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Sample records for luule metspalu pille

  1. Pill esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kikendall, J W

    1999-06-01

    Nine hundred seventy-nine cases of pill esophagitis due to nearly 100 different medications are reviewed. Pill-induced injuries occur when caustic medicinal pills dissolve in the esophagus rather than passing rapidly into the stomach as intended. Most patients suffer only self-limited pain, but esophageal hemorrhage, stricture, and perforation may occur, and fatal injuries have been reported. The incidence of this iatrogenic injury can be reduced but not eliminated by emphasizing the importance of taking pills while upright and with plenty of fluids. PMID:10372925

  2. Desloratadine Induced Pill Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Alkim, Huseyin; Iscan, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Pill induced esophagitis is a rare complication mostly seen in patients using tetracycline and its derivatives or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Here we present a 37 years old female patient experiencing pill esophagitis after taking desloratadine without liquid immediately before going to bed. This was the first pill esophagitis case related with desloratadine reported in the literature. Pill esophagitis is a preventable complication that consists of giving simple advice of how and when to take medication.

  3. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  4. Birth Control Pill

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC About Birth Control Birth Control Methods: How Well Do They Work? ... You Need a Pelvic Exam to Get Birth Control? How Can I Get on the Pill Without Telling My Parents? How Can I Get the Pill if I ...

  5. Birth control pills - combination

    MedlinePlus

    ... use another birth control method (condom, diaphragm, or sponge) for the next 7 days. This is called ... of birth control, such as condom, diaphragm, or sponge if: You miss 1 or more pills. You ...

  6. Birth control pills - progestin only

    MedlinePlus

    ... first pill, use another birth control method (condom, diaphragm, or sponge). This is called backup birth control. ... method of birth control, such as a condom, diaphragm, or sponge, if: You take a pill 3 ...

  7. Safe pill-dispensing.

    PubMed

    Testa, Massimiliano; Pollard, John

    2007-01-01

    Each patient is supplied with a smart-card containing a Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) chip storing a unique identification code. The patient places the Smart-card on a pill-dispenser unit containing an RFID reader. The RFID chip is read and the code sent to a Base-station via a wireless Bluetooth link. A database containing both patient details and treatment information is queried at the Base-station using the RFID as the search key. The patient's treatment data (i.e., drug names, quantities, time, etc.) are retrieved and sent back to the pill-dispenser unit via Bluetooth. Appropriate quantities of the required medications are automatically dispensed, unless the patient has already taken his/her daily dose. Safe, confidential communication and operation is ensured.

  8. Oral Steroids (Steroid Pills and Syrups)

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about steroids? How are steroid pills and syrups used? Steroid pills and syrups are very effective at reducing swelling and mucus ... liver or cause sterility Available as pills and syrups. Often necessary for treating more severe episodes of ...

  9. Awakened by a sleeping pill.

    PubMed

    Akeju, Oluwaseun; Brown, Emery N

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic changes in brain activity accompany the paradoxical increase in alertness observed in some patients with severe brain injury when they are treated with the sleeping pill zolpidem. PMID:24252876

  10. Awakened by a sleeping pill

    PubMed Central

    Akeju, Oluwaseun

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic changes in brain activity accompany the paradoxical increase in alertness observed in some patients with severe brain injury when they are treated with the sleeping pill zolpidem. PMID:24252876

  11. Birth control pill - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The internal female reproductive organs include the uterus, ovaries, cervix and vagina. These organs are necessary to produce a successful pregnancy. To prevent pregnancy, birth control pills affect how these organs normally function.

  12. Medical Uses of the Birth Control Pill

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pill. Birth control pills can help irregular periods, PCOS, endometriosis, acne, menstrual cramps, and low estrogen conditions. ... PMS, endometriosis, Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI) and for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Girls who are diagnosed with PCOS are ...

  13. Japanese pill approval is bittersweet.

    PubMed

    Blankson-seck, N

    1999-01-01

    This article reports the controversy over the approval of a birth control pill in Japan. The birth control pill underwent a 9-year deliberation before it was approved in June as compared with the male impotence drug Viagra, which gained a quick approval from the government. Such quick approval made women's groups feel that this was characteristic of a societal bias. For years, the health ministers delayed the approval because supposedly more research was needed to determine the pill's safety and because of other reasons cited. What bothered these women's groups was the fact that the government kept citing the reason of safety as the cause of the delay, while, on the other hand, Viagra has claimed two lives since its approval. In this sense, many believe that culture still matters in Japan and such actions can be considered a gender issue.

  14. RU-486: the "abortion pill".

    PubMed

    Herranz, G

    1991-05-23

    A report sent by the Vatican to bishops' conferences throughout the world calls RU-486, the so-called abortion pill currently available in France, "a new, serious threat to human life." The report was developed at the Vatican's request by Gonzalo Herranz, a Spanish bioethicist. A cover letter to bishops' conferences from Cardinal Alfonso Lopez Trujillo, president of the Pontifical Council for the Family, suggested that the report be used "to resist the introduction of the abortion pill RU-486 into your country." Related to TU-486 and to new terminology some use to characterize its non-surgical approach to abortion is an intention "to amoralize and thereby place the transmission of human life into an ethically neutral terrain and reduce it to pure biology," says the report. The report discusses possible future uses of RU-486 as a contraceptive, stating: "Women would no longer have to worry themselves about whether they have conceived or not. Each month they would proceed to clean out their uterus chemically." The report refers to RU-486 as "a technical step forward in an area that did not need it." It says, "The abortion pill favors a woman's privacy and secret, but it condemns her to solitude." The English text from the Vatican follows. PMID:16145821

  15. Introduction of the pill and its impact.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, L

    1999-01-01

    Introduction of the birth control pill in the United States in 1960 marked the end of a relatively short period of time (< 10 years) to intentionally produce an oral contraceptive, and the beginning of a relatively long period of controversy surrounding the use of the pill. Availability of the pill had an impact on various aspects of social life, including women's health, fertility trends, laws and policies, religion, interpersonal relationships and family roles, feminist issues, and gender relations, as well as sexual practices among both adults and adolescents. The pill proved to be highly effective from the outset. Although safety issues developed with the earlier formulations, continued evolution of pill hormones and doses has resulted in a greatly improved and safe oral contraceptive. A broad range of noncontraceptive health benefits also is associated with the pill. These health effects are significant, as they include protection against potentially fatal diseases, including ovarian and endometrial cancers, as well as against other conditions that are associated with substantial morbidity and potential hospitalization and associated costs. The popularity of the pill has remained high, with rates of use in the past 30 years in the United States ranging from one-quarter to almost one-third of women using contraception. Almost 40 years after its introduction, the pill's contraceptive efficacy is proven, its improved safety has been established, and the focus has shifted from supposed health risks to documented and real health benefits.

  16. The pill's blood clot risks disputed.

    PubMed

    Pearre, J

    1972-01-31

    This is a newspaper report of the review of 68 studies in the literature on thromboembolism in 80,000 users of oral contraception since 1963 by V.A. DRILL and D.W. CALHOUN of Searle and Company. These reviewers found that the incidence of thromboembolism was 1/1000 women/year in pill users, and 2.2/1000 women/year in normal women. Furthermore, the incidence is not affected by dose, type or potency of estrogen in the combined pills. According to this news article, the DRILL-CALHOUN survey is a prospective study, more reliable than previous retrospective statistical studies that found up to 7-fold increased risk, because this prospective study measures actual disease frequency. Further proofs of pill safety cited were the facts that pregnant women have fewer thromboembolism disorders, and that women who develop the disorder while continuing pills improve just as rapidly as women not taking pills.

  17. Parental love pills: some ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Liao, S Matthew

    2011-11-01

    It may soon be possible to develop pills that allow parents to induce in themselves more loving behaviour, attitudes and emotions towards their children. In this paper, I consider whether pharmacologically induced parental love can satisfy reasonable conditions of authenticity; why anyone would be interested in taking such parental love pills at all, and whether inducing parental love pharmacologically promotes narcissism or results in self-instrumentalization. I also examine how the availability of such pills may affect the duty to love a child.

  18. The mother of the pill.

    PubMed

    Djerassi, C

    1995-01-01

    The first synthesis of an active ingredient of the pill was performed on October 15, 1951, at Syntex in Mexico City. These preliminary results, obtained in late 1951, encouraged the submission of a synthetic progestin, norethindrone (19-nor-17alpha-ethynyltestosterone), to a number of outside investigators for more extensive biological scrutiny. Norethynodrel, together with many other steroids synthesized in the Searle laboratories, as well as Syntex's norethindrone, were examined by Pincus and collaborators for ovulation inhibition in animals and humans. Contrary to predictions, orally effective steroid ovulation inhibitors became the most widely used method of reversible birth control in most parts of the world some 40 years after their first synthesis. Toward the end of the 1960s, at least 13 international pharmaceutical companies (9 of them US) had active research and development programs dedicated to new advances in the field of contraception. Every drug to which a woman or man is exposed to for long periods of time (e.g., vaccines, systemic contraceptives, cholesterol-lowering agents, antihypertensives) in the end has to pass through large-scale postmarketing experiments. The most damaging was the requirement for 6-year toxicology in beagle dogs, which resulted in enormous development costs. Another setback was a 1986 judgment in Georgia against Ortho Pharmaceutical Company for the amount of $5,151,030 for alleged birth defects caused by the use of its spermicide Ortho-Gynol in spite of overwhelming epidemiological evidence against such a cause-effect relationship. Mifepristone (RU-486) is clearly the most significant new development in birth control as an important alternative to conventional abortion. A priority list of six new contraceptive methods for future development includes a spermicide with antiviral properties, a once-a-month menses inducer, a reliable ovulation predictor, easily reversible male sterilization, a male contraceptive pill, and an

  19. The return of rainbow diet pills.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Pieter A; Goday, Alberto; Swann, John P

    2012-09-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently warned consumers about the risks of weight loss supplements adulterated with multiple pharmaceutical agents. Some of these supplements combine potent anorectics, such as amphetamines derivatives, with benzodiazepines, beta-blockers, and other medications to suppress the anorectics' adverse effects. These weight loss supplements represent the most recent generation of rainbow diet pills, named for their bright and varied colors, which date back more than 70 years. Beginning in the 1940s, several US pharmaceutical firms aggressively promoted rainbow pills to physicians and patients. By the 1960s the pills had caused dozens of deaths before the FDA began removing them from the US market. We used a variety of original resources to trace these deadly pills from their origins in the United States to their popularity in Spain and Brazil to their reintroduction to the United States as weight loss dietary supplements.

  20. The return of rainbow diet pills.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Pieter A; Goday, Alberto; Swann, John P

    2012-09-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently warned consumers about the risks of weight loss supplements adulterated with multiple pharmaceutical agents. Some of these supplements combine potent anorectics, such as amphetamines derivatives, with benzodiazepines, beta-blockers, and other medications to suppress the anorectics' adverse effects. These weight loss supplements represent the most recent generation of rainbow diet pills, named for their bright and varied colors, which date back more than 70 years. Beginning in the 1940s, several US pharmaceutical firms aggressively promoted rainbow pills to physicians and patients. By the 1960s the pills had caused dozens of deaths before the FDA began removing them from the US market. We used a variety of original resources to trace these deadly pills from their origins in the United States to their popularity in Spain and Brazil to their reintroduction to the United States as weight loss dietary supplements. PMID:22813089

  1. Noncontraceptive Benefits of Birth Control Pills

    MedlinePlus

    ... that contain hormones) and one week of inactive placebo Treatment for acne, hirsutism (excess hair) and alopecia ( ... growth in the midline that the sugar or placebo pills are taken. A woman can increase the ...

  2. Dynamically programmable electronic pill dispenser system.

    PubMed

    Boquete, Luciano; Rodriguez-Ascariz, Jose Manuel; Artacho, Irene; Cantos-Frontela, Joaquin; Peixoto, Nathalia

    2010-06-01

    Compliance in medicine dispensation has proven critical for dosage control, diagnosis, and treatment. We have designed, manufactured, and characterized a novel dynamically programmable e-pill dispensing system. Our system is initially programmed remotely through a cell phone. After programming, the system may be reconfigured in order to adapt pill dispensation to new conditions. In this paper we describe the mechanics, electronics, control, and communication protocols implemented. Our dyn-e-pill devices can be actuated for over 350 h with two pill retrievals per hour. We challenged the charging circuit and demonstrated that the system has a lifetime longer than 6 h with a 30 min charging cycle, while it lasts for 14 h of uninterrupted use with a full charge. PMID:20503621

  3. [A brief history of traditional Chinese medicinal pills].

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Lu, X; Zhu, J P

    2016-05-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine pill, an archaic medicinal preparation form, is a kind of spherical or spherical-like preparation form produced by medicinal powders or extracts mixed with appropriate excipient or other accessories. It was originated in the Pre-Qin Dynasty, developed and enriched from the Han Dynasty to the Ming and Qing Dynasties. With the improvement of preparing process, honeyed pill, waxed pill, coating pill and wax-coating pill etc. appeared in succession. In modern times, with the progress of pharmaceutical machine, the medicinal pill is innovated constantly, and at present, it becomes the main form of Chinese patent medicine with batch production.

  4. Why we need a tax on sleeping pills.

    PubMed

    Kripke, D F

    1983-05-01

    In the United States every year the total costs of giving sleeping pills can be estimated at $500 million to $1 billion. Many if not most of the prescriptions are inappropriate. Sleeping pill use, associated with a 50% increase in overall mortality, is especially dangerous for older people, who have a high risk of sleep apnea. There is virtually no evidence that sleeping pills are effective with prolonged usage and no evidence for life-preserving benefits. Excessive use of sleeping pills should be discouraged with a tax of 4 per pill. Revenues from the tax should fund new research to determine which sleeping pills are safest and when alternative treatments are safer.

  5. [A brief history of traditional Chinese medicinal pills].

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Lu, X; Zhu, J P

    2016-05-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine pill, an archaic medicinal preparation form, is a kind of spherical or spherical-like preparation form produced by medicinal powders or extracts mixed with appropriate excipient or other accessories. It was originated in the Pre-Qin Dynasty, developed and enriched from the Han Dynasty to the Ming and Qing Dynasties. With the improvement of preparing process, honeyed pill, waxed pill, coating pill and wax-coating pill etc. appeared in succession. In modern times, with the progress of pharmaceutical machine, the medicinal pill is innovated constantly, and at present, it becomes the main form of Chinese patent medicine with batch production. PMID:27485865

  6. "Take your pill": the role and fantasy of pills in modern medicine.

    PubMed

    Leder, Drew; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2014-06-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has undergone a vast expansion in the 20th and 21st centuries. This article explores the central role now played by pills in clinical practice, but also in the public imagination. First, this article analyzes four properties that, together, account for many of the promises and perils associated with pills: They are ingestible, potent, reproducible, and miniaturized. This allows them to serve as ideal consumer items for widespread distribution and sale and also as model technological "devices" capable of downloading into the body healing chemicals. As such, they seem to promise a disburdening solution to many of life's ills. In our cultural fantasy, often shared by physician and patient alike, pills can be used not only to treat and prevent disease but also raise energy, lose weight, lessen pain, lift mood, cope with stress, and enhance sexual and athletic performance. This article also explores many adverse effects not only of pills themselves but of this exaggerated cultural fantasy of the pill. It tends to distract us from other, more holistic understandings of the locus of disease and healing. It even fosters misunderstandings of the ways in which pills themselves work, which is to assist bodily processes, and the mind's "meaning response." The intent here is not to demonize all pills-many have great therapeutic potential-but to learn how to better choose and use them wisely. We propose that this process be assisted through recontextualizing the pill as a multidimensional gift. Taken in such a way, with appropriate gratitude and discernment, we may ingest fewer pills, but with greater efficacy. PMID:24766064

  7. Exercise Pills: At the Starting Line.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunchang; Laher, Ismail

    2015-12-01

    Sedentary lifestyles, limited physical exercise, and prolonged inactivity undoubtedly increase chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. It is widely acknowledged that exercise induces a number of physiological adaptations that have beneficial effects in the prevention and treatment of these chronic metabolic diseases. Unfortunately, exercise compliance is extremely low and often not possible. The development of exercise science and molecular techniques has increased our understanding of the molecular pathways responsive to exercise. Knowledge of these molecular targets has led to the development of chemical interventions that can mimic the beneficial effects of exercise without requiring actual muscle activity. This review focuses on the concept of 'exercise pills' and how they mimic the effects produced by physical exercise including oxidative fiber-type transformation, mitochondrial biogenesis, increased fat oxidation, angiogenesis, and improvement of exercise capacity. We also review candidate exercise pills, and contrast the beneficial effects and molecular mechanisms between physical exercise and exercise pills.

  8. Use and Knowledge of Diet Pills among Female College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorociak, Jeffery D.; Vincent, Murray L.

    1985-01-01

    A survey was conducted in an attempt to assess the use and knowledge of diet pills and dietary patterns of female college students. Analysis of the data indicated that, while many students used diet pills, their knowledge of the effects of the pills was minimal. Conclusions are presented. (MT)

  9. Pill Properties that Cause Dysphagia and Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Jeremy; Go, Jorge T.; Schulze, Konrad S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pills (tablets and capsules) are widely used to administer prescription drugs or to take supplements such as vitamins. Unfortunately, little is known about how much effort it takes Americans to swallow these various pills. More specifically, it is not known to what extent hard-to-swallow pills might affect treatment outcomes (eg, interfering with adherence to prescribed medications or causing clinical complications). It is also unclear which properties (eg, size, shape, or surface texture) Americans prefer or reject for their pills. To learn more about these issues, we interviewed a small group of individuals. Methods We invited individuals in waiting rooms of our tertiary health care center to participate in structured interviews about their pill-taking habits and any problems they have swallowing pills. We inquired which pill properties they believed caused swallowing problems. Participants scored capsules and pills of representative size, shape, and texture for swallowing effort and reported their personal preferences. Results Of 100 successive individuals, 99 participants completed the interview (65% women, mean age = 41 years, range = 23-77 years). Eighty-three percent took pills daily (mean 4 pills/d; 56% of those pills were prescribed by providers). Fifty-four percent of participants replied yes to the question, "Did you ever have to swallow a solid medication that was too difficult?" Four percent recounted serious complications: 1% pill esophagitis, 1% pill impaction, and 2% stopped treatments (antibiotic and prenatal supplement) because they could not swallow the prescribed pills. Half of all participants routinely resorted to special techniques (eg, plenty of liquids or repeated or forceful swallows). Sixty-one percent of those having difficulties cited specific pill properties: 27% blamed size (20% of problems were caused by pills that were too large whereas 7% complained about pills that were too small to sense); 12% faulted rough surface

  10. Automated pilling detection and fuzzy classification of textile fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Iqbal M.; Mahmood, Waqar; Vachtsevanos, George

    1997-04-01

    In the textile industry, the degree of fabric pilling is subjectively determined by human inspectors resulting in inconsistent quality control. The observed resistance to pilling is reported on an arbitrary scale ranging from No. 5 (no pillings) to No. 1 (very severe pilling). This paper presents a system and a methodology that counts the number of pillings on textile fabric samples automatically and classifies them into one of the pre-defined classes with repeatable accuracy while accounting for the human judgment by allowing the determination of the degree of confidence assigned to the sample's membership in each class. The system consists of an apparatus; an imaging and data processing software procedure for counting the number of pillings; and a methodology for classifying the fabric samples into one of the pre-defined classes with repeatable accuracy while accounting for human judgment. A CCD camera is used to capture successive gray scale images of the fabric sample. A series of segmentation, Radon transform, morphological filtering, and detrending operations are applied to the fabric images to determine the true pilling count. The structuring element for the morphological operations is designed such that fuzz balls (which are not pillings) are filtered. Using fuzzy membership functions, the fabric pilling count is mapped to fabric pilling resistance rating. The system has been successfully tested on a large number of fabric samples with different shades and textures provided by the textile industry.

  11. The Pill vs. the Sword: Additional Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lottes, Ilsa L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I present additional information for policy-makers and researchers to consider in response to the view proposed by Potts et al that "the pill is mightier than the sword." I identify states with both high rates of terrorism and a youth bulge and discuss correlates of both these societal characteristics. The research examined supports the view that factors other than access to family planning are more important in facilitating terrorism. PMID:26673473

  12. Dispensation of emergency contraceptive pills in Michigan Title X clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J W; Boulton, M L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Emergency contraceptive pill dispensation was estimated in Michigan Title X family planning programs. METHODS: Logistic regression and tobit estimation models were used to predict whether and to what extent emergency contraceptive pills are dispensed. RESULTS: Of the 53 programs studies, 32 dispensed emergency contraceptive pills, averaging fewer than one client per month. Total dispensation was skewed toward a few programs, and the contribution of health departments to this total was small. Emergency contraceptive pill services appeared to be randomly distributed across programs, although most dispenser reported having provided the pills for less than 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: Recent policy advances should lead to more consistent emergency contraceptive pill dispensation in Title X programs. PMID:9736882

  13. Why we need a tax on sleeping pills.

    PubMed

    Kripke, D F

    1983-05-01

    In the United States every year the total costs of giving sleeping pills can be estimated at $500 million to $1 billion. Many if not most of the prescriptions are inappropriate. Sleeping pill use, associated with a 50% increase in overall mortality, is especially dangerous for older people, who have a high risk of sleep apnea. There is virtually no evidence that sleeping pills are effective with prolonged usage and no evidence for life-preserving benefits. Excessive use of sleeping pills should be discouraged with a tax of 4 per pill. Revenues from the tax should fund new research to determine which sleeping pills are safest and when alternative treatments are safer. PMID:6405485

  14. Factors predictive of adolescents' intentions to use birth control pills, condoms, and birth control pills in combination with condoms.

    PubMed

    Craig, D M; Wade, K E; Allison, K R; Irving, H M; Williams, J I; Hlibka, C M

    2000-01-01

    Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1988) as a conceptual framework, 705 secondary school students were surveyed to identify their intentions to use birth control pills, condoms, and birth control pills in combination with condoms. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that the theory explained between 23.5% and 45.8% of the variance in intentions. Variables external to the model such as past use, age, and ethnicity exhibited some independent effects. Attitudes were consistently predictive of intentions to use condoms, pills, and condoms in combination with pills for both male and female students. However, there were differences by gender in the degree to which subjective norms and perceived behavioural control predicted intentions. The findings suggest that programs should focus on: creation of positive attitudes regarding birth control pills and condoms; targeting important social influences, particularly regarding males' use of condoms; and developing strategies to increase students' control over the use of condoms.

  15. Factors predictive of adolescents' intentions to use birth control pills, condoms, and birth control pills in combination with condoms.

    PubMed

    Craig, D M; Wade, K E; Allison, K R; Irving, H M; Williams, J I; Hlibka, C M

    2000-01-01

    Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1988) as a conceptual framework, 705 secondary school students were surveyed to identify their intentions to use birth control pills, condoms, and birth control pills in combination with condoms. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that the theory explained between 23.5% and 45.8% of the variance in intentions. Variables external to the model such as past use, age, and ethnicity exhibited some independent effects. Attitudes were consistently predictive of intentions to use condoms, pills, and condoms in combination with pills for both male and female students. However, there were differences by gender in the degree to which subjective norms and perceived behavioural control predicted intentions. The findings suggest that programs should focus on: creation of positive attitudes regarding birth control pills and condoms; targeting important social influences, particularly regarding males' use of condoms; and developing strategies to increase students' control over the use of condoms. PMID:11089290

  16. A new accurate pill recognition system using imprint information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Kamata, Sei-ichiro

    2013-12-01

    Great achievements in modern medicine benefit human beings. Also, it has brought about an explosive growth of pharmaceuticals that current in the market. In daily life, pharmaceuticals sometimes confuse people when they are found unlabeled. In this paper, we propose an automatic pill recognition technique to solve this problem. It functions mainly based on the imprint feature of the pills, which is extracted by proposed MSWT (modified stroke width transform) and described by WSC (weighted shape context). Experiments show that our proposed pill recognition method can reach an accurate rate up to 92.03% within top 5 ranks when trying to classify more than 10 thousand query pill images into around 2000 categories.

  17. Countless Opioid Pills Unused by Dental-Surgery Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_161184.html Countless Opioid Pills Unused by Dental-Surgery Patients Surplus may contribute to the opioid ... half of the narcotic painkillers prescribed after wisdom teeth removal go unused, according to a new study ...

  18. Sleeping Pill Administration Time and Patient Subjective Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seockhoon; Youn, Soyoung; Yi, Kikyoung; Park, Boram; Lee, Suyeon

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Taking hypnotic agents 30 min before bedtime is the usual suggested administration time, but some patients report dissatisfaction with their sleeping pills. We investigated whether the timing of sleeping pill administration influences patient subjective satisfaction with these drugs. Methods: One hundred twelve patients with primary insomnia currently taking benzodiazepine or nonbenzodiazepine gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists as sleeping pills were selected. The time of administration for their sleeping pills, bedtime, sleep onset time, and wake up time were obtained from their medical records. Subjects were also categorized into satisfied or dissatisfied groups. Results: Hypnotic agents administration time (p < 0.001) and bedtime (p < 0.001), but not sleep onset or wake up time, occurred later in the night in the satisfied group. The durations from administration of pills to sleep onset (33.6 ± 20.7 min) and to wake up time (7.2 ± 1.2 h) were significantly shorter in the satisfied group when compared to the dissatisfied group (135.9 ± 73.4 min and 9.3 ± 1.5 h for time to sleep onset and wake up, respectively). Logistic regression analysis revealed that patient subjective satisfaction with hypnotic agents could be predicted by a short duration from administration of pills to sleep onset (odds ratio = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [0.001–0.09]) and a short duration from administration of pills to wake up time (0.53; [0.31–0.89], F = 49.9, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Taking sleeping pills at a later time and a shorter interval between pill administration and wake up time may increase patient subjective satisfaction with hypnotic agents. We propose that physicians advise patients to take sleeping pills approximately 7 h before their usual getting-out-of-bed time instead of the current standard of 30 min before bedtime. Citation: Chung S, Youn S, Yi K, Park B, Lee S. Sleeping pill administration time and patient subjective satisfaction. J

  19. Fabrication of CPA Salt Pill with Circulating Solution Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, A.; Tokoi, K.; Ishisaki, Y.; Shinozaki, K.; McCammon, D.

    2008-05-01

    We report results on fabrication of a Chromium Potassium Alum (CPA) salt pill. CPA is a typical paramagnetic salt used as refrigerant of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) because of its low Curie point, 4 11 mK. We made an test model of CPA salt pill by fast crystallizing method, namely circulating solution between 36°C and 15°C. The crystallizing rate was 0.5 g h-1, and 40 g of CPA crystal was obtained inside a stainless steel cylinder equipped with 160 copper wires. The cooling test was operated utilizing a commercial ADR system. We attached three thermometers and four heaters to the salt pill, in order to measure thermal conductance among different parts of the pill. It is confirmed that our salt pill was cooled down from B/ T=4 T/2 K to 64 mK at zero magnetic field. We suspect the cause of limiting the cooling temperature in the present level to be the dehydration of CPA, non-uniformity of magnetic field, and stainless steel of the pill which has large heat capacity below 0.1 K.

  20. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated

  1. The pill, parity, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Spector, T D; Roman, E; Silman, A J

    1990-06-01

    We report on a case-control study investigating the relationship of oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use and parity to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Women with RA were compared with 2 separate control groups, women with osteoarthritis (OA) and women randomly selected from a population-based electoral register. Nulliparity was found to be a risk factor for the development of RA, with age-adjusted odds ratios of 1.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.03) versus the OA control group and 1.83 (95% CI 1.03-3.06) versus the population control group. Use of OCPs before the age of 35 was negatively associated with RA (odds ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.29-1.12 versus the OA control group; odds ratio 0.6, 95% CI 0.30-1.17 versus the population control group). Some evidence of a duration-response effect was seen, although the numbers were small. The 2 variables were also multiplicative, with nulliparous non-OCP users having a 4-fold risk of RA compared with parous OCP users. These findings suggest that pregnancy and OCP use have a "protective effect" on the development of RA, although the mechanism remains unclear. PMID:2363734

  2. The pill, parity, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Spector, T D; Roman, E; Silman, A J

    1990-06-01

    We report on a case-control study investigating the relationship of oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use and parity to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Women with RA were compared with 2 separate control groups, women with osteoarthritis (OA) and women randomly selected from a population-based electoral register. Nulliparity was found to be a risk factor for the development of RA, with age-adjusted odds ratios of 1.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.03) versus the OA control group and 1.83 (95% CI 1.03-3.06) versus the population control group. Use of OCPs before the age of 35 was negatively associated with RA (odds ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.29-1.12 versus the OA control group; odds ratio 0.6, 95% CI 0.30-1.17 versus the population control group). Some evidence of a duration-response effect was seen, although the numbers were small. The 2 variables were also multiplicative, with nulliparous non-OCP users having a 4-fold risk of RA compared with parous OCP users. These findings suggest that pregnancy and OCP use have a "protective effect" on the development of RA, although the mechanism remains unclear.

  3. Monitoring Location and Angular Orientation of a Pill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schipper, John F.

    2012-01-01

    A mobile pill transmitter system moves through, or adjacent to, one or more organs in an animal or human body, while transmitting signals from its present location and/or present angular orientation. The system also provides signals from which the present roll angle of the pill, about a selected axis, can be determined. When the location coordinates angular orientation and the roll angle of the pill are within selected ranges, an aperture on the pill container releases a selected chemical into, or onto, the body. Optionally, the pill, as it moves, provides a sequence of visually perceptible images. The times for image formation may correspond to times at which the pill transmitter system location or image satisfies one of at least four criteria. This invention provides and supplies an algorithm for exact determination of location coordinates and angular orientation coordinates for a mobile pill transmitter (PT), or other similar device that is introduced into, and moves within, a GI tract of a human or animal body. A set of as many as eight nonlinear equations has been developed and applied, relating propagation of a wireless signal between either two, three, or more transmitting antennas located on the PT, to four or more non-coplanar receiving antennas located on a signal receiver appliance worn by the user. The equations are solved exactly, without approximations or iterations, and are applied in several environments: (1) association of a visual image, transmitted by the PT at each of a second sequence of times, with a PT location and PT angular orientation at that time; (2) determination of a position within the body at which a drug or chemical substance or other treatment is to be delivered to a selected portion of the body; (3) monitoring, after delivery, of the effect(s) of administration of the treatment; and (4) determination of one or more positions within the body where provision and examination of a finer-scale image is warranted.

  4. EPR study on non- and gamma-irradiated herbal pills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, K.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2011-06-01

    The results of EPR studies on herbal pills of marigold, hawthorn, yarrow, common balm, tutsan, nettle and thyme before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak singlet EPR line with a g-factor of 2.0048±0.0005. After irradiation herbal pills could be separated in two groups according to their EPR spectra. Radiation-induced free radicals in pills of marigold, yarrow, nettle, tutsan and thyme could be attributed mainly to saccharide excipients. Tablets of hawthorn and common balm show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, superimposed on partly resolved carbohydrate spectrum, due to the active part (herb) and inulin, which is present in the pills as an excipient. Fading study of the radiation-induced EPR signals confirms that sugar radicals are more stable than cellulose species. The reported results show that the presence of characteristic EPR spectra of herbal pills due to excipients or active part can be used as unambiguous proof of radiation processing within 35 or more days after irradiation.

  5. To pill or not to pill in GnRH antagonist cycles: that is the question!

    PubMed

    Garcia-Velasco, Juan A; Fatemi, Human M

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists are gaining ground, and the number of patients being treated for IVF with a GnRH antagonist is increasing. Cycle planning in GnRH antagonist IVF cycles has been a challenge. During the past 2 years, debate has been ongoing about the possible disadvantages of oral contraceptive pill (OCP) pre-treatment in GnRH antagonist IVF cycles. A recent meta-analysis clearly showed a significant decrease in ongoing pregnancy rates between patients who received OCP pre-treatment and those who did not. In this review, the published meta-analysis are is evaluated. It is argued that caution must be exercised in drawing conclusions too quckly on whether or not OCP pre-treatment might have a negative effect on outcome in GnRH antagonist IVF cycles. PMID:25447926

  6. Pills, Thrills and Bellyaches: Case Studies of Prescription Pill Use and Misuse among Marijuana/Blunt Smoking Middle Class Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Bardhi, Flutura; Sifaneck, Stephen J.; Johnson, Bruce D.; Dunlap, Eloise

    2008-01-01

    Recent survey research has documented important increases during the 2000s in the misuse and abuse of several prescription drugs (Vicodin, Percocet, Codeine, Dilaudid, Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, Ativan, Adderall, Ritalin, among others). This article focuses upon the patterns of pill use and misuse among young women who are middle-class white and college-educated, and they are also experienced marijuana users who report recreational consumption of other illegal drugs. The ethnographic data provides insights about various ways and reasons that such prescription pill misuse occurs among 12 college-educated, (upper) middle-class, white/Asian women in their 20s who were involved in a major ethnographic study of marijuana and blunts. Three patterns of pill use were observed: recreational; quasi-medical; and legal medical; shifts among these patterns of pill use was common. Few reported that their pill use interfered with their conventional jobs and lifestyles; they concealed such use from their employers and coworkers, and from non-using friends and family members. None reported contacts with police nor seeking treatment specifically for their pill misuse. Many reported misusing prescription pills in conjunction with illegal drugs (marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy) and alcohol. Pills were used as a way to enhance the euphoric effects of other drugs, as well as a way to avoid the negative side effects of illegal drugs. Some reported pill use as a means for reducing expenditures (and use of) alcohol and cocaine. The implications suggest a hidden subpopulation of prescription pill misusers among regular users of marijuana and other illegal drugs. Future research should include users and misusers of various pills to better understand how prescriptions pills interact with illegal drug use patterns. PMID:19081798

  7. [The NHG guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills'].

    PubMed

    Damen-van Beek, Zamire; Lucassen, Peter L B J; Gorgels, Wim; Smelt, Antonette F H; Knuistingh Neven, Arie; Bouma, Margriet

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills' provides recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of the most prevalent sleep problems and for the management of chronic users of sleeping pills. The preferred approach for sleeplessness is not to prescribe medication but to give information and behavioural advice. Practice assistants of the Dutch Association of Mental Health and Addiction Care are also expected to be able to undertake this management. The GP may consider prescribing sleeping pills for a short period only in cases of severe insomnia with considerable distress. Chronic users of sleeping pills should be advised by the GP to stop using them or to reduce the dose gradually (controlled dose reduction). The GP may refer patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) to a pulmonary or ear, nose and throat specialist or neurologist for further diagnosis depending on the regional arrangements. The GP may then consider the cardiovascular risk factors commonly present with OSA. In patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) who continue to experience major distress despite being given advice without the prescription of medication, the GP may consider prescribing a dopamine agonist.

  8. Birth Control Pills and Nonprofessional Voice: Acoustic Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Ofer; Biron-Shental, Tal; Shabtai, Esther

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Two studies are presented here. Study 1 was aimed at evaluating whether the voice characteristics of women who use birth control pills that contain different progestins differ from the voice characteristics of a control group. Study 2 presents a meta-analysis that combined the results of Study 1 with those from 3 recent studies that…

  9. Ingestible Thermometer Pill Aids Athletes in Beating the Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Developed by Goddard Space Flight Center and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory to monitor the core body temperature of astronauts during space flight, the ingestible "thermometer pill" has a silicone-coated exterior, with a microbattery, a quartz crystal temperature sensor, a space-aged telemetry system, and microminiaturized circuitry on the interior.

  10. Teaching through Trade Books: Roly-Poly Pill Bugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Emily; Ansberry, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Pill bugs, also called roly-polies, are small terrestrial isopods that are abundant in temperate areas throughout the world. Because they are engaging, harmless, and easily collected, they provide an excellent opportunity for children to learn about invertebrate body parts, behaviors, and information processing. This column includes activities…

  11. A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials

    ScienceCinema

    Abergel, Rebecca

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab's Rebecca Abergel discusses "A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas. Go here to watch the entire event with all 8 speakers:

  12. Unexpected advantages of a temporary fluid-loss control pill

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, M.

    1996-09-01

    Economics often dictate research; however, serendipity can benefit the results of research and simultaneously soften the rigidity of economic demands. Such as the case with a recently developed fluid-loss control pill. Economic reasons compelled researchers to find a replacement for an existing field product, the characteristics of which had to be duplicated. Initially, researchers sought to develop a pill that blocked fluid flow into and out of the wellbore and was mixable in brines from 8.35 to 19 lb/gal. The degradation of the replacement crosslinkable hydroxyethyl cellulose fluid (RXHEC) involves uncrosslinking and unzipping of backbone, which simplifies the disposal of returns. In addition to being environmentally acceptable, RXHEC is capable of breaking with weak acids, allowing the use of external breakers in acid-sensitive wells. Additional advantages include the ease with which tubulars can pass through the RXHEC pill and leave it in place, making a remedial pill unnecessary. The RXHEC uses a liquid gel concentrate (LGC) system and is stable beyond 125 C.

  13. A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Abergel, Rebecca

    2013-10-31

    Berkeley Lab's Rebecca Abergel discusses "A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas. Go here to watch the entire event with all 8 speakers:

  14. [Interprofessional pill box management in an ambulatory care setting].

    PubMed

    Abrecht, Loïc; Anchisi, Annick; Widmer, Daniel; Bugnon, Olivier; Du Pasquier, Sophie; Jotterand, Sébastien; Karlen, Martine; Herzig, Lilli

    2014-11-26

    Complex multimorbid patients are now more common in ambulatory care and the management of their medication more frequently needs interprofessional collaboration. This qualitative study explored health professional's main challenges when introducing, preparing and sharing the use of a pill box for a patient. Another objective of this study was to explore options for improving care in these situations.

  15. Salt Pill Design and Fabrication for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Mccammon, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The performance of an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is critically dependent on the design and construction of the salt pills that produce cooling. In most cases, the primary goal is to obtain the largest cooling capacity at the low temperature end of the operating range. The realizable cooling capacity depends on a number of factors, including refrigerant mass, and how efficiently it absorbs heat from the various instrument loads. The design and optimization of "salt pills" for ADR systems depend not only on the mechanical, chemical and thermal properties of the refrigerant, but also on the range of heat fluxes that the salt pill must accommodate. Despite the fairly wide variety of refrigerants available, those used at very low temperature tend to be hydrated salts that require a dedicated thermal bus and must be hermetically sealed, while those used at higher temperature - greater than about 0.5 K - tend to be single-­- or poly-­-crystals that have much simpler requirements for thermal and mechanical packaging. This paper presents a summary of strategies and techniques for designing, optimizing and fabricating salt pills for both low-­- and mid-­-temperature applications.

  16. [The NHG guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills'].

    PubMed

    Damen-van Beek, Zamire; Lucassen, Peter L B J; Gorgels, Wim; Smelt, Antonette F H; Knuistingh Neven, Arie; Bouma, Margriet

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills' provides recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of the most prevalent sleep problems and for the management of chronic users of sleeping pills. The preferred approach for sleeplessness is not to prescribe medication but to give information and behavioural advice. Practice assistants of the Dutch Association of Mental Health and Addiction Care are also expected to be able to undertake this management. The GP may consider prescribing sleeping pills for a short period only in cases of severe insomnia with considerable distress. Chronic users of sleeping pills should be advised by the GP to stop using them or to reduce the dose gradually (controlled dose reduction). The GP may refer patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) to a pulmonary or ear, nose and throat specialist or neurologist for further diagnosis depending on the regional arrangements. The GP may then consider the cardiovascular risk factors commonly present with OSA. In patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) who continue to experience major distress despite being given advice without the prescription of medication, the GP may consider prescribing a dopamine agonist. PMID:25804114

  17. Determination and application of location and angular orientation of a pill transmitter within a body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A mobile pill transmitter system that moves through or adjacent to one or more organs in an animal's body and that provides signals from which the pill's present location and/or present angular orientation can be determined. The system also provides signals from which the present roll angle of the pill, about a selected axis, can be determined. When the location coordinates and the roll angle of the pill are within selected ranges, an aperture on the pill container releases a selected chemical into or onto the body. Optionally, the pill as it moves also provides a sequence of visually perceptible images; the times for image formation may correspond to times at which the pill transmitter system location or image satisfies one or at least four different criteria.

  18. A male pill? Gender discrepancies in contraceptive commitment.

    PubMed

    Laird, J

    1994-01-01

    The limited number of male contraceptive methods is often assumed to comprise the major obstacle to greater male responsibility for fertility control. To assess male commitment to pregnancy prevention, 83 male and 120 female students at the University of California, Santa Barbara, were questioned about their attitudes toward an oral contraceptive (OC) intended for their gender. The male respondents were presented with a description of a hypothetical male pill as similar to the female pill as possible. 60% of female respondents had taken the pill, and 62% of men had been sexually involved with an OC user. 71% of women, compared to only 20% of men, indicated they were either likely or very likely to take an OC. Men consistently rated a male OC as more against nature, more of a bother, more harmful, and more against their beliefs than a female OC. 50.8% of women, versus 71.6% of males, indicated they had no hesitancy about their sexual partner taking OCs. The variable with the strongest correlation with hesitancy toward partner OC use was, among women, the notion that the pill is too much of a bother, and, among men, concerns the female pill is harmful. Overall, the study findings indicated that even educated, middle-class men are unwilling to assume the risks and inconveniences associated with effective contraception, yet expect their female partners to do so. Thus, the development of more male birth control methods will not be sufficient to increase male involvement in pregnancy prevention given the salience of gender power relationships.

  19. Discussing Smart Pills versus Endorsing Smart Pills: Reply to Swanson, Wigal, and Volkow (2011) and Elliott and Elliott (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farah, Martha J.; Smith, M. Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    We find much of interest, and little to disagree with, in the commentaries on our article. We take issue only with the suggestion that our article was provocative and submit that the attempt to understand the use of stimulants as smart pills does not imply an endorsement of the practice.

  20. Social constructions of the male contraception pill: When are we going to break the vicious circle?

    PubMed

    Dismore, Lorelle; Van Wersch, Anna; Swainston, Katherine

    2016-05-01

    Social constructions of men towards the availability of a male hormonal contraceptive, the 'male pill', were explored. A qualitative approach applying semi-structured interviews and scenarios with 22 men (mean age 35 years) from the North East of England revealed two core constructs and six sub-constructs using a Thematic-Construct Analysis in line with the method of Toerien and Wilkinson and Clarke and Kitzinger. Verbal accounts were inductively used to balance the deductively created two core constructs 'Constructing the male pill norm: dominant system of sensemaking' and 'Living by the male pill norm' to represent a normative framework within a changing ideology of shared responsibility in contraceptive choice. Constructing the male pill norm was divided into two sub-constructs: 'Male pill: we are going to join the women and become responsible - too!' and 'Male pill: you look so girly - what are they going to think of me?' The 'Living by the male pill norm' was further divided into four sub-constructs 'Male pill - thank you for giving me promises not to have to become a dad as yet!'; 'Male pill: thank you for the idea of fun - sorry about my morals!'; 'Male pill: in stable relations - yes, I would have you now - sorry, I am too late!' and 'Male pill, we love you - but we are too anxious - we are not ready as yet!' From this male discourse, it is clear that discussions over the male pill follow the line of a vicious circle. In order to establish long-term side effects, Phase IV studies are necessary, and these cannot commence without the male hormonal contraception being a marketable product. So, unless this circle gets broken by some brave men, the male pill will remain a virtual rotating idea for a long time. PMID:24997170

  1. Vitamin nutritional status of women using oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Murthy, N K; Vijaya, S

    1980-03-01

    A comparative study was conducted to assess the biochemical effects of a low-estrogen combined OC (oral contraceptive). The focus of the study was on possible biochemical effects indicative of altered nutritional status. Both low and high income women on pills were compared with others not on pills. The groups were further divided according to the duration of OC usage. Blood hemoglobin, serum Vitamin A, plasma ascorbic acid, folic acid, riboflavin, and aspartate transaminase levels were measured. Higher income women had better measures on all the indices than the low income women, indicating a better initial nutritional status. Deficiencies increased with duration of use. Results of the study show that OCs reduce the vitamin nutritional level in women. For poor women on OCs, special nutrition intervention programs should be instituted.

  2. [Two out of three young women use the pill].

    PubMed

    De Graaf, A

    1994-01-01

    Data from the 1993 Netherlands Fertility and Family Survey are analyzed. Results show that "three out of every four women aged 18-42 years use some method of birth control. Some 10% is pregnant or wants to become pregnant, 5% is infecund and 10% does not use a method for other reasons. Compared with the previous surveys, held in 1982 and 1988, more women use the pill, whereas the popularity of the IUD has decreased.... Among women in their thirties sterilization has decreased, but that is related to the fact that women nowadays have their children at a later age....Furthermore it can be concluded that of the women who have no male partner, 50% used some reliable method of birth control (pill, IUD or condom)." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  3. Endoscopic treatment for pill bezoars after continent ileostomy.

    PubMed

    Lian, L; Fazio, V; Shen, B

    2009-07-01

    Difficulty intubation is the most common long-term complication after continent ileostomy, which can be associated with nipple valve slippage, parastomal hernia, stenosis. Diagnosis and management of a patient with nipple valve stricture and partial bowel obstruction associated with dietary supplement retention in the pouch reservoir is described. A 50-year-old female patient with ulcerative colitis and a 15-year history of continent ileostomy after total proctocolectomy reported 5-week symptoms of abdominal pain and difficulty in intubating the pouch. Pill bezoar composed of dietary supplement was found in diagnostic pouch endoscopy. Therapeutic pouch endoscopy was performed with balloon dilation of a nipple valve stenosis and retrieval of 224 dietary supplement tablets. Pill bezoar in the pouch is rare. However, patients with continent ileostomy should be advised to avoid taking hard-to-dissolve foods and medications. PMID:18619932

  4. Brief Report: Apparent Antiretroviral Overadherence by Pill Count is Associated With HIV Treatment Failure in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Okatch, Harriet; Beiter, Kaylin; Eby, Jessica; Chapman, Jennifer; Marukutira, Tafireyi; Tshume, Ontibile; Matshaba, Mogomotsi; Anabwani, Gabriel M; Gross, Robert; Lowenthal, Elizabeth

    2016-08-15

    Pill counts with calculated adherence percentages are used in many settings to monitor adherence, but can be undermined by patients discarding pills to hide nonadherence. Pill counts suggesting that >100% of prescribed doses were taken can signal "pill dumping." We defined "overadherence" among a cohort of 300 HIV-infected adolescents as having greater than one-third of pill counts with >100% adherence during a year of follow-up. Apparent overadherence was more common in those with virologic failure than in those with suppressed viral loads (33% vs 13%, χ P = 0.001). Pill count adherence repeatedly >100% may identify HIV-infected adolescents at increased risk of treatment failure. PMID:26990822

  5. Salt pill design and fabrication for adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; McCammon, Dan

    2014-07-01

    The performance of an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is critically dependent on the design and construction of the salt pills that produce cooling. In most cases, the primary goal is to obtain the largest cooling capacity at the low temperature end of the operating range. The realizable cooling capacity depends on a number of factors, including refrigerant mass, and how efficiently it absorbs heat from the various instrument loads. The design and optimization of “salt pills” for ADR systems depend not only on the mechanical, chemical and thermal properties of the refrigerant, but also on the range of heat fluxes that the salt pill must accommodate. Despite the fairly wide variety of refrigerants available, those used at very low temperature tend to be hydrated salts that require a dedicated thermal bus and must be hermetically sealed, while those used at higher temperature - greater than about 0.5 K - tend to be single- or poly-crystals that have much simpler requirements for thermal and mechanical packaging. This paper presents a summary of strategies and techniques for designing, optimizing and fabricating salt pills for both low- and mid-temperature applications.

  6. A case of acute myocardial infarction due to the use of cayenne pepper pills.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Muhammet Rasit; Karabag, Turgut; Dogan, Sait Mesut; Akpinar, Ibrahim; Aydin, Mustafa

    2012-04-01

    The use of weight loss pills containing cayenne pepper has ever been increasing. The main component of cayenne pepper pills is capsaicin. There are conflicting data about the effects of capsaicin on the cardiovascular system. In this paper, we present the case of a 41 year old male patient with no cardiovascular risk factors who took cayenne pepper pills to lose weight and developed acute myocardial infarction.

  7. The birth control pill, thromboembolic disease, science and the media: a historical review of the relationship.

    PubMed

    Lackie, Elyse; Fairchild, Amy

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of the birth control pill (the Pill) in 1960 revolutionized the options for contraception, sparking vibrant discussion in the scientific and social science literature and in the media. Much attention focused on issues of women's rights, including ethics and personal choice. But the Pill also introduced new questions about risk. Shortly after its introduction, the risk of thromboembolic disease was recognized [1]. After more than half a century, controversies about the relationship between the Pill and thromboembolic disease have persisted. The scientific and media communities have been active in the discussion, debate and delivery of information about this risk. Scientific and public attention to thromboembolism and the Pill has had dramatic consequences, both good and bad. The spotlight on risk has helped to change norms regarding the public's right to know and assess dangers; it has sparked Pill scares linked to increased unplanned pregnancy, birth and abortion rates; and it has led to a change in federally mandated policies regarding how new contraceptive products are studied and brought to market. This paper charts the narrative of the thromboembolic risk of the Pill from its introduction in 1960 until today and reviews the corresponding media response to this history. How does the story of the thromboembolic risk of the Pill - explored through the lens of science, media and contemporary social dynamics - frame contemporary understanding of risk for researchers, clinicians, individuals and the public?

  8. Expectancy effect: impact of pill administration on cognitive performance in healthy seniors.

    PubMed

    Oken, Barry S; Flegal, Kristin; Zajdel, Daniel; Kishiyama, Shirley; Haas, Mitchell; Peters, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Expectancy or placebo effects on cognitive function have not been well studied. To determine the effect of taking pills on cognitive function, 40 participants were randomly assigned to a pill or no-pill condition. Healthy seniors who took a 2-week supply of methylcellulose pills, which they were told was an experimental cognitive enhancer, were compared to seniors not taking any pills. There were 2 primary outcome measures defined prior to the study-Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) Word List delayed recall and Stroop color word task time-as well as 7 other cognitive outcome measures. There was a significant effect of pill taking on the 2 primary outcome measures. There was also an effect of pill taking on choice reaction time and Word List immediate recall but not on the other 5 secondary cognitive outcome measures. In an exploratory analysis of potential predictors of the expectancy effect, perceived stress and self-efficacy but not personality traits interacted with the pill-taking effect on cognitive function. Further characterizing and understanding this observed expectancy effect is important to maximize cognitive health and improve clinical trial design.

  9. Effects of the oral contraceptive pill cycle on physiological responses to hypoxic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandoval, Darleen A.; Matt, Kathleen S.

    2003-01-01

    To test whether the oral contraceptive pill cycle affects endocrine and metabolic responses to hypoxic (fraction of inspired oxygen = 13%, P(IO2): 95 mmHg; H) versus normoxic (P(IO2):153 mmHg; N) exercise, we examined eight women (28 +/- 1.2 yr) during the third (PILL) and placebo (PLA) weeks of their monthly oral contraceptive pill cycle. Cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and neuroendocrine measurements were taken before, during, and after three 5-min consecutive workloads at 30%, 45%, and 60% of normoxic V(O2peak) in H and N trials. Heart rate response to exercise was greater in H versus N, but was not different between PILL and PLA. Lactate levels were significantly greater during exercise, and both lactate and glucose levels were significantly greater for 30 min after exercise in H versus N (p < 0.0001). When expressed relative to baseline, lactate levels were lower in PILL versus PLA, but glucose was greater in PILL versus PLA (p < 0.001). Cortisol levels were also significantly greater in PILL versus PLA (p < 0.001). Norepinephrine levels were significantly increased during exercise (p < 0.0001) and in H versus N (p < 0.0001). However, epinephrine levels were not different over time or with trial. Thus, the presence of circulating estradiol and progesterone during the PILL phase reduces glucose and lactate responses to hypoxic exercise.

  10. Is [symbol: see text] Yasmin a "truly different" pill?

    PubMed

    2002-08-01

    A combined oral contraceptive (COC) containing the progestogen drospirenone (pronounced dro-spi-re-known) plus the oestrogen ethinylestradiol ([symbol: see text] Yasmin--Schering Health Care) is now available in the UK. Company advertising claims that Yasmin is "truly different", as reliable and safe as other COCs and is "the pill for well-being", with "no associated weight gain" and "a demonstrable positive effect" on premenstrual symptoms and skin condition. Such claims have also appeared in the lay media. Are they justified? PMID:12216337

  11. Wine, alcohol and pills: What future for the French paradox?

    PubMed

    Biagi, Marco; Bertelli, Alberto A E

    2015-06-15

    The present review discusses the acquisitions obtained to date on the subject of wine consumption, health and cardiovascular protection. We distinguished the cardiovascular effects related to the consumption of wine and other alcoholic beverages focusing on non-alcoholic wine fraction: polyphenols and especially resveratrol. In the second part of the review we have addressed the issue of resveratrol bioavailability and the importance of wine matrix and phytocomplex highlighting the biological effects that can be obtained with nutraceuticals and resveratrol pills compared to the daily consumption of a glass of red wine.

  12. A Case of Significant Endobronchial Injury due to Recurrent Iron Pill Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Joo-Hee; Koo, Gun Woo; Chung, Sung Jun; Park, Dong Won; Kwak, Hyun Jung; Moon, Ji-Yong; Kim, Sang-Heon; Sohn, Jang Won; Yoon, Ho Joo; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Soo; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Oh, Young-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Gastric mucosal damage by iron pills is often reported. However, iron pill aspiration is uncommon. Oxidation of the impacted iron pill causes bronchial mucosal damage that progresses to chronic bronchial inflammation, necrosis, endobronchial stenosis and rarely, perforation. We reported a case of a 92-year-old woman with chronic productive cough and significant left-sided atelectasis. Bronchoscopy revealed substantial luminal narrowing with exudative inflammation of the left main bronchus. Bronchial washing cytology showed necroinflammatory exudate and a small amount of brown material. Mucosal biopsy showed diffuse brown pigments indicative of ferrous pigments, crystal deposition, and marked tissue degeneration. After vigorous coughing, she expectorated dark sediments and her symptoms and radiological abnormalities improved. There are a few such reports worldwide; however, this was the first case reported in Korea. Careful observation of aspiration-prone patients and early detection of iron pill aspiration may prevent iron pill-induced bronchial injury. PMID:26508942

  13. Cloxacillin: A New Cause of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Zezos, Petros; Harel, Ziv; Saibil, Fred

    2016-01-01

    A large variety of medications can cause pill-induced esophagitis. Herein we present a case of cloxacillin-induced esophagitis. A 66-year-old male presented with an acute onset of epigastric and retrosternal pain on the 5th day of a course of oral cloxacillin prescribed for erysipelas. Initial clinical and imaging assessment was negative and he was sent home. A few days later, he returned with persistent severe retrosternal pain; endoscopy at the same day revealed a normal upper esophagus, several small stellate erosions in the midesophagus, and a normal squamocolumnar junction with a small hiatus hernia. Treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg bid and MucaineR suspension resulted in complete resolution of his symptoms. Pill-induced esophagitis may be underreported by patients, when symptoms are mild and unrecognized and/or underdiagnosed by the clinicians as a cause of retrosternal pain, odynophagia, or dysphagia. Failure of early recognition may result in unnecessary diagnostic investigations and prolongation of the patient's discomfort. This case signifies the importance of enhancing clinician awareness for drug-associated esophageal injury when assessing patients with retrosternal pain, as well as the value of prophylaxis against this unpleasant condition by universally recommending drinking enough water in an upright position during ingestion of any oral medication. PMID:27446834

  14. Cloxacillin: A New Cause of Pill-Induced Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Zezos, Petros; Harel, Ziv; Saibil, Fred

    2016-01-01

    A large variety of medications can cause pill-induced esophagitis. Herein we present a case of cloxacillin-induced esophagitis. A 66-year-old male presented with an acute onset of epigastric and retrosternal pain on the 5th day of a course of oral cloxacillin prescribed for erysipelas. Initial clinical and imaging assessment was negative and he was sent home. A few days later, he returned with persistent severe retrosternal pain; endoscopy at the same day revealed a normal upper esophagus, several small stellate erosions in the midesophagus, and a normal squamocolumnar junction with a small hiatus hernia. Treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg bid and Mucaine(R) suspension resulted in complete resolution of his symptoms. Pill-induced esophagitis may be underreported by patients, when symptoms are mild and unrecognized and/or underdiagnosed by the clinicians as a cause of retrosternal pain, odynophagia, or dysphagia. Failure of early recognition may result in unnecessary diagnostic investigations and prolongation of the patient's discomfort. This case signifies the importance of enhancing clinician awareness for drug-associated esophageal injury when assessing patients with retrosternal pain, as well as the value of prophylaxis against this unpleasant condition by universally recommending drinking enough water in an upright position during ingestion of any oral medication. PMID:27446834

  15. Unannounced telephone-based pill counts: a valid and feasible method for monitoring adherence

    PubMed Central

    Fredericksen, R; Feldman, BJ; Brown, T; Schmidt, S; Crane, PK; Harrington, RD; Dhanireddy, S; McReynolds, J; Lober, WB; Bangsberg, DR; Kitahata, MM; Crane, HM

    2015-01-01

    Phone-based unannounced pill counts to measure medication adherence are much more practical and less expensive than home-based unannounced pill counts, but their validity has not been widely assessed. We examined the validity of phone vs. home-based pill counts using a simplified protocol streamlined for studies embedded in clinical care settings. A total of 100 paired counts were used to compare concordance between unannounced phone and home-based pill counts using interclass correlations. Discrepancy analyses using χ2 tests compared demographic and clinical characteristics across patients who were concordant between phone and home-based pill counts and patients who were not concordant. Concordance was high for phone-based and home-based unannounced total pill counts, as well as individual medication counts and calculated adherence. This study demonstrates that a simplified phone-based pill count protocol can be implemented among patients from a routine clinical care setting and is a feasible means of monitoring medication adherence. PMID:25331265

  16. Association between Physician Specialty and Risk of Prescribing Inappropriate Pill Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Yu; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Chiang, Shu-Chiung; Ho, Chin-Chin; Chou, Chia-Lin; Wu, Min-Shan; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Tsai, Han-Yi; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chou, Yueh-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescription errors that occur due to the process of pill splitting are a common medication problem; however, available prescription information involving inappropriate pill splitting and its associated factors is lacking. Methods We retrospectively evaluated a cohort of ambulatory prescriptions involving extended-release or enteric-coated formulations in a Taiwan medical center during a 5-month period in 2010. For this study, those pill splitting prescriptions involving special oral formulations were defined as inappropriate prescriptions. Information obtained included patient demographics, prescriber specialty and prescription details, which were assessed to identify factors associated with inappropriate pill splitting. Results There were 1,252 inappropriate prescriptions identified in this cohort study, representing a prescription frequency for inappropriate pill splitting of 1.0% among 124,300 prescriptions with special oral formulations. Among 35 drugs with special oral formulations in our study, 20 different drugs (57.1%, 20/35) had ever been prescribed to split. Anti-diabetic agents, cardiovascular agents and central nervous system agents were the most common drug classes involved in inappropriate splitting. The rate of inappropriate pill splitting was higher in older (over 65 years of age) patients (1.1%, 832/75,387). Eighty-seven percent (1089/1252) of inappropriate prescriptions were prescribed by internists. The rate of inappropriate pill splitting was highest from endocrinologists (3.4%, 429/12,477), nephrologists (1.3%, 81/6,028) and cardiologists (1.3%, 297/23,531). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the strongest factor associated with individual specific drug of inappropriate splitting was particular physician specialties. Conclusion This study provides important insights into the inappropriate prescription of special oral formulation related to pill splitting, and helps to aggregate information that can assist

  17. A medication adherence monitoring system for pill bottles based on a wearable inertial sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a medication adherence monitoring system for pill bottles based on a wearable inertial sensor. Signal templates corresponding to the two actions of twist-cap and hand-to-mouth are created using a camera-assisted training phase. The act of pill intake is then identified by performing a moving window dynamic time warping in real-time between signal templates and the signals acquired by the wearable inertial sensor. The outcomes of the experimentations carried out indicate that the developed medical adherence monitoring system identifies the act of pill intake with a high degree of accuracy.

