart conduction tissue leading to the electrocardiographic abnormalities of the neonatal lupus syndrome and have been closely associated with endocardial fibroelastosis.

  3. [Lupus nephropathy in childhood and familial lupus. Genetic study of a family].

    PubMed

    Gómez Campdera, F J; Yebra, M; Vicario, J L; Rodríguez, M; Rengel, M; Manzano, L; Martín Villa, J M; Gutiérrez, C

    1989-04-15

    We report a case of a 14 1/2-year-old boy who was diagnosed of systemic lupus erythematosus in the background of an acute nephritic syndrome, 3 1/2 years after being diagnosed of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. The familial history suggested the presence of other cases of SLE, which were proven with relevant clinical and laboratory studies. A genetic study for disease markers was carried out and a correlation was found with haplotypes HLA A25, B18, BW6, DRX, and DQW; C2 deficiency was ruled out. We conclude that it is of paramount importance to rule out the existence of familial SLE in front of infantile SLE, particularly in boys, and we emphasize the necessity of keeping on further searching for genetic markers of the disease. PMID:2755225

  4. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Natasha; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  5. Paraneoplastic subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus associated with cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David; McPherson, Tess

    2016-02-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a dermatosis that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals. The exogenous stimulus that triggers this condition is usually unknown; however, medication is often implicated. Malignancy is a rare cause. We present a case of paraneoplastic SCLE to cholangiocarcinoma and briefly review the features of this interesting entity.

  6. An example of endurance in an old wolf, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    An 11 to 13-year-old Arctic Wolf (Canis lupus arctos) was observed chasing a young Arctic Hare (Lepus arcticus) for 6 to 7 minutes and catching it. This provides an example of the degree of endurance of which an old wolf is capable.

  7. Acute Pancreatitis as the Initial Presentation of Systematic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Ortiz, Arleen; Mccallum, Richard; Salameh, Hasan; Serrato, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease, including the gastrointestinal system in about half of SLE patients. As a rare complication of SLE, acute pancreatitis presents as generalized flare-ups in most cases of patients previously diagnosed with SLE. Here we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation with later diagnosis of SLE. PMID:25197582

  8. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  9. Automated Detection of Lupus White Matter Lesions in MRI.

    PubMed

    Roura, Eloy; Sarbu, Nicolae; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; González-Villà, Sandra; Cervera, Ricard; Bargalló, Núria; Lladó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML). In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative, and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection [True Positive Rate (62%) and Positive Prediction Value (80%), respectively] as well as segmentation accuracy [Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%)]. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration. PMID:27570507

  10. Lupus vulgaris in a child following BCG immunization.

    PubMed

    Kokcam, I; Kose, A; Yekeler, H; Doymaz, M Z

    2001-11-01

    A three year old girl presented with lupus vulgaris of the upper arm, which appeared 1 month after BCG immunization. The diagnosis was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction after histology and culture were negative for mycobacteria. Complete healing followed 6 months of oral isoniazid.

  11. THE LUPUS TRANSIT SURVEY FOR HOT JUPITERS: RESULTS AND LESSONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Sackett, Penny D.; Weldrake, David T. F.; Tingley, Brandon W. E-mail: penny.sackett@anu.edu.au E-mail: btingley@iac.es

    2009-05-15

    We present the results of a deep, wide-field transit survey targeting 'Hot Jupiter' planets in the Lupus region of the Galactic plane conducted over 53 nights concentrated in two epochs separated by a year. Using the Australian National University 40-inch telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO), the survey covered a 0.66 deg{sup 2} region close to the Galactic plane (b = 11{sup 0}) and monitored a total of 110,372 stars (15.0 {<=} V {<=} 22.0). Using difference imaging photometry, 16,134 light curves with a photometric precision of {sigma} < 0.025 mag were obtained. These light curves were searched for transits, and four candidates were detected that displayed low-amplitude variability consistent with a transiting giant planet. Further investigations, including spectral typing and radial velocity measurements for some candidates, revealed that of the four, one is a true planetary companion (Lupus-TR-3), two are blended systems (Lupus-TR-1 and 4), and one is a binary (Lupus-TR-2). The results of this successful survey are instructive for optimizing the observational strategy and follow-up procedure for deep searches for transiting planets, including an upcoming survey using the SkyMapper telescope at SSO.

  12. Long daily movements of wolves (Canis lupus) during pup raising

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Cluff, H. Dean

    2009-01-01

    Wolves, Canis lupus, on Ellesmere Island traveled a daily round-trip distance of 40.2 km from their den to a landfill during July 2008, plus an undetermined distance hunting after leaving the landfill. Although long travels by Wolves are well known, this appears to be the first documentation of long daily movements by Wolves rearing pups.

  13. Histuria and fibrinuria in cases of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, B.; Ward, P. Dorrington

    1970-01-01

    In thirty-nine urine specimens from twenty-seven patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, tissue-like and fibrinogen-like material was looked for by immuno-diffusion techniques, using specific antisera corresponding to both antigenic categories. Half the samples exhibited an abnormal outflow of tissue-like material (histuria). Fibrinuria appeared in only a few instances when cases with microscopic haematuria were discarded. Abnormal histuria had a significant correlation with the following signs of consistent lupoid renal involvement: significant urinary total protein output (>2 mg/min), impairment of renal function and extracapillary epithelial proliferation in the glomeruli seen on biopsy. In systemic lupus erythematosus with evidence of renal involvement, the major origin of abnormal histuria is probably a direct leakage of macromolecules from damaged kidney tissue. Abnormal histuria was also observed in cases of systemic lupus erythematosus during subacute stages of the disease without any signs of renal involvement. In the latter case, histuria is likely to originate from damaged tissues outside the kidney. It is concluded that abnormal histuria during the course of systemic lupus erythematosus may indicate various organic alterations, especially in the kidney, consequent to the primary mechanism of the systemic lupoid disease. On the contrary, fibrinuria may be diverse in origin. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4984587

  14. [A case of systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with psoriasis vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Shidara, Kumi; Soejima, Makoto; Shiseki, Mariko; Ohta, Syuji; Nishinarita, Makoto

    2003-12-01

    A 49-years-old female admitted to our hospital because of skin eruptions on the extremities in 1985. She had suffered from polyarthralgia, skin eruptions since 1983. Physical examinations revealed discoid lesion, central nervous system involvement, and polyarthritis. Laboratory tests revealed leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and hypocomplementemia. Antinuclear antibody, ant-DNA antibody, LE test were positive. From these findings, she was diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). She developed lupus peritonitis in 1990 and 1994, which was successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy. Since then, the activity of SLE was in good control under administration of prednisolone 10 mg/day. Chilblain lupus was seen from 1993, Raynaud's phenomenon from 1996, and she further developed subcutaneous induration on her chest, back and upper extremities in 1999. Skin biopsy findings were compatible with lupus panniculitis. In 2002, erythematous patches with scales were observed on her right hand and left knee, and these skin lesions were histologically diagnosed as psoriasis vulgaris. An autoimmune response similar to SLE is speculated in psoriasis. We describe a rare case of SLE with various skin lesions including psoriasis vulgaris.

  15. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition is immunomodulatory and vasculoprotective in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jason S; Zhao, Wenpu; Luo, Wei; Subramanian, Venkataraman; O'Dell, Alexander A; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Eitzman, Daniel T; Thompson, Paul R; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2013-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation activates plasmacytoid dendritic cells and serves as a source of autoantigens in SLE. We propose that aberrant NET formation is also linked to organ damage and to the premature vascular disease characteristic of human SLE. Here, we demonstrate enhanced NET formation in the New Zealand mixed 2328 (NZM) model of murine lupus. NZM mice also developed autoantibodies to NETs as well as the ortholog of human cathelicidin/LL37 (CRAMP), a molecule externalized in the NETs. NZM mice were treated with Cl-amidine, an inhibitor of peptidylarginine deiminases (PAD), to block NET formation and were evaluated for lupus-like disease activity, endothelial function, and prothrombotic phenotype. Cl-amidine treatment inhibited NZM NET formation in vivo and significantly altered circulating autoantibody profiles and complement levels while reducing glomerular IgG deposition. Further, Cl-amidine increased the differentiation capacity of bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells, improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and markedly delayed time to arterial thrombosis induced by photochemical injury. Overall, these findings suggest that PAD inhibition can modulate phenotypes crucial for lupus pathogenesis and disease activity and may represent an important strategy for mitigating cardiovascular risk in lupus patients.

  16. Parasites alter the pathological phenotype of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Katsuhisa; Adachi, Keishi; Watanabe, Maho; Sasatomi, Yoshie; Ogahara, Satoru; Abe, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kenji; Dan Justin, Yombo K.; Saito, Takao

    2014-01-01

    lpr Lupus nephritis is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus and manifests with considerable phenotypic and histological heterogeneity. In particular, diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN) and membranous lupus nephritis (MLN) represent morphologic forms that are polar opposites. DPLN is associated with autoimmune responses dominated by Th1 immune response associated with high levels of interferon (IFN)-γ. In contrast, a Th2 cytokine response is associated with the pathogenesis of MLN. MRL/lpr mice develop human LN-like immune complex-associated nephritis and provide a suitable histological model for human DPLN. Infection with Schistosoma mansoni skewed a Th2-type immune response induction and IL-10 in MRL/lpr mice, drastically changing the pathophysiology of glomerulonephritis from DPLN to MLN accompanied by increased IgG1 and IgE in the sera. T cells in 32-week-old MRL/lpr mice infected with S. mansoni expressed significantly more IL-4 and IL-10 than T cells of uninfected mice; T cells with IFN-γ were comparable between infected and uninfected MR/lpr mice. Thus, the helminthic infection modified the cytokine microenvironment and altered the pathological phenotype of autoimmune nephritis. PMID:24957876

  17. Acanthamoeba Encephalitis in Patient with Systemic Lupus, India

    PubMed Central

    Shirwadkar, Charudatt G.; Samant, Rohini; Sankhe, Milind; Deshpande, Ramesh; Yagi, Shigeo; Schuster, Frederick L.; Sriram, Rama

