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Sample records for lwr systems semiannual

  1. Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

    1991-03-01

    A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs.

  2. LWR and defectivity improvement on EUV track system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harumoto, Masahiko; Stokes, Harold; Thouroude, Yan; Kaneyama, Koji; Pieczulewski, Charles; Asai, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is well known to be a strong candidate for next generation, single exposure sub-30nm halfpitch lithography.[1] Furthermore, high-NA EUV exposure tool(s) released two years ago gave a strong impression by finer pattern results. On the other hand, it seems that the coat-develop track process remains very similar and in many aspects returns to KrF or ArF dry process fundamentals, but in practice a 26-32nm pitch patterning coat develop track process also has challenges with EUV resists. As access to EUV lithography exposures has become more readily available over the last five (5) years, several challenges and accomplishments in the track process have been reported, such as the improvement of ultra-thin film coating, CD uniformity, defectivity, line width roughness (LWR), and so on.[2-8] The coat-develop track process has evolved along with novel materials and metrology capability. Line width roughness (LWR) control and defect reduction are demonstrated utilizing the SOKUDO DUO coat-develop track system with ASML NXE:3100 and NXE:3300 exposures in the IMEC (Leuven, Belgium) cleanroom environment. Additionally, we will show the latest lithographic results obtained by novel processing approaches in the EUV coat develop track system.

  3. A Study of the Semiannual Admissions System at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenhouse, Carl H.; Weiner, Samuel

    This report describes the program and examines the advantages and disadvantages of the semiannual admissions system used by the University of Tennessee College of Medicine (UTCM). It also considers effects of an accelerated program which together with the use of a semiannual admissions system permit more efficient use of facilities and the…

  4. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

  5. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic

  6. Potential-pH diagrams for alloy-water systems under LWR conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubicciotti, Daniel

    Potential-pH diagrams, which present the regions of stability of metallic species with water, are generally known as Pourbaix diagrams. They are especially useful to corrosion scientists because the diagrams indicate the areas of potential and pH in which oxides of the metal are stable and thus the regions in which an oxide corrosion layer can form on the metal, protecting it from corrosion. Potential-pH diagrams are generally available for the metallic elements, even at high temperature (up to about 600 K). But rarely is a pure metal used as a construction material. Stainless steel, which is an alloy of iron, chromium, and nickel plus some trace elements, is often used as a construction material for water systems because of its good corrosion resistance. The oxides in equilibrium with the water-Fe-Cr-Ni system are generally mixed metal oxides. In this paper, Pourbaix diagrams for this system are calculated from thermodynamic values at room temperature and at typical LWR (light water reactor) temperature. Diagrams for the ancilliary systems Fe-Cr-water, Fe-Ni-water and Cr-Ni-water are also given.

  7. Development of an integrated, unattended assay system for LWR-MOX fuel pellet trays

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.E.; Hatcher, C.R.; Pollat, L.L.

    1994-08-01

    Four identical unattended plutonium assay systems have been developed for use at the new light-water-reactor mixed oxide (LWR-MOX) fuel fabrication facility at Hanau, Germany. The systems provide quantitative plutonium verification for all MOX pellet trays entering or leaving a large, intermediate store. Pellet-tray transport and storage systems are highly automated. Data from the ``I-Point`` (information point) assay systems will be shared by the Euratom and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Inspectorates. The I-Point system integrates, for the first time, passive neutron coincidence counting (NCC) with electro-mechanical sensing (EMS) in unattended mode. Also, provisions have been made for adding high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The system accumulates data for every tray entering or leaving the store between inspector visits. During an inspection, data are analyzed and compared with operator declarations for the previous inspection period, nominally one month. Specification of the I-point system resulted from a collaboration between the IAEA, Euratom, Siemens, and Los Alamos. Hardware was developed by Siemens and Los Alamos through a bilateral agreement between the German Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) and the US DOE. Siemens also provided the EMS subsystem, including software. Through the USSupport Program to the IAEA, Los Alamos developed the NCC software (NCC COLLECT) and also the software for merging and reviewing the EMS and NCC data (MERGE/REVIEW). This paper describes the overall I-Point system, but emphasizes the NCC subsystem, along with the NCC COLLECT and MERGE/REVIEW codes. We also summarize comprehensive testing results that define the quality of assay performance.

  8. Semiannual variability of the California Undercurrent along the Southern California Current System: A tropical generated phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Valdivia, Felipe; Parés-Sierra, Alejandro; Laura Flores-Morales, Ana

    2017-02-01

    We used a high-resolution numerical model implementation to analyze the California Undercurrent (CU) dynamics along the Southern California Current System. In agreement with reported observations, the modeled CU was stronger during June-July and December-January, when it flowed continuously along Baja California and Southern California reaching long-term averages up to 6 cm s-1. Previous research has associated the biannual CU intensification to the local dynamics off Southern California. Our results evidenced, however, that the passage of remote Semiannual Coastal-Trapped Waves (SCTW) primarily explained the semiannual CU variability. The CU was stronger 2-3 months after the passage of the upwelling SCTW phase, when the offshore propagation of Rossby waves, brought about by the SCTW transit, induced an energetic cross-shore pressure gradient that strengthened the subsurface poleward circulation along the continental slope. The SCTW were independent of the local wind; they corresponded to the northward extension of semiannual equatorial Kelvin waves that have been observed along the northeastern tropical Pacific.

  9. Utilization of TRISO Fuel with LWR Spent Fuel in Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acır, Adem; Altunok, Taner

    2010-10-01

    HTRs use a high performance particulate TRISO fuel with ceramic multi-layer coatings due to the high burn up capability and very neutronic performance. TRISO fuel because of capable of high burn up and very neutronic performance is conducted in a D-T fusion driven hybrid reactor. In this study, TRISO fuels particles are imbedded body-centered cubic (BCC) in a graphite matrix with a volume fraction of 68%. The neutronic effect of TRISO coated LWR spent fuel in the fuel rod used hybrid reactor on the fuel performance has been investigated for Flibe, Flinabe and Li20Sn80 coolants. The reactor operation time with the different first neutron wall loads is 24 months. Neutron transport calculations are evaluated by using XSDRNPM/SCALE 5 codes with 238 group cross section library. The effect of TRISO coated LWR spent fuel in the fuel rod used hybrid reactor on tritium breeding (TBR), energy multiplication (M), fissile fuel breeding, average burn up values are comparatively investigated. It is shown that the high burn up can be achieved with TRISO fuel in the hybrid reactor.

  10. LWR (Light Water Reactor) power plant simulations using the AD10 and AD100 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Chien, C.J.; Jang, J.Y.; Lin, H.C.; Mallen, A.N.; Wang, S.J.; Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan; Tawian Power Co., Taipei; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan )

    1989-01-01

    Boiling (BWR) and Pressurized (PWR) Water Reactor Power Plants are being simulated at BNL with the AD10 and AD100 Peripheral Processor Systems. The AD10 system has been used for BWR simulations since 1984 for safety analyses, emergency training and optimization studies. BWR simulation capabilities have been implemented recently on the AD100 system and PWR simulation capabilities are currently being developed under the auspices of international cooperation. Modeling and simulation methods are presented with emphasis on the simulation of the Nuclear Steam Supply System. Results are presented for BWR simulation and performance characteristics are compared of the AD10 and AD100 systems. It will be shown that the AD100 simulates two times faster than two AD10 processors operating in parallel and that the computing capacity of one AD100 (with FMU processor) is twice as large as that of two AD10 processors. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Propagation of Uncertainty in System Parameters of a LWR Model by Sampling MCNPX Calculations - Burnup Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Daniel de A. M.; Lima, Claubia P. B.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.

    2014-06-01

    For all the physical components that comprise a nuclear system there is an uncertainty. Assessing the impact of uncertainties in the simulation of fissionable material systems is essential for a best estimate calculation that has been replacing the conservative model calculations as the computational power increases. The propagation of uncertainty in a simulation using a Monte Carlo code by sampling the input parameters is recent because of the huge computational effort required. In this work a sample space of MCNPX calculations was used to propagate the uncertainty. The sample size was optimized using the Wilks formula for a 95th percentile and a two-sided statistical tolerance interval of 95%. Uncertainties in input parameters of the reactor considered included geometry dimensions and densities. It was showed the capacity of the sampling-based method for burnup when the calculations sample size is optimized and many parameter uncertainties are investigated together, in the same input.

  12. Hydrogen-control systems for severe LWR accident conditions - a state-of-technology report

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, R K; Postma, A K; Jeppson, D W

    1983-03-01

    This report reviews the current state of technology regarding hydrogen safety issues in light water reactor plants. Topics considered in this report relate to control systems and include combustion prevention, controlled combustion, minimization of combustion effects, combination of control concepts, and post-accident disposal. A companion report addresses hydrogen generation, distribution, and combustion. The objectives of the study were to identify the key safety issues related to hydrogen produced under severe accident conditions, to describe the state of technology for each issue, and to point out ongoing programs aimed at resolving the open issues.

  13. Semiannual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    The issue of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) Semiannual Report to the congress covers the period from October 1, 1990, to March 31, 1991. Among the significant audits, inspections, and investigations presented in this Semiannual Report are those on environmental testing done by Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, issues relating to the construction of the Superconducting Super Collider, control exercised by the DOE over subcontracts awarded by DOE contractors in furtherance of the Work-For-Others Program, deficiencies in DOE's oversight of the personnel security program, vendors substituting used circuit breakers in place of new ones ordered, and noncompliance with DOE documentation and reporting requirements in making and managing major system acquisitions. The Semiannual report is organized into five major sections. The first section contains brief overviews of the Department of Energy and the Office of Inspector General, as well as OIG views on current legislative matters. The second section describes the significant operational results of OIG audit, inspection, and investigative activity. The third, fourth, and fifth sections contain compilations of OIG statistical data.

  14. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels: Metrics Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Lori Braase; Rose Montgomery; Chris Stanek; Robert Montgomery; Lance Snead; Larry Ott; Mike Billone

    2013-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is conducting research and development on enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) for light water reactors (LWRs). This mission emphasizes the development of novel fuel and cladding concepts to replace the current zirconium alloy-uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The overall mission of the ATF research is to develop advanced fuels/cladding with improved performance, reliability and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions, while minimizing waste generation. The initial effort will focus on implementation in operating reactors or reactors with design certifications. To initiate the development of quantitative metrics for ATR, a LWR Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held in October 2012 in Germantown, MD. This paper summarizes the outcome of that workshop and the current status of metrics development for LWR ATF.

  15. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  16. Integrated High Temperature Coal to Hydrogen System with CO2 Separation: Semi-Annual Progress Report 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, J A; Ku, A; Ramaswamy, V; Wei, W

    2005-12-21

    This is the first semi-annual progress report for the program "Integrated High Temperature Coal to Hydrogen System with CO2 Separation." The objective of the program is to develop a detailed design for a single high-temperature syngas-cleanup module to produce a pure stream of H2 from a coal-based system and to develop the new high-temperature membrane materials at the core of that design. The novel one-box process combines a shift reactor with a high-temperature CO2-selective membrane to convert CO to CO2, remove sulfur compounds, and remove CO2 in a simple, compact, fully integrated system. In the first six months of the program, a conceptual design for the one-box system was developed in Task 1 and the performance targets for the system and the membrane were evaluated. In Task 2.1 processes were developed for creating pore architectures in ceramics that are applicable to membrane structures. In Task 2.2, candidate materials were identified that have the potential for separation of CO2 and H2S at high temperatures.

  17. LWR improvement in EUV resist process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Chawon; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Sumin; Na, Hai-Sub; Park, Chang-Min; Park, Cheolhong; Cho, Kyoung-Yong

    2011-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is the most effective way to print sub-30 nm features. The roughness of both the resist sidewall (line width roughness [LWR]) and resist top must be overcome soon for EUVL to be implemented. Currently, LWR can vary by about 1 nm according to the recipe used. We have characterized two promising techniques to improve LWR, an EUV rinse/TBAH process and an implant process, and demonstrated their efficacy. After cleaning inspection (ACI), LWR was improved with both the rinse and implant processes. After development inspection (ADI), LWR improved (0.12 nm, 2.4%) and ACI LWR improved (0.1 nm, 2.0% improvement) after using the EUV rinse process. ADI and ACI LWR improvement (0.45 nm, 9.1%, and 0.3 nm, 6.9%, respectively) was demonstrated with the EUV rinse/TBAH process. ADI LWR improvement (0.5 nm, 8.1%) and ACI LWR improvement (-0.5 nm, -16.9%) were characterized with the implant process. Critical dimension (CD) showed similar changes through pitch after the EUV rinse or TBAH process, but the degree of change depended on the initial pattern size giving CD difference of 2 nm between 30 nm HP and 50 nm HP after the implant process. For this technique, the dependence of CD change on pattern size must be minimized. Further extensive studies with rinse or implant are strongly encouraged for continued LWR improvement and real process implementation in EUVL. Demonstrating <2.2 nm LWR after pattern transfer is important in EUVL and needs to be pursued using various technical approaches. Initial resist LWR is important in assessing LWR improvements with additional process techniques. An initial EUV LWR < ~5.0 nm is required to properly assess the validity of the technique. Further study is required to improve ADI LWR and maintain better LWR after etch with advanced EUV rinse materials. Defects also need to be confirmed following the EUV rinse and TBAH developer. Further developing the implant process should focus on LWR improvement at low

  18. Providing the Basis for Innovative Improvements in Advanced LWR Reactor Passive Safety Systems Design: An Educational R&D Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brian G. Williams; Jim C. P. Liou; Hiral Kadakia; Bill Phoenix; Richard R. Schultz

    2007-02-27

    This project characterizes typical two-phase stratified flow conditions in advanced water reactor horizontal pipe sections, following activation of passive cooling systems. It provides (1) a means to educate nuclear engineering students regarding the importance of two-phase stratified flow in passive cooling systems to the safety of advanced reactor systems and (2) describes the experimental apparatus and process to measure key parameters essential to consider when designing passive emergency core cooling flow paths that may encounter this flow regime. Based on data collected, the state of analysis capabilities can be determined regarding stratified flow in advanced reactor systems and the best paths forward can be identified to ensure that the nuclear industry can properly characterize two-phase stratified flow in passive emergency core cooling systems.

  19. 76 FR 40200 - Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... RESERVE SYSTEM (FRS) Final Rule Stage 445. Regulation Z--Escrow Requirements (Docket No. R-1406) Legal... July 7, 2011 Part XXI Federal Reserve System Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 130 / Thursday, July 7, 2011 / Unified Agenda#0;#0; ] FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 12 CFR Ch. II...

  20. System analysis with improved thermo-mechanical fuel rod models for modeling current and advanced LWR materials in accident scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Ian Edward

    A nuclear reactor systems code has the ability to model the system response in an accident scenario based on known initial conditions at the onset of the transient. However, there has been a tendency for these codes to lack the detailed thermo-mechanical fuel rod response models needed for accurate prediction of fuel rod failure. This proposed work will couple today's most widely used steady-state (FRAPCON) and transient (FRAPTRAN) fuel rod models with a systems code TRACE for best-estimate modeling of system response in accident scenarios such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In doing so, code modifications will be made to model gamma heating in LWRs during steady-state and accident conditions and to improve fuel rod thermal/mechanical analysis by allowing axial nodalization of burnup-dependent phenomena such as swelling, cladding creep and oxidation. With the ability to model both burnup-dependent parameters and transient fuel rod response, a fuel dispersal study will be conducted using a hypothetical accident scenario under both PWR and BWR conditions to determine the amount of fuel dispersed under varying conditions. Due to the fuel fragmentation size and internal rod pressure both being dependent on burnup, this analysis will be conducted at beginning, middle and end of cycle to examine the effects that cycle time can play on fuel rod failure and dispersal. Current fuel rod and system codes used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are compilations of legacy codes with only commonly used light water reactor materials, Uranium Dioxide (UO2), Mixed Oxide (U/PuO 2) and zirconium alloys. However, the events at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island accident have shown the need for exploration into advanced materials possessing improved accident tolerance. This work looks to further modify the NRC codes to include silicon carbide (SiC), an advanced cladding material proposed by current DOE funded research on accident tolerant fuels (ATF). Several

  1. A fully-implicit high-order system thermal-hydraulics model for advanced non-LWR safety analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Rui

    2016-11-19

    An advanced system analysis tool is being developed for advanced reactor safety analysis. This paper describes the underlying physics and numerical models used in the code, including the governing equations, the stabilization schemes, the high-order spatial and temporal discretization schemes, and the Jacobian Free Newton Krylov solution method. The effects of the spatial and temporal discretization schemes are investigated. Additionally, a series of verification test problems are presented to confirm the high-order schemes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the developed system thermal-hydraulics model can be strictly verified with the theoretical convergence rates, and that it performs very well for amore » wide range of flow problems with high accuracy, efficiency, and minimal numerical diffusions.« less

  2. A fully-implicit high-order system thermal-hydraulics model for advanced non-LWR safety analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Rui

    2016-11-19

    An advanced system analysis tool is being developed for advanced reactor safety analysis. This paper describes the underlying physics and numerical models used in the code, including the governing equations, the stabilization schemes, the high-order spatial and temporal discretization schemes, and the Jacobian Free Newton Krylov solution method. The effects of the spatial and temporal discretization schemes are investigated. Additionally, a series of verification test problems are presented to confirm the high-order schemes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the developed system thermal-hydraulics model can be strictly verified with the theoretical convergence rates, and that it performs very well for a wide range of flow problems with high accuracy, efficiency, and minimal numerical diffusions.

  3. 75 FR 79929 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] Part XXII Federal Trade Commission ###Semiannual Regulatory Agenda### ] FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION (FTC) FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Ch. I Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory...

  4. Subtask 3.12 -- Small power systems. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The programmatic goal in advanced power systems is to develop small integrated waste treatment, water purification, and power systems in the range of 20 kW to 20 MW in cooperation with commercial vendors. These systems will be designed to incorporate the advanced technical capabilities of the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with the latest advancement in vendor-offered hardware and software. The primary objective for the work to be performed under this subtask is to develop a commercialization plan for small power systems, evaluate alternative design concepts, and select practical and economical designs for targeted development in upcoming years. A leading objective for the EERC will be to continue to form strong business partnerships with equipment manufacturers who can commercialize the selected power system and treatment design(s). FY95 activities were focused on collecting information from vendors and evaluating alternative design concepts. This year`s activities began with the process of selecting one or more designs for targeted development. Once the design(s) are selected, specific technical requirements will be defined that will be the subject of focused studies to overcome technical barriers to achieving a clean, cost-effective generating system. During this program year, the technical barriers limiting the use of the selected technology in the small power system market will be identified. A plan will be devised to overcome these barriers. Also during this program year, strong business partnerships will be developed between the EERC, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), and equipment manufacturers who can commercialize the selected power system(s). A plan will be created for rapid development leading to commercialization. This may involve integration of this task with other research activities currently ongoing at the EERC and METC.

  5. Task 3.0: Advanced power systems. Semi-annual report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McCollor, D.P.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Mann, M.D.; Willson, W.G.; Hurley, J.P.

    1993-07-01

    A variety of activities are incorporated into the Advanced Power Systems program. Tasks included are (1) fuel utilization properties, (2) pressurized combustion, (3) catalytic gasification, and (4) hot-gas cleanup. ATRAN is stochastic and combines initial coal inorganics in a random manner in order to predict the resulting fly ash particle size and composition. ASHPERT, is an expert system yielding a first-order estimate of fly ash size and composition. Both models are designed to emulate pulverized-coal combustion. Input data required include identity, chemistry, size, quantity, and mineral-to-coal associations. The pressurized combustion task has focused on the construction of a versatile reactor system to simulate pressurized fluidized-bed combustion. Both castable and monolithic refractories have been investigated in determining slag prevention under a variety of conditions. Catalytic gasification coupled with a molten carbonate fuel cell offers an extremely efficient and environmentally sound power generating system using coal. Work with an Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal has not been successful. Continued efforts will focus on using the more reactive low-rank coals to try to achieve this goal. Hot-gas cleanup is the critical issue in many of the proposed advanced power system operations on coal. The key to successful ash removal is an understanding of the properties of the ash to be collected as well as the interactions of this material with the barrier itself. The knowledge base under development will assist in assessing many of these barrier material issues for a variety of coal ashes.

  6. Semi-annual report, summary of Rockwell International - Energy Systems Group contribution. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    In the decontamination task, emphasis during this report period was on determining the effect of various sensitization conditions on the metal removal rate for various stainless steel alloys, using the reference decontamination process. An accurate prediction of metal removal rate is necessary to determine the optimum process time. Results to date indicate that alloys exposed to sodium at reactor conditions show a higher metal removal rate than the same types of alloys exposed to equivalent time-temperature conditions in a vacuum. Other decontamination work included preparations for determining the effect of the reference decontamination process on hardfacing alloys and assistance in design modifications of the Clinch River Reactor decontamination system. In the program task to develop an evaporative process to remove sodium from a full-size fuel subassembly, progress was made in the final assembly of the evaporation system. The test article, a fuel subassembly, was modified by adding heaters to simulate gamma heating. Thermocouples were attached at suitable internal and external positions. The vacuum containment system was assembled and leak checked. The assembly of the system is progressing on schedule and will be conpleted during the next report period.

  7. Subtask 3.12 - Small power systems. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Kurz, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    One of the overall goals of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the technology necessary to provide for a secure, reliable, affordable, and environmentally sound source of energy. This technology is important to ensure economic stability and growth in the next century as well as to reduce current and minimize future environmental impact associated with power generation in the US and the world. Throughout the world, coal will play an expanded role in the production of affordable energy necessary to meet the demands of economic development and growth. The development of more efficient and environmentally sound technology in the US may present export market opportunities throughout the world. For coal to play a key role in the energy mix, it will be necessary to develop and commercialize technologies capable of producing electricity at significantly higher overall system efficiencies with minimum emissions. A number of demonstration projects addressing these needs for large utility plants are being performed under the Clean Coal Technology Program. A need also exists for smaller (20-kW to 20-MW) systems to satisfy the needs of remote-site markets. Many of these markets are in areas where a small increment of power is needed to meet demand, and the installation of transmission lines to bring in the power is not practical or economical. Diesel engines have traditionally filled this market niche; however, some of the advanced power systems currently under development could provide power more economically and with reduced environmental risk. Innovative solutions to barrier issues that are in some measure common to all advanced power system processes can be developed and demonstrated more economically and effectively in small-scale systems.

  8. Improving the safety of LWR power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Study to identify current, potential research issues and efforts for improving the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plants. This final report describes the work accomplished, the results obtained, the problem areas, and the recommended solutions. Specifically, for each of the issues identified in this report for improving the safety of LWR power plants, a description is provided in detail of the safety significance, the current status (including information sources, status of technical knowledge, problem solution and current activities), and the suggestions for further research and development. Further, the issues are ranked for action into high, medium, and low priority with respect to primarily (a) improved safety (e.g. potential reduction in public risk and occupational exposure), and secondly (b) reduction in safety-related costs (improving or maintaining level of safety with simpler systems or in a more cost-effective manner).

  9. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1999 through September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks.

  10. HTGR applications program advanced systems. Semiannual report, October 1, 1982-March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-05-01

    Work Breakdown Structure (WBS 41) activities emphasize the advanced HTGR modular reactor system (MRS) for reformer (R) and steam cycle/-cogeneration (SC/C) applications. This report describes progress in system performance for a 250-MW(t) MRS-R and a 300-MW(t) MRS-SC/C plant; it details the groundrules and parameters for the FY-83 nuclear core design and examines and compares fuel cycle economics. This report gives results from a study on decay heat removal transients for the MRS-R and MRS-SC/C variants. It evaluates the bypass valve system and the number and location of helium circulators, and it describes the progress on circulator component design, a prestressed concrete vessel steel closure design, and plant licensing and safety. Under the Advanced Technology Transfer Task (WBS 15), this report includes a section on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) MRS core heatup thermal model analysis. This report also gives the results of a survey on candidate reformer tube materials from GA Technologies Inc. to identify acceptable substitute materials for Inconel 617 to alleviate possible cobalt activation and carburization problems.

  11. Propulsion System Materials Program semiannual progress report for April 1995 through September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the DOE, NASA, and DOD advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a 5-year program plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. During the course of the Propulsion System Materials Program, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. To this end, the direction of the Propulsion System Materials Program is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported to include near-term (5--10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

  12. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1998 thru September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  13. Microfabricated DNA analysis system. Semi-annual report, August 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We are miniaturizing instrumentation for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) -- a bioanalytical technique that amplifies target sections of DNA through thermal cycling. This report focuses on delineating reaction chamber, design parameters through computer modeling and infrared imaging. We have also continued micro-chamber-based PCR experiments and have successfully amplified three different targets from two different biological sources. Specifically, we have amplified DNA from {beta}-globin (a subunit of hemoglobin), and two different-sized targets from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). These experiments were performed in newly-designed chambers. Reaction chambers are also being designed with detection in mind, specifically for the detection of fluorescent DNA labels. Finally, some new developments in PCR technology are described as they represent potential biological diagnostics to be evaluated in microfabricated DNA analysis systems.

  14. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program: Semiannual progress report, April 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for contributions to this report.

  15. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for April 2000 Through September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, DR

    2000-12-11

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advantages LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOx and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and

  16. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for October 1998 Through March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OIT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOX and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulate. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OIT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1,2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and

  17. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program semiannual progress report for October 1996 through March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and tribological stresses and higher temperatures of advanced designs limit the engine designers; advanced materials allow the design of components that may operate reliably at higher stresses and temperatures, thus enabling more efficient engine designs. Advanced materials also offer the opportunity to improve the emissions, NVH, and performance of diesel engines for pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. The principal areas of research are: (1) cost effective high performance materials and processing; (2) advanced manufacturing technology; (3) testing and characterization; and (4) materials and testing standards.

  18. Status report on assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for LWR extended service conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, S.; Soppet, W. K.; Majumdar, S.; Natesan, K.

    2014-07-09

    This report provides an update on an earlier assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor (LWR) materials under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2013, under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue in the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. The overall objective of this LWRS project is to assess the degradation by environmentally assisted cracking/fatigue of LWR materials, such as various alloy base metals and their welds used in reactor coolant system piping. This effort is to support the U.S. Department of Energy LWRS program for developing tools to predict the aging/failure mechanism and to correspondingly predict the remaining life of LWR components for anticipated 60-80 year operation.

  19. Evaluation of Methods for Decladding LWR Fuel for a Pyroprocessing-Based Reprocessing Plant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    Liiz 00 zz 00 LAi 0 F-.. 1 0VI V) I. C0 5 7 t AL.11 Fig. 2. Westinghouse PWR fuel assembly. (Source: Westinghouse Electric Company Information...Brochure.) 6 photograph of a Westinghouse PWR fuel assembly. Decladding systems for the LWR- Actinide Recycle (LWR-AR) plant under study will have as a...types, the thickness of the cladding ranges from 0.03 to 0.037 in. 2. Zircaloy-4. This cladding material is used in PWR fuel rods and has as its

  20. Determination of optimal LWR containment design, excluding accidents more severe than Class 8

    SciTech Connect

    Cave, L.; Min, T.K.

    1980-04-01

    Information is presented concerning the restrictive effect of existing NRC requirements; definition of possible targets for containment; possible containment systems for LWR; optimization of containment design for class 3 through class 8 accidents (PWR); estimated costs of some possible containment arrangements for PWR relative to the standard dry containment system; estimated costs of BWR containment.

  1. SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

  2. 78 FR 11735 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... February 19, 2013 Part II Small Business Administration Semiannual Regulatory Agenda; Correction #0;#0... ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Ch. I Semiannual Regulatory Agenda; Correction AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION: Semiannual Regulatory Agenda; correction. SUMMARY: This document contains a...

  3. 78 FR 44349 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... July 23, 2013 Part XXI Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0... FINANCIAL PROTECTION 12 CFR Ch. X Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory agenda. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (CFPB...

  4. Technical report on LWR design decision methodology. Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-01

    Energy Incorporated (EI) was selected by Sandia Laboratories to develop and test on LWR design decision methodology. Contract Number 42-4229 provided funding for Phase I of this work. This technical report on LWR design decision methodology documents the activities performed under that contract. Phase I was a short-term effort to thoroughly review the curret LWR design decision process to assure complete understanding of current practices and to establish a well defined interface for development of initial quantitative design guidelines.

  5. 48 CFR 1422.406-13 - Semiannual enforcement reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Semiannual enforcement reports. 1422.406-13 Section 1422.406-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Labor Standards for Contracts...

  6. 48 CFR 1422.406-13 - Semiannual enforcement reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Semiannual enforcement reports. 1422.406-13 Section 1422.406-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Labor Standards for Contracts...

  7. Main contributions of the KfK nuclear safety project in the LWR safety area

    SciTech Connect

    Kuczera, B.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Project (PNS) was established at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in 1972. At that time, nuclear energy in the Federal Republic of Germany was in a transition phase proceeding from light water reactor (LWR) demonstration plants (300 MW(e)) to commercial size plants of 1200 to 1300 MW(e) which are standard units today. Simultaneously, general questions about LWR safety and reliability as well as questions on risk-oriented features became more pronounced in the public discussion. As a consequence, various already existing LWR safety activities were brought together and combined in the organizational framework of the PNS. The overriding objectives of PNS research and development (R and D) effort were at the quantification of safety margins of reactor systems and components, and the improvement of existing safety systems to avoid accident occurrence and to minimize accident consequences. In close cooperation with governmental authorities, manufacturers, and utilities, an R and D program was developed, comprised of four main areas: 1) dynamic behavior of reactor components; 2) fuel element behavior under accident conditions; 3) core meltdown accident analyses; and 4) retention of radioactive fission products and limitation of severe accident consequences. An overview on the KfK contribution to LWR safety research is given. It deals in a comprehensive matter with results obtained in the areas listed above.

  8. LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K.; Takano, M.; Sato, S.; Shimazu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

  9. Multilevel transport solution of LWR reactor cores

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Ignacio Marquez Damian; Cassiano R.E. de Oliveira; HyeonKae Park

    2008-09-01

    This work presents a multilevel approach for the solution of the transport equation in typical LWR assemblies and core configurations. It is based on the second-order, even-parity formulation of the transport equation, which is solved within the framework provided by the finite element-spherical harmonics code EVENT. The performance of the new solver has been compared with that of the standard conjugate gradient solver for diffusion and transport problems on structured and unstruc-tured grids. Numerical results demonstrate the potential of the multilevel scheme for realistic reactor calculations.