  18. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease.

  19. Pills on the World Wide Web: reducing barriers through technology.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Lori M; Turok, David K

    2015-10-01

    Oral contraceptive pills are safe, effective, and available without a prescription in most countries. Despite support from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to provide oral contraceptives as an over-the-counter medication, US women are still required to have a prescription to obtain them. Use of online applications and the Internet has made most things easier to obtain in our society and this includes contraceptive methods. Several online ventures are now underway to enable US women to obtain oral contraceptives without visiting a medical provider's office. Women's health care professionals should encourage these novel approaches, as they will improve contraceptive access. As US women experiment with innovative health care models, providers will need to lead, follow, or be left behind.

  20. Decision-making and Anticipation in Pill Bugs (Armadillidium vulgare)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Tohru; Migita, Masao

    2004-08-01

    In the previous study, decision-making of the direction of motion was found in pill bugs. In the present experiment, we find that they autonomously choose specific places for the decision-making. Each individual was placed in a circle track surrounded by water. Small columnar marks were placed in the center of the track at equal intervals. At first, when they encountered the marks, they moved along and passed it. After some minutes, they tended to mount on the top of the marks, stayed for a while and swung the antennae as if they searched for the direction of motion. As time went on, they sometimes traced several marks. It seemed that they anticipated the appearance of the mark in advance to use it for decision-making of the direction of the next motion. In another circle track surrounded by wall, such behaviors were not observed.

  1. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dan; Eliakim, Rami

    2016-08-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE-the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  2. Adolescents at risk: pain pills to heroin: part II.

    PubMed

    Fogger, Susanne; McGuinness, Teena M

    2015-02-01

    Casually exposing adolescents to prescription opioid agents may escalate to daily use. A trend exists for adolescents using prescription opioid agents to substitute heroin because it is significantly cheaper than pills (approximately half of the cost) and is often more readily available. Additionally, it is more potent than most prescription opioid agents and carries increased risks of overdose and death. Although treatment for substance use disorders has traditionally centered on total abstinence, opioid replacement therapy (ORT) is an option that saves lives and prevents overdose deaths. In the United States, ORT is based on two medicines: methadone and buprenorphine. These drugs can be substituted for other opiate agents and have much lower overdose risks. Nursing implications and web-based resources for teaching are presented.

  3. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  4. Medicalizing reproduction: the pill and home pregnancy tests.

    PubMed

    Tone, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This article explores one chapter in the history of medicalization through a focused study of oral contraceptives and home pregnancy tests. Each commercially successful in developed nations and both decades old (the Food and Drug Administration approved oral contraceptives in 1960 and home pregnancy tests in 1977), these reproductive technologies created the first pharmaceutical mega-market comprised of young, healthy, sexually active, heterosexual women. Examining the discrete, but interconnected, histories of both products, this article explores how the Pill's popularity and profitability medicalized and feminized contraception, encouraging pharmaceutical companies to invest in the development of patented variants of hormonal contraception and creating a means by which the under-used Pap smear could be introduced to a population that had previously resisted it. Home pregnancy tests, too, had unintended consequences. Designed to shield the detection of a pregnancy from a "medical gaze," the test's widespread use encouraged women to become medical patients at an earlier stage of their pregnancy. PMID:22720823

  5. Adolescents at risk: pain pills to heroin: part II.

    PubMed

    Fogger, Susanne; McGuinness, Teena M

    2015-02-01

    Casually exposing adolescents to prescription opioid agents may escalate to daily use. A trend exists for adolescents using prescription opioid agents to substitute heroin because it is significantly cheaper than pills (approximately half of the cost) and is often more readily available. Additionally, it is more potent than most prescription opioid agents and carries increased risks of overdose and death. Although treatment for substance use disorders has traditionally centered on total abstinence, opioid replacement therapy (ORT) is an option that saves lives and prevents overdose deaths. In the United States, ORT is based on two medicines: methadone and buprenorphine. These drugs can be substituted for other opiate agents and have much lower overdose risks. Nursing implications and web-based resources for teaching are presented. PMID:25654572

  6. Highs and lows: patterns of use, positive and negative effects of benzylpiperazine-containing party pills (BZP-party pills) amongst young people in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Rachael A; Sheridan, Janie L

    2007-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate patterns and context of use of BZP-party pills, function of use, and positive and negative effects experienced by a sample of New Zealand young people who had used the products. Methods A qualitative study comprised of semi-structured interviews and group discussions. Results The sample included 58 young people aged 17–23 years who had used BZP-party pills in the previous 12 months. Young people were using these substances in a range of settings – primarily during weekend social occasions – particularly as part of the dance party culture. They were mostly used for their stimulant properties and to enhance socialisation, and were often taken in combination with other legal and illicit drugs. Young people had suffered a range of physical and emotional negative effects, although none of these was reported as being life-threatening or long-term. Many participants had reduced the frequency with which they used BZP-party pills due to adverse effects. Potentially risky behaviours identified included taking large doses, mixing BZP-party pills with alcohol and other substances, and driving whilst under the influence of BZP-party pills. Conclusion Findings suggest that young people in this study were not suffering excessive or dangerous adverse effects. However, potentially risky use of these products raises the issue of the need for developing harm reduction interventions. PMID:18021425

  7. Enhanced Oral Bioavailability of Pueraria Flavones by a Novel Solid Self-microemulsifying Drug Delivery System (SMEDDS) Dropping Pills.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qingxiang; Zhang, Guangyuan; Sun, Shilin; Fan, Hongbo; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Shaoyuan

    2016-05-01

    To improve bioavailability of pueraria flavones (PF), a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) dropping pills composed of PF, Crodamol GTCC, Maisine 35-1, Cremophor RH 40, 1,2-propylene glycol and polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000) was developed. Particle size, zeta potential, morphology and in vitro drug release were investigated, respectively. Pharmacokinetics, bioavailability of PF-SMEDDS dropping pills and commercial Yufengningxin dropping pills were also evaluated and compared in rats. Puerarin treated as the representative component of PF was analyzed. Dynamic light scattering showed the ability of PF-SMEDDS dropping pills to form a nanoemulsion droplet size in aqueous media. The type of media showed no significant effects on the release rate of PF. PF-SMEDDS dropping pills were able to improve the in vitro release rate of PF, and the in vitro release of these dropping pills was significantly faster than that of Yufengningxin dropping pills. There was a dramatic difference between the mean value of t1/2, peak concentration (Cmax), the area of concentration-time curve from 0 to 6 h (AUC0-6 h) of PF-SMEDDS dropping pills and that of commercial Yufengningxin dropping pills. A pharmacokinetic study showed that the bioavailability of PF was greatly enhanced by PF-SMEDDS dropping pills. The value of Cmax and relative bioavailability of PF-SMEDDS dropping pills were dramatically improved by an average of 1.69- and 2.36-fold compared with that of Yufengningxin dropping pills after gavage administration, respectively. It was concluded that bioavailability of PF was greatly improved and that PF-SMEDDS dropping pills might be an encouraging strategy to enhance the oral bioavailability of PF. PMID:26935150

  8. Bringing smart pills to market: FDA regulation of ingestible drug/device combination products.

    PubMed

    Avery, Matthew; Liu, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Imagine a pill that, after you swallow it, can track its position in your body. Or imagine a pill that can transmit a message to a doctor to tell him that you have taken your bitter medicine. Pills like this already exist. These so-called smart pills are an emerging type of medical therapy. However, this nascent technology has yet to reach the market and developers of these novel therapies face significant regulatory challenges. This article predicts how the Food and Drug Administration will regulate smart pills and shows how the current regulatory regime is inadequate. The article then proposes modifying the current regulatory regime to encourage development of smart pills and other innovative combination products by: (1) regulating combination products based on their "novel mode of action" rather than their "primary mode of action," (2) creating a marketing approval pathway specifically for combination products, and (3) eliminating regulations that require sponsors to get marketing approval from multiple centers within FDA and providing regulatory guidance specifically for ingestible drug/device combination products.

  9. PillCam(TradeMark), a Noninvasive Endoscopic Device for the Measurement of Gastrointestinal Motility Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaksman, Zahman; Crady, Camille; Raju, G. S.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs given by mouth are governed in part by gastrointestinal (GI) motility and function. Microgravity has been shown to decrease GI motility as indicated by a 3 fold increase in gastrointestinal transit time (GITT). The PillCam(TradeMark), an endoscopic camera embedded in a capsule, is a novel noninvasive and unobtrusive device that is used for the diagnosis of GI pathology. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of PillCam(TradeMark) as an alternative to the Lactulose Breath Hydrogen Test (LBHT) for estimating GI motility. The sensitivity and applicability of this device for detection and estimation of the effect of promethazine, a deterrent, and caffeine, a prokinetic, on GI motility were also examined. Method: In this semi-randomized cross-over design study, six male and six female subjects were administered the following 4 treatments: PillCam(TradeMark) alone, PillCam(TradeMark)+Lactulose (10g), PillCam(TradeMark)+caffeine (200mg), and PillCam(TradeMark)+Promethazine (50mg). Results: GITT ranged between 1:24 and 7:52 hr:min. Lactulose did not alter GITT. A significant increase in GITT was noticed after administration of PMZ when compared to values from PillCam(TradeMark) treatment alone or PillCam(TradeMark)+Lactulose treatment. No difference in GITT after caffeine treatment was noticed. While there were no gender related differences in GITT after administration of PillCam(TradeMark) or with lactulose, a significant difference (p<.05) between genders was observed after promethazine administration with mean GITT higher in males (5:50 hr:min) than females (4:15 hr:min). Conclusion: The PillCam(TradeMark) capsule is applicable for the determination of GITT using time stamped GI images. It can be successfully used for the assessment of drug induced changes in GI motility and therefore, may be applicable for microgravity and analog environment studies on GI motility and function.

  10. Qishen Yiqi Drop Pill improves cardiac function after myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    JianXin, Chen; Xue, Xu; ZhongFeng, Li; Kuo, Gao; FeiLong, Zhang; ZhiHong, Li; Xian, Wang; HongCai, Shang

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia (MI) is one of the leading causes of death, while Qishen Yiqi Drop Pill (QYDP) is a representative traditional Chinese medicine to treat this disease. Unveiling the pharmacological mechanism of QYDP will provide a great opportunity to promote the development of novel drugs to treat MI. 64 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups: MI model group, sham operation group, QYDP treatment group and Fosinopril treatment group. Echocardiography results showed that QYDP exhibited significantly larger LV end-diastolic dimension (LVEDd) and LV end-systolic dimension (LVEDs), compared with the MI model group, indicating the improved cardiac function by QYDP. 1H-NMR based metabonomics further identify 9 significantly changed metabolites in the QYDP treatment group, and the QYDP-related proteins based on the protein-metabolite interaction networks and the corresponding pathways were explored, involving the pyruvate metabolism pathway, the retinol metabolism pathway, the tyrosine metabolism pathway and the purine metabolism pathway, suggesting that QYDP was closely associated with blood circulation. ELISA tests were further employed to identify NO synthase (iNOS) and cathepsin K (CTSK) in the networks. For the first time, our work combined experimental and computational methods to study the mechanism of the formula of traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:27075394

  11. What's in a label? Ecstasy sellers' perceptions of pill brands.

    PubMed

    Duterte, Micheline; Jacinto, Camille; Sales, Paloma; Murphy, Sheigla

    2009-03-01

    This article presents selected findings from a qualitative study of Ecstasy sellers and their sales practices, knowledge of distribution networks, buyer-seller relationships, and self-reported drug use. In-depth interviews were conducted with 80 men and women who had sold five or more hits of Ecstasy five or more times in the six months prior to the interview. Study participants described their perceptions of the various types of Ecstasy they had distributed or used themselves. The participants had experience with a variety of Ecstasy labels, from the popular "Blue Dolphin" tablets to the powdered form called "Molly." We tracked pill brand mentions on Ecstasy-related websites to compare with interviewees' descriptions of Ecstasy brands. This study examines Ecstasy sellers' ideas about the role of brand names in Ecstasy markets and their relationship to their beliefs about different types of Ecstasy's purity and quality. We demonstrate that considering Ecstasy branding increases our understanding of buyer and seller relationships. PMID:19455907

  12. Pills easier to obtain as nations start to relax rules.

    PubMed

    1975-01-01

    In both developing and developed nations it has become easier to obtain oral contraception (OC). Generally, this means that the OC becomes available without a doctor's prescription and/or sources from outside a pharmacy. Sometimes there is no charge for the OC. In the People's Republic of China barefoot doctors distribute OC free of charge. Fiji, Israel, Korea and Pakistan have removed the prescription requirement. In India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and Turkey private family planning clinics distribute the OC on prescription but free of charge. Specially trained and registered midwives distribute OCs in Chile and Antigua has also recently lifted the prescription requirement. Free OC is available to low income women in Jamaica, Costa Rica and Peru. In Egypt family planning centers distribute the OC free and without prescription. The United Kingdom is making OCs available free-of-charge through the National Health Service. OCs are free in France. In the U.S. government agencies have provided free OCs to low-income women in government health centers and have subsidized free pills for distribution in private family planning clinics. In Canada and in the Democratic Republic of Germany, OCs are distributed free, on prescription, to low-income women. PMID:12259672

  13. Knowledge of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Hungarian Women Presenting for Induced Abortion or Seeking Emergency Contraception.

    PubMed

    Kozinszky, Z; Devosa, I; Fekete, Z; Szabó, D; Sikovanyecz, J; Pásztor, N; Keresztúri, A

    2016-09-01

    Ziel: Diese Arbeit untersucht einerseits das Wissen der Frauen um die „Pille danach“, andererseits vergleicht diese Studie die verschiedenen Verhütungsmethoden, welche die Frauen, die um die „Pille danach“ oder Abort ansuchen, verwenden. Methodik: Es wurde eine Umfrage an einer ungarischen Universitätsklinik durchgeführt. Gruppe 1 umfasste Frauen, welche die „Pille danach“ erhalten hatten (n = 940), die 2. Gruppe setzte sich aus Frauen zusammen, die sich für einen Schwangerschaftsabbruch entschieden hatten (n = 1592). Die Umfrage wurde zwischen 01.01.2005 und 20.11.2006 durchgeführt. Beide Gruppen wurden gezielt nach deren Erfahrungen, Einstellungen und Kenntnissen über die „Pille danach“ befragt. Ergebnisse: Die Notfallverhütung ist zu einem hohen Grad bekannt (87,9 %), wird aber nur selten verwendet. Nur 13 von 1592 Frauen, die eine Abtreibung wünschten, verwendeten diese Methode. Die Gruppe der Frauen, welche die Pille danach vorgezogen hatten, benutzen häufiger Kondome (Odds Ratio [OR] = 4,1) oder verwendeten keine Präventivmittel (OR = 3,8). Weniger als ein Drittel der Frauen, die einen Schwangerschaftsabbruch wünschten, hatten zuvor die Notfallverhütung versucht. Nur ein Fünftel aller Frauen in dieser Untersuchung weiß, wo man die „Pille danach“ bekommen kann. Frauen, die gut über die Existenz, Anwendung und Beschaffung informiert sind, haben diese Information von Gesundheitsdienstleistern (Adjust Odds Ratio [AOR] = 3,93) oder der Schule (AOR = 1.82). Schlussfolgerung: Bessere Ausbildung der Frauen in Bezug auf die Existenz, Anwendung und Beschaffung der Pille danach könnte die Rate der Aborte senken.

  14. Impact of a Warning CPOE System on the Inappropriate Pill Splitting of Prescribed Medications in Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Chen; Chou, Chia-Yu; Chou, Chia-Lin; Ho, Chin-Chin; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chiang, Shu-Chiung; Wu, Min-Shan; Wang, Sen-Wen; Lee, Chung-Yuan; Chou, Yueh-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Background Prescribing inappropriate pill splitting is not rare in clinical practice. To reduce inappropriate pill splitting, we developed an automatic warning system linked to a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system for special oral formulation drugs in outpatient settings. We examined the impact of the warning system on inappropriate prescribing of pill splitting and assess prescribers' responses to the warnings. Methods Drugs with extended-release or enteric-coated formulations that were not originally intended to be split were recognized as “special oral formulations”. A hard-stop system which could examine non-integer doses of drugs with special oral formulations, provide warnings to interrupt inappropriate prescriptions was integrated in CPOE in a medical center since June 2010. We designed an intervention study to compare the inappropriate splitting before and after the implementation of the warning system (baseline period 2010 January to May vs. intervention period 2010 June to 2011 August). During the intervention period, prescription changes in response to a warning were logged and analyzed. Results A total of 470,611 prescribed drug items with 34 different drugs with special oral formulations were prescribed in the study period. During the 15-month intervention period, 909 warnings for 26 different drugs were triggered among 354,523 prescribed drug items with special oral formulations. The warning rate of inappropriate splitting in the late intervention period was lower than those in baseline period (0.16% vs. 0.61%, incidence rate ratio 0.27, 95% CI 0.23–0.31, P<0.001). In respond to warnings, physicians had to make adjustments, of which the majority was changing to an unsplit pill (72.9%). Conclusions The interruptive warning system could avoid the prescriptions with inappropriate pill splitting. Accordingly, physicians changed their behavior of prescribing special oral formulations regarding inappropriate pill splitting. We suggest

  15. The Use of Pill Counts as a Facilitator of Adherence with Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Achieng, Loice; Musangi, Helen; Billingsley, Katherine; Onguit, Sharon; Ombegoh, Edwin; Bryant, LeeAnn; Mwiindi, Jonathan; Smith, Nathaniel; Keiser, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Background Pill counts are often used to measure adherence to ART, but there is little data on how they affect adherence. We previously showed a bivariate relationship between clinicians counting pills and adherence in patients receiving HIV care in Kenya. We present a secondary analysis of the relationship between numbers of pill counts and clinical outcomes in resource limited settings Methods Patients initiating ART at Kijabe Hospital were monitored for the number of discretionary pill counts performed by their clinician in the first 6 months of ART. Subjects were followed for at least 1 year after enrollment. The number of clinician pill counts was correlated to ART adherence. The primary endpoints were time to treatment failure, defined as a detectable HIV-1 viral load, death; or loss to follow-up. Results Clinician pill counts were done at 68% of clinic visits for 304 subjects. There was a positive correlation between the number of clinician pill counts and ART adherence (r = 0.21, p <0.001). Patients were divided into 3 groups (0 counts, 1 to 3 counts, 4 to 7 counts) and exhibited adherence of 76%, 84%, and 92%, respectively (p = 0.004). Time to treatment failure for these groups was 220 days, 438 days, and 497 days (P<0.01), respectively. Time to virologic failure in living patients remaining in the cohort was longer in those with more pill count (P =0.02). Multi-variate analysis adjusting for co-variates affecting time to treatment failure found that that clinician pill counts were associated with a decreased risk of treatment failure (HR = 0.69, p =0.04). Conclusions The number of clinician pill count performed was independently associated with better adherence and a decreased risk of treatment failure. The use of clinician pill counts should be further studied as an adherence promoter through a randomized clinical trial. PMID:24339861

  16. Self-corrective behavior for turn alternation in pill bugs (Armadillidium vulgare).

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Toru; Migita, Masao; Mitsuishi, Meiji

    2016-01-01

    Pill bugs (Armadillidium vulgare) demonstrate a behavior called turn alternation that keeps their overall direction of movement straight after obstacles in experimental settings force them to deviate from a course. For example, this behavior is seen when they alternate their path choice on successive trials of the T-maze test. However, sometimes pill bugs stop after turning and change their direction (directional change). The function of this directional change has not been investigated because such individuals are usually omitted from the data. The present paper shows that pill bugs use directional changes to prevent them from turning in the same direction on two successive turns, a behavior called turn repetition. We examined the behavior of 36 pill bugs that each completed 130 successive T-maze trials. Directional changes appeared more frequently when individuals had begun a turn repetition than when they had begun a turn alternation. Furthermore, after correcting for turn repetition, turn alternations increased. These results suggest that pill bugs have an inherent mechanism that acts to maintain turn-alternating behavior. PMID:26621257

  17. Self-corrective behavior for turn alternation in pill bugs (Armadillidium vulgare).

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Toru; Migita, Masao; Mitsuishi, Meiji

    2016-01-01

    Pill bugs (Armadillidium vulgare) demonstrate a behavior called turn alternation that keeps their overall direction of movement straight after obstacles in experimental settings force them to deviate from a course. For example, this behavior is seen when they alternate their path choice on successive trials of the T-maze test. However, sometimes pill bugs stop after turning and change their direction (directional change). The function of this directional change has not been investigated because such individuals are usually omitted from the data. The present paper shows that pill bugs use directional changes to prevent them from turning in the same direction on two successive turns, a behavior called turn repetition. We examined the behavior of 36 pill bugs that each completed 130 successive T-maze trials. Directional changes appeared more frequently when individuals had begun a turn repetition than when they had begun a turn alternation. Furthermore, after correcting for turn repetition, turn alternations increased. These results suggest that pill bugs have an inherent mechanism that acts to maintain turn-alternating behavior.

  18. Improved Design and Fabrication of Hydrated-Salt Pills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Canavan, Edgar R.

    2011-01-01

    A high-performance design, and fabrication and growth processes to implement the design, have been devised for encapsulating a hydrated salt in a container that both protects the salt and provides thermal conductance between the salt and the environment surrounding the container. The unitary salt/container structure is known in the art as a salt pill. In the original application of the present design and processes, the salt is, more specifically, a hydrated paramagnetic salt, for use as a refrigerant in a very-low-temperature adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The design and process can also be applied, with modifications, to other hydrated salts. Hydrated paramagnetic salts have long been used in ADRs because they have the desired magnetic properties at low temperatures. They also have some properties, disadvantageous for ADRs, that dictate the kind of enclosures in which they must be housed: Being hydrated, they lose water if exposed to less than 100-percent relative humidity. Because any dehydration compromises their magnetic properties, salts used in ADRs must be sealed in hermetic containers. Because they have relatively poor thermal conductivities in the temperature range of interest (<0.1 K), integral thermal buses are needed as means of efficiently transferring heat to and from the salts during refrigeration cycles. A thermal bus is typically made from a high-thermal-conductivity met al (such as copper or gold), and the salt is configured to make intimate thermal contact with the metal. Commonly in current practice (and in the present design), the thermal bus includes a matrix of wires or rods, and the salt is grown onto this matrix. The density and spacing of the conductors depend on the heat fluxes that must be accommodated during operation.

  19. Fertility Effects of Abortion and Birth Control Pill Access for Minors

    PubMed Central

    GULDI, MELANIE

    2008-01-01

    This article empirically assesses whether age-restricted access to abortion and the birth control pill influence minors’ fertility in the United States. There is not a strong consensus in previous literature regarding the relationship between laws restricting minors’ access to abortion and minors’ birthrates. This is the first study to recognize that state laws in place prior to the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision enabled minors to legally consent to surgical treatment—including abortion—in some states but not in others, and to construct abortion access variables reflecting this. In this article, age-specific policy variables measure either a minor’s legal ability to obtain an abortion or to obtain the birth control pill without parental involvement. I find fairly strong evidence that young women’s birthrates dropped as a result of abortion access as well as evidence that birth control pill access led to a drop in birthrates among whites. PMID:19110899

  20. Autopsy report on pseudo-Bartter syndrome with renal calcification induced by diuretics and diet pills

    PubMed Central

    Unuma, Kana; Tojo, Akihiro; Harada, Kazuki; Saka, Kanju; Nakajima, Makoto; Ishii, Takeshi; Fujita, Toshiro; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    A woman in her mid-forties had repeated vomiting and diarrhoea accompanied by muscle weakness soon after she started taking seven different diet pills imported from Thailand. After she had taken the pills for 8 days, respiratory depression progressed rapidly to arrest. Blood tests at the Emergency Department showed severe hypokalaemia with metabolic alkalosis. We diagnosed that she had developed pseudo-Bartter syndrome from the findings based on ionic abnormalities and high renin and aldosterone levels, and hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus. A postmortem blood analysis indicated subtherapeutic levels of furosemide. We concluded that the patient died from pseudo-Bartter syndrome, which was triggered by chronic self-administration of furosemide and aggravated by the diet pills. This is the first pseudo-Bartter syndrome autopsy report to show histological localisation of calcification in the kidneys. PMID:21686346

  1. Mood changes as reported by women taking the oral contraceptive pill.

    PubMed

    Chang, A M; Chick, P; Milburn, S

    1982-05-01

    In an effort to clarify the nature of emotional side effects frequently reported by women using oral contraceptives (OCs), an exploratory study was undertaken of the verbal descriptions of side effects provided by a sample of young, healthy, sexually active women attending the Family Planning Association of Queensland clinics in Brisbane; they had been using OCs for at least 6 months. The adjectives used in unstructured interviews by 20 women happy with pills and 20 complaining of side effects formed the basis for a questionnaire comparing occurrence of emotions before and after pill use. 3 consecutive sets of adjectives were tested using Principle Factor Analysis and orthogonal rotation. The final questionnaire along with questions concerning social variables were given to 100 women and the scores from different subgroups were compared using the t test. 4 distinct, specific, and uncorrelated factors containing 53 adjectives were identified, of which "annoyed" and "tiredness" suggest negative emotional effects and "passionate" and "reassured" suggest positive effects. The distribution of factor scores in subgroups with statistically significant differences indicate that increases in "annoyed" and "tiredness" scores are found mainly in women who complain of emotional side effects, who were bothered by remembering to take the pill, worried about pill-related dangers, and gained excessive weight. Increases in "passionate" scores were found in noncohabiting women with steady sexual relationships, and increases in "reassured" were universal. The results demonstrate the multidimensional nature of reported emotional side effects from the pill and indicate that highly specific and unique mood changes which do not fit into existing notions of depression or anxiety are reported by women taking the pill.

  2. Gonadotropin and estradiol secretion during the week of placebo therapy in oral contraceptive pill users.

    PubMed

    van der Spuy, Z M; Sohnius, U; Pienaar, C A; Schall, R

    1990-12-01

    The changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis during the placebo week in oral contraceptive pill users were assessed. Fifteen women using the combined oral contraceptive pill were studied for eight hours at the start and at the end of the placebo week and gonadotropin secretion and estradiol concentrations were compared with those in control women in the follicular phase of an unmedicated menstrual cycle. Both gonadotropin and estradiol concentrations were suppressed at the start of the placebo week. By day 7 of placebo, gonadotropin concentrations and pulse patterns were indistinguishable from those of the control subjects although estradiol concentrations were still significantly lower.

  3. A Little Bit of Sugar Helps the Pill Go Down: Resilience, Peace, and Family Planning: Comment on "The Pill Is Mightier Than the Sword".

    PubMed

    De Souza, Roger-Mark

    2016-02-01

    The article by Potts et al, "The Pill is Mightier than the Sword," points out that family planning has an important role to play in building peace by increasing women's empowerment and their agency, ultimately helping peacebuilding efforts. Evidence has demonstrated that family planning programs are cost effective, produce quick results, help women and couples meet their desired fertility levels, and produce a multitude of benefits around economic productivity, community engagement, conservation, resilience, and peacebuilding. In order for policy audiences from a variety of sectors, including conflict and peacebuilding, to appreciate these benefits, it is important to find common ground and articulate co-benefits that will help them appreciate and value the role of family planning, as it were, give them sugar to help the pill go down. This commentary examines how resilience, peacebuilding and family planning efforts need to focus on co-benefits in order to build on the successful interventions and opportunities that Potts et al highlight. PMID:26927398

  4. Bioaccessibility and excretion of arsenic in Niu Huang Jie Du Pian pills

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Iris; Sylvester, Steven; Lai, Vivian W.-M.; Owen, Andrew; Reimer, Kenneth J. Cullen, William R.

    2007-08-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) often contain significant levels of potentially toxic elements, including arsenic. Niu Huang Jie Du Pian pills were analyzed to determine the concentration, bioaccessibility (arsenic fraction soluble in the human gastrointestinal system) and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic. Arsenic excretion in urine (including speciation) and facial hair were studied after a one-time ingestion. The pills contained arsenic in the form of realgar, and although the total arsenic that was present in a single pill was high (28 mg), the low bioaccessibility of this form of arsenic predicted that only 4% of it was available for absorption into the bloodstream (1 mg of arsenic per pill). The species of arsenic that were solubilized were inorganic arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) but DMAA and MMAA were detected in urine. Two urinary arsenic excretion peaks were observed: an initial peak several (4-8) hours after ingestion corresponding to the excretion of predominantly As(III), and a larger peak at 14 h corresponding predominantly to DMAA and MMAA. No methylated As(III) species were observed. Facial hair analysis revealed that arsenic concentrations did not increase significantly as a result of the ingestion. Arsenic is incompletely soluble under human gastrointestinal conditions, and is metabolized from the inorganic to organic forms found in urine. Bioaccessible arsenic is comparable to the quantity excreted. Facial hair as a bio-indicator should be further tested.

  5. Diet Pills, Powders, and Liquids: Predictors of Use by Healthy Weight Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorlton, Janet; Park, Chang; Hughes, Tonda

    2014-01-01

    About 35% of healthy weight adolescent females describe themselves as overweight, and 66% report planning to lose weight. Body weight dissatisfaction is associated with unhealthy weight loss practices including diet pill/powder/liquid (PPL) use. Few studies have examined diet PPL use in healthy weight adolescent females; therefore, Youth Risk…

  6. Birthing the Pill at the University of Vermont (1970-1976)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmas, William A.; Schultz, J. Donald

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of the birth control pill in 1960 precipitated 2 decades of intense social change in the United States, particularly in the area of sexuality. Colleges and universities were not immune to these changes. The author examines the struggles at 1 land-grant university to find common ground on this issue among students, faculty,…

  7. Birthing the pill at the University of Vermont (1970-1976).

    PubMed

    Christmas, William A; Schultz, J Donald

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of the birth control pill in 1960 precipitated 2 decades of intense social change in the United States, particularly in the area of sexuality. Colleges and universities were not immune to these changes. The author examines the struggles at 1 land-grant university to find common ground on this issue among students, faculty, administrators, and trustees between 1970 and 1976.

  8. "Every 'never' I ever said came true": transitions from opioid pills to heroin injecting.

    PubMed

    Mars, Sarah G; Bourgois, Philippe; Karandinos, George; Montero, Fernando; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    This qualitative study documents the pathways to injecting heroin by users in Philadelphia and San Francisco before and during a pharmaceutical opioid pill epidemic. Data was collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews (conducted between 2010 and 2012) that were, conducted against a background of longer-term participant-observation, ethnographic studies of street-based drug users and dealers in Philadelphia (2007-12) and San Francisco (1994-2007, 2012). Philadelphia and San Francisco were selected for their contrasting political economies, immigration patterns and source type of heroin. In Philadelphia the ethnographers found heroin injectors, usually white users, who had started their opiate using careers with prescription opioids rather than transitioning from other drugs. In both Philadelphia and San Francisco, most of the young heroin injectors interviewed began, their drug-use trajectories with opioid pills--usually Percocet (oxycodone and acetaminophen), generic short acting oxycodone or, OxyContin (long-acting oxycodone)--before transitioning to heroin, usually by nasal inhalation (sniffing) or smoking at first, followed by injecting. While most of the Philadelphia users were born in the city or its suburbs and had started using both opioid pills and heroin there, many of the San Francisco users had initiated their pill and sometimes heroin use elsewhere and had migrated to the city from around the country. Nevertheless, patterns of transition of younger injectors were similar in both cities suggesting an evolving national pattern. In contrast, older users in both Philadelphia and San Francisco were more likely to have graduated to heroin injection from non-opiate drugs such as cannabis, methamphetamine and cocaine. Pharmaceutical opioid initiates typically reported switching to heroin for reasons of cost and ease-of-access to supply after becoming physically and emotionally dependent on opioid pills. Many expressed surprise and dismay at their

  9. Effect of sour tea (Lipicom) pill versus captopril on the treatment of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Ali-Reza; Akbari, Hossein; Soleimani, Saeid; Beladi Mousavi, Seyed Seifollah; Tamadon, Mohamad-Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Herbal medicines are traditionally prescribed to manage blood pressure. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate effect of sour tea pill containing the herb’s extract versus captopril on the treatment of hypertension. Patients and Methods: In our crossover clinical trial 20 patients were enrolled in the study and advised for life style modification then the participants were randomly divided into 2 groups. Sour tea pills was prescribed at a dose of 500 mg and captopril at a dose of 12.5 mg twice daily. In order to improve precision and final measurement, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was performed both prior and after measuring the hypertension in 2 successive visits. After 6 weeks of therapy, the methods changed and 6 weeks later ABPM was performed three times (baseline, at end of the 6th and 12th week). The 2 groups were merged together before data analysis. Results: Of the 20 patients, 13 (65%) were male and 7 (35%) were female. No significant difference of sex, age, and job was detected between 2 groups (P ≥ 0.05). Mean decreasing in systolic blood pressure was 7.75 ± 8.3 and 13.3 ± 16.1 mm Hg in the captopril and sour tea groups, respectively. Also, mean decline in diastolic blood pressure decreases was 2.15 ± 4.14 and 5.8 ± 7.8 mm Hg for captopril and sour tea groups, respectively. No side effect was observed in the sour tea pill group in the study. Conclusion: According to the effect of sour tea pill on decreasing blood pressure, without giving priority over captopril, sour tea pill containing the herb’s extract can be prescribed as an adjuvant therapy for lowering the prescribed dosage of captopril. PMID:26468478

  10. Behavioral evidence for internal factors affecting duration of conglobation in pill bugs (Armadillidium vulgare, Isopoda, Crustacea). Short communication.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Hiroe; Moriyama, T

    2012-01-01

    Pill bugs individually walked an experimental pathway, then were induced to conglobate with a puff of air. After recovering, they were stimulated again. Sixty of 80 pill bugs conglobated both times, first moving either antennae (A) or legs (L) during recovery. Both AA and LL groups showed a significant positive correlation between first (t1) and second (t2) conglobation times. In the AL group, pathway locomotion time (t0) was significantly positively correlated to both t1 and t2. We conclude that pill bugs determine conglobation time based partly on their previous states. PMID:22776477

  11. Behavioral evidence for internal factors affecting duration of conglobation in pill bugs (Armadillidium vulgare, Isopoda, Crustacea). Short communication.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Hiroe; Moriyama, T

    2012-01-01

    Pill bugs individually walked an experimental pathway, then were induced to conglobate with a puff of air. After recovering, they were stimulated again. Sixty of 80 pill bugs conglobated both times, first moving either antennae (A) or legs (L) during recovery. Both AA and LL groups showed a significant positive correlation between first (t1) and second (t2) conglobation times. In the AL group, pathway locomotion time (t0) was significantly positively correlated to both t1 and t2. We conclude that pill bugs determine conglobation time based partly on their previous states.

  12. Continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and satisfaction of women using an oral contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest versus a progestogen-only pill after switching from an ethinylestradiol-containing pill in a real-life setting: results of the CONTENT study

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Paula; Serrani, Marco; Vogtländer, Kai; Parke, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral contraceptives are still associated with high discontinuation rates, despite their efficacy. There is a wide choice of oral contraceptives available, and the aim of this study was to assess continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and the satisfaction of women in the first year of using a contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest (E2V/DNG) versus a progestogen-only pill (POP) in a real-life setting after discontinuing an ethinylestradiol-containing pill. Methods and results In this prospective, noninterventional, observational study, 3,152 patients were included for the efficacy analyses (n=2,558 women in the E2V/DNG group and n=592 in the POP group (two patients fulfilled the criteria of the efficacy population, but the used product was not known). Women had been taking an ethinylestradiol-containing pill ≥3 months before deciding to switch to the E2V/DNG pill or a POP. Overall, 19.8% (n=506) of E2V/DNG users and 25.8% (n=153) of POP users discontinued their prescribed pill. The median time to discontinuation was 157.0 days and 127.5 days, respectively. Time to discontinuation due to bleeding (P<0.0001) or other reasons (P=0.022) was significantly longer in the E2V/DNG group versus the POP group. The E2V/DNG pill was also associated with shorter (48.7% vs 44.1%), lighter (54% vs 46.1%), and less painful bleeding (91.1% vs 73.7%) and greater user satisfaction (80.7% vs 64.6%) than POP use, within 3–5 months after switch. Conclusion The E2V/DNG pill was associated with higher rates of continuation, bleeding profile acceptability, and user satisfaction than POP use and may be an alternative option for women who are dissatisfied with their current pill. PMID:27695365

  13. Continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and satisfaction of women using an oral contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest versus a progestogen-only pill after switching from an ethinylestradiol-containing pill in a real-life setting: results of the CONTENT study

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Paula; Serrani, Marco; Vogtländer, Kai; Parke, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral contraceptives are still associated with high discontinuation rates, despite their efficacy. There is a wide choice of oral contraceptives available, and the aim of this study was to assess continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and the satisfaction of women in the first year of using a contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest (E2V/DNG) versus a progestogen-only pill (POP) in a real-life setting after discontinuing an ethinylestradiol-containing pill. Methods and results In this prospective, noninterventional, observational study, 3,152 patients were included for the efficacy analyses (n=2,558 women in the E2V/DNG group and n=592 in the POP group (two patients fulfilled the criteria of the efficacy population, but the used product was not known). Women had been taking an ethinylestradiol-containing pill ≥3 months before deciding to switch to the E2V/DNG pill or a POP. Overall, 19.8% (n=506) of E2V/DNG users and 25.8% (n=153) of POP users discontinued their prescribed pill. The median time to discontinuation was 157.0 days and 127.5 days, respectively. Time to discontinuation due to bleeding (P<0.0001) or other reasons (P=0.022) was significantly longer in the E2V/DNG group versus the POP group. The E2V/DNG pill was also associated with shorter (48.7% vs 44.1%), lighter (54% vs 46.1%), and less painful bleeding (91.1% vs 73.7%) and greater user satisfaction (80.7% vs 64.6%) than POP use, within 3–5 months after switch. Conclusion The E2V/DNG pill was associated with higher rates of continuation, bleeding profile acceptability, and user satisfaction than POP use and may be an alternative option for women who are dissatisfied with their current pill.

  14. 'Clueless about contraception': the introduction and circulation of the contraceptive pill in state-socialist Poland (1960s-1970s).

    PubMed

    Ignaciuk, Agata

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the introduction of the pill into the state-socialist Polish market in the late 1960s and its circulation over the following decade. Abortion, legalised for socio-economic reasons in 1956, had been available practically on demand since 1959, and there were no legal obstacles to contraception. The pill first appeared in Poland in the early 1960s, but was not widely available in pharmacies until 1969, when the local pharmaceutical industry began production. Throughout the 1970s, only two brands were widely available: Femigen and Angravid. The pill played a marginal role in family planning during the 1960s and 1970s in Poland, with cycle-observation, backed by the possibility of a legal abortion, being the main resource for birth control. This was due to structural limits to the distribution of the pill on a centrally-planned market closed to Western pharmaceutical companies, cultural patterns of sexual behaviour, and the availability of abortion.

  15. Drug-Loaded Nanoparticles from 'Ershiwuwei Shanhu' Pill Induced Cellular Swelling of SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yali; Song, Xiaoping; Zheng, Siting; Luo, Yuandai; Wang, Leyu; Huang, Fukai; Qiu, Xiaozhong

    2016-03-01

    Drug-loaded nanoparticles from 'Ershiwuwei Shanhu' Pill (ESP) inducing cellular swelling of the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were investigated. Electron microscope was used to observe nanoparticles existing in the freeze-dried supernatant of 'Ershiwuwei Shanhu' Pill. Drug-free nanoparticles were obtained from the solution of drug-loaded nanoparticles via dialysis. The size and zeta potential of two kinds of nanoparticles were tested by granularmetric analysis and surface charge analysis. Results showed that nanoparticles could penetrate into cellular nucleus and caused cell swelling. CCK8 analysis implied that low concentration of drug-free nanoparticles from 'Ershiwuwei Shanhu' Pill can induce cell proliferation of the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, while drug-loaded nanoparticles can reduce cell viability through NF-κB pathway. Drug-loaded nanoparticles existed in 'Ershiwuwei Shanhu' pill might play a vital role during pharmacotherapy, which served as nanocarriers in delivering drugs into cells.

  16. Neurological function following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion is improved by the Ruyi Zhenbao pill in a rats

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TIAN; DUAN, SIJIN; WANG, HAIPING; SUN, SHAN; HAN, BING; FU, FENGHUA

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanisms of the Ruyi Zhenbao pill on neurological function following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion following reperfusion. The rats received intragastrically either sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (control and model groups) or Ruyi Zhenbao pill at doses of 0.2, 0.4 or 0.8 g/kg. Neurological function was assessed by cylinder, adhesive and beam-walking tests after 14-day Ruyi Zhenbao pill treatment. Neurogenesis and angiogenesis were detected using immunofluorescence staining. The expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Treatment with 0.4 and 0.8 g/kg Ruyi Zhenbao for 14 days significantly improved neurological function, and increased the number of von Willebrand Factor- and neuronal nuclear antigen-positive cells in the ischemic hemisphere of rats. Ruyi Zhenbao pill treatment also significantly enhanced the expression levels of BDNF, NGF and VEGF in the ischemic hemisphere. The results demonstrated that the Ruyi Zhenbao pill improved neurological function following ischemia in rats. The mechanisms of the Ruyi Zhenbao pill are associated with increasing the expression levels of BDNF, NGF and VEGF, and subsequently promoting neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the ischemic zone. PMID:26893831

  17. Abraham Lincoln's blue pills. Did our 16th president suffer from mercury poisoning?

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, N; Feldman, R G; Greaves, I A

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that Abraham Lincoln took a medicine called "blue mass" or "blue pill," commonly prescribed in the 19th century. What is now hardly known is that the main ingredient of blue mass was finely dispersed elemental mercury. As his friends understood, mercury was often prescribed for melancholy or "hypochondriasis," a condition Lincoln famously endured. Mercury in the form of the blue pill is a potential neurotoxin, which we have demonstrated by recreating and testing the recipe. We present the testimony of many of Lincoln's contemporaries to suggest that Lincoln suffered the neurobehavioural consequences of mercury intoxication but, perhaps crucial to history, before the main years of his presidency; he was astute enough to recognize the effects and stop the medication soon after his inauguration.

  18. Knowledge about missed contraceptive pills among married women at King Abdulaziz University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Iftikhar, Rahila; Aba Al Khail, Bahaa Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) are one of the most reliable methods of contraception. However, lack of knowledge about oral contraceptive use and inconsistent pill-taking might result in decreased efficacy. The study reported here aimed to explore women’s knowledge about oral contraceptive use and assess the factors associated with knowledge about OCPs among users. Methods This cross-sectional survey was conducted at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between April and June 2014. We included married, non-pregnant women >18 years old who had used a combined 21-day OCP for at least 3 months prior to recruitment. A questionnaire was used to collect the participants’ demographic information. It also assessed their knowledge about OCPs. Data were entered into and analyzed using SPSS software. Results A total of 357 women were recruited. Of these, 57.7% reported they knew what to do after missing one or two pills, but only 18.3% knew exactly what to do after missing more than two pills consecutively. Postgraduate women had a significantly higher knowledge score than illiterate women (P=0.002) and those who had completed at least primary education (P=0.001). Conversely, there was no difference in knowledge scores between Saudi and expatriate women (P=0.2). Monthly incomes (P=0.2) and mode of OCP selection (P=0.2) were also not significantly associated with knowledge scores. Conclusion Women had poor knowledge about OCP use. Appropriate measures should be taken to educate women about proper oral contraceptive use. PMID:25792813

  19. [Repackaging drugs in pill-box in France: an illegal activity for pharmacists?].

    PubMed

    Hallouard, F; Bourdelin, M; Fessi, H; Bontemps, H

    2011-07-01

    Drug repackaging in pill-box by pharmacists is booming since few years. However, repackaging processes needed to open the industrially primary packaging will be found illegal in France. Thus, in this country drug repacking remains legal only by overwrapping medicines. Now, this solution is not applicable for example, with divisible or liquid forms. Therefore, packaging recommendations must be taken immediately in order to preserve the quality of drugs dispensed and to obtain a legalization of this activity.

  20. Artichoke and milk thistle pills and syrups as sources of phenolic compounds with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; José Alves, Maria; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-07-13

    Dietary supplements based on hepatoprotective plants have been increasingly used in the prevention of liver injuries. In the present work, the aim was to study the phenolic profile and possibly relate it to the in vitro antimicrobial activity of two different formulations (pills and syrups) of artichoke and milk thistle, the antioxidant and anti-hepatocellular carcinoma activities of which were previously reported by our research group. The phenolic profiles were obtained by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS, and the antimicrobial activity evaluation was performed with the clinical isolates of multiresistant bacteria (Escherichia coli, extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Artichoke syrup revealed the presence of vanillic acid and luteolin-7-O-glucoside while the pills possessed higher concentrations of 4-O-caffeoylquinic, 5-O-caffeoylquinic and 1,3-O-dicaffeoylquinic acids, this latest being able to inhibit the growth of MRSA. Regarding milk thistle formulations, the syrup presented isorhamnetin-O-deoxyhexoside-O-dihexoside, isorhamnetin-O-deoxyhexoside-O-hexoside and isorhamnetin-3-O-rutinoside as the major phenolic constituents whereas the pills were richer in taxifolin, silymarin derivatives and hydroxylated silibinin; the syrup revealed antimicrobial activity against all the studied bacteria with the exception of Proteus mirabilis whereas the pills revealed activity against ESBL producing Escherichia coli. Overall, all of the studied formulations revealed to be a good source of phenolic compounds, among which milk thistle syrup presented the highest variety and concentration of flavonoids, which is possibly related to its strongest antimicrobial activity.

  1. Images of American sexuality in debates over nonprescription access to emergency contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Wynn, L L; Trussell, James

    2006-11-01

    The debate over emergency contraceptive pill access in the United States revolves around speculations about Americans' sexual lives. The recently released internal U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) memo that expresses fears that adolescents will form "sex-based cults" around emergency contraceptive pills echoes arguments made against the nonprescription switch at the 2003 FDA hearings. In these hearings, opponents argued that nonprescription access would lead to adolescent promiscuity and disease transmission and that adult predators would use the drug to facilitate the sexual abuse of young women. In contrast, proponents of expanded access to emergency contraceptive pills overwhelmingly portrayed their model user as a responsible adult who experiences a torn condom during consensual sex. These imaginations of American sexuality are tied to competing models of the role of medical providers in women's sexual decision making. Opponents of the nonprescription switch argued that women need a learned intermediary, not only to determine their need for emergency contraception, but also to educate them about proper sexual behavior and protect them from abuse. Proponents advocated putting more responsibility for sexual health decision making in the hands of women, not doctors, and complained about the moralizing scrutiny of medical providers. In the absence of nonprescription access to emergency contraception, advance prescription of emergency contraceptive pills can ensure that contraceptive education is not tied to a specific sexual act and therefore not perceived as a judgment about women's sexual decisions. However, advance prescription does not help women who lack access to health care or women who make sexual and contraceptive decisions without consulting physicians. PMID:17077255

  2. Artichoke and milk thistle pills and syrups as sources of phenolic compounds with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; José Alves, Maria; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-07-13

    Dietary supplements based on hepatoprotective plants have been increasingly used in the prevention of liver injuries. In the present work, the aim was to study the phenolic profile and possibly relate it to the in vitro antimicrobial activity of two different formulations (pills and syrups) of artichoke and milk thistle, the antioxidant and anti-hepatocellular carcinoma activities of which were previously reported by our research group. The phenolic profiles were obtained by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS, and the antimicrobial activity evaluation was performed with the clinical isolates of multiresistant bacteria (Escherichia coli, extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Artichoke syrup revealed the presence of vanillic acid and luteolin-7-O-glucoside while the pills possessed higher concentrations of 4-O-caffeoylquinic, 5-O-caffeoylquinic and 1,3-O-dicaffeoylquinic acids, this latest being able to inhibit the growth of MRSA. Regarding milk thistle formulations, the syrup presented isorhamnetin-O-deoxyhexoside-O-dihexoside, isorhamnetin-O-deoxyhexoside-O-hexoside and isorhamnetin-3-O-rutinoside as the major phenolic constituents whereas the pills were richer in taxifolin, silymarin derivatives and hydroxylated silibinin; the syrup revealed antimicrobial activity against all the studied bacteria with the exception of Proteus mirabilis whereas the pills revealed activity against ESBL producing Escherichia coli. Overall, all of the studied formulations revealed to be a good source of phenolic compounds, among which milk thistle syrup presented the highest variety and concentration of flavonoids, which is possibly related to its strongest antimicrobial activity. PMID:27273551

  3. ADR salt pill design and crystal growth process for hydrated magnetic salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor); DiPirro, Michael J. (Inventor); Canavan, Edgar R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A process is provided for producing a salt pill for use in very low temperature adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs). The method can include providing a thermal bus in a housing. The thermal bus can include an array of thermally conductive metal conductors. A hydrated salt can be grown on the array of thermally conductive metal conductors. Thermal conductance can be provided to the hydrated salt.

  4. Fifty years of "the pill": risk reduction and discovery of benefits beyond contraception, reflections, and forecast.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Kristina D; Burkman, Ronald T; Tornesi, Belen M; Mahadevan, Brinda

    2012-01-01

    Widely regarded as a revolutionary drug in its early years, "the pill" may be considered the first designer or lifestyle drug. Approximately 85% of women in the United States will use an oral contraceptive (OC) for an average of 5 years. Since the introduction of OCs in the 1960s, both health benefits and safety concerns have been attributed to their use. Widespread use of OC formulations by women throughout their reproductive life cycle gave rise to concerns about the effects of OCs on risk factors for cardiovascular disorders and cancer. In most instances, the noncontraceptive benefits of OCs outweigh the potential risks. As with many first in class drugs, lessons can be learned from its development and use. Indeed, "the pill" played a significant role in reshaping the regulatory process for new drugs during the second half of the 20th century. The birth control pill celebrates its 50th birthday this year, as women and men celebrate five decades of this revolutionary method of family planning. Recent scientific and technological advances in genomics, proteomics, new materials, and new drug delivery systems, along with a new understanding of reproductive biology, offer the promise of new, safe, and effective forms of contraception. In addition to the history of OC therapeutic advances and unintended side effects, the noncontraceptive health benefits that women experience beyond pregnancy prevention are discussed. This article summarizes a symposium presented at the 50th Anniversary of the Society of Toxicology National Meeting, held from 6 to 10 March 2011 in Washington, DC.

  5. Dragon's blood dropping pills have protective effects on focal cerebral ischemia rats model.

    PubMed

    Xin, Nian; Yang, Fang-Ju; Li, Yan; Li, Yu-Juan; Dai, Rong-Ji; Meng, Wei-Wei; Chen, Yan; Deng, Yu-Lin

    2013-12-15

    Dragon's blood is a bright red resin obtained from Dracaena cochinchinensis (Lour.) S.C.Chen (Yunnan, China). As a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, it has great traditional medicinal value and is used for wound healing and to stop bleeding. Its main biological activity comes from phenolic compounds. In this study, phenolic compounds were made into dropping pills and their protective effects were examined by establishing focal cerebral ischemia rats model used method of Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO), and by investigating indexes of neurological scores, infarct volume, cerebral index, cerebral water content and oxidation stress. Compared to model group, high, middle and low groups of Dragon's blood dropping pills could improve the neurological function significantly (p<0.01) and reduce cerebral infarct volume of focal cerebral ischemia rats remarkably (p<0.05-0.01). Meanwhile, each group could alleviate cerebral water content and cerebral index (p<0.05-0.01) and regulate oxidative stress of focal cerebral ischemia rats obviously (p<0.05-0.01). Activities of middle group corresponded with that treated with positive control drug. The results obtained here showed that Dragon's blood dropping pills had protective effects on focal cerebral ischemia rats. PMID:24051215

  6. Dragon's blood dropping pills have protective effects on focal cerebral ischemia rats model.

    PubMed

    Xin, Nian; Yang, Fang-Ju; Li, Yan; Li, Yu-Juan; Dai, Rong-Ji; Meng, Wei-Wei; Chen, Yan; Deng, Yu-Lin

    2013-12-15

    Dragon's blood is a bright red resin obtained from Dracaena cochinchinensis (Lour.) S.C.Chen (Yunnan, China). As a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, it has great traditional medicinal value and is used for wound healing and to stop bleeding. Its main biological activity comes from phenolic compounds. In this study, phenolic compounds were made into dropping pills and their protective effects were examined by establishing focal cerebral ischemia rats model used method of Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO), and by investigating indexes of neurological scores, infarct volume, cerebral index, cerebral water content and oxidation stress. Compared to model group, high, middle and low groups of Dragon's blood dropping pills could improve the neurological function significantly (p<0.01) and reduce cerebral infarct volume of focal cerebral ischemia rats remarkably (p<0.05-0.01). Meanwhile, each group could alleviate cerebral water content and cerebral index (p<0.05-0.01) and regulate oxidative stress of focal cerebral ischemia rats obviously (p<0.05-0.01). Activities of middle group corresponded with that treated with positive control drug. The results obtained here showed that Dragon's blood dropping pills had protective effects on focal cerebral ischemia rats.

  7. Short and long sleep and sleeping pills. Is increased mortality associated?

    PubMed

    Kripke, D F; Simons, R N; Garfinkel, L; Hammond, E C

    1979-01-01

    Prospective epidemiologic data of the American Cancer Society disclosed that reported usual sleep durations among groups who complained of insomnia and sleeping pill use "often" overlapped with those of groups who had no complaints. Reports of insomnia were not consistently associated with increased mortality when several factors were controlled; however, men who reported usually sleeping less than four hours were 2.80 times as likely to have died within six years as men who reported 7.0 to 7.9 hours of sleep. The ratio for women was 1.48. Men and women who reported sleeping ten hours or more had about 1.8 times the mortality of those who reported 7.0 to 7.9 hours of sleep. Those who reported using sleeping pills "often" had 1.5 times the mortality of those who "never" used sleeping pills. These results do not prove that mortality could be reduced by altering sleep durations or by reducing hypnotic prescribing. Rather, studies are needed to determine the causes of these mortality risk factors. PMID:760693

  8. Short and long sleep and sleeping pills. Is increased mortality associated?

    PubMed

    Kripke, D F; Simons, R N; Garfinkel, L; Hammond, E C

    1979-01-01

    Prospective epidemiologic data of the American Cancer Society disclosed that reported usual sleep durations among groups who complained of insomnia and sleeping pill use "often" overlapped with those of groups who had no complaints. Reports of insomnia were not consistently associated with increased mortality when several factors were controlled; however, men who reported usually sleeping less than four hours were 2.80 times as likely to have died within six years as men who reported 7.0 to 7.9 hours of sleep. The ratio for women was 1.48. Men and women who reported sleeping ten hours or more had about 1.8 times the mortality of those who reported 7.0 to 7.9 hours of sleep. Those who reported using sleeping pills "often" had 1.5 times the mortality of those who "never" used sleeping pills. These results do not prove that mortality could be reduced by altering sleep durations or by reducing hypnotic prescribing. Rather, studies are needed to determine the causes of these mortality risk factors.

  9. Urea kinetics in healthy young women: minimal effect of stage of menstrual cycle, contraceptive pill and protein intake.