    2006-01-01

    We report a fatal case of encephalitis caused by Acanthamoeba in a 24-year-old woman from India with systemic lupus erythematosus. Diagnosis was made by identification of amebas in brain sections by immunofluorescence analysis and confirmed by demonstrating Acanthamoeba mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene DNA in brain tissue sections. PMID:16707057

  18. Chorea in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Khamashta, M A; Gil, A; Anciones, B; Lavilla, P; Valencia, M E; Pintado, V; Vázquez, J J

    1988-01-01

    Chorea is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this report the clinical features of two cases of chorea associated with SLE are presented. Of special interest were the raised titres of antiphospholipid antibodies in both cases. The possible pathogenic role of these antibodies is briefly discussed. PMID:3415367

  19. Antibody induction of lupus-like neuropsychiatric manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David A; Bolivar, Valerie J; Hudson, Chad A; Mondal, Tapan K; Pabello, Nina G

    2007-01-01

    Although systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is usually evaluated with regard to autoimmune reactivity toward the kidney, there are multiple psychiatric abnormalities associated with this autoimmune disease. Lupus-prone male NZM88 mice, derived from NZB/NZW F1 mice, develop early neuropsychiatric manifestations without any signs of nephritis. In addition to the usual repertoire of antibody specificities, including autoantibodies to dsDNA and renal antigens, mice of this inbred strain express autoantibodies to numerous brain antigens. Here, we show that autoantibodies to brain antigens, assessed by Western analysis, are as individually varied as are the diverse neuropsychiatric manifestations observed in SLE patients. Additionally, a monoclonal antibody derived from the spleen of an untreated NZM88 male when injected into healthy BALB/cByJ, but not C57BL/6J, mice induced behaviors similar to those of lupus-prone NZM88 mice. This monoclonal antibody, which is specific to dynamin-1, binds preferentially in BALB/cByJ cortex and induces substantial expression of cytokines mainly in the hypothalamus. Thus, an antibody to just one brain antigen can induce multiple behavioral changes, and multiple autoantibodies to different brain antigens exist in lupus-prone mice; however, susceptibility to the induction of neurobehavioral deficits is dependent on host genetics.

  20. Automated Detection of Lupus White Matter Lesions in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Eloy; Sarbu, Nicolae; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; González-Villà, Sandra; Cervera, Ricard; Bargalló, Núria; Lladó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML). In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative, and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection [True Positive Rate (62%) and Positive Prediction Value (80%), respectively] as well as segmentation accuracy [Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%)]. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration. PMID:27570507

  1. [Lichen ruber planus--lupus erythematosus/overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stary, A; Schwarz, T; Duschet, P; Gschnait, F

    1987-03-01

    Lichen planus/lupus erythematosus/overlap syndrome (OS) comprises those dermatoses which show the clinical, histologic, and immunopathologic characteristics of both diseases. On account of this heterogeneity, the diagnosis of OS may be difficult. About 35 cases have been reported on in the literature so far. We are going to discuss the clinical, histologic, and immunofluorescence findings in OS in detail.

  2. Detection and quantification of lupus anticoagulants in plasma from heparin treated patients, using addition of polybrene

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Eva M; Trettenes, Elin J; Wisløff, Finn; Abildgaard, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Background Lupus anticoagulants prolong clotting times in phospholipid-dependent coagulation tests. Lupus Ratio assays are integrated tests for lupus anticoagulants that may be based on APTT, RVVT or dPT clotting times. If a patient is being treated with unfractionated heparin, however, the heparin prolong clotting times and the diagnosis of lupus anticoagulant is invalidated. Commercial assays may have heparin neutralising agents added to their reagents. However, the type and efficacy of the heparin neutralisation is often not documented. We wanted to test the influence and efficacy of heparin neutralisers in the Lupus Ratio assay. Methods Several heparin neutralisers were tested, and polybrene was chosen for further testing. Unfractionated heparin and/or polybrene were added to normal plasma and to plasma from patients with or without lupus anticoagulant and clotting times compared before and after the additions. Lupus anticoagulant-positive patients were given 5000 IU i.v. of unfractionated heparin and plasma was collected just before and five minutes after the injection. Lupus Ratios were calculated after polybrene was added to the postinjection samples. Results The Lupus Ratio became slightly lower when polybrene was added to plasma without heparin. Plasma heparinised in vitro and plasma from patients that had received heparin, both had Lupus Ratios nearly identical to the Lupus Ratios calculated before any additions. Conclusion By addition of polybrene to a final concentration of 7.9 μg/ml in test plasma, Lupus Ratio may be determined in lupus anticoagulant-negative as well as positive plasmas irrespective of the presence of heparin 0.0 – 1.3 U/ml. PMID:16436199

  3. Added value of experts' knowledge to improve a quantitative microbial exposure assessment model--Application to aseptic-UHT food products.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Laure; Johnson, Nicholas Brian; Magras, Catherine; Albert, Isabelle; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-10-15

    In a previous study, a quantitative microbial exposure assessment (QMEA) model applied to an aseptic-UHT food process was developed [Pujol, L., Albert, I., Magras, C., Johnson, N. B., Membré, J. M. Probabilistic exposure assessment model to estimate aseptic UHT product failure rate. 2015 International Journal of Food Microbiology. 192, 124-141]. It quantified Sterility Failure Rate (SFR) associated with Bacillus cereus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus per process module (nine modules in total from raw material reception to end-product storage). Previously, the probabilistic model inputs were set by experts (using knowledge and in-house data). However, only the variability dimension was taken into account. The model was then improved using expert elicitation knowledge in two ways. First, the model was refined by adding the uncertainty dimension to the probabilistic inputs, enabling to set a second order Monte Carlo analysis. The eight following inputs, and their impact on SFR, are presented in detail in this present study: D-value for each bacteria of interest (B. cereus and G. stearothermophilus) associated with the inactivation model for the UHT treatment step, i.e., two inputs; log reduction (decimal reduction) number associated with the inactivation model for the packaging sterilization step for each bacterium and each part of the packaging (product container and sealing component), i.e., four inputs; and bacterial spore air load of the aseptic tank and the filler cabinet rooms, i.e., two inputs. Second, the model was improved by leveraging expert knowledge to develop further the existing model. The proportion of bacteria in the product which settled on surface of pipes (between the UHT treatment and the aseptic tank on one hand, and between the aseptic tank and the filler cabinet on the other hand) leading to a possible biofilm formation for each bacterium, was better characterized. It was modeled as a function of the hygienic design level of the aseptic

  4. Added value of experts' knowledge to improve a quantitative microbial exposure assessment model--Application to aseptic-UHT food products.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Laure; Johnson, Nicholas Brian; Magras, Catherine; Albert, Isabelle; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-10-15

    In a previous study, a quantitative microbial exposure assessment (QMEA) model applied to an aseptic-UHT food process was developed [Pujol, L., Albert, I., Magras, C., Johnson, N. B., Membré, J. M. Probabilistic exposure assessment model to estimate aseptic UHT product failure rate. 2015 International Journal of Food Microbiology. 192, 124-141]. It quantified Sterility Failure Rate (SFR) associated with Bacillus cereus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus per process module (nine modules in total from raw material reception to end-product storage). Previously, the probabilistic model inputs were set by experts (using knowledge and in-house data). However, only the variability dimension was taken into account. The model was then improved using expert elicitation knowledge in two ways. First, the model was refined by adding the uncertainty dimension to the probabilistic inputs, enabling to set a second order Monte Carlo analysis. The eight following inputs, and their impact on SFR, are presented in detail in this present study: D-value for each bacteria of interest (B. cereus and G. stearothermophilus) associated with the inactivation model for the UHT treatment step, i.e., two inputs; log reduction (decimal reduction) number associated with the inactivation model for the packaging sterilization step for each bacterium and each part of the packaging (product container and sealing component), i.e., four inputs; and bacterial spore air load of the aseptic tank and the filler cabinet rooms, i.e., two inputs. Second, the model was improved by leveraging expert knowledge to develop further the existing model. The proportion of bacteria in the product which settled on surface of pipes (between the UHT treatment and the aseptic tank on one hand, and between the aseptic tank and the filler cabinet on the other hand) leading to a possible biofilm formation for each bacterium, was better characterized. It was modeled as a function of the hygienic design level of the aseptic

  5. Renal biopsy in the management of lupus nephritis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chen, T K; Gelber, A C; Witter, F R; Petri, M; Fine, D M

    2015-02-01

    The differential diagnosis of proteinuria and hematuria in pregnancy is broad and includes active lupus nephritis. Identification of the correct diagnosis often has a profound therapeutic impact on not only the mother but also the fetus. To date, relatively few reports exist on the role of renal biopsy during pregnancy among women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We present a case series of 11 pregnant women with SLE who underwent a renal biopsy to evaluate a presumptive flare of lupus nephritis. The electronic medical record was retrospectively analyzed for pre-biopsy serum creatinine, proteinuria, hematuria, antinuclear antibodies (ANA), and antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA); histologic findings on renal biopsy; and the clinical course of each mother and fetus. From 2001 to 2012, 11 pregnant women with SLE flares during pregnancy underwent a renal biopsy at an academic tertiary medical center. At the time of biopsy, median gestational age was 16 weeks (range 9 to 27), median serum creatinine was 0.6 mg/dl (interquartile range 0.5 to 0.9), six (55%) had hematuria, and all had proteinuria >500 mg/24 hours. Proliferative lupus nephritis was found in 10 (91%) of 11 biopsies (five with ISN/RPS Class III; five with ISN/RPS Class IV). All but one individual underwent a change in management guided by information gleaned from renal biopsy. No apparent biopsy-related complications occurred to mother or fetus. Three women elected to terminate their pregnancy; although many factors were involved, the findings on renal biopsy informed the decision-making process. Among the remaining cases, there were three pre-term deliveries, one fetus with complete heart block, one in utero demise, and one maternal death. Renal biopsy is helpful at informing the management of patients with lupus nephritis during pregnancy.