  10. Spatial-temporal patterns and driving mechanisms of semiannual variations in the Philippine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Li, Yuanlong; Wang, Fan; Zhai, Fangguo; Yu, Xiaolin

    2012-10-01

    Satellite altimetric sea surface height (SSH) measurements from 1992 through 2010 are used to explore the oceanic semiannual variations in the Philippine Sea (PS). Pronounced semiannual SSH variations are detected within two zonal bands. One lies east of Luzon Strait (19°-22°N) in the northern PS, while the other is southeast of Mindanao coast (4°-7°N) in the southern PS. In the two near-coast boxes where semiannual harmonic amplitude exceeds 4 cm, the northern box (127°-133°E, 19°-22°N) and the southern box (127°-133°E, 4°-7°N), semiannual changes contribute considerably to the total annual SSH variance by 12% and 17%, respectively. Despite prominent SSH variability, the bifurcation latitude of the North Equatorial Current (NBL) exhibits weak fluctuations with a peak-to-peak difference of only 0.3° on semiannual time scale. While the in-phase annual SSH variations between the two boxes work together to enhance annual NBL changes, their out-of-phase semiannual SSH variations offset each other in driving the NBL displacements. Further analysis with a 11/2-layer reduced-gravity model forced by ECMWF wind stress reveals that the observed semiannual SSH variations are primarily driven by local wind forcing in the far western Pacific. Rossby wave signals propagating from the eastern/central Pacific contribute much less due to along-path dispersion and cancellation. Semiannual signals of wind field in the northern PS reflect mainly the semiannual changes of the Asian Monsoon system, while those in the southern PS arise from the combined effects of Monsoon transition and the annual migration of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ).

  11. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities). During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET team continued its efforts to complete software components needed for the ESG Gateway and Data Node. These components include: Data Versioning, Data Replication, DataMover-Lite (DML) and Bulk Data Mover (BDM), Metrics, Product Services, and Security, all joining together to form ESG-CET's first beta release. The launch of the beta release is scheduled for late October with the installation of ESG Gateways at NCAR and LLNL/PCMDI. Using the developed ESG Data Publisher, the ESG II CMIP3 (IPCC AR4) data holdings - approximately 35 TB - will be among the first datasets to be published into the new ESG enterprise system. In addition, the NCAR's ESG II data holdings will also be published into the new system - approximately 200 TB. This period also saw the testing of the ESG Data Node at various collaboration sites, including: the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, the University of Tokyo Center for

  12. Thermal Properties of Structural Materials Used in LWR Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Daw; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson

    2011-01-01

    High temperature material property data for structural materials used in existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are limited. Often, extrapolated values recommended in the literature differ significantly. To reduce uncertainties in predictions relying upon extrapolated data for LWR vessel and penetration materials, high temperature tests were completed on SA533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) low alloy steel, Stainless Steel 304 (SS304), and Inconel 600 using material property measurement systems available in the High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Properties measured include thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity for temperatures up to 1200 °C. From these results, thermal conductivity and density were calculated. Results show that, in some cases, previously recommended values for these materials differ significantly from measured values at high temperatures.

  13. LIFE vs. LWR: End of the Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Blink, J A; Shaw, H F

    2008-10-02

    The worldwide energy consumption in 2003 was 421 quadrillion Btu (Quads), and included 162 quads for oil, 99 quads for natural gas, 100 quads for coal, 27 quads for nuclear energy, and 33 quads for renewable sources. The projected worldwide energy consumption for 2030 is 722 quads, corresponding to an increase of 71% over the consumption in 2003. The projected consumption for 2030 includes 239 quads for oil, 190 quads for natural gas, 196 quads for coal, 35 quads for nuclear energy, and 62 quads for renewable sources [International Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0484, Table D1 (2006) p. 133]. The current fleet of light water reactors (LRWs) provides about 20% of current U.S. electricity, and about 16% of current world electricity. The demand for electricity is expected to grow steeply in this century, as the developing world increases its standard of living. With the increasing price for oil and gasoline within the United States, as well as fear that our CO2 production may be driving intolerable global warming, there is growing pressure to move away from oil, natural gas, and coal towards nuclear energy. Although there is a clear need for nuclear energy, issues facing waste disposal have not been adequately dealt with, either domestically or internationally. Better technological approaches, with better public acceptance, are needed. Nuclear power has been criticized on both safety and waste disposal bases. The safety issues are based on the potential for plant damage and environmental effects due to either nuclear criticality excursions or loss of cooling. Redundant safety systems are used to reduce the probability and consequences of these risks for LWRs. LIFE engines are inherently subcritical, reducing the need for systems to control the fission reactivity. LIFE engines also have a fuel type that tolerates much higher temperatures than LWR fuel, and has two safety systems to remove decay heat in the event of loss of coolant or loss of coolant flow. These features of

  14. Calculation evaluation of multiplying properties of LWR with thorium fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanin, I. V.; Grachev, V. M.; Knyshev, V. V.; Bedenko, S. V.; Novikova, N. G.

    2017-01-01

    The results of multiplying properties design research of the unit cell and LWR fuel assembly with the high temperature gas-cooled thorium reactor fuel pellet are presented in the work. The calculation evaluation showed the possibility of using thorium in LWR effectively. In this case the amount of fissile isotope is 2.45 times smaller in comparison with the standard loading of LWR. The research and numerical experiments were carried out using the verified accounting code of the program MCU5, modern libraries of evaluated nuclear data and multigroup approximations.

  15. Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... [Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] Part XIV Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Ch. I EPA-HQ-OA-2007-1172 EPA-HQ-OW-2010-0169 EPA-HQ-OW-2010-0166 EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0052 Spring 2010 Regulatory Agenda AGENCY:...

  16. Department of Homeland Security Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Part VIII Department of Homeland Security Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Chs. I and II Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, DHS. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory agenda. SUMMARY: This...

  17. Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... [Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] Part XII Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (DOT) DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary 14 CFR Chs. I-III 23 CFR Chs. I-III 33 CFR Chs. I and IV 46 CFR Chs. I-III 48 CFR Ch. 12 49 CFR Subtitle A, Chs. I-VI and Chs....

  18. Federal Communications Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Part XVIII Federal Communications Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (FCC) FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Ch. I Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory agenda. SUMMARY: Twice a year, in spring and fall...

  19. 77 FR 8020 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... February 13, 2012 Part XIX Small Business Administration Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 29 / Monday, February 13, 2012 / Unified Agenda#0;#0; ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Ch. I Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION...

  20. Options for Burning LWR SNF in LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J

    2008-09-09

    We have pursued two processes in parallel for the burning of LWR SNF in the LIFE engine: (1) solid fuel option and (2) liquid fuel option. Approaches with both are discussed. The assigned Topical Report on liquid fuels is attached.

  1. Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1982-31 January 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W.E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

    1983-02-01

    The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

  2. Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1981-31 January 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W. E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

    1982-02-01

    The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

  3. Task 3.12 - small power systems. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1997--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Mayer, G.D.; Stepan, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    One of the overall goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the technology necessary to provide for a secure, reliable, affordable, and environmentally sound source of energy. This technology is important to ensure economic stability and growth in the next century as well as to reduce current and minimize future environmental impacts associated with power generation in the United States and the world. Throughout the world, coal will play an expanded role in the production of affordable energy necessary to meet the demands of economic development and growth. The development of more efficient and environmentally sound technology in the United States may present export market opportunities throughout the world. For coal to play a key role in the energy mix, it will be necessary to develop and commercialize technologies capable of producing electricity at significantly higher overall system efficiencies with minimum emissions. The programmatic goal in advanced power systems will be to develop small power systems in the range of 20 kW to 20 MW in cooperation with commercial vendors. These systems will be designed to incorporate the advanced technical capabilities of the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with the latest advancement in vendor-offered hardware and software. Work during this program year has focused on developing an integrated modular support system (IMSS) for small communities. A concept has been developed along with an approach for demonstrating an IMSS. Some of the constraints that must be overcome before the concept can be fully commercialized have also been identified and are presented here. This modular approach uses new and existing technologies to provide waste disposal, water supply treatment, and/or power generation capabilities on a scale appropriate to the situation.

  4. Northwest Laboratory for Integrated Systems, University of Washington, Semiannual Technical Report Number 1, July 1-November 8, 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-08

    contain Typically timing constraints are informally specified using program code (e.g.. C++ source code ) that is evaluated timing diagrams and tables...rpefl) Office of Naval Research - ONR Information Systems Program - Code 1513: CAF 800 North Quincy Street IS. OECLASSIFCATION/OOWNGRAOING Arlington, VA...11 Appendices: TRIPTYCH: A New FPGA Architecture (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington, TR #91-09-05) OEsim: A

  5. Fort Hood solar total energy project: technical support and systems integration. Third semiannual report, May 1, 1979-October 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Work on the Fort Hood STES which was planned by DOE as a Large Scale Experiment for the Solar Total Energy Program is described. The history of the design evolution and management of the project which began in 1973 is summarized. The project was discontinued by DOE in December 1979. Supporting studies underway at the time are reported including: (1) reassessment of energy loads, (2) revised system concept, (3) plant sizing calculations, and (4) insolation variation measurement planning. (WHK)

  6. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semi-annual progress report for October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  7. Evaluation of FSV-1 cask for the transport of LWR irradiated fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The Model FSV-1 spent fuel shipping cask was designed by General Atomic Company (GA) to service the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) nuclear generating station, a High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). This report presents an evaluation of the suitability of the FSV-1 cask for the transport of irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies from both Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The FSV-1 cask evaluation parameters covered a wide spectrum of LWR fuel assemblies, based on burnup in Megawatt Days/Metric Ton of Heavy Metal (MWD/MTHM) and years of decay since irradiation. The criteria for suitability included allowable radiation dose rates, cask surface and interior temperatures and the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the complete shipping system.

  8. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semiannual Progress Report October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-04-02

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) from October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011. It discusses ESG-CET highlights for the reporting period, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations, and lists papers and presentations. To learn more about our project and to find previous reports, please visit the ESG-CET Web sites: http://esg-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ and/or https://wiki.ucar.edu/display/esgcet/Home. This report will be forwarded to managers in the Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), as well as national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., those involved in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES); SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science; the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP); the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)), and also to researchers working on a variety of other climate model and observation evaluation activities. The ESG-CET executive committee consists of Dean N. Williams, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ian Foster, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); and Don Middleton, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The ESG-CET team is a group of researchers and scientists with diverse domain knowledge, whose home institutions include eight laboratories and two universities: ANL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LLNL, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NCAR, Oak Ridge National

  9. Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous LWR MOX fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicu, D.; Barker, M.

    2013-11-01

    It is generally observed that the thermal conductivity of LWR MOX fuel is lower than that of pure UO2. For MOX, the degradation is usually only interpreted as an effect of the substitution of U atoms by Pu. This hypothesis is however in contradiction with the observations of Duriez and Philiponneau showing that the thermal conductivity of MOX is independent of the Pu content in the ranges 3-15 and 15-30 wt.% PuO2 respectively. Attributing this degradation to Pu only implies that stoichiometric heterogeneous MOX can be obtained, while we show that any heterogeneity in the plutonium distribution in the sample introduces a variation in the local stoichiometry which in turn has a strong impact on the thermal conductivity. A model quantifying this effect is obtained and a new set of experimental results for homogeneous and heterogeneous MOX fuels is presented and used to validate the proposed model. In irradiated fuels, this effect is predicted to disappear early during irradiation. The 3, 6 and 10 wt.% Pu samples have a similar thermal conductivity. Comparison of the results for this homogeneous microstructure with MIMAS (heterogeneous) fuel of the same composition showed no difference for the Pu contents of 3, 5.9, 6, 7.87 and 10 wt.%. A small increase of the thermal conductivity was obtained for 15 wt.% Pu. This increase is of about 6% when compared to the average of the values obtained for 3, 6 and 10 wt.% Pu. For comparison purposes, Duriez also measured the thermal conductivity of FBR MOX with 21.4 wt.% Pu with O/M = 1.982 and a density close to 95% TD and found a value in good agreement with the estimation obtained using the formula of Philipponneau [8] for FBR MOX, and significantly lower than his results corresponding to the range 3-15 wt.% Pu. This difference in thermal conductivity is of about 20%, i.e. higher than the measurement uncertainties.Thus, a significant difference was observed between FBR and PWR MOX fuels, but was not explained. This difference

  10. 75 FR 79795 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...This notice provides the semiannual agenda of rules scheduled for review or development between fall 2010 and spring 2011. The Regulatory Flexibility Act and Executive Order 12866 require publication of the agenda.

  11. 78 FR 1594 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ...This notice provides the semiannual agenda of rules scheduled for review or development between fall 2012 and spring 2013. The Regulatory Flexibility Act and Executive Order 12866 require publication of the agenda.

  12. Department of Commerce Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Part IV Department of Commerce Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (DOC) DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Office of the Secretary 13 CFR Ch. III 15 CFR Subtitle A; Subtitle B, Chs. I, II, III, VII, VIII, IX, and XI 19 CFR Ch. III 37 CFR Chs. I, IV, and V 48 CFR Ch. 13 50 CFR Chs. II, III, IV, and VI Spring 2010 Semiannual Agenda of...

  13. CO2 annual and semiannual cycles from multiple satellite retrievals and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xun; Crisp, David; Olsen, Edward T.; Kulawik, Susan S.; Miller, Charles E.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Liang, Maochang; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-02-01

    Satellite CO2 retrievals from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and in situ measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA-ESRL) Surface CO2 and Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) are utilized to explore the CO2 variability at different altitudes. A multiple regression method is used to calculate the CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes from different data sets. The CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes for GOSAT XCO2 and TCCON XCO2 are consistent but smaller than those seen in the NOAA-ESRL surface data. The CO2 annual and semiannual cycles are smallest in the AIRS midtropospheric CO2 compared with other data sets in the Northern Hemisphere. The amplitudes for the CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle from GOSAT, TES, and AIRS CO2 are small and comparable to each other in the Southern Hemisphere. Similar regression analysis is applied to the Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers-2 and CarbonTracker model CO2. The convolved model CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes are similar to those from the satellite CO2 retrievals, although the models tend to underestimate the CO2 seasonal cycle amplitudes in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes and underestimate the CO2 semiannual cycle amplitudes in the high latitudes. These results can be used to better understand the vertical structures for the CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle and help identify deficiencies in the models, which are very important for the carbon budget study.

  14. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel Development for LWR Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Besmann, Theodore M; Terrani, Kurt A; Voit, Stewart L

    2012-01-01

    The concept, fabrication, and key feasibility issues of a new fuel form based on the microencapsulated (TRISO-type) fuel which has been specifically engineered for LWR application and compacted within a SiC matrix will be presented. This fuel, the so-called fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel is currently undergoing development as an accident tolerant fuel for potential UO2 replacement in commercial LWRs. While the ability of this fuel to facilitate normal LWR cycle performance is an ongoing effort within the program, this will not be a focus of this paper. Rather, key feasibility and performance aspects of the fuel will be presented including the ability to fabricate a LWR-specific TRISO, the need for and route to a high thermal conductivity and fully dense matrix that contains neutron poisons, and the performance of that matrix under irradiation and the interaction of the fuel with commercial zircaloy clad.

  15. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2005 - Mar 31, 2006

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-06-004, April, 2006. Many of the reviews that we conducted during the semiannual period provided recommendations to help the Agency achieve its mission of protecting human health and the environment.

  16. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2016 - March 31, 2017

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-17-001, May, 2017. During the semiannual period, the OIG issued various audit and program evaluation reports with recommendations to help the EPA improve efficiency, as well as better protect people and the environment.

  17. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2007 - Sept 30, 2007

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-07-003, Nov, 2007. This semiannual report includes details on these and other issues, including investigations that resulted in payments to the Federal Government and criminal, civil, or administrative actions.

  18. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2006 - Sept 30, 2006

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-06-005, Oct, 2006. This semiannual report includes details on these and other issues, including a number of investigations that resulted in payments to the Federal government and criminal, civil, or administrative actions.

  19. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2001 - Mar 31, 2002

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-k-01-002, May, 2002. During this semiannual reporting period, EPA's Office of Inspector General, identified Major Management Challenges which could severely impact the attainment of EPA’s mission.

  20. Semiannual Report: April 1, 2001 - Sept 30, 2001

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-K-01-002, Nov, 2001. The report summaries included in this semiannual report clearly illustrate some of the challenges the new Administration faces in its quest to deliver efficient and effective environmental programs.

  1. 32 CFR 70.11 - DoD semiannual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false DoD semiannual report. 70.11 Section 70.11... DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD (DRB) PROCEDURES AND STANDARDS § 70.11 DoD semiannual report. (a) Semiannual reports... from the first through the last days of each reporting period. (c) The report will contain four...

  2. 32 CFR 70.11 - DoD semiannual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DoD semiannual report. 70.11 Section 70.11... DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD (DRB) PROCEDURES AND STANDARDS § 70.11 DoD semiannual report. (a) Semiannual reports... from the first through the last days of each reporting period. (c) The report will contain four...

  3. Identification of the impacts of maintenance and testing upon the safety of LWR power plants. Part II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Husseiny, A. A.; Sabri, Z. A.; Turnage, J. J.

    1980-04-01

    Information is presented concerning overview of literature relating to radiation exposure and operating experience; details of LWR-MTC3 classification system; histograms for individual BWR facilities depicting frequency of M and T mode and frequency of systems and components involved with M and T problems; histograms for individual PWR facilities depicting frequency of M and T mode and frequency of systems and components involved with M and T problems; and Fortran program for M and T data clustering.

  4. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), in collaboration with the nuclear industry, has been conducting research and development (R&D) activities on advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels for the last few years. The emphasis for these activities was on improving the fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization and increased power density for power upgrades, as well as collaborating with industry on fuel reliability. After the events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. In the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Conference Report 112-75, the U.S. Congress directed DOE-NE to: • Give “priority to developing enhanced fuels and cladding for light water reactors to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools.” • Give “special technical emphasis and funding priority…to activities aimed at the development and near-term qualification of meltdown-resistant, accident-tolerant nuclear fuels that would enhance the safety of present and future generations of light water reactors.” • Report “to the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, on its plan for development of meltdown-resistant fuels leading to reactor testing and utilization by 2020.” Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The overall draft strategy for development and demonstration is comprised of three phases: Feasibility Assessment and Down-selection; Development and Qualification; and

  5. Survey of LWR environmental control technology performance and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Lewallen, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    This study attempts to establish a ranking for species that are routinely released to the environment for a projected nuclear power growth scenario. Unlike comparisons made to existing standards, which are subject to frequent revision, the ranking of releases can be used to form a more logical basis for identifying the areas where further development of control technology could be required. This report describes projections of releases for several fuel cycle scenarios, identifies areas where alternative control technologies may be implemented, and discusses the available alternative control technologies. The release factors were used in a computer code system called ENFORM, which calculates the annual release of any species from any part of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle given a projection of installed nuclear generation capacity. This survey of fuel cycle releases was performed for three reprocessing scenarios (stowaway, reprocessing without recycle of Pu and reprocessing with full recycle of U and Pu) for a 100-year period beginning in 1977. The radioactivity releases were ranked on the basis of a relative ranking factor. The relative ranking factor is based on the 100-year summation of the 50-year population dose commitment from an annual release of radioactive effluents. The nonradioactive releases were ranked on the basis of dilution factor. The twenty highest ranking radioactive releases were identified and each of these was analyzed in terms of the basis for calculating the release and a description of the currently employed control method. Alternative control technology is then discussed, along with the available capital and operating cost figures for alternative control methods.

  6. Task 3.0 -- Advanced power systems: Subtask 3.18 -- Ash behavior in power systems. Semi-annual report, June 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Zygarlicke, C.J.; McCollor, D.P.; Folkedahl, B.C.; Swanson, M.L.; Musich, M.A.

    1998-10-01

    Advanced power systems such as integrated gasifier combined cycle systems and fluidized bed systems are at the forefront of power industry research because of the need for increased efficiency and the reduction of greenhouse gases. Ash behavior in power systems can have a significant impact on the design and performance of these systems. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a focused research initiative aimed at filling gaps in the understanding of fundamental mechanisms of ash behavior, which has relevance to commercial application and marketable products associated with advanced power systems. This program develops methods and means to better understand and mitigate adverse coal ash behavior in advanced power systems and can act to relieve the US reliance on diminishing recoverable oil resources and other greenhouse-producing fossil fuels. Subtask 3.18 is structured as three tasks. Task 1 pertains to summarizing the critical issues in ash behavior, especially for advanced power systems. Task 2 focuses on fundamental ash sintering and viscosity-ash composition relationships that are critical for developing a better mechanistic understanding of ash deposit formation and for predicting ash behavior. Task 3 is aimed primarily at determining the role of the ash chemistry and phase relationships for specific ash interactions in advanced power systems. The role of sulfides in the formation of ash deposits in gasification systems and the factors that influence alloy corrosion in supercritical boilers will be specifically analyzed. Task results to date are presented.

  7. Uranium mononitride as a potential commercial LWR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, P.; Yan, J.; Lahoda, E. J.; Ray, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper evaluated uranium mononitride (UN) as a potential replacement for 5% enriched UO{sub 2} fuel in Generation III and III+ commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Significant improvement in LWR performance depends on developing and implementing changes in the nuclear fuel used in these reactors. Compared to UO{sub 2}, UN offers several advantages such as higher uranium loading and better thermal conductivity. In this paper, the thermal safety margin of UN was evaluated at both normal and accident conditions using a readily available coupled CFD model developed for the US DOE CASL program. One of the prime technical challenges in utilization of UN as LWR fuel is the water compatibility because pure phase UN is not stable in water at 350 deg. C. The water corrosion resistance of UN and the corrosion mechanism were reviewed and mitigation methods were proposed. (authors)

  8. Equipment designs for the spent LWR fuel dry storage demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, R.J.; Kurasch, D.H.; Hardin, R.T.; Schmitten, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    In conjunction with the Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program (SFHPP) equipment has been designed, fabricated and successfully utilized to demonstrate the packaging and interim dry storage of spent LWR fuel. Surface and near surface storage configurations containing PWR fuel assemblies are currently on test and generating baseline data. Specific areas of hardware design focused upon include storage cell components and the support related equipment associated with encapsulation, leak testing, lag storage, and emplacement operations.

  9. Semiannual patents review, January-June 1999

    Treesearch

    Marguerite Sykes; Julie Blankenburg

    1999-01-01

    This review summarizes patents related to paper recycling that were issued during the first 6 months of 1999. The two on-line databases used for this search were C1aims/U.S. Patents Abstracts and Derwent World Patents Index. This semiannual feature is intended to inform readers about the latest developments in equipment design, chemicals, and process technology for...

  10. Semiannual patents review, January — June 2001.

    Treesearch

    Marguerite S. Sykes; Julie. Blankenburg

    2001-01-01

    This review summarizes patents related to paper recycling that were issued during the first 6 months of 2001. Two online databases, Claims/U.S. Patents Abstracts and Derwent World Patents Index, were searched for this review. This semiannual feature is intended to inform readers about recent developments in equipment design, chemicals, and process technology for...

  11. Semiannual patents review, July 2001-December 2001

    Treesearch

    Roland Gleisner; Marguerite Sykes; Julie Blankenburg

    2002-01-01

    This review summarizes patents related to paper recycling that were issued during the last six months of 2001. Two on-line databases, Claims/U.S. Patents Abstracts and Derwent World Patents Index, were searched for this review. This semiannual feature is intended to inform readers about recent developments in equipment design, chemicals and process technology for...

  12. Semiannual patents review, July-December 1998

    Treesearch

    Matthew. Stroika; Marguerite. Sykes; Julie. Blankenburg

    1999-01-01

    This review summarizes patents related to paper recycling issued during the last 6 months of 1998. The two online databases used for this search are Claim/US. Patents Abstracts and Derwent World Patents Index. This semiannual feature is intended to inform readers about the latest developments in equipment, chemicals, and technology in the field of paper recycling. This...

  13. 76 FR 40144 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Semiannual regulatory agenda. SUMMARY: This agenda... INFORMATION: DoD, GSA, and NASA, under their several statutory authorities, jointly issue and maintain the FAR..., Director, Office of Acquisition Policy and Senior Procurement Executive. DOD/GSA/NASA (FAR)--Proposed Rule...

  14. Department of the Interior Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... [The Regulatory Plan and Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions] Part X Department of the Interior Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (DOI) DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of the Secretary 25 CFR Ch. I 30 CFR Chs. II and VII 36 CFR Ch. I 43 CFR Subtitle A, Chs. I and II 48 CFR Ch. 14 50 CFR Chs. I...

  15. Federal Communications Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... [The Regulatory Plan and Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions] Part XIX Federal Communications Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (FCC) FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Ch. I Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions-Fall 2010 AGENCY: Federal...

  16. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  17. Simulated Fission Gas Behavior in Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinbin; Mo, Kun; Yacout, Abdellatif; Harp, Jason

    2016-09-15

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well-understood. However, existing experimental post-irradiation examination (PIE) data are limited to the research reactor conditions, which involve lower fuel temperature compared to LWR conditions. This lack of appropriate experimental data significantly affects the development of fuel performance codes that can precisely predict the microstructure evolution and property degradation at LWR conditions, and therefore evaluate the qualification of U3Si2 as an AFT for LWRs. Considering the high cost, long timescale, and restrictive access of the in-pile irradiation experiments, this study aims to utilize ion irradiation to simulate the inpile behavior of the U3Si2 fuel. Both in situ TEM ion irradiation and ex situ high-energy ATLAS ion irradiation experiments were employed to simulate different types of microstructure modifications in U3Si2. Multiple PIE techniques were used or will be used to quantitatively analyze the microstructure evolution induced by ion irradiation so as to provide valuable reference for the development of fuel performance code prior to the availability of the in-pile irradiation data.

  18. ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS - ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS. INCLUDES THE SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 01, 1998 - JUNE 30, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature; Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined; Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (T{sub cv}) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt; Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles; Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems; and Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

  19. Measurements and sensitivities of LWR in poly spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayal, Guy; Shauly, Eitan; Levi, Shimon; Siany, Amit; Adan, Ofer; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2010-03-01

    LER and LWR have long been considered a primary issue in process development and monitoring. Development of a low power process flavors emphasizes the effect of LER, LWR on different aspects of the device. Gate level performance, particularly leakage current at the front end of line, resistance and reliability in the back-end layers. Traditionally as can be seen in many publications, for the front end of line the focus is mainly on Poly and Active area layers. Poly spacers contribution to the gate leakage, for example, is rarely discussed. Following our research done on sources of gate leakage, we found leakage current (Ioff) in some processes to be highly sensitive to changes in the width of the Poly spacers - even more strongly to the actual Poly gate CDs. Therefore we decided to measure Poly spacers LWR, its correlation to the LWR in the poly, and its sensitivity to changes in layout and OPC. In our last year publication, we defined the terms LLER (Local Line Edge Roughness) and LLWR (Local Line Width Roughness). The local roughness is measured as the 3-sigma value of the line edge/width in a 5-nm segment around the measurement point. We will use these terms in this paper to evaluate the Poly roughness impact on Poly spacer's roughness. A dedicated test chip was designed for the experiments, having various transistors layout configurations with different densities to cover the all range of process design rules. Applied Materials LER and LWR innovative algorithms were used to measure and characterize the spacer roughness relative to the distance from the active edges and from other spaces. To accurately measure all structures in a reasonable time, the recipes were automatically generated from CAD. On silicon, after poly spacers generation, the transistors no longer resemble the Poly layer CAD layout, their morphology is different compared with Photo/Etch traditional structures , and dimensions vary significantly. In this paper we present metrology and

  20. Note on the semi-annual effect in the thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volland, H.; Mayr, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    The semi-annual variation in the thermospheric density is discussed in terms of the spatial and temporal variations in the solar heat input. Two heat sources are considered: the solar heat input associated with the semi-annual migration of the sun, and the auroral heat associated with the semi-annual component in magnetic storms. It is shown that the relatively large global component in the semi-annual effect of the total mass density can be explained by the lack of advective loss which otherwise damps the latitude dependent components in the annual and semi-annual variations, and the significant latitude dependence in the semi-annual variations of composition and temperature can be tied to the diffusion process which is induced by the thermospheric circulation.

  1. Investigation of valve failure problems in LWR power plants

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    An analysis of component failures from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank shows that for both PWR and BWR plants the component category most responsible for approximately 19.3% of light water reactor (LWR) power plant shutdowns. This investigation by Burns and Roe, Inc. shows that the greatest cause of shutdowns in LWRs due to valve failures is leakage from valve stem packing. Both BWR plants and PWR plants have stem leakage problems (BWRs, 21% and PWRs, 34%).

  2. Hydrogen mixing study (HMS) in LWR type containments

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical technique has been developed for calculating the full three-dimensional time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations with multiple speies transport. The method is a modified form of the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique to solve the governing equations for low Mach number flows where pressure waves and local variations in compression and expansion are not significant. Large density variations, due to thermal and species concentration gradients, are accounted for without the restrictions of the classical Boussinesq approximation. Calculations of the EPRI/HEDL standard problems verify the feasibility of using this finite-difference technique for analyzing hydrogen mixing within LWR containments.

  3. LWR codes capability to address SFR BDBA scenarios: Modeling of the ABCOVE tests

    SciTech Connect

    Herranz, L. E.; Garcia, M.; Morandi, S.

    2012-07-01

    The sound background built-up in LWR source term analysis in case of a severe accident, make it worth to check the capability of LWR safety analysis codes to model accident SFR scenarios, at least in some areas. This paper gives a snapshot of such predictability in the area of aerosol behavior in containment. To do so, the AB-5 test of the ABCOVE program has been modeled with 3 LWR codes: ASTEC, ECART and MELCOR. Through the search of a best estimate scenario and its comparison to data, it is concluded that even in the specific case of in-containment aerosol behavior, some enhancements would be needed in the LWR codes and/or their application, particularly with respect to consideration of particle shape. Nonetheless, much of the modeling presently embodied in LWR codes might be applicable to SFR scenarios. These conclusions should be seen as preliminary as long as comparisons are not extended to more experimental scenarios. (authors)

  4. Iodine chemical forms in LWR severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    Calculated data from seven severe accident sequences in light water reactor plants were used to assess the chemical forms of iodine in containment. In most of the calculations for the seven sequences, iodine entering containment from the reactor coolant system was almost entirely in the form of CsI with very small contributions of I or HI. The largest fraction of iodine in forms other than CsI was a total of 3.2% as I plus HI. Within the containment, the CsI will deposit onto walls and other surfaces, as well as in water pools, largely in the form of iodide (I{sup {minus}}). The radiation-induced conversion of I{sup {minus}} in water pools into I{sub 2} is strongly dependent on pH. In systems where the pH was controlled above 7, little additional elemental iodine would be produced in the containment atmosphere. When the pH falls below 7, it may be assumed that it is not being controlled and large fractions of iodine as I{sub 2} within the containment atmosphere may be produced. 17 refs., 5 tabs.