    PubMed

    McClelland, I S; Jackson, A A

    1996-08-01

    Urea kinetics were measured using prime/intermittent oral doses of [15N15N]urea, on five separate protocols in thirteen normal young women. Each woman underwent either two or three study protocols. Measurements were made at day 12 and day 22 of the menstrual cycle, whilst consuming their habitual protein intake in seven women not taking the contraceptive pill and in six women taking the contraceptive pill. In three women taking the pill, and three not taking the pill, urea kinetics were measured whilst taking a diet in which the intake was restricted to 55 g protein/d. There was no difference in the rate of urea production, urea excretion or urea hydrolysis between the women taking the pill and those not taking the pill at day 22. In the women not taking the pill there was no difference in any measure between day 12 and day 22. In the women taking the pill there was a significant difference in the disposal of urea N to excretion or hydrolysis on day 12 compared with day 22, with a relative decrease in excretion and enhancement of hydrolysis at day 12 compared with day 22. On the restricted diet, an intake of 55 g protein/d represented 77% of the habitual intake and urea production, excretion and hydrolysis were reduced to about 84% of the rate found on the habitual intake. In paired studies the reduction in urea production was statistically significant, and there was a statistically significant linear relationship between urea production and either intake or the sum of intake plus hydrolysis. The within-individual variability for urea production was about 10%, for excretion 15% and for hydrolysis 44%. The between-individual variability for intake was about 17% on the habitual intake. The variability for production, excretion and hydrolysis (14, 13, 36%) was less in the women not taking the contraceptive pill than in those taking the pill 23, 32, 42% respectively). The variability was reduced on the controlled low intake of 55 g protein compared with the habitual

  10. Effect of a “pill mill” law on opioid prescribing and utilization: The case of Texas

    PubMed Central

    Lyapustina, Tatyana; Rutkow, Lainie; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Daubresse, Matthew; Ramji, Alim F.; Faul, Mark; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Alexander, G. Caleb

    2016-01-01

    Background States have attempted to reduce prescription opioid abuse through strengthening the regulation of pain management clinics; however, the effect of such measures remains unclear. We quantified the impact of Texas’s September 2010 “pill mill” law on opioid prescribing and utilization. Methods We used the IMS Health LRx LifeLink database to examine anonymized, patient-level pharmacy claims for a closed cohort of individuals filling prescription opioids in Texas between September 2009 and August 2011. Our primary outcomes were derived at a monthly level and included: (1) average morphine equivalent dose (MED) per transaction; (2) aggregate opioid volume; (3) number of opioid prescriptions; and (4) quantity of opioid pills dispensed. We compared observed values with the counterfactual, which we estimated from pre-intervention levels and trends. Results Texas’s pill mill law was associated with declines in average MED per transaction (−0.57 mg/month, 95% confidence interval [CI] −1.09, −0.057), monthly opioid volume (−9.99 kg/month, CI −12.86, −7.11), monthly number of opioid prescriptions (−12,200 prescriptions/month, CI −15,300, −9,150) and monthly quantity of opioid pills dispensed (−714,000 pills/month, CI −877,000, −550,000). These reductions reflected decreases of 8.1–24.3% across the outcomes at one year compared with the counterfactual, and they were concentrated among prescribers and patients with the highest opioid prescribing and utilization at baseline. Conclusions Following the implementation of Texas’s 2010 pill mill law, there were clinically significant reductions in opioid dose, volume, prescriptions and pills dispensed within the state, which were limited to individuals with higher levels of baseline opioid prescribing and utilization. PMID:26778760

  11. Adherence to Varenicline Among African American Smokers: An Exploratory Analysis Comparing Plasma Concentration, Pill Count, and Self-report

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Carla J.; Cox, Lisa Sanderson; Nazir, Niaman; Benowitz, Neal L.; Yu, Lisa; Yturralde, Olivia; Jacob, Peyton; Choi, Won S.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Nollen, Nicole L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Measuring adherence to smoking cessation pharmacotherapy is important to evaluating its effectiveness. Blood levels are considered the most accurate measure of adherence but are invasive and costly. Pill counts and self-report are more practical, but little is known about their relationship to blood levels. This study compared the validity of pill count and self-report against plasma varenicline concentration for measuring pharmacotherapy adherence. Methods: Data were obtained from a randomized pilot study of varenicline for smoking cessation among African American smokers. Adherence was measured on Day 12 via plasma varenicline concentration, pill count, 3-day recall, and a visual analogue scale (VAS; adherence was represented on a line with two extremes “no pills” and “all pills”). Results: The sample consisted of 55 African American moderate to heavy smokers (average 16.8 cigarettes/day, SD = 5.6) and 63.6% were female. Significant correlations (p < .05) were found between plasma varenicline concentration and pill count (r = .56), 3-day recall (r = .46), and VAS (r = .29). Using plasma varenicline concentration of 2.0 ng/ml as the cutpoint for adherence, pill count demonstrated the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.85, p = .01) and had 88% sensitivity (95% CI = 75.0–95.0) and 80% specificity (95% CI = 30.0–99.0) for detecting adherence. Conclusions: Of 3 commonly used adherence measures, pill count was the most valid for identifying adherence in this sample of African American smokers. Pill count has been used across other health domains and could be incorporated into treatment to identify nonadherence, which, in turn, could maximize smoking cessation pharmacotherapy use and improve abstinence rates. PMID:22367976

  12. The origins of the giant pill-millipedes from Madagascar (Diplopoda: Sphaerotheriida: Arthrosphaeridae).

    PubMed

    Wesener, Thomas; Raupach, Michael J; Sierwald, Petra

    2010-12-01

    Giant pill-millipedes (order Sphaerotheriida) are large-bodied millipedes without poison glands which can roll-up into a complete ball. Their disconnected area of distribution spanning South Africa, Madagascar, India, SE Asia, Australia and New Zealand makes them interesting model organisms for biogeographic studies. The here presented phylogeny is based on a molecular dataset covering all areas of distribution with a special focus on Madagascar, where some species of giant pill-millipedes show island gigantism, reaching the size of a baseball. For our study, two mitochondrial genes (partial 16S rRNA and COI) as well as the complete nuclear 18S rDNA were sequenced. While many recent vertebrate studies hint that the ancestors of the recent Malagasy fauna crossed the >350 km wide Mozambique Channel several times, no such crossing was discovered in the Sphaerotheriida. For the first time in a molecular phylogenetic study of soil arthropods, a Madagascar-India group, the family Arthrosphaeridae, is recovered, hinting to a Gondwanan origin of the Sphaerotheriida. The Malagasy-Indian family Arthrosphaeridae forms a monophyletic, statistically well-supported group in all obtained trees. The giant pill-millipedes from Madagascar are paraphyletic because the Malagasy genus Sphaeromimus is the sister-taxon of the Indian Arthrosphaera. In Sphaeromimus, an ecotone shift occurred only once: the spiny forest species Sphaeromimus musicus forms the sister-clade to the species collected in rainforests and littoral rainforests. The two species of the Malagasy genus Zoosphaerium which express island gigantism form a monophyletic group in some trees, but these trees lack good statistical support. Deeper nodes inside the Sphaerotheriida, like the position of the Australian genera Procyliosoma and Epicyliosoma, the Southeast Asian family Zephroniidae and the South African genus Sphaerotherium could not be resolved. This study is the first genetic study inside the order Sphaerotheriida

  13. Water-compatible imprinted pills for sensitive determination of cannabinoids in urine and oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Cela-Pérez, M Concepción; Bates, Ferdia; Jiménez-Morigosa, Cristian; Lendoiro, Elena; de Castro, Ana; Cruz, Angelines; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; López-Vilariño, José M; González-Rodríguez, M Victoria

    2016-01-15

    A novel molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) methodology followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed using cylindrical shaped molecularly imprinted pills for detection of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH), cannabinol (CBN) and cannabidiol (CBD) in urine and oral fluid (OF). The composition of the molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) was optimized based on the screening results of a non-imprinted polymer library (NIP-library). Thus, acrylamide as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker were selected for the preparation of the MIP, using catechin as a mimic template. MISPE pills were incubated with 0.5 mL urine or OF sample for adsorption of analytes. For desorption, the pills were transferred to a vial with 2 mL of methanol:acetic acid (4:1) and sonicated for 15 min. The elution solvent was evaporated and reconstituted in methanol:formic acid (0.1%) 50:50 to inject in LC-MS/MS. The developed method was linear over the range from 1 to 500 ng mL(-1) in urine and from 0.75 to 500 ng mL(-1) in OF for all four analytes. Intra- and inter-day imprecision were <15%. Extraction recovery was 50-111%, process efficiency 15.4-54.5% and matrix effect ranged from -78.0 to -6.1%. Finally, the optimized and validated method was applied to 4 urine and 5 OF specimens. This is the first method for the determination of THC, THC-COOH, CBN and CBD in urine and OF using MISPE technology.

  14. The origins of the giant pill-millipedes from Madagascar (Diplopoda: Sphaerotheriida: Arthrosphaeridae).

    PubMed

    Wesener, Thomas; Raupach, Michael J; Sierwald, Petra

    2010-12-01

    Giant pill-millipedes (order Sphaerotheriida) are large-bodied millipedes without poison glands which can roll-up into a complete ball. Their disconnected area of distribution spanning South Africa, Madagascar, India, SE Asia, Australia and New Zealand makes them interesting model organisms for biogeographic studies. The here presented phylogeny is based on a molecular dataset covering all areas of distribution with a special focus on Madagascar, where some species of giant pill-millipedes show island gigantism, reaching the size of a baseball. For our study, two mitochondrial genes (partial 16S rRNA and COI) as well as the complete nuclear 18S rDNA were sequenced. While many recent vertebrate studies hint that the ancestors of the recent Malagasy fauna crossed the >350 km wide Mozambique Channel several times, no such crossing was discovered in the Sphaerotheriida. For the first time in a molecular phylogenetic study of soil arthropods, a Madagascar-India group, the family Arthrosphaeridae, is recovered, hinting to a Gondwanan origin of the Sphaerotheriida. The Malagasy-Indian family Arthrosphaeridae forms a monophyletic, statistically well-supported group in all obtained trees. The giant pill-millipedes from Madagascar are paraphyletic because the Malagasy genus Sphaeromimus is the sister-taxon of the Indian Arthrosphaera. In Sphaeromimus, an ecotone shift occurred only once: the spiny forest species Sphaeromimus musicus forms the sister-clade to the species collected in rainforests and littoral rainforests. The two species of the Malagasy genus Zoosphaerium which express island gigantism form a monophyletic group in some trees, but these trees lack good statistical support. Deeper nodes inside the Sphaerotheriida, like the position of the Australian genera Procyliosoma and Epicyliosoma, the Southeast Asian family Zephroniidae and the South African genus Sphaerotherium could not be resolved. This study is the first genetic study inside the order Sphaerotheriida

  15. Are all placebo effects equal? Placebo pills, sham acupuncture, cue conditioning and their association.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jian; Spaeth, Rosa; Cook, Amanda; Kirsch, Irving; Claggett, Brian; Vangel, Mark; Gollub, Randy L; Smoller, Jordan W; Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2013-01-01

    Placebo treatments and healing rituals have been used to treat pain throughout history. The present within-subject crossover study examines the variability in individual responses to placebo treatment with verbal suggestion and visual cue conditioning by investigating whether responses to different types of placebo treatment, as well as conditioning responses, correlate with one another. Secondarily, this study also examines whether responses to sham acupuncture correlate with responses to genuine acupuncture. Healthy subjects were recruited to participate in two sequential experiments. Experiment one is a five-session crossover study. In each session, subjects received one of four treatments: placebo pills (described as Tylenol), sham acupuncture, genuine acupuncture, or no treatment rest control condition. Before and after each treatment, paired with a verbal suggestion of positive effect, each subject's pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain ratings to calibrated heat pain were measured. At least 14 days after completing experiment one, all subjects were invited to participate in experiment two, during which their analgesic responses to conditioned visual cues were tested. Forty-eight healthy subjects completed experiment one, and 45 completed experiment two. The results showed significantly different effects of genuine acupuncture, placebo pill and rest control on pain threshold. There was no significant association between placebo pills, sham acupuncture and cue conditioning effects, indicating that individuals may respond to unique healing rituals in different ways. This outcome suggests that placebo response may be a complex behavioral phenomenon that has properties that comprise a state, rather than a trait characteristic. This could explain the difficulty of detecting a signature for "placebo responders." However, a significant association was found between the genuine and sham acupuncture treatments, implying that the non-specific effects of acupuncture

  16. Water-compatible imprinted pills for sensitive determination of cannabinoids in urine and oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Cela-Pérez, M Concepción; Bates, Ferdia; Jiménez-Morigosa, Cristian; Lendoiro, Elena; de Castro, Ana; Cruz, Angelines; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; López-Vilariño, José M; González-Rodríguez, M Victoria

    2016-01-15

    A novel molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) methodology followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed using cylindrical shaped molecularly imprinted pills for detection of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH), cannabinol (CBN) and cannabidiol (CBD) in urine and oral fluid (OF). The composition of the molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) was optimized based on the screening results of a non-imprinted polymer library (NIP-library). Thus, acrylamide as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker were selected for the preparation of the MIP, using catechin as a mimic template. MISPE pills were incubated with 0.5 mL urine or OF sample for adsorption of analytes. For desorption, the pills were transferred to a vial with 2 mL of methanol:acetic acid (4:1) and sonicated for 15 min. The elution solvent was evaporated and reconstituted in methanol:formic acid (0.1%) 50:50 to inject in LC-MS/MS. The developed method was linear over the range from 1 to 500 ng mL(-1) in urine and from 0.75 to 500 ng mL(-1) in OF for all four analytes. Intra- and inter-day imprecision were <15%. Extraction recovery was 50-111%, process efficiency 15.4-54.5% and matrix effect ranged from -78.0 to -6.1%. Finally, the optimized and validated method was applied to 4 urine and 5 OF specimens. This is the first method for the determination of THC, THC-COOH, CBN and CBD in urine and OF using MISPE technology. PMID:26718187

  17. A "Suicide Pill" for Older People: Attitudes of Physicians, the General Population, and Relatives of Patients Who Died after Euthanasia or Physician-Assisted Suicide in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rurup, Mette L.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.; van der Wal, Gerrit; van der Heide, Agnes; van Der Maas, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    In the Netherlands there has been ongoing debate in the past 10 years about the availability of a hypothetical "suicide pill", with which older people could end their life in a dignified way if they so wished. Data on attitudes to the suicide pill were collected in the Netherlands from 410 physicians, 1,379 members of the general population, and…

  18. The Pill Really Can Be Mightier Than the Sword: A Response to Recent Commentaries

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Malcolm; Graves, Alisha

    2016-01-01

    We appreciate the four commentaries that add new material and fresh perspectives to our article "The pill is mightier than the sword." In emphasizing the role of voluntary family planning and girls’ education as achievable strategies with a potential to make the world a more peaceable place, we did not mean to oversimplify or disregard the intrinsic complexity of human conflict. On the whole, the commentators support and add to our thesis, although we question Pillai and Ya-Chien Wang’s suggestion that we may have overstated the unique human predisposition to kill our own species. We present additional data on male team aggression. PMID:26927598

  19. Genome sequence of a crustacean iridovirus, IIV31, isolated from the pill bug, Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Piégu, Benoît; Guizard, Sébastien; Yeping, Tan; Cruaud, Corinne; Asgari, Sassan; Bideshi, Dennis K; Federici, Brian A; Bigot, Yves

    2014-07-01

    Members of the family Iridoviridae are animal viruses that infect only invertebrates and poikilothermic vertebrates. The invertebrate iridovirus 31 (IIV31) was originally isolated from adult pill bugs, Armadillidium vulgare (class Crustacea, order Isopoda, suborder Oniscidea), found in southern California on the campus of the University of California, Riverside, USA. IIV31 virions are icosahedral, have a diameter of about 135 nm, and contain a dsDNA genome 220.222 kbp in length, with 35.09 mol % G+C content and 203 ORFs. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence of this virus and its annotation. This is the eighth genome sequence of an IIV reported. PMID:24722681

  20. Genome sequence of a crustacean iridovirus, IIV31, isolated from the pill bug, Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Piégu, Benoît; Guizard, Sébastien; Yeping, Tan; Cruaud, Corinne; Asgari, Sassan; Bideshi, Dennis K; Federici, Brian A; Bigot, Yves

    2014-07-01

    Members of the family Iridoviridae are animal viruses that infect only invertebrates and poikilothermic vertebrates. The invertebrate iridovirus 31 (IIV31) was originally isolated from adult pill bugs, Armadillidium vulgare (class Crustacea, order Isopoda, suborder Oniscidea), found in southern California on the campus of the University of California, Riverside, USA. IIV31 virions are icosahedral, have a diameter of about 135 nm, and contain a dsDNA genome 220.222 kbp in length, with 35.09 mol % G+C content and 203 ORFs. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence of this virus and its annotation. This is the eighth genome sequence of an IIV reported.

  1. The Pill Really Can Be Mightier Than the Sword: A Response to Recent Commentaries.

    PubMed

    Potts, Malcolm; Graves, Alisha

    2016-03-01

    We appreciate the four commentaries that add new material and fresh perspectives to our article "The pill is mightier than the sword." In emphasizing the role of voluntary family planning and girls' education as achievable strategies with a potential to make the world a more peaceable place, we did not mean to oversimplify or disregard the intrinsic complexity of human conflict. On the whole, the commentators support and add to our thesis, although we question Pillai and Ya-Chien Wang's suggestion that we may have overstated the unique human predisposition to kill our own species. We present additional data on male team aggression. PMID:26927598

  2. Results of planned in-vitro fertilization programming through the pre-administration of the oestrogen-progesterone combined pill.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J; Debache, C; Solal, P; Serkine, A M; Achard, B; Boujenah, A; Pez, J P; Paris, X; Robert, J; Loffredo, V

    1987-01-01

    The use of an oestrogen-progesterone combined pill permits the induction of ovulation in the absence of any developing follicle. Two treatments were compared. In the first, patients received no prior treatment before stimulation. In the second, combined oestrogen-progesterone treatment was given during approximately two menstrual cycles prior to stimulation. No differences between the two groups were found in relation to oocyte maturity, fertilization in vitro, cleavage, replacement and pregnancy. Fewer luteinizing hormone surges occurred in patients pre-treated with steroids. The utilization of the oestrogen-progesterone combined pill prior to induction of ovulation facilitates the forward planning of patients for in-vitro fertilization. PMID:3106405

  3. Analyses of use of tranquilizers and sleeping pills across five surveys of the same population (1985-1991): the relationship with gender, age and use of other substances.

    PubMed

    Graham, K; Vidal-Zeballos, D

    1998-02-01

    The present study used analyses of data from five surveys of the same population over a 6-year period to examine the relationship of use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills with gender, age and use of other psychoactive substances. Part of the study involved identifying methodological issues in using surveys to study tranquilizer/sleeping pill use. Across surveys and within all age groups, females were more likely to use tranquilizers and/or sleeping pills than males, with an average ratio overall of a little higher than three to two (varying across surveys from 1.4 to 2.1; mode of 1.6). Prevalence rates for both females and males were strongly affected by timeframe over which use was measured. Use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills increased with age; however, the relationship with age was different for tranquilizers than for sleeping pills. For tranquilizers, the high correlation between age and use was largely attributable to the low rate of use by those aged 34 and younger. For sleeping pills, on the other hand, the relationship is based more on the high rate of use by those aged 65 and older. In addition, age was a major factor in nonmedical use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills, with nonmedical use decreasing dramatically with age. Use of other types of psychoactive medications was significantly higher among tranquilizer/sleeping pill users than among non-users. The results pertaining to concurrent use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills and alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco, however, showed some trends, but findings were not consistent across all surveys. Further analyses suggested that this lack of consistent findings might be attributable to survey design issues, in particular, the extent that the format of the survey question tended to exclude nonmedical users. The implications of these results for future research on tranquilizer/sleeping pill use are discussed. PMID:9460819

  4. Analyses of use of tranquilizers and sleeping pills across five surveys of the same population (1985-1991): the relationship with gender, age and use of other substances.

    PubMed

    Graham, K; Vidal-Zeballos, D

    1998-02-01

    The present study used analyses of data from five surveys of the same population over a 6-year period to examine the relationship of use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills with gender, age and use of other psychoactive substances. Part of the study involved identifying methodological issues in using surveys to study tranquilizer/sleeping pill use. Across surveys and within all age groups, females were more likely to use tranquilizers and/or sleeping pills than males, with an average ratio overall of a little higher than three to two (varying across surveys from 1.4 to 2.1; mode of 1.6). Prevalence rates for both females and males were strongly affected by timeframe over which use was measured. Use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills increased with age; however, the relationship with age was different for tranquilizers than for sleeping pills. For tranquilizers, the high correlation between age and use was largely attributable to the low rate of use by those aged 34 and younger. For sleeping pills, on the other hand, the relationship is based more on the high rate of use by those aged 65 and older. In addition, age was a major factor in nonmedical use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills, with nonmedical use decreasing dramatically with age. Use of other types of psychoactive medications was significantly higher among tranquilizer/sleeping pill users than among non-users. The results pertaining to concurrent use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills and alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco, however, showed some trends, but findings were not consistent across all surveys. Further analyses suggested that this lack of consistent findings might be attributable to survey design issues, in particular, the extent that the format of the survey question tended to exclude nonmedical users. The implications of these results for future research on tranquilizer/sleeping pill use are discussed.

  5. De-constructing 'choice': the social imperative and women's use of the birth control pill.

    PubMed

    Granzow, Kara

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the social construction of 'choice' in women's use of the oral contraceptive birth control pill. Using social and historical critiques of neo-liberalism, it is argued that the contemporary priority placed on 'choice' positions women in contradictory ways-requiring them to be both 'choosing' reproductive subjects and reproductive subjects with very few options. The paper works to de-construct contemporary understandings of choice and finds that women's use of the birth control pill is less an exercise of idealized individual agency than it is an act of repetition, tied to ambiguity around what a lived experience of choice might be. To elaborate elements of the theoretical discussion, findings from a qualitative study of women's use of the oral contraceptive are discussed. These reveal that women's articulations of 'choice' challenge the notion of genuinely available and viable alternatives for women, and demonstrate how the use of a technology can silence understandings of contraception as something other than an individual responsibility. PMID:17364713

  6. A Little Bit of Sugar Helps the Pill Go Down: Resilience, Peace, and Family Planning

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Roger-Mark

    2016-01-01

    The article by Potts et al, "The Pill is Mightier than the Sword," points out that family planning has an important role to play in building peace by increasing women’s empowerment and their agency, ultimately helping peacebuilding efforts. Evidence has demonstrated that family planning programs are cost effective, produce quick results, help women and couples meet their desired fertility levels, and produce a multitude of benefits around economic productivity, community engagement, conservation, resilience, and peacebuilding. In order for policy audiences from a variety of sectors, including conflict and peacebuilding, to appreciate these benefits, it is important to find common ground and articulate co-benefits that will help them appreciate and value the role of family planning, as it were, give them sugar to help the pill go down. This commentary examines how resilience, peacebuilding and family planning efforts need to focus on co-benefits in order to build on the successful interventions and opportunities that Potts et al highlight. PMID:26927398

  7. Is there U-turn from insulin back to pills in diabetes?

    PubMed

    Ertek, Sibel; Cetinkalp, Sevki

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance together with progressive loss of beta-cell function. After recognition of gluco- and lipo-toxicity, attention was focused on the preservation and/or restoration of beta cell function, especially at the early stages of the diabetes, with better beta-cell reserve and in the absence of complications. Early treatment of glucotoxicity with insulin was searched by early insulin treatment studies, and these studies have some promising results, pointing the possibility of "remission" of diabetes in some patients. According to the results of these studies, patients with early diagnosis of diabetes, the ones with better beta cell reserve, patients with low tendency for "insulin-abuse" could make "U"-turn from insulin to pills or even drug-free life. Criteria to turn back to pills could be listed as disappearance of diabetic symptoms, daily insulin need < 0.25 unit/kg, euglycemia in both fasting and postprandial state, and better beta cell function. The main problems in early insulin treatment are the ''insulin resistance'' of both patients and doctors, hypoglycemia, weight gain and increased appetite. Meanwhile, hyperinsulinemia desensitizes receptors and causes worsening of situation in a vicious cycle of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Therefore, patients should be selected properly and U-turn could be performed in relevant conditions explained in the text. It could be possible to see early insulin treatment and U-turn strategies in future guidelines for type 2 diabetes.

  8. Evaluation of Pharmacists' Services for Dispensing Emergency Contraceptive Pills in Delhi, India: A Mystery Shopper Study

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Pikee; Mishra, Archana; Nigam, Aruna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although emergency contraceptive pills are available over the counter, the quality of consultation, including key areas of contraceptive counseling and prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STI), has not been well documented. Objective: To evaluate actual pharmacist services while dispensing emergency contraception through a mystery shopper technique. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 81 pharmacies situated in Delhi by 4 trained mystery shoppers posed as customers over a period of 6 months. Results: None of the pharmacists asked about the time lapsed since last unprotected sexual intercourse or last menstrual period before deciding the eligibility of the customer. The majority were unclear about side effects associated with emergency contraception (78.57%) or with anticipated changes in menstrual flow (78.57%); 85.71% did not know whether subsequent unprotected intercourse would be protected. Only 15.71% counseled shoppers regarding risk of STI on asking leading questions and 88.5% did not provide any contraceptive advice. Conclusion: There is a huge gap in the technical knowledge and mindset of the pharmacists when it comes to checking for the eligibility of the client and providing advice regarding use of regular contraception and barrier for protection from STI, which needs to be addressed in order to realize the full benefit of making emergency contraceptive pills available over the counter. PMID:27385872

  9. [Determination of pinoresinol diglucoside in Qing' e Pills by ultra performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijia; Chen, Jie; Zhao, Junming; Liao, Liping; Sun, Qinglong; Wu, Tao; Wang, Zhengtao

    2010-08-01

    A new ultra performance liquid chromatographic (UPLC) method was established for the determination of pinoresinol diglucoside (PDG) in Qing' e Pills. After extracted by the Soxhlet's method, the methanol extracts of the samples were passed through a Waters Oasis HLB SPE column to achieve good chromatographic performance. The separation was performed on a Waters Acquity C18 BEH column (100 mm x 1.0 mm, 1.7 microm) with acetonitrile-water (the pH adjusted to 4.0 with phosphoric acid) (9: 91, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.1 mL/min. The detection wavelength was set at 227 nm, the column temperature was 25 degrees C and the injection volume was 0.5 microL. Under the optimized conditions, there was good linear relationship between the mass concentration and the peak area of PDG in the range of 1.40 - 506.00 mg/L with the correlation coefficient of 1. The average recoveries of PDG at three levels ranged from 100.10% to 102.37%. The method is accurate, sensitive, highly reproducible and suitable for the quality control of Qing' e Pills.

  10. Designing a flashcard with knowledge pills for learning to solve chemistry exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancela, Angeles; Sanchez, Angel; Maceiras, Rocio

    2012-08-01

    Nowadays, universities tend to promote more learner-centred learning, creating a more interactive and motivational environment for students and teachers. This paper describes an expanded framework to help chemical educators to construct a quiz for solution of chemical exercises in their courses. The novelty of this contribution is that the proposed tool combines a flashcards-based method with knowledge pills. The framework has three levels: definition of problem for a teacher; the quiz; use of the quiz for the student. The tool could provide predefined or automatically generated exercises of chemicals. Students could practise where and whenever they like via the Internet. Theirs answers would be registered automatically by the tool and if the students have doubts about any of the questions, they can see a knowledge pill with a teacher explanation about the solution of the exercise. Moreover, they would be able to check their scores from the tests. Once the flashcards were designed and produced, the opinions of other lecturers and students about them were considered. Both groups considered that the tool could be useful to improve the students' learning process. For future work, this design will be used with the students and its effectiveness will be analysed.

  11. [Identification of yougui and jisheng shenqi pills with FTIR and EDS fingerprint spectra by new visual comparison].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Shuang; Zou, Hua-Bin; Tian, Fang; Du, Ai-Qin; Dong, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Xin-Ling

    2011-09-01

    FTIR combined with EDS fingerprint spectra was first applied to the identification of two kind of traditional Chinese compound formulae-Yougui pill and Jisheng shenqi pills, which have the similar composition The IR FPS of extraction of two kinds of pills extracted with chloroform were measured by liquid membrane method. The exclusively characteristic peak groups of these two kinds of formulae were theoretically established based on the Shapiro-Wilk W testing method,and the characteristic radicals and compound species corresponding to each characteristic peak were determined. Meanwhile, EDS fingerprint spectra of the two kinds of original powders were also measured which can reflect the element species and content information. Based on the three kinds of information (characteristic peak groups, radicals and compound species, different elements), Yougui and Jisheng shenqi pills were identified quickly, precisely and reliably. In this method, infrared fingerprint spectra possess the similar ability with chromatograph fingerprint spectra in identification of traditional Chinese compound formulae. The results show that the new visual comparison method is suitable for identifying traditional Chinese compound formulae with the same dosage-form and similar composition.

  12. Seasonal abundance and activity of pill millipedes ( Arthrosphaera magna) in mixed plantation and semi-evergreen forest of southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwini, Krishna M.; Sridhar, Kandikere R.

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal occurrence and activity of endemic pill millipedes ( Arthrosphaera magna) were examined in organically managed mixed plantation and semi-evergreen forest reserve in southwest India between November 1996 and September 1998. Abundance and biomass of millipedes were highest in both habitats during monsoon season. Soil moisture, conductivity, organic carbon, phosphate, potassium, calcium and magnesium were higher in plantation than in forest. Millipede abundance and biomass were about 12 and 7 times higher in plantation than in forest, respectively ( P < 0.001). Their biomass increased during post-monsoon, summer and monsoon in the plantation ( P < 0.001), but not in forest ( P > 0.05). Millipede abundance and biomass were positively correlated with rainfall ( P = 0.01). Besides rainfall, millipedes in plantation were positively correlated with soil moisture as well as temperature ( P = 0.001). Among the associated fauna with pill millipedes, earthworms rank first followed by soil bugs in both habitats. Since pill millipedes are sensitive to narrow ecological changes, the organic farming strategies followed in mixed plantation and commonly practiced in South India seem not deleterious for the endangered pill millipedes Arthrosphaera and reduce the risk of local extinctions.

  13. Using Caffeine Pills for Performance Enhancement. An Experimental Study on University Students' Willingness and Their Intention to Try Neuroenhancements.

    PubMed

    Brand, Ralf; Koch, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that university students sometimes use caffeine pills for neuroenhancement (NE; non-medical use of psychoactive substances or technology to produce a subjective enhancement in psychological functioning and experience), especially during exam preparation. In our factorial survey experiment, we manipulated the evidence participants were given about the prevalence of NE amongst peers and measured the resulting effects on the psychological predictors included in the Prototype-Willingness Model of risk behavior. Two hundred and thirty-one university students were randomized to a high prevalence condition (read faked research results overstating usage of caffeine pills amongst peers by a factor of 5; 50%), low prevalence condition (half the estimated prevalence; 5%) or control condition (no information about peer prevalence). Structural equation modeling confirmed that our participants' willingness and intention to use caffeine pills in the next exam period could be explained by their past use of neuroenhancers, attitude to NE and subjective norm about use of caffeine pills whilst image of the typical user was a much less important factor. Provision of inaccurate information about prevalence reduced the predictive power of attitude with respect to willingness by 40-45%. This may be because receiving information about peer prevalence which does not fit with their perception of the social norm causes people to question their attitude. Prevalence information might exert a deterrent effect on NE via the attitude-willingness association. We argue that research into NE and deterrence of associated risk behaviors should be informed by psychological theory.

  14. 'Clueless about contraception': the introduction and circulation of the contraceptive pill in state-socialist Poland (1960s-1970s).

    PubMed

    Ignaciuk, Agata

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the introduction of the pill into the state-socialist Polish market in the late 1960s and its circulation over the following decade. Abortion, legalised for socio-economic reasons in 1956, had been available practically on demand since 1959, and there were no legal obstacles to contraception. The pill first appeared in Poland in the early 1960s, but was not widely available in pharmacies until 1969, when the local pharmaceutical industry began production. Throughout the 1970s, only two brands were widely available: Femigen and Angravid. The pill played a marginal role in family planning during the 1960s and 1970s in Poland, with cycle-observation, backed by the possibility of a legal abortion, being the main resource for birth control. This was due to structural limits to the distribution of the pill on a centrally-planned market closed to Western pharmaceutical companies, cultural patterns of sexual behaviour, and the availability of abortion. PMID:26054213

  15. Cure for empire: the 'Conquer-Russia-Pill', pharmaceutical manufacturers, and the making of patriotic Japanese, 1904-45.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoi-Eun

    2013-04-01

    Seirogan, a popular anti-diarrhoeal pill, is arguably one of the most successful pharmaceutical products of modern Japan. What is less known is that the Japanese army initially developed Seirogan during the Russo-Japanese War as the ‘Conquer-Russia-Pill’, which was later marketed to the public by private manufacturers. Previous scholars have emphasised the top–down governmental method of mobilising private sectors to manipulate public opinion for the cause of external imperialist expansion and domestic stability during wartime Japan. But the matrix that the Conquer-Russia-Pill allows us to glimpse is an inverted power relation among the state, commercial sectors, and imperial citizens. While the Japanese government remained indifferent if not hostile to jingoistic pharmaceutical manufacturers who could easily disrupt international relations, pharmaceutical companies quickly recognised and exploited the opportunities that the Conquer-Russia-Pill and its symbolism provided under the banner of the empire. In turn, Japanese consumers reacted to commercial sermons carefully anchored in patriotic and militaristic discourses and images by opening their wallets. In other words, the popularity of the Conquer-Russia-Pill was a culmination of the convergence of a governmental initiative to enhance military capabilities, the commercial ingenuity of pharmaceutical manufacturers, and a consumer response to patriotic exhortations. PMID:24070348

  16. Using Caffeine Pills for Performance Enhancement. An Experimental Study on University Students’ Willingness and Their Intention to Try Neuroenhancements

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Ralf; Koch, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that university students sometimes use caffeine pills for neuroenhancement (NE; non-medical use of psychoactive substances or technology to produce a subjective enhancement in psychological functioning and experience), especially during exam preparation. In our factorial survey experiment, we manipulated the evidence participants were given about the prevalence of NE amongst peers and measured the resulting effects on the psychological predictors included in the Prototype-Willingness Model of risk behavior. Two hundred and thirty-one university students were randomized to a high prevalence condition (read faked research results overstating usage of caffeine pills amongst peers by a factor of 5; 50%), low prevalence condition (half the estimated prevalence; 5%) or control condition (no information about peer prevalence). Structural equation modeling confirmed that our participants’ willingness and intention to use caffeine pills in the next exam period could be explained by their past use of neuroenhancers, attitude to NE and subjective norm about use of caffeine pills whilst image of the typical user was a much less important factor. Provision of inaccurate information about prevalence reduced the predictive power of attitude with respect to willingness by 40-45%. This may be because receiving information about peer prevalence which does not fit with their perception of the social norm causes people to question their attitude. Prevalence information might exert a deterrent effect on NE via the attitude-willingness association. We argue that research into NE and deterrence of associated risk behaviors should be informed by psychological theory. PMID:26903909

  17. Methamphetamine Pills

    MedlinePlus

    ... but not a rush. Other effects include irritability/aggression, anxiety, nervousness, convulsions, and insomnia. What are their ... full-blown toxic psychosis (often exhibited as violent, aggressive behavior). This violent, aggressive behavior is usually coupled ...

  18. Temperature Pill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Ingestible Thermal Monitoring System was developed at Johns Hopkins University as means of getting internal temperature readings for treatments of such emergency conditions as dangerously low (hypothermia) and dangerously high (hyperthermia) body temperatures. ITMS's accuracy is off no more than one hundredth of a degree and provides the only means of obtaining deep body temperature. System has additional applicability in fertility monitoring and some aspects of surgery, critical care obstetrics, metabolic disease treatment, gerontology (aging) and food processing research. Three-quarter inch silicone capsule contains telemetry system, micro battery, and a quartz crystal temperature sensor inserted vaginally, rectally, or swallowed.

  19. Effects of Qishe Pill, a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on cervical radiculopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neck pain is a common symptom in most patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy. However, some conservative treatments are limited by their modest effectiveness. On the other hand, surgical intervention for cervical disc disorders is indicated when symptoms are refractory to conservative treatments and neurological symptoms are progressive. Many patients use complementary and alternative medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, to address their symptoms. The purpose of the present study is to examine the efficacy and safety of Qishe Pill, a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, for neck pain in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Methods/design A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Qishe Pill is proposed. The study will include 240 patients from five sites across China and diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy, according to the following inclusion criteria: age 18 to 65 with pain or stiffness in the neck for at least 2 weeks (neck disability index score 25 or more) and accompanying arm pain that radiates distally from the elbow. Qualified participants will be randomly allocated into two groups: Qishe Pill group and placebo group. The prescription of the trial medications (Qishe Pill/placebo) are 3.75 g each twice a day for 28 consecutive days. The primary outcome is pain severity. Secondary outcomes are functional status, patient satisfaction, and adverse events as reported in the trial. Discussion Qishe Pill is composed of processed Radix Astragali, Muscone, Szechuan Lovage Rhizome, Radix Stephaniae Tetrandrae, Ovientvine, and Calculus Bovis Artifactus. According to modern research and preparation standards, Qishe Pill is developed to improve on the various symptoms of cervical radiculopathy, especially for neck pain. As it has a potential benefit in treating patients with neck pain, we designed a double-blind, prospective, randomized-controlled trial and

  20. Predicting fate of the contraceptive pill in wastewater treatment and discharge.

    PubMed

    Mastrup, M; Schäfer, A I; Khan, S J

    2005-01-01

    The risk of endocrine disrupters to humans and wildlife is to date poorly understood, although evidence of effects is now widespread. In understanding the risk, an important step is the determination of the partitioning, as well as chemical and biochemical transformation, of compounds in the environment, the water cycle and the food chain. This is a complex task and this paper is a first step towards estimating some of these factors from a largely theoretical approach. A chemical fate model is used to predict the fate of the contraceptive drug 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2). The example of the contraceptive pill is chosen to follow the journey of the drug from human ingestion and excretion to treatment in a sewage treatment plant (STP) using fugacity-based fate models, followed by discharge into a receiving river and eventually into the estuary/sea. The model predicts how EE2 will partition into the different compartments during each stage of this journey and thereby infiltrate into the food chain. The results suggest that a person would have to ingest more than 30,000 portions of fish to consume an equivalent to a single average dose of the contraceptive pill. While this scenario is highly unlikely, the biochemical consequence of the contraceptive pill is greatly significant. Furthermore, there are many identified similarly estrogenic compounds in the environment while this study only considers one. Cumulative effects of such compounds as well as degradation into other potent compounds may be anticipated. An important message in this paper is the interrelation of wastewater effluent discharge and eventual human exposure of marginally degradable and lipophilic chemicals. While at present the main concerns regarding endocrine disrupters appear to be the fear of their occurrence in drinking water sources, it is clear that the domains of wastewater treatment and discharge, water supply and contamination of food should not be treated as separate issues. The model

  1. A "suicide pill" for older people: attitudes of physicians, the general population, and relatives of patients who died after euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Rurup, Mette L; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; Van Der Wal, Gerrit

    2005-01-01

    In the Netherlands there has been ongoing debate in the past 10 years about the availability of a hypothetical "suicide pill", with which older people could end their life in a dignified way if they so wished. Data on attitudes to the suicide pill were collected in the Netherlands from 410 physicians, 1,379 members of the general population, and 87 relatives of patients who died after euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. The general population and relatives were more in favor than physicians. Fifteen percent of the general population and 36% of the relatives thought a suicide pill should be made available.

  2. Review on the Applications and Molecular Mechanisms of Xihuang Pill in Tumor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiujun; Lin, Jinyin; Liu, Rui; Gao, Yebo; He, Shulin; Xu, Xinyao; Hua, Baojin; Li, Conghuang; Hou, Wei; Zheng, Honggang; Bao, Yanju

    2015-01-01

    Xihuang pill (XH) is a complementary and alternative medicine that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of tumors since the 18th century. XH has clinical effects on non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, and bone metastasis. XH can also inhibit the growth of tumor cells and cancer stem cells, prevent tumor invasion and angiogenesis, and regulate the tumor microenvironment. XH is composed of Ru Xiang (olibanum), Mo Yao (Commiphora myrrha), She Xiang (Moschus), and Niu Huang (Calculus bovis). Some of the compounds found in these ingredients exert multiple antitumor effects and may synergize with the other ingredients. We aimed to summarize the clinical applications and molecular mechanisms of XH and its chemical composition. This review will provide potential new strategies and alternative perspectives for tumor treatments and basic research into complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:26170886

  3. Pill-induced esophageal injury. Case reports and review of the medical literature.

    PubMed

    Kikendall, J W; Friedman, A C; Oyewole, M A; Fleischer, D; Johnson, L F

    1983-02-01

    We report four cases of esophageal injury associated with the ingestion of commonly prescribed tablets or capsules. History and clinical characteristics of these cases suggest that the medications failed to transit the esophagus and acted locally to produce esophagitis. A search of English- and foreign-language medical journals documented 221 similar cases due to 26 different types of medication. While most of these esophageal injuries are self-limited and produce no morbidity beyond transient retrosternal pain, odynophagia, and dysphagia, major complications have occurred, such as mediastinal penetration, hemorrhage, and death. Patients should be counseled to take pills in an upright posture with liberal amounts of fluid well before retiring for the night.

  4. [Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by the use of diet pills and unbalanced diet].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Adrián; Aradi, Gabriella; Várallyay, György; Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Bereczki, Dániel; Vastagh, Ildikó

    2014-03-23

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute, potentially life-threatening, neurological syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency. The disorder is still greatly underdiagnosed and, without prompt treatment, the condition can lead to the chronic form of the disease, Korsakoff's syndrome or even death. In developed countries Wernicke's encephalopathy has been associated with alcoholism, but in recent years there has been an increasing number of non-alcoholic cases. Authors report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed oculomotor dysfunction, encephalopathy and ataxia as a result of an extreme diet and use of diet pills. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was supported by the resolution of neurological signs after parenteral thiamine replacement. This case is presented because of the rare etiology and diagnostic difficulty, and the latest diagnostic and therapic guidelines are also highlighted. PMID:24631935

  5. Review on the Applications and Molecular Mechanisms of Xihuang Pill in Tumor Treatment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiujun; Lin, Jinyin; Liu, Rui; Gao, Yebo; He, Shulin; Xu, Xinyao; Hua, Baojin; Li, Conghuang; Hou, Wei; Zheng, Honggang; Bao, Yanju

    2015-01-01

    Xihuang pill (XH) is a complementary and alternative medicine that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of tumors since the 18th century. XH has clinical effects on non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, and bone metastasis. XH can also inhibit the growth of tumor cells and cancer stem cells, prevent tumor invasion and angiogenesis, and regulate the tumor microenvironment. XH is composed of Ru Xiang (olibanum), Mo Yao (Commiphora myrrha), She Xiang (Moschus), and Niu Huang (Calculus bovis). Some of the compounds found in these ingredients exert multiple antitumor effects and may synergize with the other ingredients. We aimed to summarize the clinical applications and molecular mechanisms of XH and its chemical composition. This review will provide potential new strategies and alternative perspectives for tumor treatments and basic research into complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:26170886

  6. [The "morning after pill": the impact of the Supreme Court ruling in the medical field].

    PubMed

    Cossío-Díaz, José Ramón

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the Court's ruling regarding the constitutionality of the Official Norm "NOM-046-SSA2-2005". Jalisco's Governor challenged the validity of the referred norm arguing that it was against articles 4, 5, 14, 16, 20, 21, 29, 31-V, 49, 73, 74, 89-I, 123, 124 y 133 of the Federal Constitution. The Supreme Court disregarded Governor's claim and determined that the members of the National Health System are obliged to offer and give the "day after pill" to sexual violation victims. According to article 5 of General Health Law, the National Health System includes private and public hospitals, whether they are local or federal. This means that all these health institutions have the obligation to observe the dispositions contained in the appealed Official Norm Given the significance of the Court's ruling in the medical sphere, in this article the most relevant issues of the Court decision and its implications are analyzed. PMID:20964067

  7. Emergency contraception pills (ECPs): current trends in United States college health centers.

    PubMed

    Brening, Rory K; Dalve-Endres, Andrea M; Patrick, Kevin

    2003-06-01

    Access to emergency contraception pills (ECPs) could drastically reduce the high rates of unintended pregnancies in college women. In spring 2001, a survey was distributed to 139 US college health centers to assess availability of ECPs. Those that prescribed ECPs provided additional information about health center distribution policies and procedures, provider practice patterns, advertising and staff attitudes. Those that did not offer ECPs were asked to state reasons for not providing this service and whether FDA approval of dedicated emergency contraception products might promote availability. The majority of campuses (66.9%) prescribe ECPs; however, many barriers exist to access. Campuses not prescribing ECPs cited moral conviction (56.5%) as a main reason for not providing this service. Staff and administration attitudes appear to play a major role in whether campuses make ECPs available to their students. Despite recent advances leading to increased availability of ECPs among college health centers, a number of campuses still do not prescribe ECPs.

  8. Diet pills, powders, and liquids: predictors of use by healthy weight females.

    PubMed

    Thorlton, Janet; Park, Chang; Hughes, Tonda

    2014-04-01

    About 35% of healthy weight adolescent females describe themselves as overweight, and 66% report planning to lose weight.Body weight dissatisfaction is associated with unhealthy weight loss practices including diet pill/powder/liquid (PPL) use. Few studies have examined diet PPL use in healthy weight adolescent females; therefore, Youth Risk Behavior Survey data (n =247) were analyzed to identify predictors of use. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were conducted using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Complex Samples software. Social cognitive theory served as the framework guiding the analysis. Approximately 8% of healthy weight females reported using diet PPL for weight loss. Describing self as overweight, planning to lose weight, being offered drugs at school, fasting to lose weight, cigarette/alcohol use, vomiting, and laxative use were significantly associated (p < .05) with diet PPL use. Health professionals, including school nurses, must assess for unhealthy weight loss practices in healthy weight females, in order to adequately address related issues.

  9. Review on the Applications and Molecular Mechanisms of Xihuang Pill in Tumor Treatment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiujun; Lin, Jinyin; Liu, Rui; Gao, Yebo; He, Shulin; Xu, Xinyao; Hua, Baojin; Li, Conghuang; Hou, Wei; Zheng, Honggang; Bao, Yanju

    2015-01-01

    Xihuang pill (XH) is a complementary and alternative medicine that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of tumors since the 18th century. XH has clinical effects on non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, and bone metastasis. XH can also inhibit the growth of tumor cells and cancer stem cells, prevent tumor invasion and angiogenesis, and regulate the tumor microenvironment. XH is composed of Ru Xiang (olibanum), Mo Yao (Commiphora myrrha), She Xiang (Moschus), and Niu Huang (Calculus bovis). Some of the compounds found in these ingredients exert multiple antitumor effects and may synergize with the other ingredients. We aimed to summarize the clinical applications and molecular mechanisms of XH and its chemical composition. This review will provide potential new strategies and alternative perspectives for tumor treatments and basic research into complementary and alternative medicine.

  10. Estrogen-free oral hormonal contraception: benefits of the progestin-only pill.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Nilson Roberto

    2010-09-01

    Although combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are commonly used and highly effective in preventing pregnancy, they may not be suitable for some women. COC use is associated with increased rates of cardiovascular events and is not recommended in nonbreastfeeding women in the immediate postpartum period or in breastfeeding women during the initial 6 months of breastfeeding. Moreover, estrogen-related adverse effects, such as headache, are common. Estrogen-free progestin-only pills (POPs) are a valuable option in women who prefer to take an oral hormonal contraceptive, but are ineligible for, or choose not to use, COCs. Although some POPs have been associated with lower contraceptive effectiveness than COCs, the POP containing desogestrel has shown similar contraceptive effectiveness to COCs. The most commonly reported complaints in women using all POPs are bleeding problems. Counseling women interested in using POPs about the variable bleeding patterns associated with this method may improve compliance and acceptance. PMID:21080791

  11. Antiatherosclerotic and Cardioprotective Effects of Time-Released Garlic Powder Pills.

    PubMed

    Karagodin, Vasily P; Sobenin, Igor A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Garlic is believed to produce beneficial changes in different cardiovascular risk factors, thus possessing antiatherosclerotic properties. The hypotensive and cholesterol-lowering effects were investigated in two studies in men with mild arterial hypertension and in men with mild hypercholesterolemia. Eight-week treatment resulted in the reduction of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 5.2% (P=0.008) and 4.0% (P=0.014), respectively. In hypolipidemic study, the 12-week treatment resulted in a decrease in LDL cholesterol by 11.8% (P=0.002), while HDL cholesterol increased by 11.5% (P=0.013). In men with cerebral atherosclerosis it has been demonstrated that 14-days treatment inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation by 25.4% (P<0.05) and increased plasma fibrinolytic activity by 22.4% (P<0.05). One more study was performed in high-risk patients to evaluate the changes of prognostic cardiovascular risk that was calculated using algorithms derived from Framingham and Muenster Studies. Twelve-months treatment lowered 10-years prognostic risk of CHD by 13.2% in men (P=0.005), and by 7.1% in women (P=0.040). Ten-year prognostic risk of acute myocardial infarction and sudden coronary death was lowered by 26.1% in men (P=0.025). The Atherosclerosis Monitoring and Atherogenicity Reduction Study (AMAR) was designed to estimate the effect of two-year treatment with garlic powder pills on the progression of carotid atherosclerosis in asymptomatic men. A significant correlation has been revealed between the changes in blood serum atherogenicity and the changes in carotid intima-media thickness (r=0.144, P=0.045). Evidence obtained from these studies as well as series of double-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trials indicates that garlic powder pills are effective for prevention of cardiovascular disorders.

  12. Research closing in on birth control pill for men. Contraception (health).

    PubMed

    1997-06-30

    This news brief informs about the breakthrough in the development of a suitable male contraceptive pill. Joseph Hall, a biochemist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, developed a synthetic compound that interferes with sperm maturation. This male contraceptive was developed over a 10-year period with the support of the National Science Foundation's division of integrative biology and neuroscience. The compound is a sugary substance that inhibits 98% of enzyme activity needed for sperm maturation and fertility in male rats. The substance did not alter the hormone balance and had few effects on the sex drive. There was no effect on fertility after the dosage was stopped. The substance inhibited the activity of the 'B' form of the N-acetyl-beta-D-hexosaminidase enzyme, which is secreted and inserted into sperm cells after leaving the testes. The sperm cells traverse the tube-like epididymis and after ejaculation are unable to recognize, bind with, and penetrate the egg membranes, which prevents fertilization. The enzyme's 'A' and 'B' forms both perform the same physiological functions, but the 'B' enzyme was only found in sperm cells. The analog inhibited 98% of enzyme activity required for union with the egg in "in vitro" experiments. Oral administration of the analog blocked fertilization about 90% of the time. Further experimentation will be conducted in order to understand how the analog is metabolized. The compound is being tested on bull and human sperm. The research was conducted in part due to a challenge from the researcher's wife to develop a safe, effective male birth control pill.

  13. How to uncoil your partner—"mating songs" in giant pill-millipedes (Diplopoda: Sphaerotheriida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesener, Thomas; Köhler, Jörn; Fuchs, Stefan; van den Spiegel, Didier

    2011-11-01

    The stridulation of the giant pill-millipede genus Sphaerotherium from South Africa, one of only three groups of millipedes that produce sounds, was studied. One hundred one stridulation series of a total of nine different species ( Sphaerotherium dorsaloide, Sphaerotherium hanstroemi, Sphaerotherium mahaium, Sphaerotherium similare, Sphaerotherium punctulatum, Sphaerotherium convexitarsum, Sphaerotherium dorsale, Sphaerotherium rotundatum, and Sphaerotherium perbrincki) were analyzed. Stridulation sounds are produced only with a special field of ribs on the posterior surface of the posterior telopod, which is actively moved over a field of sclerotized nubs on the inner margin of the anal shield. The Sphaerotherium male usually stridulates only when in contact with a female to initiate mating. This seems to prevent the female from volvating into a ball or stimulate the female to uncoil when already rolled in. The sound analyzes revealed a broad frequency spectrum in all stridulation sounds produced, without obvious differences in frequency distribution among species. However, the temporal pattern of the stridulation varies greatly between species and seems to be species-specific, arguing for a species recognition function of the stridulation during courtship behavior. A single species ( S. punctulatum) was found to stridulate during mating while three species also show postcopulatory stridulation. Apparently, pill-millipedes are not capable of acoustic perception, as no hearing organs are known, indicating that the communication is mainly based on perception of temporal vibration patterns, and not of the acoustic signal itself. The need to overcome the rolling-in reflex of the female is developed as a hypothesis why stridulation exists only in millipedes able to coil into a ball, and apparently evolved four times independently in the superorder Oniscomorpha.

  14. Factors affecting the decision to hospitalise children admitted to the emergency department due to non-fatal suicide attempts by pills

    PubMed Central

    Gokalp, Gamze; Anil, Murat; Bal, Alkan; Bicilioglu, Yuksel; Kamit Can, Fulya; Anil, Ayse Berna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Suicide attempts (SAs) in the paediatric age group represent an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to examine the factors affecting the decision to hospitalize children with a diagnosis of non-fatal SA by pills. Methods: Children <18 years of age admitted with SA by pills during 2014 were evaluated retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups: Group-I comprised hospitalised patients and Group-II included those who were discharged from the PED. These two groups were compared in terms of clinical and demographic characteristics recorded upon PED admission. Results: A total of 196 patients were included in the study. The number of pills taken for self-poisoning in Group-I (median: 20 pills) was higher than that in Group-II (median: 12 pills) (p < 0.001), and the rate of pathological findings during the first paediatric psychiatric consultation was higher in Group-I (91.1%) than in the Group-II (54.8%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Factors affecting the disposition decision in cases of children who performed non-fatal SA via pills included the amount of medication taken for the suicide attempt and the presence of psychiatric disorders, as determined by a paediatric psychiatrist during the acute phase. PMID:27375723

  15. Do fixed-dose combination pills or unit-of-use packaging improve adherence? A systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Jennie; Rafter, Natasha; Rodgers, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Adequate adherence to medication regimens is central to the successful treatment of communicable and noncommunicable disease. Fixed-dose combination pills and unit-of-use packaging are therapy-related interventions that are designed to simplify medication regimens and so potentially improve adherence. We conducted a systematic review of relevant randomized trials in order to quantify the effects of fixed-dose combination pills and unit-of-use packaging, compared with medications as usually presented, in terms of adherence to treatment and improved outcomes. Only 15 trials met the inclusion criteria; fixed-dose combination pills were investigated in three of these, while unit-of-use packaging was studied in 12 trials. The trials involved treatments for communicable diseases (n = 5), blood pressure lowering medications (n = 3), diabetic patients (n = 1), vitamin supplementation (n = 1) and management of multiple medications by the elderly (n = 5). The results of the trials suggested that there were trends towards improved adherence and/or clinical outcomes in all but three of the trials; this reached statistical significance in four out of seven trials reporting a clinically relevant or intermediate end-point, and in seven out of thirteen trials reporting medication adherence. Measures of outcome were, however, heterogeneous, and interpretation was further limited by methodological issues, particularly small sample size, short duration and loss to follow-up. Overall, the evidence suggests that fixed-dose combination pills and unit-of-use packaging are likely to improve adherence in a range of settings, but the limitations of the available evidence means that uncertainty remains about the size of these benefits. PMID:15654408

  16. Is Time an Important Problem in Management of Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia by Using an Amlodipine-Atorvastatin Single Pill Combination?

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Rui; Wang, Mian; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Is the timing of dosing for amlodipine and atorvastatin important with regard to therapeutic efficacy? To answer this question, we designed an outpatient, practice-based, case-control study lasting 8 weeks. Material/Methods Two hundred patients were divided into 2 groups: in Group I, patients were provided with a single pill containing amlodipine/atorvastatin (5/20 mg) to be taken each night at 10 pm, and in Group II, patients were taking amlodipine (5 mg) and atorvastatin (20 mg) each morning at 7 am. Results Our results indicated no obvious difference in blood pressure control between the 2 groups. Taking amlodipine at night not only lowered blood pressure, but it also provided better control during the peak blood pressure in the morning. Hypercholesterolemia control in the 2 groups was also not significantly different, taking atorvastatin in the morning was as effective as dosing at night in patients with hypercholesterolemia. While the carotid IMT, hs-CRP, and LVMI were significantly lower after treatment, no differences were found between the 2 groups. Although no obvious difference was found in adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups, compliance was much better in the single-pill group than in patients taking the 2 medications separately. Conclusions In conclusion, single-pill amlodipine-atorvastatin taken at night can lower blood pressure and reduce the morning peak blood pressure levels the next day. Additionally, this dosing method could improve patient adherence to the therapy. PMID:27459306

  17. Qualitative and quantitative determination of 15 main active constituents in Fructus Sophorae pill by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xu-ran; Zhang, Zhi-yong; Jia, Pei-pei; Zhang, Xiao-xu; Yuan, Lin; Sheng, Ning; Zhang, Lan-tong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fructus Sophorae pill, one of the traditional Chinese medicine, was widely used for hemorrhoids, hypertension and odontalgia. This paper describes a sensitive and specific assay for the determination of the 15 active constituents (sophoricoside, genistin, genistein, rutin, quercetin, kaempferol, baicalein, baicalin, naringin, naringenin, hesperidin, neohesperidin, wogonin and cimifugin, prim-O-glucosylcimifugin) in Fructus Sophorae pill. Materials and Methods: Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column with acidified aqueous methanol gradients at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The identification and quantification of the analytes were achieved by use of a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Multiple-reaction monitoring scanning was applied to quantification with switching electrospray ion source polarity between positive and negative modes. Results: The proposed method was used to analyze 40 batches of samples with good linearity (r, 0.9990-0.9999), intraday precisions (RSD, 0.14-2.55%), interday precisions (RSD, 0.51-2.81%), stability (RSD, 0.31-2.65%), and recovery (RSD, 1.29-2.95%) of the 15 compounds. In addition, the hierarchical cluster analysis, including a method called furthest neighbor and nearest neighbor, was employed to classify samples according to characteristics of the 15 constituents. Conclusion: The results indicated that the analytical method was rapid, reliable, simple and suitable for the quality evaluation of Fructus Sophorae pill. PMID:25709233

  18. Over-the-counter sleeping pills: a survey of use in Hong Kong and a review of their constituents.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ka Fai; Lee, Claire K Y

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the composition of over-the-counter (OTC) sleeping pills in Hong Kong and reviewed the current knowledge about the hypnotic efficacy and safety of their major herbal and dietary supplement constituents. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of OTC sleep aids at drug stores in a residential district of 0.3 million population and literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, China Journal Net, China Biomedical Database and relevant English and Chinese literature. We identified 17 brands of OTC sleeping pill: eleven of them were composed of mixtures of Chinese and Western herbal agents and six brands contained 3 mg of melatonin. The Chinese herbal mixture suanzaorentang, comprising zizyphi spinosi semen, poria cocos, ligusticum wallichii, anemarrhenae rhizoma and glycyrrhizae radix in ratio of 7:5:2:1:1, was the most common OTC sleeping pill available in the survey. Our literature review showed that kava, valerian and melatonin were the better-researched herbs and dietary supplements, however, the data on hypnotic efficacy and safety was inadequate to support their clinical use. More rigorous investigations of the risk-benefit relationship of herbal agents and dietary supplements used for insomnia are needed. PMID:12490346

  19. Over-the-counter sleeping pills: a survey of use in Hong Kong and a review of their constituents.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ka Fai; Lee, Claire K Y

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the composition of over-the-counter (OTC) sleeping pills in Hong Kong and reviewed the current knowledge about the hypnotic efficacy and safety of their major herbal and dietary supplement constituents. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of OTC sleep aids at drug stores in a residential district of 0.3 million population and literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, China Journal Net, China Biomedical Database and relevant English and Chinese literature. We identified 17 brands of OTC sleeping pill: eleven of them were composed of mixtures of Chinese and Western herbal agents and six brands contained 3 mg of melatonin. The Chinese herbal mixture suanzaorentang, comprising zizyphi spinosi semen, poria cocos, ligusticum wallichii, anemarrhenae rhizoma and glycyrrhizae radix in ratio of 7:5:2:1:1, was the most common OTC sleeping pill available in the survey. Our literature review showed that kava, valerian and melatonin were the better-researched herbs and dietary supplements, however, the data on hypnotic efficacy and safety was inadequate to support their clinical use. More rigorous investigations of the risk-benefit relationship of herbal agents and dietary supplements used for insomnia are needed.