  6. Blisters and Loss of Epidermis in Patients With Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Merklen-Djafri, Carine; Bessis, Didier; Frances, Camille; Poulalhon, Nicolas; Debarbieux, Sébastien; Cordel, Nadège; Lipsker, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The nosology of bullous lesions or equivalents (vesicles, erosions, and crusts) in patients with lupus erythematosus (LE) is rarely addressed. The primary aim of this study was to draw up a precise phenotypic inventory of such skin lesions; the secondary objective was to assess a potential relationship between the different types of loss of epidermis and extracutaneous lupus manifestations. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study including 22 patients with definite LE and bullous lesions or equivalents. All biopsies were reviewed. Patients were recruited in the dermatology departments of 6 centers. Patients were included if they met the diagnosis of systemic LE according to American College of Rheumatology and/or Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics criteria or diagnosis of cutaneous LE based on classic clinical criteria and/or histological ascertainment of LE. Patients were recruited through clinician's memory and photographic collections. Three clinico-pathological patterns could be individualized. First, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN)-like, sheet-like, skin detachment; sun-exposure, mild mucosal involvement, and dermal mucin deposition allow differential diagnosis with classical Lyell syndrome. Second, vesiculo-bullae and/or crusting occurring on typical lesions of subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus or chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Third, tense vesicles and/or blisters with an underlying neutrophilic dermatosis and a usual response to dapsone. A careful analysis of 22 LE patients with epidermal detachment reveals 2 main pathomechanisms: a classic LE interface dermatitis, which can be hyperacute and lead to TEN-like skin detachment; and a neutrophilic dermatosis, with tense vesicles and/or blisters, including classic bullous LE. PMID:26579826

  7. The inhibitory effect of strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate particles on cytokines from macrophages and osteoblasts leading to aseptic loosening in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengcheng; Li, Li; Yu, Xixun; Gu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Xu

    2014-04-01

    Aseptic loosening is a common cause of joint implant failure in humans. In order to enhance implant stability, we need to develop a new material that not only promotes the wear resistance of components of an artificial joint, but also possesses the pharmaceutical efficacy of protecting patients against aseptic loosening. Strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) has been found to have this potential ability. The goal of this study is to respectively quantify the levels of TNF-α (for macrophages), receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) (for osteoblasts) when osteoblasts and macrophages are challenged with various particles (including SCPP). In this study, the osteoblasts ROS 17/2.8 and macrophages RAW 264.7 were challenged with various wear particles (8% SCPP, the molar percentage of Sr in SCPP is 8%, UHMWPE, hydroxyapatite (HA) and CPP). The secretion of TNF-α (from RAW 264.7), OPG and RANKL protein (from ROS 17/2.8) was analyzed by ELISA. The OPG and RANKL mRNA from ROS 17/2.8 was detected by RT-PCR. The data of ELISA indicated that the amount of TNF-α challenged with 8% SCPP particles was more than three-fold lower than that of all other test groups. The ratio of OPG/RANKL in the 8% SCPP group was significantly increased compared to that of all other test groups. The results of OPG and RANKL mRNA expression showed the same tendency as the ELISA results. In general, this study showed that 8% SCPP particles can inhibit the expression of TNF-α and RANKL, promote the expression of OPG so that SCPP can inhibit bone resorption and promote bone formation, and then inhibit aseptic loosening. Thus SCPP could be a promising material for the construction of artificial joints. PMID:24518283

  8. Optimizing and developing a continuous separation system for the wet process separation of aluminum and polyethylene in aseptic composite packaging waste.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dahai; Peng, Zheng; Liu, Yuqiang; Li, Li; Huang, Qifei; Xie, Minghui; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of milk in China is increasing as living standards rapidly improve, and huge amounts of aseptic composite milk packaging waste are being generated. Aseptic composite packaging is composed of paper, polyethylene, and aluminum. It is difficult to separate the polyethylene and aluminum, so most of the waste is currently sent to landfill or incinerated with other municipal solid waste, meaning that enormous amounts of resources are wasted. A wet process technique for separating the aluminum and polyethylene from the composite materials after the paper had been removed from the original packaging waste was studied. The separation efficiency achieved using different separation reagents was compared, different separation mechanisms were explored, and the impacts of a range of parameters, such as the reagent concentration, temperature, and liquid-solid ratio, on the separation time and aluminum loss ratio were studied. Methanoic acid was found to be the optimal separation reagent, and the suitable conditions were a reagent concentration of 2-4 mol/L, a temperature of 60-80°C, and a liquid-solid ratio of 30 L/kg. These conditions allowed aluminum and polyethylene to be separated in less than 30 min, with an aluminum loss ratio of less than 3%. A mass balance was produced for the aluminum-polyethylene separation system, and control technique was developed to keep the ion concentrations in the reaction system stable. This allowed a continuous industrial-scale process for separating aluminum and polyethylene to be developed, and a demonstration facility with a capacity of 50t/d was built. The demonstration facility gave polyethylene and aluminum recovery rates of more than 98% and more than 72%, respectively. Separating 1t of aluminum-polyethylene composite packaging material gave a profit of 1769 Yuan, meaning that an effective method for recycling aseptic composite packaging waste was achieved.

  9. Decompression sickness and aseptic necrosis of bone: Investigations carried out during and after the construction of the Tyne Road Tunnel (1962-66)

    PubMed Central

    1971-01-01

    Report of Decompression Sickness Panel, Medical Research Council (1971). Brit. J. industr. Med., 28, 1-21. Decompression sickness and aseptic necrosis of bone: Investigations carried out during and after the construction of the Tyne Road Tunnel (1962-66). This paper describes investigations into the health of compressed air workers during and after the construction of a road tunnel under the River Tyne. Altogether 641 men were exposed to the compressed air environment over a period of approximately 31 months. The maximum working pressure was 42 psig (289·6 kN/m2), and the overall decompression sickness rate for work at pressures of 18 psig (124·1 kN/m2) and above was 2%. Radiological examination of the chest was carried out on 183 men to detect lung cysts but only one was found. Thus lung cysts were not shown to be a common factor in the causation of decompression sickness but the possibility of small sub-radiological collections of trapped air being involved was not excluded. Radiological examinations of the shoulders, hips and knee joints were carried out on 171 men. There was evidence of aseptic necrosis in one or more bones of 44 men (26%). Fifteen of the men with definite lesions of aseptic necrosis of bone and 7 of the men with suspected lesions had never worked in compressed air before this contract. The remaining 14 men with definite lesions and the 8 with suspected lesions had worked elsewhere in compressed air prior to this contract, but a definite lesion in one of these men and a suspected lesion in another can almost certainly be attributed to their work in compressed air on this contract. Images PMID:5543625

  10. An outbreak of aseptic meningitis due to echovirus 30 in a high school baseball club--possible role of severe exercise for a high attack rate.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Shirayoshi, Takamasa; Nagano, Takuro; Yaoita, Hiroyuki; Kogure, Shuji; Nariai, Hiroki; Natsumeda, Tomo; Taniuchi, Mayumi; Sandoh, Mitsuru; Sato, Yoshitake

    2009-01-01

    In September 2008, an outbreak of aseptic meningitis caused by echovirus 30 occurred in Ota City, Gunma. Among the 26 people hospitalized, 17 were members of a high school baseball club. The attack rate within the club was as high as 40%. The other 9 patients were either their families or close relatives of the baseball club members, indicating the outbreak was confined to a limited community. Although numerous outbreaks of echoviral meningitis have been reported worldwide, those with such a high attack rate within a limited community are rare. Severe physical exercise in a hot temperature could be associated with this high attack rate.

  11. Health-related quality of life assessed by LupusQoL questionnaire and SF-36 in Turkish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz-Oner, Sibel; Oner, Can; Dogukan, Fatih Mert; Moses, Toklong Filam; Demir, Kubra; Tekayev, Nazar; Atagunduz, Pamir; Tuglular, Serhan; Direskeneli, Haner

    2016-03-01

    The LupusQoL is a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measure for patients with lupus. We conducted this study to compare the efficiency of LupusQoL-TR (validated Turkish version of the LupusQoL questionnaire) with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), a generic quality of life (QoL) scale, in Turkish patients with lupus. Both questionnaires were conducted at a single visit to the clinic. Disease activity was measured with the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Associations between the LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 domains were examined while also examining age, disease duration, and disease activity for each questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Spearman's correlation coefficients, and Students t test were performed to analyze the data. A total of 113 consecutive patients with lupus (F/M 108:5, mean age 40.6 ± 11.9 years, mean disease duration 8.5 ± 7.0 years) were included, and 69 % of these were active. The median SLEDAI score was 2 (0-24), the mean global LupusQoL-TR score was 60.9 ± 23.3, and the mean SF-36 score was 41.2 ± 9.0. There was a significant correlation between LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 mean scores (r = 0.83; p < 0.001). QoL assessed by LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 did not correlate with disease activity (r = -0.11; p = 0.244 and r = -0.03; p = 0.721, respectively). LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 questionnaires were beneficial instruments in evaluating HRQoL in Turkish lupus patients. However, LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 were not associated with SLEDAI scores, which suggested that QoL might be affected by other factors besides disease activity, especially in clinically inactive or mildly active patients.