  5. Iodine chemical forms in LWR severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.; Kress, T.S.; Parker, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Calculated data from seven severe accident sequences in light-water reactor plants were used to assess the chemical forms of iodine in containment. In most of the calculations for the seven sequences, iodine entering containment from the reactor coolant system was almost entirely in the form of CsI with very small contributions of I or HI. The largest fraction of iodine in forms other than CsI was a total of 3.2% as I plus HI. Within the containment, the CsI will deposit onto walls and other surfaces, as well as in water pools, largely in the form of iodide (I{sup {minus}}). The radiation induced conversion of I{sup {minus}} in water pools into I{sub 2} is strongly dependent on pH. In systems where the pH was controlled above 7, little additional elemental iodine would be produced in the containment atmosphere. When the pH falls below 7, it may be assumed that it is not being controlled, and large fractions of iodine as I{sub 2} within the containment atmosphere may be produced. 16 refs.

  6. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2004 - Mar 31, 2005

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-05-002, April, 2005. During this semiannual reporting period, two of our more important activities focused on the efforts of the EPA to make air safe and healthy to breathe, and to help improve homeland security.

  7. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2009 - Sept 30, 2009

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-09-036, Nov, 2009. The OIG took numerous steps during the past semiannual reporting period to help the EPA properly and efficiently spend the $7.2 billion it has received under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009.

  8. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Agency Reports § 146.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile... Clerk of the House of Representatives. (h) Agencies shall keep the originals of all disclosure reports... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600...

  9. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Agency Reports § 146.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile... Clerk of the House of Representatives. (h) Agencies shall keep the originals of all disclosure reports... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600...

  10. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agency Reports § 146.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile... Clerk of the House of Representatives. (h) Agencies shall keep the originals of all disclosure reports... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600...

  11. 77 FR 25523 - Semi-Annual Workforce Management Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... Office of the Secretary Semi-Annual Workforce Management Conference AGENCY: U.S. Department of... of Transportation, Office of the Secretary, announces the second Semi-Annual Workforce Management... for addressing labor/management issues, and safety. Registration Space is limited. Registration will...

  12. 22 CFR 311.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 311.600 Section 311.600 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 311.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B) and...

  13. 22 CFR 227.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 227.600 Section 227.600 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 227.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the...

  14. 24 CFR 87.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 87.600 Section 87.600 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 87.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of...

  15. 24 CFR 87.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 87.600 Section 87.600 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 87.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of...

  16. 22 CFR 227.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 227.600 Section 227.600 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 227.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the...

  17. 24 CFR 87.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 87.600 Section 87.600 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 87.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of...

  18. 24 CFR 87.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 87.600 Section 87.600 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 87.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of...

  19. 24 CFR 87.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 87.600 Section 87.600 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 87.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of...

  20. 22 CFR 227.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 227.600 Section 227.600 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 227.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the...

  1. 22 CFR 227.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 227.600 Section 227.600 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 227.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the...

  2. 22 CFR 311.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 311.600 Section 311.600 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 311.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B)...

  3. 22 CFR 311.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 311.600 Section 311.600 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 311.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B)...

  4. 22 CFR 311.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 311.600 Section 311.600 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 311.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B)...

  5. 22 CFR 311.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 311.600 Section 311.600 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 311.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B)...

  6. FMDP reactor alternative summary report: Volume 4, Evolutionary LWR alternative

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] have become surplus to national defense needs both in the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. The purpose of this report is to provide schedule, cost, and technical information that will be used to support the Record of Process (ROD). Following the screening process, DOE/MD via its national laboratories initiated a more detailed analysis activity to further evaluate each of the ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived the screening process. Three ``Alternative Teams,`` chartered by DOE and comprised of technical experts from across the DOE national laboratory complex, conducted these analyses. One team was chartered for each of the major disposition classes (borehole, immobilization, and reactors). During the last year and a half, the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) Reactor Alternative Team (RxAT) has conducted extensive analyses of the cost, schedule, technical maturity, S&S, and other characteristics of reactor-based plutonium disposition. The results of the RxAT`s analyses of the existing LWR, CANDU, and partially complete LWR alternatives are documented in Volumes 1-3 of this report. This document (Volume 4) summarizes the results of these analyses for the ELWR-based plutonium disposition option.

  7. A classification scheme for LWR fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.S.; Williamson, D.A.; Notz, K.J.

    1988-11-01

    With over 100 light water nuclear reactors operating nationwide, representing designs by four primary vendors, and with reload fuel manufactured by these vendors and additional suppliers, a wide variety of fuel assembly types are in existence. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, both the Systems Integration Program and the Characteristics Data Base project required a classification scheme for these fuels. This scheme can be applied to other areas and is expected to be of value to many Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management programs. To develop the classification scheme, extensive information on the fuel assemblies that have been and are being manufactured by the various nuclear fuel vendors was compiled, reviewed, and evaluated. It was determined that it is possible to characterize assemblies in a systematic manner, using a combination of physical factors. A two-stage scheme was developed consisting of 79 assembly types, which are grouped into 22 assembly classes. The assembly classes are determined by the general design of the reactor cores in which the assemblies are, or were, used. The general BWR and PWR classes are divided differently but both are based on reactor core configuration. 2 refs., 15 tabs.

  8. Semiannually alternating exchange of intermediate waters east of the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lina

    2017-04-01

    Intermediate water exchange in the northwest tropical Pacific is explored with the temperature, salinity, and current measurements of a mooring system deployed at 8°N, 127.05°E during 2010-2014. For the first time, prominent semiannual variability (SAV; with the maximum power at 187 days) of subthermocline meridional flow along the Mindanao coast is revealed. A significant correlation between meridional flow and salinity is found at intermediate depths. This provides direct evidence for the alternating transports of South Pacific and North Pacific Intermediate Waters by northward and southward undercurrents, respectively. Further analysis with an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model demonstrates that the SAV is generated locally near the western boundary, manifesting as large-scale subthermocline recirculation and leading to alternating northward and southward flows near the Mindanao coast, which plays an efficient role in the intermediate water exchange of the northwest tropical Pacific. Mechanisms underlying the observed SAV are discussed

  9. Platoon Interactions and Real-World Traffic Simulation and Validation Based on the LWR-IM

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kok Mun; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2016-01-01

    Platoon based traffic flow models form the underlying theoretical framework in traffic simulation tools. They are essentially important in facilitating efficient performance calculation and evaluation in urban traffic networks. For this purpose, a new platoon-based macroscopic model called the LWR-IM has been developed in [1]. Preliminary analytical validation conducted previously has proven the feasibility of the model. In this paper, the LWR-IM is further enhanced with algorithms that describe platoon interactions in urban arterials. The LWR-IM and the proposed platoon interaction algorithms are implemented in the real-world class I and class II urban arterials. Another purpose of the work is to perform quantitative validation to investigate the validity and ability of the LWR-IM and its underlying algorithms to describe platoon interactions and simulate performance indices that closely resemble the real traffic situations. The quantitative validation of the LWR-IM is achieved by performing a two-sampled t-test on queues simulated by the LWR-IM and real queues observed at these real-world locations. The results reveal insignificant differences of simulated queues with real queues where the p-values produced concluded that the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. Thus, the quantitative validation further proved the validity of the LWR-IM and the embedded platoon interactions algorithm for the intended purpose. PMID:26731745

  10. Platoon Interactions and Real-World Traffic Simulation and Validation Based on the LWR-IM.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kok Mun; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2016-01-01

    Platoon based traffic flow models form the underlying theoretical framework in traffic simulation tools. They are essentially important in facilitating efficient performance calculation and evaluation in urban traffic networks. For this purpose, a new platoon-based macroscopic model called the LWR-IM has been developed in [1]. Preliminary analytical validation conducted previously has proven the feasibility of the model. In this paper, the LWR-IM is further enhanced with algorithms that describe platoon interactions in urban arterials. The LWR-IM and the proposed platoon interaction algorithms are implemented in the real-world class I and class II urban arterials. Another purpose of the work is to perform quantitative validation to investigate the validity and ability of the LWR-IM and its underlying algorithms to describe platoon interactions and simulate performance indices that closely resemble the real traffic situations. The quantitative validation of the LWR-IM is achieved by performing a two-sampled t-test on queues simulated by the LWR-IM and real queues observed at these real-world locations. The results reveal insignificant differences of simulated queues with real queues where the p-values produced concluded that the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. Thus, the quantitative validation further proved the validity of the LWR-IM and the embedded platoon interactions algorithm for the intended purpose.

  11. Field validation of cable monitoring and rating system (CMARS) laboratory model. Semi-annual report, 1 May 1979-31 December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Englehardt, J.; Harris, H.; Kasny, E.; Orifice, D.; Patton, R.; Sottovia, P.

    1980-01-01

    One year of research on validating the performance of the Cable Monitoring and Rating System (CMARS) is reported. The performance testing was conducted on underground 230-kV and 345-kV pipe type cable circuits owned by the New Jersey Public Service Electric and Gas Co. Laser temperature monitoring systems and a data acquisition system were installed. Software installation and development is discussed. The CMARS testing program is described. (LCL)

  12. ARPA Semi-annual Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-30

    Suti(/(/rJ AUPA oLMT-ANNUAL TECHNICAL REPORT RI:AD INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER *?/S S. TYT»F. OF...ArPA Semi-annua) Technical Report 6/1/74 to 1 1/30/74 O O •83 nil uEEEITDTbl E • > Sponsored by Advanced Research Projects Agency ARPA...mu*immm i i mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm&mmmmmmmmmmrmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmmmmmmm i ■nw AD/A-004 915 ARTA SEMI-ANNUAL TECHNICAL

  13. Characteristics Data Base: Programmer's guide to the LWR Quantities Data Base

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.E. ); Moore, R.S. )

    1990-08-01

    The LWR Quantities Data Base is a menu-driven PC data base developed as part of OCRWM's waste, technical data base on the characteristics of potential repository wastes, which also includes non-LWR spent fuel, high-level and other materials. This programmer's guide completes the documentation for the LWR Quantities Data Base, the user's guide having been published previously. The PC data base itself may be requested from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using the order form provided in Volume 1 of publication DOE/RW-0184.

  14. A Review and Analysis of European Industrial Experience in Handling LWR Spent Fuel and Vitrified High-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Blomeke, J.O.

    2001-07-10

    The industrial facilities that have been built or are under construction in France, the United Kingdom, Sweden, and West Germany to handle light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and canisters of vitrified high-level waste before ultimate disposal are described and illustrated with drawings and photographs. Published information on the operating performance of these facilities is also given. This information was assembled for consideration in planning and design of similar equipment and facilities needed for the Federal Waste Management System in the United States.

  15. ORNL studies of fission product release under LWR accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    High burnup Zircaloy-clad UO{sub 2} fuel specimens have been heated to study the release of fission products in tests simulating LWR accident conditions. The dominant variable was found to be temperature, with atmosphere, time, and burnup also being significant variables. Comparison of data from tests in steam and hydrogen, at temperatures of 2000 to 2700 K, have shown that the releases of the most volatile species (Kr, Xe, I, and Cs) are relatively insensitive to atmosphere. The releases of the less-volatile species (Sr, Mo, Ru, Sb, Te, Ba, and Eu), however, may vary by orders of magnitude depending on atmosphere. In addition, the atmosphere may drastically affect the mode and extent of fuel destruction.

  16. Irradiation effects on thermal properties of LWR hydride fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, Kurt; Balooch, Mehdi; Carpenter, David; Kohse, Gordon; Keiser, Dennis; Meyer, Mitchell; Olander, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Three hydride mini-fuel rods were fabricated and irradiated at the MIT nuclear reactor with a maximum burnup of 0.31% FIMA or ∼5 MWd/kgU equivalent oxide fuel burnup. Fuel rods consisted of uranium-zirconium hydride (U (30 wt%)ZrH1.6) pellets clad inside a LWR Zircaloy-2 tubing. The gap between the fuel and the cladding was filled with lead-bismuth eutectic alloy to eliminate the gas gap and the large temperature drop across it. Each mini-fuel rod was instrumented with two thermocouples with tips that are axially located halfway through the fuel centerline and cladding surface. In-pile temperature measurements enabled calculation of thermal conductivity in this fuel as a function of temperature and burnup. In-pile thermal conductivity at the beginning of test agreed well with out-of-pile measurements on unirradiated fuel and decreased rapidly with burnup.

  17. Feasibility of performing criticality experiments with spent LWR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.

    1988-02-01

    Criticality experiments can be performed with irradiated LWR fuel under very well defined and controlled conditions to provide data sutiable for verifying calculational models. Two facilities currently exist in which such experiments could be performed. Furthermore, the experiments can be performed in a timely manner and for a relatively reasonable cost. It is expected the cost will be greater than those normally incurred for similar experiments with unirradiated fuel because of the handling problems created by the high radiation fields. Although the cost will of course depend on the scoper of the experimental programs, current estimates indicate the costs will be less or comparable to a similar level of effort in other activities with irradiated fuel (e.g., Dry Rod Consolation Project). 2 figs.

  18. Release of fission gas during transient heating of LWR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, S.M.

    1982-05-01

    The direct electrical heating technique was used to study fission-gas release and mechanical behavior of irradiated light-water reactor (LWR) fuels during thermal transients. An empirical correlation between fission-gas release and transient temperature history was developed for power-cooling mismatch (PCM) and anticipated transients. Gas release during the refill portion of a design-basis loss of cooling accident was estimated to be less than 1%. Fission-gas release during PCM accidents was found to be controlled by intergranular microcracking and the interlinkage of tunnels on grain edges. For high-gas-release transients, the fractional gas release was shown to be equal to the fractional coverage of grain boundaries by microcracks. Temperature calculations indicated that microcracking causes a significant decrease in the fuel thermal conductivity.

  19. Validating the BISON fuel performance code to integral LWR experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Williamson, R. L.; Gamble, K. A.; Perez, D. M.; ...

    2016-03-24

    BISON is a modern finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior and has been used to analyze a variety of fuel forms in 1D spherical, 2D axisymmetric, or 3D geometries. Code validation is underway and is the subject of this study. A brief overview of BISON’s computational framework, governing equations, and general material and behavioral models is provided. BISON code and solution verification procedures are described, followed by a summary of the experimental data used to datemore » for validation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Validation comparisons focus on fuel centerline temperature, fission gas release, and rod diameter both before and following fuel-clad mechanical contact. Comparisons for 35 LWR rods are consolidated to provide an overall view of how the code is predicting physical behavior, with a few select validation cases discussed in greater detail. Our results demonstrate that 1) fuel centerline temperature comparisons through all phases of fuel life are very reasonable with deviations between predictions and experimental data within ±10% for early life through high burnup fuel and only slightly out of these bounds for power ramp experiments, 2) accuracy in predicting fission gas release appears to be consistent with state-of-the-art modeling and with the involved uncertainties and 3) comparison of rod diameter results indicates a tendency to overpredict clad diameter reduction early in life, when clad creepdown dominates, and more significantly overpredict the diameter increase late in life, when fuel expansion controls the mechanical response. In the initial rod diameter comparisons they were unsatisfactory and have lead to consideration of additional separate effects experiments to better understand and predict clad and fuel mechanical behavior. Results from this study are being used to

  20. Validating the BISON fuel performance code to integral LWR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, R. L.; Gamble, K. A.; Perez, D. M.; Novascone, S. R.; Pastore, G.; Gardner, R. J.; Hales, J. D.; Liu, W.; Mai, A.

    2016-03-24

    BISON is a modern finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior and has been used to analyze a variety of fuel forms in 1D spherical, 2D axisymmetric, or 3D geometries. Code validation is underway and is the subject of this study. A brief overview of BISON’s computational framework, governing equations, and general material and behavioral models is provided. BISON code and solution verification procedures are described, followed by a summary of the experimental data used to date for validation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Validation comparisons focus on fuel centerline temperature, fission gas release, and rod diameter both before and following fuel-clad mechanical contact. Comparisons for 35 LWR rods are consolidated to provide an overall view of how the code is predicting physical behavior, with a few select validation cases discussed in greater detail. Our results demonstrate that 1) fuel centerline temperature comparisons through all phases of fuel life are very reasonable with deviations between predictions and experimental data within ±10% for early life through high burnup fuel and only slightly out of these bounds for power ramp experiments, 2) accuracy in predicting fission gas release appears to be consistent with state-of-the-art modeling and with the involved uncertainties and 3) comparison of rod diameter results indicates a tendency to overpredict clad diameter reduction early in life, when clad creepdown dominates, and more significantly overpredict the diameter increase late in life, when fuel expansion controls the mechanical response. In the initial rod diameter comparisons they were unsatisfactory and have lead to consideration of additional separate effects experiments to better understand and predict clad and fuel mechanical behavior. Results from this study are being used to define

  1. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for April 1, 2002 Through September 20, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2002-12-03

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  2. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2001 Through March 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    J. P. Moore, JPM

    2002-05-22

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  3. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for September 2000 through March 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2001-05-22

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) and weld shields (WS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2001. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, CVS, and WS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials. or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  4. Note on the semiannual effect in the thermosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volland, H.; Mayr, H. G.

    1973-01-01

    There are two external heat sources known that oscillate with a period of half a year: (1) the solar heat input associated with the semiannual migration of the subsolar point between both hemispheres, which peaks at the equator and which is small in comparison with that in the annual component, and (2) the auroral heat input associated with the semiannual component in the occurrence of magnetic storms. An attempt is made to show that a number of apparent conflicts in the description and interpretation of the semiannual effect can be resolved by considering some of the dynamic properties of the thermosphere.

  5. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Siebenlist, F.; Shoshani, A.; Sim, A.; Bell, G.; Drach, R.; Ahrens, J.; Jones, P.; Brown, D.; Chastang, J.; Cinquini, L.; Fox, P.; Harper, D.; Hook, N.; Nienhouse, E.; Strand, G.; West, P.; Wilcox, H.; Wilhelmi, N.; Zednik, S.; Hankin, S.; Schweitzer, R.; Bernholdt, D.; Chen, M.; Miller, R.; Shipman, G.; Wang, F.; Bharathi, S.; Chervenak, A.; Schuler, R.; Su, M.

    2010-04-21

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities).

  6. Computational strategies for three-dimensional flow simulations on distributed computer systems. Ph.D. Thesis Semiannual Status Report, 15 Aug. 1993 - 15 Feb. 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weed, Richard Allen; Sankar, L. N.

    1994-01-01

    An increasing amount of research activity in computational fluid dynamics has been devoted to the development of efficient algorithms for parallel computing systems. The increasing performance to price ratio of engineering workstations has led to research to development procedures for implementing a parallel computing system composed of distributed workstations. This thesis proposal outlines an ongoing research program to develop efficient strategies for performing three-dimensional flow analysis on distributed computing systems. The PVM parallel programming interface was used to modify an existing three-dimensional flow solver, the TEAM code developed by Lockheed for the Air Force, to function as a parallel flow solver on clusters of workstations. Steady flow solutions were generated for three different wing and body geometries to validate the code and evaluate code performance. The proposed research will extend the parallel code development to determine the most efficient strategies for unsteady flow simulations.

  7. Predicting LER and LWR in SAQP with 3D virtual fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jiangjiang (Jimmy); Zhao, Dalong; Allampalli, Vasanth; Faken, Daniel; Greiner, Ken; Fried, David M.

    2016-03-01

    For the first time, process impact on line-edge roughness (LER) and line-width roughness (LWR) in a back-end-of-line (BEOL) self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) flow has been systematically investigated through predictive 3D virtual fabrication. This frequency dependent LER study shows that both deposition and etching effectively reduce high frequency LER, while deposition is much more effective in reducing low frequency LER. Spacer-assisted patterning technology reduces LWR significantly by creating correlated edges, and further LWR improvement can be achieved by optimizing individual process effects on LER. Our study provides a guideline for the understanding and optimization of LER and LWR in advanced technology nodes.

  8. LWR fuel assembly designs for the transmutation of LWR Spent Fuel TRU with FCM and UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2} Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, G.; Hong, S. G.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, transmutation of transuranic (TRU) nuclides from LWR spent fuels is studied by using LWR fuel assemblies which consist of UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2} fuel pins and FCM (Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated) fuel pins. TRU from LWR spent fuel is loaded in the kernels of the TRISO particle fuels of FCM fuel pins. In the FCM fuel pins, the TRISO particle fuels are distributed in SiC matrix having high thermal conductivity. The loading patterns of fuel pins and the fuel compositions are searched to have high transmutation rate and feasible neutronic parameters including pin power peaking, temperature reactivity coefficients, and cycle length. All studies are done only in fuel assembly calculation level. The results show that our fuel assembly designs have good transmutation performances without multi-recycling and without degradation of the safety-related neutronic parameters. (authors)

  9. Fundamental quantitative analysis of microbial activity in aquifer bioreclamation; and Modeling the transport of biologically and chemically reactive solutes in a two-dimensional, heterogeneous intermediate scale system. Semi-annual progress report, August 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, B.E.; Valocchi, A.J.; Baveye, P.

    1992-12-31

    This report is the semi-annual progress report for the second half of the third year. The project has four primary areas: (1) biodegradation of poorly soluble organic contaminants; (2) dual-limitation kinetics of electron donors and acceptors; (3) two-dimensional modeling of biofilm reactions in nonhomogeneous porous media; and (4) biologically induced clogging in porous media. For each area, this report presents a brief summary of the previous progress, as well as reporting this period`s progress. In addition plans for future work are included.

  10. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2003 - Sept 30, 2003

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-K-03-002, Nov, 2003. We recently issued a major report examining how EPA responded to the crisis at the World Trade Center following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

  11. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2010 - Mar 31, 2011

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-11-005, May, 2011. The dedicated staff of the OIG will continue to do its best to ensure that Agency programs achieve their intended results and that its funds are properly expended.

  12. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2009 - Mar 31, 2010

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-10-004, May, 2010. EPA continues to face challenges in using its funds and accomplishing its mission in an efficient and effective manner, particularly concerning Recovery Act projects.

  13. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2014 - Mar 31, 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-15-001, May, 2015. This report contains numerous examples where the agency could have put funds to better use, done more to improve efficiencies, or improved business practices and accountability.

  14. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2012 - Mar 31, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-13-001, May, 2013. The EPA and the OIG remain responsible stewards of taxpayer dollars, striving to add value and transparency and assisting the agency in accomplishing its mission.

  15. 48 CFR 1422.406-13 - Semiannual enforcement reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Involving Construction 1422.406-13 Semiannual enforcement reports. PAM is responsible for submitting the report required by FAR 22.406-13 to DOL. In accordance with DOL memoranda, PAM requires bureaus to...

  16. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2012 - Sept 30, 2012

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA‐350‐R‐12‐003, Nov, 2012. Our work will continue to add value and assist the Agency in accomplishing its mission of safeguarding the health of the American people and protecting the environment.

  17. CSB Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2012 - Sept 30, 2012

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nov 2012. This CSB Semiannual Report contains the results of our work related to the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) for the reporting period April 1, 2012, through Sept 30, 2012.

  18. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2002 - Mar 31, 2003

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-K-03-001, May, 2003. The OIG completed a number of investigations, audits, and evaluations that demonstrate our commitment to help EPA better deliver cost-effective solutions to pressing environmental problems.

  19. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2015 - Sept 30, 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-15-002, Nov, 2015. During this period, witnesses from the EPA OIG testified at congressional hearings, and the OIG produced reports in response to congressional requests, demonstrating their continued interest in our work.

  20. Site S-7 Representative Model and Application for the Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VZMS) McClellan AFB - 1998 Semi-Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.L.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    1998-12-01

    Vadose zone data collection and enhanced data analysis are continuing for the Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VZMS) installed at site S-7 in IC 34 at McClellan MB. Data from core samples from boreholes drilled in 1998 and from VZMS continuous monitoring are evaluated and compared to previously collected data and analyses. The suite of data collected to date is used to develop and constrain a spatially averaged, one-dimensional site S-7 representative model that is implemented into T2VOC. Testing of the conceptual model under conditions of recharge of 100 mm/yr produces plausible moisture contents relative to data from several sources. Further scoping calculations involving gas-phase TCE transport in the representative model were undertaken. We investigate the role of recharge on TCE transport as well as the role of ion- and gas-phase flow driven by density and barometric pumping effects. This report provides the first example of the application of the site S-7 representative model in th e investigation of subsurface VOC movement.

  1. First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glennan, T. Keith

    1959-01-01

    The First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 206 (a) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) to provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the Earth's atmosphere, which states: The Administration shall submit to the President for transmittal to Congress, semiannually and at such other times as it deems desirable, a report on its activities and accomplishments.

  2. Advanced multiphysics coupling for LWR fuel performance analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Gleicher, F. N.; ...

    2015-10-01

    Even the most basic nuclear fuel analysis is a multiphysics undertaking, as a credible simulation must consider at a minimum coupled heat conduction and mechanical deformation. The need for more realistic fuel modeling under a variety of conditions invariably leads to a desire to include coupling between a more complete set of the physical phenomena influencing fuel behavior, including neutronics, thermal hydraulics, and mechanisms occurring at lower length scales. This paper covers current efforts toward coupled multiphysics LWR fuel modeling in three main areas. The first area covered in this paper concerns thermomechanical coupling. The interaction of these two physics,more » particularly related to the feedback effect associated with heat transfer and mechanical contact at the fuel/clad gap, provides numerous computational challenges. An outline is provided of an effective approach used to manage the nonlinearities associated with an evolving gap in BISON, a nuclear fuel performance application. A second type of multiphysics coupling described here is that of coupling neutronics with thermomechanical LWR fuel performance. DeCART, a high-fidelity core analysis program based on the method of characteristics, has been coupled to BISON. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during a depletion or a fast transient simulation. Two-way coupling between these codes was achieved by mapping fission rate density and fast neutron flux fields from DeCART to BISON and the temperature field from BISON to DeCART while employing a Picard iterative algorithm. Finally, the need for multiscale coupling is considered. Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact fuel performance by causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity, and fission gas release. The mechanisms involved occur at the atomistic and grain scale and are therefore not the domain of a fuel performance code. However, it is

  3. Advanced multiphysics coupling for LWR fuel performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Gleicher, F. N.; Spencer, B. W.; Novascone, S. R.; Williamson, R. L.; Pastore, G.; Perez, D. M.

    2015-10-01

    Even the most basic nuclear fuel analysis is a multiphysics undertaking, as a credible simulation must consider at a minimum coupled heat conduction and mechanical deformation. The need for more realistic fuel modeling under a variety of conditions invariably leads to a desire to include coupling between a more complete set of the physical phenomena influencing fuel behavior, including neutronics, thermal hydraulics, and mechanisms occurring at lower length scales. This paper covers current efforts toward coupled multiphysics LWR fuel modeling in three main areas. The first area covered in this paper concerns thermomechanical coupling. The interaction of these two physics, particularly related to the feedback effect associated with heat transfer and mechanical contact at the fuel/clad gap, provides numerous computational challenges. An outline is provided of an effective approach used to manage the nonlinearities associated with an evolving gap in BISON, a nuclear fuel performance application. A second type of multiphysics coupling described here is that of coupling neutronics with thermomechanical LWR fuel performance. DeCART, a high-fidelity core analysis program based on the method of characteristics, has been coupled to BISON. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during a depletion or a fast transient simulation. Two-way coupling between these codes was achieved by mapping fission rate density and fast neutron flux fields from DeCART to BISON and the temperature field from BISON to DeCART while employing a Picard iterative algorithm. Finally, the need for multiscale coupling is considered. Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact fuel performance by causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity, and fission gas release. The mechanisms involved occur at the atomistic and grain scale and are therefore not the domain of a fuel performance code. However, it is possible to use

  4. Federal Reserve System Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... (DOCKET NO: R-1370) Legal Authority: 12 USC 1601 et seq Abstract: On May 22, 2009, the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009 (Credit Card Act) was signed into law. Public Law No. 111-24, 123 Stat. 1734 (2009). The Credit Card Act primarily amended the Truth in Lending Act (TILA...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1420 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... first half of a calendar year, submit your semiannual report by August 1 of that year. (b) For data you collected during the second half of the calendar year, submit your semiannual report by February 1 of...

  6. LWR reactivity/isotopics code for pedagogical and scoping applications

    SciTech Connect

    AbuZaied, G.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    A program designated BRICC (Burnup Reactivity and Isotopic Composition Computation), has been programmed for use on microcomputers to permit rapid parametric studies of the neutronics of light water reactor (LWR) assemblies. It is currently employed as a teaching tool in a graduate-level subject on nuclear fuel management, and has proven to be of sufficient accuracy to permit its use as a submodule in a more comprehensive program used to evaluate various mechanical spectral shift concepts for pressurized water reactor control. It should also prove useful in teaching reactor physics as it will fill an important gap between hand calculations of inadequate accuracy and state-of-the-art multigroup programs of daunting complexity. The BRICC program combines a minimum adequate set of old-fashioned phenomenological submodels that describe key physics attributed in an integral fashion, thereby providing the student or researcher with convenient mental pictures to serve as the basis for deductive reasoning. The program is short, written in a simplistic version of the Basic language, with many interspersed Remark statements, and is therefore easy to tinker with for various constructive purposes.

  7. Robot Kinematics Identification: KUKA LWR4+ Redundant Manipulator Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolyubin, Sergey; Paramonov, Leonid; Shiriaev, Anton

    2015-11-01

    This work is aimed at a comprehensive discussion of algorithms for the kinematic parameters identification of robotic manipulators. We deal with an open-loop geometric calibration task, when a full 6D robot's end-effector pose is measured. Effective solutions of such a task is of high interest in many practical applications, because it can dramatically improve key robot characteristics. On the first step, we select optimal calibration configurations. A comparative analysis of three different algorithms and two observability indexes used for numerical optimization is provided. Afterwards, using the acquired and pre-processed experimental data we identify modified Denavit-Hartenberg parameters of the manipulator. Estimates are obtained resolving original nonlinear forward kinematics relations. Finally, we compare nominal and calibrated geometric parameters and show how much deviations in these parameters affect robot positioning accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, such integrated efforts are new for the KUKA LWR4+ robot and Nikon K610 optical coordinate measuring machine (CMM), which were used in the study. Discussion of practical issues on how to organise the experiment is an additional contribution of this work. The proposed procedure is highly automated and can be implemented to improve manipulator's performance on a periodic basis.