  20. Is Time an Important Problem in Management of Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia by Using an Amlodipine-Atorvastatin Single Pill Combination?

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rui; Wang, Mian; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Is the timing of dosing for amlodipine and atorvastatin important with regard to therapeutic efficacy? To answer this question, we designed an outpatient, practice-based, case-control study lasting 8 weeks. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two hundred patients were divided into 2 groups: in Group I, patients were provided with a single pill containing amlodipine/atorvastatin (5/20 mg) to be taken each night at 10 pm, and in Group II, patients were taking amlodipine (5 mg) and atorvastatin (20 mg) each morning at 7 am. RESULTS Our results indicated no obvious difference in blood pressure control between the 2 groups. Taking amlodipine at night not only lowered blood pressure, but it also provided better control during the peak blood pressure in the morning. Hypercholesterolemia control in the 2 groups was also not significantly different, taking atorvastatin in the morning was as effective as dosing at night in patients with hypercholesterolemia. While the carotid IMT, hs-CRP, and LVMI were significantly lower after treatment, no differences were found between the 2 groups. Although no obvious difference was found in adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups, compliance was much better in the single-pill group than in patients taking the 2 medications separately. CONCLUSIONS In conclusion, single-pill amlodipine-atorvastatin taken at night can lower blood pressure and reduce the morning peak blood pressure levels the next day. Additionally, this dosing method could improve patient adherence to the therapy. PMID:27459306

  1. Design and performance of a fast thermal response miniature Chromium Potassium Alum (CPA) salt pill for use in a millikelvin cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, J.; Hardy, G.; Hepburn, I. D.

    2015-01-01

    The design and performance of a fast thermal response miniature (24 mm outer diameter by 30 mm long) Chromium Potassium Alum (CPA) salt pill is described. The need for a fast thermal response has been driven by the development of a continuously operating millikelvin cryocooler (mKCC) which uses 2 T superconducting magnets that can be ramped to full field in 30 s. The consequence of magnetising and demagnetising the CPA pill in such a short time is that thermal boundary resistance and eddy current heating have a significant impact on the performance of the pill, which was investigated in detail using modelling. The complete design of a prototype CPA pill is described in this paper, including the methods used to minimise thermal boundary resistance and eddy current heating as well as the manufacturing and assembly processes. The performance of the prototype CPA pill operated from a 3.6 K bath is presented, demonstrating that a complete CPA cycle (magnetising, cooling to bath and demagnetising) can be accomplished in under 2.5 min, with magnetisation and demagnetisation taking just 30 s each. The cold finger base temperature of the prototype varies with demagnetisation speed as a consequence of eddy current heating; for a 30 s demagnetisation, a base temperature of 161 mK is obtained, whilst for a 5 min demagnetisation, a base temperature of 149 mK was measured (both from a 3.6 K and 2 T starting position). The measured hold times of the CPA pill at 200 mK, 300 mK, and 1 K are given, proving that the hold time far exceeds the recycle time and demonstrating the potential for continuous operation when two ADRs are used in a tandem configuration. The ease and speed at which the CPA pill temperature can be changed and controlled when stepping between operating temperatures in the range of 200 mK to 4 K using a servo control program is also shown, once again highlighting the excellent thermal response of the pill. All of the test results are in good agreement with the

  2. Monitorization of drug content in furosemide and lorazepam tablets stored in multidose pill boxes

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Jessica; Oliveira, Magda; Tapiço, Maria; Nascimento, Tânia; Grenha, Ana; Braz, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic nonadherence is a major health problem, particularly when therapeutic regimens are complex and long-lasting. Therefore, tools such as multidose pill boxes have been designed to provide the means for higher therapeutic compliance. However, no studies are available reporting on their capacity to keep the drug content of the stored tablets unaltered. Objective: This work aimed at monitoring the drug content of tablets stored in multidose boxes for a period of two weeks. Materials and Methods: Furosemide and lorazepam were selected as model drugs, given their frequent chronic use, which is coherent with the profile of medicines susceptible of storage in the referred boxes. Variations of the tablets drug content were assessed as a function of temperature (25°C and 40°C) and the presence of blister. Results and Discussion: The obtained results allowed concluding that concerning temperature, only lorazepam tablets registered drug content alterations and only when stored at 40°C. On the other side, it was concluded that the absence of blister does not compromise the drug content of the studied tablets. Conclusion In the specific conditions of this study, the storage of these medicines in multidose boxes is considered reliable and adequate. PMID:21180472

  3. Diet pills, powders, and liquids: predictors of use by healthy weight females.

    PubMed

    Thorlton, Janet; Park, Chang; Hughes, Tonda

    2014-04-01

    About 35% of healthy weight adolescent females describe themselves as overweight, and 66% report planning to lose weight.Body weight dissatisfaction is associated with unhealthy weight loss practices including diet pill/powder/liquid (PPL) use. Few studies have examined diet PPL use in healthy weight adolescent females; therefore, Youth Risk Behavior Survey data (n =247) were analyzed to identify predictors of use. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were conducted using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Complex Samples software. Social cognitive theory served as the framework guiding the analysis. Approximately 8% of healthy weight females reported using diet PPL for weight loss. Describing self as overweight, planning to lose weight, being offered drugs at school, fasting to lose weight, cigarette/alcohol use, vomiting, and laxative use were significantly associated (p < .05) with diet PPL use. Health professionals, including school nurses, must assess for unhealthy weight loss practices in healthy weight females, in order to adequately address related issues. PMID:23797274

  4. [Promotion of Function of Endothelial Progenitor Cells with Shexiang Baoxin Pill Treatment under Shear Stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Chen, Yang; Wu, Jiang

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether shear stress could promote function of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) with Shexiang Baoxin Pill (SBP) treatment in vitro, and to study whether shear stress contributed to vascular injury repair by EPCs. EPCs were isolated and characterized; EPCs' proliferation, migration, adhesion, tube formation and eNOS protein level in vitro were investigated by culturing confluent EPCs in 4 mg/mL SBP under physiological shear stress (15 dyne/cm2) for up to 24 hours. Afterwards, EPCs were transfused into rats after wire-induced carotid artery injury augmented re-endothelialization. The results showed that, compared to the SBP group, the shear stress+SBP group obviously enhanced EPCs proliferation, migration, adhesion, tube formation and eNOS protein expression in vitro (P<0.01). After one week, immunofluorescence staining showed that endothelial regeneration rate obviously enhanced in shear stress+SBP group (P<0.01). The present study demonstrates that shear stress can promote function of endothelial progenitor cells treated with SBP, which improves the vascular injury repair potentials of EPCs. PMID:26710458

  5. Enhanced Estrogenic Activity of Soybean Isoflavones by Coadministration of Liuwei Dihuang Pills in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Baogang; Zhang, Shuohua; Liu, Jie; Zhan, Xuejun; Xie, Daze; Zhang, Zhirong

    2015-07-01

    Soybean isoflavones are beneficial for treating hormone-related diseases. Simultaneous consumption of soybean isoflavones and Liuwei Dihuang pills (LWPs) is effective for treating perimenopausal period syndrome. However, why the combination of isoflavones and LWPs is more effective than ingestion of each component alone remains unknown. Here, we show that enhanced estrogenic activities would appear when the ovariectomized rats were fed with a soybean diet in combination of LWPs treatment. Our further studies explored enhancements of Lactobacillus (19-fold) and Bifidobacterium (12-fold) contents in the intestine of rat and 1.84-fold higher intestinal β-glucosidase activity in LWPs treatment group compared with the control group. As a result, steady-state concentrations of genistein (1.20-fold), daidzein (1.36-fold), and equol (1.43-fold) in serum were significantly elevated in the combination group compared with the soybean alone group. The results present the first evidence of the mechanism of enhanced estrogenic activity of dietary soybean isoflavones in combination with LWPs. Our study indicates that alterations of gut bacteria after LWPs treatment play a key role in the enhanced estrogenic effect of dietary soybean, suggesting a direct relationship between dietary soybean, LWPs, and gut flora. PMID:25826579

  6. Absorption, metabolism and effect of compatibility on absorption of qishenyiqi dropping pill.

    PubMed

    Han, Yan-Qi; Wang, Jing; Cui, Qing-Xin; Wang, Li-Qiang; Cheng, Bin-Feng; Zhao, Hong-Zhi; Jiang, Min; Bai, Gang; Luo, Guo-An

    2014-04-01

    Qishenyiqi dropping pill (QSYQ), is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription for treating heart diseases in China. Knowledge concerning the systemic identification of active compounds and metabolic components of QSYQ is generally lacking. Therefore, it is essential to develop a valid method for the analysis of active compounds of the combined prescription and determination of interactions among the herbs. The absorbable compounds and metabolites of QSYQ were profiled using computational chemistry prediction, an improved everted gut sac in vitro experiment, the Caco-2 cell monolayer in vitro test, a rat in vivo experiment and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection/quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrum (UPLC/DAD/Q-TOF MS). In total, 42 prototype compounds were recognized as absorbable compounds, and eight metabolites were identified by UPLC/DAD/Q-TOF MS. The absorption rates of phenolic acids and saponins were significantly improved and the absorption of isoflavone was inhibited after compatibility. The volatile oil component had an improved effect on the absorption of other compounds, while its own absorption was inhibited. In conclusion, the present study established a rapid and effective strategy for demonstrating the absorption and metabolism of QSYQ and revealing the compatible relationship among herbs. This investigation can provide a reference for the compatibility of prescriptions and the modernization of TCM.

  7. Sounding board. The pill: a perspective for assessing risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, F S

    1977-09-15

    Over the past 17 years, a "contraceptive revolution" has occurred, based on highly effective methods which can be applied at a time unrelated to sexual intercourse. In the 1950s, birth control was thought to be a settled issue for the middle and upper class. Although motivated to limit family size, low-income women found the diaphragm and condom inappropriate for their life style. Between 1960-1965, Planned Parenthood's caseloads of low-income women tripled. By 1975, nearly 4 million women of low and marginal income were clinic patients, with 72% choosing oral contraceptives. Those who advocate replacing the pill because of medical risk with coitally related methods are ignoring the needs of many low-income women in the U.S. Tietze et al. have shown that except for older women who smoke, the risk of mortality from using any method of fertility control is lower than the risk from automobile accidents or from childbirth. A more comprehensive framework is needed for weighing the total benefits expected by contraceptors against the total risks of any particular method. We also need an enlarged research program for safer contraceptives; a higher priority in the National Institutes of Health budget.

  8. The effect of external marking on the behaviour of the common pill woodlouse Armadillidium vulgare

    PubMed Central

    Drahokoupilová, Táňa; Tuf, Ivan Hadrián

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Zoologists distinguish individual animals using marking techniques. Generally they test the potential influence of marking on survival only; the influence on behaviour is usually neglected. We evaluated the influence of two external marking techniques (nail polish and queen-bee marker) on the behaviour of common pill woodlouse, Armadillidium vulgare. The behaviour was examined from two points of view: (1) activity during 24 hours and (2) specific expressions of behaviour (exploring, feeding, resting and hiding) over a 24 hour period. We compared behaviour among woodlice marked with nail polish and queen-bee marker with the unmarked control group during a nine-day experiment. Although we did not find any influence of marking on survival, there was an evident influence on behaviour in most cases. Generally, in the groups of marked individuals of Armadillidium vulgare there were large differences observed against the control group in the overall activity. Activity of marked individuals was significantly reduced and they preferred hiding. The influence of polish and marker on the overall frequencies of behavioural categories was evident, mainly in feeding, resting and hiding. The influence on the frequency of exploring was significant in the polish marked group only. PMID:22536105

  9. The effect of external marking on the behaviour of the common pill woodlouse Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Drahokoupilová, Táňa; Tuf, Ivan Hadrián

    2012-01-01

    Zoologists distinguish individual animals using marking techniques. Generally they test the potential influence of marking on survival only; the influence on behaviour is usually neglected. We evaluated the influence of two external marking techniques (nail polish and queen-bee marker) on the behaviour of common pill woodlouse, Armadillidium vulgare. The behaviour was examined from two points of view: (1) activity during 24 hours and (2) specific expressions of behaviour (exploring, feeding, resting and hiding) over a 24 hour period. We compared behaviour among woodlice marked with nail polish and queen-bee marker with the unmarked control group during a nine-day experiment. Although we did not find any influence of marking on survival, there was an evident influence on behaviour in most cases. Generally, in the groups of marked individuals of Armadillidium vulgare there were large differences observed against the control group in the overall activity. Activity of marked individuals was significantly reduced and they preferred hiding. The influence of polish and marker on the overall frequencies of behavioural categories was evident, mainly in feeding, resting and hiding. The influence on the frequency of exploring was significant in the polish marked group only. PMID:22536105

  10. Diet pills and the cataract outbreak of 1935: reflections on the evolution of consumer protection legislation.

    PubMed

    Margo, Curtis E; Harman, Lynn E

    2014-01-01

    An outbreak of cataracts in 1935 caused by dinitrophenol (DNP), the active ingredient of popular diet pills, highlighted the inability of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent harmful drugs from entering the marketplace. Just two years earlier, the FDA used horrific images of ocular surface injury caused by cosmetics at the World's Fair in Chicago to garner public support for legislative reform. The FDA had to walk a fine line between a public awareness campaign and lobbying Congress while lawmakers debated the need for consumer protection. The cataract outbreak of 1935 was conspicuous in the medical literature during the height of New Deal legislation, but questions persist as to how much it affected passage of the proposed Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (of 1938). The legislation languished in committee for years. The cataract outbreak probably had little impact on the eventual outcome, but medical opinion concerning the safety of DNP may have contributed to the voluntary withdrawal of the diet drug from the market. We review the DNP cataract outbreak and examine it in context of the challenges facing regulatory reform at that time. PMID:24913328

  11. Diplosegmentation in the pill millipede Glomeris marginata is the result of dorsal fusion.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    All trunk segments in the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda) are initially patterned genetically, (as visualized by the embryonic expression pattern of the even-skipped gene) and formed morphologically, (as visualized by 4-6-diamidin-2-phenylindol stained embryos) in a single segmental period. In addition, formation of every nascent trunk segment concerns ventral as well as dorsal segmental units. Only after the formation of the nascent posterior trunk segments, the dorsal segmental units of two adjacent segments fuse to form a single dorsal segmental unit that subsequently covers two ventral leg-bearing segmental units. The formation of a diplosegmental unit, or in short a diplosegment, is thus the result of dorsal fusion of embryonic tissue and not the result of any splitting-process or fusion of dorsal tergites. The new data also argue against heterochrony as a primary causative factor for the formation of the diplosegments during the formation of dorsal versus ventral segmental units. Furthermore, no evidence was found supporting the hypothesis that anterior trunk segments in diplopods represent degenerate diplosegments. Two possible scenarios arise from the ontogenetic data presented here, whether this represents an ancestral feature of the diplopods, or alternatively if they represent an isolated case only found in Glomeris (and close relatives). If the former is the case, my work may provide an impressive example of Haeckel's recapitulation theory.

  12. The combined oral contraceptive pill and the assumed 28-day cycle.

    PubMed

    Dowse, M St Leger; Gunby, A; Moncad, R; Fife, C; Smerdon, G; Bryson, P

    2007-07-01

    Some studies involving women taking the combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) have on occasion assumed the COCP group to have a rigid 28-day pharmaceutically driven cycle. Anecdotal evidence suggests otherwise, with many women adjusting their COCP usage to alter the time between break-through bleeds for sporting and social reasons. A prospective field study involving 533 scuba diving females allowed all menstrual cycle lengths (COCP and non-COCP) to be observed for up to three consecutive years (St Leger Dowse et al. 2006). A total of 29% of women were COCP users who reported 3,241 cycles. Of these cycles, only 42% had a rigid 28-day cycle, with the remainder varying in length from 21 to 60 days. When performing studies involving the menstrual cycle, it should not be assumed that COCP users have a rigid confirmed 28-day cycle and careful consideration should be given to data collection and analysis. The effects of differing data interpretations are shown.

  13. Systematic Review of Compound Danshen Dropping Pill: A Chinese Patent Medicine for Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Chen, Keji

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This paper systematically evaluated the efficacy and safety of compound Danshen dropping pill (CDDP) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), comparing CDDP with no intervention, placebo, or conventional western medicine, were retrieved. Data extraction and analyses were conducted in accordance with the Cochrane standards. We assessed risk of bias for each included study and evaluated the strength of evidence on prespecified outcomes. Results. Seven RCTs enrolling 1215 patients were included. CDDP was associated with statistically significant reductions in the risk of cardiac death and heart failure compared with no intervention based on conventional therapy for AMI. In addition, CDDP was associated with improvement of quality of life and impaired left ventricular ejection fraction. Nevertheless, the safety of CDDP was unproven for the limited data. The quality of evidence for each outcome in the main comparison (CDDP versus no intervention) was “low” or “moderate.” Conclusion. CDDP showed some potential benefits for AMI patients, such as the reductions of cardiac death and heart failure. However, the overall quality of evidence was poor, and the safety of CDDP for AMI patients was not confirmed. More evidence from high quality RCTs is warranted to support the use of CDDP for AMI patients. PMID:23843882

  14. What’s in a Label? Ecstasy Sellers’ Perceptions of Pill Brands†

    PubMed Central

    Duterte, Micheline; Jacinto, Camille; Sales, Paloma; Murphy, Sheigla

    2009-01-01

    This article presents selected findings from a qualitative study of Ecstasy sellers and their sales practices, knowledge of distribution networks, buyer-seller relationships, and self-reported drug use. In-depth interviews were conducted with 80 men and women who had sold five or more hits of Ecstasy five or more times in the six months prior to the interview. Study participants described their perceptions of the various types of Ecstasy they had distributed or used themselves. The participants had experience with a variety of Ecstasy labels, from the popular “Blue Dolphin” tablets to the powdered form called “Molly.” We tracked pill brand mentions on Ecstasy-related websites to compare with interviewees’ descriptions of Ecstasy brands. This study examines Ecstasy sellers’ ideas about the role of brand names in Ecstasy markets and their relationship to their beliefs about different types of Ecstasy’s purity and quality. We demonstrate that considering Ecstasy branding increases our understanding of buyer and seller relationships. PMID:19455907

  15. Bak Foong Pills induce an analgesic effect by inhibiting nociception via the somatostatin pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Dewi Kenneth; Cui, Yu Gui; So, Siu Cheung; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chung, Yiu Wa; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2012-01-01

    Dysmenorrhoea, defined as cramping pain in the lower abdomen occurring before or during menstruation, affects, to varying degrees, up to 90% of women of child-bearing age. We investigated whether BFP (Bak Foong Pills), a traditional Chinese medicine treatment for dysmenorrhoea, possesses analgesic properties. Results showed that BFP was able to significantly reduce pain responses following subchronic treatment for 3 days, but not following acute (1 h) treatment in response to acetic acid-induced writhing in C57/B6 mice. The analgesic effect was not due to inhibition of COX (cyclo-oxygenase) activity, evidenced by the lack of inhibition of prostacyclin and PGE2 (prostaglandin E2) production. Molecular analysis revealed that BFP treatment modulated the expression of a number of genes in the spinal cord of mice subjected to acetic acid writhing. RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) analysis of spinal cord samples showed that both sst4 (somatostatin receptor 4) and sst2 receptor mRNA, but not μOR (μ-opiate receptor) and NK1 (neurokinin-1) receptor mRNA, were down-regulated following BFP treatment, thus implicating somatostatin involvement in BFP-induced analgesia. Administration of c-som (cyclo-somatostatin), a somatostatin antagonist, prior to acetic acid-induced writhing inhibited the analgesic effect. Thus subchronic treatment with BFP has anti-nociceptive qualities mediated via the somatostatin pathway. PMID:21980955

  16. [Research on bioactive ingredients in rat liver after oral administration of different combinations of Wuji pill].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Jie; Chen, Ying; Gong, Zi-Peng; Dong, Yu; Zhang, Hai-Xian; Yang, Qing; Weng, Xiao-Gang; Li, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Xiao-Xin

    2014-05-01

    A L9 (3(4)) orthogonal design table to be used to get nine combinations of extraction of three herbs of Wuji pill: Coptis chinensis, Tetradium ruticarpum and Paeonia lactiflora Pall., and nine extraction of single herbs correspondingly, altogether eighteen combinations. Quantification of five representative bioactive ingredients: berberine, palmatine, evodiamine, rutaecarpine, paeoniflorin in rat liver by ultra high liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after oral administration at 2 h time point of eighteen combinations. The result shows the bioactive ingredients have different concentrations betweem different combinations and the single herb with the same dosage significantly as well as the same dose combinations. C. chinensis with evodiamine concentration of low and high dose T. ruticarpum was positively correlated. T. ruticarpum with berberine concentration of low dose C. chinensis was negatively correlated and of meddle dose C. chinensis was correlated positively. T. ruticarpum with paeoniflorin concentration of middle dose P. lactiflora was correlated positively. P. lactiflora with palmatine concentration of middle dose C. chinensis was negatively correlated and with evodiamine and rutaecarpine concentration of middle dose T. ruticarpum was negatively correlated. These shows the three single herbs interactions resulted in the differences of each ingredients concentration in rat liver. The orthogonal analysis indicates the combination 12: 6: 6 make the maximum concentration in rat liver. PMID:25095387

  17. Chinese Herbal Cardiotonic Pill Stabilizes Vulnerable Plaques in Rabbits by Decreasing the Expression of Adhesion Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Changjiang; Rong, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Yawei; Xu, Xinsheng; Yao, Guihua; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The cardiotonic pill (CP), consisting of a mixture of Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae, Radix Notoginseng, and Borneolum Syntheticum, has been widely used in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Adhesion molecules, including intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, are involved in the development of vulnerable plaque. We investigated the effect of the CP in a rabbit model of vulnerable plaque established by local transfection with p53 gene. Compared with the control group, rabbits with vulnerable plaque showed a significantly lower intima-media thickness and plaque burden after CP treatment for 12 weeks. Moreover, the reduction in rate of plaque rupture and vulnerability index was similar. On enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry analysis, the expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 was inhibited with CP treatment. CP treatment could postpone atherosclerotic plaque development and stabilize vulnerable plaque by inhibiting the expression of adhesion molecules in treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27110743

  18. Reliability of intestinal temperature using an ingestible telemetry pill system during exercise in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Ruddock, Alan D; Tew, Garry A; Purvis, Alison J

    2014-03-01

    Ingestible telemetry pill systems are being increasingly used to assess the intestinal temperature during exercise in hot environments. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the interday reliability of intestinal temperature during an exercise-heat challenge. Intestinal temperature was recorded as 12 physically active men (25 ± 4 years, stature 181.7 ± 7.0 cm, body mass 81.1 ± 10.6 kg) performed two 60-minute bouts of recumbent cycling (50% of peak aerobic power [watts]) in an environmental chamber set at 35° C 50% relative humidity 3-10 days apart. A range of statistics were used to calculate the reliability, including a paired t-test, 95% limits of agreement (LOA), coefficient of variation (CV), standard error of measurement (SEM), Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Cohen's d. Statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. The method indicated a good overall reliability (LOA = ± 0.61° C, CV = 0.58%, SEM = 0.12° C, Cohen's d = 0.12, r = 0.84, ICC = 0.84). Analysis revealed a statistically significant (p = 0.02) mean systematic bias of -0.07 ± 0.31° C, and the investigation of the Bland-Altman plot suggested the presence of heteroscedasticity. Further analysis revealed the minimum "likely" change in intestinal temperature to be 0.34° C. Although the method demonstrates a good reliability, researchers should be aware of heteroscedasticity. Changes in intestinal temperature >0.34° C as a result of exercise or an intervention in a hot environment are likely changes and less influenced by error associated with the method.

  19. Efficacy of a combined contraceptive regimen consisting of condoms and emergency contraception pills

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of the combined regimen (consisting of condoms and emergency contraception pills (ECP)) and using condoms only for the purpose of preventing pregnancy. Methods One-thousand-five-hundred-and-sixty-two (1,562) couples as volunteers enrolled at nine centers in Shanghai. Eight-hundred-and-twelve (812) were randomized to use male condoms and ECP (i.e., Levonorgestrel) as a back-up to condoms (the intervention group) and 750 to use male condoms only(the control group), according to their working unit. Participants were visited at admission and at the end of 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The cumulative life table rates were calculated for pregnancy and other reasons for discontinuation. Result The gross cumulative life table rates showed that the cumulative discontinuation rates for all reasons during the year of follow-up in the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 7.76 ± 0.94 and 6.61 ± 0.91, respectively, per 100 women (χ2 = 0.41, p = 0.5227). The cumulative gross pregnancy rate of the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 2.17 ± 0.52 and 1.25 ± 0.41, respectively, per 100 women (χ2 = 1.93, p = 0.1645). The Pearl Index in the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 2.21% and 1.26%, respectively. Conclusion Male condoms remain a highly effective contraceptive method for a period of one year while consistently and correctly used. In addition, the lowest pregnancy rate followed from perfect use condom. PMID:24725355

  20. Suxiao Jiuxin Pill Induces Potent Relaxation and Inhibition on Contraction in Human Artery and the Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Qin; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Wang, Jun; Tong, Yong-Ling; Xiong, Song-Jin; Liu, Li-Hua; Wang, Lei; He, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Suxiao Jiuxin Pill, a compound Chinese traditional medicine with main components of tetramethylpyrazine and borneol, is widely used for antiangina treatment in China but its pharmacological effect on human blood vessels is unknown. We investigated the effect and possible mechanism of SJP in the human internal mammary artery (IMA, n = 78) taken from patients undergoing coronary surgery. SJP caused full relaxation in KCl- (99.4 ± 10.5%, n = 6) and U46619- (99.9 ± 5.6%, n = 6) contracted IMA. Pretreatment of IMA with plasma concentrations of SJP (1 mg/mL), calculated from the plasma concentration of its major component borneol, significantly depressed the maximal contraction to KCl (from 35.8 ± 6.0 mN to 12.6 ± 5.6 mN, P = 0.03) and U46619 (from 19.4 ± 2.9 mN to 5.7 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.007) while SJP at 10 mg/mL abolished the subsequent contraction. Endothelium denudation and inhibition of eNOS significantly altered the SJP-induced relaxation without changes of eNOS expression. We conclude that SJP has a potent inhibitory effect on the vasoconstriction mediated by a variety of vasoconstrictors in human arteries. The vasorelaxation involves both endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Thus, the effect of SJP on human arteries demonstrated in this study may prove to be particularly important in vasorelaxing therapy in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24808920

  1. Bak Foong pills combined with metformin in the treatment of a polycystic ovarian syndrome rat model

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WENHUI; LIU, WENPEI; FU, YULING; WANG, YAN; ZHANG, YUANZHEN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the treatment effects and associated mechanism of Bak Foong pills (BFPs) combined with metformin in the treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). BFPs and/or metformin were administrated to treat the PCOS rats, and the weights and morphologies of the ovary, uterus and adrenal gland were measured. The levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), serum testosterone (T), luteinizing hormone, fasting insulin (FIN) and insulin-like growth factor-1 were also measured, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. The expression level of androgen receptor (AR) in the ovarian tissue, and the cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) mRNA levels in the ovary and adrenal tissues were detected. The levels of T, FIN, FBG and HOMA-IR in the combination group were significantly reduced; the wet weights of the ovary and the adrenal gland were decreased significantly, while that of the uterus was increased, and the histological morphology benignly recovered. The rats of each treatment group all experienced restored ovulation. The AR expression level in the treatment group was reduced, and the P450scc mRNA levels in the ovary and the adrenal gland of the combined treatment group were decreased. BFPs combined with metformin significantly affected PCOS, and the possible mechanism involved in the treatment may have been through the reduction of P450scc generation. BFPs may reduce the androgen levels, thus allowing the ovary to restore ovulation. PMID:26622758

  2. Adherence to Warfarin Assessed by Electronic Pill Caps, Clinician Assessment, and Patient Reports: Results from the IN-RANGE Study

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Catherine S.; Chen, Zhen; Price, Maureen; Gross, Robert; Metlay, Joshua P.; Christie, Jason D.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Newcomb, Craig W.; Samaha, Frederick F.

    2007-01-01

    Background Patient adherence to warfarin may influence anticoagulation control; yet, adherence among warfarin users has not been rigorously studied. Objective Our goal was to quantify warfarin adherence over time and to compare electronic medication event monitoring systems (MEMS) cap measurements with both self-report and clinician assessment of patient adherence. Design We performed a prospective cohort study of warfarin users at 3 Pennsylvania-based anticoagulation clinics and assessed pill-taking behaviors using MEMS caps, patient reports, and clinician assessments. Results Among 145 participants, the mean percent of days of nonadherence by MEMS was 21.8% (standard deviation±21.1%). Participants were about 6 times more likely to take too few pills than to take extra pills (18.8 vs. 3.3%). Adherence changed over time, initially worsening over the first 6 months of monitoring, which was followed by improvement beyond 6 months. Although clinicians were statistically better than chance at correctly labeling a participant’s adherence (odds ratio = 2.05, p = 0.015), their estimates often did not correlate with MEMS-cap data; clinicians judged participants to be “adherent” at 82.8% of visits that were categorized as moderately nonadherent using MEMS-cap data (≥20% nonadherence days). Similarly, at visits when participants were moderately nonadherent by MEMS, they self-reported perfect adherence 77.9% of the time. Conclusions These results suggest that patients may benefit from adherence counseling even when they claim to be taking their warfarin or the clinician feels they are doing so, particularly several months into their course of therapy. PMID:17587092

  3. "Pregnancy and labour cause more deaths than oral contraceptives": The debate on the pill in the Spanish press in the 1960s and 1970s.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Gómez, Teresa; Ignaciuk, Agata

    2015-08-01

    From 1941 to 1978, Franco's regime in Spain banned all contraceptive methods. The pill started circulating in Spain from the 1960s, officially as a drug used in gynaecological therapy. However, in the following decade it was also increasingly used and prescribed as a contraceptive. This paper analyses debates about the contraceptive pill in the Spanish daily newspaper ABC and in two magazines, Blanco y Negro and Triunfo, in the 1960s and 1970s. It concludes that the debate on this contraceptive method was much more heterogeneous than might be expected given the Catholic-conservative character of the dictatorship. The daily press focused on the adverse effects of the drug and magazines concentrated on the ethical and religious aspects of the pill and discussed it in a generally positive light. Male doctors and Catholic authors dominated the debate.

  4. Acute myocardial infarction and coronary vasospasm associated with the ingestion of cayenne pepper pills in a 25-year-old male.

    PubMed

    Sogut, Ozgur; Kaya, Halil; Gokdemir, Mehmet Tahir; Sezen, Yusuf

    2012-01-01

    Capsaicin, one of the major active components of cayenne pepper pills, is an over-the-counter substance with sympathomimetic activity used commonly by young individuals for weight loss. Here we report the case of a previously healthy young male who developed severe chest pain after using cayenne pepper pills for slimming and sustained an extensive inferior myocardial infarction. Electrocardiography combined with a bedside transthoracic echocardiogram confirmed the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The patient denied using illicit substances, and he had no risk factors for coronary artery disease. His medication history revealed that he had recently started taking cayenne pepper pills for slimming. A subsequent coronary angiogram revealed patent coronary arteries, suggesting that the mechanism was vasospasm. We postulate that the patient developed acute coronary vasospasm and a myocardial infarction in the presence of this known sympathomimetic agent. This case highlights the potential danger of capsaicin, even when used by otherwise healthy individuals. PMID:22264348

  5. Rethinking agency and medical adherence technology: applying Actor Network Theory to the case study of Digital Pills.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2015-12-01

    Much literature surrounding medical technology and adherence posits that technology is a mechanism for social control. This assumes that the medical establishment can take away patients' agency. Although power relationships and social control can play a key role, medical technology can also serve as an agentive tool to be utilized. We (1) offer the alternative framework of Actor Network Theory to view medical technology, (2) discuss the literature on medication adherence and technology, (3) delve into the ramifications of looking at adherence as a network and (4) use Digital Pills as a case study of dispersed agency.

  6. Does incentivising pill-taking 'crowd out' risk-information processing? Evidence from a web-based experiment.

    PubMed

    Mantzari, Eleni; Vogt, Florian; Marteau, Theresa M

    2014-04-01

    The use of financial incentives for changing health-related behaviours raises concerns regarding their potential to undermine the processing of risks associated with incentivised behaviours. Uncertainty remains about the validity of such concerns. This web-based experiment assessed the impact of financial incentives on i) willingness to take a pill with side-effects; ii) the time spent viewing risk-information and iii) risk-information processing, assessed by perceived-risk of taking the pill and knowledge of its side-effects. It further assesses whether effects are moderated by limiting cognitive capacity. Two-hundred and seventy-five UK-based university staff and students were recruited online under the pretext of being screened for a fictitious drug-trial. Participants were randomised to the offer of different compensation levels for taking a fictitious pill (£0; £25; £1000) and the presence or absence of a cognitive load task (presentation of five digits for later recall). Willingness to take the pill increased with the offer of £1000 (84% vs. 67%; OR 3.66, CI 95% 1.27-10.6), but not with the offer of £25 (79% vs. 67%; OR 1.68, CI 95% 0.71-4.01). Risk-information processing was unaffected by the offer of incentives. The time spent viewing the risk-information was affected by the offer of incentives, an effect moderated by cognitive load: Without load, time increased with the value of incentives (£1000: M = 304.4sec vs. £0: M = 37.8sec, p < 0.001; £25: M = 66.6sec vs. £0: M = 37.8sec, p < 0.001). Under load, time decreased with the offer of incentives (£1000: M = 48.9sec vs. £0: M = 132.7sec, p < 0.001; £25: M = 60.9sec vs. £0: M = 132.7sec, p < 0.001), but did not differ between the two incentivised groups (p = 1.00). This study finds no evidence to suggest incentives "crowd out" risk-information processing. On the contrary, incentives appear to signal risk, an effect, however, which disappears under cognitive load. Although these findings require

  7. Pregnancy is more dangerous than the pill: A critical analysis of professional responses to the Yaz/Yasmin controversy.

    PubMed

    Geampana, Alina

    2016-10-01

    The fourth and most recent generation of hormones used in oral contraceptives has stirred a significant amount of debate regarding the safety of these compounds. Drospirenone, a new type of synthetic hormone used in popular oral contraceptives Yaz and Yasmin, has been found by epidemiologists to increase the risk of blood clots when compared to the previous generations of pills. North American regulatory bodies have investigated the health risks of drospirenone and concluded that the increased risks do not require pulling the new contraceptive technology off the market. Instead, the FDA and Health Canada along with several medical associations have actively managed the Yaz/Yasmin controversy through official statements and press releases between 2010 and 2014. This study provides an analysis of these documents and how risk information about drospirenone-containing pills has been presented to the public. The analysis addresses a gap in our knowledge about cultural factors that impact contraceptive risk assessment. Prevalent risk models used by professionals are highlighted and examined through the use of critical discourse analysis methods. More specifically, this paper highlights the main strategies used to put drospirenone risks into perspective and classify it as safe. I argue that while risks related to pregnancy and the postpartum period are overly-emphasized, other risks are downplayed through a selection process underscored by normative beliefs about women's bodies and sexuality. Future research needs to address consumer perspectives and bridge the gap between lay and scientific risk/benefit assessment of oral contraceptives.

  8. Pregnancy is more dangerous than the pill: A critical analysis of professional responses to the Yaz/Yasmin controversy.

    PubMed

    Geampana, Alina

    2016-10-01

    The fourth and most recent generation of hormones used in oral contraceptives has stirred a significant amount of debate regarding the safety of these compounds. Drospirenone, a new type of synthetic hormone used in popular oral contraceptives Yaz and Yasmin, has been found by epidemiologists to increase the risk of blood clots when compared to the previous generations of pills. North American regulatory bodies have investigated the health risks of drospirenone and concluded that the increased risks do not require pulling the new contraceptive technology off the market. Instead, the FDA and Health Canada along with several medical associations have actively managed the Yaz/Yasmin controversy through official statements and press releases between 2010 and 2014. This study provides an analysis of these documents and how risk information about drospirenone-containing pills has been presented to the public. The analysis addresses a gap in our knowledge about cultural factors that impact contraceptive risk assessment. Prevalent risk models used by professionals are highlighted and examined through the use of critical discourse analysis methods. More specifically, this paper highlights the main strategies used to put drospirenone risks into perspective and classify it as safe. I argue that while risks related to pregnancy and the postpartum period are overly-emphasized, other risks are downplayed through a selection process underscored by normative beliefs about women's bodies and sexuality. Future research needs to address consumer perspectives and bridge the gap between lay and scientific risk/benefit assessment of oral contraceptives. PMID:27522113

  9. How-To-Do-It: Snails, Pill Bugs, Mealworms, and Chi-Square? Using Invertebrate Behavior to Illustrate Hypothesis Testing with Chi-Square.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biermann, Carol

    1988-01-01

    Described is a study designed to introduce students to the behavior of common invertebrate animals, and to use of the chi-square statistical technique. Discusses activities with snails, pill bugs, and mealworms. Provides an abbreviated chi-square table and instructions for performing the experiments and statistical tests. (CW)

  10. Use of birth control pills and condoms among 17-19-year-old adolescents in Norway: contraceptive versus protective behaviour?

    PubMed

    Traeen, B; Lewin, B; Sundet, J M

    1992-01-01

    This article addresses the relationship between sexual risk behaviour and contraceptive behaviour, and considers whether adolescents who use condoms are practising birth control or STD protective behaviour. The material comprised a representative sample of 3000 Norwegians aged 17-19 years. Data were collected by anonymous self-administered questionnaires. The response-rate was 63%. At the first sexual intercourse 51% of the adolescents used condoms and 7% birth control pills. At the most recent intercourse 31% used condoms and 38% the pill. Use of the pill was widespread among adolescents with high coital frequency and few coital partners. Use of condoms was not particularly widespread among adolescents who reported a relatively large number of coital partners. Irrespective of the number of years they had been coitally active there was no significant difference between those who intended to use condoms at the next sexual intercourse and those who did not as regards their beliefs about condoms as protection against STDs, HIV and unintended pregnancies. The results from this study indicate that the majority of adolescents who use contraception do this for protection against unintended pregnancy and not for protection against STDs. The preference for the pill may make teenagers less prepared to practise STD protective behaviour in specific situations.

  11. Emergency Contraceptive Pill (ECP) Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States: Changes since ECP Went Over-the-Counter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers since ECP went over-the-counter (OTC) in 2006. Related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved, contraindications, follow-up procedures, methods of advertising, and staff attitudes, were…

  12. Emergency Contraceptive Pills: A 10-Year Follow-up Survey of Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laura McKeller; Sawyer, Robin G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a 10-year follow-up study using a telephone survey to investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. They also examined related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved,…

  13. Investigating Birth Control: Comparing Oestrogen Levels in Patients Using the Ortho Evra[R] Patch versus the Ortho-Cyclen[R] Pill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurent, Theresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent drug studies have investigated the incidence of blood clots among patients using the Ortho Evra[R] birth control patch. In this article, the author describes an investigation of oestrogen levels in the body resulting from the application of the Ortho Evra[R] birth control patch versus daily use of Ortho-Cyclen[R] birth control pills.…

  14. The Power of the Pill for the Next Generation: Oral Contraception’s Effects on Fertility, Abortion, and Maternal & Child Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ananat, Elizabeth Oltmans; Hungerman, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers how oral contraception’s diffusion to young unmarried women affected the number and parental characteristics of children born to these women. In the short-term, pill access caused declines in fertility and increases in both the share of children born with low birthweight and the share born to poor households. In the long-term, access led to negligible changes in fertility while increasing the share of children with college-educated mothers and decreasing the share with divorced mothers. The short-term effects appear to be driven by upwardly-mobile women opting out of early childbearing while the long-term effects appear to be driven by a retiming of births to later ages. These effects differ from those of abortion legalization, although we find suggestive evidence that pill diffusion lowered abortions. Our results suggest that abortion and the pill are on average used for different purposes by different women, but on the margin some women substitute from abortion towards the pill when both are available. JELNo. I0, J13, N12. PMID:22389533

  15. [Isolation and mass spectrometric analysis of antioxidant peptides from enzymatic hydrolysates of roasted pills of Asini Corii Colla].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Chen; Yan, Li-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Qi-Wei; Gao, Jian-Ping; Chen, Liang-Mian; Wang, Jin-Yu; Tong, Yan; Zhang, Gui-Feng

    2013-04-01

    A fraction named GFC-1 with high antioxidant activities in vitro was isolated from the enzymatic hydrolysates of roasted pills of Asini Corii Colla, and the peptides in this fraction were identified. The enzymatic hydrolysates were isolated and purified with anion exchange chromatography and Sephadex G-25 filtration chromatography successively. GFC-1, a fraction isolated from the hydrolysates, exhibited the highest DPPH and ABTS scavenging capacity (DPPH 47. 95% at 2.0 g x L(-1) and ABTS 97.20% at 0.40 g x L(-1). Nine peptides from GFC-1 were identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS coupled with TurboSEQUEST search software and Swiss-Prot data base, and a high repetition core sequence GPAGPP*GPP* was also found. PMID:23847950

  16. How the Pill Became a Lifestyle Drug: The Pharmaceutical Industry and Birth Control in the United States Since 1960

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Elizabeth Siegel

    2012-01-01

    Marketing decisions, rather than scientific innovations, have guided the development and positioning of contraceptive products in recent years. I review the stalled progress in contraceptive development in the decades following the advent of the Pill in 1960 and then examine the fine-tuning of the market for oral contraceptives in the 1990s and 2000s. Although birth control has been pitched in the United States as an individual solution, rather than a public health strategy, the purpose of oral contraceptives was understood by manufacturers, physicians, and consumers to be the prevention of pregnancy, a basic health care need for women. Since 1990, the content of that message has changed, reflecting a shift in the drug industry's view of the contraception business. Two factors contributed to bring about this change: first, the industry's move away from research and development in birth control and second, the growth of the class of medications known as lifestyle drugs. PMID:22698049

  17. How the pill became a lifestyle drug: the pharmaceutical industry and birth control in the United States since 1960.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Elizabeth Siegel

    2012-08-01

    Marketing decisions, rather than scientific innovations, have guided the development and positioning of contraceptive products in recent years. I review the stalled progress in contraceptive development in the decades following the advent of the Pill in 1960 and then examine the fine-tuning of the market for oral contraceptives in the 1990s and 2000s. Although birth control has been pitched in the United States as an individual solution, rather than a public health strategy, the purpose of oral contraceptives was understood by manufacturers, physicians, and consumers to be the prevention of pregnancy, a basic health care need for women. Since 1990, the content of that message has changed, reflecting a shift in the drug industry's view of the contraception business. Two factors contributed to bring about this change: first, the industry's move away from research and development in birth control and second, the growth of the class of medications known as lifestyle drugs. PMID:22698049

  18. Pill characterization data streams for reducing exposure to inadequately identified anti-malarial medication in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A large fraction of anti-malaria medicines (and indeed many other medicines classes) used in developing countries are inadequately identified. Framing this problem as one of misidentification rather than the more common framing of criminal misrepresentation leads to new solutions sets not currently being considered. Method That reframing led to consideration and analysis of 4 new problems that informed design of a digital platform technology for delivering a distributed medicine characterization system: 1) problematic interests associated with a focus on preventing counterfeiting, 2) the complexity of the many ways that medicines can deviate from expected identities, 3) the challenge of choosing amongst a diversity of attribute characterization technologies, and 4) the need for a flexible and distributed data aggregation mechanism. Results Analysis of those new problems confirmed an initial insight that a previously described digital technology for tracking malaria tests results in infrastructure limited regions could be adapted for characterizing pill attributes. Feasibility is illustrated by describing how the platform design can be implemented using open-source software and commodity computational and communication technology readily available and supportable in developing countries. Discussion A system of this type would allow users to answer several questions. Is this medicine what it is supposed to be? Can it be used to treat locally encountered malaria? What has been the experience of others who have used pills having the same identity? Ubiquitous access to global digital telecommunication infrastructure allows the system to generate data streams from these distributed medicine characterization transactions that can be used to map global patterns of use of specifically identified medicines. This can provide feedback necessary to guide efforts to reduce the burden of malaria. PMID:20649985

  19. The Rationale and Design of the Pharmacist Intervention for Low Literacy in Cardiovascular Disease (PILL-CVD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Schnipper, Jeffrey L.; Roumie, Christianne L.; Cawthon, Courtney; Businger, Alexandra; Dalal, Anuj K.; Mugalla, Ileko; Eden, Svetlana; Jacobson, Terry A.; Rask, Kimberly J.; Vaccarino, Viola; Gandhi, Tejal K.; Bates, David W.; Johnson, Daniel C.; Labonville, Stephanie; Gregory, David; Kripalani, Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Background Medication errors and adverse drug events are common after hospital discharge, due to changes in medication regimens, suboptimal discharge instructions, and prolonged time to follow-up. Pharmacist-based interventions may be effective in promoting the safe and effective use of medications, especially among high risk patients such as those with low health literacy. Methods and Results The Pharmacist Intervention for Low Literacy in Cardiovascular Disease (PILL-CVD) study is a randomized controlled trial conducted at 2 academic centers – Vanderbilt University Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or acute decompensated heart failure were randomized to usual care or intervention. The intervention consisted of pharmacist-assisted medication reconciliation, inpatient pharmacist counseling, low-literacy adherence aids, and tailored telephone follow-up after discharge. The primary outcome is the occurrence of serious medication errors in the first 30 days after hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes are health care utilization, disease-specific quality of life, and cost effectiveness. Enrollment was completed September 2009. A total of 862 patients were enrolled, and 430 patients were randomized to receive the intervention. Analyses will determine whether the intervention was effective in reducing serious medication errors, particularly in patients with low health literacy. Conclusions The PILL-CVD study was designed to reduce serious medication errors after hospitalization through a pharmacist-based intervention. The intervention, if effective, will inform health care facilities on the use of pharmacist-assisted medication reconciliation, inpatient counseling, low-literacy adherence aids, and patient follow-up after discharge. Clinical Trial Registration http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00632021, NCT00632021 PMID:20233982

  20. The suppression effect of a periodic surface with semicircular grooves on the high power microwave long pill-box window multipactor phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xue Wang, Yong; Fan, Junjie; Zhong, Yong; Zhang, Rui

    2014-09-15

    To improve the transmitting power in an S-band klystron, a long pill-box window that has a disk with grooves with a semicircular cross section is theoretically investigated and simulated. A Monte-Carlo algorithm is used to track the secondary electron trajectories and analyze the multipactor scenario in the long pill-box window and on the grooved surface. Extending the height of the long-box window can decrease the normal electric field on the surface of the window disk, but the single surface multipactor still exists. It is confirmed that the window disk with periodic semicircular grooves can explicitly suppress the multipactor and predominantly depresses the local field enhancement and the bottom continuous multipactor. The difference between semicircular and sharp boundary grooves is clarified numerically and analytically.

  1. [Effect of Jingui Shenqi pill combined with nifedipine for the treatment of elderly hypertensive patients with spleen-kidney Yang deficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu-dong; Fu, Jian; Feng, Mu-zhong; Zhang, Zheng-hua

    2015-12-01

    Totally 96 elderly patients with spleen-kidney Yang deficiency type hypertension were selected in this study. Patients were randomly divided into study and control group. It was treated with the Jingui Shenqi pill combined nifedipine sustained-release tablets in the study group and only nifedipine sustained-release tablets for the control group. Meanwhile, the clinical features including reducing blood pressure, blood lipid and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndromes of the two groups were observed pre and post treatment. Finally, the results showed that it could significantly reduce the hypertensive, hyperlipidemia and TCM syndromes in the study group compared with the control group (P < 0.05), which indicated that the combination of the Jingui Shenqi pill with nifedipine sustained-release tablets was effective for the patients with hypertension with spleen-kidney Yang deficiency type, especially for decreasing TCM syndromes and the blood lipid. PMID:27245042

  2. The Prescription of the Morning-After Pill in a Berlin Emergency Department Over a Four-Year Period - User Profiles and Reasons for Use.

    PubMed

    David, M; Radke, A-M; Pietzner, K

    2012-05-01

    Questions: There are no current health care studies from Germany regarding the "morning-after pill". This paper will use routine data to analyse details regarding the users' profiles, reasons for using it and the utilisation of hospital outpatient facilities. Patient Collective and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all triage sheets in the emergency department of the Virchow Hospital Campus/Charité University Hospital, Berlin, over a four-year period from 2007 to 2010 that were coded with the ICD diagnosis Z30 (= contraception advice) and statistical processing of the associated administrative data. Results: 860 triage sheets were included in the analysis. The emergency department is used most frequently for the prescription of the "morning-after pill" at the weekend. The average age of the users was 25.1 years. The most common reason cited for needing emergency contraception was unprotected sexual intercourse, with the second-most common being "condom failure". Around half of the women attended the department within 12 hours of having unprotected sex. Less than 2 % (n = 14) of all women decided against a prescription of emergency contraceptive after counselling. Conclusions: The user profile and reasons for using emergency oral contraception correlate largely with the information contained in international literature. Although the "morning-after pill" is probably prescribed mainly in general practices in Germany, and despite the availability of new drugs with a permitted post-exposure interval of up to 120 hours after unprotected sex, there appears to still be a high demand for counselling and prescriptions of the "morning-after pill" in the context of the emergency department.

  3. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled superiority trial of the Yiqigubiao pill for the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at a stable stage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng-Sen; Zhang, Yan-Li; Li, Zheng; Xu, Dan; Liao, Chun-Yan; Ma, Huan; Gong, Li; Su, Jun; Sun, Qi; Xu, Qian; Gao, Zhen; Wang, Ling; Jing, Jing; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Min; Tian, Ge; Hasan, Bilal

    2016-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), the Yiqigubiao pill is commonly used to enhance physical fitness. The current clinical trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Yiqigubiao pill as an adjuvant therapy for patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The current trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled superiority trial. The participants were recruited from outpatients at the Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital affiliated with Xinjiang Medical University (Ürümqi, China) between February and September 2012. All participants were patients with stable COPD that were randomized to the Yiqigubiao pill (YQGB; n=84) or placebo (Pb; n=87) groups. The occurrences of acute exacerbation (AE) of COPD during the trial were recorded. Lung function value assessments, scoring of life quality and exercise endurance, arterial blood gas analysis and serum inflammatory cytokines level determination were performed prior to and throughout the study. A total of 139 participants completed the intervention and 132 participants completed the study. The interval between the initial intervention and the first AECOPD was greater in the YQGB group compared with the Pb group (P<0.01). The incidence rate of AECOPD was lower in the YQGB group than in the Pb group (P<0.01). Subsequent to the intervention or at the end of the study, the 6-min walking distance difference was longer in the YQGB group compared with the Pb group (P<0.01). The scores reflecting life quality decline became lower in the YQGB group (P<0.01). The serum levels of proinflammatory factors were downregulated to a greater extent in the YQGB group compared with the Pb group. Thus, the Yiqigubiao pill is an efficient and safe adjuvant therapy for the treatment of stable patients with COPD.

  4. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled superiority trial of the Yiqigubiao pill for the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at a stable stage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng-Sen; Zhang, Yan-Li; Li, Zheng; Xu, Dan; Liao, Chun-Yan; Ma, Huan; Gong, Li; Su, Jun; Sun, Qi; Xu, Qian; Gao, Zhen; Wang, Ling; Jing, Jing; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Min; Tian, Ge; Hasan, Bilal

    2016-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), the Yiqigubiao pill is commonly used to enhance physical fitness. The current clinical trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Yiqigubiao pill as an adjuvant therapy for patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The current trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled superiority trial. The participants were recruited from outpatients at the Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital affiliated with Xinjiang Medical University (Ürümqi, China) between February and September 2012. All participants were patients with stable COPD that were randomized to the Yiqigubiao pill (YQGB; n=84) or placebo (Pb; n=87) groups. The occurrences of acute exacerbation (AE) of COPD during the trial were recorded. Lung function value assessments, scoring of life quality and exercise endurance, arterial blood gas analysis and serum inflammatory cytokines level determination were performed prior to and throughout the study. A total of 139 participants completed the intervention and 132 participants completed the study. The interval between the initial intervention and the first AECOPD was greater in the YQGB group compared with the Pb group (P<0.01). The incidence rate of AECOPD was lower in the YQGB group than in the Pb group (P<0.01). Subsequent to the intervention or at the end of the study, the 6-min walking distance difference was longer in the YQGB group compared with the Pb group (P<0.01). The scores reflecting life quality decline became lower in the YQGB group (P<0.01). The serum levels of proinflammatory factors were downregulated to a greater extent in the YQGB group compared with the Pb group. Thus, the Yiqigubiao pill is an efficient and safe adjuvant therapy for the treatment of stable patients with COPD. PMID:27698749

  5. Monitoring the quality consistency of Fufang Danshen Pills using micellar electrokinetic chromatography fingerprint coupled with prediction of antioxidant activity and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhengchao; Sun, Wanyang; Sun, Guoxiang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A fast micellar electrokinetic chromatography fingerprint method combined with quantification was developed and validated to evaluate the quality of Fufang Danshen Pills, a traditional Chinese Medicine, which has been used in the treatment of cardiovascular system diseases, in which the tetrahedron optimization method was first used to optimize the background electrolyte solution. Subsequently, the index of the fingerprint information amount of I was performed as an excellent objective indictor to investigate the experimental conditions. In addition, a systematical quantified fingerprint method was constructed for evaluating the quality consistency of 20 batches of test samples obtained from the same drug manufacturer. The fingerprint analysis combined with quantitative determination of two components showed that the quality consistency of the test samples was quite good within the same commercial brand. Furthermore, the partial least squares model analysis was used to explore the fingerprint-efficacy relationship between active components and antioxidant activity in vitro, which can be applied for the assessment of anti-oxidant activity of Fufang Danshen pills and provide valuable medicinal information for quality control. The result illustrated that the present study provided a reliable and reasonable method for monitoring the quality consistency of Fufang Danshen pills.

  6. High-performance liquid chromatographic column packings with different particle sizes: chromatographic behavior for the quality analysis of HuanglianShangqing pill.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Li, Ying; Yang, Fangxiu; Du, Yan; Li, Yinjie; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Daoquan

    2015-02-01

    The chromatographic separation of traditional Chinese medicines is still a highly challenging task in analytical science with respect to its hundreds and thousands of chemical compounds, while increase of separation efficiency can greatly improve the separation power of chromatographic column for traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, 13 bioactive components in HuanglianShangqing pill were selected as an index to optimize the separation conditions and evaluate the system suitability of three commercially available columns packed with 1.8, 3.5, and 5.0 μm particles. The chromatographic separations were obtained by the most appropriate Eclipse Plus C18 column (100 × 2.1 mm, 3.5 μm) within 45 min using gradient elution with aqueous-ammonium acetate (10 mmol/L, pH 5.0) and acetonitrile, at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min and an operating temperature of 30°C. The quality of HuanglianShangqing pill was assessed through combining simultaneous quantification of 13 compounds with fingerprint analysis. For the qualitative analysis, mass spectrometry was used to confirm the 13 compounds. All the validation data conformed to the acceptable requirements. For the fingerprint analysis, 32 peaks were selected as the common peaks at 254 nm to evaluate the similarities among HuanglianShangqing pills obtained from ten manufacturers.

  7. Study of the analgesic activities, chronic toxicity and addictive potential of Jia-Yuan-Qing pill in rats

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, YE; TENG, LI-RONG; WANG, ZHEN-ZUO; ZHAO, MIN; MENG, QING-FAN; LU, JIA-HUI; TIAN, JIAN-MING; ZHANG, WEI-WEI; ZHENG, XIAOYI; WANG, DI; TENG, LE-SHENG

    2015-01-01

    Jia-Yuan-Qing pill (JYQP) composed of Porcellio laevis Latreille, Corydalis Rhizoma and Radix Cynanchi Paniculati at a ratio of 9:7:7 has been found to be an effective analgesic agent. The present study aimed to evaluate the safety, addictive potential and anti-cancer pain activity of JYQP in a rat model. During the 6-month chronic toxicity test, no significant changes in general behavior, defecation, postural abnormalities, dietary or water intake or blood biochemical parameters were observed in male and female rats. Although a high dose of JYQP (5 g/kg) caused swelling of the liver, spleen and kidney in male and female rats, no pathological changes were observed in all organs examined via hematoxylin and eosin staining. The analgesic effect of JYQP on bone cancer pain was successfully confirmed in a rat model of Walker 256 cell-induced bone cancer. In contrast to morphine, in a physical dependence test, JYQP produced no withdrawal symptoms following chronic administration. The data from this study provide experimental evidence supporting the clinical use of JYQP as an effective, safe and non-addictive agent for the treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:26136985

  8. Suxiaojiuxin pill enhances atherosclerotic plaque stability by modulating the MMPs/TIMPs balance in ApoE-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinbao; Zhuang, Pengwei; Lu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Mixia; Zhang, Teng; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Jinlei; Liu, Dan; Tong, Yongling

    2014-08-01

    : Suxiaojiuxin pill (SX) is a famous Chinese formulated product, which has been used to treat coronary heart disease and angina pectoris in China. This study was carried out to investigate the effect and possible mechanism of SX on the stability of atherosclerotic plaque in ApoE-deficient mice. ApoE-/- mice of 6-8 weeks old were fed with high-fat diet for developing artherosclerosis. After oral administration of SX for 8 weeks, histopathology of aortic plaque was performed by Sudan III and hematoxylin-eosin staining, and muscle protein was detected by Western blotting (WB). The mRNA and proteins associated with aortic plaque stability were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and WB, respectively. SX treatment could not only reduce serum triglyceride level and plaque area but also increase fibrous cap thickness and collagen content compared with the model group. WB results showed that SX could increase α-smooth muscle actin, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), and TIMP-2 protein expression, whereas decrease matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 protein expression. Moreover, SX could upregulate the expression of α-smooth muscle actin mRNA and downregulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA. These results showed that SX could enhance atherosclerotic plaque stability in ApoE-deficient mice. The mechanism may be associated with modulating the MMPs/TIMPs balance.