  12. Cardiovascular Events in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Rúa-Figueroa, Íñigo; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Galindo-Izquierdo, María; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Olivé-Marqués, Alejandro; Ordóñez-Cañizares, Carmen; Martín-Martínez, María A.; Blanco, Ricardo; Melero-González, Rafael; Ibáñez-Rúan, Jesús; Bernal-Vidal, José Antonio; Tomero-Muriel, Eva; Uriarte-Isacelaya, Esther; Horcada-Rubio, Loreto; Freire-González, Mercedes; Narváez, Javier; Boteanu, Alina L.; Santos-Soler, Gregorio; Andreu, José L.; Pego-Reigosa, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article estimates the frequency of cardiovascular (CV) events that occurred after diagnosis in a large Spanish cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and investigates the main risk factors for atherosclerosis. RELESSER is a nationwide multicenter, hospital-based registry of SLE patients. This is a cross-sectional study. Demographic and clinical variables, the presence of traditional risk factors, and CV events were collected. A CV event was defined as a myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, and/or peripheral artery disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the possible risk factors for atherosclerosis. From 2011 to 2012, 3658 SLE patients were enrolled. Of these, 374 (10.9%) patients suffered at least a CV event. In 269 (7.4%) patients, the CV events occurred after SLE diagnosis (86.2% women, median [interquartile range] age 54.9 years [43.2–66.1], and SLE duration of 212.0 months [120.8–289.0]). Strokes (5.7%) were the most frequent CV event, followed by ischemic heart disease (3.8%) and peripheral artery disease (2.2%). Multivariate analysis identified age (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.03 [1.02–1.04]), hypertension (1.71 [1.20–2.44]), smoking (1.48 [1.06–2.07]), diabetes (2.2 [1.32–3.74]), dyslipidemia (2.18 [1.54–3.09]), neurolupus (2.42 [1.56–3.75]), valvulopathy (2.44 [1.34–4.26]), serositis (1.54 [1.09–2.18]), antiphospholipid antibodies (1.57 [1.13–2.17]), low complement (1.81 [1.12–2.93]), and azathioprine (1.47 [1.04–2.07]) as risk factors for CV events. We have confirmed that SLE patients suffer a high prevalence of premature CV disease. Both traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to this higher prevalence. Although it needs to be verified with future studies, our study also shows—for the first time—an association between diabetes and CV events in SLE patients. PMID:26200625

  13. Clinical Application of a Modular Genomics Technique in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Progress towards Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zollars, Eric; Courtney, Sean M; Wolf, Bethany J; Allaire, Norm; Ranger, Ann; Hardiman, Gary; Petri, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring disease activity in a complex, heterogeneous disease such as lupus is difficult. Both over- and undertreatment lead to damage. Current standard of care serologies are unreliable. Better measures of disease activity are necessary as we move into the era of precision medicine. We show here the use of a data-driven, modular approach to genomic biomarker development within lupus-specifically lupus nephritis. PMID:27656648

  14. Neurologic complications of systemic lupus erythematosus, sjögren syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Shamik; Helfgott, Simon M

    2014-09-01

    Neurologic complications are frequent and often morbid in systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although all are systemic inflammatory syndromes, each disease affects the nervous system distinctly, such as peripheral neuropathy in Sjögren syndrome, cerebrovascular disease in lupus, and cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis. Some neurologic complications share convergent pathophysiology across diseases, such as neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders in both Sjögren syndrome and lupus. Ill-defined cognitive complaints are especially common in lupus and Sjögren syndrome. For the majority of the complications, evidence for treatment efficacy is limited and requires further investigation.

  15. MR appearance of bilateral, spontaneous patellar tendon rupture in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gould, E S; Taylor, S; Naidich, J B; Furie, R; Lane, L

    1987-01-01

    Bilateral spontaneous patellar tendon rupture is an unusual complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The ability of magnetic resonance to detect these tendon abnormalities is demonstrated.

  16. Curcumin aggravates CNS pathology in experimental systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Foxley, Sean; Zamora, Marta; Hack, Bradley; Alexander, Rebecca Rashmi; Roman, Brian; Quigg, Richard John; Alexander, Jessy John

    2013-04-01

    Complement activation and inflammation are key disease features of systemic lupus erythematosus. Curcumin is an anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits the complement cascade. Therefore, we hypothesized that curcumin will be protective in CNS lupus. To assess the effect of curcumin on CNS-lupus, MRL/lpr mice were used. Brain MRI showed that curcumin (30mg/kg body wt. i.p. from 12-20 weeks) worsened regional brain atrophy. The volumes of the lateral and third ventricles are significantly increased (150%-213% and 107%-140%, without and with treatment respectively compared to MRL+/+ controls). The hippocampus was reduced further (83%-81%) by curcumin treatment. In line with increased brain atrophy, there were edematous cells (41% increase in cell size in MRL/lpr compared to MRL+/+ mice. The cell size was further increased by 28% when treated with curcumin; p<0.02) in the cortex. In line with increased atrophy and edema, there was a significant increase (p<0.02) in the mRNA and protein expression of the water channel protein, aquaporin 4 in these mice. The increase in the matrix proteins, glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin in lupus mice in the hippocampus was prevented by curcumin. Curcumin increased IgG deposits and decreased C3 deposits in brain with a corresponding increase in immune complexes and decrease in C3 concentration (by 60% in MRL/lpr mice Vs. MRL+/+ mice and a further 26% decrease when treated with curcumin) in circulation. Decrease in C3 could alter the transport of immune complexes leading to an increase in IgG deposits which could induce inflammatory pathways thereby leading to worsening of the disease. The neurological outcome as measured by maze performance indicates that the curcumin treated mice performed poorly compared to the untreated counterparts. Our results for the first time provide evidence that at the dose used in this study, curcumin aggravates some CNS disease manifestations in experimental lupus brain. Therefore, until a safe

  17. Immunological aspects of biopsy-proven lupus nephritis in Bahraini patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Farid, Eman M; Hassan, Adla B; Abalkhail, Ali A; El-Agroudy, Amgad E; Arrayed, Sameer Al-M; Al-Ghareeb, Sumaya M

    2013-11-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a frequent and potentially serious complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that may influence morbidity and mortality. Immunological investigations are aiding tools to the kidney biopsy findings in early diagnosis, in addition to monitoring the effect of therapy. The aim of the present study is to highlight the role of these investigations in a group of Bahraini patients and to determine whether there is any positive association between these findings and the outcome of LN. The current study is a retrospective case-control study of randomly selected 88 SLE patients, 44 with biopsy-proven LN and 44 without, acting as controls. All renal biopsies performed during the period from 1996 to 2012 were classified according to the World Health Organization classification. Immunological investigations analyzed are: Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-ds DNA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (abs) and complement components C3, C4. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing class II was performed on selected cases. All patients had positive ANA (100%). A significantly high frequency of anti-Smith abs among the non-LN group (43.18%) compared with the LN group (18.18%) was found (P <0.001). On the other hand, the anti-Ro/SSA abs in the non-LN group was also found at a statistically higher frequency (20.45%) compared with that in the LN group (4.54%) (P <0.01). Anti-ds-DNA abs were found to be higher in the LN group (84.09%) compared with the non-LN group (70.45%), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.082). There was a positive association of ANA positivity and low C3 and or C4 in the studied group. In our study, 88.2% of the HLA typed patients had HLADR2, DR3 or both. In conclusion, in our Arabic Bahraini SLE patients, the presence of anti-Smith, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-RNP antibodies and the absence of anti-dsDNA antibodies are independent predictive markers for renal involvement. However, more prospective studies with a

  18. Presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated reactions in periprosthetic tissue after aseptic loosening of total hip replacements with metal bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huber, Monika; Reinisch, Georg; Trettenhahn, Günter; Zweymüller, Karl; Lintner, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of articular implants is frequently associated with tissue reactions to wear particles. Some patients, who had received metal-on-metal articulations, present early symptoms including persistent pain and implant failure. These symptoms raise the suspicion about the development of an immunological response. Furthermore, the generation of rare corrosion products in association with metallic implants has been observed. Corrosion products are known to enhance third-body wear and contribute to the loss of the implant. The purpose of this study was to investigate periprosthetic tissue containing solid corrosion products after aseptic loosening of second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements made of low-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy for the presence of immunologically determined tissue changes. Periprosthetic tissue of 11 cases containing uncommon solid deposits was investigated by light microscopy. In order to confirm the presence of corrosion products, additional methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were used. All investigated cases revealed solid chromium orthophosphate corrosion products as well as metallic wear particles to a various extent. Moreover, various intense tissue reactions characteristic of immune response were observed in all cases. The simultaneous presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated tissue reaction indicates that a relationship between corrosion development and implant-related hypersensitivity may exist. PMID:18725188

  19. Investigation of the Actual Causes of Hip Joint Implant Loosening Classified as Aseptic--Analysis of Microbiological Culture Results and Levels of Inflammatory Markers.

    PubMed

    Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Bogut, Agnieszka; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the hip joint prosthesis is considered as one of the most significant postoperative complications in recent years. The laboratory diagnostic procedure used to differentiate periprosthetic infection from aseptic loosening is very difficult because of the biofilm which microorganisms form on the implant surface. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the level of concordance between clinical classification of implant loosening among 50 patients subjected to reimplantation procedure and laboratory investigation of PJI including microbiological culture results and the levels of inflammatory markers assessed in the patients' synovial fluid samples, serum, and full blood. The synovial fluid was collected for leukocyte count, differential cell count, and culture on standard media. The levels of systemic inflammation markers such as the ESR and CRP concentration were determined in serum and full blood. Tissue samples were collected for microbiological studies. Components from endoprostheses were exposed to ultrasound in a process called sonication. Among the parameters measured in serum and full blood the levels of ESR and CRP were higher in the septic group of patients. Cytologic analysis of synovial fluid was in correlation with microbiologic identification. The most frequent isolated bacteria was Staphylococcus epidermidis. Culture results from materials such as synovial fluid, sonicate and tissues are crucial to establish the infectious aetiology of the loosening. Microscopic analysis of synovial fluid represents a simple, rapid and accurate method for differentiating PJI from aseptic failure. Sonication increases detection of the infectious process, and culture results are in correlation with the cytologic analysis of synovial fluid.

  20. Investigation of the Actual Causes of Hip Joint Implant Loosening Classified as Aseptic--Analysis of Microbiological Culture Results and Levels of Inflammatory Markers.