  8. Evaluation of inorganic sorbent treatment for LWR coolant process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Roddy, J.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents results of a survey of the literature and of experience at selected nuclear installations to provide information on the feasibility of replacing organic ion exchangers with inorganic sorbents at light-water-cooled nuclear power plants. Radioactive contents of the various streams in boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors were examined. In addition, the methods and performances of current methods used for controlling water quality at these plants were evaluated. The study also includes a brief review of the physical and chemical properties of selected inorganic sorbents. Some attributes of inorganic sorbents would be useful in processing light water reactor (LWR) streams. The inorganic resins are highly resistant to damage from ionizing radiation, and their exchange capacities are generally equivalent to those of organic ion exchangers. However, they are more limited in application, and there are problems with physical integrity, especially in acidic solutions. Research is also needed in the areas of selectivity and anion removal before inorganic sorbents can be considered as replacements for the synthetic organic resins presently used in LWRs. 11 figures, 14 tables.

  9. CO2 Annual and Semiannual Cycles from Satellite Retrievals and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Crisp, D.; Olsen, E. T.; Kulawik, S. S.; Miller, C. E.; Pagano, T. S.; Yung, Y. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have compared satellite CO2 retrievals from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) with in-situ measurements from the Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA-ESRL) Surface CO2 and Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON), and utilized zonal means to characterize variability and distribution of CO2. In general, zonally averaged CO2 from the three satellite data sets are consistent with the surface and TCCON XCO2 data. Retrievals of CO2 from the three satellites show more (less) CO2 in the northern hemisphere than that in the southern hemisphere in the northern hemispheric winter (summer) season. The difference between the three satellite CO2 retrievals might be related to the different averaging kernels in the satellites CO2 retrievals. A multiple regression method was used to calculate the CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes from different satellite CO2 retrievals. The CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes are largest at the surface, as seen in the NOAA-ESRL CO2 data sets. The CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes in the GOSAT XCO2, AIRS mid-tropospheric CO2, and TES mid-tropospheric CO2 are smaller compared with those from the surface CO2. Similar regression analysis was applied to the Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers-2 (MOZART-2) and CarbonTracker model CO2. The convolved model CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes are similar to those from the satellite CO2 retrievals, although the model tends to under-estimate the CO2 seasonal cycle amplitudes in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes from the comparison with GOSAT and TES CO2 and underestimate the CO2 semi-annual cycle amplitudes in the high latitudes from the comparison with AIRS CO2. The difference between model and satellite CO2 can be used to identify possible deficiency in the model and improve the model in the future.

  10. Aging of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1984-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are evaluated to determine the expected embrittlement of cast components during the operating lifetime of reactors and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. This presentation describes the status of the program. Data for the metallurgical characterization of the various cast stainless steels used in the investigation are presented. Charpy impact tests on short-term aged material indicate that CF-3 stainless steels are less susceptible to embrittlement than CF-8 or CF-8M stainless steels. Microstructural characterization of cast stainless steels that were obtained from Georg Fischer Co. and aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400/sup 0/C reveals the formation of four different types of precipitates that are not ..cap alpha..'. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase is primarily due to pinning of the dislocations by two of these precipitates, designated as Type M and Type X. The ferrite phase is embrittled after approx. 8 y at 300/sup 0/C and shows cleavage fracture. Examination of the fracture surfaces of the impact-test specimens indicates that the toughness of the long-term aged material is determined by the austenite phase. 8 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Code System to Predict LWR Reflood Heat Transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    KIRCHNER, WALTER L.

    1999-04-27

    Version: 00 REFLUX calculates the temperature-time history of a representative fuel rod during the reflood stage of a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The logic used fo selection of the appropriate flow regime for analysis of the cladding temperature transient is based on the axial position with regard to the continuous liquid level (based on a mass balance), a liquid carry-over criterion (derived from a force balance on a drop suspended in a vapor stream), and the local cladding surface temperature. A generalized boiling curve is constructed, and the local flow and clad conditions determine the applicable heat transfer coefficient.

  12. Uranium Nitride as LWR TRISO Fuel: Thermodynamic Modeling of U-C-N

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M; Shin, Dongwon

    2012-01-01

    TRISO coated particle fuel is envisioned as a next generation replacement for current urania pellet fuel in LWR applications. To obtain adequate fissile loading the kernel of the TRISO particle will need to be UN. In support of the fuel development effort, an assessment of phase regions of interest in the U-C-N system was undertaken as the fuel will be prepared by the carbothermic reduction of the oxide and it will be in equilibrium with carbon within the TRISO particle. The phase equilibria and thermochemistry of the U-C-N system is reviewed, including nitrogen pressure measurements above various phase fields. Selected measurements were used to fit a first order model of the UC1-xNx phase, represented by the inter-solution of UN and UC. Fit to the data was significantly improved by also adjusting the heat of formation for UN by ~12 kJ/mol and the phase equilbria was best reproduced by also adjusting the heat for U2N3 by +XXX. The determined interaction parameters yielded a slightly positive deviation from ideality, which agrees with lattice parameter measurements which show positive deviation from Vegard s law. The resultant model together with reported values for other phases in the system were used to generate isothermal sections of the U-C-N phase diagram. Nitrogen partial pressures were also computed for regions of interest.

  13. 31 CFR 359.11 - What is the semiannual inflation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the semiannual inflation rate... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.11 What is the semiannual inflation rate? The index used to determine the semiannual inflation rate is the non-seasonally adjusted CPI-U (the Consumer Price Index...

  14. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find when...

  15. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find when...

  16. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find when...

  17. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find when...

  18. 31 CFR 359.11 - What is the semiannual inflation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the semiannual inflation rate... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.11 What is the semiannual inflation rate? The index used to determine the semiannual inflation rate is the non-seasonally adjusted CPI-U (the Consumer Price Index...

  19. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2012-11-26

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  20. Flooding of a large, passive, pressure-tube LWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hejzlar, P.; Todreas, N.E.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    A reactor concept has been developed which can survive LOCA without scram and without replenishing primary coolant inventory. The proposed concept is a pressure tube type reactor similar to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects: (1) a solid SiC-coated graphite fuel matrix is used in place of fuel pin bundles, (2) the heavy water coolant in the pressure tubes is replaced by light water, and (3) the calandria tank contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. The gas displaces the light water from the calandria during normal operation, while during loss of coolant or loss of heat sink accidents, it allows passive calandria flooding. This paper describes the thermal hydraulic characteristics of the gravity driven calandria flooding process. Flooding the calandria space with light water is a unique and very important feature of the proposed pressure-tube LWR concept. The flooding of the top row of fuel channels must be accomplished fast enough so that none of the critical components of the fuel channel exceed their design limits. The flooding process has been modeled and shown to be rapid enough to maintain all components within their design limits. Two other considerations are important. The thermal shock experienced by the calandria and pressure tubes has been evaluated and shown to be within acceptable bounds. Finally, although complete flooding renders the reactor deeply subcritical, various steam/water densities can be hypothesized to be present during the flooding process which could cause reactivity to increase from the initially voided calandria case. One such hypothesis which leads to the maximum possible density of the steam/water mixture in the still unflooded calandria space is entrainment from the free surface. It is shown that the steam/water mixture density yielding the maximum reactivity peak cannot be achieved by entrainment because it exceeds thermohydraulically attainable densities of steam/water by an order of magnitude.

  1. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2001-12-26

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report.

  2. Achievement of world's best performance in Japanese LWR, through the successful development on fuels and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitsugu, Mishima

    1989-12-01

    Research and development on fuel and cladding materials in the past 40 years, which led to the excellent performance of today's Japanese LWR are overviewed. Most of the programs for the development of LWR fuels and Zircaloy cladding tube have been conducted by the author, starting from the metal uranium fuel rod for the research reactor JRR-3, then going on to the domestic production of fuel for the power-demonstration reactor JPDR. LWR fuel fabrication has been successfully performed on these bases together with the research and development work on Zircaloy tube fabrication technology among metal industries. Fundamental works and co-operative studies among specialists from every related field have been effectively combined with the development works among industry, which contributed to the achievement of the world's top level fuel and thus to the excellent performance of 36 LWRs in Japan, today.

  3. Review of literature on the TMI accident and correlation to the LWR Safety Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.J.

    1980-05-01

    This report is the result of approximately two man-months of effort devoted to assimilating and comprehending significant publicly available material related to Three Mile Island Unit 2 and events during and subsequent to the accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Those events were then correlated with the Preliminary LWR Safety Technology Program Plan (Preliminary Program Plan) prepared for the US Department of Energy by Sandia National Lab. This report is being submitted simultaneously with the SAI report entitled Preliminary Prioritization of Tasks in the Draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan.

  4. Improvements and applications of COBRA-TF for stand-alone and coupled LWR safety analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Avramova, M.; Cuervo, D.

    2006-07-01

    The advanced thermal-hydraulic subchannel code COBRA-TF has been recently improved and applied for stand-alone and coupled LWR core calculations at the Pennsylvania State Univ. in cooperation with AREVA NP GmbH (Germany)) and the Technical Univ. of Madrid. To enable COBRA-TF for academic and industrial applications including safety margins evaluations and LWR core design analyses, the code programming, numerics, and basic models were revised and substantially improved. The code has undergone through an extensive validation, verification, and qualification program. (authors)

  5. Semiannual report to Congress, April 1--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This issue of the Office of Inspector General's (OIG's) Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from April 1, 1990, to September 30, 1990. During that time, the Office issued 130 audit and inspection reports. The Semiannual Report is organized into five major sections. The first section contains brief overviews of the Department of Energy and the Office of Inspector General, as well as OIG views on current legislative matters. The second section describes the significant operational results of OIG audit, inspection, and investigative activity. The third, fourth, and fifth sections contain compilations of OIG statistical data.

  6. Collation of monthly and semiannual reports covering instrumentation at the Decade 80 house in Tucson, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Decade 80 solar house, located in Tucson, Arizona, was built to show the use of copper in home building and to demonstrate the use of solar energy to provide space heating and cooling and domestic hot water. The auxiliary energy sources are electrical resistance heating for the domestic hot water and a gas fired boiler for space heating and operation of the absorption air conditioning units. The Semi-Annual report gives an overview of the instrumentation effort with the back-up monthly reports reflecting more detail of the effort that went into the implementation of the data acquisition system.

  7. Extending dry storage of spent LWR fuel for 100 years.

    SciTech Connect

    Einziger, R. E.

    1998-12-16

    Because of delays in closing the back end of the fuel cycle in the U.S., there is a need to extend dry inert storage of spent fuel beyond its originally anticipated 20-year duration. Many of the methodologies developed to support initial licensing for 20-year storage should be able to support the longer storage periods envisioned. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing information and methodologies to support dry storage up to 100 years. The thrust of the analysis is the potential behavior of the spent fuel. In the USA, the criteria for dry storage of LWR spent fuel are delineated in 10 CFR 72 [1]. The criteria fall into four general categories: maintain subcriticality, prevent the release of radioactive material above acceptable limits, ensure that radiation rates and doses do not exceed acceptable levels, and maintain retrievability of the stored radioactive material. These criteria need to be considered for normal, off-normal, and postulated accident conditions. The initial safety analysis report submitted for licensing evaluated the fuel's ability to meet the requirements for 20 years. It is not the intent to repeat these calculations, but to look at expected behavior over the additional 80 years, during which the temperatures and radiation fields are lower. During the first 20 years, the properties of the components may change because of elevated temperatures, presence of moisture, effects of radiation, etc. During normal storage in an inert atmosphere, there is potential for the cladding mechanical properties to change due to annealing or interaction with cask materials. The emissivity of the cladding could also change due to storage conditions. If there is air leakage into the cask, additional degradation could occur through oxidation in breached rods, which could lead to additional fission gas release and enlargement of cladding breaches. Air in-leakage could also affect cover gas conductivity, cladding oxidation, emissivity changes, and

  8. Annual and semiannual oscillations of stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kaichi

    1987-01-01

    The global structures of annual oscillation (AO) and semiannual oscillation (SAO) of stratospheric ozone are examined by applying spherical harmonic analysis to the ozone data obtained from the Nimbus-7 solar backscattered UV-radiation (SBUV) measurements for the period November 1978 to October 1980. Significant features of the results are: (1) while the stratospheric ozone AO is prevalent only in the polar regions, the ozone SAO prevails both in the equatorial and polar stratospheres; (2) the vertical distribution of the equatorial ozone SAO has a broad maximum of the order of 0.5 (mixing ratio in μg/g) and the maximum appears earlier at high altitude (shifting from May [and November] at 0.3 mb [˜60 km] to November [and May] at 40 mb); (3) above the 40 km level, the maximum of the polar ozone SAO shifts upward towards later phase with altitude with a rate of approximately 10 km/month in both hemispheres; (4) vertical distributions of the polar ozone AOs and SAOs show two peaks in amplitude with a minimum (nodal layer) in between and a rapid phase change with altitude takes place in the respective nodal layers; and (5) the heights of the ozone AO- and SAO-peaks decrease with latitude. The main part of AOs and SAOs of stratospheric ozone including hemispheric asymmetries is ascribable to: (i) temperature dependent ozone photochemistry in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, (ii) variations of radiation field in the lower stratosphere affected by the annual cycle of solar illumination and temperature in the upper stratosphere and (iii) meridional ozone transport by dynamical processes in the lower stratosphere.

  9. Effect of material heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2005-07-31

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the design of Class 1 components of nuclear power plants. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify design curves for applicable structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. The existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. Under certain environmental and loading conditions, fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) can be a factor of 20 lower in water than in air. This report presents experimental data on the effect of heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic Type 304 SS in LWR coolant environments. A detailed metallographic examination of fatigue test specimens was performed to characterize the crack morphology and fracture morphology. The key material, loading, and environmental parameters and their effect on the fatigue life of these steels are also described. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic SSs as a function of material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented.

  10. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMAL AND STRUCTURAL MATERIAL PROPERTIES FOR METALS USED IN LWR VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; J. C. Crepeau

    2008-06-01

    Because of the impact that melt relocation and vessel failure may have on subsequent progression and associated consequences of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) accident, it is important to accurately predict heating and relocation of materials within the reactor vessel, heat transfer to and from the reactor vessel, and the potential for failure of the vessel and structures within it. Accurate predictions of such phenomena require high temperature thermal and structural properties. However, a review of vessel and structural steel material properties used in severe accident analysis codes reveals that the required high temperature material properties are extrapolated with little, if any, data above 1000 K. To reduce uncertainties in predictions relying upon extrapolated high temperature data, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) obtained high data for two metals used in LWR vessels: SA 533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) low alloy steel, which is used to fabricate most US LWR reactor vessels; and Type 304 Stainless Steel SS304, which is used in LWR vessel piping, penetration tubes, and internal structures. This paper summarizes the new data, and compares it to existing data.

  11. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 3 - partially complete LWR alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, S.R.; Fisher, S.E.; Bevard, B.B.

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 3 of a four volume report summarizes the results of these analyses for the partially complete LWR (PCLWR) reactor based plutonium disposition alternative.

  12. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2010 - Sept 30, 2010

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-10-005, Nov, 2010. The OIG will do its best to help the Agency address the nation’s critical environmental challenges by ensuring that Agency funds are properly expended to safeguard human health and the environment.

  13. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2011 - Sept 30, 2011

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-11-036, Nov, 2011. We have made great progress and I look forward to fulfilling the new Office of Inspector General vision of being the best in public service and oversight for a better environment tomorrow.

  14. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2008 - Mar 31, 2009

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-09-003, May, 2009. The next few years will be challenging ones as the OIG works with the EPA to ensure that Recovery Act and other funding is expended efficiently and effectively to safeguard human health and the environment.

  15. 45 CFR 604.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 604.600 Section 604.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NEW..., shall be available for public inspection 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and...

  16. 45 CFR 604.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 604.600 Section 604.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NEW..., shall be available for public inspection 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and...

  17. 45 CFR 1168.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1168.600 Section 1168.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 1168.600 Semi...

  18. 45 CFR 1168.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1168.600 Section 1168.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 1168.600 Semi...

  19. 45 CFR 1168.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1168.600 Section 1168.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 1168.600 Semi...

  20. 45 CFR 1168.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1168.600 Section 1168.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 1168.600 Semi...

  1. 45 CFR 1168.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1168.600 Section 1168.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 1168.600 Semi...

  2. 18 CFR 1315.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 1315.600 Section 1315.600 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NEW... Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  3. 18 CFR 1315.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1315.600 Section 1315.600 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NEW... Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  4. 18 CFR 1315.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1315.600 Section 1315.600 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NEW... Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  5. Semiannual Report to Congress, October 1, 2002-March 31, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    This semiannual report to Congress by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), U.S. Department of Education, covers the actions of the OIG from October 1, 2002, through March 31, 2003. The report discusses four goals of the President's Management Agenda: (1) improved financial performance: includes information on financial statement audits,…

  6. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2005 - Sept 30, 2005

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-05-003, Dec, 2005. We look forward to the challenges ahead as EPA and the Nation continue the effort to rebuild the Gulf States region and to safeguard our environment for us and for the generations that follow.

  7. Semi-annual conference review January-June 2000

    Treesearch

    John K. Borchardt; Marguerite S. Sykes; Mahendra R. Doshi

    2000-01-01

    Conferences covered in this semiannual review include the TAPPI Recycling Symposium and the 9th PTS/CTP Deinking Symposium. The intent of this feature is to present a synopsis of the significant research results and industry ideas related to paper recycling reported at these conferences. Due to space constraints, we are not able to cover all of the presented papers in...

  8. 22 CFR 227.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives a report containing a compilation of the information... 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and the Clerk. (c) Information that involves... information shall not be available for public inspection. (e) The first semi-annual compilation shall...

  9. 38 CFR 45.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 45.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of... Representatives a report containing a compilation of the information contained in the disclosure reports received... report by the Secretary and the Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall...

  10. 40 CFR 34.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 34.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each... report containing a compilation of the information contained in the disclosure reports received during... the Secretary and the Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported...

  11. 12 CFR 411.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Reports § 411.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the... information contained in the disclosure reports received during the six-month period ending on March 31 or... public inspection 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and the Clerk. (c)...

  12. 22 CFR 138.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives a report containing a compilation of the information... 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and the Clerk. (c) Information that involves... information shall not be available for public inspection. (e) The first semi-annual compilation shall...

  13. 32 CFR 28.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 28.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each... report containing a compilation of the information contained in the disclosure reports received during... the Secretary and the Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported...

  14. 45 CFR 93.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... LOBBYING Agency Reports § 93.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and... compilation of the information contained in the disclosure reports received during the six-month period ending... Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select...

  15. 15 CFR 28.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agency Reports § 28.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile... the information contained in the disclosure reports received during the six-month period ending on.... (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  16. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 1998 - Sept 30, 1998

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-98-004, Nov, 1998. We look forward to working with the Administrator, Agency managers, Congress, and EPA's various stakeholders to help ensure that EPA delivers the maximum in environmental and health benefits to the public.

  17. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600 Section 146.600 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING.... (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee on...

  18. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2000 - Mar 31, 2001

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-K-01-001, May, 2001. Our new structure provides a solid foundation for the OIG's efforts to continuously improve its performance, and I am certain that it will greatly enhance our ability to be agents of positive change.

  19. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600 Section 146.600 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING.... (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee on...

  20. 22 CFR 712.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 712.600 Section 712.600 Foreign Relations OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON... the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House...

  1. 22 CFR 712.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 712.600 Section 712.600 Foreign Relations OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON... the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House...

  2. Semiannual patents review July 2002–December 2002

    Treesearch

    Roland Gleisner; Julie Blankenburg

    2003-01-01

    This review summarizes patents related to paper recycling that were issued during the last six months of 2002. Two on-line databases, Claims/U.S. Patents Abstracts and Derwent World Patents Index, were searched for this review. This semiannual feature is intended to inform readers about recent developments in equipment design, chemicals, and process technology for...

  3. Semiannual Report to Congress, October 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    Included among these are asset accountability, the Guam realignment, health care, Recovery Act projects, product substitution, and acquisitions and...Semiannual Report to the Congress October 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010 Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended Title 5, U.S. Code, Appendix 2 Purpose...General Act of 1978, as

  4. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 1997 - Mar 31, 1998

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-98-001, May, 1998. As evidenced by the success of our efforts in these and other areas, the Office of Inspector General remains committed to assisting the Agency in the accomplishment of its environmental goals.

  5. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-06

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  6. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-01

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  7. Stability of SiC-matrix microencapsulated fuel constituents at relevant LWR conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, L. L.; Terrani, K. A.; Katoh, Y.; Silva, C.; Leonard, K. J.; Perez-Bergquist, A. G.

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses certain key feasibility issues facing the application of SiC-matrix microencapsulated fuels for light water reactor application. Issues addressed are the irradiation stability of the SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix under LWR-relevant irradiation conditions, the presence or extent of reaction of the SiC matrix with zirconium-based cladding, the stability of the inner and outer pyrolytic graphite layers of the TRISO coating system at this uncharacteristically low irradiation temperature, and the state of the particle-matrix interface following irradiation which could possibly affect thermal transport. In the process of determining these feasibility issues microstructural evolution and change in dimension and thermal conductivity was studied. As a general finding the SiC matrix was found to be quite stable with behavior similar to that of CVD SiC. In magnitude the irradiation-induced swelling of the matrix material was slightly higher and irradiation-degraded thermal conductivity was slightly lower as compared to CVD SiC. No significant reaction of this SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix material with Zircaloy was observed. Irradiation of the sample in the 320-360 °C range to a maximum dose of 7.7 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) did not have significant negative impact on the constituent layers of the TRISO coating system. At the highest dose studied, layer structure and interface integrity remained essentially unchanged with good apparent thermal transport through the microsphere to the surrounding matrix.

  8. Semi-annual Sq-variation in solar activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnoy, V.; Malosiev, T.

    The peculiarities of semi-annual variation in solar activity cycle have been studied. The data from observatories having long observational series and located in different latitude zones were used. The following observatories were selected: Huancayo (magnetic equator), from 1922 to 1959; Apia (low latitudes), from 1912 to 1961; Moscow (middle latitudes), from 1947 to 1965. Based on the hourly values of H-components, the average monthly diurnal amplitudes (a difference between midday and midnight values), according to five international quiet days, were computed. Obtained results were compared with R (relative sunspot numbers) in the ranges of 0-30R, 40-100R, and 140-190R. It was shown, that the amplitude of semi-annual variation increases with R, from minimum to maximum values, on average by 45%. At equatorial Huancayo observatory, the semi-annual Sq(H)-variation appears especially clearly: its maximums take place at periods of equinoxes (March-April, September-October), and minimums -- at periods of solstices (June-July, December-January). At low (Apia observatory) and middle (Moscow observatory) latitudes, the character of semi-annual variation is somewhat different: it appears during the periods of equinoxes, but considerably less than at equator. Besides, with the growth of R, semi-annual variation appears against a background of annual variation, in the form of second peaks (maximum in June). At observatories located in low and middle latitudes, second peaks become more appreciable with an increase of R (March-April and September-October). During the periods of low solar activity, they are insignificant. This work has been carried out with the support from International Scientific and Technology Center (Project #KR-214).

  9. The global structure of the annual and semiannual sea surface height variability from Geosat altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Gregg A.; Born, George H.; Parke, Mike E.; Allen, Patrick C.

    1992-01-01

    Two years of data from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission are employed to study the annual and semiannual variability of sea-surface height on a global basis. The data are treated with atmospheric corrections and interpolations, and the orbit error of about 40 cm RMS is purged. The spatial variability of the Geosat data is constructed for particular frequencies, and the estimate of the M2 tidal error indicates that the error is aliased to 1.15 cycles/yr and has an unusual spatial pattern. Sine and cosine coefficients are derived for the annual and semiannual frequencies by means of a least squares fit yielding the amplitude and phase of the changes in sea-surface height. A 180-deg phase difference is noted between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for the annual variability, and large-scale westward propagating waves are identified. The Geosat data also indicate the phase relationships between major current systems and the systems of variations at work in the Intertropical Convergence Zone.

  10. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-02-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods changes the microstructure (radiation hardening) and microchemistry (radiation-induced segregation) of these steels, and degrades their fracture properties. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is another degradation process that affects LWR internal components exposed to neutron radiation. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to evaluate the effects of key parameters such as material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of these materials in LWR environments. The significance of microstructural and microchemistry changes in the material on IASCC susceptibility is also discussed. The results are used to determine (a) the threshold fluence for IASCC and (b) the disposition curves for cyclic and IASCC growth rates for irradiated SSs in LWR environments.

  11. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of austenitic stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Roa, A. S.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. NRC

    2010-12-15

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods changes the microstructure (radiation hardening) and microchemistry (radiation-induced segregation) of these steels, and degrades their fracture properties. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is another degradation process that affects LWR internal components exposed to neutron radiation. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to evaluate the effects of key parameters such as material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of these materials in LWR environments. The significance of microstructural and microchemistry changes in the material on IASCC susceptibility is also discussed. The results are used to determine (a) the threshold fluence for IASCC and (b) the disposition curves for cyclic and IASCC growth rates for irradiated SSs in LWR environments.

  12. Proceedings of the 2007 LWR Fuel Performance Meeting / TopFuel 2007 'Zero by 2010'

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    ANS, ENS, AESJ and KNS are jointly organizing the 2007 International LWR Fuel Performance Meeting following the successful ENS TopFuel meeting held during 22-26 October, 2006 in Salamaca, Spain. Merging three premier nuclear fuel design and performance meetings: the ANS LWR Fuel Performance Meeting, the ENS TopFuel and Asian Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting (WRFPM) created this international meeting. The meeting will be held annually on a tri-annual rotational basis in USA, Asia, and Europe. The technical scope of the meeting includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as performance experience in commercial and test reactors. The meeting excludes front end and back end fuel issues, however, it covers all front and/or back issues that impact fuel designs and performance.

  13. Challenges in the development of high-fidelity LWR core neutronics tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Forget, B.

    2013-07-01

    Modern computing has made possible the solution of extremely large-scale reactor simulations, and the literature has numerous examples of high-resolution methods (often Monte Carlo) applied to full-core reactor problems. However, there are currently no examples in the literature of application of such 'High-Fidelity' or 'First Principles' methods to operating Light Water Reactor (LWR) analysis. This paper seeks to remind code developers, project managers, and analysts of the many important aspects of LWR simulation that must be incorporated to produce truly high-fidelity analysis tools. The authors offer a monetary prize to the first person (or group) that successfully solves a new two-cycle operational PWR depletion benchmark problem using high-fidelity tools and demonstrates acceptable accuracy by comparison with measured operational plant data (open source) provided to the reactor analysis community. (authors)

  14. Study of the effect of amine additives on LWR and LER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlihan, Francis M.; Rentkiewicz, David; Lin, Guanyang; Rahman, Dalil; Mackenzie, Douglas; Timko, Allen; Kudo, Takanori; Anyadiegwu, Clement; Thiyagarajan, Muthiah; Chiu, Simon; Romano, Andrew; Dammel, Ralph R.; Padmanaban, Munirathna

    2006-03-01

    We will give an account of our investigation on structure property relationships of amines with regards to line width roughness (LWR) and line edge roughness (LER) of a 193 nm alicyclic-acrylate resist. Specifically, we have looked at basicity, molar volume and logD as factors which may have an influence of roughness of 80 nm 1:1 L/S features. For relatively hydrophobic amines (Log D > -1), the lower the hydrophilicity at acidic pH the greater the LER and LWR becomes. Specifically, in this range of Log D, more hydrophobic larger amines, with higher basicity, tend to give worse L/S feature roughness. For amines which are more hydrophilic, the relationship becomes more complex with some amines giving a lower LER while others do not. This appears to be predicated on a delicate balance between basicity, hydrophilicy and size.

  15. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO{sub 2} fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed.

  16. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO[sub 2] fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed.

  17. Draft report: a selection methodology for LWR safety R and D programs and proposals

    SciTech Connect

    Husseiny, A. A.; Ritzman, R. L.

    1980-03-01

    The results of work done to develop a methodology for selecting LWR safety R and D programs and proposals is described. A critical survey of relevant decision analysis methods is provided including the specifics of multiattribute utility theory. This latter method forms the basis of the developed selection methodology. Details of the methodology and its use are provided along with a sample illustration of its application.

  18. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulation of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinbin; Ye, Bei; Hofman, Gerard; Yacout, Abdellatif; Gamble, Kyle; Mei, Zhi-Gang

    2016-08-29

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well understood. In this report, rate theory model was developed based on existing experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations so as to predict the fission gas behavior in U3Si2 at LWR conditions. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 can be divided into three temperature regimes. During steady-state operation, the majority of the fission gas stays in intragranular bubbles, whereas the dominance of intergranular bubbles and fission gas release only occurs beyond 1000 K. The steady-state rate theory model was also used as reference to establish a gaseous swelling correlation of U3Si2 for the BISON code. Meanwhile, the overpressurized bubble model was also developed so that the fission gas behavior at LOCA can be simulated. LOCA simulation showed that intragranular bubbles are still dominant after a 70 second LOCA, resulting in a controllable gaseous swelling. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is benign according to the rate theory prediction at both steady-state and LOCA conditions, which provides important references to the qualification of U3Si2 as a LWR fuel material with excellent fuel performance and enhanced accident tolerance.

  19. Recycle of LWR (Light Water Reactor) actinides to an IFR (Integral Fast Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Poa, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    A large quantity of actinide elements is present in irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission-to-capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high-energy neutrons in the metal-fueled Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel represents a valuable resource for an expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, removal of the TRU elements from the spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of a high-level waste facility by reducing the heat loads and increasing the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirements. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle, for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. The major objective of the LWR fuel recovery process is high TRU element recovery, with decontamination a secondary issue, because fission product removal is accomplished in the IFR process. The extensive pyrochemical processing studies of the 1960s and 1970s provide a basis for the design of possible processes. Two processes were selected for laboratory-scale investigation. One is based on the Salt Transport Process studied at ANL for mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel, and the other is based on the blanket processing studies done for ANL's second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-2). This paper discusses the two processes and is a status report on the experimental studies. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Mechanism and estimation of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    2002-08-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters (such as steel type, strain range, strain rate, temperature, dissolved-oxygen level in water, and flow rate) on the fatigue lives of these steels. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic stainless steels as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. The influence of reactor environments on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in these steels is also discussed.