  9. Compound Danshen Dripping Pill for Treating Early Diabetic Retinopathy: A Randomized, Double-Dummy, Double-Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dan; Qin, Yali; Yuan, Wei; Deng, Hui; Zhang, Youhua; Jin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, double-dummy, double-blind study was to observe the therapeutic effects of compound Danshen dripping pill (CDDP) in treating early diabetic retinopathy (DR). All the 57 type 2 diabetes cases in nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) stage were divided into two groups randomly: 28 cases treated with CDDP as the treated group and 29 cases treated with calcium dobesilate as the control group. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in the treated group was significantly improved after treatment when compared to that before treatment (P < 0.05). Mean defect (MD) of visual field, hemorrhage area of the fundus, microaneurysm number, fluorescent leakage area, and capillary nonperfusion area evaluated by visual field, fundus photography, and fundus fluorescein angiography in the treated group had the same results as BCVA. However, there was no statistical difference in each index between the two groups. No obvious adverse events with clinical significance occurred. Our present study showed that CDDP has a similar improvement and safety to calcium dobesilate for NPDR. In future DR treatments, CDDP may function as the auxiliary drug. PMID:26457110

  10. In vitro inhibition of proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by serum of rats treated with Dahuang Zhechong pill.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Hui; Liu, Jun-Tian; Wen, Bin-Yu; Xiao, Xiang-Hua

    2007-06-13

    Dahuang Zhechong pill (DHZCP) is a famous and classical Chinese herbal prescription, which is clinically used to treat hepatic, gynecological and cardiovascular diseases in China. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of the serum of rats treated with DHZCP on the proliferation of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and hyperlipidemic serum (HLS), and on DNA, protein and collagen syntheses of VSMCs induced by PDGF in vitro. VSMCs proliferation was assayed by measuring the cell viability with MTT method, and syntheses of DNA, protein and collagen were evaluated by detecting [(3)H]-thymidine, [(3)H]-leucine and [(3)H]-proline incorporations, respectively. The results showed that PDGF, ox-LDL and HLS stimulated the proliferation of rat VSMCs in vitro. The serum of rats treated with DHZCP significantly inhibited the proliferation of rat VSMCs induced by the above stimulants and the incorporations of [(3)H]-thymidine, [(3)H]-leucine and [(3)H]-proline into rat VSMCs induced by PDGF in comparison with the model control group (P<0.01). The data suggest that DHZCP is able to obviously inhibit VSMCs proliferation via interfering with syntheses of DNA and protein, and to decrease production of extracellular matrix by VSMCs through antagonizing collagen synthesis.

  11. Efficacy of Acupuncture versus Combined Oral Contraceptive Pill in Treatment of Moderate-to-Severe Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sriprasert, Intira; Suerungruang, Suparerk; Athilarp, Porntip; Matanasarawoot, Anuchart; Teekachunhatean, Supanimit

    2015-01-01

    This open-label randomized controlled trial was designed to compare the efficacy of acupuncture and combined oral contraceptive (COC) pill in treating moderate-to-severe primary dysmenorrhea. Fifty-two participants were randomly assigned to receive either acupuncture (n = 27) or COC (n = 25) for three menstrual cycles. Mefenamic acid was prescribed as a recue analgesic drug with both groups. The statistical approach used for efficacy and safety assessments was intention-to-treat analysis. By the end of the study, both treatments had resulted in significant improvement over baselines in all outcomes, that is, maximal dysmenorrhea pain scores, days suffering from dysmenorrhea, amount of rescue analgesic used, and quality of life assessed by SF-36 questionnaire. Over the three treatment cycles, COC caused greater reduction in maximal pain scores than acupuncture, while improvements in the remaining outcomes were comparable. Responders were defined as participants whose maximal dysmenorrhea pain scores decreased at least 33% below their baseline. Response rates following both interventions at the end of the study were not statistically different. Acupuncture commonly caused minimal local side effects but did not cause any hormone-related side effects as did COC. In conclusion, acupuncture is an alternative option for relieving dysmenorrhea, especially when COC is not a favorable choice. PMID:26346199

  12. Long-term safety and efficacy of telmisartan/amlodipine single pill combination in the treatment of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Billecke, Scott S; Marcovitz, Pamela A

    2013-01-01

    The use of multiple drug regimens is increasingly recognized as a tacit requirement for the management of hypertension, a necessity fueled in part by rising rates of metabolic syndrome and diabetes. By targeting complementary pathways, combinations of antihypertensive drugs can be applied to provide effective blood pressure control while minimizing side effects and reducing exposure to high doses of individual medications. In addition, combination therapies, including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and calcium channel blockers (CCBs), have the added benefit of reducing cardiovascular mortality and morbidity over other dual therapies while providing equivalent blood pressure control. It is possible that angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), which unlike ACE inhibitors are minimally affected by upregulation of alternative pathways for angiotensin II accumulation following long-term treatment, would also provide such outcome benefits. At issue, however, is maintaining patient compliance, as adding medications is known to reduce adherence to treatment regimens. The purpose of this review is to summarize existing trial data for the long-term safety and efficacy of a recent addition to the armamentarium of dual-antihypertensive therapeutic options, the telmisartan/amlodipine single pill combination. The areas where long-term data are lacking, notably clinical information regarding minorities and women, will also be discussed. PMID:23662062

  13. Diversity and functional significance of cellulolytic microbes living in termite, pill-bug and stem-borer guts.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Zeenat; Kondapalli, Vamsi Krishna; Adlakha, Nidhi; Sharma, Anil; Bhatnagar, Raj K; Chandel, Girish; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2013-01-01

    Arthropods living on plants are able to digest plant biomass with the help of microbial flora in their guts. This study considered three arthropods from different niches - termites, pill-bugs and yellow stem-borers - and screened their guts for cellulase producing microbes. Among 42 unique cellulase-producing strains, 50% belonged to Bacillaceae, 26% belonged to Enterobacteriaceae, 17% belonged to Microbacteriaceae, 5% belonged to Paenibacillaceae and 2% belonged to Promicromonosporaceae. The distribution of microbial families in the three arthropod guts reflected differences in their food consumption habits. Most of the carboxymethylcellulase positive strains also hydrolysed other amorphous substrates such as xylan, locust bean gum and β-D-glucan. Two strains, A11 and A21, demonstrated significant activity towards Avicel and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobiose, indicating that they express cellobiohydrolase. These results provide insight into the co-existence of symbionts in the guts of arthropods and their possible exploitation for the production of fuels and chemicals derived from plant biomass. PMID:23990056

  14. Safety, efficacy, actions, and patient acceptability of drospirenone/ethinyl estradiol contraceptive pills in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder

    PubMed Central

    Breech, Lesley L; Braverman, Paula K

    2010-01-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is estimated to affect 3%–8% of reproductive age women. Multiple therapeutic modalities have been evaluated with varying efficacy for the associated somatic and mood symptoms. The majority of older studies had shown that oral contraceptive pills (OCs) were most effective for the physical symptoms. However, newer OCs containing a novel progestin, drospirenone, have shown promise in alleviating both the somatic and affective/behavioral symptoms. This progestin, which is a derivative of spironolactone, has both antimineralocorticoid and antiandrogenic activity. A 24/4 formulation containing 20 μg of ethinyl estradiol has been found effective in randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trials utilizing established scales documenting symptoms associated with PMDD. Multiple studies have shown that drospirenone-containing OCs are safe without evidence of clinically adverse effects on carbohydrate metabolism, lipids, blood pressure, weight, serum potassium or increased thrombotic events compared to other low dose OCs. In addition, significant improvements have been demonstrated in acne, hirsutism, and fluid retention symptoms. Several open label studies demonstrated good patient compliance and reported satisfaction with the method. Because of the significant placebo effect demonstrated in the blinded placebo-controlled trials, additional large randomized placebo-controlled trials are needed to confirm the efficacy of the drospirenone OCs in the treatment of PMDD. However, this OC formulation appears to be a promising therapeutic modality. PMID:21072278

  15. Qi-Shen-Yi-Qi Dripping Pills for the Secondary Prevention of Myocardial Infarction: A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Hongcai; Zhang, Junhua; Yao, Chen; Liu, Baoyan; Gao, Xiumei; Ren, Ming; Cao, Hongbao; Dai, Guohua; Weng, Weiliang; Zhu, Sainan; Wang, Hui; Xu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Boli

    2013-01-01

    Background. Several types of drugs have been recommended for the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI). However, these conventional strategies have several limitations, such as low adherence, high cost, and side effects during long time use. Novel approaches to this problem are still needed. This trial aimed to test the effectiveness and safety of Qi-Shen-Yi-Qi Dripping Pills (QSYQ), a multi-ingredient Chinese patent medicine, for the secondary prevention of MI. Methods and Findings. A total of 3505 eligible patients were randomly assigned to QSYQ group (1746 patients) or aspirin group (1759). Patients took their treatments for 12 months. The final follow-up visit took place 6 months after the end of the trial drugs. The 12-month and 18-month estimated incidences of the primary outcome were 2.98% and 3.67%, respectively, in the QSYQ group. The figures were 2.96% and 3.81% in the aspirin group. No significant difference was identified between the groups. Conclusions. This trial did not show significant difference of primary and secondary outcomes between aspirin and QSYQ in patients who have had an MI. Though inconclusive, the result suggests that QSYQ has similar effects to aspirin in the secondary prevention of MI. PMID:23935677

  16. Single-pill combination of telmisartan/amlodipine in patients with severe hypertension: results from the TEAMSTA severe HTN study.

    PubMed

    Neutel, Joel M; Mancia, Giusepe; Black, Henry R; Dahlöf, Bjorn; Defeo, Holly; Ley, Ludwin; Vinisko, Richard

    2012-04-01

    This 8-week, randomized, double-blind, controlled study compared efficacy and tolerability of telmisartan/amlodipine (T/A) single-pill combination (SPC) vs the respective monotherapies in 858 patients with severe hypertension (systolic/diastolic blood pressure [SBP/DBP] ≥180/95 mm Hg). At 8 weeks, T/A provided significantly greater reductions from baseline in seated trough cuff SBP/DBP (-47.5 mm Hg/-18.7 mm Hg) vs T (P<.0001) or A (P=.0002) monotherapy; superior reductions were also evident at 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Blood pressure (BP) goal and response rates were consistently higher with T/A vs T or A. T/A was well tolerated, with less frequent treatment-related adverse events vs A (12.6% vs 16.4%) and a numerically lower incidence of peripheral edema and treatment discontinuation. In conclusion, treatment of patients with substantially elevated BP with T/A SPCs resulted in high and significantly greater BP reductions and higher BP goal and response rates than the respective monotherapies. T/A SPCs were well tolerated.

  17. Diversity and functional significance of cellulolytic microbes living in termite, pill-bug and stem-borer guts.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Zeenat; Kondapalli, Vamsi Krishna; Adlakha, Nidhi; Sharma, Anil; Bhatnagar, Raj K; Chandel, Girish; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2013-01-01

    Arthropods living on plants are able to digest plant biomass with the help of microbial flora in their guts. This study considered three arthropods from different niches - termites, pill-bugs and yellow stem-borers - and screened their guts for cellulase producing microbes. Among 42 unique cellulase-producing strains, 50% belonged to Bacillaceae, 26% belonged to Enterobacteriaceae, 17% belonged to Microbacteriaceae, 5% belonged to Paenibacillaceae and 2% belonged to Promicromonosporaceae. The distribution of microbial families in the three arthropod guts reflected differences in their food consumption habits. Most of the carboxymethylcellulase positive strains also hydrolysed other amorphous substrates such as xylan, locust bean gum and β-D-glucan. Two strains, A11 and A21, demonstrated significant activity towards Avicel and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobiose, indicating that they express cellobiohydrolase. These results provide insight into the co-existence of symbionts in the guts of arthropods and their possible exploitation for the production of fuels and chemicals derived from plant biomass.

  18. Diversity and functional significance of cellulolytic microbes living in termite, pill-bug and stem-borer guts

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Zeenat; Kondapalli, Vamsi Krishna; Adlakha, Nidhi; Sharma, Anil; Bhatnagar, Raj K.; Chandel, Girish; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2013-01-01

    Arthropods living on plants are able to digest plant biomass with the help of microbial flora in their guts. This study considered three arthropods from different niches - termites, pill-bugs and yellow stem-borers - and screened their guts for cellulase producing microbes. Among 42 unique cellulase-producing strains, 50% belonged to Bacillaceae, 26% belonged to Enterobacteriaceae, 17% belonged to Microbacteriaceae, 5% belonged to Paenibacillaceae and 2% belonged to Promicromonosporaceae. The distribution of microbial families in the three arthropod guts reflected differences in their food consumption habits. Most of the carboxymethylcellulase positive strains also hydrolysed other amorphous substrates such as xylan, locust bean gum and β-D-glucan. Two strains, A11 and A21, demonstrated significant activity towards Avicel and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobiose, indicating that they express cellobiohydrolase. These results provide insight into the co-existence of symbionts in the guts of arthropods and their possible exploitation for the production of fuels and chemicals derived from plant biomass. PMID:23990056

  19. Effect of Oral Contraceptive Pills on the Blood Serum Enzymes and DNA Damage in Lymphocytes Among Users.

    PubMed

    Naz, Falaq; Jyoti, Smita; Rahul; Akhtar, Nishat; Siddique, Yasir Hasan

    2016-07-01

    The continuous use of synthetic hormones as contraceptive pill or hormonal replacement therapy among women is increasing day by day. The widespread use of different formulations as oral contraceptives by women throughout their reproductive cycle has given rise to a serious concern for studying the effects of oral contraceptives on enzymatic profile and DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among users. The present study was carried out on women taking oral contraceptives. The study was based on the questionnaire having the information of reproductive history, fasting, age, health, nature of menstrual cycle, bleeding and other disease. The profile of the blood serum enzymes i.e. alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aminotransferases (SGOT and SGPT), serum proteins (albumin and globulin) and DNA damage in lymphocytes was studied among users and non-users. The results of the present study suggest that OCs not only effects enzymatic activity but also results in DNA damage that may vary with the duration of using oral contraceptives. A significant increase in LDH, GGT, SGPT, SGOT, globulin and decrease in ALP as well as albumin was found among users as compared to non-users. The observed DNA damage was more in users as compared to non-users. Hormonal contraceptives seem to exert DNA damage and also have significant effects on blood serum enzymes. PMID:27382200

  20. Awareness and attitudes towards emergency contraceptive pills among young people in the entertainment places, Vientiane City, Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emergency Contraception is not officially available to the public sector in Laos. The potential of emergency contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancies is well documented in developed countries, but in Laos no studies of ECPs exist. This study aimed to assess knowledge of and attitudes towards emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) in Vientiane, the capital city of the Lao PDR. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 500 young adults in entertainment venues by using the convenience sampling between May to July, 2007. Data were obtained through face-to-face interview. Participants were asked about socio- demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes related to ECPs, and source of information about ECPs. Data analysis was performed with chi-square test and logistic regression (p < .05). Results Only 22.4 percent of respondents had heard of ECPs and of these only 17.9 percent knew the correct time-frame for effective use. Most of the respondents (85%) agreed on the need for ECPs to be available in Laos and 66.8 percent stated that they would use them should the need arise, if they were available. Among those who said they would not use ECPs, 63.8 percent were concerned about possible health effects, or other side effects. Awareness of ECPs was associated with increasing age (OR = 2.78, p = .025) and male sex (OR = 2.91, p = .010). Conclusions There is needed to provide effective health education about the method, timing of use, and how to obtain ECPs through both informal, peer channels, and also through formal channels such as health care providers. PMID:23514104

  1. Effects of ovarian hormones and oral contraceptive pills on cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, André L; Ramos, Plinio S; Vianna, Lauro C; Ricardo, Djalma R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the ovarian hormones and the use of oral contraceptive pills (OCP) on cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise. Thirty physically active women aged 19-32 years were divided into two groups: OCP users (n = 17) and non-OCP users (n = 13). Participants were studied randomly at three different phases of the menstrual cycle: early follicular (day 3.6 ± 1.2; range 1-5), ovulatory (day 14.3 ± 0.8; range 13-16) and midluteal (day 21.3 ± 0.8; range 20-24), according to endogenous (in non-OCP users) or exogenous (in OCP users) estradiol and progesterone variations. The cardiac vagal withdrawal was represented by the cardiac vagal index (CVI), which was obtained by the 4-s exercise test. Additionally, resting heart rate, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were obtained. The CVI was not significantly different between the three phases of the menstrual cycle in either the non-OCP users (early follicular: 1.58 ± 0.1; ovulatory: 1.56 ± 0.1; midluteal: 1.58 ± 0.1, P > 0.05) or OCP users (early follicular: 1.47 ± 0.1; ovulatory: 1.49 ± 0.1; midluteal: 1.47 ± 0.1, P > 0.05) (mean ± SEM). Resting cardiovascular responses were not affected by hormonal phase or OCP use, except that the SBP was higher in the OCP users than non-OCP users in all phases of the cycle (P < 0.05). In summary, our results demonstrate that cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise was not impacted by the menstrual cycle or OCP use in physically active women.

  2. Effects of Ovarian Hormones and Oral Contraceptive Pills on Cardiac Vagal Withdrawal at the Onset of Dynamic Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, André L.; Ramos, Plinio S.; Vianna, Lauro C.; Ricardo, Djalma R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the ovarian hormones and the use of oral contraceptive pills (OCP) on cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise. Thirty physically active women aged 19–32 years were divided into two groups: OCP users (n = 17) and non-OCP users (n = 13). Participants were studied randomly at three different phases of the menstrual cycle: early follicular (day 3.6 ± 1.2; range 1–5), ovulatory (day 14.3 ± 0.8; range 13–16) and midluteal (day 21.3 ± 0.8; range 20–24), according to endogenous (in non-OCP users) or exogenous (in OCP users) estradiol and progesterone variations. The cardiac vagal withdrawal was represented by the cardiac vagal index (CVI), which was obtained by the 4-s exercise test. Additionally, resting heart rate, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were obtained. The CVI was not significantly different between the three phases of the menstrual cycle in either the non-OCP users (early follicular: 1.58 ± 0.1; ovulatory: 1.56 ± 0.1; midluteal: 1.58 ± 0.1, P > 0.05) or OCP users (early follicular: 1.47 ± 0.1; ovulatory: 1.49 ± 0.1; midluteal: 1.47 ± 0.1, P > 0.05) (mean ± SEM). Resting cardiovascular responses were not affected by hormonal phase or OCP use, except that the SBP was higher in the OCP users than non-OCP users in all phases of the cycle (P < 0.05). In summary, our results demonstrate that cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise was not impacted by the menstrual cycle or OCP use in physically active women. PMID:25785599

  3. [Study on action mechanism and material base of compound Danshen dripping pills in treatment of carotid atherosclerosis based on techniques of gene expression profile and molecular fingerprint].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Song, Xiang-gang; Chen, Chao; Wang, Shu-mei; Liang, Sheng-wang

    2015-08-01

    Action mechanism and material base of compound Danshen dripping pills in treatment of carotid atherosclerosis were discussed based on gene expression profile and molecular fingerprint in this paper. First, gene expression profiles of atherosclerotic carotid artery tissues and histologically normal tissues in human body were collected, and were screened using significance analysis of microarray (SAM) to screen out differential gene expressions; then differential genes were analyzed by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and KEGG pathway analysis; to avoid some genes with non-outstanding differential expression but biologically importance, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) were performed, and 7 chemical ingredients with higher negative enrichment score were obtained by Cmap method, implying that they could reversely regulate the gene expression profiles of pathological tissues; and last, based on the hypotheses that similar structures have similar activities, 336 ingredients of compound Danshen dripping pills were compared with 7 drug molecules in 2D molecular fingerprints method. The results showed that 147 differential genes including 60 up-regulated genes and 87 down regulated genes were screened out by SAM. And in GO analysis, Biological Process ( BP) is mainly concerned with biological adhesion, response to wounding and inflammatory response; Cellular Component (CC) is mainly concerned with extracellular region, extracellular space and plasma membrane; while Molecular Function (MF) is mainly concerned with antigen binding, metalloendopeptidase activity and peptide binding. KEGG pathway analysis is mainly concerned with JAK-STAT, RIG-I like receptor and PPAR signaling pathway. There were 10 compounds, such as hexadecane, with Tanimoto coefficients greater than 0.85, which implied that they may be the active ingredients (AIs) of compound Danshen dripping pills in treatment of carotid atherosclerosis (CAs). The present method can be applied to the research on material

  4. Comprehensive quantitative analysis of Chinese patent drug YinHuang drop pill by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin-Long; An, Ya-Qi; Yan, Bing-Chao; Yue, Rui-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Bo; Ho, Hing-Man; Ren, Tian-Jing; Fung, Hau-Yee; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Liu, Zhong-Liang; Pu, Jian-Xin; Han, Quan-Bin; Sun, Han-Dong

    2016-06-01

    YinHuang drop pill (YHDP) is a new preparation, derived from the traditional YinHuang (YH) decoction. Since drop pills are one of the newly developed forms of Chinese patent drugs, not much research has been done regarding the quality and efficacy. This study aims to establish a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the chemical profile of YHDP. ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS) was used to identify 34 non-sugar small molecules including 15 flavonoids, 9 phenolic acids, 5 saponins, 1 iridoid, and 4 iridoid glycosides in YHDP samples, and 26 of them were quantitatively determined. Sugar composition of YHDP in terms of fructose, glucose and sucrose was examined via a high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detector on an amide column (HPLC-NH2P-ELSD). Macromolecules were examined by high performance gel permeation chromatography coupled with ELSD (HPGPC-ELSD). The content of the drop pill's skeleton component PEG-4000 was also quantified via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with charged aerosol detector (UHPLC-CAD). The results showed that up to 73% (w/w) of YHDP could be quantitatively determined. Small molecules accounted for approximately 5%, PEG-4000 represented 68%, while no sugars or macromolecules were found. Furthermore, YHDP showed no significant differences in terms of daily dosage, compared to YinHuang granules and YinHuang oral liquid; however, it has a higher small molecules content compared to YinHuang lozenge. PMID:27131804

  5. [Study on action mechanism and material base of compound Danshen dripping pills in treatment of carotid atherosclerosis based on techniques of gene expression profile and molecular fingerprint].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Song, Xiang-gang; Chen, Chao; Wang, Shu-mei; Liang, Sheng-wang

    2015-08-01

    Action mechanism and material base of compound Danshen dripping pills in treatment of carotid atherosclerosis were discussed based on gene expression profile and molecular fingerprint in this paper. First, gene expression profiles of atherosclerotic carotid artery tissues and histologically normal tissues in human body were collected, and were screened using significance analysis of microarray (SAM) to screen out differential gene expressions; then differential genes were analyzed by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and KEGG pathway analysis; to avoid some genes with non-outstanding differential expression but biologically importance, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) were performed, and 7 chemical ingredients with higher negative enrichment score were obtained by Cmap method, implying that they could reversely regulate the gene expression profiles of pathological tissues; and last, based on the hypotheses that similar structures have similar activities, 336 ingredients of compound Danshen dripping pills were compared with 7 drug molecules in 2D molecular fingerprints method. The results showed that 147 differential genes including 60 up-regulated genes and 87 down regulated genes were screened out by SAM. And in GO analysis, Biological Process ( BP) is mainly concerned with biological adhesion, response to wounding and inflammatory response; Cellular Component (CC) is mainly concerned with extracellular region, extracellular space and plasma membrane; while Molecular Function (MF) is mainly concerned with antigen binding, metalloendopeptidase activity and peptide binding. KEGG pathway analysis is mainly concerned with JAK-STAT, RIG-I like receptor and PPAR signaling pathway. There were 10 compounds, such as hexadecane, with Tanimoto coefficients greater than 0.85, which implied that they may be the active ingredients (AIs) of compound Danshen dripping pills in treatment of carotid atherosclerosis (CAs). The present method can be applied to the research on material

  6. Comprehensive quantitative analysis of Chinese patent drug YinHuang drop pill by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin-Long; An, Ya-Qi; Yan, Bing-Chao; Yue, Rui-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Bo; Ho, Hing-Man; Ren, Tian-Jing; Fung, Hau-Yee; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Liu, Zhong-Liang; Pu, Jian-Xin; Han, Quan-Bin; Sun, Han-Dong

    2016-06-01

    YinHuang drop pill (YHDP) is a new preparation, derived from the traditional YinHuang (YH) decoction. Since drop pills are one of the newly developed forms of Chinese patent drugs, not much research has been done regarding the quality and efficacy. This study aims to establish a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the chemical profile of YHDP. ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS) was used to identify 34 non-sugar small molecules including 15 flavonoids, 9 phenolic acids, 5 saponins, 1 iridoid, and 4 iridoid glycosides in YHDP samples, and 26 of them were quantitatively determined. Sugar composition of YHDP in terms of fructose, glucose and sucrose was examined via a high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detector on an amide column (HPLC-NH2P-ELSD). Macromolecules were examined by high performance gel permeation chromatography coupled with ELSD (HPGPC-ELSD). The content of the drop pill's skeleton component PEG-4000 was also quantified via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with charged aerosol detector (UHPLC-CAD). The results showed that up to 73% (w/w) of YHDP could be quantitatively determined. Small molecules accounted for approximately 5%, PEG-4000 represented 68%, while no sugars or macromolecules were found. Furthermore, YHDP showed no significant differences in terms of daily dosage, compared to YinHuang granules and YinHuang oral liquid; however, it has a higher small molecules content compared to YinHuang lozenge.

  7. Identification and Simultaneous Determination of Twelve Active Components in the Methanol Extract of Traditional Medicine Weichang’an Pill by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingze; Gao, Wenyuan; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Zhidan

    2013-01-01

    Weichang’an (WCA) pill, a traditional Chinese patent medicine consisting of ten Chinese medicinal herbs, has been used to treat irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia for several decades. In this study, twelve bioactive constituents in the methanol extract of WCA were accurately identified since MS/MS fragmentation behavior of the references and the standards by using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS analysis and a reliable and accurate method for the simultaneous determination was developed. Twelve active components including costunolide and dehydrodehydrocostus lactone from the principal herb Radix Aucklandiae; naringin, hesperidin and neohesperidin from Fructus Aurantii; magnolol and honokiol from the ministerial herbs Cortex Magnoliae officinalis; aloe-emodin, rhein, emodin, chrysophanol and physcion from adjunctive and messenger herb Radix et Rhizoma Rhei were analyzed in the samples. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Kromasil C18 column with gradient elution of acetonitrile-methanol and 1.0% acetic acid water. In this condition, linearity, inter- and intra-day precision and accuracy were within acceptable ranges. The developed method showed satisfactory precision and accuracy with overall intra- and inter-day variations of 0.68-1.33% and 0.67-2.05% respectively, and the overall recoveries of 97.54-102.69% for twelve compounds. The proposed approach was successfully applied as a powerful tool for the quality control of WCA pill. PMID:24250567

  8. Cardiovascular risk in Egyptian healthy consumers of different types of combined oral contraceptives pills: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    El-Haggar, Sahar M; Mostafa, Tarek M

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the associated cardiovascular risk in Egyptian healthy consumers of different types of combined oral contraceptives pills (COCPs) via determination of lipids profiles, Castelli index I, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin concentrations as cardiovascular risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, the study groups consisted of control group that represented by 30 healthy married women who were not on any contraceptive mean or any hormonal therapy and had normal menstrual cycles, group two consisted of 30 women who were users of Levonorgesterl 0.15 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle, group three consisted of 30 women who were users of Gestodene 0.075 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle, and group four consisted of 30 women who were users of Drospirenone 3 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle. One-way analysis of variance followed by LSD post hoc test was used for comparison of variables. P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. The comparison of the studied groups revealed that COCPs containing levonorgestrel plus ethinylestradiol resulted in significantly lower adiponectin level, and significantly higher leptin and resistin levels with more atherogenic lipid profile presented by significantly higher LDL-C, significantly lower HDL-C concentrations, and significantly higher atherogenic index. Formulation containing ethinylestradiol combined with gestodene neither altered adipose tissue function nor showed deleterious effect on lipid panel. Formulation containing ethinylestradiol combined with drospirenone resulted in significantly higher HDL-C and adiponectin concentrations. In conclusion, the uptake of COCPs containing levonorgestrel plus ethinylestradiol is associated with high cardiovascular risk since this formulation showed significantly lower adiponectin concentration, significantly higher leptin, resistin, and atherogenic index as compared to other studied groups. By contrast, the

  9. Cardiovascular risk in Egyptian healthy consumers of different types of combined oral contraceptives pills: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    El-Haggar, Sahar M; Mostafa, Tarek M

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the associated cardiovascular risk in Egyptian healthy consumers of different types of combined oral contraceptives pills (COCPs) via determination of lipids profiles, Castelli index I, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin concentrations as cardiovascular risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, the study groups consisted of control group that represented by 30 healthy married women who were not on any contraceptive mean or any hormonal therapy and had normal menstrual cycles, group two consisted of 30 women who were users of Levonorgesterl 0.15 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle, group three consisted of 30 women who were users of Gestodene 0.075 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle, and group four consisted of 30 women who were users of Drospirenone 3 mg plus Ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg as 21 days cycle. One-way analysis of variance followed by LSD post hoc test was used for comparison of variables. P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. The comparison of the studied groups revealed that COCPs containing levonorgestrel plus ethinylestradiol resulted in significantly lower adiponectin level, and significantly higher leptin and resistin levels with more atherogenic lipid profile presented by significantly higher LDL-C, significantly lower HDL-C concentrations, and significantly higher atherogenic index. Formulation containing ethinylestradiol combined with gestodene neither altered adipose tissue function nor showed deleterious effect on lipid panel. Formulation containing ethinylestradiol combined with drospirenone resulted in significantly higher HDL-C and adiponectin concentrations. In conclusion, the uptake of COCPs containing levonorgestrel plus ethinylestradiol is associated with high cardiovascular risk since this formulation showed significantly lower adiponectin concentration, significantly higher leptin, resistin, and atherogenic index as compared to other studied groups. By contrast, the

  10. Cycle scheduling for in vitro fertilization with oral contraceptive pills versus oral estradiol valerate: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) and estradiol (E2) valerate have been used to schedule gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles and, consequently, laboratory activities. However, there are no studies comparing treatment outcomes directly between these two pretreatment methods. This randomized controlled trial was aimed at finding differences in ongoing pregnancy rates between GnRH antagonist IVF cycles scheduled with OCPs or E2 valerate. Methods Between January and May 2012, one hundred consecutive patients (nonobese, regularly cycling women 18–38 years with normal day 3 hormone levels and <3 previous IVF/ICSI attempts) undergoing IVF with the GnRH antagonist protocol were randomized to either the OCP or E2 pretreatment arms, with no restrictions such as blocking or stratification. Authors involved in data collection and analysis were blinded to group assignment. Fifty patients received OCP (30 μg ethinyl E2/150 μg levonorgestrel) for 12–16 days from day 1 or 2, and stimulation was started 5 days after stopping OCP. Similarly, 50 patients received 4 mg/day oral E2 valerate from day 20 for 5–12 days, until the day before starting stimulation. Results Pretreatment with OCP (mean±SD, 14.5±1.7 days) was significantly longer than with E2 (7.8±1.9 days). Stimulation and embryological characteristics were similar. Ongoing pregnancy rates (46.0% vs. 44.0%; risk difference, –2.0% [95% CI –21.2% to 17.3%]), as well as implantation (43.5% vs. 47.4%), clinical pregnancy (50.0% vs. 48.0%), clinical miscarriage (7.1% vs. 7.7%), and live birth (42.0% vs. 40.0%) rates were comparable between groups. Conclusions This is the first study to directly compare these two methods of cycle scheduling in GnRH antagonist cycles. Our results fail to show statistically significant differences in ongoing pregnancy rates between pretreatment with OCP and E2 for IVF with the GnRH antagonist protocol. Although the

  11. Comparison of the Effect of Vaginal Zataria multiflora Cream and Oral Metronidazole Pill on Results of Treatments for Vaginal Infections including Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis in Women of Reproductive Age.

    PubMed

    Abdali, Khadijeh; Jahed, Leila; Amooee, Sedigheh; Zarshenas, Mahnaz; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Bekhradi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Effect of Zataria multiflora on bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis is shown in vivo and in vitro. We compare the effectiveness of Zataria multiflora cream and oral metronidazole pill on results of treatment for vaginal infections including Trichomonas and bacterial vaginosis; these infections occur simultaneously. The study included 420 women with bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, or both infections together, who were randomly divided into six groups. Criteria for diagnosis were wet smear and Gram stain. Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream and placebo pill were administered to the experiment groups; the control group received oral metronidazole pill and vaginal placebo cream. Comparison of the clinical symptoms showed no significant difference in all three vaginitis groups receiving metronidazole pill and vaginal Zataria multiflora cream. However, comparison of the wet smear test results was significant in patients with trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis associated with trichomoniasis in the two treatment groups (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01). Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream had the same effect of oral metronidazole tablets in improving clinical symptoms of all three vaginitis groups, as well as the treatment for bacterial vaginosis. It can be used as a drug for treatment of bacterial vaginosis and elimination of clinical symptoms of Trichomonas vaginitis.

  12. Comparison of the Effect of Vaginal Zataria multiflora Cream and Oral Metronidazole Pill on Results of Treatments for Vaginal Infections including Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis in Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Abdali, Khadijeh; Jahed, Leila; Amooee, Sedigheh; Zarshenas, Mahnaz; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Bekhradi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Effect of Zataria multiflora on bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis is shown in vivo and in vitro. We compare the effectiveness of Zataria multiflora cream and oral metronidazole pill on results of treatment for vaginal infections including Trichomonas and bacterial vaginosis; these infections occur simultaneously. The study included 420 women with bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, or both infections together, who were randomly divided into six groups. Criteria for diagnosis were wet smear and Gram stain. Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream and placebo pill were administered to the experiment groups; the control group received oral metronidazole pill and vaginal placebo cream. Comparison of the clinical symptoms showed no significant difference in all three vaginitis groups receiving metronidazole pill and vaginal Zataria multiflora cream. However, comparison of the wet smear test results was significant in patients with trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis associated with trichomoniasis in the two treatment groups (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01). Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream had the same effect of oral metronidazole tablets in improving clinical symptoms of all three vaginitis groups, as well as the treatment for bacterial vaginosis. It can be used as a drug for treatment of bacterial vaginosis and elimination of clinical symptoms of Trichomonas vaginitis. PMID:26266260

  13. [From a method for family planning to a differentiating lifestyle drug: images of the pill and its consumer in gynaecological advertising since the 1960s in West Germany and France].

    PubMed

    Malich, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Based upon flyers and advertisements for the contraceptive pill from 1961 until 2005, this paper discusses the ways in which the drug and its female users were represented in the marketing of two West European countries, France and the German Federal Republic. As my analysis suggests, national differences are only discernible in the marketing until the end of the 1970s. In West Germany, the pill was depicted from early on as a contraceptive, whereas, due to the restrictive legal situation, in France the pill was marketed as a multi-purpose drug. Nevertheless, the sources in both countries emphasized the safety of the drug. Likewise the representations of women changed from the notion of the married mother to a more diverse image, including young, modern and active women. From the early 1980s on, French and German materials conformed to one another. Now more classification systems were developed, emphasizing the differences between types of pills and types of women. Lifestyle, leisure and fun became increasingly central topics. Correspondingly, the female user was often portrayed in a sexualized way and represented as an active consumer with individual needs and wishes.

  14. "Smart Pills" Promising, Problematic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    An explosion in the variety and availability of cognitive-enhancing drugs, from prescriptions like Ritalin to commercial drinks like NeuroFuel, raises concerns for scientists and educators alike--not just over the potential for abuse, but also over what educators and researchers consider, and how they approach, normal achievement. Evidence is…

  15. Birth control pills - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman's ovary from releasing an egg during her menstrual cycle (called ovulation). They do this by changing the ... cause many side effects. These include: Changes in menstrual cycles, no menstrual cycles, extra bleeding Nausea, mood changes, ...

  16. Beyond pills and condoms.

    PubMed

    Steinhart, P

    1991-01-01

    Conditions and changes in Kenya, noted by the author after an absence of 20 years, are discussed. Commentary is provided on the marriage pattern and birth rate, modernization, unemployment, changes in transfers of wealth; the individual waste of natural resources in developed countries is contrasted with Kenya's population. The difficulty of individual action and the constraints on acting on the basis of one's understanding are presented. Kenya's population growth from 11 million in 1969 to 25 million in 1990 is evident in the differences in the road to Kutus. The 7 miles down the slope of Mount Kenya in 1969 were dotted with small farms and stretches of solitude, while in 1990 people were everywhere, hundreds going or coming and working in small farms metered out across the countryside. Kenya was 1 of the 1st African nations to adopt a population policy. The growth rate was very high at 4.1 in the 1980s. The present density is 1/2500 people/sq mile. 50% of the population is 15 years. 40,000 were unemployed in 1976 and 1 million are unemployed at present. 75% of the women now 40 married before the age of 20 years; 22% married before 15 years. Kenyans value children as wealth and old age security. Expected children/family has dropped from 7.7 in 1984 to 6.7 in 1989. Contraceptive use has increased from 7% in 1977 to 27% in 1989. Modernization has begun. Many people, because of population growth do not have access to land. Education is the only hope for the future. Civil unrest may occur. Only 4% of the land is arable. Agriculture must expand to the arid plains. Food production/capita has dropped 30% since 1972. Imports for food and development money means debt to developed nations. Westerners hold the monetary wealth, consume more soil, water, and energy, and contribute more greenhouse gases. The impact on the ecosystem of a US baby is 4 times what it is for a Kenyan baby. The example of waste is given of the van of tourists traveling down the road to Kutus, which uses as much oil on the trip as 1 Kenyan might use in a lifetime. Leadership advice is to redirect resources privately: buy products from developing nations. The feeling of being stuck between 2 worlds was paramount. PMID:12343969

  17. Birth control pill overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Kester M, Karpa KD, Vrana KE. Endocrine pharmacology. In: Kester M, Karpa KD, Vrana KE, eds. Elsevier's Integrated Review Pharmacology . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 12. Nikkanen HE, ...

  18. Nutraceutical pill containing berberine versus ezetimibe on plasma lipid pattern in hypercholesterolemic subjects and its additive effect in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia on stable cholesterol-lowering treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although statins (STs) are drugs of first choice in hypercholesterolemic patients, especially in those at high cardiovascular risk, some of them are intolerant to STs or refuse treatment with these drugs. In view of this, we have evaluated the lipid-lowering effect of a nutraceutical pill containing berberine (BBR) and of ezetimibe, as alternative treatments, in monotherapy or in combination, in 228 subjects with primary hypercholesterolemia (HCH), with history of STs intolerance or refusing STs treatment. In addition, since PCSK9 was found up-regulated by STs dampening their effect through an LDL receptors (LDLRs) degradation, and BBR suppressed PCSK9 expression in cellular studies, we supplemented the stable lipid-lowering therapy of 30 genotype-confirmed Familial Hypercholesterolemia heterozygotes (HeFH) with BBR, searching for a further plasma cholesterol reduction. Plasma lipid pattern was evaluated at baseline and during treatments. Results In HCH subjects the nutraceutical pill resulted more effective than EZE in lowering LDL cholesterol (−31.7% vs −25.4%, P < 0.001) and better tolerated. On treatment, LDL-C level below 3.36 mmol/L (≤130 mg/dl) was observed in 28.9% of subjects treated with the nutraceutical pill and 11.8% of those treated with EZE (P <0.007). In the group treated with EZE the subjects carrying the G allele of the g.1679 C > G silent polymorphism of NPC1L1 gene showed a higher response to EZE than homozygous for the common allele (GG + CG: LDL-C −29.4±5.0%, CC −23.6±6.5%, P <0.001). Combined treatment with these drugs was as effective as STs in moderate doses (LDL cholesterol −37%, triglycerides −23%). In HeFH patients the addition of BBR resulted in LDL cholesterol reductions inversely related to those induced by the stable therapy (r = −0.617, P <0.0001), with mean 10.5% further decrease. Conclusions The alternative treatments tested in our HCH subjects were rather effective and safe. The findings in

  19. The preparation of Cistanche phenylethanoid glycosides liquid proliposomes: Optimized formulation, characterization and proliposome dripping pills in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Li, Yunjing; Liu, Weiwei; Li, Rongli; Qin, Cuiying; Liu, Nan; Han, Jing

    2016-10-10

    Water-soluble Cistanche phenylethanoid glycosides (CPhGs) have poor permeability and low bioavailability. However, liposomes can improve the permeability of such drugs and their poor stability, and proliposomes have been used to overcome these problems. Based on this, Cistanche phenylethanoid glycoside liquid proliposomes (CPhGsP) and dripping(?) pills were prepared and optimized using response surface methodology. The properties of CPhGsP were evaluated in terms of their encapsulation efficiency, particle size, zeta potential, and morphology. The results obtained showed that the optimal formulation was drug/soybean phospholipid/poloxamer-188/sodium deoxycholate/propylene glycol 1:22.38:3.52:0.84:80 (w/w/w/w/v). This resulted in an encapsulation efficiency, particle size, and zeta potential of hydrated proliposomes with phosphate buffer solution (pH7.4) of 51.97%, 671.7nm, and -25.49mV, respectively. Stability testing of CPhGsP and CPhGs ordinary liposomes was carried out for 3months at 4±2°C, 25±2°C, 40±2°C, 75±5% RH. The results obtained showed that the stability of the proliposomes was better than that of ordinary liposomes at the same temperature, while a lower temperature of 4°C is ideal for storage. Cistanche phenylethanoid glycoside liquid proliposomes dripping pills (CPhGsPD) are efficiently released in gastrointestinal solution as shown by in vitro release experiments and the structure of the liposomes does not destroy the proliposome dripping pills by hydration. In vivo experiments showed that the areas under the plasma level-time curves and peak concentrations of CPhGsPD and hydrated proliposomes were higher than those of CPhGs. Moreover, with CPhGsPD, the pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to those with hydrated proliposomes. These results showed that CPhGsPD offer a good way to improve the oral delivery of CPhGs. PMID:27493021

  20. UFLC-MS/MS determination and pharmacokinetic studies of six Saikosaponins in rat plasma after oral administration of Bupleurum Dropping Pills.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiufeng; Wang, Xiangyang; Yan, Kaijing; Chu, Yang; Li, Shuming; Li, Wei; Yan, Xueying; Ma, Xiaohui; Zhou, Shuiping; Sun, He; Liu, Changxiao

    2016-05-30

    A rapid and sensitive ultra fast liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method (UFLC-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of six Saikosaponins (SSs) (SSa, SSb1, SSb2, SSd, SSc, SSf) of Bupleurum Dropping Pills (BDP) in rat plasma using chloramphenicol as the internal standard (IS). The SSs were separated using an ACQUITY UPLC(®) BEH C18 column (50 mm × 2.1mm, 1.7 μm) and detection of these compounds were done by using a Qtrap 5500 mass spectrometer coupled with negative electrospray ionization (ESI) source under the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. According to regulatory guidelines, the established method was fully validated and results were showed within acceptable limits. The lower limit of quantifications (LLOQs) of all analytes were 0.2 ng/mL. The validated method was successfully applied into a pharmacokinetic study of orally administered BDP in rats. PMID:26970984

  1. SmartPill® as an objective parameter for determination of severity and duration of postoperative ileus: study protocol of a prospective, two-arm, open-label trial (the PIDuSA study)

    PubMed Central

    Vilz, Tim O; Pantelis, Dimitrios; Lingohr, Philipp; Fimmers, Rolf; Esmann, Anke; Randau, Thomas; Kalff, Jörg C; Coenen, Martin; Wehner, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative ileus (POI) is a frequent complication after abdominal surgery (AS). Until today, neither a prophylaxis nor an evidence-based therapy exists. This originates from the absence of objective parameters evaluating the severity and duration of POI resulting in clinical trials of modest quality. The SmartPill®, a capsule which frequently measures pH value, temperature and intraluminal pressure after swallowing, offers an elegant option for analysing gastrointestinal (GI) transit times and smooth muscle activity in vivo. As the use in patients in the first months after AS is not covered by the marketing authorisation, we aim to investigate the safety and feasibility of the SmartPill® immediately after surgery. Additionally, we analyse the influence of prokinetics and laxatives as well as standardised physiotherapy on postoperative bowel contractility, as scientific evidence of its effects is still lacking. Methods and analysis The PIDuSA study is a prospective, single-centre, two-arm, open-label trial. The SmartPill® will be applied to 55 patients undergoing AS having a high risk for POI and 10 patients undergoing extra-abdominal surgery rarely developing POI. The primary objective is the safety of the SmartPill® in patients after surgery on the basis of adverse device effects/serious adverse device effects (ADE/SADE). The sample size suggests that events with a probability of 3% could be seen with a certainty of 80% for at least once in the sample. Secondary objective is the analysis of postoperative intestinal activity in the GI tract in both groups. Furthermore, clinical signs of bowel motility disorders will be correlated to the data measured by the SmartPill® to evaluate its significance as an objective parameter for assessing POI severity. Additionally, effects of prokinetics, laxatives and physiotherapy on postoperative peristaltic activity recorded by the SmartPill® will be analysed. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was

  2. Participant Experiences and Facilitators and Barriers to Pill Use Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in the iPrEx Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Trial in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Albert; Koester, Kimberly Ann; Amico, K. Rivet; McMahan, Vanessa; Goicochea, Pedro; Vargas, Lorena; Lubensky, David; Buchbinder, Susan; Grant, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In 2010, the iPrEx study demonstrated efficacy of daily emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in reducing HIV acquisition among men who have sex with men. Adherence to study product was critical for PrEP efficacy, and varied considerably, with FTC/TDF detection rates highest in the United States. We conducted a qualitative study to gain insights into the experiences of iPrEx participants in San Francisco (SF) where there was high confirmed adherence, to understand individual and contextual factors influencing study product use in this community. In 2009 and 2011, we conducted focus groups and in-depth interviews in 36 and 16 SF iPrEx participants, respectively. Qualitative analyses indicate that participants joined the study out of altruism. They had a clear understanding of study product use, and pill taking was facilitated by establishing or building on an existing routine. Participants valued healthcare provided by the study and relationships with staff, whom they perceived as nonjudgmental, and found client-centered counseling to be an important part of the PrEP package. This facilitated pill taking and accurate reporting of missed doses. Adherence barriers included changes in routine, side effects/intercurrent illnesses, and stress. Future PrEP adherence interventions should leverage existing routines and establish client-centered relationships/ environments to support pill taking and promote accurate reporting. PMID:24093809

  3. In vitro and in vivo preclinical evaluation of a minisphere emulsion-based formulation (SmPill®) of salmon calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Tanira A S; Rosa, Mónica; Coulter, Ivan S; Brayden, David J

    2015-11-15

    Salmon calcitonin (sCT, MW 3432Da) is a benchmark molecule for an oral peptide delivery system because it is degraded and has low intestinal epithelial permeability. Four dry emulsion minisphere prototypes (SmPill®) containing sCT were co-formulated with permeation enhancers (PEs): sodium taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC), sodium caprate (C10) or coco-glucoside (CG), or with a pH acidifier, citric acid (CA). Minispheres protected sCT from thermal degradation and the released sCT retained high bioactivity, as determined by cyclic AMP generation in T47D cells. Pre-minisphere emulsions of PEs combined with sCT increased absolute bioavailability (F) compared to native sCT following rat intra-jejunal (i.j.) and intra-colonic (i.c.) loop instillations, an effect that was more pronounced in colon. Minispheres corresponding to ~2000I.U. (~390μg) sCT/kg were instilled by i.j. or i.c. instillations and hypocalcaemia resulted from all prototypes. The absolute F (i.j.) of sCT was 11.0, 4.8, and 1.4% for minispheres containing NaTDC (10μmol/kg), CG (12μmol/kg) or CA (32μmol/kg) respectively. For i.c. instillations, the largest absolute F (22% in each case) was achieved for minispheres containing either C10 (284μmol/kg) or CG (12μmol/kg), whilst the absolute F was 8.2% for minispheres loaded with CA (32μmol/kg). In terms of relative F, the best data were obtained for minispheres containing NaTDC (i.j.), a 4-fold increase over sCT solution, and also for either C10 or CG (i.c.), where there was a 3-fold increase over sCT solution. Histology of instilled intestinal loops indicated that neither the minispheres nor components thereof caused major perturbation. In conclusion, selected SmPill® minisphere formulations may have the potential to be used as oral peptide delivery systems when delivered to jejunum or colon. PMID:26349051

  4. To compare the efficacy of two kinds of Zhizhu pills in the treatment of functional dyspepsia of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome:a randomized group sequential comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory, functional dyspepsia (FD) can be divided into different syndromes according to different clinical symptoms and signs, and the most common one is spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome that can be treated by Chinese traditional patent medicine ---- two kinds of Zhizhu pills, between which the primary difference in ingredients is that one contains immature orange fruit of Citrus aurantium L.(IFCA) and the other contains that of Citrus sinensis Osbeck (IFCS). The trial's objective was to compare the efficacy of two kinds of Zhizhu pills on symptom changes in patients with FD of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome. Methods A randomized, group sequential, double-blinded, multicenter trial was conducted in patients with FD of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome at 3 hospitals in Beijing between June 2003 and May 2005. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups (IFCA group and IFCS group) in a 1:1 ratio, and respectively took one of the two kinds of Zhizhu pills orally, 6 g each time, 3 times a day, for 4 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed with use of a group sequential method, the triangular test (TT). Results A total of 163 patients were randomized, and 3 patients were excluded from analysis because of early dropouts, leaving 160 patients (IFCA group: n = 82; IFCS group: n = 78) for statistical analysis. Three interim analyses were done after 62, 116, and 160 patients had completed their 4-week treatment, respectively. At the third interim analysis, the sample path crossed the upper boundary and the trial was stopped, the cure-markedly effective rates were 45% for IFCS group and 67% for IFCA group, respectively, the one-sided p-value was 0.0036, the median unbiased estimate of the odds ratio (OR) for the benefit of IFCA relative to IFCS was 2.91 with 95%CI: 1.40 to 6.06. No adverse events were observed in the two groups. Conclusions Zhizhu pills containing IFCA was superior

  5. Simultaneous determination of nineteen major components in Qi She Pill by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongliang; Li, Qiang; Li, Qiufen; Du, Simiao; Zhou, Yongquan; Lv, Chunming; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Qi She Pill (QSP) is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription that has been used in treating cervical spondylosis radiculopathy for many years. In this study, a simple and sensitive method using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS/MS) on a reverse-phase C18 column was developed for the simultaneous determination of the 19 major components in QSP. We found that the optimum mobile phase for gradient elution was 0.1% formic acid and methanol. The correlation coefficients of all calibration curves were greater than 0.99. Recoveries measured at three concentration levels varied from 95.43% to 102.35%. Relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-day precisions were less than 4.45%. After successfully validating our method, we then applied it to the quantification of 19 components in QSP products to show that this method provides a new standard in quality assessment of TCM prescriptions containing multiple bioactive components. PMID:26579408

  6. Massive pulmonary embolism associated with Factor V Leiden, prothrombin, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutations in a young patient on oral contraceptive pills: a case report.

    PubMed

    Charafeddine, Khalil M; Mahfouz, Rami A; Ibrahim, Georges Y; Taher, Ali T; Hoballah, Jamal J; Taha, Assad M

    2010-10-01

    Factor V Leiden (Factor V G1691A), prothrombin gene mutation G20210A, and homozygous C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are known to predispose venous thromboembolism (VTE). We present herein a rare case of a young woman heterozygous for these mutations and taking oral contraceptive pills for less than 2 months, diagnosed to have massive deep venous thrombosis and bilateral pulmonary embolism. The patient was managed for 10 days in the hospital and discharged home on oral anticoagulants. This case suggests that screening for these factors in people with family history of thrombosis and in relatives of patients with these mutations is highly recommended to prevent fatal consequences. In addition, a new guideline for treatment and prophylaxis with anticoagulant for these patients and others who are at risk of developing VTE (American College of Chest Physicians [ACCP] guidelines-Chest 2008) has been published recently. Our recommendation is to promote for the internationally published algorithms through their application, where necessary, to prevent any future thrombotic morbidity or mortality incidents. PMID:19520679

  7. Hypertensive nephropathy treatment by heart-protecting musk pill: a study of anti-inflammatory therapy for target organ damage of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dengke; Ling, Shuang; Chen, Gangling; Li, Yajuan; Liu, Jun; Ferid, Murad; Bian, Ka

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of the heart-protecting musk pill (HMP) on inflammatory injury of kidney from spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Male SHRs aged 4 weeks were divided into SHR model group, HMP low-dosage group (13.5 mg/kg), and HMP high-dosage group (40 mg/kg). Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats were used as normal control. All rats were killed at 12 weeks of age. Tail-cuff method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to determine rat systolic blood pressure and angiotensin II (Ang II) contents, respectively. Renal inflammatory damage was evaluated by the following parameters: protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines, carbonyl protein contents, nitrite concentration, infiltration of monocytes/macrophages in interstitium and glomeruli, kidney pathological changes, and excretion rate of urinary protein. HMP did not prevent the development of hypertension in SHR. However, this Chinese medicinal compound decreased renal Ang II content. Consistent with the change of renal Ang II, all the parameters of renal inflammatory injury were significantly decreased by HMP. This study indicates that HMP is a potent suppressor of renal inflammatory damage in SHR, which may serve as a basis for the advanced preventive and therapeutic investigation of HMP in hypertensive nephropathy.

  8. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Volatile Components of Zhengtian Pills Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry and Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cui-ting; Zhang, Min; Yan, Ping; Liu, Hai-chan; Liu, Xing-yun; Zhan, Ruo-ting

    2016-01-01

    Zhengtian pills (ZTPs) are traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) which have been commonly used to treat headaches. Volatile components of ZTPs extracted by ethyl acetate with an ultrasonic method were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Twenty-two components were identified, accounting for 78.884% of the total components of volatile oil. The three main volatile components including protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid, and ligustilide were simultaneously determined using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection (UHPLC-DAD). Baseline separation was achieved on an XB-C18 column with linear gradient elution of methanol-0.2% acetic acid aqueous solution. The UHPLC-DAD method provided good linearity (R2 ≥ 0.9992), precision (RSD < 3%), accuracy (100.68–102.69%), and robustness. The UHPLC-DAD/GC-MS method was successfully utilized to analyze volatile components, protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid, and ligustilide, in 13 batches of ZTPs, which is suitable for discrimination and quality assessment of ZTPs. PMID:26904360

  9. PillCam COLON 2© in Crohn’s disease: A new concept of pan-enteric mucosal healing assessment

    PubMed Central

    Boal Carvalho, Pedro; Rosa, Bruno; Dias de Castro, Francisca; Moreira, Maria João; Cotter, José

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate mucosal healing in patients with small bowel plus colonic Crohn’s disease (CD) with a single non-invasive examination, by using PillCam COLON 2© (PCC2). METHODS: Patients with non-stricturing nonpenetrating small bowel plus colonic CD in sustained corticosteroid-free remission were included. At diagnosis, patients had undergone ileocolonoscopy to identify active CD lesions, such as ulcers and erosions, and small bowel capsule endoscopy to assess the Lewis Score (LS). After ≥ 1 year of follow-up, patients underwent entire gastrointestinal tract evaluation with PCC2. The primary endpoint was assessment of CD mucosal healing, defined as no active colonic CD lesions and LS < 135. RESULTS: Twelve patients were included (7 male; mean age: 32 years), and mean follow-up was 38 mo. The majority of patients (83.3%) received immunosuppressive therapy. Three patients (25%) achieved mucosal healing in both the small bowel and the colon, while disease activity was limited to either the small bowel or the colon in 5 patients (42%). It was possible to observe the entire gastrointestinal tract in 10 of the 12 patients (83%) who underwent PCC2. CONCLUSION: Only three patients in sustained corticosteroid-free clinical remission achieved mucosal healing in both the small bowel and the colon, highlighting the limitations of clinical assessment when stratifying disease activity, and the need for pan-enteric endoscopy to guide therapeutic modification. PMID:26109810

  10. Simultaneous determination of nineteen major components in Qi She Pill by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongliang; Li, Qiang; Li, Qiufen; Du, Simiao; Zhou, Yongquan; Lv, Chunming; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Ning

    2014-10-01

    Qi She Pill (QSP) is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription that has been used in treating cervical spondylosis radiculopathy for many years. In this study, a simple and sensitive method using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) on a reverse-phase C18 column was developed for the simultaneous determination of the 19 major components in QSP. We found that the optimum mobile phase for gradient elution was 0.1% formic acid and methanol. The correlation coefficients of all calibration curves were greater than 0.99. Recoveries measured at three concentration levels varied from 95.43% to 102.35%. Relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-day precisions were less than 4.45%. After successfully validating our method, we then applied it to the quantification of 19 components in QSP products to show that this method provides a new standard in quality assessment of TCM prescriptions containing multiple bioactive components. PMID:26579408

  11. Improving Access to Emergency Contraception Pills through Strengthening Service Delivery and Demand Generation: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence in Low and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Angela; Tran, Nguyen-Toan; Westley, Elizabeth; Mangiaterra, Viviana; Festin, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Emergency contraception pills (ECP) are among the 13 essential commodities in the framework for action established by the UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children. Despite having been on the market for nearly 20 years, a number of barriers still limit women's access to ECP in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) including limited consumer knowledge and poor availability. This paper reports the results of a review to synthesise the current evidence on service delivery strategies to improve access to ECP. Methods A narrative synthesis methodology was used to examine peer reviewed research literature (2003 to 2013) from diverse methodological traditions to provide critical insights into strategies to improve access from a service delivery perspective. The studies were appraised using established scoring systems and the findings of included papers thematically analysed and patterns mapped across all findings using concept mapping. Findings Ten papers were included in the review. Despite limited research of adequate quality, promising strategies to improve access were identified including: advance provision of ECP; task shifting and sharing; intersectoral collaboration for sexual assault; m-health for information provision; and scale up through national family planning programs. Conclusion There are a number of gaps in the research concerning service delivery and ECP in LMIC. These include a lack of knowledge concerning private/commercial sector contributions to improving access, the needs of vulnerable groups of women, approaches to enhancing intersectoral collaboration, evidence for social marketing models and investment cases for ECP. PMID:25285438

  12. Amlodipine/Atorvastatin single-pill therapy for blood pressure and lipid goals in African Americans: influence of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith C; Flack, John M; Saunders, Elijah; Victor, Ronald; Watson, Karol; Kursun, Attila; Jamieson, Michael J; Shi, Harry

    2009-10-01

    African Americans with diabetes +/- the metabolic syndrome are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. This subanalysis of the Clinical Utility of Caduet in Simultaneously Achieving Blood Pressure and Lipid End Points (CAPABLE) trial studied attainment of the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) and the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) blood pressure (BP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals by 8 flexibly titrated doses (5/10-10/80 mg) of amlodipine/atorvastatin single pill in 494 African Americans with hypertension and dyslipidemia, according to the presence of diabetes +/- the metabolic syndrome. In 169 diabetic patients, the metabolic syndrome was associated with poorer BP goal attainment (38.5% vs 48.5% in diabetic patients without the metabolic syndrome). Among diabetic patients (+/- the metabolic syndrome) 61% to 62% reached LDL-C goal. More than 60% of patients with diabetes uncontrolled for LDL-C were maintained on suboptimal atorvastatin therapy (mean final dose: 29.9 mg vs maximum of 80 mg). Reluctance to intensify therapy to attain accepted targets in high-risk individuals suggests a degree of clinical inertia not explained by objective evidence of dose-dependent intolerance. PMID:19817942

  13. Absorption, metabolism and excretion of flavanones from single portions of orange fruit and juice and effects of anthropometric variables and contraceptive pill use on flavanone excretion

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Gary M.; Hollands, Wendy; Needs, Paul W.; Teucher, Birgit; Dainty, Jack R.; Davis, Barry D.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Kroon, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Oranges are rich sources of flavonoids that are bioactive and may protect against age-related diseases. The absorption of orange flavanones may be affected by factors such as processing and subject anthropometric variables, and the bioactivity of the absorbed phytochemicals depends on how they are metabolised during absorption. In a randomised cross-over study, twenty subjects consumed a single portion of orange fruit (150 g) or juice (300 g) that contained the flavanones narirutin and hesperidin, and an additional 109 subjects across a broad age range (18–80 years) consumed the juice. Flavanone metabolites were measured in regularly collected samples of plasma and urine. After consumption of fruit or juice, flavanone conjugates, but not the aglycones, were detected in plasma and urine. The flavanone conjugates were shown to include the 7- and 4′-O-monoglucuronides of naringenin, the 7- and 3′-O-monoglucuronides of hesperetin, two hesperetin diglucuronides and a hesperetin sulfo-glucuronide, but no aglycones or rutinosides. Analysis of the plasma pharmacokinetic and urinary excretion data on a dose-adjusted basis indicated no difference in absorption or excretion of either flavanone between the fruit and juice matrices. In the extended urinary excretion dataset the individual variation was very large (range 0–59 % urinary yield). There was a small but significant (P<0·05) decrease in the excretion of hesperetin (but not naringenin) with increasing age (P<0·05), but the effects of sex, BMI and contraceptive pill use were shown not to be associated with the variation in flavanone excretion. PMID:18710603

  14. Local Hotspots of Endemism or Artifacts of Incorrect Taxonomy? The Status of Microendemic Pill Millipede Species of the Genus Glomeris in Northern Italy (Diplopoda, Glomerida).