    PubMed

    Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Bogut, Agnieszka; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the hip joint prosthesis is considered as one of the most significant postoperative complications in recent years. The laboratory diagnostic procedure used to differentiate periprosthetic infection from aseptic loosening is very difficult because of the biofilm which microorganisms form on the implant surface. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the level of concordance between clinical classification of implant loosening among 50 patients subjected to reimplantation procedure and laboratory investigation of PJI including microbiological culture results and the levels of inflammatory markers assessed in the patients' synovial fluid samples, serum, and full blood. The synovial fluid was collected for leukocyte count, differential cell count, and culture on standard media. The levels of systemic inflammation markers such as the ESR and CRP concentration were determined in serum and full blood. Tissue samples were collected for microbiological studies. Components from endoprostheses were exposed to ultrasound in a process called sonication. Among the parameters measured in serum and full blood the levels of ESR and CRP were higher in the septic group of patients. Cytologic analysis of synovial fluid was in correlation with microbiologic identification. The most frequent isolated bacteria was Staphylococcus epidermidis. Culture results from materials such as synovial fluid, sonicate and tissues are crucial to establish the infectious aetiology of the loosening. Microscopic analysis of synovial fluid represents a simple, rapid and accurate method for differentiating PJI from aseptic failure. Sonication increases detection of the infectious process, and culture results are in correlation with the cytologic analysis of synovial fluid. PMID:26373172

  1. Lupus nephritis: clinicopathological study of 162 cases in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Parichatikanond, P; Francis, N D; Malasit, P; Laohapand, T; Nimmannit, S; Singchoovong, L; Nilwarangkur, S; Chrirawong, P; Vanichakarn, S

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and sixty two cases of lupus nephritis biopsied over three years in Thailand were studied. A pattern of clinical and histological renal disease very similar to that seen in the United States or Europe emerged. The predominant histological type was World Health Organisation class IV (diffuse proliferative; 58.6%). Patients with renal insufficiency (creatinine greater than or equal to 2 mg/100 ml) or hypertension at the time of biopsy had a considerably worse three year survival. Certain features such as sclerotic glomeruli, tubular atrophy, and an interstitial mononuclear cell infiltrate were significantly associated with a worse outcome (0.05 greater than p greater than 0.01), and patients who died with poor renal function had significantly higher chronicity scores than those in other groups (p less than 0.05). These findings emphasise the importance of chronic renal damage in the morbidity and mortality of patients with lupus nephritis. PMID:3485117

  2. Minimal change disease: a variant of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Neto, Miguel; Costa, Roberto S; Rodrigues, Fernanda F; Vieira Neto, Osvaldo M; Reis, Marlene A; Louzada Júnior, Paulo; Romão, Elen A; Dantas, Márcio

    2011-02-01

    Some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) present with nephrotic syndrome due to minimal change disease (MCD). Histopathological diagnosis of patients with SLE and nephrotic-range proteinuria has shown that these patients present with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis and membranous glomerulonephritis, World Health Organization (WHO) classes IV and V, respectively, more frequently than the other classes. In the present study, we reported a case of nephrotic syndrome and renal biopsy-proven MCD associated with SLE. A complete remission occurred after steroid treatment, which was followed by a relapse 15 months later with a concomitant reactivation of SLE. A second biopsy showed WHO class IIb lupus nephritis. Prednisone treatment was restarted, and the patient went into complete remission again. The association of MCD and SLE may not be a coincidence, and MCD should be considered as an associated SLE nephropathy.

  3. Hydrocephalus in an elderly man with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Wu, Tsai-Hung; Chou, Chung-Tei; Tsai, Chang-Youh

    2009-06-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with quadriplegia, seizures, dysarthria, motor aphasia and urinary incontinence lasting for several years. The development of proteinuria and increased susceptibility to infections brought the physician's attention to possible underlying autoimmune diseases. Laboratory investigations revealed evidence for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome. Imaging studies showed obstructive hydrocephalus. Several courses of methylprednisolone therapies followed by maintenance therapy with low-dose steroid, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and antihypertensives improved the proteinuria and dysarthria but not the urinary incontinence or dementia. A thromboembolic event in the central nervous system secondary to phospholipid antibodies or lupus activity may represent a pathogenetic basis for hydrocephalus. When encountering a patient with hydrocephalus but without apparent predisposing factors, it is always important to include SLE as a differential diagnosis.

  4. Disseminated lupus vulgaris and papulonecrotic tuberculid: case report.

    PubMed

    Senol, M; Ozcan, A; Aydin, A; Karincaoglu, Y; Sasmaz, S; Sener, S

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis and extrapulmonary forms of this disease is increasing all over the world. Lupus vulgaris is the most prevalent form of cutaneous tuberculosis in Europe and the Middle East. Papulonecrotic tuberculid, the most common form of hyperergic response to mycobacteria or their fragments, is uncommon in children. We report lupus vulgaris with papulonecrotic tuberculid in a 12-year-old girl who had a 3-year history of slowly growing plaques on her trunk, extremities, and the tip of her nose and papuloulcerative lesions over her entire body. A skin biopsy specimen showed minimally caseating granulomatous inflammation. Staining for acid-fast bacilli was negative in both plaques and papules. Polymerase chain reaction identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in the patient's sputum, gastric fluid, and plaques and was negative in the papules. She was started on antituberculous therapy with four drugs and her lesions responded rapidly.

  5. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus: recent lessons from animal models.

    PubMed

    Ghoreishi, M; Dutz, J P

    2010-08-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) may present as a clinically heterogeneous group of lupus-specific skin lesions that have common histopathological findings. Determination of the immunopathological sequence of events in this group of disorders has been challenging for dermatologists and immunologists but is vital for therapeutic targeting. We review animal models in which different aspects of immune alteration in CLE have been addressed. The MRL/lpr mouse develops spontaneous skin disease with some features of CLE. Study of this strain and related gene-manipulated strains has revealed roles for multiple cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-18, and IL-21, in disease pathogenesis. A role for the growth factor colony stimulating factor 1 and the inflammatory protein high-mobility group box 1 has also been suggested. We discuss potential novel treatment options suggested by these models.

  6. Ulcerative lupus vulgaris of face: an uncommon presentation in India.

    PubMed

    Padmavathy, L; Rao, L Lakshmana; Ethirajan, N; Krishnaswami, B

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis affects the population world wide, more among those living in developing countries. The incidence of tuberculosis registered an upward trend even in developed countries, with the advent of HIV infection. Cutaneous tuberculosis accounts for about 1% of cases of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Cutaneous tuberculosis presents with various lesions ranging from ulcerative to proliferative or hyperkeratotic lesions. The lesions may sometimes be associated with marked destruction of the tissues resulting in marked disfigurement, especially when it involves face as seen in cases of Lupus Vulgaris. A case of Lupus Vulgaris in a young woman with extensive ulceration of face which responded to ATT resulting in scarring of the face is reported for its rarity amongst Indian population as against western population.

  7. Annular lupus vulgaris: an unusual case undiagnosed for five years.

    PubMed

    Gönül, Müzeyyen; Kiliç, Arzu; Külcü Cakmak, Seray; Gül, Ulker; Koçak, Oğuzhan; Demiriz, Murat

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still a serious problem in both developing and developed countries. It is often confused with various cutaneous disorders both clinically and histopathologically.A 46-year-old woman attended our clinic with progressive, asymptomatic, annular skin lesions on her right upper extremity for 5 years. She had received many different therapies for these lesions at other institutions previously but these medications were not effective and the lesions deteriorated. On dermatological examination, well-demarcated, irregular bordered, violaceous colored, elevated and crusted annular lesions on her right hand dorsum and forearm were observed. She was diagnosed as having lupus vulgaris clinically and histopathologically. Antituberculosis therapy was administered and regression of the lesions started in the second week of medication.We report a case of long-standing, undiagnosed and uncommon, annular form of lupus vulgaris. We want to stress that clinical and histopathological findings are still important for the diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis.

  8. Case of lupus vulgaris diagnosed 50 years after onset.

    PubMed

    Uttawichai, Pattanawadee; Igarashi, Tsukasa; Kawana, Seiji

    2009-02-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infrequent form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, but is a symptom that can lead to diagnosis of tuberculosis. We describe a case of lupus vulgaris in a 79-year-old woman who had a 50-year history of a slowly growing plaque on her right cheek. She visited many hospitals without resolution and the plaque gradually enlarged. Recently, she was misdiagnosed with eczema and prescribed topical steroids that had no effect, and she subsequently visited our outpatient clinic. A diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was made based on histopathology, culture and polymerase chain reaction, and isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol were administered as antituberculosis treatment. Although the incidence of cutaneous tuberculosis has decreased significantly in developed countries, knowledge and awareness of the disease are still of importance for proper diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Modulation of hormones in the treatment of lupus.

    PubMed

    Walker, S E

    2001-10-01

    The etiologic enigma of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has so far precluded a fully integrated approach to understanding and managing the disease. As new findings continue to uncover relationships between the endocrine system and the besieged immune system in lupus patients, however, researchers have an opportunity to rethink the direction of their investigative efforts. A successful approach to development of long-awaited new treatments may well include modulation of specific hormones. The peptide hormone prolactin may be associated with SLE disease activity. The dopamine agonist bromocriptine, which inhibits pituitary secretion of prolactin, has been shown in a variety of small animal and human trials to reduce disease activity in SLE. Continued research may show that it can be an attractive alternative or adjacent therapy in cases where hydroxychloroquine is contraindicated.