  1. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1997-07-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fatigue design curves for structural materials do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Recent test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping materials in light water reactor (LWR) environments. Fatigue tests have been conducted on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steel in air and LWR environments to evaluate the effects of various material and loading variables, e.g., steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) in water, and strain range, on fatigue lives of these steels. The results confirm the significant decrease in fatigue life in water. The environmentally assisted decrease in fatigue life depends both on strain rate and DO content in water. A decrease in strain rate from 0.4 to 0.004%/s decreases fatigue life by a factor of {approx} 8. However, unlike carbon and low-alloy steels, environmental effects are more pronounced in low-DO than in high-DO water. At {approx} 0.004%/s strain rate, reduction in fatigue life in water containing <10 ppb D is greater by a factor of {approx} 2 than in water containing {ge} 200 ppb DO. Experimental results have been compared with estimates of fatigue life based on the statistical model. The formation and growth of fatigue cracks in austenitic stainless steels in air and LWR environments are discussed.

  2. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table B Appendix B to Part 359 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1895 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? 60.1895 Section 60.1895 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION..., 1999 Model Rule-Reporting § 60.1895 If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? (a) For...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1420 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? 60.1420 Section 60.1420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 60.1420 If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? (a) For data collected during the...

  5. 77 FR 8034 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda and Fiscal Year 2011 Regulatory Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... February 13, 2012 Part XXI Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 29 / Monday, February 13, 2012 / Unified Agenda#0;#0; ] BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION 12 CFR Ch. X Semiannual Regulatory Agenda and Fiscal Year 2011...

  6. 31 CFR 359.11 - What is the semiannual inflation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., will be expressed as a percentage, rounded to the nearest one-hundredth of one percent. More specifically, the semiannual inflation rate will be determined by the following formula (the resulting rate will be rounded to the nearest one-hundredth of one percent): Semiannual inflation rate = (CPI...

  7. 40 CFR 62.15350 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? 62.15350 Section 62.15350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... it? (a) For data collected during the first half of a calendar year, submit your semiannual report...

  8. Federal Energy Resources Modernization Coordinating Committee. Semiannual Report, October 1, 1991 Through March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G B

    1992-07-01

    This report summarizes the broad range of activities supported by Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) and other federal agencies focused on meeting the President`s Executive Order on Federal Energy Management promulgated to meet energy savings goals and encourage more efficient management of all federal energy resources. These activities are reported semiannually under the auspices of the FERM Coordinating Committee, and as such include activities undertaken from October 1, 1991, through March 31, 1992. The activities reported are classified into four major categories: (1) technology-base support, which includes development of processes, software, metering and monitoring equipment and strategies, and other tools for the federal energy manager to better understand and characterize their energy resources; (2) federal energy systems testing and monitoring; (3) federal energy systems modernization projects at federal installations in cooperation with the utilities serving the sites; and (4) energy supply, distribution and end-use conservation assessment for federal agencies and/or facilities.

  9. Isotope separation and advanced manufacturing technology. Volume 2, No. 2, Semiannual report, April--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Tehmanu; Carpenter, J.

    1993-12-31

    This is the second issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives of the ISAM Program include: the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) process, and advanced manufacturing technologies which include industrial laser materials processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. Topics included in this issue are: production plant product system conceptual design, development and operation of a solid-state switch for thyratron replacement, high-performance optical components for high average power laser systems, use of diode laser absorption spectroscopy for control of uranium vaporization rates, a two-dimensional time dependent hydrodynamical ion extraction model, and design of a formaldehyde photodissociation process for carbon and oxygen isotope separation.

  10. Automated solar cell assembly teamed process research. Semiannual subcontract report, December 6, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlan, M.

    1995-01-01

    This is the second Semiannual Technical Progress Report for the program titled `Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research` funded under National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract No. ZAG-3-11219-01. This report describes the work done on Phase II of the program in the period from December 6, 1993 to June 30, 1994. Spire`s objective in this program is to develop high throughput (5 MW/yr) automated processes for interconnecting thin (200 {mu}m) silicon solar cells. High yield will be achieved with these fragile cells through the development of low mechanical stress and low thermal stress processes. For example, a machine vision system is being developed for cell alignment without mechanically contacting the cell edges, while a new soldering process is being developed to solder metal interconnect ribbons simultaneously to a cells` front and back contacts, eliminating one of the two heating steps normally used for soldering each cell.

  11. Program for the improvement of downhole drilling motor bearings and seals. Phase IV. Semi-annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tibbitts, G.A.; DeLafosse, P.H.; Black, A.; Green, S.J.

    1980-07-01

    Four main areas of development for the project are covered: design and fabrication of a dynamometer and a mud cooling system for the Bearing-Seal Package Test Facility; modification of the Bearing-Seal Package Test Facility based on test results; testing of new lubricant samples from Pacer Lubricants, Inc., in the Terra Tek High Temperature Lubricant Tester; and testing of new seal types in the Terra Tek Sea Tester. The Maurer Engineering Report, Semi-Annual Progress Report on Improvement of Downhole Motor Bearings and Seals by Jeff L. Barnwell, has been included as Appendix B.

  12. Prioritization of tasks in the draft LWR safety technology program plan. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, E. Y.; Miller, W. J.; Parkinson, W. J.; Ritzman, R. L.; vonHerrmann, J. L.; Wood, P. J.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe both the approach taken and the results produced in the SAI effort to prioritize the tasks in the Sandia draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan. This work used the description of important safety issues developed in the Reactor Safety Study (2) to quantify the effect of safety improvements resulting from a research and development program on the risk from nuclear power plants. Costs of implementation of these safety improvements were also estimated to allow a presentation of the final results in a value (i.e., risk reduction) vs. impact (i.e., implementation costs) matrix.

  13. In-reactor performance of LWR-type tritium targe rods

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, D.D.; Paxton, M.M.; Crumbaugh, L.

    1992-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted several one-year irradiation tests of light-water reactor (LWR)-type tritium target rods. This report discusses these tests which have been sponsored by DOE`s Office of New Production Reactors. The first test, designated water capsule-I (WC-1), was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at DOE`s Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from November 1989 to December 1990. The test vehicle contained a single four-foot target rod within a pressurized water capsule. The capsule maintained the rod at PWR-type water temperature and pressure conditions.

  14. Fuel-rod temperature transients during LWR degraded-core accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Briscoe, F; Rivard, J B; Young, M F

    1982-01-01

    Heat transfer models of fuel rods and coolant have been developed in support of LWR damaged fuel studies underway at Sandia National Laboratories for the NRC. A one-dimensional, full-length model simulates a PWR fuel rod; a two-dimensional, 0.5 m model simulates 9-rod bundle experiments to be performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor. The models include zircaloy oxidation, heat transfer by convecting steam/hydrogen flow, and radiation between surfaces through an absorbing/emitting gas. Characteristics of the one-dimensional reactor fuel rod model for two types of accident sequence are reported, as well as comparisons with MARCH code results.

  15. Annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field at equatorial locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    For a year of quiet solar-activity level, geomagnetic records from American hemisphere observatories located between about 0?? and 30?? north geomagnetic latitude were used to compare the annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field associated with three separate contributions: (a) the quiet-day midnight level, MDT; (b) the solar-quiet daily variation, Sq; (c) the quiet-time lunar semidiurnal tidal variation, L(12). Four Fourier spectral constituents (24, 12, 8, 6 h periods) of Sq were individually treated. All three orthogonal elements (H, D and Z) were included in the study. The MDT changes show a dominant semiannual variation having a range of about 7 gammas in H and a dominant annual variation in Z having a range of over 8 gammas. These changes seem to be a seasonal response to the nightside distortions by magnetospheric currents. There is a slow decrease in MDT amplitudes with increasing latitude. The Sq changes follow the patterns expected from an equatorial ionospheric dynamo electrojet current system. The dominant seasonal variations occur in H having a range of over 21 gammas for the 24 h period and over 12 gammas for the 12 h period spectral components. The higher-order components are relatively smaller in size. The Sq(H) amplitudes decrease rapidly with increasing latitude. Magnetospheric contributions to the equatorial Sq must be less than a few per cent of the observed magnitude. The L(12) variation shows the ionospheric electrojet features by the dominance of H and the rapid decrease in amplitude with latitude away from the equator. However, the seasonal variation range of over 7 gammas has a maximum in early February and minimum in late June that is not presently explainable by the known ionospheric conductivity and tidal behavior. ?? 1981.

  16. Optimization of accelerator-driven technology for LWR waste transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.

    1996-12-31

    The role of accelerator-driven transmutation technology is examined in the context of the destruction of actinide waste from commercial light water reactors. It is pointed out that the commercial plutonium is much easier to use for entry-level nuclear weapons than weapons plutonium. Since commercial plutonium is easier to use, since there is very much more of it already, and since it is growing rapidly, the permanent disposition of commercial plutonium is an issue of greater importance than weapons plutonium. The minor actinides inventory, which may be influenced by transmutation, is compared in terms of nuclear properties with commercial and weapons plutonium and for possible utility as weapons material. Fast and thermal spectrum systems are compared as means for destruction of plutonium and the minor actinides. it is shown that the equilibrium fast spectrum actinide inventory is about 100 times larger than for thermal spectrum systems, and that there is about 100 times more weapons-usable material in the fast spectrum system inventory compared to the thermal spectrum system. Finally it is shown that the accelerator size for transmutation can be substantially reduced by design which uses the accelerator-produced neutrons only to initiate the unsustained fission chains characteristic of the subcritical system. The analysis argues for devoting primary attention to the development of thermal spectrum transmutation technology. A thermal spectrum transmuter operating at a fission power of 750-MWth fission power, which is sufficient to destroy the actinide waste from one 3,000-MWth light water reactor, may be driven by a proton beam of 1 GeV energy and a current of 7 mA. This accelerator is within the range of realizable cyclotron technology and is also near the size contemplated for the next generation spallation neutron source under consideration by the US, Europe, and Japan.

  17. Nature of corrosion films in simulated LWR water. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsden, J.B.

    1985-06-01

    Passive films on Alloy 600 and Type 304 stainless steel were characterized using surface analysis instruments. The films were formed under conditions suspected of causing cracking in nuclear systems and compared to those formed under conditions where cracking does not occur. Alloy 600 was investigated in the boric acid-lithium hydroxide thiosulfate solution. Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was correlated with the occurrence of a film containing sulfide ions. Environmental conditions which produce an oxide film do not cause stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in the system studied. Type 304 stainless steel was investigated in high purity water at 288/sup 0/C having levels of dissolved O/sub 2/ where Type 304 stainless steel is susceptible and not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. A correlation was found between passive film chemistry and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking.

  18. Short communication on "In-situ TEM ion irradiation investigations on U3Si2 at LWR temperatures"

    DOE PAGES

    Miao, Yinbin; Harp, Jason; Mo, Kun; ...

    2016-11-21

    Here, the radiation-induced amorphization of U3Si2 was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy using 1 MeV Kr ion irradiation. Both arc-melted and sintered U3Si2 specimens were irradiated at room temperature to confirm the similarity in their responses to radiation. The sintered specimens were then irradiated at 350 °C and 550 °C up to 7.2 × 1015 ions/cm2 to examine their amorphization behavior under light water reactor (LWR) conditions. U3Si2 remains crystalline under irradiation at LWR temperatures. Oxidation of the material was observed at high irradiation doses.

  19. Short Communication on "In-situ TEM ion irradiation investigations on U3Si2 at LWR temperatures"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinbin; Harp, Jason; Mo, Kun; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Baldo, Peter; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2017-02-01

    The radiation-induced amorphization of U3Si2 was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy using 1 MeV Kr ion irradiation. Both arc-melted and sintered U3Si2 specimens were irradiated at room temperature to confirm the similarity in their responses to radiation. The sintered specimens were then irradiated at 350 °C and 550 °C up to 7.2 × 1015 ions/cm2 to examine their amorphization behavior under light water reactor (LWR) conditions. U3Si2 remains crystalline under irradiation at LWR temperatures. Oxidation of the material was observed at high irradiation doses.

  20. Technical program to study the benefits of nonlinear analysis methods in LWR component designs. Technical report TR-3723-1

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, P. P.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of the study program to assess the benefits of nonlinear analysis methods in Light Water Reactor (LWR) component designs. The current study reveals that despite its increased cost and other complexities, nonlinear analysis is a practical and valuable tool for the design of LWR components, especially under ASME Level D service conditions (faulted conditions) and it will greatly assist in the evaluation of ductile fracture potential of pressure boundary components. Since the nonlinear behavior is generally a local phenomenon, the design of complex components can be accomplished through substructuring isolated localized regions and evaluating them in detail using nonlinear analysis methods.

  1. Groundwars Analysis of the Laser Warning Receiver (LWR). Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-02

    attack, and moving to an alternate fire position in defense. 3. For further information, please contact Mr. Dennis Bjoraker or Ms. Lisa Jokubaitis...i A1 Statement A per telecom Dennis B3joraker Program Executive Office, Anflored Systems odernization ATTN: AFAE-ASM...Y- Y I t- MNM I rmr I ()Nmr T I I IN~ m l~ I N I I cc aI (8 a 0 01 G ; 1 00 00 0 I I GLI OO I 1ee e e e i 0ee e e e I c I w I I 00- coY.Y i oc o o o i

  2. Aging management of major LWR components with nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; MacDonald, P.E.; Akers, D.W.; Sellers, C.; Murty, K.L.; Miraglia, P.Q.; Mathew, M.D.; Haggag, F.M.

    1997-12-31

    Nondestructive evaluation of material damage can contribute to continued safe, reliable, and economical operation of nuclear power plants through their current and renewed license period. The aging mechanisms active in the major light water reactor components are radiation embrittlement, thermal aging, stress corrosion cracking, flow-accelerated corrosion, and fatigue, which reduce fracture toughness, structural strength, or fatigue resistance of the components and challenge structural integrity of the pressure boundary. This paper reviews four nondestructive evaluation methods with the potential for in situ assessment of damage caused by these mechanisms: stress-strain microprobe for determining mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel and cast stainless materials, magnetic methods for estimating thermal aging damage in cast stainless steel, positron annihilation measurements for estimating early fatigue damage in reactor coolant system piping, and ultrasonic guided wave technique for detecting cracks and wall thinning in tubes and pipes and corrosion damage to embedded portion of metal containments.

  3. Microstructural examination of fatigue accumulation in critical LWR (light water reactor) components: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.J.; Buttle, D.J.; Coleman, C.F.; Smith, F.A.; Smith, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes a morphological study of the feasibility of measuring the fatigue damage accumulation state of critical light water reactor (LWR) components by microstructural examination. The changes in microstructure associated with fatigue processes are first discussed so that relevant NDE measurement parameters can be identified. (The creep regime is not considered in this report). The candidate NDE techniques are then reviewed in detail under the following headings: positron annihilation, x-ray diffraction, magnetic techniques, the magnetic Barkhausen effect, the magneto acoustic technique, acoustic emission, ultrasonic techniques and finally other miscellaneous techniques applicable to fatigue damage assessment. All the feasible techniques are summarised and rated in a set of comparison tables. A possible programme for the immediate development of the positron annihilation lineshape technique is proposed. It is concluded that the most successful method of measuring the fatigue accumulation in LWR critical components in a way which relates to the intent of the ASME pressure vessel codes, is likely to be the use of several techniques together and the cross-relation of the results obtained by each. Five techniques are highlighted for immediate possible development: 'etching and surface replication', 'positron annihilation lineshapes', 'x-ray diffraction residual stress', 'acoustic emission' and 'ultrasonic surface acoustic waves'.

  4. Compatibility/Stability Issues in the Use of Nitride Kernels in LWR TRISO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Beth L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2012-02-01

    The stability of the SiC layer in the presence of free nitrogen will be dependent upon the operating temperatures and resulting nitrogen pressures whether it is at High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) temperatures of 1000-1400 C (coolant design dependent) or LWR temperatures that range from 500-700 C. Although nitrogen released in fissioning will form fission product nitrides, there will remain an overpressure of nitrogen of some magnitude. The nitrogen can be speculated to transport through the inner pyrolytic carbon layer and contact the SiC layer. The SiC layer may be envisioned to fail due to resulting nitridation at the elevated temperatures. However, it is believed that these issues are particularly avoided in the LWR application. Lower temperatures will result in significantly lower nitrogen pressures. Lower temperatures will also substantially reduce nitrogen diffusion rates through the layers and nitriding kinetics. Kinetics calculations were performed using an expression for nitriding silicon. In order to further address these concerns, experiments were run with surrogate fuel particles under simulated operating conditions to determine the resulting phase formation at 700 and 1400 C.

  5. Application of the Reactor Analysis Support Package LWR set-point analysis guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, R.E.; Sorensen, J.M.; May, R.S.; Doran, K.J.; Trikouros, N.G.; Mozzias, E.S.

    1989-07-01

    Frequently, a situation is encountered in which the technical specification setpoints established by the plant safety analysis are judged to be unacceptable from a plant operational standpoint. This report documents the application of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Reactor Analysis Support Package (RASP) Light Water Reactor (LWR) setpoint analysis guidelines to provide justification for relaxing the high pressure setpoints at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generation Station. More Specifically, the plant operation's staff determined that it was desirable to provide increased margin for measurement uncertainties in the high pressure instrument and safety valve setpoints. Previous experience had indicated that there was insufficient margin to justify the desired setpoints using conventional deterministic inputs to the safety analysis and plant performance evaluation process. Therefore, it was determined that the RASP LWR setpoint analysis guidelines, which incorporated the use of a statistical combination of uncertainties methodology, would be used to establish an acceptable set of high pressure setpoints. This report documents the results of applying the RASP setpoint analysis guidelines to provide justification for an acceptable set of high pressure setpoints for the Oyster Creek station. 14 refs., 53 figs., 28 tabs.

  6. EUV resist curing technique for LWR reduction and etch selectivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narishige, Kazuki; Katsunuma, Takayuki; Honda, Masanobu; Yatsuda, Koichi

    2012-03-01

    This paper introduces a new technique utilizing a direct current superimposed (DCS) capacitively-coupled plasma (CCP) to enhance the etch selectivity to EUV resist with decreasing line width roughness (LWR). This new technique includes chemical and e-beam curing effects. DCS CCP generates ballistic electrons, which reform the chemical structure of photoresist. This surface modification hardens the photoresist (PR), and enhances the etch selectivity. The PR-hardening technique also improves the tolerance towards stress by polymer. Hence, a polymer becomes applicable to protect photoresist, and the etch selectivity increases even more. As a result, this cure can be processed without consuming the thickness of EUV resist. The mechanism of EUV resist cure is discussed based on the surface analysis. In addition to the basic physics of PR-hardening, this paper shows the benchmark results between DCS CCP and the conventional curing techniques by RIE, such as HBr cure and H2 cure. Several new chemistries were applied to DCS CCP. In consequence, the PR-hardening by DCS CCP achieved a 33% reduction in LWR at pre-etch treatment, and a 30% reduction during under layer etch simultaneously maintaining enough thickness of EUV resist.

  7. Modeling and Analysis of UN TRISO Fuel for LWR Application Using the PARFUME Code

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboraroty (INL) PARFUME (particle fuel model) code was used to assess the overall fuel performance of uranium nitride (UN) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) ceramic fuel under irradiation conditions typical of a Light Water Reactor (LWR). The dimensional changes of the fuel particle layers and kernel were calculated, including the formation of an internal gap. The survivability of the UN TRISO particle was estimated depending on the strain behavior of the constituent materials at high fast fluence and burn up. For nominal cases, internal gas pressure and representative thermal profiles across the kernel and layers were determined along with stress levels in the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers. These parameters were then used to evaluate fuel particle failure probabilities. Results of the study show that the survivability of UN TRISO fuel under LWR irradiation conditions might only be guaranteed if the kernel and PyC swelling rates are limited at high fast fluence and burn up. These material properties have large uncertainties at the irradiation levels expected to be reached by UN TRISO fuel in LWRs. Therefore, a large experimental effort would be needed to establish material properties, including kernel and PyC swelling rates, under these conditions before definitive conclusions can be drawn on the behavior of UN TRISO fuel in LWRs.

  8. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented.

  9. 78 FR 1698 - Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Sequence No. Title Identifier No. 525 Regulation KK--Margin and 7100-AD74 Capital Requirements for Covered..., Phone: 202 452-3818. RIN: 7100-AD80 FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (FRS) Long-Term Actions 525. Regulation KK...

  10. Princeton VLSI Project: Semi-Annual Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    beginning to explore ways to create graphics interfaces to the AU system. AU2 the second version of our layout system is coming along well. Valdes has...already fully defined the new language and implementation is now under way o [7]. AMl differs from AU in two essential ways . First, it is based on...that sizes of transis- tors can be changed but that the layout cannot be restructured. Under these ’assumptions she can tightly bound the worst case

  11. Thermochemical Compatibility and Oxidation Resistance of Advanced LWR Fuel Cladding

    DOE PAGES

    Besmann, T. M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Unocic, K. A.

    2016-06-21

    We assessed the thermochemical compatibility of potential replacement cladding materials for zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Considered were FeCrAl steel (similar to Kanthal APMT), Nb-1%Zr (similar to PWC-11), and a hybrid SiC-composite with a metallic barrier layer. The niobium alloy was also seen as requiring an oxidation protective layer, and a diffusion silicide was investigated. Metallic barrier layers for the SiC-composite reviewed included a FeCrAl alloy, Nb-1%Zr, and chromium. Thermochemical calculations were performed to determine oxidation behavior of the materials in steam, and for hybrid SiC-composites possible interactions between the metallic layer and SiC. Additionally, experimental exposures of SiC-alloymore » reaction couples at 673K, 1073K, and 1273K for 168 h in an inert atmosphere were made and microanalysis performed. Whereas all materials were determined to oxidize under higher oxygen partial pressures in the steam environment, these varied by material with expected protective oxides forming. Finally, the computed and experimental results indicate the formation of liquid phase eutectic in the FeCrAl-SiC system at the higher temperatures.« less

  12. Thermochemical Compatibility and Oxidation Resistance of Advanced LWR Fuel Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T. M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Unocic, K. A.

    2016-06-21

    We assessed the thermochemical compatibility of potential replacement cladding materials for zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Considered were FeCrAl steel (similar to Kanthal APMT), Nb-1%Zr (similar to PWC-11), and a hybrid SiC-composite with a metallic barrier layer. The niobium alloy was also seen as requiring an oxidation protective layer, and a diffusion silicide was investigated. Metallic barrier layers for the SiC-composite reviewed included a FeCrAl alloy, Nb-1%Zr, and chromium. Thermochemical calculations were performed to determine oxidation behavior of the materials in steam, and for hybrid SiC-composites possible interactions between the metallic layer and SiC. Additionally, experimental exposures of SiC-alloy reaction couples at 673K, 1073K, and 1273K for 168 h in an inert atmosphere were made and microanalysis performed. Whereas all materials were determined to oxidize under higher oxygen partial pressures in the steam environment, these varied by material with expected protective oxides forming. Finally, the computed and experimental results indicate the formation of liquid phase eutectic in the FeCrAl-SiC system at the higher temperatures.

  13. Thermochemical Compatibility and Oxidation Resistance of Advanced LWR Fuel Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T. M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Unocic, K. A.

    2016-06-21

    We assessed the thermochemical compatibility of potential replacement cladding materials for zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Considered were FeCrAl steel (similar to Kanthal APMT), Nb-1%Zr (similar to PWC-11), and a hybrid SiC-composite with a metallic barrier layer. The niobium alloy was also seen as requiring an oxidation protective layer, and a diffusion silicide was investigated. Metallic barrier layers for the SiC-composite reviewed included a FeCrAl alloy, Nb-1%Zr, and chromium. Thermochemical calculations were performed to determine oxidation behavior of the materials in steam, and for hybrid SiC-composites possible interactions between the metallic layer and SiC. Additionally, experimental exposures of SiC-alloy reaction couples at 673K, 1073K, and 1273K for 168 h in an inert atmosphere were made and microanalysis performed. Whereas all materials were determined to oxidize under higher oxygen partial pressures in the steam environment, these varied by material with expected protective oxides forming. Finally, the computed and experimental results indicate the formation of liquid phase eutectic in the FeCrAl-SiC system at the higher temperatures.

  14. Recovery of actinides from LWR spent fuel by pyrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    McPheeters, C.C.; Pierce, R.D.; Johnson, G.K.; Poa, D.S.

    1993-12-31

    Recovery of transuranium elements from light-water reactor spent fuel for burnup in the integral fast reactor is an attractive alternative to the current once-through, low burn-up fuel cycle. Argonne National Laboratory is developing pyrochemical methods for recovery of these actinide elements. The processes involve reducing the oxide fuel to metals, separation of the transuranium elements from the bulk uranium, and consolidating the trans uranium product as a metal ingot suitable for introduction into the integral fast reactor fuel cycle. The process streams are recycled where possible to minimize wastes. The process steps have been proven in small-scale experiments, and the process is being scaleup up for {open_quotes}engineering-scale{close_quotes} demonstration (20-kg batch size). This engineering-scale system is in the construction stage, and it is expected to be in operation by late 1993. Future plans include additional demonstration of the processes with actual light-water reactor spent fuel, development of qualified waste forms, and development of a preliminary design for a full-scale processing plant.

  15. TREAT Neutronics Analysis of Water-Loop Concept Accommodating LWR 9-rod Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Connie M.; Woolstenhulme, Nicolas E.; Parry, James R.; Bess, John D.; Housley, Gregory K.

    2016-09-01

    Abstract. Simulation of a variety of transient conditions has been successfully achieved in the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility during operation between 1959 and 1994 to support characterization and safety analysis of nuclear fuels and materials. A majority of previously conducted tests were focused on supporting sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) designs. Experiments evolved in complexity. Simulation of thermal-hydraulic conditions expected to be encountered by fuels and materials in a reactor environment was realized in the development of TREAT sodium loop experiment vehicles. These loops accommodated up to 7-pin fuel bundles and served to simulate more closely the reactor environment while safely delivering large quantities of energy into the test specimen. Some of the immediate TREAT restart operations will be focused on testing light water reactor (LWR) accident tolerant fuels (ATF). Similar to the sodium loop objectives, a water loop concept, developed and analyzed in the 1990’s, aimed at achieving thermal-hydraulic conditions encountered in commercial power reactors. The historic water loop concept has been analyzed in the context of a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) simulation for high burnup LWR 2-pin and 3-pin fuel bundles. Findings showed sufficient energy could be deposited into the specimens for evaluation. Similar results of experimental feasibility for the water loop concept (past and present) have recently been obtained using MCNP6.1 with ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data libraries. The old water loop concept required only two central TREAT core grid spaces. Preparation for future experiments has resulted in a modified water loop conceptual design designated the TREAT water environment recirculating loop (TWERL). The current TWERL design requires nine TREAT core grid spaces in order to place the water recirculating pump under the TREAT core. Due to the effectiveness of water moderation, neutronics analysis shows that removal of seven additional

  16. 78 FR 44355 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... edition, the Internet became the basic means for dissemination of the Unified Agenda. The complete Unified... Internet. Dated: April 24, 2013. Todd A. Stevenson, Secretary, Consumer Product Safety Commission. Consumer... reactions, such as central nervous system (``CNS'') depression, decreased heart rate, and depressed...

  17. 75 FR 79925 - Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Title Identifier Number Number 604 Regulation Z--Truth in Lending Act (Docket Number: R-1366) 7100-AD33 605 Regulation Z--Truth in Lending Act (Docket No: R-1370) 7100-AD42 606 Regulation Z--Truth in Lending (Docket No. R-1384) 7100-AD49 Federal Reserve System (FRS) Completed Actions 604. REGULATION Z...

  18. 40 CFR 62.15350 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... it? (a) For data collected during the first half of a calendar year, submit your semiannual report by August 1 of that year. (b) For data you collected during the second half of the calendar year,...

  19. Semiannual report, 1 April - 30 September 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The major categories of the current Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software for parallel computers. Research in these areas is discussed.

  20. Semiannual Report to Congress on the Effectiveness of the Civil Aviation Security Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-13

    AD-fl143 023 SEMIANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS ON THEUEFFECTIVENESS OF i/i THE CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY PROGRAM(U) FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION...Semiannual Report to O Congress on the US Deportmnent of TrasEffectiveness ofi of TransportationFedewl Avkffim Avao The Civil Aviation - Security Program... Aviation Security Program 8. Performing OrgniaetioNi RePwt Us. Aviation Security Division 9. Performing Organistion Name and Address 10. Work Unit No

  1. A model for the temperature and composition effects in the semiannual variations of the thermospheric density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Volland, H.

    1971-01-01

    A model is proposed in which latitudinal variations in composition and temperature are used to interpret the semiannual effect in the thermospheric density. Two heat sources are postulated for the semiannual circulation: one at high latitudes associated with the semiannual component in the occurance of magnetic storms and a second weaker one that peaks at the equator associated with the semiannual migration between both hemispheres. Depending on the relative magnitude of these sources, the latitude regions in which composition and temperature effects dominate vary. The temperature effects however should be expected weakest at low to mid latitudes where the relative concentration of atomic oxygen is enriched during equinox. At high latitudes the semiannual temperature component would peak, associated with an oxygen depletion in the lower thermosphere during equinox. In combining these features it is shown that the total atmospheric density could still exhibit a relatively small latitude dependence in the semiannual component with the tendency to decrease at high latitudes, in agreement with observations.

  2. Semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period October 1, 1994, through March 31, 1995. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large number of which facilitated Department management`s efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by six primary performance measures: (1) Recommendations accepted by management, (2) Audit/inspection savings, recoveries, and funds identified for better use, (3) Legislative/regulatory compliance to recommendations, (4) Positive impacts on the Department after implementation of recommendations, (5) Complaints resolved, and (6) Investigation recoveries, fines, and funds identified for better use.

  3. MODIS Science Team Member Semi-annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermote, Eric; ElSaleous, Nazmi; Fisher, Paul; Karakos, Damianos; Ray, James; Vermeulen, Anne

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-annual report of the MODerate resolution imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Science Team Members. The most important activities undertaken during this reporting period are the following: 1) Versions 2.1 and 2.2 surface reflectance L2/L3 DAAC/SDST delivery; 2) Version 2.0 1km and 250m VI product delivery (assist Arizona); 3) Version 2.1 surface reflectance L2 testing; 4) Land Synthetic data set generator improvements; 5) QA; 6) Surface reflectance error budget generation (SWAMP request); 7) SCF Hardware; 8) Aerosol transport modeling; 9) Aerosol optical depth retrieval from AVHRR data; 10) Aerosol characteristics retrieval from SeaWIFS/AVHRR fusioned data; 11) Validation activities; 12) Aerosol climatology; and 13) 6S code. The report includes summaries of the topics above.