    PubMed

    Wesener, Thomas; Conrad, Cathrin

    2016-01-01

    Local endemic species with their unique evolutionary history always stirred the interest of scientists. One such area especially rich in endemics is northern Italy. In case of pill millipedes of the genus Glomeris Latreille, 1803, only a single species is found in northern Europe, while 22 country-endemics alone are known from Italy. Many of these endemics, however, have not been studied in several decades; therefore we aimed to determine whether this diversity is the result of overlooked synonymies or natural processes. A focus was placed on the local endemics that are in some aspects morphologically similar to the widespread and variable G. klugii Brandt, 1833. The local endemics Glomeris larii Verhoeff, 1921, G. primordialis Verhoeff, 1930, G. oblongoguttata Verhoeff, 1894, G. oropensis Verhoeff, 1936, G. transalpina Koch, 1836, G. romana Verhoeff, 1900, G. ligurica Latzel, 1884 and G. apuana Verhoeff, 1911 were included in a molecular analysis incorporating ribosomal nuclear (28S) and mitochondrial (COI) genes. Individuals were sequenced and compared to 31 specimens from 18 localities of G. klugii. The final dataset included 657 base pairs for 56 terminals in the COI, and 14 terminals with 1068 base pairs in the combined 28S and COI analysis. Our analysis shows intraspecific distances of up to 5% in the COI gene in G. klugii that are not strictly correlated to geography or color pattern. G. larii is discovered to be genetically and morphologically identical to G. klugii and is synonymised with the latter. Interspecific distances in our dataset vary between 6.7 to 15.9%, with the lowest (6.7-9.0%) between G. primordialis and G. klugii. Our analysis confirms the species status of the local endemics G. primordialis, G. oblongoguttata, G. oropensis, G. transalpina, G. ligurica and G. apuana. We also confirm the synonymy of G. undulata Koch, 1844 under G. klugii. G. genuensis Latzel, 1886 is indistinguishable from G. ligurica.

  15. Protocol for ACCESS: a qualitative study exploring barriers and facilitators to accessing the emergency contraceptive pill from community pharmacies in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Hussainy, Safeera Yasmeen; Ghosh, Ayesha; Taft, Angela; Mazza, Danielle; Black, Kirsten Isla; Clifford, Rhonda; Mc Namara, Kevin Peter; Ryan, Kath; Jackson, John Keith

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rate of unplanned pregnancy in Australia remains high, which has contributed to Australia having one of the highest abortion rates of developed countries with an estimated 1 in 5 women having an abortion. The emergency contraceptive pill (ECP) offers a safe way of preventing unintended pregnancy after unprotected sex has occurred. While the ECP has been available over-the-counter in Australian pharmacies for over a decade, its use has not significantly increased. This paper presents a protocol for a qualitative study that aims to identify the barriers and facilitators to accessing the ECP from community pharmacies in Australia. Methods and analysis Data will be collected through one-on-one interviews that are semistructured and in-depth. Partnerships have been established with 2 pharmacy groups and 2 women's health organisations to aid with the recruitment of women and pharmacists for data collection purposes. Interview questions explore domains from the Theoretical Domains Framework in order to assess the factors aiding and/or hindering access to ECP from community pharmacies. Data collected will be analysed using deductive content analysis. The expected benefits of this study are that it will help develop evidence-based workforce interventions to strengthen the capacity and performance of community pharmacists as key ECP providers. Ethics and dissemination The findings will be disseminated to the research team and study partners, who will brainstorm ideas for interventions that would address barriers and facilitators to access identified from the interviews. Dissemination will also occur through presentations and peer-reviewed publications and the study participants will receive an executive summary of the findings. The study has been evaluated and approved by the Monash Human Research Ethics Committee. PMID:26656987

  16. Bidirectional adherence changes and associated factors in patients switched from free combinations to equivalent single-pill combinations of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Ying-Hsien; Huang, Chien-Hua; Chen, Wen-Jone; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2014-05-01

    There are no reported studies assessing the effects of fixed-dose single-pill combinations (SPCs) of antihypertensive drugs on adherence in real-world patients with hypertension switched from free combinations to the corresponding SPCs. In this retrospective cohort study with a 1-year mirror-image design, a total of 896 patients who had been prescribed with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker and a thiazide-type diuretic within the preceding 12 months of the index (switching) date and the corresponding SPC within 12 months after the index date were included by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance database from January 2001 to December 2007. Adherence was measured by medication possession ratio (MPR). For patients switched to SPCs, the MPR increased significantly from 42% in the preindex period to 69% in the postindex period (relative difference, 75%; 95% confidence interval, 58%-100%; P<0.001). However, for switched patients with high adherence (MPR ≥0.8) in the preindex period, the MPR unexpectedly decreased in the postindex period (absolute difference, -13%; 95% confidence interval, -17% to -9%; P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, MPR difference was inversely related to the preindex MPR, the number of other antihypertensive drugs, and congestive heart failure. In summary, despite of the dramatic effect of SPCs on improving adherence, this strategy is not effective or even worse in patients adequately adhering to their free-combined antihypertensive regimens. The inverse association between adherence improvement and number of concurrent antihypertensive drugs suggests early use of SPCs to curtail the nonadherence gap. PMID:24446059

  17. Local Hotspots of Endemism or Artifacts of Incorrect Taxonomy? The Status of Microendemic Pill Millipede Species of the Genus Glomeris in Northern Italy (Diplopoda, Glomerida).

    PubMed

    Wesener, Thomas; Conrad, Cathrin

    2016-01-01

    Local endemic species with their unique evolutionary history always stirred the interest of scientists. One such area especially rich in endemics is northern Italy. In case of pill millipedes of the genus Glomeris Latreille, 1803, only a single species is found in northern Europe, while 22 country-endemics alone are known from Italy. Many of these endemics, however, have not been studied in several decades; therefore we aimed to determine whether this diversity is the result of overlooked synonymies or natural processes. A focus was placed on the local endemics that are in some aspects morphologically similar to the widespread and variable G. klugii Brandt, 1833. The local endemics Glomeris larii Verhoeff, 1921, G. primordialis Verhoeff, 1930, G. oblongoguttata Verhoeff, 1894, G. oropensis Verhoeff, 1936, G. transalpina Koch, 1836, G. romana Verhoeff, 1900, G. ligurica Latzel, 1884 and G. apuana Verhoeff, 1911 were included in a molecular analysis incorporating ribosomal nuclear (28S) and mitochondrial (COI) genes. Individuals were sequenced and compared to 31 specimens from 18 localities of G. klugii. The final dataset included 657 base pairs for 56 terminals in the COI, and 14 terminals with 1068 base pairs in the combined 28S and COI analysis. Our analysis shows intraspecific distances of up to 5% in the COI gene in G. klugii that are not strictly correlated to geography or color pattern. G. larii is discovered to be genetically and morphologically identical to G. klugii and is synonymised with the latter. Interspecific distances in our dataset vary between 6.7 to 15.9%, with the lowest (6.7-9.0%) between G. primordialis and G. klugii. Our analysis confirms the species status of the local endemics G. primordialis, G. oblongoguttata, G. oropensis, G. transalpina, G. ligurica and G. apuana. We also confirm the synonymy of G. undulata Koch, 1844 under G. klugii. G. genuensis Latzel, 1886 is indistinguishable from G. ligurica. PMID:27632210

  18. Liuwei Dihuang Pills Enhance the Effect of Western Medicine in Treating Diabetic Nephropathy: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lan; Wang, Qiuhong; Yi, Yongxin; Wang, Shihan; Qiu, Zonglin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the effectiveness and adverse effects of adding Liuwei Dihuang Pills (LDP) to Western medicine for treating diabetic nephropathy. Methods. Studies were retrieved from seven electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, CBM, CNKI, Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), and Wanfang Data until November 2015. Study selection, data extraction, quality assessment, and data analyses were conducted according to Cochrane standards. Meta-analysis was performed on the overall therapeutic efficacy of hyperglycemia and renal functions, and the study also analyzed adverse events. Results. A total of 1,275 patients from 18 studies were included. The methodological quality of these included trials was generally low. We found that adding LDP can lower patients' FBG (MD: −0.36 [−0.46, −0.25], P < 0.00001), PBG (MD: −1.10 [−1.35, −0.85], P < 0.00001), and HbA1c (MD: −0.14 [−0.49, 0.21], P = 0.43). There were also improvements in lowering patients' BUN (MD: −0.67 [−0.89, −0.45], P < 0.00001), SCr (MD: −0.96 [−1.53, −0.39], P < 0.00001), 24 h UTP (SMD: −1.26 [−2.38, −0.15], P < 0.00001), UAER (MD: −26.18 [−27.51, −24.85], P < 0.00001), and UmAlb (SMD: −1.72 [−2.67, −0.77], P < 0.00001). Conclusion. There is encouraging evidence that adding LDP to Western medicine might improve treatment outcomes of diabetic nephropathy, including hyperglycemia and renal functions. However, the evidence remains weak. More rigorous high-quality trials are warranted to substantiate or refute the results. PMID:26997962

  19. Local Hotspots of Endemism or Artifacts of Incorrect Taxonomy? The Status of Microendemic Pill Millipede Species of the Genus Glomeris in Northern Italy (Diplopoda, Glomerida)

    PubMed Central

    Wesener, Thomas; Conrad, Cathrin

    2016-01-01

    Local endemic species with their unique evolutionary history always stirred the interest of scientists. One such area especially rich in endemics is northern Italy. In case of pill millipedes of the genus Glomeris Latreille, 1803, only a single species is found in northern Europe, while 22 country-endemics alone are known from Italy. Many of these endemics, however, have not been studied in several decades; therefore we aimed to determine whether this diversity is the result of overlooked synonymies or natural processes. A focus was placed on the local endemics that are in some aspects morphologically similar to the widespread and variable G. klugii Brandt, 1833. The local endemics Glomeris larii Verhoeff, 1921, G. primordialis Verhoeff, 1930, G. oblongoguttata Verhoeff, 1894, G. oropensis Verhoeff, 1936, G. transalpina Koch, 1836, G. romana Verhoeff, 1900, G. ligurica Latzel, 1884 and G. apuana Verhoeff, 1911 were included in a molecular analysis incorporating ribosomal nuclear (28S) and mitochondrial (COI) genes. Individuals were sequenced and compared to 31 specimens from 18 localities of G. klugii. The final dataset included 657 base pairs for 56 terminals in the COI, and 14 terminals with 1068 base pairs in the combined 28S and COI analysis. Our analysis shows intraspecific distances of up to 5% in the COI gene in G. klugii that are not strictly correlated to geography or color pattern. G. larii is discovered to be genetically and morphologically identical to G. klugii and is synonymised with the latter. Interspecific distances in our dataset vary between 6.7 to 15.9%, with the lowest (6.7–9.0%) between G. primordialis and G. klugii. Our analysis confirms the species status of the local endemics G. primordialis, G. oblongoguttata, G. oropensis, G. transalpina, G. ligurica and G. apuana. We also confirm the synonymy of G. undulata Koch, 1844 under G. klugii. G. genuensis Latzel, 1886 is indistinguishable from G. ligurica. PMID:27632210

  20. A first integrative study of the identity and origins of the British Dwarf Pill Millipede populations, Trachysphaera cf. lobata (Diplopoda, Glomerida, Glomeridae)

    PubMed Central

    Wilbrandt, Jeanne; Lee, Paul; Read, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Three populations of the pill millipede genus Trachysphaera Heller 1858 are present in Great Britain, one on the Isle of Wight, one in South Wales and one in mid-Wales. To identify and characterize the British Trachysphaera populations, the intraspecific and interspecific variation of the populations in South Wales and on the Isle of Wight were studied and evaluated in a first integrative study of members of Trachysphaera, utilizing barcoding and SEM. DNA was extracted from 28 British Trachysphaera and 10 French T. lobata (Ribaut 1954) specimens, one each of French T. cf. drescoi (Conde and Demange 1961) and T. pyrenaica (Ribaut 1908), and one of Spanish T. cf. rousseti (Demange 1959); the barcoding fragment of the COI gene was amplified and their genetic intra- and interpopulation distances compared with one another using two Italian T. spp. and one Croatian T. schmidti Heller 1858 specimens as near outgroups. To compare the genetic distances with the morphological characters, 15 characters of a total of 13 British Trachysphaera, together with two specimens of T. pyrenaica, two T. cf. drescoi and one of T. cf. rousseti were imaged, using the same individuals utilized for DNA extraction. Albeit both British populations are genetically distant, they are closely related (1.9–2.5% p-distance) to French T. lobata, corroborating results of earlier studies. Between different Trachysphaera species, genetic distance was high (16.7–18.8%). The morphological study showed the non-reliability of key taxonomic characters in Trachysphaera, with genetically identical individuals exhibiting morphological variation, especially on the telopods. The only observed morphological characters constant within and different between species were the number of rows of sclerotized bacilli on the tergites, as well as the shape of the male and female anal shield. Both, barcoding and the morphological study identify the British Trachysphaera populations as T. lobata. PMID:26175612

  1. Chemical comparison of two dosage forms of Hemp Seed Pills by UHPLC-Q-ToF-MS/MS and multivariate statistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Song, Jing-Zheng; Fu, Wen-Wei; Tan, Hong-Sheng; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2013-10-01

    Hemp seed soft gel capsule (HSSGC) is a modernised dosage form that is derived from a traditional Chinese patent medicine, Hemp Seed Pills (HSP). Two dosage forms claim the same therapeutic effects; however, their chemical components and chemical equivalency are unclear. In the present study, an ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ToF-MS)-based chemical profiling approach was proposed to rapidly evaluate the chemical differences between HSP and HSSGC as model dosage forms. Samples of the two dosage forms were subjected to UHPLC-ToF-MS analysis. The datasets of retention time (TR) and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) pairs, ion intensities and sample codes were processed with principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) to holistically compare the difference between these two dosage form samples. A clear classification trend was observed in the score plot, and a loading bi-plot was generated in which the variables are correlated with the group and the samples that were observed. The important chemical components that caused differences among the samples were explored with a Variables Importance Projection (VIP) index. Using the proposed approach, global chemical differences were found between the two dosage forms and among samples of the same dosage form. The most important components that are related to the differences were identified and most of them were attributed to Fructus Aurantii Immaturus. It is suggested that this newly established approach could be used for pre-clinical trial chemical equivalence study or the quality evaluation of the traditional medicinal products with large variations in quality.

  2. Liuwei Dihuang Pills Enhance the Effect of Western Medicine in Treating Diabetic Nephropathy: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan; Wang, Qiuhong; Yi, Yongxin; Wang, Shihan; Qiu, Zonglin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the effectiveness and adverse effects of adding Liuwei Dihuang Pills (LDP) to Western medicine for treating diabetic nephropathy. Methods. Studies were retrieved from seven electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, CBM, CNKI, Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), and Wanfang Data until November 2015. Study selection, data extraction, quality assessment, and data analyses were conducted according to Cochrane standards. Meta-analysis was performed on the overall therapeutic efficacy of hyperglycemia and renal functions, and the study also analyzed adverse events. Results. A total of 1,275 patients from 18 studies were included. The methodological quality of these included trials was generally low. We found that adding LDP can lower patients' FBG (MD: -0.36 [-0.46, -0.25], P < 0.00001), PBG (MD: -1.10 [-1.35, -0.85], P < 0.00001), and HbA1c (MD: -0.14 [-0.49, 0.21], P = 0.43). There were also improvements in lowering patients' BUN (MD: -0.67 [-0.89, -0.45], P < 0.00001), SCr (MD: -0.96 [-1.53, -0.39], P < 0.00001), 24 h UTP (SMD: -1.26 [-2.38, -0.15], P < 0.00001), UAER (MD: -26.18 [-27.51, -24.85], P < 0.00001), and UmAlb (SMD: -1.72 [-2.67, -0.77], P < 0.00001). Conclusion. There is encouraging evidence that adding LDP to Western medicine might improve treatment outcomes of diabetic nephropathy, including hyperglycemia and renal functions. However, the evidence remains weak. More rigorous high-quality trials are warranted to substantiate or refute the results.

  3. Clinic Attendance for Antiretroviral Pills Pick-Up among HIV-Positive People in Nepal: Roles of Perceived Family Support and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Ghimire, Mamata; Shibanuma, Akira; Pant, Madhab Raj; Poudel, Krishna C.; Jimba, Masamine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV-positive people’s clinic attendance for medication pick-up is critical for successful HIV treatment. However, limited evidence exists on it especially in low-income settings such as Nepal. Moreover, the role of family support in clinic attendance remains under-explored. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the association between perceived family support and regular clinic attendance and to assess factors associated with regular clinic attendance for antiretroviral pills pick-up among HIV-positive individuals in Nepal. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 423 HIV-positive people in three districts of Nepal. Clinic attendance was assessed retrospectively for the period of 12 months. To assess the factors associated, an interview survey was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire from July to August, 2015. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess the factors associated with regular clinic attendance. Results Of 423 HIV-positive people, only 32.6% attended the clinics regularly. They were more likely to attend them regularly when they received high family support (AOR = 3.98, 95% CI = 2.29, 6.92), participated in support programs (AOR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.00, 2.82), and had knowledge on the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (AOR = 2.62, 95% CI = 1.15, 5.99). In contrast, they were less likely to attend them regularly when they commuted more than 60 minutes to the clinics (AOR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.30, 0.93), when they self-rated their health status as being very good (AOR = 0.13, 95% CI = 0.04, 0.44), good (AOR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.04, 0.46), and fair (AOR = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.06, 0.70). Conclusion HIV-positive individuals are more likely to attend the clinics regularly when they receive high family support, know the benefits of antiretroviral therapy, and participate in support programs. To improve clinic attendance, family support should be incorporated with HIV care programs in resource limited settings

  4. Aliskiren/amlodipine as a single-pill combination in hypertensive patients: subgroup analysis of elderly patients, with metabolic risk factors or high body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Axthelm, Christoph; Sieder, Christian; Meister, Franziska; Pittrow, David; Kaiser, Edelgard

    2013-01-01

    Aims Blood pressure (BP) reduction in hypertensive patients is more difficult to achieve in the elderly or in the presence of comorbidities. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of the single-pill combination (SPC) aliskiren/amlodipine in hypertensive elderly patients, patients with high body mass index (BMI), with at least one metabolic risk factor, and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods In an open-label non-randomized study, patients not adequately controlled by previous treatment with the SPC olmesarten 40/amlodipine 10 (phase 1) were switched to the SPC aliskiren 300/amlodipine 10 (phase 2). The present post-hoc analysis investigated BP reduction in phase 2 in the named subgroups. The EudraCT identifier was 2009-016693-33, ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01113047. Results Of the 187 patients not adequately controlled in phase 1 and thus treated with the SPC aliskiren 300/amlodipine 10 in phase 2, 69 were of advanced age (≥65 years), 74 or 89 were overweight or obese (BMI 25.0–29.9 kg/m2 or ≥30 kg/m2, respectively), 91 had metabolic risk factors (without DM) and 41 had DM. At the beginning of phase 2, depending on the subgroup, baseline SBP was 168–169 mmHg and DBP 103–104 mmHg. After 4 weeks of treatment with aliskiren 300/amlodipine 10, SBP/DBP was lowered by −5.1/−4.8 mmHg in the total cohort, by −5.5/−5.1 mmHg in elderly patients, by −6.7/−5.5 in overweight and by −4.2/−4.5 mmHg in obese patients, by −6.4/−4.7 mmHg in patients with metabolic risk factors without DM, and by −3.3/−5.0 mmHg in DM patients. Limitations include low sample size, limited treatment duration and the fact that the post-hoc defined groups were not mutually exclusive. Conclusions In this study reflecting clinical practice, the aliskiren/amlodipine combination achieved effective BP reduction in elderly patients or with metabolic comorbidities, including DM that might be more difficult to treat. This consistent BP lowering

  5. Rapid Simultaneous Determination of Telmisartan, Amlodipine Besylate and Hydrochlorothiazide in a Combined Poly Pill Dosage Form by Stability-Indicating Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Nalwade, Santaji; Ranga Reddy, Vangala; Durga Rao, Dantu; Koteswara Rao, Inabathina

    2011-01-01

    A simple, precise and rapid stability-indicating ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method is developed for the simultaneous quantitative determination of Telmisartan, Amlodipine besylate and Hydrochlorothiazide from their innovative poly pill combination drug product in the presence of degradation products. It involves a 100 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm C-18 column. The separation is achieved on a simple gradient method. The mobile phase A contains a mixture of sodium perchlorate buffer pH 3.2 (0.053M): acetonitrile in the ratio 90:10, v/v, and mobile B contains a mixture of sodium perchlorate buffer pH 3.2 (0.053M): acetonitrile in the ratio 20:80, v/v. The flow rate is 0.6 mL min−1 and the column temperature is maintained at 55°C.The gradient program (T/%B) is set as 0/5, 1.2/5, 1.6/40, 4/40, 4.1/5 and 4.5/5. The detector wavelength is 271 nm for Hydrochlorothiazide and Telmisartan and 237 nm for Amlodipine. The retention times of Telmisartan, Amlodipine, and Hydrochlorothiazide are 3.6 minutes, 3.2 minutes and 0.9 minutes; respectively. The total runtime for the separation of the three active compounds and their degradation products is 4.5 minutes. The described method is validated with respect to system suitability, specificity, linearity, precision and accuracy. The precision of the assay method is evaluated by carrying out six independent assays of T, A and H (0.032 mg mL−1 of T, 0.004 mg mL−1 of A, 0.01 mg mL−1 of H). The accuracy of the method is evaluated in triplicate at three concentration levels, i.e. 50%, 100% and 150% of target test concentration (0.64 mg mL−1 of T, 0.08 mg mL−1 of A, 0.2 mg mL−1 of H). The described method is linear over the range, 16 to 48 μg mL−1 for T, 2 to 6 μg mL−1A and 5 to 15 μg mL−1 for H. The method is fast and suitable for high-throughput analysis allowing the analysis of about 250 samples per working day. PMID:21617773

  6. 10 "Poison Pills" for Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... left on the bedside table. Zolpidem may make cats wobbly and sleepy, but most pets become very ... very common pain killer found in most households. Cats are extremely sensitive to acetaminophen, but dogs can ...

  7. Use of a Multidrug Pill In Reducing cardiovascular Events (UMPIRE): rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial of a cardiovascular preventive polypill-based strategy in India and Europe.

    PubMed

    Thom, Simon; Field, Jane; Poulter, Neil; Patel, Anushka; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Stanton, Alice; Grobbee, Diederick E; Bots, Michiel L; Reddy, K Srinath; Cidambi, Raghu; Rodgers, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    The use of preventive medications in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease is conceptually straightforward, yet in practice the adoption of such measures is disappointingly low, plus there is wide international variation in preventive therapies. Several barriers might explain this shortfall and variation, but the simplicity and economy of a polypill-based strategy might overcome some barriers. The 'Use of a Multidrug Pill In Reducing cardiovascular Events' (UMPIRE) trial assesses whether a polypill strategy (by combining aspirin, a statin and two blood pressure lowering agents) would improve adherence to guideline-indicated therapies and would lower both blood pressure and cholesterol, in people with established cardiovascular disease. UMPIRE, running in India and three European countries (England, Ireland and the Netherlands), is an open, randomised, controlled trial designed to include 1000 participants in India and 1000 in Europe, with a followup of 12-24 months. Participants were randomised to one of two versions of the polypill or relegated to usual care. The primary study outcomes were the self-reported use of aspirin, a statin and at least two blood pressure lowering agents; as well as changes in blood pressure and cholesterol. Secondary outcomes included: any cardiovascular events, reasons for stopping medications, serious adverse events and perceived changes in quality of life. Interpretation of the study data will be enhanced by health, economic and process-related evaluations. UMPIRE is registered with the European Clinical Trials database, as EudraCT: 2009-016278-34 and the Clinical Trials Registry, India as CTRI/2010/091/000250. The trial was part of the 'Single Pill Against Cardiovascular Events (SPACE)' collaboration, which encompasses the 'IMProving Adherence using Combination Therapy (IMPACT)' and 'Kanyini Guidelines Adherence with the Polypill (Kanyini-GAP)' trials.

  8. Simultaneous quantification of catechin, epicatechin, liquiritin, isoliquiritin, liquiritigenin, isoliquiritigenin, piperine and glycyrrhetinic acid in rat plasma by HPLC-MS/MS: application to a pharmacokinetic study of Longhu Rendan pills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianming; Ding, Liqing; Jin, Huajia; Shi, Rong; Li, Yuanyuan; Wu, Jiasheng; Li, Yifei; Zhu, Li; Ma, Yueming

    2016-08-01

    A sensitive, specific, accurate HPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of catechin, epicatechin, liquiritin, isoliquiritin, liquiritigenin, isoliquiritigenin, piperine and glycyrrhetinic acid from Longhu Rendan pills in rat plasma. Chromatographic separation was performed with a Hypersil Gold C18 column using a gradient of methanol and 0.01% acetic acid containing 0.2 mm ammonium acetate as mobile phase. The analytes were quantified on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, operating in selected reaction monitoring mode and switching the electrospray ion source polarity between positive and negative modes in a single run. The calibration curves of catechin, epicatechin, liquiritin, isoliquiritin, liquiritigenin, isoliquiritigenin, piperine and glycyrrhetinic acid were linear over the concentration ranges of 5-2000, 5-2000, 0.5-200, 0.5-200, 0.25-100, 0.25-100, 0.025-10 and 0.50-200 ng mL(-1) , respectively. The intra- and inter-assay precisions and accuracies were <11.6 and 91.9-108.2%, respectively, for all analytes. Matrix effects for all analytes were between 88.2 and 114.2%. Stability testing showed that all analytes were stable in plasma at 24 °C for 3 h, at 4 °C for 24 h, after three freeze-thaw cycles, and at -80 °C for 15 days. The method was successfully applied to an in vivo study evaluating the pharmacokinetics of multiple nonvolatile compounds following intragastric administration of Longhu Rendan pills to rats. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of traditional Chinese medicine Niu Huang Jie Du Pill using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with tunable UV detector and rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xu; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Xi; Dai, Weixing; Li, Haiyun; Hu, Liwei; Liu, Hui; Su, Juan; Zhang, Weidong

    2010-02-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with tunable UV detector (UPLC-TUV) and rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (RRLC-Q-TOF) method was developed for the quality assessment of Niu Huang Jie Du Pill (NHJDP), a commonly used traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Ten compounds were simultaneously identified by electrospray ion mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and comparison with reference standards and literature data. All of them were quantified by UPLC method. Baseline separation was achieved on an ODS-140HTP C(18) column (2.3mum, 100mmx2.1mm I.D.) with linear gradient elution of acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid. This developed method provides good linearity (r(2)>0.9996), repeatability (RSD<3.63%), intra- and inter-day precisions (RSD<0.86%) with accuracies (97.88-101.56%) and recovery (98.88-101.92%) of 10 major constituents, namely baicalin, baicalein, wogonoside, wogonin, glycyrrhizic acid, liquiritin, rhein, emodin, chrysophanol and physcion. In addition, the principal component analysis (PCA) coupled with the UPLC fingerprint was applied to classify the NHJDP samples according to their manufacture corporation. This proposed method with high sensitivity and selectivity was successfully utilized to analyze 10 major bioactive compounds in 30 batches of NHJDPs, and the results demonstrate that this analytical method is simple and suitable for the original discrimination and quality control of this TCM.

  10. Estradiol Valerate Pretreatment in Short Protocol GnRH-Agonist Cycles versus Combined Pretreatment with Oral Contraceptive Pills in Long Protocol GnRH-Agonist Cycles: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kunicki, Michal; Kuczynski, Waldemar; Pastuszek, Ewa; Jakiel, Grzegorz; Plociennik, Lukasz; Zielinski, Krzysztof; Zabielska, Judyta

    2015-01-01

    The strategy of in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures relies on the increasing pregnancy rate and decreasing the risk of premature ovulation and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. They are also designed to avoid weekend oocyte retrievals. Combined oral contraceptive (OC) pills are among the medicines used to accomplish these objectives. Alternatively, estradiol can be used instead of OC to obtain similar results. The aim of our study was to compare the differences in pregnancy rates (PRs), implantation rates, and miscarriage rates between a short agonist protocol with estradiol priming and a long protocol with combined OC. Of the 298 women who participated in this study, 134 achieved clinical pregnancies (45.0%). A higher PR (58.4%, n = 80, compared to 40.3%, n = 54) was achieved in the long protocol after OC pretreatment group. The implantation rate was also higher for this group (37.8% versus 28.0%; P = 0.03). The miscarriage rate was 15.0% (n = 12) for the long protocol after OC pretreatment group and 20.4% (n = 11) for the short agonist group (P = 0.81). The short agonist protocol required a 5.7% lower human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) dosage than the long protocol but surprisingly the number of oocytes retrieved was also smaller. PMID:25922838

  11. Protective effects of alginate–chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Zuojin Pill) against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Zhu, Xiao-Ning; Jiang, Heng-Li; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Zuojin Pill (ZJP), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w) and was first recorded in “Danxi’s experiential therapy” for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids reduce the inflammatory response by decreasing the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), downregulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α, and IL-1β in gastric mucosa. All the results indicate that mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could not only increase the residence time of alkaloids in rat stomach, but also exert gastroprotective effects through reducing the inflammatory response on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Thus

  12. Protective effects of alginate-chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Zuojin Pill) against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Zhu, Xiao-Ning; Jiang, Heng-Li; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Zuojin Pill (ZJP), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w) and was first recorded in "Danxi's experiential therapy" for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids reduce the inflammatory response by decreasing the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), downregulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α, and IL-1β in gastric mucosa. All the results indicate that mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could not only increase the residence time of alkaloids in rat stomach, but also exert gastroprotective effects through reducing the inflammatory response on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Thus, these

  13. Comparative Efficacy and Durability of Continuation Phase Cognitive Therapy for Preventing Recurrent Depression: Design of a Double-Blinded, Fluoxetine- and Pill-Placebo–Controlled, Randomized Trial with 2-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Thase, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is highly prevalent and associated with disability and chronicity. Although cognitive therapy (CT) is an effective short-term treatment for MDD, a significant proportion of responders subsequently suffer relapses or recurrences. Purpose This design prospectively evaluates: 1) a method to discriminate CT-treated responders at lower versus higher risk for relapse; and 2) the subsequent durability of 8-month continuation phase therapies in randomized higher risk responders followed for an additional 24-months. The primary prediction is: after protocol treatments are stopped, higher risk patients randomly assigned to continuation phase CT (C-CT) will have a lower risk of relapse/recurrence than those randomized to fluoxetine (FLX). Methods Outpatients, aged 18 to 70 years, with recurrent MDD received 12–14 weeks of CT provided by 15 experienced therapists from two sites. Responders (i.e., no MDD and 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression ≤ 12) were stratified into higher and lower risk groups based on stability of remission during the last 6 weeks of CT. The lower risk group entered follow-up for 32 months; the higher risk group was randomized to 8 months of continuation phase therapy with either C-CT or clinical management plus either double-blinded FLX or pill placebo. Following the continuation phase, higher risk patients were followed by blinded evaluators for 24 months. Results The trial began in 2000. Enrollment is complete (N=523). The follow-up continues. Conclusions The trial evaluates the preventive effects and durability of acute and continuation phase treatments in the largest known sample of CT responders collected worldwide. PMID:20451668

  14. Simultaneous determination of shanzhiside methyl ester, 8-O-acetylshan- zhiside methyl ester and luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside in rat plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its application to a pharmacokinetic study after oral administration of Lamiophlomis rotata Pill.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Yang; Liang, Xinlei; Sun, Tingting; Luo, Jinghan; Guo, Xingjie; Zhao, Longshan

    2016-05-01

    A rapid, sensitive and specific ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of shanzhiside methyl ester, 8-O-acetylshanzhiside methyl ester and luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside of Lamiophlomis rotata Pill in rat plasma was developed and validated. After liquid-liquid extraction with n-butyl alcohol/ethyl acetate (70:30, v/v), analytes and paeoniflorin (internal standard, IS) were separated on an Acquity BEH UPLC C18 column (100 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm) with gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. All calibration curves had good linearity (r>0.9929) over the concentration ranges of 1-1000 ng/mL for shanzhiside methyl ester and 8-O-acetylshanzhiside methyl ester, 0.3-150 ng/mL for luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside. The intra- and inter-day precisions were all within 11.1% and the accuracy (relative error, RE%) all ranged from -13.6% to 5.3%. The method also guaranteed an acceptable selectivity, recovery and stability, which was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of the three analytes in rats after oral administration of Lamiophlomis rotata Pill. PMID:27023158

  15. The Pill is Mightier Than the Sword

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Malcolm; Mahmood, Aafreen; Graves, Alisha A.

    2015-01-01

    One determinant of peace is the role of women in society. Some studies suggest that a young age structure, also known as a "youth bulge" can facilitate conflict. Population growth and age structure are factors amenable to change in a human rights context. We propose that policies which favor voluntary family planning and the education of women can ameliorate the global burden of disease associated with conflict and terrorism. PMID:26340389

  16. Popping Pills: Prescription Drug Abuse in America

    MedlinePlus

    ... but few people are aware of just how big the problem really is. In its candy-coated ... Figure 7: Sources NSDUH: http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2k11Results/NSDUHresults2011.htm NSDUH: http://www.samhsa. ...

  17. Learning Difficulties and Nutrition: Pills or Pedagogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Roy

    1999-01-01

    Examines the efforts to find effective ameliorative measures for literacy difficulties such as dyslexia and dyspraxia, focusing on noneducational techniques found in holistic medicine, complementary therapies, and nutritional supplements. Maintains that dyslexia has become big business for drug companies and that the appropriate research regarding…

  18. 'The Pill' May Raise Depression Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... said the findings confirm the link between hormonal birth control and depression symptoms. However, the association does not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. Manufacturers already list "mood changes," including new ...

  19. Serotonin syndrome: pills, thrills and shoulder aches.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Malcolm; Gormley, Joe

    2013-01-01

    This case demonstrates an acute presentation of unwitnessed seizure causing typical injuries. Progress in hospital was complicated by worsening autonomic disturbance and agitation, typical for serotonin syndrome, suspected in light of recent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant initiation. Supportive care required treatment in the intensive care unit setting but full recovery ensued. This case not only reminds clinicians of the potential pitfalls in assessing postictal injured patients, but also that serotonin syndrome requires a high-index of diagnostic suspicion given the range of presenting features. Management ranges from simple withdrawal of the offending agent to specific therapies such as a cyproheptadine. PMID:23429023

  20. Payments, promotion, and the purple pill.

    PubMed

    Ridley, David B

    2015-01-01

    Understanding competition in the US drug market requires knowing how sensitive demand is to prices. The relevant prices for insured consumers are copayments. There are many studies of copayment elasticity in the health literature, but they are of limited applicability for studies of competition. Because of a paucity of data, such studies typically control for neither competitor copayment nor advertising. Whereas previous studies examined copayment sensitivity when copayments for branded drugs move in unison, this study examines copayment sensitivity when copayments diverge. This study uses unique panel data of insurance copayments and utilization for 77 insurance groups, as well as data on advertising. The results indicate that demand can be much more sensitive to copayment than previously recognized. Manufacturers selling drugs with higher copayments than branded competitors can lose substantial market share. Manufacturers can offset the loss of demand by increasing advertising to physicians, but it is costly. PMID:25491652

  1. Pretreatment with oral contraceptive pills to identify poor responders that may benefit from rLH supplementation during GnRH-antagonist treatment for IVF: A pilot perspective study proposal

    PubMed Central

    GIZZO, SALVATORE; ANDRISANI, ALESSANDRA; NOVENTA, MARCO; GANGEMI, MICHELE; NARDELLI, GIOVANNI BATTISTA; AMBROSINI, GUIDO

    2015-01-01

    Controlled ovarian stimulation, using a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol, is a potential treatment option for women with a low response to other fertility treatments as it appears to be at least as effective as GnRH agonists (long protocol). However, previous studies have indicated that the administration of GnRH antagonist may cause an excessive reduction in endogenous luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. The use of recombinant LH (rLH) supplementation during ovarian stimulation is controversial. The present article proposes a future study focused on women aged ≥40 years old, with the aim of identifying patients who are poor responders to GnRH-antagonist treatment that may benefit from rLH supplementation. We hypothesize that patients with suppressed hypothalamic-pituitary-axis activity may benefit from rLH supplementation, as GnRH-antagonist administration has the potential to induce a marked reduction in LH levels in such patients compared with that in patients that exhibit a regular recovery following the administration of oral contraceptive pills (OCPs). Furthermore, patients with hyper-responsive hypothalamic-pituitary-axis activity may be affected by ‘low-gonadotropin-responsiveness’, similar to that observed in patients with any mutation in the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor, who are known to benefit from rLH supplementation. The proposed pilot study would include 120 women who are predicted to be poor responders to GnRH-antagonist treatment. All subjects will be allocated at random (using 2:1 computerized randomization) into two study groups: Group A (OCP-treated) and group B (control). For all patients, the serum values of FSH, LH and 17β estradiol (E2) will be detected on day 3 of the menstrual cycle preceding OCP treatment (baseline) and at day 4 following OCP treatment. The Δ-variation from baseline levels for all markers, the FSH/LH ratio and the E2/FSH ratio will be determined. Δ-variation from the baseline

  2. Astronomical Pills: One-shot questions about the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallotti, F.; Romaniello, S.; Sandrelli, S.

    2005-12-01

    In the last two years, the Public Outreach & Education office (POE) of the INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Milano, Italy) has carried on an extensive survey (over 1300 tests) on the instinctive ideas that junior and secondary school students (aged 13-19) use when facing astronomical concepts. Students were asked to answer nine closed-answer questions and an open-answer one. They were only allowed a few seconds to make their choices. Our goal was to take a first step into the exploration of the naive view of the Universe developed by students in the different age ranges. In particular we explored the evolution (if any) of some misconceptions with respect to age and other educational factors. In this talk we present a critical review of our work, highlighting the following points: "lessons learned", "what works and what doesn't" and "what can be learned" from our personal experience.

  3. Osteoarthritis: No Pills Yet | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... colleagues are studying stem cells in specially bred mice to determine whether there is a correlation between ... genes, for cartilage repair and osteoarthritis in these mice, and target these genes in the development of ...

  4. Ravines and Sugar Pills: Defending Deceptive Placebo Use

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that deceptive placebo use can be morally permissible, on the grounds that the deception involved in the prescription of deceptive placebos can differ in kind to the sorts of deception that undermine personal autonomy. In order to argue this, I shall first delineate two accounts of why deception is inimical to autonomy. On these accounts, deception is understood to be inimical to the deceived agent’s autonomy because it either involves subjugating the deceived agent’s will to another’s authority or because it precludes the agent from acting effectively in pursuit of their ends. I shall argue that providing an agent with false beliefs is not inimical to their autonomy if they are only able to effectively pursue their autonomously chosen ends by virtue of holding those particular false beliefs. Finally, I show that deceptive placebo use need only involve this latter sort of deception. PMID:25503607

  5. Humility pills: building an ethics of cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Rob

    2014-06-01

    The use of cognition-enhancing drugs (CEDs) appears to be increasingly common in both academic and workplace settings. But many universities and businesses have not yet engaged with the ethical challenges raised by CED use. This paper considers criticisms of CED use with a particular focus on the Accomplishment Argument: an influential set of claims holding that enhanced work is less dignified, valuable, or authentic, and that cognitive enhancement damages our characters. While the Accomplishment Argument assumes a view of authorship based on individual credit-taking, an impersonal or collaborative view is just as possible. This paper considers the benefits of this view-including humility, a value often claimed by critics of enhancement-and argues that such a view is consistent with open CED use. It proposes an ethics of cognitive enhancement based on toleration, transparency, and humility, and it discusses how institutions and individuals can build a culture of open cognitive enhancement.

  6. Ovarian morphology and histopathology in post pill amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Said, S; el Habashy, M A; Osman, M M; Shams, A T; Madwar, A Y; Nayel, S A

    1987-03-01

    There have been a large number of reports of amenorrhea after oral contraception termination. It may be due to oversuppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis or to direct atrophic effects on the endometrium. Comparative studies were done by means of a laparoscopic examination of the ovaries of 20 women with postpill amenorrhea as compared with normal ovaries. In the women with postpill amenorrhea the ovaries were free from the fimbrial ends of the tubes. They were almond-shaped and were close to the size of the resting ovaries in the control group. The amenorrhea patients' ovaries were of a porcelain white color with no superficial blood vessels. There were no corpora lutea or growing follicles. Ovarian biopsies showed diffuse fibrous stroma, primordial primary follicles, and atrophic follicular cysts. Endometrial biopsy showed characteristic atrophic or resting endometria. None of the findings were pathological, which may explain why most cases of postpill amenorrhea are reversible.

  7. Combined Hormonal Birth Control: Pill, Patch, and Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause heavy bleeding and menstrual pain, such as fibroids and endometriosis . • Used continuously, they can reduce the ... Estrogen: A female hormone produced in the ovaries. Fibroids: Benign growths that form in the muscle of ...

  8. Progestin-Only Hormonal Birth Control: Pill and Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders —Possible decrease in bleeding associated with uterine fibroids What are possible risks of the injection? Bone ... Estrogen: A female hormone produced in the ovaries. Fibroids: Benign growths that form in the muscle of ...

  9. Electronic Health Record Use a Bitter Pill for Many Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Meigs, Stephen L.; Solomon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) adoption among office-based physician practices in the United States has increased significantly in the past decade. However, the challenges of using EHRs have resulted in growing dissatisfaction with the systems among many of these physicians. The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to increase understanding of physician perceptions regarding the value of using EHR technology. Important findings included the belief among physicians that EHR systems need to be more user-friendly and adaptable to individual clinic workflow preferences, physician beliefs that lack of interoperability among EHRs is a major barrier to meaningful use of the systems, and physician beliefs that EHR use does not improve the quality of care provided to patients. These findings suggest that although government initiatives to encourage EHR adoption among office-based physician practices have produced positive results, additional support may be required in the future to maintain this momentum. PMID:26903782

  10. The Red Pill: Social Studies, Media Texts, and Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Trenia L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the use of media texts in contemporary high school social studies classrooms. Much of the current research regarding media education in social studies classes has focused on history classes and has centered on small idealized samples of both teachers and students. This study, based on the observations conducted in eight…

  11. The pill and the rising costs of fertility control.

    PubMed

    Blake, J

    1977-01-01

    Until recently it appeared as if oral contraception greatly reduced the costs of fertility control. The advantages of effectiveness and the convenience of this method in preference to coitus-related contraception led to the dramatic increase in oral contraceptive (OC) use during the 1960s in the U.S. The trend in the 1970s is different. OC use has leveled off, and suspicions have arisen that the net costs to women of using this form of birth control are higher than was previously believed. Discontinuation rates by women who have been on OCs have increased despite major improvement in the chemistry of the OC in recent years. In view of the evidence concerning the apparent risks to health associated with OCs, the current trend is not surprising. The range of major diseases for which the relative risk is higher among OC users seems to be broadening, and, as a consequence, the cumulative absolute risk overall of these diseases may be very much higher than was believed when only selected thromboembolic entities seemed to be involved. In order to obtain the public's view about the safety of OCs, 1500 voting age adults have been questioned in national surveys since 1966. 34% of the respondents in 1976 said that they believed the OC to be safe, but 47% of this group meant that it is as safe as aspirin. 34% ranked it as being somewhat less safe than aspirin. Their answers indicate that over time there had been increasing anxiety about the safety of the OC, but no general sense of panic. Even among those who felt it is unsafe, only a minority are willing to label it as "really dangerous."

  12. Sleeping Pills for Insomnia: Which Ones Work Best?

    MedlinePlus

    ... state settlement of consumer-fraud claims regarding the marketing of the prescription drug Neurontin (gabapentin). ... Build & Buy Car Buying Service Save thousands off MSRP with upfront dealer pricing information and a transparent car buying experience. See your ...

  13. Pills for the Poor: John Wesley's Primitive Physick

    PubMed Central

    Rogal, Samuel J.

    1978-01-01

    While John Wesley's Primitive Physick (1747) cannot be termed a classic of British medical literature, it must certainly be identified as one of the most popular volumes published in England during the eighteenth century. Although the work came under attack from contemporary surgeons, physicians, and apothecaries, who maintained that its remedies were founded upon ignorance, Wesley probably knew as much as most members of the medical profession; in fact, on no less than twenty instances throughout the volume, he paraphrases or cites directly from prominent physicians and theorists—such figures as Sydenham, Boerhaave, Cheyne, Mead, and Huxham. However, despite its obvious emphasis upon practical remedies, the underlying focus of Primitive Physick is upon the soul of man. Wesley had consulted some sources, common sense, and his own experience, tempering those with the general principle of “doing good to all men,” particularly “those who desire to live according to the gospel....” Thus, the Methodist patriarch's own formula for life had as much to do with the spread of Primitive Physick throughout eighteenth-century Britain and America as did all of the remedies and suggestions imprinted upon its pages. PMID:354225

  14. Blood Thinner Pills: Your Guide to Using Them Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Organization (PSO) Program Quality Measure Tools & Resources Tools & Resources Value Surveys on Patient Safety Culture Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture Nursing Home Survey ...

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV Reaching people who could benefit from PrEP Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... MMWR Article 1 MMWR Article 2 Science Clips Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do ...

  16. Dose measurements in space by the Hungarian Pille TLD system.

    PubMed

    Apathy, I; Deme, S; Feher, I; Akatov, Y A; Reitz, G; Arkhanguelski, V V

    2002-10-01

    Exposure of crew, equipment, and experiments to the ambient space radiation environment in low Earth orbit poses one of the most significant problems to long-term space habitation. Accurate dose measurement has become increasingly important during the assembly (extravehicular activity (EVA)) and operation of space stations such as on Space Station Mir. Passive integrating detector systems such as thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) are commonly used for dosimetry mapping and personal dosimetry on space vehicles. The well-known advantages of passive detector systems are their independence of power supply, small dimensions, high sensitivity, good stability, wide measuring range, resistance to environmental effects, and relatively low cost. Nevertheless, they have the general disadvantage that for evaluation purposes they need a laboratory or large--in mass and power consumption--terrestrial equipment, and consequently they cannot provide time-resolved dose data during long-term space flights. KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (KFKI AEKI) has developed and manufactured a series of thermoluminescent dosemeter systems for measuring cosmic radiation doses in the 10 microGy to 10 Gy range, consisting of a set of bulb dosemeters and a compact, self-contained, TLD reader suitable for on-board evaluation of the dosemeters. By means of such a system, highly accurate measurements were carried out on board the Salyut-6, -7 and Mir Space Stations as well as on the Space Shuttle. A detailed description of the system is given and the comprehensive results of these measurements are summarised. PMID:12440428

  17. Dose measurements in space by the Hungarian Pille TLD system.

    PubMed

    Apathy, I; Deme, S; Feher, I; Akatov, Y A; Reitz, G; Arkhanguelski, V V

    2002-10-01

    Exposure of crew, equipment, and experiments to the ambient space radiation environment in low Earth orbit poses one of the most significant problems to long-term space habitation. Accurate dose measurement has become increasingly important during the assembly (extravehicular activity (EVA)) and operation of space stations such as on Space Station Mir. Passive integrating detector systems such as thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) are commonly used for dosimetry mapping and personal dosimetry on space vehicles. The well-known advantages of passive detector systems are their independence of power supply, small dimensions, high sensitivity, good stability, wide measuring range, resistance to environmental effects, and relatively low cost. Nevertheless, they have the general disadvantage that for evaluation purposes they need a laboratory or large--in mass and power consumption--terrestrial equipment, and consequently they cannot provide time-resolved dose data during long-term space flights. KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (KFKI AEKI) has developed and manufactured a series of thermoluminescent dosemeter systems for measuring cosmic radiation doses in the 10 microGy to 10 Gy range, consisting of a set of bulb dosemeters and a compact, self-contained, TLD reader suitable for on-board evaluation of the dosemeters. By means of such a system, highly accurate measurements were carried out on board the Salyut-6, -7 and Mir Space Stations as well as on the Space Shuttle. A detailed description of the system is given and the comprehensive results of these measurements are summarised.

  18. [The origin of complex coagulopathies in sleeping pill poisonings].

    PubMed

    Kühnel, L; Gaida, H; Heinrichs, C

    1978-10-15

    About 80 per cent of haemostasis disorders were found by systematic examinations of the clotting potential in 130 unselected moderately severe up to severe intoxications by tablets (degree of severity II--IV according to Reed). These disorders are essentially corresponding to a disseminated intravascular coagulation, but provided an extreme case they also may lead to a combination with production-, defect-, and casualty-coagulopathy. Occurring disorders in coagulation are to be treated dependent on stages by heparinisation, in case of need directed haemosubstitution and provided that a hyperfibrinolysis is proved also by antifibrinolytics. In special cases a--not too late beginning--therapy with streptokinase should be taken into consideration. These measures are to be classified into an optimal therapy regimen of detoxication and the exertion of influence of vital functions. PMID:735247

  19. [The origin of complex coagulopathies in sleeping pill poisonings].

    PubMed

    Kühnel, L; Gaida, H; Heinrichs, C

    1978-10-15

    About 80 per cent of haemostasis disorders were found by systematic examinations of the clotting potential in 130 unselected moderately severe up to severe intoxications by tablets (degree of severity II--IV according to Reed). These disorders are essentially corresponding to a disseminated intravascular coagulation, but provided an extreme case they also may lead to a combination with production-, defect-, and casualty-coagulopathy. Occurring disorders in coagulation are to be treated dependent on stages by heparinisation, in case of need directed haemosubstitution and provided that a hyperfibrinolysis is proved also by antifibrinolytics. In special cases a--not too late beginning--therapy with streptokinase should be taken into consideration. These measures are to be classified into an optimal therapy regimen of detoxication and the exertion of influence of vital functions.

  20. Take the Red Pill: A New Matrix of Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brabazon, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Using "The Matrix" film series as an inspiration, aspiration and model, this article integrates horizontal and vertical models of literacy. My goal is to create a new matrix for media literacy, aligning the best of analogue depth models for meaning making with the rapid scrolling, clicking and moving through the read-write web. To…

  1. Free pill in the Netherlands: for how much longer?

    PubMed

    Doppenberg, H

    1994-03-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) and other medical methods of contraception have been available free of charge in the Netherlands since 1972, which may explain the high rate of modern contraceptive use and low rate of abortions. Recently, however, partial private payment has been introduced and there have been proposals to abolish free availability of OCs altogether. In 1972 the national health insurance scheme started to cover OCs, IUDs, sterilization, and diaphragms. As a result, by 1982 more than 40% of all women in reproductive age were using OCs, the highest rate in the world. But in 1991 the government introduced a new system for reimbursing medicines: the GVS system which set a maximum price for all medications including OCs. In practice, women had to pay part of the price of more expensive modern OCs. Recently, combined OC and condom use has been promoted as Double Dutch. A conflict often arises between the government and pharmaceutical companies that argue that prices are too low, hampering the development of higher quality products. The Ministry of Health can also lower prices if it finds that a new product is superior to older ones, thereby interfering in the contraceptive market. The government can also decide to pay or not to pay for a new drug if it finds that its additional medical qualities do not justify the higher price. Drug companies claim the need to charge more because of research and development costs. Most women have to pay very little for more expensive OCs; however, low-income women find even this small fee to be a problem. Contraceptive prevalence was not influenced by the introduction of private payment (it was 36.9% for OCs in 1991 and 39.0% in 1992). On the other hand, studies have found that 10% of all OC users would halt usage if they had to pay the full price.

  2. Continuous Assessment in Schools: Teachers' Bitter Pill to Swallow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumadi, Mutendwahothe Walter

    2011-01-01

    This paper articulates debates surrounding the concept of Continuous Assessment (CA) in South African schools. Although the research was focused on schools in this democratic country, it became evident from the findings that assessment is still a challenge besetting both General Education and Training (GET)and Further Education and Training Bands…

  3. Sleep complaints: Whenever possible, avoid the use of sleeping pills.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    (1) Most sleep complaints involve difficulties in getting to sleep or staying asleep, or not feeling refreshed on awakening. Misconceptions and worrying over the lack of sleep and its consequences can contribute to reinforcing these disorders; (2) How can patients who complain of poor-quality sleep be helped, without resorting to treatments that can have adverse effects? To answer this question, we conducted a systematic review of the literature based on the standard Prescrire procedure; (3) One effective approach is to explain the basic physiology of sleep, to discuss misconceptions, and to adopt a strategy of "stimulus control". This method has a similar efficacy to prescribing a benzodiazepine. and the effect is longer lasting; (4) Moderate, regular physical exercise, especially in the morning, seems to help some patients, but the evidence is weak; (5) Some clinical trials of phytotherapy have shown a positive risk-benefit balance of weak aqueous or hydroalcoholic valerian extracts. Efficacy is limited, however; (6) A meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials showed that benzodiazepines and related drugs increase the duration of sleep and help patients to fall asleep sooner. However, none of these trials provides comparative data spanning periods of more than two weeks. Efficacy is uncertain in the longer term, as patients quickly develop a tolerance to the hypnotic effects of benzodiazepines; (7) The adverse effects of benzodiazepines include frequent memory disorders, daytime drowsiness, falls, fractures and road accidents, and a withdrawal syndrome after treatment cessation. Related drugs such as zolpidem and zopiclone provoke similar adverse effects; (8) Sedative antihistamines have not been as well-evaluated as benzodiazepines in this setting. Small comparative trials of doxylamine and diphenhydramine showed no major difference in efficacy versus benzodiazepines and related drugs. The main adverse effects of sedative antihistamines are daytime drowsiness and altered vigilance, and atropinic effects; (9) Case-control studies showed a statistical link between benzodiazepine use in early pregnancy and birth defects such as cleft lip. In contrast, data on the use of doxylamine during pregnancy are reassuring; (10) Other sedative psychotropics have not been adequately tested in this setting or have been shown to have a negative risk-benefit balance; (11) In practice, patients who complain of poor-quality sleep should be given appropriate information on the mechanisms of normal sleep and related misconceptions, on the best methods for getting to sleep, and on the dangers of sedative psychotropics (dependence, withdrawal syndrome). When prescribing or dispensing a benzodiazepine to a woman of child-bearing age, the risk of birth defects, although not clearly demonstrated, must be mentioned.

  4. Some Professors Pop Pills for an Intellectual Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Professors know that some of their students pop Ritalin and other stimulants to give themselves a mental edge, but an informal survey suggests that some faculty members are also taking drugs for the express purpose of helping their careers. In an online survey of 1,400 readers published this month, the journal "Nature" found that 20 percent had…

  5. Adolescents at risk: pain pills to heroin: part I.

    PubMed

    Fogger, Susanne; McGuinness, Teena M

    2014-12-01

    Prescription pain medication has proliferated in the United States in the past 10 years, and opioid agents are the second most commonly abused substance in the United States. The opioid class comprises various prescription medications, including hydrocodone, as well as illicit substances, such as opium and heroin. The current article offers an example of one adolescent's history that began as weekend use of prescription opioid agents but expanded to daily use and physical dependence. Currently, a trend exists in which adolescents and young adults are moving from prescription opioid medication to heroin use due to increasing restrictions on prescription opioid agents. Nursing implications and web-based resources for teaching are also presented. PMID:25453507

  6. The Giant Pill-Millipedes of Nepal (Diplopoda, Sphaerotheriida, Zephroniidae).

    PubMed

    Wesener, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The type of the only species of the order Sphaerotheriida with a record in Nepal, Kophosphaera excavata (Butler, 1874), originally described from Sikkim, is redescribed. The subspecies K. excavata mammifera Attems, 1936 from Sureil, Darjeeling, India, is elevated to species rank, K. mammifera stat. nov.. A species of unclear country of origin ('Himalaya'), Sphaeropoeus montanus Karsch, 1881, is briefly redescribed and transferred to the genus Zephronia, Z. montana (Karsch, 1881) n. comb.. Z. tumida Butler, 1882, an apparently widespread north Indian Zephronia species, is redescribed. Sphaerotheriida specimens collected during several expeditions to Nepal undertaken by Prof. J. Martens in the 1970s and 1980s were examined. The material contained 10 specimens (7 males, 3 females) from seven localities, including three undescribed species, Zephronia nepalensis n. sp., Kophosphaera shivapuri n. sp., and Kophosphaera martensi n. sp., as well as a specimen of Kophosphaera politissima Attems, 1935, type species of the genus and described previously from India. A key to all (now seven) species of Kophosphaera is presented. A brief diagnosis of the Kophosphaera excavata group is provided. While Zephronia seems to be restricted to the eastern part of Nepal, two endemic and two more widespread Kophosphaera species occur also in its central and mid-western part, representing the western-most records of the family Zephroniidae in Asia. The current distribution of the family in Nepal clearly indicates the Zephroniidae as a family adapted to tropical environments.