  10. DNA-damaging autoantibodies and cancer: the lupus butterfly theory.

    PubMed

    Noble, Philip W; Bernatsky, Sasha; Clarke, Ann E; Isenberg, David A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Hansen, James E

    2016-07-01

    Autoantibodies reactive against host DNA are detectable in the circulation of most people with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The long-held view that antibodies cannot penetrate live cells has been disproved. A subset of lupus autoantibodies penetrate cells, translocate to nuclei, and inhibit DNA repair or directly damages DNA. The result of these effects depends on the microenvironment and genetic traits of the cell. Some DNA-damaging antibodies alone have little impact on normal cells, but in the presence of other conditions, such as pre-existing DNA-repair defects, can become highly toxic. These findings raise new questions about autoimmunity and DNA damage, and reveal opportunities for new targeted therapies against malignancies particularly vulnerable to DNA damage. In this Perspectives article, we review the known associations between SLE, DNA damage and cancer, and propose a theory for the effects of DNA-damaging autoantibodies on SLE pathophysiology and cancer risk. PMID:27009542

  11. Pregnancies in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, K

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has preponderance in women in their childbearing years; consequently pregnancy has always been an important issue of concern for the patient and the treating physician. Based upon numerous reports on successful pregnancy outcomes in the past decades, the initial advice against pregnancy in the 1950s has been replaced by a common understanding that women with SLE often have successful pregnancy outcomes, and clinicians therefore advise on pregnancy planning, including possible drug adjustments, timing and close surveillance. The recently published Predictors of Pregnancy Outcome: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (PROMISSE) study, so far the largest multicentre cohort study of pregnant women with underlying stable SLE, has given some important answers to long-discussed questions. Future studies on data collected from the PROMISSE cohort will hopefully identify serological biomarkers, possibly genes, and in addition, give valuable information about underlying disease mechanisms.

  12. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus in elderly people: a case series.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, M S; Byrne, E J; Hopkinson, N; Bendall, P

    1992-01-01

    Five elderly patients presenting with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus were referred to the sectorised psychiatry service of the department of health care of the elderly. They represented 2% of patients admitted over a period of two years. Two patients presented with a subacute confusional state, two with dementia, and one with depression. Three patients responded well to treatment. This suggests that systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is more common in elderly people than was originally thought and is a potentially treatable cause of organic brain disorder. The absence of reports of elderly patients with SLE is likely to be due to the continued application of the American Rheumatism Association's revised 1982 classification criteria, which are inappropriate for this population. PMID:1479395

  13. Cavitary pulmonary lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus: an unusual manifestation.

    PubMed

    Dalili, Amir Reza; Lotfi, Reza; Mousavi, Seyedeh Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis. The frequency of SLE with cavitary lesion manifestation is very rare and is thought to be due to infection or pulmonary embolism. A 19-year-old female diagnosed with SLE complicated by lupus nephritis and cavitary pulmonary lesion is presented in this case report. Other diseases that can lead to such lesions were ruled out in the patient. The patient improved briefly after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy, but was unresponsive to supportive treatment due to pneumothorax. Pneumothorax is caused by cavitary lesions and possibly bronchopleural fistulas - these later caused respiratory distress and death. The patient did not show any improvement in the lesions after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. This case report suggests that the differential diagnosis of cavitary lung lesions should include SLE. PMID:25763160

  14. [Cytokine production in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Müzes, G; González-Cabello, R; Van Vien, C; Fehér, J; Gergely, P

    1991-09-01

    The production of different cytokines, namely interleukin-2, interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha produced by peripheral immunocompetent cells was evaluated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in active and inactive stage of the disease. The results obtained were compared to healthy controls. It has been found that lymphocytes from both groups of SLE patients produced similarly less interleukin-2 activity. Interleukin-1 activity of monocytes was significantly reduced only in patients with active stage of the disease, whereas tumor necrosis factor-alpha production was diminished even in cases of inactive SLE. The simultaneous detection of the above mentioned cytokines may indicate further details concerning immunoregulatory disturbances of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:1923468

  15. Thrombotic and hemorrhagic complications in children with the lupus anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, M L; Salusinsky-Sternbach, M; Bellefleur, M; Esseltine, D W

    1984-12-01

    Endogenous circulating anticoagulants are unusual in children without a congenital factor deficiency. In particular, the lupus anticoagulant has only rarely been reported in children. Despite its functioning in vitro to prolong the partial thromboplastin time, patients more frequently have problems with thrombosis than bleeding, unless there is a coexistent prothrombin deficiency or thrombocytopenia. We report the cases of three children with the lupus anticoagulant. Two children had associated thromboses. One had a thrombosis of the iliofemoral system and the other had a partial Budd-Chiari syndrome, a thrombosis of the deep calf veins and ureteric obstruction. The third child had a concomitant prothrombin deficiency and bleeding after tooth extraction. Associated findings in these patients included a positive antinuclear antibody test in two, a positive anti-DNA antibody test in two, a false-positive VDRL test in two, and an antiphospholipid antibody test in two. PMID:6439032

  16. Toxocara canis infection: Unusual trigger of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michaël; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Baudouin, Véronique; Guillem, Colette; Peuchmaur, Michel; Deschênes, Georges; Fila, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Infection by Toxocara canis can cause systemic vasculitis. We report here a unique case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) triggered by T. canis infection. An 8-year-old girl was treated with albendazole therapy for common toxocariasis, but she developed two weeks later, asthenia, fever, infiltrated maculopapular eruption of the face, peripheral vascular disease with necrosis of the fingers and inflammatory anemia with proteinuria. Anti-nuclear, anti-DNA and anti-Sm antibodies positivity, together with minimal change nephritis with mesangial exclusive IgM deposit on renal biopsy and clinical relapse after initially successful steroid therapy, led to the diagnosis of SLE. T. canis infection can trigger systemic lupus but must also be ruled out of the differential diagnosis given its association with autoimmunity. PMID:26147636

  17. Immunologic findings, thrombocytopenia and disease activity in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W. F.; Linton, A. L.; Cordy, P. E.; Keown, P. E.; Lohmann, R. C.; Lindsay, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty patients with nephritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus were followed up for a mean of 34 months after renal biopsy with serial determinations of total serum complement and C3 and C4 concentrations, binding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), antinuclear antibody pattern and platelet count. There were 25 episodes of nonhematologic observed disease activity in 16 of the 20 patients; elevated DNA binding and thrombocytopenia correlated well with these episodes. The mean platelet count during episodes of observed disease activity was 96 +/- 42 X 10(9)/L, which was significantly different from the mean count of 248 +/- 90 X 10(9)/L during disease quiescence. The proportion of false-positive results with the immunologic tests varied from 25% to 67% and with platelet counts it was 11%. It is suggested that thrombocytopenia may be a simple and accurate index of disease activity in lupus nephritis. PMID:350367

  18. Genetic Factors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Contribution to Disease Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Borgiani, Paola; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Rufini, Sara; Cipriano, Enrica; Alessandri, Cristiano; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Sili Scavalli, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors exert an important role in determining Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, interplaying with environmental factors. Several genetic studies in various SLE populations have identified numerous susceptibility loci. From a clinical point of view, SLE is characterized by a great heterogeneity in terms of clinical and laboratory manifestations. As widely demonstrated, specific laboratory features are associated with clinical disease subset, with different severity degree. Similarly, in the last years, an association between specific phenotypes and genetic variants has been identified, allowing the possibility to elucidate different mechanisms and pathways accountable for disease manifestations. However, except for Lupus Nephritis (LN), no studies have been designed to identify the genetic variants associated with the development of different phenotypes. In this review, we will report data currently known about this specific association. PMID:26798662

  19. Presence of hepatitis-associated antigen in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Díaz-Jouanen, E.

    1972-01-01

    Presence of hepatitis-associated antigen (HAA) was investigated in 504 sera from 116 patients with SLE and was found in 41% of them. HAA was present in at least one serum in 75% of the patients but there were variations in presence and titres in the same patient at different times. Except for a tendency of HAA to appear or rise in titre with lupusi nactivation following corticosteroid or immunosuppresive therapy, there was no correlation between its presence and disease activity, specific organ involvement, antinuclear antibodies or immunoglobulin levels. All but one of twelve lupus patients with recurrent bacterial infections had HAA at high titres. HAA appeared in the serum of a patient upon development of IgA deficiency. HAA antigenaemia in systemic lupus erythematosus seems a consequence rather than a cause of the immunological derangement in this disease. PMID:4538860

  20. Amyloïdosis, sarcoidosis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Amel; Hassine, Imene Ben; Karmani, Monia; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of renal and multiple organ Amyloïdosis is currently considered exceptional in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a case of a concomitant SLE and Amyloïdosis in a 57 year old female patient with hypothyroidism history, who presented with erythema nodosum, fever, arthralgia and sicca syndrome. Biological findings showed an inflammatory syndrome, renal failure, proteinuria (1g / 24h), positive auto antibodies and anti DNA. Lung radiology revealed medistinal lymphadenopathy, pleural nodules, ground glass infiltrates and pleuritis. Bronchial biopsy showed non specific inflammation. The salivary gland biopsy showed amyloïd deposits. This case report reminds us that lupus and Amyloïdosis association, although exceptional remains possible. The occurrence of Lofgren syndrome in this situation make the originality of this report. PMID:27583087

  1. Increased mortality in patients with the lupus anticoagulant: the Vienna Lupus Anticoagulant and Thrombosis Study (LATS).

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Johanna; Posch, Florian; Koder, Silvia; Perkmann, Thomas; Quehenberger, Peter; Zoghlami, Claudia; Ay, Cihan; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2015-05-28

    Data on the clinical course of lupus anticoagulant (LA)-positive individuals with or without thrombotic manifestations or pregnancy complications are limited. To investigate mortality rates and factors that might influence mortality, we conducted a prospective observational study of LA-positive individuals. In total, 151 patients (82% female) were followed for a median of 8.2 years; 30 of the patients (20%) developed 32 thromboembolic events (15 arterial and 17 venous events) and 20 patients (13%) died. In univariable analysis, new onset of thrombosis (hazard ratio [HR] = 8.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.46-22.16) was associated with adverse survival. Thrombosis remained a strong adverse prognostic factor after multivariable adjustment for age and hypertension (HR = 5.95; 95% CI, 2.43-14.95). Concomitant autoimmune diseases, anticoagulant treatment at baseline, or positivity for anticardiolipin- or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies were not associated with mortality. In a relative survival analysis, our cohort of LA positives showed a persistently worse survival in comparison with an age-, sex-, and study-inclusion-year-matched Austrian reference population. The cumulative relative survival was 95.0% (95% CI, 88.5-98.8) after 5 years and 87.7% (95% CI, 76.3-95.6) after 10 years. We conclude that occurrence of a thrombotic event is associated with higher mortality in patients with LA. Consequently, the prevention of thromboembolic events in LA positives might improve survival.