  4. MODIS Science Team Member Semi-annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermote, Eric; ElSaleous, Nazmi; Fisher, Paul; Karakos, Damianos; Ray, James; Vermeulen, Anne

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-annual report of the MODerate resolution imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Science Team Members. The most important activities undertaken during this reporting period are the following: 1) Versions 2.1 and 2.2 surface reflectance L2/L3 DAAC/SDST delivery; 2) Version 2.0 1km and 250m VI product delivery (assist Arizona); 3) Version 2.1 surface reflectance L2 testing; 4) Land Synthetic data set generator improvements; 5) QA; 6) Surface reflectance error budget generation (SWAMP request); 7) SCF Hardware; 8) Aerosol transport modeling; 9) Aerosol optical depth retrieval from AVHRR data; 10) Aerosol characteristics retrieval from SeaWIFS/AVHRR fusioned data; 11) Validation activities; 12) Aerosol climatology; and 13) 6S code. The report includes summaries of the topics above.

  5. The Semiannual Oscillation of Southern Ocean Sea Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbert, A.

    2012-04-01

    The atmospheric Semiannual Oscillation (SAO) is a half-yearly wave in mean sea level air pressure, which exhibits equinoctial maxima between 45°S and 50°S and solstitial maxima between 55°S and 65°s, with a phase reversal occurring at around 60°S. Its existence has been attributed to a phase difference in the annual temperature cycle between mid- and high-latitudes which sets up meridional temperature and pressure gradients that are largest during September and March, enhancing atmospheric baroclinicity and inducing equinoctial maxima in the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies. In this study, we use harmonic analysis of atmospheric and oceanic Southern Ocean datasets to show that this atmospheric SAO induces oceanic counterparts in sea level and circumpolar transport. This aspect of atmosphere-ocean interaction is particularly important, given the capacity of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) to influence regional climate through the exchange of heat, fresh water and nutrients to each of the major ocean basins. We examine the relative contributions of local and regional semiannual atmospheric fluctuations in explaining the observed sea level response at 20 Southern Ocean and South Atlantic tide gauge stations and find that the oceanic SAO is associated with a modulation of zonal surface wind strength at key latitudes between ~55°S and 65°S. We also explore whether a seasonal inequality in SAO amplitude might facilitate the deduction of the timescales upon which Southern Ocean 'eddy saturation' theory might operate. However, though we find evidence of biannual fluctuations in eddy kinetic energy, regional variations in the phases and amplitudes of these emergent harmonics prevent us from elucidating the possible timescales upon which an eddy response to the atmospheric SAO might arise.

  6. Surface Gasification Materials Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The objective of the Surface Gasification Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for application to the specific needs of coal gasification systems. The Program is divided into two subprograms: (1) the Gasification Systems Fabrication Technology Program and (2) the Materials Application and Development Program. The purpose of the Gasification Systems Fabrication Technology Program is to evaluate innovative fabrication methods which have the potential to lower costs and improve reliability and safety for gasifier vessels and components. The purpose of the Materials Application and Development Program is to conduct engineering-scale development and application of materials for coal gasification systems to ensure that the materials of construction for pilot plants and future large-scale plants can be properly selected and specified. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), in its lead role for gasification projects, is responsible for ensuring that the Surface Gasification Materials Program is responsive to the needs for gasification systems. Under its lead role for fossil energy materials, the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO), is responsible for the planning, implementation, and management of the program in accordance with guidance received from METC. The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined semiannual progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating organizations.

  7. Semiannual report for the period October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980 of work on: (1) superconducting power transmission system development; (2) cable insulation development. Power Transmission Project Technical Note No. 106

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-07

    Progress is reported in a program whose objective is to develop an underground superconducting power transmission system which is economical and technically attractive to the utility industry. The system would be capable of carrying very large blocks of electric power, and would supplant overhead lines in urban and suburban areas and regions of natural beauty. The program consisted initially of work in the laboratory to develop suitable materials, cryostats, and cable concepts. The materials work covers the development and testing of suitable superconductors and dielectric insulation. The laboratory work has now been extended to an outside test facility which represents an intermediate step between the laboratory scale and a full-scale system. The facility will allow cables several hundred feet long to be tested under realistic conditions. In addition, the refrigerator has been designed for optimum service for utility applications.

  8. Nonlinear analysis of LWR components: areas of investigation/benefits/recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S. J.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify specific topics of investigation into design procedures, design concepts, methods of analysis, testing practices, and standards which are characterized by nonlinear behavior (both geometric and material) and which are considered to offer some economic and/or technical benefits to the LWR industry (excluding piping). In this study these topics were collected, compiled, and subjectively evaluated as to their potential benefit. The topics considered to have the greatest benefit/impact potential are discussed. The topics of investigation were found to fall basically into three areas: component, code interpretation, and load/failure mechanism. The topics are arbitrarily reorganized into six areas of investigation: Fracture, Fatigue, Vibration/Dynamic/Seismic, Plasticity, Component/Computational Considerations, and Code Interpretation.

  9. Integrated Computational Modeling of Water Side Corrosion in Zirconium Metal Clad Under Nominal LWR Operating Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanfar, Asghar; Thomas, John; Van der Ven, Anton; Xu, Donghua; Youssef, Mostafa; Yang, Jing; Yildiz, Bilge; Marian, Jaime

    2016-11-01

    A mesoscopic chemical reaction kinetics model to predict the formation of zirconium oxide and hydride accumulation light-water reactor (LWR) fuel clad is presented. The model is designed to include thermodynamic information from ab initio electronic structure methods as well as parametric information in terms of diffusion coefficients, thermal conductivities and reaction constants. In contrast to approaches where the experimentally observed time exponents are captured by the models by design, our approach is designed to be predictive and to provide an improved understanding of the corrosion process. We calculate the time evolution of the oxide/metal interface and evaluate the order of the chemical reactions that are conducive to a t 1/3 dependence. We also show calculations of hydrogen cluster accumulation as a function of temperature and depth using spatially dependent cluster dynamics. Strategies to further cohesively integrate the different elements of the model are provided.

  10. A Model for Assessment of Failure of LWR Fuel during an RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenfeng; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a model for Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) failure of LWR fuel during an RIA. The model uses the J-integral as a driving parameter to characterize the failure potential during PCMI. The model is implemented in the FRAPTRAN code and is validated by CABRI and NSRR simulated RIA test data. Simulation of PWR and BWR conditions are conducted by FRAPTRAN to evaluate the fuel failure potential using this model. Model validation and simulation results are compared with the strain-based failure model of PNNL and the SED/CSED model of EPRI. Our fracture mechanics model has good capability to differentiate failure from non-failure cases. The results reveal significant effects of power pulse width: a wider pulse width generally increases the threshold for fuel failure. However, this effect is less obvious for highly corroded cladding. (authors)

  11. Demonstration and Evaluation of the PLATO IV Computer-Based Education System (Computer-Based Education for a Volunteer Armed Service Personnel Program). Semi-Annual Report for the Period July 1, 1976-December 31, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Computer-Based Education Research Lab.

    This is a report of a program aimed at the demonstration, tests, and evaluation of the educational and economic effectiveness of PLATO IV computer-based education as implemented in several geographically dispersed military training sites. It also describes a technical program aimed at increasing the cost effectiveness of the PLATO system. During…

  12. Review of Technical Issues Related to Predicting Isotopic Compositions and Source Terms for High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I. C.; Parks, C. V.

    2000-12-11

    This report has been prepared to review the technical issues important to the prediction of isotopic compositions and source terms for high-burnup, light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel as utilized in the licensing of spent fuel transport and storage systems. The current trend towards higher initial 235U enrichments, more complex assembly designs, and more efficient fuel management schemes has resulted in higher spent fuel burnups than seen in the past. This trend has led to a situation where high-burnup assemblies from operating LWRs now extend beyond the area where available experimental data can be used to validate the computational methods employed to calculate spent fuel inventories and source terms. This report provides a brief review of currently available validation data, including isotopic assays, decay heat measurements, and shielded dose-rate measurements. Potential new sources of experimental data available in the near term are identified. A review of the background issues important to isotopic predictions and some of the perceived technical challenges that high-burnup fuel presents to the current computational methods are discussed. Based on the review, the phenomena that need to be investigated further and the technical issues that require resolution are presented. The methods and data development that may be required to address the possible shortcomings of physics and depletion methods in the high-burnup and high-enrichment regime are also discussed. Finally, a sensitivity analysis methodology is presented. This methodology is currently being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a computational tool to better understand the changing relative significance of the underlying nuclear data in the different enrichment and burnup regimes and to identify the processes that are dominant in the high-burnup regime. The potential application of the sensitivity analysis methodology to help establish a range of applicability for experimental

  13. Methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage sites: Proposal for optimizing a biological treatment system for denitrification of Y-12 waste streams. Semiannual progress report, November 1, 1987--March 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, G.M.; Revis, N.

    1988-12-31

    The denitrification process at Y-12 involves the use of sludge to denitrify aqueous plating waste containing relatively high levels of NO{sub 3}. The process from time to time does not denitrify. The factors associated with the failure of the process remains to be resolved. The authors propose to resolve those factors by taking the following research approaches: (1) isolation and identification of microorganisms originating from sewage sludge which are associated with denitrification; (2) define physiological factors required for denitrification in this process system; and (3) define toxic factors associated with the aqueous waste that may affect the process of denitrification.

  14. Federal Energy Resources Modernization Coordinating Committee; Semiannual report, April 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G. B.

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the broad range of activities that are focused on meeting the President's Executive Order on Federal Energy Management promulgated to meet energy savings goals and encourage more efficient management of all federal energy resources. These activities are reported semiannually under the auspices of the Federal Energy Resource Modernization (FERM) Coordinating Committee, and as such include activities undertaken from April 1, 1992, through September 30, 1992. The activities reported are classified into four major categories: (1) technology-base support, which includes development of processes, software, metering and monitoring equipment and strategies, and other tools for federal energy managers to better understand and characterize their energy resources; (2) federal energy systems testing and monitoring; (3) federal energy systems revitalization projects at federal installations in cooperation with the utilities serving the sites; and (4) energy supply, distribution and end-use conservation assessment for federal agencies and/or facilities. Lighting systems and air conditioning projects at federal facilities, especially military bases are updated.

  15. Surface Gasification Materials Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R.A.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of the Surface Gasification Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for application to the specific needs of coal gasification systems. One of the goals of the program is to evaluate innovative fabrication methods which have the potential to lower costs and improve reliability and safety for gasifier vessels and components. Another goal is to conduct engineering-scale development and application of materials for coal gasification systems to ensure that the materials of construction for pilot plants and future large-scale plants can be properly selected and specified. Contents of this semiannual progress report include: (1) corrosion studies of plant materials surveillance tests; (2) slagging gasifier refractories - application/evaluation; (3) protective coatings and claddings - application/evaluation; (4) corrosion of structural ceramics in coal gasification environments; (5) advanced pressure vessel materials technology; (6) electroslag component casting; (7) production and evaluation of electroslag castings; (8) cost reduction of electroslag casting manufacturing process; and (9) quantitative microstructural characterization of steel casting.

  16. 78 FR 59047 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-Annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... Title of Information Collection: Semi-annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report--Local Contracting... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-Annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report--Local Contracting Agencies (HUD Programs) AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information...

  17. 17 CFR 274.101 - Form N-SAR, semi-annual report of registered investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form N-SAR, semi-annual report... Forms for Reports § 274.101 Form N-SAR, semi-annual report of registered investment companies. This form... citations affecting Form N-SAR, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids...

  18. 17 CFR 274.101 - Form N-SAR, semi-annual report of registered investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form N-SAR, semi-annual report... Forms for Reports § 274.101 Form N-SAR, semi-annual report of registered investment companies. This form... citations affecting Form N-SAR, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids...

  19. 17 CFR 274.101 - Form N-SAR, semi-annual report of registered investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form N-SAR, semi-annual report... Forms for Reports § 274.101 Form N-SAR, semi-annual report of registered investment companies. This form... citations affecting Form N-SAR, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids...

  20. 17 CFR 274.101 - Form N-SAR, semi-annual report of registered investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form N-SAR, semi-annual report... Forms for Reports § 274.101 Form N-SAR, semi-annual report of registered investment companies. This form... citations affecting Form N-SAR, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids...

  1. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Heat Exchange Systems

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Requirements for Heat Exchange Systems 8 Table 8 to Subpart VVVVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Chemical Manufacturing Area Sources Pt. 63, Subpt. VVVVVV, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart VVVVVV... next semi-annual periodic report required by § 63.152(c)” means the next semi-annual compliance report...

  2. Gaseous swelling of U 3 Si 2 during steady-state LWR operation: A rate theory investigation

    DOE PAGES

    Miao, Yinbin; Gamble, Kyle A.; Andersson, David; ...

    2017-07-25

    Rate theory simulations of fission gas behavior in U3Si2 are reported for light water reactor (LWR) steady-state operation scenarios. We developed a model of U3Si2 and implemented into the GRASS-SST code based on available research reactor post-irradiation examination (PIE) data, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations of key material properties. Simplified peripheral models were also introduced to capture the fuel-cladding interaction. The simulations identified three regimes of U3Si2 swelling behavior between 390 K and 1190 K. Under typical steady-state LWR operating conditions where U3Si2 temperature is expected to be below 1000 K, intragranular bubbles are dominant and fission gas ismore » retained in those bubbles. The consequent gaseous swelling is low and associated degradation in the fuel thermal conductivity is also limited. Those predictions of U3Si2 performance during steady-state operations in LWRs suggest that this fuel material is an appropriate LWR candidate fuel material. Fission gas behavior models established based on this work are being coupled to the thermo-mechanical simulation of the fuel behavior using the BISON fuel performance multi-dimensional finite element code.« less

  3. Gaseous Swelling of U3Si2 during Steady-State LWR Operation: A Rate Theory Invesitgation

    DOE PAGES

    Miao, Yinbin; Gamble, Kyle A.; Andersson, David; ...

    2017-10-01

    Rate theory simulations of fission gas behavior in U3Si2 are reported for light water reactor (LWR) steady-state operation scenarios. A model of U3Si2 was developed and implemented into the GRASS-SST code based on available research reactor post-irradiation examination (PIE) data, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations of key material properties. Simplified peripheral models were also introduced to capture the fuel-cladding interaction. The simulations identified three regimes of U3Siz swelling behavior between 390 K and 1190 K. Under typical steady-state LWR operating conditions where U3Si2 temperature is expected to be below 1000 K, intragranular bubbles are dominant and fission gas ismore » retained in those bubbles . The consequent gaseous swelling is low and associated degradation in the fuel thermal conductivity is also limited. Those predictions of U3Si2 performance during steady-state operations in LWRs suggest that this fuel material is an appropriate LWR candidate fuel material. Fission gas behavior models established based on this work are being coupled to the thermo-mechanical simulation of the fuel behavior using the BISON fuel performance multi-dimensional finite element code.« less

  4. CFD Simulations of a Flow Mixing and Heat Transfer Enhancement in an Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    In, Wang-Kee; Chun, Tae-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Hwan; Oh, Dong-Seok

    2007-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to investigate a flow-mixing and heat-transfer enhancement caused by a mixing-vane spacer in a LWR fuel assembly which is a rod bundle. This paper presents the CFD simulations of a flow mixing and heat transfer in a fully heated 5x5 array of a rod bundle with a split-vane and hybrid-vane spacer. The CFD prediction at a low Reynolds number of 42,000 showed a reasonably good agreement of the initial heat transfer enhancement with the measured one for a partially heated experiment using a similar spacer structure. The CFD simulation also predicted the decay rate of a normalized Nusselt number downstream of the split-vane spacer which agrees fairly well with those of the experiment and the correlation. The CFD calculations for the split vane and hybrid vane at the LWR operating conditions(Re = 500,000) predicted hot fuel spots in a streaky structure downstream of the spacer, which occurs due to the secondary flow occurring in an opposite direction near the fuel rod. However, the split-vane and hybrid-vane spacers are predicted to significantly enhance the overall heat transfer of a LWR nuclear fuel assembly. (authors)

  5. Four Mile Creek semi-annual sampling report, January 1993 sampling event

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    From 1955 to 1988 low-level radioactive wastewater generated by chemical separation processes within the General Separations Area (GSA) was discharged to seepage basins in the F and H Areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). These basins were designed to permit the infiltration of the process wastewaters. As wastewater percolated downward through the basins, chemical and radioactive constituents were retained or sequestered in the subsoils. An extensive study aimed at characterizing the groundwater seeping into Four Mile Creek and its associated seepline was conducted in 1988 and 1989 (Haselow et al. 1990). Results of this study suggested that contaminants leaching from the F and H Area seepage basins were impacting the Four Mile Creek wetland system. The seepage basins were closed in 1988 and capped and sealed in 1990. This effectively eliminated the source of the contaminants and the hydraulic head driving the migration of contaminants from the basins. It has been hypothesized that, after the elimination of the source and head, annual rainfall amounts would be sufficient to dilute and flush out contaminants remaining in the subsoils and groundwaters beneath the basins. Westinghouse Savannah River Company has designed a semi-annual sampling and analytical program for the Four Mile Creek (FMC) seepline and stream water to test the hypothesis. This report summarizes field monitoring activities from January 25, 1993 to February 4, 1993.

  6. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, April 1--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Semiannual Report to Congress covers the period April 1 to September 30, 1998. The report summarizes significant Office of Inspector General (OIG) audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period.These OIG efforts facilitated Department of Energy (DOE) efforts to improve the overall management of its programs. The OIG has developed a Strategic Plan which sets out its overall goals and objectives. The Office`s significant accomplishments are grouped by the strategic goals against which the OIG measures its performance. Highlights are presented on the following items: prime contractor fees policy strengthening; low-level and low-level mixed waste management program improvement; hazardous waste training agreement cost $6 million more than necessary; controls over architect-engineering costs improvement; funds expended contrary to Congressional direction and internal budget execution guidelines; company mischarges costs on several federal contracts; year 2000 computer issues; Qui Tam investigations; task force investigations; financial assistance grantees; DOE suspect/counterfeit items information trending and analysis; and management information systems.

  7. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulations of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinbin; Ye, Bei; Mei, Zhigang; Hofman, Gerard; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2015-12-10

    Uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel has higher thermal conductivity and higher uranium density, making it a promising candidate for the accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs). However, previous studies on the fuel performance of U3Si2, including both experimental and computational approaches, have been focusing on the irradiation conditions in research reactors, which usually involve low operation temperatures and high fuel burnups. Thus, it is important to examine the fuel performance of U3Si2 at typical LWR conditions so as to evaluate the feasibility of replacing conventional uranium dioxide fuel with this silicide fuel material. As in-reactor irradiation experiments involve significant time and financial cost, it is appropriate to utilize modeling tools to estimate the behavior of U3Si2 in LWRs based on all those available research reactor experimental references and state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculation capabilities at the early development stage. Hence, in this report, a comprehensive investigation of the fission gas swelling behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is introduced. The modeling efforts mentioned in this report was based on the rate theory (RT) model of fission gas bubble evolution that has been successfully applied for a variety of fuel materials at devious reactor conditions. Both existing experimental data and DFT-calculated results were used for the optimization of the parameters adopted by the RT model. Meanwhile, the fuel-cladding interaction was captured by the coupling of the RT model with simplified mechanical correlations. Therefore, the swelling behavior of U3Si2 fuel and its consequent interaction with cladding in LWRs was predicted by the rate theory modeling, providing valuable information for the development of U3Si2 fuel as an accident

  8. Annual and Semi-Annual Temperature Oscillations in the Upper Mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niciejewski, R. J.; Killeen, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fourier transform spectrometer observations of the mesosphere have been performed at the University of Michigan (latitude: 42.5 N) on a long term basis. A database of near infrared Meinel hydroxyl spectra has been accumulated from which rotational temperatures have been determined. Harmonic analysis of one-day averaged temperatures for the period 1992.0 to 1994.5 has shown a distinct annual and semi-annual variation. Subsequent fitting of a five term periodic function characterizing the annual and semi-annual temperature oscillations to the daily averaged temperatures was performed. The resultant mean temperature and the amplitudes and phases of the annual and semi-annual variations are shown to coincide with an emission height slightly above 85 km which is consistent with the mean rocket derived altitude for peak nocturnal hydroxyl emission.

  9. Preparation of plant and system design description documents

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This standard prescribes the purpose, scope, organization, and content of plant design requirements (PDR) documents and system design descriptions (SDDs), to provide a unified approach to their preparation and use by a project as the principal means to establish the plant design requirements and to establish, describe, and control the individual system designs from conception and throughout the lifetime of the plant. The Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Requirements Document should be considered for LWR plants.

  10. Preparation of plant and system design description documents

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This standard prescribes the purpose, scope, organization, and content of plant design requirements (PDR) documents and system design descriptions (SDDs), to provide a unified approach to their preparation and use by a project as the principal means to establish the plant design requirements and to establish, describe, and control the individual system designs from conception and throughout the lifetime of the plant. The Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Requirements Document should be considered for LWR plants.

  11. The impact of integrated water management on the Space Station propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George R.

    1987-01-01

    The water usage of elements in the Space Station integrated water system (IWS) is discussed, and the parameters affecting the overall water balance and the water-electrolysis propulsion-system requirements are considered. With nominal IWS operating characteristics, extra logistic water resupply (LWR) is found to be unnecessary in the satisfaction of the nominal propulsion requirements. With the consideration of all possible operating characteristics, LWR will not be required in 65.5 percent of the cases, and for 17.9 percent of the cases LWR can be eliminated by controlling the stay time of theShuttle Orbiter orbiter.

  12. BUGJEFF311.BOLIB (JEFF-3.1.1) and BUGENDF70.BOLIB (ENDF/B-VII.0) - Generation Methodology and Preliminary Testing of two ENEA-Bologna Group Cross Section Libraries for LWR Shielding and Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescarini, Massimo; Sinitsa, Valentin; Orsi, Roberto; Frisoni, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    Two broad-group coupled neutron/photon working cross section libraries in FIDO-ANISN format, dedicated to LWR shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry applications, were generated following the methodology recommended by the US ANSI/ANS-6.1.2-1999 (R2009) standard. These libraries, named BUGJEFF311.BOLIB and BUGENDF70.BOLIB, are respectively based on JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data and adopt the same broad-group energy structure (47 n + 20 γ) of the ORNL BUGLE-96 similar library. They were respectively obtained from the ENEA-Bologna VITJEFF311.BOLIB and VITENDF70.BOLIB libraries in AMPX format for nuclear fission applications through problem-dependent cross section collapsing with the ENEA-Bologna 2007 revision of the ORNL SCAMPI nuclear data processing system. Both previous libraries are based on the Bondarenko self-shielding factor method and have the same AMPX format and fine-group energy structure (199 n + 42 γ) as the ORNL VITAMIN-B6 similar library from which BUGLE-96 was obtained at ORNL. A synthesis of a preliminary validation of the cited BUGLE-type libraries, performed through 3D fixed source transport calculations with the ORNL TORT-3.2 SN code, is included. The calculations were dedicated to the PCA-Replica 12/13 and VENUS-3 engineering neutron shielding benchmark experiments, specifically conceived to test the accuracy of nuclear data and transport codes in LWR shielding and radiation damage analyses.

  13. Fission product release and survivability of UN-kernel LWR TRISO fuel

    SciTech Connect

    T. M. Besmann; M. K. Ferber; H.-T. Lin; B. P. Collin

    2014-05-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from fission product recoil calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 um diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated within a TRISO particle undergoing burnup. Creep and swelling of the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by computing the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers from internal pressure and thermomechanics of the layers. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.

  14. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y. -J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, III, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-06-29

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.

  15. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    DOE PAGES

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y. -J.; ...

    2016-06-29

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation ofmore » very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.« less

  16. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  17. Review and Prioritization of Technical Issues Related to Burnup Credit for LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C V; DeHart, M D; Wagner, John C

    2000-03-13

    This report has been prepared to review relevant background information and provide technical discussion that will help initiate a PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables) process for use of burnup credit in light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel storage and transport cask applications. The PIRT process will be used by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to help prioritize and guide a coordinated program of research and as a means to obtain input/feedback from industry and other interested parties. The review and discussion in this report are based on knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries. Current regulatory practice and perceived industry needs are also reviewed as a background for prioritizing technical needs that will facilitate safe practice in the use of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation is given. Finally, phenomena that need to be better understood for effective licensing, together with technical issues that require resolution, are presented and discussed in the form of a prioritization ranking and initial draft program plan.

  18. Storage of LWR (light-water-reactor) spent fuel in air

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.E.; Charlot, L.A.; Coleman, J.E. ); Knoll, R.W. )

    1989-12-01

    An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the oxidation response of light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels under conditions appropriate to fuel storage in air. The program is designed to investigate several independent variables that might affect the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Included are temperature (135 to 230{degree}C), fuel burnup (to about 34 MWd/kgM), reactor type (pressurized and boiling water reactors), moisture level in the air, and the presence of a high gamma field. In continuing tests with declad spent fuel and nonirradiated UO{sub 2} specimens, oxidation rates were monitored by weight-gain measurements and the microstructures of subsamples taken during the weighing intervals were characterized by several analytical methods. The oxidation behavior indicated by weight gain and time to form powder will be reported in Volume III of this series. The characterization results obtained from x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger electron spectrometry of oxidized fuel samples are presented in this report. 28 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y. -J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, III, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-06-29

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.

  20. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y.-J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. The maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ∼2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ∼300-500 μm thick cladding.

  1. Feasibility study of a plant for LWR used fuel reprocessing by pyrochemical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bychkov, A.V.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.; Savotchkin, Yu.P.; Sokolovsky, Yu.S.; Baganz, Catherine; Lopoukhine, Serge; Maurin, Guy; Medzadourian, Michel

    2007-07-01

    In 2005, experts from AREVA and RIAR performed a joint research work on the feasibility study of a plant reprocessing 1000 t/y of LWR spent nuclear fuel by the gas-fluoride and pyro-electrochemical techniques developed at RIAR. This work was based on the RIAR experience in development of pyrochemical processes and AREVA experience in designing UNF reprocessing plants. UNF reprocessing pyrochemical processes have been developed at RIAR at laboratory scale and technology for granulated MOX fuel fabrication and manufacturing of vibro-packed fuel rods is developed at pilot scale. The research work resulted in a preliminary feasibility assessment of the reprocessing plant according to the norms and standards applied in France. The study results interpretation must integrate the fact that the different technology steps are at very different stage of development. It appears clearly however that in its present state of development, pyro-electrochemical technology is not adapted to the treatment of an important material flow issuing from thermal reactors. There is probably an economic optimum to be studied for the choice of hydrometallurgical or pyro-electrochemical technology, depending on the area of application. This work is an example of successful and fruitful collaboration between French and Russian specialists. (authors)

  2. Fission Product Release and Survivability of UN-Kernel LWR TRISO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M; Ferber, Mattison K; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2014-01-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from range calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 m diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated with a TRISO particle as a function of fluence. Creep and swelling of the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by measuring the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers as a function of fluence. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.

  3. Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1998-10-16

    This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle.

  4. Analysis of fission gas release in LWR fuel using the BISON code

    SciTech Connect

    G. Pastore; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; R.L. Williamson

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in the development of the finite-element based, multidimensional fuel performance code BISON of Idaho National Laboratory are presented. Specifically, the development, implementation and testing of a new model for the analysis of fission gas behavior in LWR-UO2 fuel during irradiation are summarized. While retaining a physics-based description of the relevant mechanisms, the model is characterized by a level of complexity suitable for application to engineering-scale nuclear fuel analysis and consistent with the uncertainties pertaining to some parameters. The treatment includes the fundamental features of fission gas behavior, among which are gas diffusion and precipitation in fuel grains, growth and coalescence of gas bubbles at grain faces, grain growth and grain boundary sweeping effects, thermal, athermal, and transient gas release. The BISON code incorporating the new model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments database, also included in the IAEA coordinated research projects FUMEX-II and FUMEX-III. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data at moderate burn-up is presented, pointing out an encouraging predictive accuracy, without any fitting applied to the model parameters.

  5. Semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from October 1, 1995, through March 31, 1996. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large portion of which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. A major accomplishment during this period was the completion of financial statement audits for Fiscal Year 1995. Annual financial statement audits are mandated by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990. Narratives of our most significant reports are grouped by measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its performance. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. During this reporting period, the Office of Inspector General issued 67 audit and 15 inspection reports. For reports issued during the period, the Office of Inspector General made audit recommendations that, when implemented by management, could result in $134.6 million being put to better use. Management committed to taking corrective actions which the Office of Inspector General estimates will result in a more efficient use of funds totaling $333.2 million. Office of Inspector General investigations led to 6 criminal convictions and 1 pretrial diversion, as well as criminal and civil prosecutions which resulted in fines and recoveries of $10,942,714. The Office of Inspector General also provided 33 investigative referrals to management for recommended positive action.

  6. Annual and semiannual variations of thermospheric density: EOF analysis of CHAMP and GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jiuhou; Matsuo, Tomoko; Dou, Xiankang; Sutton, Eric; Luan, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, observations from CHAMP and GRACE during 2002-2010 are used to study the seasonal variations of thermospheric density by characterizing the dominant modes of thermospheric density variability as empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Our results showed that the first three EOFs captured most of the density variability, which can be as large as 98% of total density variability. Subsequently, the obtained mean field, first three EOFs and the corresponding amplitudes of three EOFs are applied to construct a thermospheric density model at 400 km to study seasonal variations of thermospheric density under geomagnetically quiet conditions. Thermospheric density shows strong latitudinal dependence in seasonal variation, although it usually has maxima near the equinoxes and minimum in the local winter at middle and high latitudes. Semiannual variations imbedded in the annual variations are seen at all latitudes; annual variations however become dominant in the southern hemisphere. Specifically, the observations show that the annual amplitude can reach as large as 40-50% of the annual mean at high latitudes in the southern hemisphere and it decreases gradually from the southern to northern hemisphere. The semiannual component to the annual mean is about 15-20% without significant latitudinal dependence. Additionally, the relative amplitudes of annual and semiannual variations in the MSISE00 density agree fairly well with the observations, albeit the MSISE00 gives an opposite solar activity dependence for the annual and semiannual variations compared with the positive F107 dependence seen in the observations.

  7. Unconventional gas recovery program. Semi-annual report for the period ending September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Manilla, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    This document is the third semi-annual report describing the technical progress of the US DOE projects directed at gas recovery from unconventional sources. Currently the program includes Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project, Eastern Gas Shales Project, Western Gas Sands Project, and Geopressured Aquifers Project.