  7. [Dysmenorrhea: patience, pills or hot-water bottle?].

    PubMed

    Graz, Bertrand; Savoy, Mona; Buclin, Thierry; Bonvin, Eric

    2014-11-26

    Which treatments are used for dysmenorrhea and with what reported outcome? A questionnaire was sent to 2400 students and apprentices, following the "retrospective treatment-outcome" method. The response rate was 22%. Most frequent treatments used are ibuprofene (53%), paracetamol (51%), hormonal contraception (40%), hot-water bottle (or hot pad) (35%), food supplements or medicinal plants (23%). Physicians only discuss a tiny proportion of dysmenorrhea treatment in their consultation, because it is mostly a matter of self-treatment, with the family as the source of information in 80% of the cases. Rather surprising because not mentioned in most official guidelines, hot-water bottle (or hot pad) appears as the treatment followed by the best reported outcome (satisfactory in 92% of users). PMID:25562981

  8. Humility pills: building an ethics of cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Rob

    2014-06-01

    The use of cognition-enhancing drugs (CEDs) appears to be increasingly common in both academic and workplace settings. But many universities and businesses have not yet engaged with the ethical challenges raised by CED use. This paper considers criticisms of CED use with a particular focus on the Accomplishment Argument: an influential set of claims holding that enhanced work is less dignified, valuable, or authentic, and that cognitive enhancement damages our characters. While the Accomplishment Argument assumes a view of authorship based on individual credit-taking, an impersonal or collaborative view is just as possible. This paper considers the benefits of this view-including humility, a value often claimed by critics of enhancement-and argues that such a view is consistent with open CED use. It proposes an ethics of cognitive enhancement based on toleration, transparency, and humility, and it discusses how institutions and individuals can build a culture of open cognitive enhancement. PMID:24847120

  9. Sleep complaints: Whenever possible, avoid the use of sleeping pills.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    (1) Most sleep complaints involve difficulties in getting to sleep or staying asleep, or not feeling refreshed on awakening. Misconceptions and worrying over the lack of sleep and its consequences can contribute to reinforcing these disorders; (2) How can patients who complain of poor-quality sleep be helped, without resorting to treatments that can have adverse effects? To answer this question, we conducted a systematic review of the literature based on the standard Prescrire procedure; (3) One effective approach is to explain the basic physiology of sleep, to discuss misconceptions, and to adopt a strategy of "stimulus control". This method has a similar efficacy to prescribing a benzodiazepine. and the effect is longer lasting; (4) Moderate, regular physical exercise, especially in the morning, seems to help some patients, but the evidence is weak; (5) Some clinical trials of phytotherapy have shown a positive risk-benefit balance of weak aqueous or hydroalcoholic valerian extracts. Efficacy is limited, however; (6) A meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials showed that benzodiazepines and related drugs increase the duration of sleep and help patients to fall asleep sooner. However, none of these trials provides comparative data spanning periods of more than two weeks. Efficacy is uncertain in the longer term, as patients quickly develop a tolerance to the hypnotic effects of benzodiazepines; (7) The adverse effects of benzodiazepines include frequent memory disorders, daytime drowsiness, falls, fractures and road accidents, and a withdrawal syndrome after treatment cessation. Related drugs such as zolpidem and zopiclone provoke similar adverse effects; (8) Sedative antihistamines have not been as well-evaluated as benzodiazepines in this setting. Small comparative trials of doxylamine and diphenhydramine showed no major difference in efficacy versus benzodiazepines and related drugs. The main adverse effects of sedative antihistamines are daytime drowsiness and altered vigilance, and atropinic effects; (9) Case-control studies showed a statistical link between benzodiazepine use in early pregnancy and birth defects such as cleft lip. In contrast, data on the use of doxylamine during pregnancy are reassuring; (10) Other sedative psychotropics have not been adequately tested in this setting or have been shown to have a negative risk-benefit balance; (11) In practice, patients who complain of poor-quality sleep should be given appropriate information on the mechanisms of normal sleep and related misconceptions, on the best methods for getting to sleep, and on the dangers of sedative psychotropics (dependence, withdrawal syndrome). When prescribing or dispensing a benzodiazepine to a woman of child-bearing age, the risk of birth defects, although not clearly demonstrated, must be mentioned. PMID:19536941

  10. Exercise and "the pill": putting a rumor to rest.

    PubMed

    Schelkun, P H

    1991-03-01

    Every once in a while, female athletes hear the rumor that oral contraceptives (OCs) keep them from performing their best. Yet, studies that have tried to evaluate the effects of OCs on physically active women have not been conclusive. This rumor probably started with the initial, higher-dose formulations instead of with the current biphasic or triphasic OCs. Side effects of the higher-dose OCs included weight gain, nausea, fatigue, headaches, and increased risks of hypertension, thromboembolism, and changes in glucose and lipid metabolism. Current OCs minimize these side effects and the risk of complications. In fact, the aerobic exercise female athletes undergo most likely neutralizes the negative effects of OCs on coagulation and lipid metabolism. Further, OCs may even improve athletic performance because they can decrease bleeding, the risk of iron deficiency, and frequency of cramps. Moreover, athletes can use OCs to orchestrate their menstrual cycles around competitive meets. Some studies with small sample sizes show that athletes on OCs experience a slight reduction in functional aerobic capacity and endurance capability. A Swedish study of female soccer players reported that OC users suffer fewer traumatic injuries than nonusers. It is difficult to attribute this to OCs, because there is considerable psychological control over sports performance. A sports physician in Hawaii is aware of rumors that OCs induce sluggishness or fatigue during certain days of the month, but he does not know a female athlete who believes this. The head trainer of the US Olympic Committee says that many female Olympic athletes use OCs. Strenuous exercise, considerable weight loss, and possibly other stress factors induce athletic amenorrhea, especially in adolescent females. In many cases, OCs can treat it. They are especially needed to minimize the risk of reduced bone density and musculoskeletal injury.

  11. Sacral Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus infection includes the following oral antiviral medications: Acyclovir pills Valacyclovir pills Famciclovir pills These medications are ... virus infection includes the same oral antiviral medications: Acyclovir pills Valacyclovir pills Famciclovir pills People who experience ...

  12. Contraceptive pills and thrombosis: effects of the French crisis on prescriptions and consequences for medicine agencies.

    PubMed

    Emmerich, J; Thomassin, C; Zureik, M

    2014-09-01

    The higher risk of venous thromboembolism with 3rd and 4th- generations combined oral contraceptives compared to 2nd generation triggered a media crisis in France. Exposure to 3rd or 4th-generation combined oral contraceptives led to an annual excess of around 100 premature deaths in Europe. In the absence of any demonstrated additional benefit of these combined oral contraceptives, measures were taken to decrease exposure of women to this illegitimate excess of risk. As a consequence, this crisis saw a 45% decrease in the prescription of 3rd and 4th-generations combined oral contraceptives, without adverse consequences.

  13. Adding folate to the contraceptive pill: a new concept for the prevention of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Klaus; Koletzko, Berthold; Eckmann-Scholz, Christel

    2012-09-01

    Although it is proven for a long time that folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period can prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) effectively, all measures taken so far including food fortification and awareness campaigns so far had only limited success. Since more than 50% of the pregnant women in Europe get pregnant after they have used oral contraceptives (OCs) before, OCs are an ideal vehicle to increase not only the awareness for periconceptional folate application, but they can also help to bridge the gap between the recognition of a pregnancy and closure of the neural tube which is before day 26. In order to reach a truly protective folate level at the critical time period during pregnancy, now OCs are available which contain metafolin. The availability of this innovative type of OC will significantly reduce the number of NTDs.

  14. [The end of an era. Fourteen radio sketches for the Pink Pills].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Those sketches, restaured by the French "Institut national de l'audiovisuel", are transcribed and analyzed for the first time. They was probably broadcasted during the summer of 1939 by the private station Radio Gard Nîmes.

  15. Sugaring the pill: ethics and uncertainties in the use of sucrose for newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dominic J C; Savulescu, Julian; Slater, Rebeccah

    2012-07-01

    Sucrose is widely used for the management of procedural pain in newborn infants, including capillary blood sampling, venepuncture, and vascular cannulation. Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that sweet-tasting solutions reduce behavioral responses to acute painful stimuli. It has been claimed that sucrose should be a standard of care in neonatal units and that further placebo-controlled trials of sucrose are unnecessary and unethical. However, recently published data cast doubt on the analgesic properties of sucrose. We review this new evidence and analyze the philosophical and ethical questions that it raises, including the "problem of other minds." Sugar may be better understood not as an analgesic, removing or relieving pain, but as a compensating pleasure. There is a need for further research on the mechanism of sucrose's effect on pain behavior and on the long-term effects of sucrose treatment. Such trials will require comparison with placebo or with other interventions. Given uncertainty about the benefit of sucrose, it may be wise to use alternative analgesics or nonpharmacological interventions where these are available and appropriate. Sucrose may not be the answer to procedural pain in newborns.

  16. The pill not taken: revisiting Physical Education Teacher Effectiveness in a Public Health Context.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Thomas L; Lounsbery, Monica A F

    2014-09-01

    In "Physical Education Teacher Effectiveness in a Public Health Context," we took a broad view of physical education (PE) teacher effectiveness that included public health need and support for PE. Public health officials have been consistent and fervent in their support of PE, and for more than two decades, they have called on schools to promote and provide physical activity. They have strongly recommended PE because: (a) It is part of the formalized school curriculum and an essential access point to provide and promote physical activity for nearly all children, and (b) it is the only venue where the least active children experience physical activity at higher intensities. Within the current marginalized status of PE, public health is an ally. Hence, we took a broad public health position, indicated that teacher effectiveness is tied closely to PE program effectiveness, identified physical activity and its assessment as important parts of PE, offered a vision of teacher effectiveness that goes beyond the PE lesson to include components of the comprehensive school physical activity model, and emphasized the need for the collection of data to support PE and physical activity programs. We have read the written reviews and listened to dialogue about our article. In this follow-up article, we address the major comments using 4 themes: prioritizing public health over other PE emphases, PE having a muddled mission, concerns about physical activity, and extending the roles and skills of physical educators.

  17. Wish-fulfilling jewel pills: Tibetan medicines from exclusivity to ubiquity.

    PubMed

    Blaikie, Calum

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent growth of social science literature concerning the traditional medicine industry in Asia, insights into the contemporary dynamics of so-called 'classical formulae' remain relatively scant, as do studies of small-scale, less capitally intensive and technologically advanced modes of production. This paper seeks to address these gaps by considering a single Sowa Rigpa (Tibetan medicine) formula known as Samphel Norbu, or 'wish-fulfilling jewel', which appears in numerous texts and is today among the most popular Tibetan medicines in the world. Drawing primarily upon long-term fieldwork in Himalayan India, the paper follows Samphel Norbu's rise from exclusivity to popularity and examines the ways it has been transformed in the process, both materially and in its economic, social and clinical significance. The paper shows how Samphel Norbu acts as a marker of inequality between different groups of healers, and examines the role the medicine played in the development of commercial pharmacy and the proliferation of complex medicines. Tracing out wide variations in the medicine's formulation, composition, mode of production and pattern of circulation places the issue of multiplicity at the centre of analysis, and leads to a questioning of the assumptions that underpin the category 'classical formula'. The paper reflects upon the repositioning of such formulae within emergent configurations of knowledge, power, industry and market, and on their transformations and transformative effects both over time and in the present moment. PMID:25633307

  18. Extracolonic findings with the PillCam Colon: is panendoscopy with capsule endoscopy closer?

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Vázquez, Javier; Caunedo-Álvarez, Ángel; Belda-Cuesta, Alba; Jiménez-García, Victoria Alejandra; Pellicer-Bautista, Francisco; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Colon capsules display images from the moment they are ingested, making the study of other extracolonic areas possible. The aim of this study was to analyze the significance of these extracolonic findings. Patients and methods: In this single-center, prospective study, 165 patients underwent colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) between September 2009 and October 2012 to rule out colonic pathology. Images were recorded, without interruptions, from the moment the capsule was ingested until its battery ran out. The study was deemed complete when the capsule had traveled from the esophagus to excretion or until the hemorrhoidal plexus was observed. Results: CCE was used for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (81.2 %), to investigate for chronic diarrhea (9.7 %) and chronic iron deficiency anemia (6.1 %), and for patients with incomplete colonoscopy (3.0 %). The capsule returned findings in the esophagus in 52.1 % of patients, in the stomach in 45.5 % of patients, and in the small bowel in 70.7 % of patients, with the findings being considered relevant in 4.9 %, 9.7 %, and 22.6 % of patients, respectively. The whole extent of the digestive tract was fully recorded in 86.1 % of patients and the Z line could be fully observed in 57.6 % of patients. There were no adverse events. Conclusions: CCE allows the recording of images from almost the whole extent of the digestive tract in most patients, enabling relevant pathologies to be identified in extracolonic areas, particularly the small bowel. Technical and procedural improvements are still necessary in order to achieve better observation of the stomach and esophagus. PMID:27747276

  19. Aggregation: An anti-aggravation pill for new-millennium consumers

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, L.K.; Stevenson, D.

    1999-07-01

    A diverse array of providers is positioning aggregation as a no-headaches energy solution for residential and small commercial customers. Tied into millennial lifestyle concerns, aggregation can be an effective means of reaching customers for whom energy is not a major priority. From the seller's perspective, the opportunity to obtain meaningful market share in a single deal is appealing, especially at the threshold of a new market. These benefits translate into more favorable pricing and terms than otherwise available, including the availability of innovative energy efficiency and management services. Additionally, if the group maintains its presence and reputation in the market, members may find significant additional value when it is time to renew supply arrangements. Finally, a successful electric aggregation group can, over time, add new services to its product line, such as fuel oil, natural gas, telephone, cable, or Internet services, to increase benefits to members.

  20. Designing a Flashcard with Knowledge Pills for Learning to Solve Chemistry Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancela, Angeles; Sanchez, Angel; Maceiras, Rocio

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, universities tend to promote more learner-centred learning, creating a more interactive and motivational environment for students and teachers. This paper describes an expanded framework to help chemical educators to construct a quiz for solution of chemical exercises in their courses. The novelty of this contribution is that the…

  1. Providing innovative solutions in a single pill: Servier's portfolio in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Jean-Jacques; Guillerm, Jean-Christophe

    2016-09-01

    Jean-Jacques Mourad & Jean-Christophe Guillerm speak to Henry Ireland, Drug Evaluation Editor: Jean-Jacques Mourad talks about his vision of the current landscape and unmet medical needs in the field of hypertension. Jean-Christophe Guillerm describes the family of antihypertensive treatments from Servier, which were designed to address the current challenges in the management of hypertension by providing an adapted solution to doctors and to the specific needs of each patient. Jean-Jacques Mourad currently works as Professor of Medicine and is the Head of the Hypertension Unit at the Hôpital Avicenne in Bobigny, France. He completed his academic degrees at the Pierre and Marie Curie University, Paris VI in the field of internal and vascular medicine in 1996, and in the area of cardiovascular medicine and pharmacology in 2001. He is the past president of the French League Against Hypertension (since 2012), and the former General Secretary of the French Microcirculation Society. He is the actual Scientific Secretary of the French Society of Hypertension. He is also a member of the administrative council of the Collège Français de Pathologie Vasculaire. His research focuses on the epidemiology of hypertension, arterial structure and function, determinants of adherence to chronic treatment and the effects of antihypertensive agents. He was involved in several studies and surveys. He is a co-author of more than 130 publications and of 900 communications presented at national and international meetings. Jean-Christophe Guillerm, joined the pharmaceutical industry 17 years ago. He is currently the Head of the Cardiovascular Division for Servier, in charge of both cardiology and hypertension's medical strategy at a global level. Prior to this, he was in charge of the diabetes and internal medicine franchise at a global level. He also has experience in French commercial operations.

  2. Knowledge of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Hungarian Women Presenting for Induced Abortion or Seeking Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Kozinszky, Z.; Devosa, I.; Fekete, Z.; Szabó, D.; Sikovanyecz, J.; Pásztor, N.; Keresztúri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the differences in contraceptive characteristics and the knowledge of emergency contraception (ECP) among women who used ECP after unprotected intercourse and those who sought an abortion. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted in a Hungarian university hospital among women for whom ECP was prescribed after unprotected intercourse (n = 940) as well as women who presented for the termination of pregnancy (n = 1592) between January 1, 2005 and November 20, 2006. Their knowledge of ECP and their experience with and attitudes toward ECP use were targeted. Results: The availability of ECP was well known (87.9 %), but it was still greatly underutilized: applied by only 13 of the 1592 women who resorted to abortion. Primarily, the ECP group consisted of those who experienced a condom failure significantly more often (odds ratio [OR] = 4.1), followed by those cases where ECP applications was a consequence of not using any kind of contraception (OR = 3.8). Fewer than one third (32 %) of the abortion seekers had previously used ECP, and only one fifth knew how to obtain it. Appropriate awareness of ECP was influenced by information obtained from health-care providers (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.93) or school education (AOR = 1.82). Conclusions: More thorough education is needed to provide a deeper knowledge of ECP use during contraceptive counseling for women seeking abortion, including those contraceptive mishaps where unintended pregnancy can be prevented by ECP. PMID:27681523

  3. Providing innovative solutions in a single pill: Servier's portfolio in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Jean-Jacques; Guillerm, Jean-Christophe

    2016-09-01

    Jean-Jacques Mourad & Jean-Christophe Guillerm speak to Henry Ireland, Drug Evaluation Editor: Jean-Jacques Mourad talks about his vision of the current landscape and unmet medical needs in the field of hypertension. Jean-Christophe Guillerm describes the family of antihypertensive treatments from Servier, which were designed to address the current challenges in the management of hypertension by providing an adapted solution to doctors and to the specific needs of each patient. Jean-Jacques Mourad currently works as Professor of Medicine and is the Head of the Hypertension Unit at the Hôpital Avicenne in Bobigny, France. He completed his academic degrees at the Pierre and Marie Curie University, Paris VI in the field of internal and vascular medicine in 1996, and in the area of cardiovascular medicine and pharmacology in 2001. He is the past president of the French League Against Hypertension (since 2012), and the former General Secretary of the French Microcirculation Society. He is the actual Scientific Secretary of the French Society of Hypertension. He is also a member of the administrative council of the Collège Français de Pathologie Vasculaire. His research focuses on the epidemiology of hypertension, arterial structure and function, determinants of adherence to chronic treatment and the effects of antihypertensive agents. He was involved in several studies and surveys. He is a co-author of more than 130 publications and of 900 communications presented at national and international meetings. Jean-Christophe Guillerm, joined the pharmaceutical industry 17 years ago. He is currently the Head of the Cardiovascular Division for Servier, in charge of both cardiology and hypertension's medical strategy at a global level. Prior to this, he was in charge of the diabetes and internal medicine franchise at a global level. He also has experience in French commercial operations. PMID:27503672

  4. Can a pill prevent HIV? Negotiating the biomedicalisation of HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Young, Ingrid; Flowers, Paul; McDaid, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    This article examines how biomedicalisation is encountered, responded to and negotiated within and in relation to new biomedical forms of HIV prevention. We draw on exploratory focus group discussions on pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and treatment as prevention (TasP) to examine how the processes of biomedicalisation are affected by and affect the diverse experiences of communities who have been epidemiologically framed as 'vulnerable' to HIV and towards whom PrEP and TasP will most likely be targeted. We found that participants were largely critical of the perceived commodification of HIV prevention as seen through PrEP, although this was in tension with the construction of being medical consumers by potential PrEP candidates. We also found how deeply entrenched forms of HIV stigma and homophobia can shape and obfuscate the consumption and management of HIV-related knowledge. Finally, we found that rather than seeing TasP or PrEP as 'liberating' through reduced levels of infectiousness or risk of transmission, social and legal requirements of responsibility in relation to HIV risk reinforced unequal forms of biomedical self-governance. Overall, we found that the stratifying processes of biomedicalisation will have significant implications in how TasP, PrEP and HIV prevention more generally are negotiated. PMID:26498141

  5. [Family planning-the pill or natural method of birth control (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Janisch, H

    1980-08-29

    Observations made at the Family Planning Clinic and a review of the literature show that there is no increased tendency towards the natural contraceptive method among advice-seeking couples. On the contrary-apart from a few exceptions-the most effective method is always chosen. The natural method presupposes a high degree of motivation, of readiness to communicate and of clarification. These prerequisites underly the relatively high rate of failure because not all couples have the right degree of understanding. Nevertheless, to many people this method is the only acceptable and morally justifiable one. Thus, precise and detailed instructions and frequent check-ups would be necessary especially during the first few months, until adequate experience is gained.

  6. Indonesia village programs stress pill continuation while medical clinics start women on method use.

    PubMed

    1976-09-01

    The emphasis of Indonesia's experiment with village distribution of contraceptives, begun in 1974, is on maintenance rather than initiation of oral contraceptive use. As part of the experiment, it was decided to make resupplies available without charge outside the clinics on Java and Bali experimentally. The effort operated on the principles of avoiding standardization and focusing on resupply. In the province of West Java, resupply depots were established in the homes of acceptors whoowere also known village leaders. Each month the depot holders received a resupply, had their record-keeping reviewed, and were advised on how to deal with complaints. Presently, there are about 1600 village distribution centers with each of these units serving several subunits of a village. Effective village distribution efforts have also been established in Central Java and East Java. A unique feature of the East Java program is a lottery created to sustain the interest of those already in the program as well as to attract new acceptors. The Bali program is different from those of East Java in that most acceptors are IUD users. In this program emphasis is on recruiting new acceptors and maintaining those already in the program, and motivational effort is directed to the male. Village distribution effort data in Indonesia suggest that as the number of village distribution outlets increases, the proportion of married women of reproductive age who use contraception also increases. In addition to the government supported family planning program, there is now a combined effort supported by the Indonesian government and Aid to International Development to achieve acceptance of the condom and increased involvement of men in family planning. PMID:12277532

  7. Finding Ponce de Leon's Pill: Challenges in Screening for Anti-Aging Molecules.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Surinder; Lombard, David B

    2016-01-01

    Aging is characterized by the progressive accumulation of degenerative changes, culminating in impaired function and increased probability of death. It is the major risk factor for many human pathologies - including cancer, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases - and consequently exerts an enormous social and economic toll. The major goal of aging research is to develop interventions that can delay the onset of multiple age-related diseases and prolong healthy lifespan (healthspan). The observation that enhanced longevity and health can be achieved in model organisms by dietary restriction or simple genetic manipulations has prompted the hunt for chemical compounds that can increase lifespan. Most of the pathways that modulate the rate of aging in mammals have homologs in yeast, flies, and worms, suggesting that initial screening to identify such pharmacological interventions may be possible using invertebrate models. In recent years, several compounds have been identified that can extend lifespan in invertebrates, and even in rodents. Here, we summarize the strategies employed, and the progress made, in identifying compounds capable of extending lifespan in organisms ranging from invertebrates to mice and discuss the formidable challenges in translating this work to human therapies. PMID:27081480

  8. Pigs, Pirates, and Pills: Using Film to Teach the Social Context of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, David J.; Bejoian, Lynne M.

    2006-01-01

    With the overwhelming negative connotations of disability, how can people ever see disability as a natural part of human diversity, merely another bodily attribute, and one that people can frame in positive terms? In brief, how can people view disability as simply another way of being? In this article, the authors begin to address these questions…

  9. The Pill Not Taken: Revisiting Physical Education Teacher Effectiveness in a Public Health Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Lounsbery, Monica A. F.

    2014-01-01

    In "Physical Education Teacher Effectiveness in a Public Health Context," we took a broad view of physical education (PE) teacher effectiveness that included public health need and support for PE. Public health officials have been consistent and fervent in their support of PE, and for more than two decades, they have called on schools to…

  10. Systems, not pills: The options market for antibiotics seeks to rejuvenate the antibiotic pipeline.

    PubMed

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing recognition of the increasing growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and a relative decline in the production of novel antibacterial therapies. The combination of these two forces poses a potentially grave threat to global health, in both developed and developing countries. Current market forces do not provide appropriate incentives to stimulate new antibiotic development, thus we propose a new incentive mechanism: the Options Market for Antibiotics. This mechanism, modelled on the principle of financial call options, allows payers to buy the right, in early stages of development, to purchase antibiotics at a discounted price if and when they ever make it to market approval. This paper demonstrates the effect of such a model on the expected Net Present Value of a typical antibacterial project. As part of an integrated strategy to confront the impending antibiotic crisis, the Options Market for Antibiotics may effectively stimulate corporate and public investment into antibiotic research and development. PMID:26808335

  11. Conglobation in the pill bug, Armadillidium vulgare, as a water conservation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Smigel, Jacob T; Gibbs, Allen G

    2008-01-01

    Water balance of the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare, was investigated during conglobation (rolling-up behavior). Water loss and metabolic rates were measured at 18 +/- 1 degrees C in dry air using flow-through respirometry. Water-loss rates decreased 34.8% when specimens were in their conglobated form, while CO2 release decreased by 37.1%. Water loss was also measured gravimetrically at humidities ranging from 6 to 75 %RH. Conglobation was associated with a decrease in water-loss rates up to 53 %RH, but no significant differences were observed at higher humidities. Our findings suggest that conglobation behavior may help to conserve water, in addition to its demonstrated role in protection from predation. PMID:20233103

  12. Repellents in the Japanese cedar, Cryptomeria japonica, against the pill-bug, Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Morisawa, Jun; Kim, Chul-Sa; Kashiwagi, Takehiro; Tebayashi, Shin-ichi; Horiike, Michio

    2002-11-01

    Sandaracopimarinol and (1S,6R)-2,7(14),10-bisabolatrien-1-ol-4-one were isolated and identified from Cryptomeria japonica as repellents against Armadillidium vulgare which is well known as an unpleasant pest in the house and as vegetable pest in Japan. These compounds strongly repelled A. vulgare when they were combined, although each compound alone did not show any activity. PMID:12506982

  13. Knowledge of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Hungarian Women Presenting for Induced Abortion or Seeking Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Kozinszky, Z.; Devosa, I.; Fekete, Z.; Szabó, D.; Sikovanyecz, J.; Pásztor, N.; Keresztúri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the differences in contraceptive characteristics and the knowledge of emergency contraception (ECP) among women who used ECP after unprotected intercourse and those who sought an abortion. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted in a Hungarian university hospital among women for whom ECP was prescribed after unprotected intercourse (n = 940) as well as women who presented for the termination of pregnancy (n = 1592) between January 1, 2005 and November 20, 2006. Their knowledge of ECP and their experience with and attitudes toward ECP use were targeted. Results: The availability of ECP was well known (87.9 %), but it was still greatly underutilized: applied by only 13 of the 1592 women who resorted to abortion. Primarily, the ECP group consisted of those who experienced a condom failure significantly more often (odds ratio [OR] = 4.1), followed by those cases where ECP applications was a consequence of not using any kind of contraception (OR = 3.8). Fewer than one third (32 %) of the abortion seekers had previously used ECP, and only one fifth knew how to obtain it. Appropriate awareness of ECP was influenced by information obtained from health-care providers (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.93) or school education (AOR = 1.82). Conclusions: More thorough education is needed to provide a deeper knowledge of ECP use during contraceptive counseling for women seeking abortion, including those contraceptive mishaps where unintended pregnancy can be prevented by ECP.

  14. Are Birth Control Pills Tied to Decline in Ovarian Cancer Deaths?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Translational Epidemiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. SOURCE: Annals of Oncology , news release, Sept. 6, 2016 HealthDay Copyright (c) 2016 HealthDay . All rights reserved. ...

  15. Exercise is medicine for patients with major depressive disorders: but only if the "pill" is taken!

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Brand, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorders (MDDs) are a widespread and burdensome mental illness associated with a high comorbidity with other conditions and a significantly reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. Therefore, targeted actions are needed to improve physical health in people with MDDs, in addition to ongoing efforts to enhance psychological well-being. Meanwhile, the positive effects of exercise training on the treatment of MDDs are well documented, while compelling evidence exists that exercise interventions can improve cardiorespiratory fitness in clinically meaningful ways. On the flipside, the long-term effects of exercise therapy are still not well documented, and recent studies suggest that initial improvements in MDDs dissipate if regular exercise participation is discontinued after the end of interventions. A recent survey among Swiss psychiatric hospitals further shows that all institutions provide some form of physical activity and exercise program. However, only a limited number of patients participate in these programs, mainly because participation is voluntary and no particular efforts are undertaken to engage patients with the lowest physical activity levels. We argue that more systematic efforts are needed to fully exploit the potential of physical activity and exercise programs in psychiatric care. We also emphasize that initiating and maintaining regular physical activity among psychiatric patients is a major challenge because specific dysfunctional cognitive-emotional processes might interfere with their capacity to self-regulate health-related behaviors. Specifically, we claim that behavioral skill training should be used to support patients with MDDs in overcoming barriers to initiating and maintaining physical activity. Moreover, we suggest that the assessment of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness should become routine in psychiatric practice. PMID:27540294

  16. Conglobation in the Pill Bug, Armadillidium vulgare, as a Water Conservation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Smigel, Jacob T.; Gibbs, Allen G.

    2008-01-01

    Water balance of the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare, was investigated during conglobation (rolling-up behavior). Water loss and metabolic rates were measured at 18 ± 1°C in dry air using flow-through respirometry. Water-loss rates decreased 34.8% when specimens were in their conglobated form, while CO2 release decreased by 37.1%. Water loss was also measured gravimetrically at humidities ranging from 6 to 75 %RH. Conglobation was associated with a decrease in water-loss rates up to 53 %RH, but no significant differences were observed at higher humidities. Our findings suggest that conglobation behavior may help to conserve water, in addition to its demonstrated role in protection from predation. PMID:20233103

  17. [The end of an era. Fourteen radio sketches for the Pink Pills].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Those sketches, restaured by the French "Institut national de l'audiovisuel", are transcribed and analyzed for the first time. They was probably broadcasted during the summer of 1939 by the private station Radio Gard Nîmes. PMID:26827549

  18. Taking pills for developmental ails in Southern Brazil: The biologization of adolescence?

    PubMed Central

    Béhague, Dominique P.

    2015-01-01

    In the late 1990s researchers in Pelotas Southern Brazil began documenting what they considered to be unacceptably high rates of licensed psychotropic use among individuals of all ages, including youth. This came as a surprise, since the vast majority of psychiatrists in Pelotas draw on psychoanalytic theory and approach pharmaceutical use, especially for children and adolescents, in a consciously tempered way. Drawing from a longitudinal ethnographic sub-study, part of a larger 1982 birth cohort study, this paper follows the circuitous trajectories of emergent pharma-patterns among “shantytown” youth over a ten-year period, exploring the thickly layered and often moralized contingencies in which psychodynamic psychiatrists' intention to resist excessive pharmaceuticalization both succeed and crumble. I juxtapose these trajectories with the growing salience of an “anti-biologizing” explanatory framework that psychiatrists and researchers are using to pre-empt the kind of diagnostics-driven “biopsychiatrization” so prevalent in North America. My analysis suggests that psychiatrists' use of this framework ironically contributes to their failed attempts to “resist” pharmaceuticalization. PMID:25533870

  19. Novel Formulation of Levodopa May Ease Parkinson's Symptoms with Fewer Pills

    MedlinePlus

    ... as optimized doses of levodopa. Levodopa remains the gold-standard drug used to treat the motor symptoms ... Does It Mean? Levodopa treatment is still the gold-standard treatment for PD. However, over time, people ...

  20. 'Evidence for binge drinking pill does not justify cost to NHS'.

    PubMed

    2016-09-21

    There is 'no direct evidence' to support the effectiveness of nalmefene, the drug approved for use in the NHS in England by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to curb excess drinking among those who are alcohol dependent. PMID:27654537

  1. Another Pill, Another Test, and Another Procedure: One Resident's Reflection on Healthcare Cost Containment.

    PubMed

    Chertoff, Jason

    2015-03-01

    In the United States, healthcare expenditures have continued to rise at alarming rates despite numerous strategies to contain costs. One area of focus that is underappreciated is doctor-patient communication about expectations of treatment. Studies have shown that clinicians' misperceptions of assumptions about patients' expectations are an essential component to our nation's healthcare overuse problem. Strategies to address these misperceptions and assumptions as a method of reducing costs and providing higher-quality care to our patients are warranted.

  2. 'A pill for every ill': explaining the expansion in medicine use.

    PubMed

    Busfield, Joan

    2010-03-01

    This paper explores the major factors underpinning the expansion in medicine use over recent decades, using England as an example. It begins by constructing a 'progressive' model of the expansion and considers its limitations; it then uses a framework of countervailing powers to examine the contribution of key actors in the field. It examines the commercial orientation of the pharmaceutical industry and the strategies companies deploy to generate demand for their products. It explores the part played by doctors as researchers and gatekeepers to medicines, considering how features of medical knowledge and practice contribute to, rather than curtail, the expansion. It considers the role of the public as consumers of medicines, and the role of governments and insurance companies in both facilitating and controlling medicine use.

  3. Medical drugs of limited commercial interest: profit alone is a bitter pill.

    PubMed

    Asbury, C H

    1981-01-01

    Medical drugs of limited commercial interest frequently are unavailable to the public even though their therapeutic efficacy is well established. At present, availability of a particular drug is unpredictable, and determined largely by pharmaceutical industry willingness to produce the drug potentially at no profit. Anticipated profitability also profoundly guides drug development decisions by industry. Federal efforts by both the executive and legislative branches to develop policy aimed at facilitating development and distribution of medical drugs of limited commercial interest have intensified. Thorough analysis of the problems and of proposed plans for their amelioration is necessary to effect a policy which takes into account the social, political, and scientific factors, as well as the profit motive. PMID:7298256

  4. Thrills, spills and pills: Bond, Benzedrine and the pharmacology of peace.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Sam

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the conjunction of pharmacological science and espionage fiction of the post-war era. This paper argues that, during the 1950s, the relatively new science of pharmacology propounded the possibility that illness and human deficiency could be treated in a way that better reflected the post-war zeitgeist. The use of pharmacological medicine, perceived as cleaner and quicker than more 'bodily' forms of treatment, represented progress in contemporary medical science. It is argued that this philosophy extended to more overt means of pharmacological application, directly related to the geopolitical concerns of the 'Cold War'. A growing form of popular literature in this period was the espionage novel. This paper argues that the benefits proffered by pharmacology were incorporated into the fabric of espionage fiction, specifically the James Bond novels of Ian Fleming. Here, it is demonstrated how Fleming used pharmacological knowledge of Benzedrine throughout his novels. His works illustrate a belief that the augmentation of the spy's natural ability with pharmacological science would award decisive advantage in the Cold War conflict played out in spy fiction. However, the relationship between public use of Benzedrine and awareness of its side effects changed during the period of Fleming's publications, moving from a position of casual availability to one of controlled prescription. It is argued that the recognition of the dangers associated with the drug were over-ruled in favour of the benefits its use presented to the state. The continued use of the drug by Bond illustrates how the concerns of the nation are given priority over the health, and life, of the individual. PMID:21393270

  5. Finding Ponce de Leon’s Pill: Challenges in Screening for Anti-Aging Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Surinder; Lombard, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is characterized by the progressive accumulation of degenerative changes, culminating in impaired function and increased probability of death. It is the major risk factor for many human pathologies – including cancer, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases – and consequently exerts an enormous social and economic toll. The major goal of aging research is to develop interventions that can delay the onset of multiple age-related diseases and prolong healthy lifespan (healthspan). The observation that enhanced longevity and health can be achieved in model organisms by dietary restriction or simple genetic manipulations has prompted the hunt for chemical compounds that can increase lifespan. Most of the pathways that modulate the rate of aging in mammals have homologs in yeast, flies, and worms, suggesting that initial screening to identify such pharmacological interventions may be possible using invertebrate models. In recent years, several compounds have been identified that can extend lifespan in invertebrates, and even in rodents. Here, we summarize the strategies employed, and the progress made, in identifying compounds capable of extending lifespan in organisms ranging from invertebrates to mice and discuss the formidable challenges in translating this work to human therapies. PMID:27081480

  6. Safety of Fixed Dose of Antihypertensive Drug Combinations Compared to (Single Pill) Free-Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Emmanuel; Happe, André; Bouget, Jacques; Paillard, Francois; Vigneau, Cécile; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves; Oger, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare serious adverse events of fixed-dose dual antihypertensive drug combination (FIXED) to component-based free-combination (FREE). A population-based nationwide cohort from the French Health Insurance System included subjects over 50 years with first time claims (new user) in the second half of 2009 for a calcium-channel blocker or a thiazide-like diuretic in combination with either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker as FREE or FIXED. We designed a nested matched case–control analysis with 304 cases, hospitalized for hypotension, syncope, or collapse (n = 224), renal failure (n = 19), hyponatremia, hyper- or hypokalemia (n = 61) and 1394 controls matched for gender, age, date of inclusion in the cohort, and administrative county. Subjects with a medical history of cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, or cancer were excluded. The mean age ± SD was 73 ± 10 years and 70% were women. Based on the last delivery preceding the index date, 1414 patients (83%) were exposed to FIXED. Homogeneity of FIXED effect compared to FREE across components of the main composite outcome was rejected (P = 0.0099). FIXED formulation significantly increased the odd of the most frequent component (ie, hypotension, syncope, or collapse): OR = 1.88 (95% CI: 1.15–3.05) compared to FREE after adjusting for confounding factors including dose. Serious adverse event occurring in the early phase of treatment deserves attention of physicians because it could alter the benefit/risk ratio of antihypertensive drug combination. PMID:26656365

  7. Systems, not pills: The options market for antibiotics seeks to rejuvenate the antibiotic pipeline.

    PubMed

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing recognition of the increasing growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and a relative decline in the production of novel antibacterial therapies. The combination of these two forces poses a potentially grave threat to global health, in both developed and developing countries. Current market forces do not provide appropriate incentives to stimulate new antibiotic development, thus we propose a new incentive mechanism: the Options Market for Antibiotics. This mechanism, modelled on the principle of financial call options, allows payers to buy the right, in early stages of development, to purchase antibiotics at a discounted price if and when they ever make it to market approval. This paper demonstrates the effect of such a model on the expected Net Present Value of a typical antibacterial project. As part of an integrated strategy to confront the impending antibiotic crisis, the Options Market for Antibiotics may effectively stimulate corporate and public investment into antibiotic research and development.

  8. Of pills, plants, and paraquat: the relevance of poison centers in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Andreas; Ceschi, Alessandro; Deters, Michael; Kaiser, Guido

    2013-03-01

    The organization and work of a poisons center are demonstrated on the basis of GIZ-Nord Poisons Center Annual Report for 2011. In a short summary the basic principles of clinical toxicology are elucidated: the indications for gastric lavage and the application of activated charcoal. Moreover the means of enhanced elimination are presented: hemodialysis, hemoperfusion, multi-dose activated charcoal and molecular absorbent recirculating system (MARS). Gastric lavage is indicated within one hour after ingestion of a life-threatening dose of a poison. In intoxications with CNS penetrating substances gastric lavage should be performed only after endotracheal intubation due to the risk of aspiration. The basic management of the intoxicated patient by emergency medicine personnel out of hospital and on the way into the hospital is presented. The "Bremen List", a compilation of five antidotes (atropine, 4-DMAP, tolonium chloride, naloxone, activated charcoal) for the out of hospital treatment by emergency doctors is introduced. PMID:23245927

  9. Pediatric fatality from gun bluing solution: the need for a chemical equivalent of the one-pill-can-kill list.

    PubMed

    Chomchai, Chulathida; Sirisamut, Thanakorn; Silpasupagornwong, Uraiwan

    2012-06-01

    Gun bluing solution is commonly used to polish guns and prevent rusting. The authors report a case of a 2-year-old boy who inadvertently ingested approximately 15 ml of his father's Fox Gun Blue solution. The patient subsequently developed acidosis, hypotension, and coma. He died within four hours after ingestion. His plasma selenium level was 857 ng/ml. A brief review of other reported ingestion of gun bluing liquid in both adults and children is also included.

  10. The Daily Mail has been trying to raise public anxiety over teenagers, sex and the contraceptive pill to reckless levels.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, C

    The Daily Mail is opposed to the provision of family planning counseling and argues that all family planning advice is a conspiracy of the Left. The publication recently devoted its front page to a story claiming that 10% of girls take oral contraception by reaching age 15 years. This study was based upon 13 words in a 13-page Department of Health document published weeks earlier which stated that an estimated 10% of resident women aged 14-15 years attended family planning clinics. Only like-minded conservatives were called upon to comment in the publication. The Family Planning Association's press office fielded many calls the morning the story broke, explaining to callers that the organization was pleased to see that so many young people were using family planning clinics' services and that it hoped the figures would increase in the future in the interest of checking the incidence of unplanned pregnancy, abortion, and sexually transmitted diseases. Related radio news coverage ensued.

  11. Impact of pilling and long-term topsoil storage on the potential soil microbial activity in the Northern Chihuahuan Desert

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptobiotic soil crusts in arid regions contribute to ecosystem stability through increased water infiltration, soil aggregate stability, and nutrient cycling between the soil community and vascular plants. Natural gas mining involves removal of the topsoil, including surface crust, and storage of ...

  12. 'The problem here is that they want to solve everything with pills': medication use and identity among Mainland Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Adams, Wallis E; Todorova, Irina L G; Guzzardo, Mariana T; Falcón, Luis M

    2015-07-01

    Taking medications are complex symbolic acts, infused with diverse meanings regarding body and identity. This article focuses on the meanings of medications for older Puerto Ricans living on the United States mainland, a population experiencing stark health disparities. We aim to gain an understanding of the way multiple cultural and personal meanings of medications are related to and integrated in identity, and to understand how they are situated within Puerto Rican culture, history and circumstance on the US mainland. Data is drawn from thirty qualitative interviews, transcribed and translated, with older Puerto Ricans living on mainland United States. Thematic Analysis indicated four prevalent themes: embodiment of medication use; medications redefining self through the fabric of daily life; healthcare experience defined through medication; and medicine dividing the island and the mainland. While identity is impacted by experience of chronic illness, the experience of medication prescription and consumption is further related to the construction of the sense of self in distinct ways. For these individuals, medication use captures the dilemma of immigration. While cultural belonging and well-being remains on the island of Puerto Rico, the mainland hosts both easier access to and excess reliance on medication.

  13. New Connectors Coming for Enteral Feeding Tubes; Marqibo and Risk of Errors; Angeliq Is Not a Birth Control Pill

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael R.; Smetzer, Judy L.

    2014-01-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again—perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers’ names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters’ wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:25477575

  14. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in women under combined oral contraceptive. The PILl Genetic RIsk Monitoring (PILGRIM) Study.

    PubMed

    Suchon, Pierre; Al Frouh, Fadi; Henneuse, Agathe; Ibrahim, Manal; Brunet, Dominique; Barthet, Marie-Christine; Aillaud, Marie-Françoise; Venton, Geoffroy; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Identifying women at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major public health issue. The objective of this study was to identify environmental and genetic determinants of VTE risk in a large sample of women under combined oral contraceptives (COC). A total of 968 women who had had one event of VTE during COC use were compared to 874 women under COC but with no personal history of VTE. Clinical data were collected and a systematic thrombophilia screening was performed together with ABO blood group assessment. After adjusting for age, family history, and type and duration of COC use, main environmental determinants of VTE were smoking (odds ratio [OR] =1.65, 95% confidence interval [1.30-2.10]) and a body mass index higher than 35 kg.m⁻² (OR=3.46 [1.81-7.03]). In addition, severe inherited thrombophilia (OR=2.13 [1.32-3.51]) and non-O blood groups (OR=1.98 [1.57-2.49]) were strong genetic risk factors for VTE. Family history poorly predicted thrombophilia as its prevalence was similar in patients with or without first degree family history of VTE (29.3% vs 23.9%, p=0.09). In conclusion, this study confirms the influence of smoking and obesity and shows for the first time the impact of ABO blood group on the risk of VTE in women under COC. It also confirms the inaccuracy of the family history of VTE to detect inherited thrombophilia.

  15. Huge right-handed current effects in B->K*(K pi)l+l- in supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lunghi, E.; Matias, J.; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2006-12-01

    Transverse asymmetries in the decay B {yields} K*(K{pi}){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} are an extremely sensitive probe of right-handed flavor-changing neutral currents. They show how to include the contribution from the chiral partner of the electromagnetic operator on the transverse asymmetries at NLO in QCD factorization. They then consider supersymmetric models with non-minimal flavor violation in the down-squark sector. They include all the relevant experimental constraints and present a numerical formula for B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} that takes into account the most recent NNLO calculations. they show that the flavor-changing parameters of these models are poorly constrained by present data and allow for large effects on the transverse asymmetries that they consider.

  16. Pills or Push-Ups? Effectiveness and Public Perception of Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Caviola, Lucius; Faber, Nadira S.

    2015-01-01

    We review work on the effectiveness of different forms of cognitive enhancement, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological. We consider caffeine, methylphenidate, and modafinil for pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE) and computer training, physical exercise, and sleep for non-pharmacological cognitive enhancement (NPCE). We find that all of the techniques described can produce significant beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, effect sizes are moderate, and consistently dependent on individual and situational factors as well as the cognitive domain in question. Although meta-analyses allowing a quantitative comparison of effectiveness across techniques are lacking to date, we can conclude that PCE is not more effective than NPCE. We discuss the physiological reasons for this limited effectiveness. We then propose that even though their actual effectiveness seems similar, in the general public PCE is perceived as fundamentally different from NPCE, in terms of effectiveness, but also in terms of acceptability. We illustrate the potential consequences such a misperception of PCE can have. PMID:26696922

  17. Peer mentors, mobile phone and pills: collective monitoring and adherence in Kenyatta National Hospital's HIV treatment programme

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Kenyan state joined the international commitment to make antiretroviral treatment free in public health institutions to people infected with HIV. Less than a decade later, treatment has reached over 60% of those who need it in Kenya. This paper, which is based on an in-depth ethnographic case study of the HIV treatment programme at Kenyatta National Hospital, conducted intermittently between 2008 and 2014, examines how HIV-positive peer mentors encourage and track adherence to treatment regimens within and beyond the clinic walls using mobile phones and computer technology. This research into the everyday practices of patient monitoring demonstrates that both surveillance and adherence are collective activities. Peer mentors provide counselling services, follow up people who stray from treatment regimens, and perform a range of other tasks related to patient management and treatment adherence. Despite peer mentors’ involvement in many tasks key to encouraging optimal adherence, their role is rarely acknowledged by co-workers, hospital administrators, or public health officials. Following a biomedical paradigm, adherence at Kenyatta and in Kenya is framed by programme administrators as something individual clients must do and for which they must be held accountable. This framing simultaneously conceals the sociality of adherence and undervalues the work of peer mentors in treatment programmes. PMID:25175291

  18. Policies, pills, and political will: a critique of policies to improve the health status of ethnic minorities.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, W I

    1989-01-21

    The health status of the UK's Pakistani, Indian, Bangladeshi, and East African minorities is significantly poorer than that of the white population. Improvements in the health experiences of these minorities requires more than initiatives within the traditional sphere of health services; needed is the political will to eradicate inequalities in areas such as poverty, unemployment, and education that impact on health status. To date, efforts to improve the health of Asians in the UK have focused on health education, with an emphasis on culture and victim-blaming rather than social circumstances. Racism within the National Health Service (NHS) affects virtually all blacks, including Asians, and such prejudice and stereotyping has an adverse effect on service delivery. This racism also affects minority employees of the NHS and medical students. The health services need to drive out racial discrimination from service delivery and employment. Health professionals need to raise awareness of political, social, economic, and environmental determinants of health. To dispel false notions of biological determinism, research on the health of minorities needs to be conducted in the context of their disadvantaged status. Finally, health professionals need to speak out against racial discrimination that keeps Asians and other ethnic minorities in low standards of health and social existence.

  19. Women's Education and World Peace: A Feminist Dream Comes True: Comment on "The Pill Is Mightier Than the Sword".

    PubMed

    Pillai, Vijayan K; Wang, Ya-Chien

    2015-10-01

    This commentary on Potts et al provides a critical view on their thesis that increasing the level of education among women is likely to reduce terrorism. Presence of a strong family planning program enables women to control family size resulting in women's public participation more likely and facilitating the emergence of small birth cohorts who are less likely to become unemployed. In spite of the several theoretical insights their paper offers, they have not adequately described the multiple social and economic linkages that may exist between fertility rates and lowering frequency of wars, terrorism, etc.

  20. Sending Learning Pills to Mobile Devices in Class to Enhance Student Performance and Motivation in Network Services Configuration Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz-Organero, M.; Munoz-Merino, P. J.; Kloos, C. D.

    2012-01-01

    Teaching electrical and computer software engineers how to configure network services normally requires the detailed presentation of many configuration commands and their numerous parameters. Students tend to find it difficult to maintain acceptable levels of motivation. In many cases, this results in their not attending classes and not dedicating…

  1. A hard pill to swallow: a qualitative study of women's experiences of adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harrow, Alison; Dryden, Ruth; McCowan, Colin; Radley, Andrew; Parsons, Mark; Thompson, Alastair M; Wells, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore women's experiences of taking adjuvant endocrine therapy as a treatment for breast cancer and how their beliefs about the purpose of the medication, side effects experienced and interactions with health professionals might influence adherence. Design Qualitative study using semistructured, one-to-one interviews. Setting 2 hospitals from a single health board in Scotland. Participants 30 women who had been prescribed tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors (anastrozole or letrozole) and had been taking this medication for 1–5 years. Results Women clearly wished to take their adjuvant endocrine therapy medication as prescribed, believing that it offered them protection against breast cancer recurrence. However, some women missed tablets and did not recognise that this could reduce the efficacy of the treatment. Women did not perceive that healthcare professionals were routinely or systematically monitoring their adherence. Side effects were common and impacted greatly on the women’s quality of life but did not always cause women to stop taking their medication, or to seek advice about reducing the side effects they experienced. Few were offered the opportunity to discuss the impact of side effects or the potential options available. Conclusions Although most women in this study took adjuvant endocrine therapy as prescribed, many endured a range of side effects, often without seeking help. Advice, support and monitoring for adherence are not routinely offered in conventional follow-up settings. Women deserve more opportunity to discuss the pros, cons and impact of long-term adjuvant endocrine therapy. New service models are needed to support adherence, enhance quality of life and ultimately improve survival. These should ideally be community based, in order to promote self-management in the longer term. PMID:24928595

  2. Treating Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer): from surgery to antibiotics, is the pill mightier than the knife?

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Paul J; Nuermberger, Eric L; Almeida, Deepak V; Grosset, Jacques H

    2011-01-01

    Until 2004, the skin disease known as Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, could only be treated by surgery and skin grafting. Although this worked reasonably well on early lesions typically found in patients in Australia, the strategy was usually impractical on large lesions resulting from diagnostic delay in patients in rural West Africa. Based on promising preclinical studies, treatment trials in West Africa have shown that a combination of rifampin and streptomycin administered daily for 8 weeks can kill M. ulcerans bacilli, arrest the disease, and promote healing without relapse or reduce the extent of surgical excision. Improved treatment options are the focus of research that has increased tremendously since the WHO began its Global Buruli Ulcer Initiative in 1998. PMID:22004037

  3. A magic pill? A qualitative analysis of patients’ views on the role of antidepressant therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies with healthy volunteers have demonstrated that antidepressants can improve immunoregulatory activity and thus they may have a potential to positively impact the disease course in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic and incurable condition. However, patients’ views on the role of antidepressants in the management of their IBD are unknown. Thus, this study aimed to explore patients’ experiences and opinions regarding the effect of antidepressants on IBD course before possibly undertaking future treatment trials with antidepressants. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews with open-ended questions were conducted with a randomly selected sample of IBD patients recruited at the Australian public hospital IBD clinic and currently receiving antidepressants. A qualitative content analysis was undertaken to summarise patients’ responses. A Visual Analogue Scale was used to provide a quantitative assessment of patients’ experiences with antidepressants. Results Overall, 15 IBD sufferers currently on antidepressants (nine females, six males) were interviewed. All 15 reported a positive response to antidepressants reporting they improved their quality of life, with minimal side-effects. Five patients (33.3%) felt the antidepressant had specifically improved their IBD course. Three patients noted how they believed the reduction in feelings of stress mediated the positive influence of the antidepressant on IBD course. Ten patients (66.7%) felt the antidepressants had not specifically influenced their IBD. Nine patients (60.0%) had a generally positive attitude towards antidepressants, four patients (26.7%) were ambivalent, and two patients (13.3%) held a negative view towards antidepressants. Twelve patients (80.0%) stated that they would be willing to participate in clinical trials. Conclusions Antidepressants seem to be well tolerated by IBD patients. One third of patients reported an observable improvement of their IBD under the influence of this treatment. The positive attitude towards antidepressants in these participants may make the conduct of clinical trials to further assess for any specific role on IBD course feasible. However, due to a small sample size, a qualitative nature of this study and in light of the results of studies on other populations indicating reluctance to taking antidepressants at least in some patients, these results should be interpreted with caution until confirmed in quantitative studies. PMID:22816728

  4. A Pill for the Ill? Patients’ Reports of Their Experience of the Medical Encounter in the Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas; Svensson, Tommy; Meeuwisse, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Background Starting in the 1960s, a broad-based patients’ rights movement began to question doctors’ paternalism and to demand disclosure of medical information, informed consent, and active participation by the individual in personal health care. According to scholars, these changes contributed to downplay the biomedical approach in favor of a more patient-oriented perspective. The Swedish non-profit organization Consumer Association for Medicines and Health (KILEN) has offered the possibility for consumers to report their perceptions and experiences from their use of medicines in order to strengthen consumer rights within the health care sector. Methodology In this paper, qualitative content analysis was used to analyze 181 KILEN consumer reports of adverse events from antidepressant medications in order to explore patients’ views of mental ill health symptoms and the doctor-patient interaction. Principal Findings Overall, the KILEN stories contained negative experiences of the patients’ medical encounters. Some reports indicated intense emotional outrage and strong feelings of abuse by the health care system. Many reports suggested that doctors and patients had very different accounts of the nature of the problems for which the patient was seeking help. Although patients sought help for problems like tiredness and sleeplessness (often with a personal crisis of some sort as a described cause), the treating doctor in most cases was exceptionally quick in both diagnosing depression and prescribing antidepressant treatment. When patients felt they were not being listened to, trust in the doctor was compromised. This was evident in the cases when the doctor tried to convince them to take part in medical treatment, sometimes by threatening to withdraw their sick-listing. Conclusions Overall, this study suggests that the dynamics happening in the medical encounter may still be highly affected by a medical dominance, instead of a patient-oriented perspective. This may contribute to a questionable medicalization and/or pharmaceuticalization of depression. PMID:23823902

  5. Are Prescription Stimulants "Smart Pills"? The Epidemiology and Cognitive Neuroscience of Prescription Stimulant Use by Normal Healthy Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, M. Elizabeth; Farah, Martha J.

    2011-01-01

    Use of prescription stimulants by normal healthy individuals to enhance cognition is said to be on the rise. Who is using these medications for cognitive enhancement, and how prevalent is this practice? Do prescription stimulants in fact enhance cognition for normal healthy people? We review the epidemiological and cognitive neuroscience…

  6. Medicines for sleep

    MedlinePlus

    Benzodiazepines; Sedatives; Hypnotics; Sleeping pills; Insomnia - medicines; Sleep disorder - medicines ... the-counter (OTC) sleeping pills contain antihistamines. These medicines are commonly used to treat allergies. While these ...

  7. A Double Blind, Randomized, Neoadjuvant Study of the Tissue effects of POMx Pills in Men with Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Freedland, Stephen J.; Carducci, Michael; Kroeger, Nils; Partin, Alan; Rao, Jian-yu; Jin, Yusheng; Kerkoutian, Susan; Wu, Hong; Li, Yunfeng; Creel, Patricia; Mundy, Kelly; Gurganus, Robin; Fedor, Helen; King, Serina A.; Zhang, Yanjun; Heber, David; Pantuck, Allan J.

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranates slow prostate cancer xenograft growth and prolong PSA doubling times in single-arm human studies. Pomegranates’ effects on human prostate tissue are understudied. We hypothesized orally administered pomegranate extract (POMx; PomWonderful, Los Angeles, CA) would lower tissue 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidative stress biomarker. 70 men were randomized to 2 tablets POMx or placebo daily up to 4 weeks prior to radical prostatectomy. Tissue was analyzed for intra-prostatic Urolithin A, a pomegranate metabolite, benign and malignant 8-OHdG, and cancer pS6 kinase, NFκB, and Ki67. Primary end-point was differences in 8-OHdG powered to detect 30% reduction. POMx was associated with 16% lower benign tissue 8-OHdG (p=0.095), which was not statistically significant. POMx was well-tolerated with no treatment-related withdrawals. There were no differences in baseline clinicopathological features between arms. Urolithin A was detected in 21/33 patient in the POMx group vs. 12/35 in the placebo group (p=0.031). Cancer pS6 kinase, NFκB, Ki67, and serum PSA changes were similar between arms. POMx prior to surgery results in pomegranate metabolite accumulation in prostate tissues. Our primary end-point in this modest-sized short-term trial was negative. Future larger longer studies are needed to more definitely test whether POMx reduces prostate oxidative stress as well as further animal testing to better understand the multiple mechanisms through which POMx may alter prostate cancer biology. PMID:23985577

  8. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: oral contraceptive pills-dual gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist suppression with step-down gonadotropin protocols.

    PubMed

    Damario, Mark A

    2010-11-01

    The identification of patients at high risk for excessive responses to ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer is essential in the tailoring of safe and effective treatment strategies. Known factors associated with increased sensitivity to gonadotropins include polycystic ovary syndrome, young age, prior ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), high baseline antral follicle count, and high baseline ovarian volume. Although several treatment strategies have been proposed for these patients, this report describes the experience using the dual suppression with gonadotropin step-down protocol. This protocol uses oral contraceptive pretreatment in combination with a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist followed by a programmed step-down in gonadotropin dosing. Hormonal characteristics of dual suppression include an improved luteinizing hormone-to-follicle-stimulating hormone ratio and lower serum androgens, particularly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Clinical characteristics of the protocol include a lower cancellation rate and favorable clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates per initiated cycle while mitigating the risk of OHSS.