  2. Cardiovascular Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: The Role of Traditional and Lupus Related Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Carlos Borelli; Appenzeller, Simone

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by immune cell activation, inflammation driven plaque formation and subsequent destabilization. In other disorders of an inflammatory nature, the chronic inflammatory state per se has been linked to acceleration of the atherosclerotic process which is underlined by an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antiphopholipid (Hughes) syndrome (APS). SLE is an autoimmune disease that may affect any organ. Premature coronary heart disease has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in SLE. In addition to mortality, cardiovascular morbidity is also markedly increased in these patients, compared with the general population. The increased cardiovascular risk can be explained only partially by an increased prevalence of classical risk factors for cardiovascular disease; it also appears to be related to inflammation. Inflammation is increasingly being considered central to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and an important risk factor for vascular disease. Recent epidemiologic and pathogenesis studies have suggested a great deal in common between the pathogenesis of prototypic autoimmune disease such as SLE and that of atherosclerosis. We will review traditional risk factors for CVD in SLE. We will also discuss the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis, as well as possible treatment strategies in these patients. PMID:19936286

  3. LAPping up dead cells to prevent lupus nephritis: a novel role for noncanonical autophagy in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jeremy S; Ross, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis remain poorly understood. A recent study demonstrates that deficiencies in the immune system's ability to degrade scavenged dead cells via noncanonical autophagy is sufficient to break immune tolerance and produce features commonly seen in lupus, including circulating autoantibodies, inflammatory cytokines, and nephritis. This work provides a possible mechanism for the association of polymorphisms in autophagy genes with the risk of lupus. PMID:27418084

  4. LAPping up dead cells to prevent lupus nephritis: a novel role for noncanonical autophagy in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jeremy S; Ross, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis remain poorly understood. A recent study demonstrates that deficiencies in the immune system's ability to degrade scavenged dead cells via noncanonical autophagy is sufficient to break immune tolerance and produce features commonly seen in lupus, including circulating autoantibodies, inflammatory cytokines, and nephritis. This work provides a possible mechanism for the association of polymorphisms in autophagy genes with the risk of lupus.

  5. Denning behaviour of non-gravid wolves, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Phillips, M.K.; Smith, D.W.; Kreeger, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    Wild wolves (Canis lupus) that had produced pups in earlier years but were not currently pregnant, and ovariectomized captive wolves, dug dens during and after the whelping season even though they produced no pups. These observations suggest that den digging is not a function of pregnancy or of ovarian estrogen or progesterone. We hypothesize that increasing prolactin in spring elicits or mediates den-digging behavior.

  6. Outcomes in African Americans and Hispanics with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Contreras, G; Lenz, O; Pardo, V; Borja, E; Cely, C; Iqbal, K; Nahar, N; de La Cuesta, C; Hurtado, A; Fornoni, A; Beltran-Garcia, L; Asif, A; Young, L; Diego, J; Zachariah, M; Smith-Norwood, B

    2006-05-01

    Poor outcomes have been reported in African Americans and Hispanics compared to Caucasians with lupus nephritis. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to identify independent predictors of outcomes in African Americans and Hispanics with lupus nephritis. In total, 93 African Americans, 100 Hispanics, and 20 Caucasians with a mean age of 28 +/- 13 years and an annual household income of 32.9 +/- 17.3 (in 1000 US dollars) were studied. World Health Organization (WHO) lupus nephritis classes II, III, IV, and V were seen in 9, 13, 52, and 26%, respectively. Important baseline differences were higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) in African Americans compared to Hispanics and Caucasians (107 +/- 19, 102 +/- 15, and 99 +/- 13 mmHg, P < 0.05), and higher serum creatinine (1.66 +/- 1.3, 1.25 +/- 1.0, and 1.31 +/- 1.0 mg/dl, P < 0.025). African Americans had lower hematocrit compared to Hispanics and Caucasians (29 +/- 5, and 31 +/- 6, and 32 +/- 7%, P < 0.05), and lower annual household income (30.8 +/- 14.9, 33.1 +/- 15.9, and 42.2 +/- 29.3 in 1000 US dollars; P < 0.05). Lower prevalence of WHO class IV was seen in Caucasians (30%) compared to Hispanics (57%, P = 0.03) and African Americans (51%, P = 0.09). Development of doubling creatinine or end-stage renal disease was higher in African Americans and Hispanics than in Caucasians (31, 18, and 10%; P < 0.05), as was the development of renal events or death (34, 20, and 10%; P < 0.025). Our results suggest that both biological factors indicating an aggressive disease and low household income are common in African Americans and Hispanics with lupus nephritis, and outcomes in these groups are worse than in Caucasians.

  7. Lupus vulgaris of the popliteal fossa: a delayed diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Altunay, Ilknur Kivanc; Kayaoglu, Semra; Ekmekci, Tugba Rezan; Kutlu, Safiye; Arpag, Esra Saygin

    2007-07-13

    Lupus vulgaris (LV) is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis. It commonly presents on the head and neck regions. The diagnosis may be difficult when LV occurs at unexpected regions or in unusual clinical forms. Sometimes special stains for the organism and mycobacterial cultures may be negative. Nevertheless, it is usually possible to reach the correct diagnosis of LV using clinical and histopathological findings. But at times, a therapeutic trial with antitubercular agents may be required.

  8. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Orrea Solano, M

    1993-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) manifestations of the chronic autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are reviewed. SLE-CNS dysfunction is broadly divided into neurologic and psychiatric clinical categories. The distinct clinical entities within these broad categories are fully described. Diagnostic criteria employed to verify the presence of SLE-CNS dysfunction, including laboratory serum and cerebral spinal fluid analyses as well as radiologic and other multimodality diagnostic tools, are compared and contrasted with respect to sensitivity and specificity.

  9. Minocycline-induced clinical and biological lupus-like disease.

    PubMed

    Tournigand, C; Généreau, T; Prudent, M; Diemert, M C; Herson, S; Chosidow, O

    1999-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed maculopapular rash, myalgias, arthralgias and myocarditis with elevated anti-nuclear and anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies. She was taking minocycline for acne and all symptoms resolved when this treatment was stopped. The patient has no evidence of disease one year after onset of symptoms. Clinicians should be aware of minocycline's responsibility in inducing lupus-like disease.

  10. Therapeutic targeting of BET protein BRD4 delays murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shitong; Sun, Yonghua; Sha, Hongyu

    2015-12-01

    BRD4 is a member of the BET (bromodomain and extraterminal domain) family proteins that can bind acetylated histones and influence transcription, which are considered as potential therapeutic targets in many distinct diseases. And the BET inhibitor JQ1 has been proven to be effective in suppressing multiple inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. This study aimed to examine the therapeutic potential of JQ1 on a lupus model, MRL-lpr mice. Ten-week-old MRL-lpr mice were treated with JQ1 (oral administration of 200mg/kg) or vehicle for 8weeks. The proteinuria, nephritic damage, serum biochemistry, autoantibodies and cytokines were examined. Splenocytes of MRL-lpr mice were isolated for in vitro experiments. Treatment with JQ1 significantly attenuated the progression of proteinuria and nephritis. The serum concentrations of anti-dsDNA antibody as well as B-cell activating factor (BAFF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and INF-γ were inhibited, and IL-10 augmented by JQ1. Importantly, JQ1 improved the survival of lupus mice. In vitro, BAFF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and INF-γ were inhibited, and IL-10 augmented by JQ1 (500nM) in the cultures of splenocytes from diseased MRL-lpr mice, which was further supported by a significant reduction in immune complex-mediated activation of human monocytes in vitro by JQ1. Taken together, JQ1 effectively alleviates lupus in MRL-lpr mice by suppressing BAFF, pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoimmunity, supporting the therapeutic value of JQ1 in lupus disease. PMID:26590112

  11. Vitamin D and systemic lupus erythematosus: continued evolution.

    PubMed

    Yap, Kristy S; Morand, Eric F

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone that has well-established roles in calcium and bone metabolism. Vitamin D has more recently become recognized for its role in the immune response and its potential immunomodulatory effects in autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This review provides a summary of the recent literature regarding vitamin D and SLE, as well as current recommendations for vitamin D supplementation in patients with SLE.