  8. Annual and semi-annual cycle of equatorial Atlantic circulation associated with basin mode resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Peter; Claus, Martin; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Kopte, Robert; Toole, John M.; Johns, William E.; Böning, Claus W.

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal variability of the tropical Atlantic circulation is dominated by the annual cycle, but semi-annual variability is also pronounced, despite weak forcing at that period. Here we use multi-year, full depth velocity measurements from the central equatorial Atlantic to analyze the vertical structure of annual and semi-annual variations of zonal velocity. A baroclinic modal decomposition finds that the annual cycle is dominated by the 4th mode and the semi-annual cycle by the 2nd mode. Similar local behavior is found in a high-resolution general circulation model. This simulation reveals that the annual and semi-annual cycles of the respective dominant baroclinic modes are associated with characteristic basin-wide structures. Using an idealized linear reduced-gravity model to simulate the dynamics of individual baroclinic modes, it is shown that the observed circulation variability can be best explained by resonant equatorial basin modes. Companion simulations using the reduced-gravity model varying the basin geometry, i.e. square basin versus realistic coastlines, and forcing, i.e. spatially uniform versus spatially varying wind forcing, show a structural robustness of the simulated basin modes. A main focus of this study is the seasonal variability of the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) as identified in recent observational studies. Main characteristics of the observed EUC including seasonal variability of transport, core depth, and maximum core velocity can be explained by the linear superposition of the dominant equatorial basin modes as obtained from the reduced-gravity model.

  9. Low-rank coal research semiannual report, January 1992--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This semiannual report is a compilation of seventeen reports on ongoing coal research at the University of North Dakota. The following research areas are covered: control technology and coal preparation; advanced research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction and gasification. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. State Research Coordinating Unit Activities for the Period July 1, 1971-December 31, 1971. Semiannual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.

    This semiannual report summarizes research activities of the State Research Coordinating Units conducted under Section 131(b) of the Vocational Education Amendments of 1968 during the first half of fiscal year 1972. The purpose of the report is to facilitate exchange of information and reduce duplication of effort among the states by providing…

  11. Inspector General's Semiannual Report to Congress, No. 55. April 1, 2007-September 30, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This semiannual report to Congress on the activities and accomplishments of the Office of Inspector General (OIG), U.S. Department of Education (Department) from April 1, 2007, through September 30, 2007, highlights the audits, inspections, investigations, and other activities to illustrate an ongoing commitment to promoting accountability,…

  12. NRC regulatory agenda: Semiannual report, July--December 1996. Volume 15, Number 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued semiannually.

  13. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    2000-03-01

    This is the twenty-seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components.

  14. Stability of SiC-Matrix Microencapsulated Fuel Constituents at Relevant LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Katoh, Yutai; Leonard, Keith J; Perez-Bergquist, Alex G; Silva, Chinthaka M; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses certain key feasibility issues facing the application of SiC-matrix microencapsulated fuels for light water reactor application. Issues addressed are the irradiation stability of the SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix under LWR-relevant irradiation conditions, the presence or extent of reaction of the SiC matrix with zirconium-based cladding, the stability of the inner and outer pyrolytic graphite layers of the microencapsulated (TRISO) particle at this uncharacteristically low irradiation temperature, and the state of the particle-matrix interface following irradiation which could possibly effect thermal transport. In the process of determining these feasibility issues microstructural evolution and change in dimension and thermal conductivity was studied. As a general finding the SiC matrix was found to be quite stable with behavior similar to that of CVD SiC. In magnitude the irradiation-induced swelling of the matrix material was slightly higher and irradiation-degraded thermal conductivity was slightly lower as compared to CVD SiC. No significant reaction of this SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix material with Zircaloy was observed. Irradiation of the TRISO in the 320-360 C range to a maximum dose of 7.7 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) did not have significant negative impact on the constituent layers of the TRISO fuel. At the highest dose studied layer structure and interface integrity remained essentially unchanged with good apparent thermal transport through the microsphere to the surrounding matrix.

  15. European utility requirements: common rules to design next LWR plants in an open electricity market

    SciTech Connect

    Berbey, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    The major European electricity producers want to keep able to build new nuclear power plants and they believe 3. generation LWRs would be the most adapted response to their needs in the first decades of this century. Producing a common European Utility Requirement (EUR) document has been one of the basic tasks towards this objective. In this common frame, standardized and competitive LWR NPPs could be developed and offered to the investors. This idea is now well supported by all the other actors on the European electricity market: vendors, regulators, grid managers, administrations although in the competitive and unified European electricity market that is emerging, the electricity producers' stakes are more and more different from the other electricity business actors'. The next term objectives of the electricity producers involved in EUR are focused on negotiating common rules of the game together with the regulators. This covers the nuclear safety approaches, the conditions requested to connect a plant to a HV grid, as well as the design standards. Discussions are going on between the EUR organization and all the corresponding bodies to develop stabilized and predictable design rules that would meet the constraints of nuclear electricity generation in this new environment. Finally there cannot be competition without competitors. The EUR organization has proven to be the right place to establish trustful relationship between the vendors and their potential customers, through fair assessment of the proposed designs performance vs. the utility needs. This will be continued and developed with the main vendors present in Europe, so as to keep alive a list of 4 to 6 designs 'qualified', i.e. showing an acceptable score of non-compliance vs. EUR. (authors)

  16. Analysis of the Reuse of Uranium Recovered from the Reprocessing of Commercial LWR Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    DelCul, Guillermo Daniel; Trowbridge, Lee D; Renier, John-Paul; Ellis, Ronald James; Williams, Kent Alan; Spencer, Barry B; Collins, Emory D

    2009-02-01

    This report provides an analysis of the factors involved in the reuse of uranium recovered from commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels (1) by reenrichment and recycling as fuel to LWRs and/or (2) by recycling directly as fuel to heavy-water-reactors (HWRs), such as the CANDU (registered trade name for the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor). Reuse is an attractive alternative to the current Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) baseline plan, which stores the reprocessed uranium (RU) for an uncertain future or attempts to dispose of it as 'greater-than-Class C' waste. Considering that the open fuel cycle currently deployed in the United States already creates a huge excess quantity of depleted uranium, the closed fuel cycle should enable the recycle of the major components of spent fuel, such as the uranium and the hazardous, long-lived transuranic (TRU) actinides, as well as the managed disposal of fission product wastes. Compared with the GNEP baseline scenario, the reuse of RU in the uranium fuel cycle has a number of potential advantages: (1) avoidance of purchase costs of 11-20% of the natural uranium feed; (2) avoidance of disposal costs for a large majority of the volume of spent fuel that is reprocessed; (3) avoidance of disposal costs for a portion of the depleted uranium from the enrichment step; (4) depending on the {sup 235}U assay of the RU, possible avoidance of separative work costs; and (5) a significant increase in the production of {sup 238}Pu due to the presence of {sup 236}U, which benefits somewhat the transmutation value of the plutonium and also provides some proliferation resistance.

  17. Modeling the Impact and Costs of Semiannual Mass Drug Administration for Accelerated Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis

    PubMed Central

    de Vlas, Sake J.; Fischer, Peter U.; Weil, Gary J.; Goldman, Ann S.

    2013-01-01

    The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) has a target date of 2020. This program is progressing well in many countries. However, progress has been slow in some countries, and others have not yet started their mass drug administration (MDA) programs. Acceleration is needed. We studied how increasing MDA frequency from once to twice per year would affect program duration and costs by using computer simulation modeling and cost projections. We used the LYMFASIM simulation model to estimate how many annual or semiannual MDA rounds would be required to eliminate LF for Indian and West African scenarios with varied pre-control endemicity and coverage levels. Results were used to estimate total program costs assuming a target population of 100,000 eligibles, a 3% discount rate, and not counting the costs of donated drugs. A sensitivity analysis was done to investigate the robustness of these results with varied assumptions for key parameters. Model predictions suggested that semiannual MDA will require the same number of MDA rounds to achieve LF elimination as annual MDA in most scenarios. Thus semiannual MDA programs should achieve this goal in half of the time required for annual programs. Due to efficiency gains, total program costs for semiannual MDA programs are projected to be lower than those for annual MDA programs in most scenarios. A sensitivity analysis showed that this conclusion is robust. Semiannual MDA is likely to shorten the time and lower the cost required for LF elimination in countries where it can be implemented. This strategy may improve prospects for global elimination of LF by the target year 2020. PMID:23301115

  18. Status of the MeLoDIE experiment, an advanced device for the study of the irradiation creep of LWR cladding with full online capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Guimbal, P.; Huotilainen, S.; Taehtinen, S.; Thellier, G.; Villard, J.F.

    2015-07-01

    As a prototype of future instrumented material experiments in the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), the MELODIE project was launched in 2009 by the CEA in collaboration with VTT. Being designed as a biaxial creep experiment with online capability, MELODIE is able to apply an online-controlled biaxial loading on a LWR clad sample up to 120 MPa and to perform an online measurement of its biaxial deformation. An important experimental challenge was to perform reliably accurate measurements under the high nuclear heat load of in-core locations while keeping within their tight space. For that purpose, specific sensors were co-designed with and built by IFE Halden. Manufacturing of the MELODIE components was completed one year ago. The complexity of its in-pile section and of the pressurization system requested a step-by-step tuning of the setup. The toughest part of this process dealt with the Diameter gauge which required a partial redesign to take into account unexpected and unwanted electromagnetic interactions with the hosting device. Final cold performance tests of the on-board instrumentation will be presented. The MELODIE device is now ready and irradiation should start in OSIRIS reactor this spring. (authors)

  19. Preliminary investigation of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven noise analysis method of subcriticality measurement in LWR fuel storage and initial loading applications

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method to measure subcriticality has been demonstrated in a variety of experimental configurations of fissile materials. Calculations for an approximately 4-m-dia configuration of light water reactor (LWR) fuel elements indicated the feasibility of measuring the subcriticality of large, loosely coupled arrays of LWR fuel elements by this same method. These analysis suggested application to the initial loading of both pressurized and boiling water reactors, zero-power testing of reactors (such as shutdown margin measurements after initial loading), light water reactor refueling, and safe storage of LWR spent fuel. In the fuel storage application, direct measurement of subcriticality in the actual fuel storage facilities provides the parameter which is directly related to criticality safety.

  20. The stratopause semiannual oscillation in the NCAR Community Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassi, Fabrizio; Garcia, Roland R.; Boville, Byron A.

    1993-01-01

    The middle atmospheric version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2) has been used to study the development of the equatorial semiannual oscillation (SAO) in the stratosphere. The model domain extends from the ground to about 80 km, with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Transport of nitrous oxide (N2O) with simplified photochemistry is included in the calculation to illustrate the influence of tropical circulations on the distribution of trace species. Diagnosis of model output reveals two distinct phases in the evolution of the zonal mean state on the equator. In early December, a strong and broad easterly jet appears near the stratopause in connection with a midlatitude wave event (sudden stratospheric warming) that reverses the winter westerlies of the Northern Hemisphere throughout the upper stratosphere. When the wave forcing dies out, the radiative drive allows the westerlies to recover at midlatitudes, while easterlies persist in the tropics. The resulting strong meridional gradient of the zonal mean wind provides favorable conditions for the development of inertial instability at lower latitudes. The meridional circulation associated with the instability shapes the 'nose' of the easterly jet, reducing the extension of the unstable region. In equinoctial conditions, a jet of westerlies appears in the lower equatorial mesosphere and descends to lower altitudes; positive accelerations associated with the descending westerlies are due primarily to Kelvin waves. The descent of the westerly jet does not reproduce well the observed behavior of the SAO westerly phase, either in amplitude or in the extent of downward propagation. As a consequence, the model does not simulate the 'double peak' observed in the tropical distribution of N2O. Comparison of wave amplitudes in the model with those derived from satellite observations shows that the calculated amplitudes are larger than observed in the upper stratosphere. It follows that inadequate Kelvin wave forcing is

  1. The stratopause semiannual oscillation in the NCAR Community Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassi, Fabrizio; Garcia, Roland R.; Boville, Byron A.

    1993-01-01

    The middle atmospheric version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2) has been used to study the development of the equatorial semiannual oscillation (SAO) in the stratosphere. The model domain extends from the ground to about 80 km, with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Transport of nitrous oxide (N2O) with simplified photochemistry is included in the calculation to illustrate the influence of tropical circulations on the distribution of trace species. Diagnosis of model output reveals two distinct phases in the evolution of the zonal mean state on the equator. In early December, a strong and broad easterly jet appears near the stratopause in connection with a midlatitude wave event (sudden stratospheric warming) that reverses the winter westerlies of the Northern Hemisphere throughout the upper stratosphere. When the wave forcing dies out, the radiative drive allows the westerlies to recover at midlatitudes, while easterlies persist in the tropics. The resulting strong meridional gradient of the zonal mean wind provides favorable conditions for the development of inertial instability at lower latitudes. The meridional circulation associated with the instability shapes the 'nose' of the easterly jet, reducing the extension of the unstable region. In equinoctial conditions, a jet of westerlies appears in the lower equatorial mesosphere and descends to lower altitudes; positive accelerations associated with the descending westerlies are due primarily to Kelvin waves. The descent of the westerly jet does not reproduce well the observed behavior of the SAO westerly phase, either in amplitude or in the extent of downward propagation. As a consequence, the model does not simulate the 'double peak' observed in the tropical distribution of N2O. Comparison of wave amplitudes in the model with those derived from satellite observations shows that the calculated amplitudes are larger than observed in the upper stratosphere. It follows that inadequate Kelvin wave forcing is

  2. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Volume 14, Semiannual report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Good, M.S.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V.

    1992-07-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWR`s); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1991 through September 1991.

  3. Estimation of mechanical properties of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-10-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy- impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common ``lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  4. Estimation of mechanical properties of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-10-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common predicted lower-bound J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  5. Thermal aging of cast stainless steels in LWR systems: Estimation of mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-11-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common ``lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  6. Thermal aging of cast stainless steels in LWR systems: Estimation of mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-11-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The saturation'' impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  7. Identification of the impacts of maintenance and testing upon the safety of LWR power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Husseiny, A. A.; Sabri, Z. A.; Turnage, J. J.

    1980-04-01

    The present study was designed to identify the impact of maintenance and testing (M and T) upon the safety of LWR power plants. The study involved data extraction from various sources reporting safety-related and operation-related nuclear power plant experience. Primary sources reviewed, including Licensee Event Reports (LER's) submitted to the NRC, revealed that only ten percent of events reported could be identified as M and T problems. The collected data were collated in a manner that would allow identification of principal types of problems which are associated with the performance of M and T tasks in LWR power plants. Frequencies of occurrence of events and their general endemic nature were analyzed using data clustering and pattern recognition techniques, as well as chi-square analyses for sparse contingency tables. The results of these analyses identified seven major categories of M and T error modes which were related to individual facilities and reactor type. Data review indicated that few M and T problems were directly related to procedural inadequacies, with the majority of events being attributable to human error.

  8. Impact of implicit effects on uncertainties and sensitivities of the Doppler coefficient of a LWR pin cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hursin, Mathieu; Leray, Olivier; Perret, Gregory; Pautz, Andreas; Bostelmann, Friederike; Aures, Alexander; Zwermann, Winfried

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, PSI and GRS sensitivity analysis (SA) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods, SHARK-X and XSUSA respectively, are compared for reactivity coefficient calculation; for reference the results of the TSUNAMI and SAMPLER modules of the SCALE code package are also provided. The main objective of paper is to assess the impact of the implicit effect, e.g., considering the effect of cross section perturbation on the self-shielding calculation, on the Doppler coefficient SA and UQ. Analyses are done for a Light Water Reactor (LWR) pin cell based on Phase I of the UAM LWR benchmark. The negligence of implicit effects in XSUSA and TSUNAMI leads to deviations of a few percent between the sensitivity profiles compared to SAMPLER and TSUNAMI (incl. implicit effects) except for 238U elastic scattering. The implicit effect is much larger for the SHARK-X calculations because of its coarser energy group structure between 10 eV and 10 keV compared to the applied SCALE libraries. It is concluded that the influence of the implicit effect strongly depends on the energy mesh of the nuclear data library of the neutron transport solver involved in the UQ calculations and may be magnified by the response considered.

  9. Microstructure and hydrothermal corrosion behavior of NITE-SiC with various sintering additives in LWR coolant environments

    DOE PAGES

    Parish, Chad M.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Kim, Young -Jin; ...

    2016-11-28

    Nano-infiltration and transient eutectic phase (NITE) sintering was developed for fabrication of nuclear grade SiC composites. We produced monolithic SiC ceramics using NITE sintering, as candidates for accident-tolerant fuels in light-water reactors (LWRs). In this work, we exposed three different NITE chemistries (yttria-alumina [YA], ceria-zirconia-alumina [CZA], and yttria-zirconia-alumina [YZA]) to autoclave conditions simulating LWR coolant loops. The YZA was most corrosion resistant, followed by CZA, with YA being worst. High-resolution elemental analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) X-ray mapping combined with multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) datamining helped explain the differences in corrosion. YA-NITE lost all Al from the corrodedmore » region and the ytttria reformed into blocky precipitates. The CZA material lost all Al from the corroded area, and the YZA – which suffered the least corrosion –retained some Al in the corroded region. Lastly, the results indicate that the YZA-NITE SiC is most resistant to hydrothermal corrosion in the LWR environment.« less

  10. Microstructure and hydrothermal corrosion behavior of NITE-SiC with various sintering additives in LWR coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Kim, Young -Jin; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-11-28

    Nano-infiltration and transient eutectic phase (NITE) sintering was developed for fabrication of nuclear grade SiC composites. We produced monolithic SiC ceramics using NITE sintering, as candidates for accident-tolerant fuels in light-water reactors (LWRs). In this work, we exposed three different NITE chemistries (yttria-alumina [YA], ceria-zirconia-alumina [CZA], and yttria-zirconia-alumina [YZA]) to autoclave conditions simulating LWR coolant loops. The YZA was most corrosion resistant, followed by CZA, with YA being worst. High-resolution elemental analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) X-ray mapping combined with multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) datamining helped explain the differences in corrosion. YA-NITE lost all Al from the corroded region and the ytttria reformed into blocky precipitates. The CZA material lost all Al from the corroded area, and the YZA – which suffered the least corrosion –retained some Al in the corroded region. Lastly, the results indicate that the YZA-NITE SiC is most resistant to hydrothermal corrosion in the LWR environment.

  11. A fracture mechanics approach for estimating fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H. B.; Chopra, O. K.

    2000-04-10

    A fracture mechanics approach for elastic-plastic materials has been used to evaluate the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels. The fatigue life of such steel, defined as the number of cycles required to form an engineering-size crack, i.e., 3-mm deep, is considered to be composed of the growth of (a) microstructurally small cracks and (b) mechanically small cracks. The growth of the latter was characterized in terms of {Delta}J and crack growth rate (da/dN) data in air and LWR environments; in water, the growth rates from long crack tests had to be decreased to match the rates from fatigue S-N data. The growth of microstructurally small cracks was expressed by a modified Hobson relationship in air and by a slip dissolution/oxidation model in water. The crack length for transition from a microstructurally small crack to a mechanically small crack was based on studies on small crack growth. The estimated fatigue S-N curves show good agreement with the experimental data for these steels in air and water environments. At low strain amplitudes, the predicted lives in water can be significantly lower than the experimental values.

  12. Extended-burnup LWR (light-water reactor) fuel: The amount, characteristics, and potential effects on interim storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-03-01

    The results of a study on extended-burnup, light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the study was to collect and evaluate information on the status of in-reactor performance and integrity of extended-burnup LWR fuel and initiate the investigation of the effects of extending fuel burnup on the subsequent handling, interim storage, and other operations (e.g., rod consolidation and shipping) associated with the back end of the fuel cycle. The results of this study will aid DOE and the nuclear industry in assessing the effects on waste management of extending the useful in-reactor life of nuclear fuel. The experience base with extended-burnup fuel is now substantial and projections for future use of extended-burnup fuel in domestic LWRs are positive. The basic performance and integrity of the fuel in the reactor has not been compromised by extending the burnup, and the potential limitations for further extending the burnup are not severe. 104 refs., 15 tabs.

  13. Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 2A, Physical descriptions of LWR (Light-Water Reactor) fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This appendix includes a four-page Physical Description report for each assembly type identified from the current data. Where available, a drawing of an assembly follows the appropriate Physical Description report. If no drawing is available for an assembly, a cross-reference to a similar assembly is provided if possible. For Advanced Nuclear Fuels, Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, and Westinghouse assemblies, information was obtained via subcontracts with these fuel vendors. Data for some assembly types are not available. For such assemblies, the information shown in this report was obtained from the open literature and by inference from reload fuels made by other vendors. Efforts to obtain additional information are continuing. Individual Physical Description reports can be generated interactively through the menu-driven LWR Assemblies Data Base system. These reports can be viewed on the screen or directed to a printer. Special reports and compilations of specific data items can be produced on request.

  14. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from October 1, 1996, through March 31, 1997. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its performance. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. Five such performance measures were used during this semiannual period to present outcomes of Office of Inspector General work in terms of improvements in Department programs and operations.

  15. National Institute for Global Environmental Change. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Werth, G.C.

    1992-04-01

    This document is the Semi-Annual Report of the National Institute for Global Environmental Change for the reporting period July 1 to December 31, 1991. The report is in two parts. Part I presents the mission of the Institute, examples of progress toward that mission, a brief description of the revised management plan, and the financial report. Part II presents the statements of the Regional Center Directors along with progress reports of the projects written by the researchers themselves.

  16. Semiannual Report to Congress on the Effectiveness of the Civil Aviation Security Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-30

    and airport security measures in effect. Section V of this report provides a smry of firearms which were detected at screening points under suspicious...with the Secretary of State concerning threats, and (3) the inclusion of a sumnmary on foreign airport security in the Semiannual Report to Congress on...International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to embark inediately upon an intensified program aimed at responding to the need for enhanced airport security . As

  17. Annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field at equatorial locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, W. H.

    1981-06-01

    The annual and semiannual variations of the quiet-sun year (1965) geomagnetic field are examined using geomagnetic records obtained from observatories located between about 0 and 30 deg N geomagnetic latitude. Three separate contributions are analyzed: (1) the quiet-day midnight level (MDT), (2) the solar-quiet daily variation (Sq), and (3) the quiet-time lunar semidiurnal tidal variation (L). Methods of three recent studies (Campbell, 1980a, 1980b) are used to emphasize the equatorial features, and the differences in the seasonal amplitude and phase changes, obtained from a Fourier analysis of annual and semiannual components in the three orthogonal magnetic-field directions, are illustrated. Conclusions are presented, including: (1) the equatorial MDT variations of the northward and vertical components at quiet periods seem to represent the expected seasonal nighttime magnetospheric distortions, (2) the seasonal equatorial region Sq follows closely the annual and semiannual patterns expected to be caused by ionospheric conductivity and heating variations that give rise to a dynamo current at E-region heights, and (3) the lunar seasonal variations show characteristics of dayside ionospheric electrojet origin.

  18. Origins of the semiannual variation of geomagnetic activity in 1954 and 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E.; Svalgaard, L.; Ling, A.

    2004-01-01

    . We investigate the cause of the unusually strong semiannual variation of geomagnetic activity observed in the solar minimum years of 1954 and 1996. For 1996 we separate the contributions of the three classical modulation mechanisms (axial, equinoctial, and Russell-McPherron) to the six-month wave in the index and find that all three contribute about equally. This is in contrast to the longer run of geomagnetic activity (1868-1998) over which the equinoctial effect accounts for 70% of the semiannual variation. For both 1954 and 1996, we show that the Russell-McPherron effect was enhanced by the Rosenberg-Coleman effect (an axial polarity effect) which increased the amount of the negative (toward Sun) [positive (away from Sun)] polarity field observed during the first [second] half of the year; such fields yield a southward component in GSM coordinates. Because this favourable condition occurs only for alternate solar cycles, the marked semiannual variation in 1954 and 1996 is a manifestation of the 22-year cycle of geomagnetic activity. The 11-year evolution of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) also contributes to the strong six-month wave during these years. At solar minimum, the streamer belt at the base of the HCS is located near the solar equator, permitting easier access to high speed streams from polar coronal holes when the Earth is at its highest heliographic latitudes in March and September. Such an axial variation in solar wind speed was observed for 1996 and is inferred for 1954.

  19. Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar. Semiannual progesss report, 13 April-13 October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, D.A.; Kim, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers work performed during the period from April 13, 1988 to October 13, 1988 under NASA grant number NAG-1-877 entitled, Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar. We have designed a flashlamp-pumped Cr3(+);GSAG laser of pulsed laser energy greater than 200 mJ and of pulse width of 1 ms FWHM to simulate a high-power laser diode in pumping mid-infrared laser crystals such as Tm3(+), Er3(+), and/or Ho3(+)-ion doped YAG, YLF or other host materials. This Cr3(+);GSAG laser will be used to determine optimum conditions for laser diode pumped mid-infrared lasers, maximum energy extraction limit with longitudinal pumping, thermal damage limit, and other problems related to high power laser diode pumping. We have completed a modification of an existing flashlamp-pumped and liquid nitrogen cooled rare earth laser system for 60 J electrical input energy and a 500 micron pulse width, and have carried out preliminary experiments with a Ho(+):Er3(+):Tm3(+):YAG crystal to test the system performance. This flashlamp-pumped rare earth laser system will be used to determine optimum Tm3(+)-ion concentration in Ho3(+):Cr3(+):Tm3(+):YAG crystal in the remaining research period.

  20. Radiation Damage Assessment in the Reactor Pressure Vessel of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaspoehler, Timothy; Petrovic, Bojan

    2016-02-01

    One of the major limiting factors to nuclear reactors lifetime is the radiation-induced material damage in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). While older reactors were designed assuming a 40-year operating lifetime, new reactor designs are expected to have lifetimes up to 100 years. For safe operation, the integrity of the RPV must be ensured against significant material property changes. In this work, typical neutron damage indicators are calculated in the RPV of the I2S-LWR (Integral Inherently Safe LWR) Power Plant, including DPA (displacements per atom) and fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV and >0.1MeV). I2S-LWR is a PWR of integral design, which means that its wider downcomer provides additional shielding to the vessel. However, its higher core power density and longer lifetime may offset this advantage. In order to accurately represent the neutron environment for RPV damage assessment, a detailed model based on the preliminary design specifications of the I2S-LWR was developed to be used in the MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations) sequence of the Scale6.1 code package. MAVRIC uses the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling) methodology to bias a fixed-source MC (Monte Carlo) simulation. To establish the upper limit of a bounding envelope, a flat-source distribution was used. For the low limit, a center-peaked source was generated using the KENO-VI criticality sequence assuming uniform fresh fuel core. Results based on the preliminary I2S-LWR model show that DPA rates and fast fluence rates are conservatively 75% lower than in typical PWRs being operated currently in the US.

  1. Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 2E, Physical descriptions of LWR nonfuel assembly hardware, Appendix 2F, User's guide to the LWR nonfuel assembly data base

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-01

    This appendix includes a two to three page Physical Description report for each Non-fuel Assembly (NFA) Hardware item identified from the current data. Information was obtained via subcontracts with these NFA hardware vendors: Babcock and Wildox, Combustion Engineering and Westinghouse. Data for some NFA hardware are not available. For such hardware, the information shown in this report was obtained from the open literature. Efforts to obtain additional information are continuing. NFA hardware can be grouped into six categories: BWR Channels, Control Elements, Guide Tube Plugs/Orifice Rods, Instrumentation, Neutron Poisons, and Neutron Sources. This appendix lists Physical Description reports alphabetically by vendor within each category. Individual Physical Description reports can be generated interactively through the menu-driven LWR Non-Fuel Assembly Hardware Data Base system. These reports can be viewed on the screen, directed to a printer, or saved in a text file for later use. Special reports and compilations of specific data items can be produced on request.

  2. HANFORD SITE AIR OPERATING PERMIT SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 07/01/2004 THRU 12/31/2004

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN, W.E.

    2005-01-19

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. One condition contained in the AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, is the requirement to submit semiannual reports by March 15th and September 15th each year, which are certified for truth, accuracy, and completeness by a Responsible Official. This semiannual report contains information from July 1, 2004 through December 31, 2004. Copies of semiannual reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, as amended in August 2002 and December 2002, identifies the following. (1) Each semiannual report will provide a reference to deviation reports submitted to the regulatory agencies as required by Section 4.5. ''Permit Deviation Reporting''. (2) Each semiannual report will consist of reports of any required monitoring not submitted previously to the agencies or a reference to reports of required monitoring submitted during the reporting period. (3) Each semiannual report will contain a summary of any substantiated air emission complaint investigation(s) required in Table 1.2 of AOP, Attachment 1, and issued during the reporting period. (4) For all minor radioactive emission points (potential to emit <0.1 mrem to the maximally exposed individual) listed in AOP, Attachment 2. Tables 1.2. 1.3, and 2.1, each semiannual report will confirm that any required monitoring was conducted to verify low emissions during the reporting period. Data derived from that monitoring will be reported in the Annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Report (AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.1). AOP requirement is for annual monitoring (e.g., four 1 week samples

  3. Economic incentives and recommended development for commercial use of high burnup fuels in the once-through LWR fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R.B.; Merckx, K.R.; Holm, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    This study calculates the reduced uranium requirements and the economic incentives for increasing the burnup of current design LWR fuels from the current range of 25 to 35 MWD/Kg to a range of 45 to 55 MWD/Kg. The changes in fuel management strategies which may be required to accommodate these high burnup fuels and longer fuel cycles are discussed. The material behavior problems which may present obstacles to achieving high burnup or to license fuel are identified and discussed. These problems are presented in terms of integral fuel response and the informational needs for commercial and licensing acceptance. Research and development programs are outlined which are aimed at achieving a licensing position and commercial acceptance of high burnup fuels.

  4. Clarification of rim structure effects on properties and behaviour of LWR UO{sub 2} fuels and gadolinia doped fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, T.; Kameyama, T.; Sasahara, A.; Kitajima, S.; Nauchi, Y.; Kinoshita, M.; Rondinella, V.V.; Wiss, T.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Papaioannou, D.; Sheindlin, M.; Staicu, D.