  9. [Effects of compound malt pills on expressions of ERα and ERβ in ovaries of rats with letrozole-induced polycystic ovarian syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Lan, Nan; Yang, Yangbojun; Chen, Rong

    2016-02-01

    目的:观察复方麦芽丸对来曲唑诱导的多囊卵巢综合征(polycystic ovarian syndrome,PCOS)大鼠模型雌激素受体α亚型(estrogen receptor α,ERα)和雌激素受体β亚型(estrogen receptor β,ERβ)的影响,探讨其对PCOS的作用机制。方法:建立PCOS大鼠模型,48只6周龄雌性SD大鼠随机均分为6组(正常组、模型对照组、阳性对照组、复方低剂量组、复方中剂量组、复方高剂量组),21 d造模成功后,灌胃治疗21 d。观察治疗后各组大鼠卵巢组织形态变化,采用免疫组织化学、Western 印迹和RT-PCR检测各组大鼠卵巢组织中ERα和ERβ蛋白的表达。结果:模型对照组大鼠卵巢囊状扩张数较正常组增多,颗粒细胞减少;与模型对照组比较,治疗后各组大鼠囊状扩张的卵泡明显减少并缩小,原始卵泡、黄体、颗粒细胞增多。模型对照组ERα和ERβ的表达明显降低(P<0.01),药物干预组ERα和ERβ的表达升高(P<0.05或 P<0.01)。结论:复方麦芽丸可通过调控卵巢组织ERα和ERβ蛋白的表达而在PCOS的治疗中发挥作用。.

  10. Safety of Fixed Dose of Antihypertensive Drug Combinations Compared to (Single Pill) Free-Combinations: A Nested Matched Case-Control Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Emmanuel; Happe, André; Bouget, Jacques; Paillard, Francois; Vigneau, Cécile; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves; Oger, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    To compare serious adverse events of fixed-dose dual antihypertensive drug combination (FIXED) to component-based free-combination (FREE).A population-based nationwide cohort from the French Health Insurance System included subjects over 50 years with first time claims (new user) in the second half of 2009 for a calcium-channel blocker or a thiazide-like diuretic in combination with either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker as FREE or FIXED. We designed a nested matched case-control analysis with 304 cases, hospitalized for hypotension, syncope, or collapse (n = 224), renal failure (n = 19), hyponatremia, hyper- or hypokalemia (n = 61) and 1394 controls matched for gender, age, date of inclusion in the cohort, and administrative county. Subjects with a medical history of cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, or cancer were excluded.The mean age ± SD was 73 ± 10 years and 70% were women. Based on the last delivery preceding the index date, 1414 patients (83%) were exposed to FIXED. Homogeneity of FIXED effect compared to FREE across components of the main composite outcome was rejected (P = 0.0099). FIXED formulation significantly increased the odd of the most frequent component (ie, hypotension, syncope, or collapse): OR = 1.88 (95% CI: 1.15-3.05) compared to FREE after adjusting for confounding factors including dose.Serious adverse event occurring in the early phase of treatment deserves attention of physicians because it could alter the benefit/risk ratio of antihypertensive drug combination.

  11. Safety of Fixed Dose of Antihypertensive Drug Combinations Compared to (Single Pill) Free-Combinations: A Nested Matched Case-Control Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Emmanuel; Happe, André; Bouget, Jacques; Paillard, Francois; Vigneau, Cécile; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves; Oger, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    To compare serious adverse events of fixed-dose dual antihypertensive drug combination (FIXED) to component-based free-combination (FREE).A population-based nationwide cohort from the French Health Insurance System included subjects over 50 years with first time claims (new user) in the second half of 2009 for a calcium-channel blocker or a thiazide-like diuretic in combination with either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker as FREE or FIXED. We designed a nested matched case-control analysis with 304 cases, hospitalized for hypotension, syncope, or collapse (n = 224), renal failure (n = 19), hyponatremia, hyper- or hypokalemia (n = 61) and 1394 controls matched for gender, age, date of inclusion in the cohort, and administrative county. Subjects with a medical history of cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, or cancer were excluded.The mean age ± SD was 73 ± 10 years and 70% were women. Based on the last delivery preceding the index date, 1414 patients (83%) were exposed to FIXED. Homogeneity of FIXED effect compared to FREE across components of the main composite outcome was rejected (P = 0.0099). FIXED formulation significantly increased the odd of the most frequent component (ie, hypotension, syncope, or collapse): OR = 1.88 (95% CI: 1.15-3.05) compared to FREE after adjusting for confounding factors including dose.Serious adverse event occurring in the early phase of treatment deserves attention of physicians because it could alter the benefit/risk ratio of antihypertensive drug combination. PMID:26656365

  12. Preventing Depressive Relapse and Recurrence in Higher Risk Cognitive Therapy Responders: A Randomized Trial of Continuation Phase Cognitive Therapy, Fluoxetine, or Matched Pill Placebo

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Robin B.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Gershenfeld, Howard; Friedman, Edward S.; Thase, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Context Strategies to improve the course of recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) have great public health relevance. To reduce the risk of relapse/recurrence after acute phase Cognitive Therapy (CT), a continuation phase model of therapy (C-CT) may improve outcomes. Objectives To test the efficacy of C-CT and fluoxetine (FLX) for relapse prevention in a placebo (PBO) controlled randomized trial and compare the durability of prophylaxis after discontinuation of treatments. Design A sequential, three stage design with: acute phase (all patients received 12 weeks of CT), 8 month experimental phase (responders at higher risk were randomized to C-CT, FLX, or PBO), and 24 months of longitudinal, post-treatment follow-up. Setting Two university-based specialty clinics. Patients 523 adults with recurrent MDD began acute phase CT, of which 241 “higher risk” responders were randomized and 181 subsequently entered the follow-up. Interventions CT responders at higher risk for relapse were randomized to receive 8 months of C-CT (n = 86), FLX (n = 86) or PBO (n = 69). Main Outcome Measures Survival analyses of relapse/recurrence rates, as determined by “blinded” evaluators using DSM-IV criteria and the LIFE interview. Results As predicted, the C-CT or FLX groups were significantly less likely to relapse than the PBO group across 8 months. Relapse/recurrence rates for C-CT and FLX were nearly identical during the 8 months of treatment, although C-CT patients were more likely to accept randomization, stayed in treatment longer, and attended more sessions than those in FLX/PBO. Contrary to prediction, relapse/recurrence rates following the discontinuation of C-CT and FLX did not differ. Conclusions Relapse risk was reduced by both C-CT and FLX in an “enriched” randomization sampling only CT responders. The preventive effects of C-CT were not significantly more ‘durable’ than those of FLX after treatment was stopped, suggesting that some higher risk patients may require alternate longer-term interventions. PMID:24005123

  13. Steps towards a phylogeny of the pill millipedes: non-monophyly of the family Protoglomeridae, with an integrative redescription of Eupeyerimhoffia archimedis (Diplopoda, Glomerida)

    PubMed Central

    Oeyen, Jan Philip; Wesener, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Eupeyerimhoffia archimedis (Strasser, 1965) is redescribed based on several specimens collected at a number of sites close to the type locality on Sicily, Italy. Scanning electron microscopy is used to illustrate several unusual morphological characters for a member of the Glomerida for the first time. A fragment of the mitochondrial COI gene (668bp) is sequenced for the first time in Eupeyerimhoffia to provide a species-specific barcode and to gain first insights into the genetic distances between the genera in the widespread family Protoglomeridae. The novel sequences are compared to representatives of all other genera of the family: Protoglomeris vasconica (Brölemann, 1897) from northern Spain, the dwarfed Glomerellina laurae Silvestri, 1908 from Italy and Glomeroides primus (Silvestri, 1929) from western North America. The addition of COI sequences from the two other families of the Glomerida renders the family Protoglomeridae paraphyletic with Glomeroides primus being more closely related to Glomeridella minima (Latzel, 1884) than to the other genera in the family. The large genetic distances (13.2–16.8%) between Eupeyerimhoffia and the other genera in the order, as well as its unusual morphological characters, including unique morphological adaptations to roll into a ball, are probably an indication of the old age of the group. PMID:26257534

  14. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) for rapid determination of ginsenoside Rg1 and Re in Chinese patent medicine Naosaitong pill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Qu, Zhengyi; Wang, Yingping; Yao, Chunlin; Bai, Xueyuan; Bian, Shuai; Zhao, Bing

    2015-03-01

    Ginsenosides in plant samples have been extensively studied because protopanaxadiol saponins are ubiquitous in Chinese patent medicines, in which they can be used in promoting human health as the main active ingredients. A method for rapid determination of two ginsenosides (Rg1 and Re) in Naosaitong (NST) samples using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) is studied to determine the contents of ginsenoside Rg1 and Re in this work. Partial least square (PLS) regression was used for building the calibration models, and the effects of spectral preprocessing and variable selection on the models are investigated for optimization of the models. A total of 93 samples were scanned by NIRS, and also by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a diode array detector to determine the contents of ginsenoside Rg1 and Re. The calibration models for Rg1 and Re had high values of the coefficient of determination (R2) (0.9766 and 0.9764) and low root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) (0.0136 and 0.0104), and the values of the standard error of prediction set (SEP) are 0.00764 and 0.0103, which indicate a good correlation between reference values and NIRS predicted values. The overall results show that NIRS could be applied for the rapid determination of the contents of ginsenosides in Ginseng byproducts for pharmaceuticals that develop high-quality Chinese patent medicines.

  15. ["Haemorrhoidal colic", "strong pills of stahl", and "quacks". Johann Gottwerth Müller, writer of the enlightenment, critic of medicine and his evils in letters and books].

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Johann Gottwerth Müller, a so called "independent author", was one of the most successful novelists in the German Enlightenment around 1800. Educated as a scholar and trained as a physician, although not a practicing physician, Müller was sick throughout his life and constantly reflects on his diseases, and on what he considered to be an insufficient "medical system" and a socially "sick" society. This outlook is revealed by his library (in 1828: about 13300 volumes, of which 254 volumes of medical publications), his correspondence and his novels. Letters he exchanged with the publisher Friedrich Nicolai (74 letters between 1777 and 1796) about private and business affairs show that Miller uses statements about his sickness in order to win sympathy, to document his sufferings as part of an "independent" writer's identity, as a metaphor for social health, and as a means for excuses and compulsions in business connections. The didactic novels serve the author's transformation of individual suffering into the perspective of an enlightened humanitarian development of the government, the society, and the medical system within the structured society of his day. PMID:18354992

  16. A bitter pill for type 2 diabetes? The activation of bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 can stimulate GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hung; Hui, Hongxiang; Morvaridi, Susan; Cai, Jiena; Zhang, Sanqi; Tan, Jun; Wu, Vincent; Levin, Nancy; Knudsen, Beatrice; Goddard, William A.; Pandol, Stephen J.; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been found in many extra-oral locations like the gastrointestinal (GI) system, respiratory system, and brain, though its function at these locations is only beginning to be understood. To probe the receptor’s potential metabolic role, immunohistochemistry of human ileum tissues was performed, which showed that the receptor was co-localized with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in L-cells. In a previous study, we had modeled the structure of this receptor for its many taste-variant haplotypes (Tan et al. 2011), including the taster haplotype PAV. The structure of this haplotype was then used in a virtual ligand screening pipeline using a collection of ~2.5 million purchasable molecules from the ZINC database. Three compounds (Z7, Z3, Z1) were purchased from the top hits and tested along with PTU (known TAS2R38 agonist) in in vitro and in vivo assays. The dose-response study of the effect of PTU and Z7 on GLP-1 release using wild-type and TAS2R38 knockout HuTu-80 cells showed that the receptor TAS2R38 plays a major role in GLP-1 release due to these molecules. In vivo studies of PTU and the three compounds showed that they each increase GLP-1 release. PTU was also chemical linked to cellulose to slow its absorption and when tested in vivo, it showed an enhanced and prolonged GLP-1 release. These results suggest that the GI lumen location of TAS2R38 on the L-cell makes it a relatively safe drug target as systemic absorption is not needed for a TAS2R38 agonist drug to effect GLP-1 release. PMID:27208775

  17. Randomized, placebo-controlled phase II trial of heat-killed Mycobacterium vaccae (Longcom batch) formulated as an oral pill (V7)

    PubMed Central

    Efremenko, Yuri V; Butov, Dmytro A; Prihoda, Natalia D; Zaitzeva, Svetlana I; Yurchenko, Larisa V; Sokolenko, Nina I; Butova, Tetyana S; Stepanenko, Anna L; Kutsyna, Galyna A; Jirathitikal, Vichai; Bourinbaiar, Aldar S

    2013-01-01

    One-month Phase II trial was conducted in 43 sputum smear-positive patients with pulmonary tuberculosis randomized into treatment (n = 22) and placebo (n = 21) arms to investigate the safety and efficacy of an orally-administered therapeutic TB vaccine (V7) containing 10 μg of heat-killed Mycobacterium vaccae provided by Longcom company. Immunotherapy and control groups comprised 8 newly diagnosed (1stDx TB; 18.6%), 6 re-treated (RTB; 14%), and 29 multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB; 67.4%) cases distributed at 5:4:13 and 3:2:16 ratios, respectively. Both arms received conventional TB drugs administered under directly observed therapy. The average weight gain in V7 arm was modest, but statistically significant (0.6 kg; p = 0.004), while placebo patients lost 0.1 kg (p = 0.77). Except defervescence and increased lymphocyte percentage, other secondary endpoints such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), leukocyte counts and hemoglobin content were not significantly affected. In control patients only one secondary endpoint, ESR, has improved. After one month mycobacterial clearance in sputum smears was observed in 31.8% (p = 0.03) and 9.5% (p = 0.83) of patients on V7 and placebo. However, the difference between outcomes in two arms was below significance threshold (p = 0.07). Thus, larger population of patients with prolonged follow-up is required to support these preliminary findings. PMID:23782489

  18. A bitter pill for type 2 diabetes? The activation of bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 can stimulate GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine L-cells.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung; Hui, Hongxiang; Morvaridi, Susan; Cai, Jiena; Zhang, Sanqi; Tan, Jun; Wu, Vincent; Levin, Nancy; Knudsen, Beatrice; Goddard, William A; Pandol, Stephen J; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-07-01

    The bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been found in many extra-oral locations like the gastrointestinal (GI) system, respiratory system, and brain, though its function at these locations is only beginning to be understood. To probe the receptor's potential metabolic role, immunohistochemistry of human ileum tissues was performed, which showed that the receptor was co-localized with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in L-cells. In a previous study, we had modeled the structure of this receptor for its many taste-variant haplotypes (Tan et al. 2011), including the taster haplotype PAV. The structure of this haplotype was then used in a virtual ligand screening pipeline using a collection of ∼2.5 million purchasable molecules from the ZINC database. Three compounds (Z7, Z3, Z1) were purchased from the top hits and tested along with PTU (known TAS2R38 agonist) in in vitro and in vivo assays. The dose-response study of the effect of PTU and Z7 on GLP-1 release using wild-type and TAS2R38 knockout HuTu-80 cells showed that the receptor TAS2R38 plays a major role in GLP-1 release due to these molecules. In vivo studies of PTU and the three compounds showed that they each increase GLP-1 release. PTU was also chemical linked to cellulose to slow its absorption and when tested in vivo, it showed an enhanced and prolonged GLP-1 release. These results suggest that the GI lumen location of TAS2R38 on the L-cell makes it a relatively safe drug target as systemic absorption is not needed for a TAS2R38 agonist drug to effect GLP-1 release. PMID:27208775

  19. "And mostly they have a need for sleeping pills": physicians' views on treatment of sleep disorders with drugs in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Flick, Uwe; Garms-Homolová, Vjenka; Röhnsch, Gundula

    2012-12-01

    The percentage of nursing home residents treated with hypnotic medications is high, as many authors report, despite the fact that such medications are almost always associated with undesirable effects for old people. This article takes a closer look at nursing home physicians' views of prescriptions when treating sleep disorders of nursing home residents. How do physicians characterize the treatment strategy for residents suffering from sleep disorders? How do they balance the benefits and risks of the hypnotic medication? Under what circumstances do they accept negative consequences? To answer these questions, N=20 physicians (aged 36 to 68 years) in 16 nursing homes in a German city were interviewed. The physicians were either employed by nursing homes or worked on a contract basis. Comparative categorization of the data produced a typology across cases. Three interpretative patterns concerning the use of drugs for treating sleep disorders were identified--"by request," "ambivalence," and "reflected prescription." Differences between them were determined by the significance of residents' wishes, neglect of risks, particularly that of addiction, and the attempt to balance benefits and disadvantages. The study showed deficits in professional management of sleep disorders in nursing homes. PMID:22939545

  20. Comparison of dosage of intensive upper limb therapy for children with unilateral cerebral palsy: how big should the therapy pill be?

    PubMed

    Sakzewski, Leanne; Provan, Kerry; Ziviani, Jenny; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare efficacy of two dosages of modified constraint induced movement therapy (mCIMT) and bimanual therapy on upper limb and individualized outcomes for children with unilateral cerebral palsy. This secondary analysis included two separate randomized trials that compared equal doses (high or low) of mCIMT to bimanual therapy; Study 1 (full dose--60 h) n=64 and; Study 2 (half dose--30 h) n=18 for children aged five to 16 years with unilateral cerebral palsy. Outcomes for both studies included the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function, Assisting Hand Assessment, Jebsen Taylor Test of Hand Function and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure which were administered at baseline, three and 26 weeks. Mixed linear modelling was used to compare between dose (e.g. "full dose" to "half dose" of either mCIMT or bimanual therapy) on outcomes at three and 26 weeks post-intervention. There were no significant differences between groups at baseline, however, on average the half dose mCIMT group was younger with better hand function compared to the other groups. The full compared to half dose mCIMT group achieved greater gains in bimanual performance at three weeks and dexterity and quality of movement at 26 weeks. There were no between group differences for bimanual therapy doses. Half dose groups receiving either mCIMT or bimanual therapy did not make significant within group gains on any upper limb motor outcome, however gains in occupational performance were clinically meaningful. These results suggest that a half dose (30 h) of either mCIMT or bimanual therapy may not be sufficient to impact upper limb outcomes, but made clinically meaningful gains in occupational performance for school aged children with UCP. PMID:25460215

  1. Methemoglobinemia due to ingestion of at most three pills of pyridium in a 2-year-old: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Gold, Nina A; Bithoney, William G

    2003-08-01

    Pyridium (phenazopyridine HCl) is a commonly prescribed medication in the treatment of urinary tract infections and is known to cause methemoglobinemia in excessive doses. We report the case of a 2-year-old child who ingested a maximum of three 200-mg tablets (approximately 50 mg/kg) of pyridium and yet developed cyanosis and methemoglobinemia (29.1%), resulting in methylene blue therapy. We urge physicians to consider a period of observation (4-6 h) or to obtain methemoglobin levels in children who ingest even a small number of pyridium tablets because this can represent a toxic dose in a small child.

  2. A novel male contraceptive pill-patch combination: oral desogestrel and transdermal testosterone in the suppression of spermatogenesis in normal men.

    PubMed

    Hair, W M; Kitteridge, K; O'Connor, D B; Wu, F C

    2001-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of transdermal T and oral desogestrel on the reproductive axis of healthy men. Twenty-three men were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups and received a daily transdermal T patch plus oral desogestrel at a dose of 75, 150, or 300 microg/d for 24 wk. Baseline blood and semen samples were obtained and then every 4 wk thereafter for 32 wk. The outcome measures were sperm density and plasma levels of FSH, LH, total and free T. The results show a dose-dependent suppression of spermatogenesis and gonadotropins. Seven of the 17 subjects became azoospermic. Desogestrel (300 microg daily) in combination with 5 mg daily transdermal T was the most effective (57% azoospermic), whereas a dose of 75 microg was ineffective (0% azoospermic). Total and free plasma T were reduced by approximately 30%. High density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly reduced. No serious side-effects were encountered. We conclude that daily self-administered desogestrel with transdermal T is capable of suppressing the male reproductive axis, although the efficacy was less marked and less consistent than injectable regimens. The lower efficacy is likely to be due to failure of the transdermal T system to maintain circulating T levels consistently in the required range.

  3. Toward "Good Enough Methods" for Autoethnography in a Graduate Education Course: Trying to Resist the Matrix with Another Promising Red Pill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Sherick A.

    2008-01-01

    Educational research suggests that the response biases of educators can negatively influence student performance and aptitude (Blanchett 2006; Bloom 2001; Darity et al. 2001; Gordon 2005; and Skiba et al. 2000). This article introduces "good enough methods" for autoethnography as an alternative approach to this problem. Luttrell (2000, 13)…

  4. Redefining Adjuvant Therapy for Colon Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with resected stage III colon cancer are being randomly assigned to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy for either 3 or 6 months and to take either a pill called celecoxib or a matching placebo pill for 3 years.

  5. HealthLines

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink coffee a new study suggests. Researchers compared caffeine (the stimulant in coffee, tea, soda, and energy ... took a nap, another took a pill with caffeine, and the third took a dummy pill with ...

  6. Diethylpropion

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are allergic to diethylpropion; amphetamines; other diet pills; medications for allergies, hay fever, and colds; or ... Tell your doctor if you have taken other diet pills in the past year.tell your doctor if ...

  7. Emergency contraception

    MedlinePlus

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... Emergency contraception most likely prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing or delaying ...

  8. Inhaled Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... potential for side effects than steroid pills or syrups. There have been concerns regarding the possibility of ... treatment. Learn about oral steroids (steroid pills and syrups), and more about steroid side effects. What are ...

  9. About Steroids (Inhaled and Oral Corticosteroids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... dose-inhalers ( inhaled steroids ), oral forms (pills or syrups) , injections (shots) and intravenous (IV) solutions. Healthcare providers ... slowly decreased. Inhaled steroids and steroid pills and syrups are often prescribed for people with a chronic ...

  10. Kerion

    MedlinePlus

    ... weeks of treatment with oral antifungal pills or syrup, including: Griseofulvin Terbinafine Itraconazole Fluconazole Ketoconazole Often, the ... may recommend starting oral corticosteroids (cortisone pills or syrup). Steroids are strong medications that can quickly reduce ...

  11. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraception are available: emergency contraceptive pills and the copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD). Emergency contraceptive pills include ... for emergency use, talk to your doctor. The copper-containing IUD (brand name: Paragard) is a small, ...

  12. MedlinePlus: Vaginal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... before puberty or after menopause. Causes can include Uterine fibroids or polyps Hormone problems Hormone pills, such as birth control pills and menopausal hormone therapy Cancer of the cervix , ovaries , uterus or vagina ...

  13. Painkiller (Oxy, Vike) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... People Abuse Alcohol Facts Cigarette and Tobacco Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana ( ... these pills just like they sell heroin or cocaine. Some people borrow or steal these pills from ...

  14. Sodium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lithium Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Water pills (diuretics) DO NOT stop taking any medicine before talking ... salt or fluid Receive intravenous (IV) fluids Take diuretics (water pills) or certain other medicines, including the ...

  15. Kidney stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... for uric acid stones) Antibiotics (for struvite stones) Diuretics (water pills) Phosphate solutions Sodium bicarbonate or sodium citrate Water pills (thiazide diuretics) Tamsulosin to relax the ureter and help the ...

  16. Ménière disease - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your health care provider may prescribe medicines like diuretics (water pills) or antihistamines to help. Surgery may ... your provider may also give you water pills (diuretics) to help reduce the fluid in your body ...

  17. Potassium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure. You may have hypokalemia if you: Take diuretics (water pills) to treat high blood pressure or ... and angiotensin 2 receptor blockers (ARBs) Potassium-sparing diuretics (water pills) such as spironolactone or amiloride Severe ...

  18. Benazepril and Hydrochlorothiazide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hydrochlorothiazide is in a class of medications called diuretics ('water pills'). It works by causing the kidneys ... as dexamethasone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and prednisone (Rayos); other diuretics ('water pills'); other medications for high blood pressure; ...

  19. Enalapril and Hydrochlorothiazide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hydrochlorothiazide is in a class of medications called diuretics ('water pills'). It works by causing the kidneys ... as indomethacin (Indocin, Tivorbex); cholestyramine (Prevalite); colestipol (Colestid); diuretics ('water pills'); insulin or oral medications for diabetes; ...

  20. Sodium urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as glaucoma or stomach ulcers) Water pills (diuretics) DO NOT stop taking any medicine before talking ... due to: Certain medicines, such as water pills (diuretics) Low function of the adrenal glands Inflammation of ...

  1. How Medicare Prescription Drug Plans & Medicare Advantage Plans with Prescription Drug Coverage (MA-PDs) Use Pharmacies,...

    MedlinePlus

    ... drug. Example of step therapy Step 1 —Dr. Smith wants to prescribe a new sleeping pill to ... sleeping pill available. Some of the drugs Dr. Smith considers prescribing are brand-name only prescription drugs. ...

  2. Deer Velvet

    MedlinePlus

    Birth control pills (Contraceptive drugs)Some birth control pills contain estrogen. Deer velvet might have some of the same effects as estrogen. However, deer velvet isn't as strong as the estrogen in birth control pills. Taking deer velvet along with birth ...

  3. A refractory fixed drug reaction to a dye used in an oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Steven E; Meffert, Jeffrey

    2004-10-01

    A young woman presented with a classic fixed drug eruption (FDE) after taking the inactive green pills of her oral contraceptives (OCs). The patient's history was unique in that the FDE did not occur every time she took the inactive pills but was refractory, occurring every third month within hours after she took the green pills. After discontinuing the green pills but continuing the active oral contraceptive pills, the patient has not experienced a recurrence of the rash in more than 2 years. This case report reviews the unusual phenomenon of refractory periods in FDEs and highlights the importance of understanding this phenomenon in the diagnosis of drug eruptions. PMID:15551717

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Chryseobacterium artocarpi UTM-3T and Chryseobacterium contaminans C26T, Isolated from Rhizospheres, and Chryseobacterium arthrosphaerae CC-VM-7T, Isolated from the Feces of a Pill Millipede

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeonghyeok; Oh, Ji Yeon; Mannaa, Mohamed; Kim, Yoo Jun; Hong, Jeum Kyu; Choi, In-Geol

    2016-01-01

    Species of the genus Chryseobacterium belonging to the family Flavobacteriaceae are nonmotile, yellow-pigmented, and rod-shaped bacteria, some of which were frequently isolated from soil or plant-related materials. Here, we present draft genome sequences of three type strains of Chryseobacterium, which contain genes related to plant growth promotion, colonization, or stress adaptation. PMID:27795281

  5. Modeling the photocatalytic mineralization in water of commercial formulation of estrogens 17-β estradiol (E2) and nomegestrol acetate in contraceptive pills in a solar powered compound parabolic collector.

    PubMed

    Colina-Márquez, José; Machuca-Martínez, Fiderman; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors in water are contaminants of emerging concern due to the potential risks they pose to the environment and to the aquatic ecosystems. In this study, a solar photocatalytic treatment process in a pilot-scale compound parabolic collector (CPC) was used to remove commercial estradiol formulations (17-β estradiol and nomegestrol acetate) from water. Photolysis alone degraded up to 50% of estradiol and removed 11% of the total organic carbon (TOC). In contrast, solar photocatalysis degraded up to 57% of estrogens and the TOC removal was 31%, with 0.6 g/L of catalyst load (TiO2 Aeroxide P-25) and 213.6 ppm of TOC as initial concentration of the commercial estradiols formulation. The adsorption of estrogens over the catalyst was insignificant and was modeled by the Langmuir isotherm. The TOC removal via photocatalysis in the photoreactor was modeled considering the reactor fluid-dynamics, the radiation field, the estrogens mass balance, and a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law, that was expressed in terms of the rate of photon adsorption. The optimum removal of the estrogens and TOC was achieved at a catalyst concentration of 0.4 g/L in 29 mm diameter tubular CPC reactors which approached the optimum catalyst concentration and optical thickness determined from the modeling of the absorption of solar radiation in the CPC, by the six-flux absorption-scattering model (SFM). PMID:26205059

  6. “If I know I am on the pill and I get pregnant, it’s an act of God”: women’s views on fatalism, agency and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rachel K.; Frohwirth, Lori F.; Blades, Nakeisha M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Fatalism is the idea that outside forces have control over events. Pregnancy and pregnancy prevention play a prominent role in many women’s lives, and we sought to understand if and how fatalism informed their thinking about these issues. Study design We conducted in-depth interviews with 52 unmarried women between the ages of 18 and 30. We used NVivo to analyze the transcripts. The current analysis focuses on the ways that women discussed fatalism and pregnancy both in response to a direct question and as it came up spontaneously. Results The majority of respondents expressed a mix of fatalistic and non-fatalistic views about pregnancy. Many related that “fate,” “destiny” and/or God play a role in pregnancy, but most also asserted that pregnancy risk could be substantially reduced, most commonly by using contraception. Fatalism sometimes served a positive function, for example as a mechanism to deal with an unintended pregnancy. Having a fatalistic outlook did not preclude contraceptive use. Rather, some women using highly effective methods related that if they were to become pregnant, they would interpret it as a sign that the pregnancy was “meant to happen.” Finally some women related that there was no guarantee a woman could get pregnant when she wanted to, suggesting that some degree of fatalism may be inevitable when it comes to pregnancy. Conclusions Fatalism and agency should not be viewed as opposing outlooks when it comes to pregnancy and pregnancy prevention; having fatalistic views about pregnancy does not preclude contraceptive use. Implications Given that women do not have total control over attainment of a wanted pregnancy or even prevention of pregnancy, some amount of fatalism about fertility is a logical and pragmatic response. Both research and clinical practice need to recognize that fatalism and contraceptive use are often not in conflict. PMID:26872719

  7. Prioritizing HIV Comparative Effectiveness Trials based on Value of Information: Generic vs. Brand-Name ART in the US

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Pamela P.; Weinstein, Milton C.; Li, X. Cynthia; Hughes, Michael D.; Paltiel, A. David; Hou, Taige; Parker, Robert A.; Gaynes, Melanie R.; Sax, Paul E.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Schackman, Bruce R.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Value of Information (VOI) analysis examines whether to acquire information before making a decision. We introduced VOI to the HIV audience, using the example of generic antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the US. Methods and Findings We used a mathematical model and probabilistic sensitivity analysis to generate probability distributions of survival (in quality-adjusted life years, QALYs) and cost for three potential first-line ART regimens: 3-pill generic, 2-pill generic, and 1-pill branded. These served as input for a comparison of two hypothetical two-arm trials: 3-pill generic vs. 1-pill branded; and 2-pill generic vs.1-pill branded. We modeled pre-trial uncertainty by defining probability distributions around key inputs, including 24-week HIV-RNA suppression and subsequent ART failure. We assumed that, without a trial, patients received the 1-pill branded strategy. Post-trial, we assumed that patients received the most cost-effective strategy. For both trials, we quantified the probability of changing to a generic-based regimen upon trial completion and the expected VOI in terms of improved health outcomes and costs. Assuming a willingness to pay threshold of $100,000/QALY, the 3-pill trial led to more treatment changes (84%) than the 2-pill trial (78%). Estimated VOI was $48,000 (3-pill trial) and $35,700 (2-pill trial) per future patient initiating ART. Conclusions A 3-pill trial of generic ART is more likely to lead to post-trial treatment changes and to provide more value than a 2-pill trial if policy decisions are based on cost-effectiveness. Value of Information analysis can identify trials likely to confer the greatest impact and value for HIV care. PMID:26651525

  8. Thermally Insulating, Kinematic Tensioned-Fiber Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.

    2004-01-01

    A salt pill and some parts of a thermally insulating, kinematic suspension system that holds the salt pill rigidly in an adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is presented. "Salt pill" in this context denotes a unit comprising a cylindrical container, a matrix of gold wires in the container, and a cylinder of ferric ammonium alum (a paramagnetic salt) that has been deposited on the wires. The structural members used in this system for both thermal insulation and positioning are aromatic polyamide fibers (Kevlar(R) or equivalent) under tension. This suspension system is designed to satisfy several special requirements to ensure the proper operation of the ADR. These requirements are to (1) maintain the salt pill at a specified position within the cylindrical bore of an electromagnet; (2) prevent vibrations, which would cause dissipation of heat in the salt pill; and (3) minimize the conduction of heat from the electromagnet bore and other neighboring objects to the salt pill; all while (4) protecting the salt pill (which is fragile) against all tensile and bending loads other than those attributable to its own weight. In addition, the system is required to consist of two subsystems -- one for the top end and one for the bottom end of the salt pill -- that can be assembled and tensioned separately from each other and from the salt pill, then later attached to the salt pill.

  9. The radiopacity of ingested medications.

    PubMed

    Savitt, D L; Hawkins, H H; Roberts, J R

    1987-03-01

    We investigated prospectively the radiopacity of 312 pills found on a university hospital formulary by first radiographing them through 15 and 25 cm of water to duplicate the radiodensity of the human body. The pills that were radiodense through water were studied in a human cadaver model, and their densities were quantified by computed tomography (CT). Thirty-five of 312 pills were radiopaque in 15 cm or more of water, and 23 of these pills were radiopaque on a plain radiograph when placed in the stomach of a cadaver. Common mnemonics used to identify radiopaque pills were found to be incomplete and inadequate. Chloral hydrate, iron-containing preparations, calcium carbonate, iodinated compounds, acetazolamide, busulfan, and potassium preparations were consistently radiopaque. Antihistamines, phenothiazines, and tricyclic antidepressants demonstrated varying radiopacity. There was varying radiopacity among the same medications made by different manufacturers. The presence of an enteric coating did not assure that the pill would be radiopaque. Merely radiographing a pill that has been placed on a standard radiograph cassette will make pills that are actually radiolucent in the body appear radiopaque. This test cannot be used to predict radiopacity in vivo. Visibility when radiographed through 15 cm or more of water and a CT radiodensity of more than 1,300 Hounsfield units are predictors of the radiopacity of a pill in the stomach of a cadaver model on a standard KUB radiograph. Variables, such as the size of the patient, the arrangement of pills in the stomach, air contrasting a pill, and the specific composition of the enteric coating or the pillmatrix, affect the radiodensity of pills.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs (such as minocycline and birth control pills) Endocrine diseases such as Addison disease Hemochromatosis (iron overload) Sun exposure Pregnancy Causes of hypopigmentation include: Skin inflammation Certain fungal ...

  11. Laryngoceles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Information, Search Drug Names, Generic and Brand Natural Products, Search Drug Interactions Pill Identifier News & Commentary ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures Images Audio Pronunciations The ...

  12. Bacterial Nasal Infections

    MedlinePlus

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  13. Cutis Laxa

    MedlinePlus

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  14. Cervical Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

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  15. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

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  16. Medial and Lateral Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    MedlinePlus

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  17. Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases

    MedlinePlus

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  18. Osteochondrodysplasias

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  19. Eosinophilic Fasciitis

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  20. Ileus

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  1. Rib Fractures

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  2. Overview of the Spleen

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  3. Paracoccidioidomycosis

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  4. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

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  5. Urethritis

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  6. Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

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  7. Cervical Myomas

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  8. Anal and Rectal Disorders

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  9. Polyps of the Cervix

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  10. Lymphatic Disorders

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  11. Dacryocystitis

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  12. Bacterial Skin Infections

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    ... Search Drug Interactions Pill Identifier Commonly searched drugs Aspirin Metformin Warfarin Tramadol Lactulose Ranitidine News & Commentary Recent News Cancer Caregivers Face Difficult Demands Health Tip: Why Floss? ...

  13. Congestive Hepatomegaly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Drug Interactions Pill Identifier Commonly searched drugs Aspirin Metformin Warfarin Tramadol Lactulose Ranitidine News & Commentary Recent News Cancer Caregivers Face Difficult Demands Child Health Improves When ...

  14. Nicotine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... nonprescription medications you are taking, especially acetaminophen (Tylenol), caffeine, diuretics ('water pills'), imipramine (Tofranil), insulin, medications for high blood pressure, oxazepam (Serax), pentazocine (Talwin, Talwin NX, Talacen), propoxyphene ( ...

  15. Bacteremia

    MedlinePlus

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  16. Necrotizing Skin Infections

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  17. White Blood Cell Disorders

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  18. Inflammation of the Orbit

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  19. Perichondritis

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  20. Intestinal Lymphangiectasia

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  1. Endophthalmitis

    MedlinePlus

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  2. Gallbladder and Bile Duct Disorders

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  3. Ear Tumors

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  4. Ear Injury

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  5. Eyes, Bulging (Proptosis)

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  6. Symptoms of Blood Disorders

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  7. Introduction to Symptoms of Eye Disorders

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  8. Measuring adherence to treatment of paediatric HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Naar-King, S; Frey, M; Harris, M; Arfken, C

    2005-04-01

    Parent, child, physician report and pill counts were used to measure adherence in paediatric HIV. Relationships to viral load were assessed. Pill counts were considered invalid. Adherence measures did not correlate with one another. Physicians reported lower adherence than parents, but parent and physician report correlated with viral load. The clinical and research utility of the various measures are discussed.

  9. EFFECTS OF ETHINYL ESTRADIOL EXPOSURE ON REPRODUCTION IN AN ESTUARINE FISH TAUTOGLABRUS ADSPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural estrogen levels in women are routinely supplemented by potent pharmaceutical estrogens through use of birth control pills and hormone therapy. Excess estrogen is excreted by these women. Currently, about seventeen percent of women in the US use birth control pills and som...

  10. The Menstrual Cycle and Response to Erotic Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul R.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study focuses upon the relationship between phase of the menstrual cycle and sexual arousability. Women (N=133) participated in an experiment that induced sexual arousal by means of an erotic story. Independent factors were use of contraceptive pills versus no contraceptive pills and phase of the menstrual cycle. (Author)

  11. Searching for Ideal Contraceptives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djerassi, Carl

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the problem of adolescent pregnancy and focuses on improving contraception as a practical solution. Describes the advantages and disadvantages of existing methods (the condom, the pill, and the contraceptive sponge). Predicts that the development of a fundamentally new contraceptive, such as a monthly menses-inducer pill, will not occur…

  12. Biotelemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundt, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing pill-shaped biotelemeters for measuring physiological parameters during space flight life sciences experiments using rodents aboard the ISS Gravitational Biology Facility, with the additional capability for monitoring the health of astronauts in the Human Research Facility. The first "pill transmitter" is capable of measuring pressure and temperature for up to 10 months. The NASA objective is to utilize these devices. The pill-transmitters can also be used by non-NASA users for medical applications. One application is fetal surgery. The 44pill" is small enough to be endoscopically placed into the womb through a tube used during surgeries to correct fetal defects before birth. After surgery, the pill-transmitter will continue to monitor body temperature, pressure and other vital signs in the womb, radioing results to physicians. It will help them to detect preterm-labor, a serious problem after fetal surgery. The pill is about one-third-of-an-inch across and one-and-one-third-inches long. Future pill-versions will include pH, heartrate, and ECG. A pH-pill prototype is currently being tested. Sensors 2000! has also designed and built a 2-channel biotelemetry receiver and has developed data acquisition software to display and record the measured physiological parameters. A DSP-base hand-held receiver (trisponder) is currently under development.

  13. Early Impact Of The Affordable Care Act On Oral Contraceptive Cost Sharing, Discontinuation, And Nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Pace, Lydia E; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Keating, Nancy L

    2016-09-01

    The oral contraceptive pill is the contraceptive method most commonly used by US women, but inconsistent use of the pill is a contributor to high rates of unintended pregnancy. The relationship between consumer cost sharing and consistent use of the pill is not well understood, and the impact of the elimination of cost sharing for oral contraceptive pills in a mandate in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is not yet known. We analyzed insurance claims for 635,075 women with employer-sponsored insurance who were initiating use of the pill, to examine rates of discontinuation and nonadherence, their relationship with cost sharing, and trends before and during the first year after implementation of the ACA mandate. We found that cost sharing for oral contraceptives decreased markedly following implementation, more significantly for generic than for brand-name versions. Higher copays were associated with greater discontinuation of and nonadherence to generic pills than was the case with zero copayments. Discontinuation of the use of generic or brand-name pills decreased slightly but significantly following ACA implementation, as did nonadherence to brand-name pills. Our findings suggest a modest early impact of the ACA on improving consistent use of oral contraceptives among women initiating their use.

  14. Early Impact Of The Affordable Care Act On Oral Contraceptive Cost Sharing, Discontinuation, And Nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Pace, Lydia E; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Keating, Nancy L

    2016-09-01

    The oral contraceptive pill is the contraceptive method most commonly used by US women, but inconsistent use of the pill is a contributor to high rates of unintended pregnancy. The relationship between consumer cost sharing and consistent use of the pill is not well understood, and the impact of the elimination of cost sharing for oral contraceptive pills in a mandate in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is not yet known. We analyzed insurance claims for 635,075 women with employer-sponsored insurance who were initiating use of the pill, to examine rates of discontinuation and nonadherence, their relationship with cost sharing, and trends before and during the first year after implementation of the ACA mandate. We found that cost sharing for oral contraceptives decreased markedly following implementation, more significantly for generic than for brand-name versions. Higher copays were associated with greater discontinuation of and nonadherence to generic pills than was the case with zero copayments. Discontinuation of the use of generic or brand-name pills decreased slightly but significantly following ACA implementation, as did nonadherence to brand-name pills. Our findings suggest a modest early impact of the ACA on improving consistent use of oral contraceptives among women initiating their use. PMID:27605641

  15. Why Kicking the Opioid Habit Can Be So Tough

    MedlinePlus

    ... recalled. "Every day I'd wake up in pain. And every day I'd automatically pop a pill right away and go back to work. I ... bullet wound, and I couldn't stand the pain." Then, over time, there was a "gradual slide," he said, to more pills and higher doses. It's a story shared by ...

  16. Biotelemeters for Space Flights and Fetal Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundt, Carsten W.; Ricks, Robert D.; Hines, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Pill-shaped biotelemeters originally designed for space flight applications will soon be used for monitoring the health of a fetus during and after in-utero fetal surgery. The authors developed a family of biotelemeters that are not only small enough for rodent studies on board the space shuttle or international space station, but also fit through a 10 mm trocar, a plastic tube that is used in endoscopic fetal surgery to obtain minimally invasive access to the fetus. The first 'pill' measures pressure and temperature, and is currently undergoing long-term leakage and biocompatibility tests. A second pill under development measures pH and temperature. A prototype of the 'pH-pill' has been built and successfully tested and is presently being miniaturized into the same dimensions as the 'pressure pill'. Additional pills measuring heart rate, ECG, other ions such as calcium and potassium, and eventually glucose and blood gases, will follow. All pills are designed for ultra-low power consumption yielding lifetimes of up to 10 months in order to meet the requirements of fetal monitoring, but also to provide the capability of long-term space station experiments. Each pill transmits its pulse-interval-modulated signal on a unique carrier frequency in the frequency range of 174-216MHz. A custom-designed multi-channel receiver demodulates and decodes each pill signal and sends the data to a LabVIEW program that performs real-time data analysis and display. A patent for the pill family and its data analysis system is pending.

  17. A less stressful alternative to oral gavage for pharmacological and toxicological studies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mary K.; Boberg, Jason R.; Walsh, Mary T.; Wolf, Valerie; Trujillo, Alisha; Duke, Melissa Skelton; Palme, Rupert

    2012-04-01

    Oral gavage dosing can induce stress and potentially confound experimental measurements, particularly when blood pressure and heart rate are endpoints of interest. Thus, we developed a pill formulation that mice would voluntarily consume and tested the hypothesis that pill dosing would be significantly less stressful than oral gavage. C57Bl/6 male mice were singly housed and on four consecutive days were exposed to an individual walking into the room (week 1, control), a pill being placed into the cage (week 2), and a dose of water via oral gavage (week 3). Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded by radiotelemetry continuously for 5 h after treatment, and feces collected 6–10 h after treatment for analysis of corticosterone metabolites. Both pill and gavage dosing significantly increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) during the first hour, compared to control. However, the increase in MAP was significantly greater after gavage and remained elevated up to 5 h, while MAP returned to normal within 2 h after a pill. Neither pill nor gavage dosing significantly increased heart rate during the first hour, compared to control; however, pill dosing significantly reduced heart rate while gavage significantly increased heart rate 2–5 h post dosing. MAP and heart rate did not differ 24 h after dosing. Lastly, only gavage dosing significantly increased fecal corticosterone metabolites, indicating a systemic stress response via activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. These data demonstrated that this pill dosing method of mice is significantly less stressful than oral gavage. -- Highlights: ► Developed a novel oral dosing method using a pill that mice will readily consume. ► Assessed stress by blood pressure, heart rate, and fecal corticosterone metabolites. ► Demonstrated that pill dosing is significantly less stressful than oral gavage.

  18. Treatment adherence, clinical outcomes, and economics of triple-drug therapy in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Panjabi, Sumeet; Lacey, Michael; Bancroft, Timothy; Cao, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Poor antihypertensive treatment adherence adversely affects blood pressure control. We analyzed US health plan data to assess the impact of fixed- versus loose-dose triple-combination therapy on adherence, clinical, and economic outcomes. Patients initiating triple therapy with an angiotensin receptor blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, or beta blocker plus amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide comprised three cohorts. Within-cohort comparisons were made between fixed-dose combinations of two antihypertensives plus a second pill (two pills) or three separate pills. Outcomes included adherence, cardiovascular events, health care resource use, and costs for patients with ≥ 12 months follow-up. A total of 16,290 patients were matched. Patients receiving two pills were more likely to be adherent (P < .001) and less likely to discontinue treatment (P < .001) across all cohorts. Therapy with two versus three pills resulted in significantly lower adjusted risk of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio = 0.76, P = .005) in the beta blocker cohort only. Total adjusted health care costs were significantly lower for two- versus three-pill therapy in the beta blocker cohort only (cost ratio = 0.74 overall, P < .01; 0.71 hypertension-attributable, P < .01). In patients with hypertension requiring triple therapy, fixed-dose combinations that lower pill burden may improve adherence (seen across all cohorts) and clinical outcomes (seen in the beta blocker cohort) without increasing health care costs.

  19. Comparing the effects of the second-and third-generation oral contraceptives on sexual functioning

    PubMed Central

    Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Bayatipayan, Somaye; Khalili, Azizeh Farshbaf; Kochaksaraei, Fatemeh Ranjbar; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Banoi, Kamala Gaza; Nahaee, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the second- and third-generation oral contraceptives on women's reproductive sexual function. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 82 married women of reproductive age in Tehran. Samples were randomized into the groups receiving second- and third-generation oral contraceptive pills. Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) tool was used before the intervention and 2 and 4 months after the intervention. Data analysis was carried out using analysis of variance (ANOVA) within repeated measures and P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the positive and negative moods between the experimental and control groups before the intervention in the second and fourth months. The second-generation pills caused a decrease in sexual function in the second month and an increase in sexual function in the fourth month, but the third-generation pills led to an increase in sexual function in the second and fourth months. The increase in sexual function that resulted from using the third-generation pills was significantly higher than that resulted on using the second-generation pills. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, sexual functioning decreased in the second month of using the second-generation pills and sexual performance was significantly more on using the third-generation pills compared to second-generation pills. The most common type of oral contraceptive used in Iran is the second-generation oral contraceptive LD™ (low-dose estrogen), which is freely distributed in health centers. Therefore, it is necessary for women who wish to use these contraceptive methods to be educated and consulted before they start using them. The third-generation contraceptive pills can be recommended to women who wish to use oral contraceptives. PMID:25709690

  20. Research on structural design and test technologies for a three-chamber launching device.

    PubMed

    Jun, Wu; Qiushi, Yan; Ling, Xiao; Tieshuan, Zhuang; Chengyu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A three-chamber launching device with improved acceleration is proposed and developed. As indicated by the damage generated during the pill and engineering protection tests, the proposed device is applicable as a high-speed launching platform for pills of different shapes and quality levels. Specifically, it can be used to investigate kinetic energy weapons and their highly destructive effects due to the resulting large bomb fragments. In the horizontal direction of the barrel, two auxiliary chambers are set at a certain distance from the main chamber. When the pill reaches the mouth of the auxiliary chambers, the charges in the auxiliary chambers are ignited by the high-temperature, high-pressure combustible gas trailing the pill. The combustible gas in the auxiliary chambers can resist the rear pressure of the pill and thus maintain the high pressure of the pill base. In this way, the required secondary acceleration of the pill is met. The proposed device features the advantage of launching a pill with high initial velocity under low bore pressure. Key techniques are proposed in the design of the device to address the problems related to the angle between the main chamber axis and the ancillary chamber axis, the overall design of a three-chamber barrel, the structural design of auxiliary propellant charge, the high-pressure combustible gas sealing technology, and the sabot and belt design. Results from the launching test verify the reasonable design of this device and its reliable structural sealing. Additionally, the stiffness and the strength of the barrel meet design requirements. Compared with the single-chamber launching device with the same caliber, the proposed device increases the average launching velocity by approximately 15% and the amount of muzzle kinetic energy by approximately 35%. Therefore, this equipment is capable of carrying out small-caliber, high-speed pill firing tests. PMID:27475595

  1. Research on structural design and test technologies for a three-chamber launching device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Wu; Qiushi, Yan; Ling, Xiao; Tieshuan, Zhuang; Chengyu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A three-chamber launching device with improved acceleration is proposed and developed. As indicated by the damage generated during the pill and engineering protection tests, the proposed device is applicable as a high-speed launching platform for pills of different shapes and quality levels. Specifically, it can be used to investigate kinetic energy weapons and their highly destructive effects due to the resulting large bomb fragments. In the horizontal direction of the barrel, two auxiliary chambers are set at a certain distance from the main chamber. When the pill reaches the mouth of the auxiliary chambers, the charges in the auxiliary chambers are ignited by the high-temperature, high-pressure combustible gas trailing the pill. The combustible gas in the auxiliary chambers can resist the rear pressure of the pill and thus maintain the high pressure of the pill base. In this way, the required secondary acceleration of the pill is met. The proposed device features the advantage of launching a pill with high initial velocity under low bore pressure. Key techniques are proposed in the design of the device to address the problems related to the angle between the main chamber axis and the ancillary chamber axis, the overall design of a three-chamber barrel, the structural design of auxiliary propellant charge, the high-pressure combustible gas sealing technology, and the sabot and belt design. Results from the launching test verify the reasonable design of this device and its reliable structural sealing. Additionally, the stiffness and the strength of the barrel meet design requirements. Compared with the single-chamber launching device with the same caliber, the proposed device increases the average launching velocity by approximately 15% and the amount of muzzle kinetic energy by approximately 35%. Therefore, this equipment is capable of carrying out small-caliber, high-speed pill firing tests.

  2. Research on structural design and test technologies for a three-chamber launching device.

    PubMed

    Jun, Wu; Qiushi, Yan; Ling, Xiao; Tieshuan, Zhuang; Chengyu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A three-chamber launching device with improved acceleration is proposed and developed. As indicated by the damage generated during the pill and engineering protection tests, the proposed device is applicable as a high-speed launching platform for pills of different shapes and quality levels. Specifically, it can be used to investigate kinetic energy weapons and their highly destructive effects due to the resulting large bomb fragments. In the horizontal direction of the barrel, two auxiliary chambers are set at a certain distance from the main chamber. When the pill reaches the mouth of the auxiliary chambers, the charges in the auxiliary chambers are ignited by the high-temperature, high-pressure combustible gas trailing the pill. The combustible gas in the auxiliary chambers can resist the rear pressure of the pill and thus maintain the high pressure of the pill base. In this way, the required secondary acceleration of the pill is met. The proposed device features the advantage of launching a pill with high initial velocity under low bore pressure. Key techniques are proposed in the design of the device to address the problems related to the angle between the main chamber axis and the ancillary chamber axis, the overall design of a three-chamber barrel, the structural design of auxiliary propellant charge, the high-pressure combustible gas sealing technology, and the sabot and belt design. Results from the launching test verify the reasonable design of this device and its reliable structural sealing. Additionally, the stiffness and the strength of the barrel meet design requirements. Compared with the single-chamber launching device with the same caliber, the proposed device increases the average launching velocity by approximately 15% and the amount of muzzle kinetic energy by approximately 35%. Therefore, this equipment is capable of carrying out small-caliber, high-speed pill firing tests.

  3. Emergency Contraception: Do Your Patients Have a Plan B?

    PubMed

    Bullock, Holly; Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Emergency contraception is used after unprotected sex, inadequately protected sex, or sexual assault to reduce the risk of pregnancy. Of emergency contraceptive methods available in the United States, the copper intrauterine device has the highest efficacy, followed by ulipristal acetate, levonorgestrel-containing emergency contraceptive pills, and the Yuzpe method. However, access to the most effective methods is limited. Although advanced prescription of emergency contraceptive pills and counseling on emergency contraception to all reproductive-aged women is recommended, women should be advised to contact their health care providers after taking emergency contraceptive pills to discuss possible copper intrauterine device placement and other follow-up.

  4. An epidemiological perspective of personalized medicine: the Estonian experience

    PubMed Central

    Milani, L; Leitsalu, L; Metspalu, A

    2015-01-01

    Milani L, Leitsalu L, Metspalu A (University of Tartu). An epidemiological perspective of personalized medicine: the Estonian experience (Review). J Intern Med 2015; 277: 188–200. The Estonian Biobank and several other biobanks established over a decade ago are now starting to yield valuable longitudinal follow-up data for large numbers of individuals. These samples have been used in hundreds of different genome-wide association studies, resulting in the identification of reliable disease-associated variants. The focus of genomic research has started to shift from identifying genetic and nongenetic risk factors associated with common complex diseases to understanding the underlying mechanisms of the diseases and suggesting novel targets for therapy. However, translation of findings from genomic research into medical practice is still lagging, mainly due to insufficient evidence of clinical validity and utility. In this review, we examine the different elements required for the implementation of personalized medicine based on genomic information. First, biobanks and genome centres are required and have been established for the high-throughput genomic screening of large numbers of samples. Secondly, the combination of susceptibility alleles into polygenic risk scores has improved risk prediction of cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and several other diseases. Finally, national health information systems are being developed internationally, to combine data from electronic medical records from different sources, and also to gradually incorporate genomic information. We focus on the experience in Estonia, one of several countries with national goals towards more personalized health care based on genomic information, where the unique combination of elements required to accomplish this goal are already in place. PMID:25339628

  5. L-arginine

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle and nervous system problems). There is some interest in using L-arginine to improve symptoms associated ... might also increase potassium in the body. In theory, taking L-arginine along with some "water pills" ...

  6. Spironolactone and Hydrochlorothiazide

    MedlinePlus

    ... antagonists. It causes the kidneys to eliminate unneeded water and sodium from the body into the urine, ... is in a class of medications called diuretics (''water pills''). It works by causing the kidneys to ...

  7. Sudden Deafness

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases where the cause is unknown, is corticosteroids. Steroids are used to treat many different disorders and ... decreasing swelling, and helping the body fight illness. Steroids are usually prescribed in pill form. In recent ...

  8. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the attacks should occur as soon as possible. Glucose or other carbohydrates (sugars) given during an attack may reduce the severity of the symptoms. Calcium or diuretics (water pills) may need to be given through a ...

  9. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary supplements are vitamins, minerals, herbs, and many other products. They can come as pills, capsules, powders, drinks, ... possible Tell your health care provider about any dietary supplements you use Do not take a bigger dose ...

  10. Medications Used to Treat Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... colored labels and stick them on your medicine bottles to simplify your routine. For example, blue can ... easier to take. Purchase timer caps for pill bottles to remind you when to take medication. Also, ...

  11. Medications for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... colored labels and stick them on your medicine bottles to simplify your routine. For example, blue can ... easier to take. Purchase timer caps for pill bottles to remind you when to take medication. Also, ...

  12. Medications and Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... colored labels and stick them on your medicine bottles to simplify your routine. For example, blue can ... easier to take. Purchase timer caps for pill bottles to remind you when to take medication. Also, ...

  13. IOC Rescinds Ban on Birth Control Drug.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1988-01-01

    A review of the International Olympic Committee's ban and subsequent reinstatement of a certain drug found in birth-control pills points out the need for careful analysis of drugs and their effects before they are banned. (CB)

  14. Preventing unintended pregnancy: the cost-effectiveness of three methods of emergency contraception.

    PubMed Central

    Trussell, J; Koenig, J; Ellertson, C; Stewart, F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the cost-effectiveness of emergency contraceptive pills, minipills, and the copper-T intrauterine device (IUD) as emergency contraception. METHODS: Cost savings were modeled for both (1) a single contraceptive treatment following unprotected intercourse and (2) emergency contraceptive pills provided in advance. RESULTS: In a managed care (public payer) setting, a single treatment of emergency contraception after unprotected intercourse saves $142 ($54) with emergency contraceptive pills and $119 ($29) with minipills. The copper-T IUD is not cost-effective as an emergency contraceptive alone, but savings quickly accrue as use continues. Advance provision of emergency contraceptive pills to women using barrier contraceptives, spermicides, withdrawal, or periodic abstinence saves from $263 to $498 ($99 to $205) annually. CONCLUSIONS: Emergency contraception is cost-effective whether provided when the emergency arises or in advance to be used as needed. Greater use of emergency contraception could reduce the considerable medical and social costs of unintended pregnancies. PMID:9224172

  15. Levalbuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... inhaler or nebulizer. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to show you how to use it. ... propranolol (Inderal); digoxin (Digitek, Lanoxin); diuretics ('water pills'); epinephrine (Epipen, Primatene Mist); medications for colds; and other ...

  16. Coronary Artery Anomalies

    MedlinePlus

    ... can reach the heart, which can lead to sudden death. How is a CAA diagnosed? Doctors will perform ... symptoms, medicines may be used, especially to prevent sudden cardiac death. Beta-blockers slow the heartbeat. Diuretics (water pills) ...

  17. How Is Hemochromatosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... they started and their severity. Whether you take iron (pills or injections) with or without vitamin C supplements (vitamin C helps your body absorb iron from food). If so, your doctor may ask ...

  18. Chlamydia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of STDs, including chlamydia. Latex condoms provide greater protection than natural-membrane condoms. The female condom, made ... against STDs. Although birth control pills offer no protection against STDs, they may provide some protection against ...

  19. Atopic dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection. Other treatments that may be used include: Antibiotic creams or pills if your skin is infected Drugs that suppress the immune system Phototherapy, a medical treatment in which your skin ...

  20. End-stage kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your doctor before taking supplements). Medicines called phosphate binders, to help prevent phosphorous levels from becoming too high. Treatment for anemia, such as extra iron in the diet, iron pills or shots, shots ...