  12. Lupus enteritis: from clinical findings to therapeutic management

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lupus enteritis is a rare and poorly understood cause of abdominal pain in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we report a series of 7 new patients with this rare condition who were referred to French tertiary care centers and perform a systematic literature review of SLE cases fulfilling the revised ACR criteria, with evidence for small bowel involvement, excluding those with infectious enteritis. We describe the characteristics of 143 previously published and 7 new cases. Clinical symptoms mostly included abdominal pain (97%), vomiting (42%), diarrhea (32%) and fever (20%). Laboratory features mostly reflected lupus activity: low complement levels (88%), anemia (52%), leukocytopenia or lymphocytopenia (40%) and thrombocytopenia (21%). Median CRP level was 2.0 mg/dL (range 0–8.2 mg/dL). Proteinuria was present in 47% of cases. Imaging studies revealed bowel wall edema (95%), ascites (78%), the characteristic target sign (71%), mesenteric abnormalities (71%) and bowel dilatation (24%). Only 9 patients (6%) had histologically confirmed vasculitis. All patients received corticosteroids as a first-line therapy, with additional immunosuppressants administered either from the initial episode or only in case of relapse (recurrence rate: 25%). Seven percent developed intestinal necrosis or perforation, yielding a mortality rate of 2.7%. Altogether, lupus enteritis is a poorly known cause of abdominal pain in SLE patients, with distinct clinical and therapeutic features. The disease may evolve to intestinal necrosis and perforation if untreated. Adding with this an excellent steroid responsiveness, timely diagnosis becomes primordial for the adequate management of this rare entity. PMID:23642042

  13. Lupus enteritis: from clinical findings to therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Peter; Arnaud, Laurent; Galicier, Lionel; Mathian, Alexis; Hie, Miguel; Sene, Damien; Haroche, Julien; Veyssier-Belot, Catherine; Huynh-Charlier, Isabelle; Grenier, Philippe A; Piette, Jean-Charles; Amoura, Zahir

    2013-01-01

    Lupus enteritis is a rare and poorly understood cause of abdominal pain in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we report a series of 7 new patients with this rare condition who were referred to French tertiary care centers and perform a systematic literature review of SLE cases fulfilling the revised ACR criteria, with evidence for small bowel involvement, excluding those with infectious enteritis. We describe the characteristics of 143 previously published and 7 new cases. Clinical symptoms mostly included abdominal pain (97%), vomiting (42%), diarrhea (32%) and fever (20%). Laboratory features mostly reflected lupus activity: low complement levels (88%), anemia (52%), leukocytopenia or lymphocytopenia (40%) and thrombocytopenia (21%). Median CRP level was 2.0 mg/dL (range 0-8.2 mg/dL). Proteinuria was present in 47% of cases. Imaging studies revealed bowel wall edema (95%), ascites (78%), the characteristic target sign (71%), mesenteric abnormalities (71%) and bowel dilatation (24%). Only 9 patients (6%) had histologically confirmed vasculitis. All patients received corticosteroids as a first-line therapy, with additional immunosuppressants administered either from the initial episode or only in case of relapse (recurrence rate: 25%). Seven percent developed intestinal necrosis or perforation, yielding a mortality rate of 2.7%. Altogether, lupus enteritis is a poorly known cause of abdominal pain in SLE patients, with distinct clinical and therapeutic features. The disease may evolve to intestinal necrosis and perforation if untreated. Adding with this an excellent steroid responsiveness, timely diagnosis becomes primordial for the adequate management of this rare entity. PMID:23642042

  14. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Deep Vein Thrombosis and Cutaneous Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Renu; Goyal, Laxmikant; Agrawal, Abhishek; Wadhwani, Dileep; Mital, Pradeep; Sharma, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    We are reporting a case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with left upper limb and lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) due to protein S deficiency which was aggravated by anticoagulants. Oral anticoagulant-induced skin necrosis also developed in this patient. This patient was negative for anti-phospholipid antibodies (APLA). Such a case is rarity where SLE patient without APLA has protein S deficiency. PMID:27608879

  15. Lupus enteritis: from clinical findings to therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Peter; Arnaud, Laurent; Galicier, Lionel; Mathian, Alexis; Hie, Miguel; Sene, Damien; Haroche, Julien; Veyssier-Belot, Catherine; Huynh-Charlier, Isabelle; Grenier, Philippe A; Piette, Jean-Charles; Amoura, Zahir

    2013-05-03

    Lupus enteritis is a rare and poorly understood cause of abdominal pain in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we report a series of 7 new patients with this rare condition who were referred to French tertiary care centers and perform a systematic literature review of SLE cases fulfilling the revised ACR criteria, with evidence for small bowel involvement, excluding those with infectious enteritis. We describe the characteristics of 143 previously published and 7 new cases. Clinical symptoms mostly included abdominal pain (97%), vomiting (42%), diarrhea (32%) and fever (20%). Laboratory features mostly reflected lupus activity: low complement levels (88%), anemia (52%), leukocytopenia or lymphocytopenia (40%) and thrombocytopenia (21%). Median CRP level was 2.0 mg/dL (range 0-8.2 mg/dL). Proteinuria was present in 47% of cases. Imaging studies revealed bowel wall edema (95%), ascites (78%), the characteristic target sign (71%), mesenteric abnormalities (71%) and bowel dilatation (24%). Only 9 patients (6%) had histologically confirmed vasculitis. All patients received corticosteroids as a first-line therapy, with additional immunosuppressants administered either from the initial episode or only in case of relapse (recurrence rate: 25%). Seven percent developed intestinal necrosis or perforation, yielding a mortality rate of 2.7%. Altogether, lupus enteritis is a poorly known cause of abdominal pain in SLE patients, with distinct clinical and therapeutic features. The disease may evolve to intestinal necrosis and perforation if untreated. Adding with this an excellent steroid responsiveness, timely diagnosis becomes primordial for the adequate management of this rare entity.

  16. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus for General Practitioners: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Karrar, Ali; AI-Dalaan, Abdullah

    1994-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease of unknown etiology or etiologies. The disease may be acute or chronic. A wide clinicopathological spectrum is expressed in each organ involved which is induced through multiple antibodies that result in. imnunologically mediated tissue injury. In this literature review, the clinical and pathological features as well as laboratory abnormalities, measures /or diagnosis, outlines of management, and prognosis are discussed. PMID:23008531

  17. Current role of rituximab in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mok, Chi Chiu

    2015-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by periods of flares and remission, resulting in organ damage over time caused by persistent disease activity and treatment-related complications. Conventional therapies are not ideal in terms of efficacy and safety. Novel biological therapies are being developed to enhance therapeutic efficacy, minimize disease exacerbation and reduce toxicities. As dysregulation of B cells is the hallmark of SLE, B-cell targeted therapies are the focus of recent clinical research. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been used with success in recalcitrant lupus manifestations. However, randomized controlled trials have failed to reveal its benefit in renal and non-renal SLE when combined with conventional immunosuppressive protocols. Although heterogeneity of SLE manifestations, pitfalls in study design and the limitations of the assessment tools for various clinical end points may have contributed to the discouraging results, rituximab remains an option in patients who are refractory or intolerant to conventional therapies. Recently, a regimen consisting of rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil without oral corticosteroids was reported to be effective in lupus nephritis. While the efficacy of this regimen has to be confirmed, future controlled trials should focus on the efficacy of rituximab in refractory lupus manifestations and its synergistic effect with other immunosuppressive agents such as cyclophosphamide. In short-term randomized controlled trials, a non-significant increase in serious adverse events was observed in SLE patients treated with rituximab. Long-term safety data of rituximab in SLE, in particular the incidence of hypogammaglobulinemia and serious/opportunistic infections, have to be continuously surveyed.

  18. Novel molecular targets in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crispín, JoséC; Tsokos, George C.

    2009-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of biochemical abnormalities which include altered expression of key signaling molecules, heightened calcium responses, and skewed expression of transcription factors. These defects are involved in the altered behavior of SLE T cells and are probably central in the disease pathogenesis. The aim of this communication is to review the defects that have been consistently documented in SLE T cells, highlighting molecules and pathways that represent therapeutic targets. PMID:18190888

  19. T cells in murine lupus: propagation and regulation of disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, S L; Craft, J

    1996-01-01

    MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice develop a spontaneous lupus syndrome, including hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies, glomerulonephritis, and lymphadenopathy. To investigate the role of lymphocytes subsets in the pathogenesis of disease, lupus-prone MRL mice deficient in alpha beta T cells, gamma delta T cells, or both were generated. Mice deficient in alpha beta T cells developed a partially penetrant lupus syndrome, characterized by lymphadenopathy, elevated levels of class-switched immunoglobulins, an increased incidence of antinuclear antibodies, and immune deposits in kidneys which progressed to renal insufficiency over time. In comparison to wild type animals, gamma delta T cell-deficient animals developed an accelerated and exacerbated disease phenotype, characterized by accelerated hypergammaglobulinemia and enhanced autoantibody production and mortality. Repertoire analysis of these latter animals identified polyclonal expansion (V beta) of alpha beta CD4+ B220-cells. Mice lacking both alpha beta and gamma delta T cells failed to generate class-switched autoantibodies and immune complex renal disease. First, these findings demonstrate that murine lupus in the setting of Fas-deficiency does not absolutely require the presence of alpha beta T cells, and they also suggest that a significant basis for MRL/lpr disease, including renal disease, involves alpha beta T cell-independent, gamma delta T cell dependent, polyreactive B cell autoimmunity, upon which alpha beta T cell-dependent mechanisms aggravate specific autoimmune responses. Second, these data indicate that gamma delta T cells partake in the regulation of systemic autoimmunity, presumably via their effects on alpha beta CD4+ B220-T cells that provide B cell help. Finally, these results demonstrate that MRL/lpr B cells, despite their intrinsic abnormalities, cannot per se cause tissue injury without T cell help.

  20. Mycophenolate Mofetil versus Cyclophosphamide for Induction Treatment of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Gerald B.; Contreras, Gabriel; Dooley, Mary Anne; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Isenberg, David; Jayne, David; Li, Lei-Shi; Mysler, Eduardo; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Solomons, Neil; Wofsy, David

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) may offer advantages over intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVC) for the treatment of lupus nephritis, but these therapies have not been compared in an international randomized, controlled trial. Here, we report the comparison of MMF and IVC as induction treatment for active lupus nephritis in a multinational, two-phase (induction and maintenance) study. We randomly assigned 370 patients with classes III through V lupus nephritis to open-label MMF (target dosage 3 g/d) or IVC (0.5 to 1.0 g/m2 in monthly pulses) in a 24-wk induction study. Both groups received prednisone, tapered from a maximum starting dosage of 60 mg/d. The primary end point was a prespecified decrease in urine protein/creatinine ratio and stabilization or improvement in serum creatinine. Secondary end points included complete renal remission, systemic disease activity and damage, and safety. Overall, we did not detect a significantly different response rate between the two groups: 104 (56.2%) of 185 patients responded to MMF compared with 98 (53.0%) of 185 to IVC. Secondary end points were also similar between treatment groups. There were nine deaths in the MMF group and five in the IVC group. We did not detect significant differences between the MMF and IVC groups with regard to rates of adverse events, serious adverse events, or infections. Although most patients in both treatment groups experienced clinical improvement, the study did not meet its primary objective of showing that MMF was superior to IVC as induction treatment for lupus nephritis. PMID:19369404