    2007-07-01

    At the peripheral region of high burnup fuel pellets, a crystallographic re-structuring is observed, commonly called the 'rim structure', which is characterized by the existence of highly dense small sub-grains, whose size is approximately 100 nm, and the accumulation of small pores with average size around 1 {mu}m. This restructuring can influence the fuel performance including, e.g. fission gas release behaviour, temperature, hardness and density. In order to clarify the threshold burnup and temperature of rim structure formation and fuel performances of LWR UO{sub 2} fuels and gadolinia-doped ((U,Gd)O{sub 2}) fuels whose usage is increasing for higher burnup in LWR, several post irradiation examinations such as scanning electron microscope (SEM) /transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation, density measurements, hot cell annealing and thermal diffusivity measurements are done. By SEM and TEM observations, it is clarified that the microstructure evolution and the burnup and temperature threshold of rim structure formation of (U,Gd)O{sub 2} fuels is not different from that of UO{sub 2} fuels. The density change of UO{sub 2} and (U,Gd)O{sub 2} fuels is almost similar, and the irradiation temperature does not affect the density change significantly. Fission gas release behaviour can be classified by the existence of rim structure, and the release behaviour between UO{sub 2} and (U, Gd)O{sub 2} fuels is almost same. The thermal diffusivity behavior of (U, Gd)O{sub 2} fuels is similar to that of UO{sub 2} fuels, and the decrease rate of thermal diffusivity is prevented in burnup range of 50-70 MWd/kgU. (authors)

  5. Fuel Performance Improvement Program. Semiannual progress report, October 1979-March 1980. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Progress on the Fuel Performance Improvement Program's fuel design tests and demonstration irradiations for October 1979 through March 1980 is reported. Included are the results of out-of-reactor experiments with Zircaloy cladding using a device that simulates the interaction between fuel and cladding. Also included are reports on the irradiation of the advanced LWR fuel designs in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor and in Consumers Power Company's Big Rock Point Reactor. The establishment of the technical bases and licensing requirements for the advanced fuel concepts are also described.

  6. Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Semiannual Report for the period July 21 2001 Thru December 31 2001

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN, W.E.

    2002-02-01

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. One condition contained in the AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, is the requirement to submit semiannual reports by March 15th and August 15th each year, which are certified for truth and accuracy by a Responsible Official. This first semiannual report contains information for the period from July 2, 2001 through December 31, 2001. Hereafter, the March 15th semiannual report will contain information for the period from July 1 through December 31. The semiannual report submitted by August 15th will contain information for the period from January 1 through June 30. Copies of the semiannual reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, identifies the following: (1) Each semiannual report will provide a reference to deviation reports submitted to the regulatory agencies as required by Section 4.5, ''Permit Deviation Reporting''. (2) Each semiannual report will consist of reports of any required monitoring not submitted previously to the agencies or a reference to reports of required monitoring that were submitted during the reporting period. (3) Each semiannual report will contain a summary of any substantiated air emission complaint investigation(s) required in Table 1.2 of AOP, Attachment 1, and issued during the reporting period (4) For all minor radioactive emission points (potential to emit <0.1 mrem to the maximally exposed individual) listed in AOP, Attachment 2. Tables 1.2, 1.3 and 2.1. each semiannual report will confirm that any required monitoring was conducted to verify low emissions during the reporting period. The data derived from that monitoring will be reported

  7. Randomized Equivalence Trial of Intensive and Semiannual Applications of Fluoride Varnish in the Primary Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, P.; Spiekerman, C.; Milgrom, P.

    2009-01-01

    For children in the primary dentition with high caries prevalence the standard semiannual application of fluoride varnish may not be successful in preventing tooth decay. Oftentimes this population is mobile and does not receive consistent preventive care. This trial tested whether an intensive fluoride 5% sodium varnish regimen (three applications/2 weeks) applied annually has an equivalent effect on caries progression in the primary dentition compared to single applications applied semiannually. This study was a randomized clinical trial with two treatment groups. All participants (n = 600; mean age ± SD = 55.3 ± 4.6 months) received three varnish applications (active varnish or placebo) at semiannual visits over 3 years. Once per year the intensive-treatment group received one set of three active treatments and three placebo treatments 6 months later, each time within 2 weeks. The standard group received one active and two placebo treatments every 6 months. Children were assessed clinically at baseline and 12, 24 and 36 months after the initiation of the study. The mean (SD) numbers of newly decayed primary tooth surfaces observed over 3 years were 9.8 (8.6) and 7.4 (7.7) in the intensive and standard groups, respectively. The adjusted rate ratio was 1.13 (95% CI = 0.94–1.37, p = 0.20). In conclusion, the trial failed to demonstrate clear evidence of a difference in efficacy. However, differences of up to 36% greater rates of caries in the intensive group could not be ruled out, thus equivalence of the treatments cannot be concluded. PMID:20016179

  8. Short communication on "In-situ TEM ion irradiation investigations on U3Si2 at LWR temperatures"

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinbin; Harp, Jason; Mo, Kun; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Baldo, Peter; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2016-11-21

    Here, the radiation-induced amorphization of U3Si2 was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy using 1 MeV Kr ion irradiation. Both arc-melted and sintered U3Si2 specimens were irradiated at room temperature to confirm the similarity in their responses to radiation. The sintered specimens were then irradiated at 350 °C and 550 °C up to 7.2 × 1015 ions/cm2 to examine their amorphization behavior under light water reactor (LWR) conditions. U3Si2 remains crystalline under irradiation at LWR temperatures. Oxidation of the material was observed at high irradiation doses.

  9. Evaluation of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method for measuring the subcriticality of LWR fuel storage casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method was evaluated to determine if it could be used to measure the subcriticality of storage casks of burnt light water reactor (LWR) fuel submerged in fuel storage pools, fully loaded and as they are being loaded. Measurements of k/sub eff/ would provide the parameter most directly related to the criticality safety of storage cask configurations of LWR fuel and could allow proper credit for fuel burnup without reliance on calculations. This, in turn, could lead to more cost-effective cask designs. Evaluation of the method for this application was based on experiments already completed at a critical experiments facility using arrays of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel pins typical of the size of storage cask configurations, the existence of neutron detectors that can function in shipping cask environments, and the ability to construct ionization chambers containing /sup 252/Cf of adequate intensity for these measurements.

  10. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for the Period Ending June 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1999-09-01

    This is the twenty-sixth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and its reported separately.

  11. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

  12. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    1998-09-01

    This is the twenty-fourth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliff, A.F.; Burn, G.

    1999-04-01

    This is the twenty-fifth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately.

  14. Surface-Gasification Materials Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R.A.

    1983-05-01

    Contents of this semiannual report include the following: introduction; (1) plant materials surveillance tests (Illinois Institute of Technology); (2) slagging gasifier refractories - appliction/evaluation (Argonne National Laboratory); (3) protective clothing and claddings - application/evaluation (ANL); (4) ceramic application technology - brittle material design (LANL); (5) advanced pressure vessel materials technology (ORNL); (6) electroslag component casting (ORNL); (7) cost reduction of the electroslag casting manufacturing process (CMU); (8) materials review and component failure analysis in support of coal gasification processes and plants (ANL); (9) process plant materials review, evaluation, and support (ORNL).

  15. TFE verification program: Semiannual report for the period ending April 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a Thermionic Fuel Element suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. 14 refs., 107 figs., 35 tabs.

  16. TFE Verification Program: Semiannual report for the period ending April 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. 55 figs., 30 tabs.

  17. TFE Verification Program semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and full-power life of 7 years. The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented in this paper will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results.

  18. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1987-09-01

    This is the second in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities in the following areas: (1) Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; (2) Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and (3) Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. Separate analytics were prepared for the reports in this volume.

  19. US oil company participation in the Intenational Energy Program. Twelfth semiannual report to the Congress and the President

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    Under the EPCA's semi-annual reporting requirement, the Commission is required to evaluate the impact on competition and small business of oil company activities pursuant to the voluntary agreement and plan of action. This report has set out industry activities and related events over the past six months and attempted to assess whether any International Energy Program (IEP) may have an effect on competition and small business. Many safeguards have been included in the Voluntary Agreement to minimize the potential anticompetitive effect. These include advance notice of meetings, government monitoring or meetings, the maintenance of full and complete records, confinement of most IEP activities to the meeting context, and the prohibition against dissemination of confidential information outside of the meetings. During the past six months the industry assisted the IEA to evaluate and improve its data collection systems, to consider appropriate actions in sub-crisis situations, to analyze current and future market developments, and to plan the next allocation system test. We consider the discussions that occurred during these meetings to be of little competitive concern. During the ISAG training session, the companies received a clearance to receive material containing confidential information used during AST-3. The Commission considered the antitrust risks when this information was first used to be minimal. The information was dated, frequently distorted by hypothetical disruption scenarios and possibly disguised by the submitting company. The risks during its re-use were further attenuated. During the next six months, the IEA and its industry groups will be planning AST-4. This exercise may be the first to consider the impact of pricing on the IEP system. As the industry discusses this sensitive area, the Commission will be monitoring the deliberations carefully to ensure that the goals of the IEP will be met in the least anticompetitive manner.

  20. US oil company participation in the International Energy Program. Eleventh semi-annual report to the Congress and the President

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This publication is a semiannual report on the impact on competition and small business of US oil company participation in the IEP activities. IEA's response to the oil supply disruption created by the Iran/Iraq war is discussed. The proposed Plan of Action released by the DOE on May 8, 1981 is described. The report reviews the subjects discussed at meetings of the IAB and Subcommittees A and C during the reporting period. One important issue addressed at these meetings was the potential effectiveness of the allocation system. The report describes industry advice on the date to begin oil sharing after system activation. Another passage focuses on the controversies surrounding the reporting of stocks at sea and the monitoring of oil markets during non-crisis periods. Industry advice concerning emergency stock policy is reviewed. The review of industry activities during this six-month reporting period has disclosed no adverse effects on competition or small business. The allocation system was not activated, no proprietary information was exchanged among the companies, and, except as noted in the discussion of sub-trigger situations, the topics discussed were confined to those for which an antitrust defense is authorized by Section 252. To assist the Secretariat in analyzing the disruption resulting from the Iran-Iraq war, the industry did receive non-public IEA Secretariat forecasts and discussed the short-term oil supply outlook with the Secretariat. While under some circumstances these activities may have anticompetitive potential, the Commission does not believe that any adverse effects on competition actually occurred; we have no evidence that supply actions were taken by companies as a result of access to this information or participation in the meetings.

  1. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report III Appendix III to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. III...

  2. Data Summary Report for the 1997 Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J.W. II

    1998-01-05

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the 1997 RFI/RI semiannual tritium survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The RFI/RI was performed under the direction of WSRC ESS/Ecology. This report was prepared under the direction EPD/EMS.

  3. Data Summary Report for the 1998 Semiannual Tritium Surveys for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J.

    1999-01-26

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the 1998 semiannual tritium surveys for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The project was performed under the direction of WSRC EAS/Ecology. This report was prepared under the direction of EPD/EMS.

  4. Data Summary Report for the Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J. II

    1996-12-16

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The survey was performed at the request of the WSRC ERD and conducted by WSRC/ESS. This report was prepared under the direction of EPD/EMS.

  5. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report III Appendix III to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App....

  6. The Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR). Phase 3. Semiannual technical summary 1 Oct 1992-31 Mar 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    This Semiannual Technical Summary describes the operation, maintenance and research activities at the Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR), the Norwegian...0 for the reporting period are given. Maintenance activities in the period comprise preventive/corrective maintenance in con- nection with all the...NORSAR subarrays, NORESS and ARCESS. In addition, the mainte- nance center has been involved with occasional maintenance of equipment for FINESA

  7. Research Libraries in the Online Environment. Minutes of the Semiannual Meeting (102nd, Banff, Alberta, May 4-6, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    Included in the transcript of this semiannual meeting of the Assocation of Research Libraries (ARL) are the following: (1) papers by Sharon Hogan on the definition of data in an online environment, by John Black on ways of communicating data, and by Peter Wolters on data sharing and library networking in the United States and Canada; (2) a record…

  8. 17 CFR 270.30b1-1 - Semi-annual report for registered management investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... registered management investment companies. 270.30b1-1 Section 270.30b1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....30b1-1 Semi-annual report for registered management investment companies. Every registered management... management investment company that has filed a registration statement with the Commission registering...

  9. 17 CFR 270.30b1-1 - Semi-annual report for registered management investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... registered management investment companies. 270.30b1-1 Section 270.30b1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....30b1-1 Semi-annual report for registered management investment companies. Every registered management... management investment company that has filed a registration statement with the Commission registering...

  10. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to Employers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. B Appendix B to Part 40—DOT Drug Testing...) (b) Negative and Dilute (number) 3. Specimens Reported as Rejected for Testing (total number) By...

  11. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to DOT

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. C Appendix C to Part 40—DOT Drug Testing... of Drug and Alcohol Policy and Compliance, W62-300, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590...

  12. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to Employers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. B Appendix B to Part 40—DOT Drug Testing...) (b) Negative and Dilute (number) 3. Specimens Reported as Rejected for Testing (total number) By...

  13. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to DOT

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. C Appendix C to Part 40—DOT Drug Testing... of Drug and Alcohol Policy and Compliance, W62-300, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590...

  14. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to DOT

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. C Appendix C to Part 40—DOT Drug Testing... of Drug and Alcohol Policy and Compliance, W62-300, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590...

  15. Research on Reading in Secondary Schools: A Semi-Annual Report, Volume 2, Number 2. Monograph Number Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Joseph L., Jr., Ed.; Gaus, Paula J., Ed.

    This monograph is the third in a series of semiannual reports of research related to reading in secondary schools. The first section of the monograph is made up of three research studies on the validation of teaching procedures to facilitate students' comprehension of content area texts, the graph-reading abilities of seventh grade students, and a…

  16. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to DOT

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Uncorrected Flaw (number) 4. Positive Results Reported (total number) By Drug (a) Marijuana Metabolite (number... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. C Appendix C to Part 40—DOT Drug...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to Employers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... number) By Drug (a) Marijuana Metabolite (number) (b) Cocaine Metabolite (number) (c) Opiates (number) (1... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. B Appendix B to Part 40—DOT Drug...

  18. Research on Reading in Secondary Schools: A Semi-Annual Report, Volume 2, Number 2. Monograph Number Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Joseph L., Jr., Ed.; Gaus, Paula J., Ed.

    This monograph is the third in a series of semiannual reports of research related to reading in secondary schools. The first section of the monograph is made up of three research studies on the validation of teaching procedures to facilitate students' comprehension of content area texts, the graph-reading abilities of seventh grade students, and a…

  19. 17 CFR 249.330 - Form N-SAR, annual and semi-annual report of certain registered investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form N-SAR, annual and semi... Exchange Act of 1934 § 249.330 Form N-SAR, annual and semi-annual report of certain registered investment... Form N-SAR, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the...

  20. 17 CFR 249.330 - Form N-SAR, annual and semi-annual report of certain registered investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form N-SAR, annual and semi... Exchange Act of 1934 § 249.330 Form N-SAR, annual and semi-annual report of certain registered investment... Form N-SAR, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the...

  1. 17 CFR 249.330 - Form N-SAR, annual and semi-annual report of certain registered investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form N-SAR, annual and semi... Exchange Act of 1934 § 249.330 Form N-SAR, annual and semi-annual report of certain registered investment... Form N-SAR, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the...

  2. 17 CFR 249.330 - Form N-SAR, annual and semi-annual report of certain registered investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form N-SAR, annual and semi... Exchange Act of 1934 § 249.330 Form N-SAR, annual and semi-annual report of certain registered investment... Form N-SAR, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the...

  3. Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs. Semiannual report, April 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G. B.; Currie, J. W.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semi-annual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semi-annually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

  4. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Y.; Qian, S.; Littrell, K.; ...

    2015-02-13

    A non-destructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentration were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distributionmore » of circumferential hydrides across the wall. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount ( 20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor will be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for absolute hydrogen concentration determination.« less

  5. Regulatory instrument review: Aging management of LWR cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves

    SciTech Connect

    Werry, E.V.; Somasundaram, S.

    1995-09-01

    The results of Stage 2 of the Regulatory Instrument Review are presented in this volume. Selected regulatory instruments, such as the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Regulatory Guides, and ASME Codes, were investigated to determine the extent to which these regulations apply aging management to selected safety-related components in nuclear power plants. The Regulatory Instrument Review was funded by the NRC under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Stage 2 of the review focused on four safety-related structures and components; namely, cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves. The review suggests that the primary-emphasis of the regulatory instruments was on the design, construction, start-up, and operation of a nuclear power plant, and that aging issues were primarily addressed after an aging-related problem was recognized. This Stage 2 review confirms the results of the prior review; (see Regulatory Instrument Review: Management of Aging of LWR Major Safety-Related Components NUREG/CR-5490. The observations indicate that the regulations generally address management of age-related degradation indirectly. Specific age-related degradation phenomena frequently are dealt with in bulletins and notices or through generic issues, letters, etc. The major recommendation of this report, therefore, is that the regulatory instruments should more directly and explicitly address the aging phenomenon and the management of the age-related degradation process.

  6. Actinide neutron induced cross-sections; analysis of the OSMOSE LWR-UO{sub 2} experiment in MINERVE

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.; Litaize, O.; Santamarina, A.; Antony, M.; Hudelot, J. P.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the interpretation of the first phase of the OSMOSE experimental program. The OSMOSE experiment began in 2005 in the MINERVE French facility and will continue until 2008. It consists in reactivity worth measurements of separated actinides by an oscillation technique. First results are obtained in a standard LWR neutron spectrum (UO{sub 2} lattice). The present study focuses on the following isotopes: {sup 234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239,242}Pu. The comparison between APOLLO2 accurate deterministic calculations and experiments shows the reliability of the latest JEFF-3.1 European nuclear data library for all oscillated isotopes, except {sup 237}Np. The obtained (C/E-1){+-}({delta}E/E) values are the following: {sup 234}U: -5%{+-}2% {sup 237}Np: -11%{+-}2% {sup 239}Pu: +1%{+-}2% {sup 242}Pu: +2%{+-}2% An energetic decomposition of the reactivity worth is carried out using Standard Perturbation Theory that underlines the underestimation of the {sup 237}Np(n, {gamma}) thermal and resonant capture cross-section. (authors)

  7. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO/sub 2/ oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs.

  8. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Qian, S.; Littrell, K.; Parish, C. M.; Plummer, L. K.

    2015-02-13

    A non-destructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentration were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount ( 20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor will be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for absolute hydrogen concentration determination.

  9. Issues for Conceptual Design of AFCF and CFTC LWR Spent Fuel Separations Influencing Next-Generation Aqueous Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hebditch; R. Henry; M. Goff; K. Pasamehmetoglu; D. Ostby

    2007-09-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) strategic plan, which aims to meet US and international energy, safeguards, fuel supply and environmental needs by harnessing national laboratory R&D, deployment by industry and use of international partnerships. Initially, two industry-led commercial scale facilities, an advanced burner reactor (ABR) and a consolidated fuel treatment center (CFTC), and one developmental facility, an advanced fuel cycle facility (AFCF) are proposed. The national laboratories will lead the AFCF to provide an internationally recognized R&D center of excellence for developing transmutation fuels and targets and advancing fuel cycle reprocessing technology using aqueous and pyrochemical methods. The design drivers for AFCF and the CFTC LWR spent fuel separations are expected to impact on and partly reflect those for industry, which is engaging with DOE in studies for CFTC and ABR through the recent GNEP funding opportunity announcement (FOA). The paper summarizes the state-of-the-art of aqueous reprocessing, gives an assessment of engineering drivers for U.S. aqueous processing facilities, examines historic plant capital costs and provides conclusions with a view to influencing design of next-generation fuel reprocessing plants.

  10. ICASE Semiannual Report, October 1, 1992 through March 31, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    species concentration and temperature measurements made in turbulent flames using UV Raman Scattering are being compared to 1-) strained laminar flamelet...models. Super-flamelet OH values have been discovered in turbulent flames and are being investigated. In addition, a line Raman system has been...information about scalar gradients through the reaction zone. The liner Raman system is currently being modified •o make measurements on l-D strained

  11. Proceedings of the First Semiannual Distributed Receiver Program Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Point focus and line focus distributed receiver solar thermal technology for the production of electric power and of industrial process heat is addressed. Concentrator, receiver, and power conversion development are covered along with hardware tests and evaluation. Mass production costing, parabolic dish applications, and trough and bowl systems are included.

  12. ICASE Semiannual Report, 1 April 1990 - 30 September 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    Department of Mathematical Scien :es, Clemson University. Control Theory for Multivariable Systems. Joel H . Ferziger - Ph.D., Nuclear Engineering ...problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods ; e Computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics...approach is applicable to the problem of estimating arbitrary corrosion shape of the material. Numerical experiments indicate the method is attractive

  13. 48 CFR 222.406-13 - Semiannual enforcement reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT..., for construction work subject to the Construction Wage Rate Requirements statute and the CWSS statute... restitution found due under— (i) Construction Wage Rate Requirements statute; and (ii) CWSS statute;...

  14. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Volume 2, Appendices. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1994--March 27, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Bartley, D.A.; Hatcher, P.

    1996-10-15

    This semiannual progress report contains the following appendices: description of the 1,000 lb steam/h watertube research boiler; the Pennsylvania CGE model; Phase II, subtask 3.9 coal market analysis; the CGE model; and sector definition.

  15. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, July 1998-December 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Kassner, T. F.; Ruther, W. E.; Shack, W. J.; Smith, J. L.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain; R. V.

    1999-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from July 1998 to December 1998. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of primary pressure boundary materials, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests have been conducted to determine the crack initiation and crack growth characteristics of austenitic SSs in LWR environments. Procedures are presented for incorporating the effects of reactor coolant environments on the fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping steels. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and posttest fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) in helium at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results have been used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Fracture toughness J-R curve tests were also conducted on two heats of Type 304 SS that were irradiated to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} in the Halden reactor. Crack-growth-rate tests have been conducted on compact-tension specimens of Alloys 600 and 690 under constant load to evaluate the resistance of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking in LWR environments.

  16. SIGIR Quarterly and Semiannual Report to the United States Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    promoting market reforms and reducing subsidies • helping to reinforce the weak law enforce- ment structure • creating a public education campaign on...revealed by SIGIR reviews of the reconstruction program’s information systems. Adding Output and Outcome metrics to the analytic mix will deepen and...production actually makes it to the foreign markets . The potential for return on investment has been one of the key factors for project pri

  17. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

  18. Fossil Energy Program semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers progress made during the period October 1, 1990, through March 31, 1991, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Petroleum Reserves, the DOE Fossil Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, and the US Agency for International Development. The Fossil, Energy Program organization chart is shown in the appendix. Topics include: alloys, ceramics and composite research and development; corrosion and erosion research; environmental analysis and information systems; coal conversion development; mild gasification product characterization; coal combustion research; strategic petroleum reserve planning and modeling; and coal structure and chemistry.

  19. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  20. ICASE semiannual report, April 1 - September 30, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Institute conducts unclassified basic research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science in order to extend and improve problem-solving capabilities in science and engineering, particularly in aeronautics and space. The major categories of the current Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers. ICASE reports are considered to be primarily preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to appropriate research journals or that are to appear in conference proceedings.

  1. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-07-01

    The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies Pathway conducts targeted research and development (R&D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. This work involves two major goals: (1) to ensure that legacy analog II&C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and (2) to implement digital II&C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the nuclear power plant operating model. Resolving long-term operational concerns with the II&C systems contributes to the long-term sustainability of the LWR fleet, which is vital to the nation's energy and environmental security.

  2. Annual and semiannual cycles of midlatitude near-surface temperature and tropospheric baroclinicity: reanalysis data and AOGCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembo, Valerio; Bordi, Isabella; Speranza, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Seasonal variability in near-surface air temperature and baroclinicity from the ECMWF ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis and six coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 and 5 (CMIP3 and CMIP5) are examined. In particular, the annual and semiannual cycles of hemispherically averaged fields are studied using spectral analysis. The aim is to assess the ability of coupled general circulation models to properly reproduce the observed amplitude and phase of these cycles, and investigate the relationship between near-surface temperature and baroclinicity (coherency and relative phase) in such frequency bands. The overall results of power spectra agree in displaying a statistically significant peak at the annual frequency in the zonally averaged fields of both hemispheres. The semiannual peak, instead, shows less power and in the NH seems to have a more regional character, as is observed in the North Pacific Ocean region. Results of bivariate analysis for such a region and Southern Hemisphere midlatitudes show some discrepancies between ERAI and model data, as well as among models, especially for the semiannual frequency. Specifically, (i) the coherency at the annual and semiannual frequency observed in the reanalysis data is well represented by models in both hemispheres, and (ii) at the annual frequency, estimates of the relative phase between near-surface temperature and baroclinicity are bounded between about ±15° around an average value of 220° (i.e., approximately 1-month phase shift), while at the semiannual frequency model phases show a wider dispersion in both hemispheres with larger errors in the estimates, denoting increased uncertainty and some disagreement among models. The most recent CMIP climate models (CMIP5) show several improvements when compared with CMIP3, but a degree of discrepancy still persists though masked by the large errors characterizing the semiannual

  3. Nuclear technology programs. Semiannual progress report, April--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April through September 1991. These programs involve R & D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  4. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1988--March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1990-12-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1988--March 1989. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories. 127 refs., 76 figs., 103 tabs.

  5. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1990--March 1991. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transpose of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  6. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  7. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

  8. Nuclear technology programs; Semiannual progress report, October 1989--March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  9. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlaw, P.D.; Minick, S.K.

    1998-07-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 48th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVIII) that were received on or before June 1, 1998.

  10. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1997--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This Office of Inspector General (OIG) Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from October 1, 1997, through March 31, 1998. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period that facilitated Department of Energy (Department) efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. This report highlights OIG accomplishments in support of its Strategic Plan. Narratives of the Office`s most significant reports are grouped by the strategic goals against which the OIG measures its performance. To put the OIG accomplishments for this reporting period in context, the following statistical information is provided: audit and inspection reports issued -- 47; recommendations that funds be put to better use -- $356,257,856; management commitment to taking corrective actions -- $289,106,445; criminal indictments/convictions -- 8; fines and recoveries -- $1,612,932; and investigative reports to management recommending positive change -- 21.

  11. Equatorial semiannual oscillation in zonally averaged temperature observed by the Nimbus 7 SAMS and LIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delisi, Donald P.; Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1988-04-01

    Zonally averaged equatorial temperatures obtained aboard Nimbus 7 by the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (SAMS) are compared to comparable data obtained from the limb IR monitor of the stratosphere. The SAMS data are shown to confirm the seasonal asymmetry in semiannual wind regimes previously noted in rocketsonde observations near the equator. Two explanations for the asymmetry are considered: (1) an improved Kelvin and gravity wave transmissivity in stronger equatorial easterlies (resulting from planetary Rossby wave momentum transport), implying stronger westerly mean flow acceleration in the first cycle than in the second; and (2) evidence of strong polar-tropical coupling in the northern winter indicating that mean meridional circulations are present on a global scale.

  12. Synodic and Semiannual Oscillations of Argon-40 in the Lunar Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. Richard, Jr.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The neutral mass spectrometer on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft collected a trove of exospheric data, including a set of high-quality measurements of radiogenic Ar-40 over a period of 142 days. Data synthesis studies, using well-established exosphere simulation tools, show that the LADEE argon data are consistent with an exosphere-regolith interaction that is dominated by adsorption and that the desorption process generates the Armand distribution of exit velocities. The synthesis work has uncovered an apparent semiannual oscillation of argon that is consistent with temporal sequestration in the seasonal cold traps created at the poles by the obliquity of the Moon. In addition, the LADEE data provide new insight into the pristine nature of lunar regolith, its spatially varying sorption properties, and the influence of sorption processes on the synodic oscillation of the argon exosphere.

  13. Fusion reactor materials. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee`, S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  14. Synodic and semiannual oscillations of argon-40 in the lunar exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, R. Richard; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The neutral mass spectrometer on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft collected a trove of exospheric data, including a set of high-quality measurements of radiogenic 40Ar over a period of 142 days. Data synthesis studies, using well-established exosphere simulation tools, show that the LADEE argon data are consistent with an exosphere-regolith interaction that is dominated by adsorption and that the desorption process generates the Armand distribution of exit velocities. The synthesis work has uncovered an apparent semiannual oscillation of argon that is consistent with temporal sequestration in the seasonal cold traps created at the poles by the obliquity of the Moon. In addition, the LADEE data provide new insight into the pristine nature of lunar regolith, its spatially varying sorption properties, and the influence of sorption processes on the synodic oscillation of the argon exosphere.

  15. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    This is the twenty-second in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Topics covered here are: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide composites; ferritic/martensitic steels; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; solid breeding materials; radiation effects mechanistic studies and experimental methods; dosimetry damage parameters; activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; irradiation facilities; test matrices; and experimental methods.

  16. NRC regulatory agenda: Semiannual report, January--June 1997. Volume 16, Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a semiannual compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition. The agenda consists of two sections that have been updated through June 30, 1997. Section 1, ``Rules,`` includes (A) rules on which final action has been taken since December 31, 1996, the closing date of the last NRC Regulatory Agenda; (B) rules published previously as proposed rules on which the Commission has not taken final action; (C) rules published as advance notices of proposed rulemaking for which neither a proposed nor final rule has been issued; and (D) unpublished rules on which the NRC expects to take action. Section 2, ``Petitions for Rulemaking,`` includes (A) petitions denied or incorporated into final rules since December 31, 1996; (B) petitions incorporated into proposed rules; and (C) petitions pending staff review.

  17. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s ninth Semiannual Report to Congress to be submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1 through September 30, 1993, the Department took final action on four contract and financial assistance audit reports. At the end of the period only three reports awaited final action. With regard to operational, financial, and preaward audits, final action was taken on 41 reports, resulting in 93 audit reports needing final action at the end of the period.

  18. TFE Verification Program: Semiannual report for the period ending October 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized, but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. 65 figs., 36 tabs.

  19. TFE Verification Program: Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized, but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern.

  20. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlaw, P.D.

    1998-01-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 4 days after the reporting deadline via the Internet at www.eml.doe.gov. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 47th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVII) that were received on or before December 1, 1997.

  1. The tropical semiannual oscillations in temperature and ozone as observed my the MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric A.; Holton, James R.; Fishbein, Evan F.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Waters, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    The first two years of Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) temperature and ozone data are used to examine the tropical upper-stratospheric semiannual oscillation (SAO). Time series analysis revealed that the strongest amplitudes of the SAO occurred near the equator at 2 mb for temperature and 5 mb for ozone, consistent with previous observations. The first cycle of each calendar year was observed to have a much higher amplitude than the second cycle except for the warm phase in late 1991. Interannual variability in the strength of the SAO, such as the much stronger warm phase of late 1991 as compared to late 1992, was significant and could be partly attributed to the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in zonal wind.

  2. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, April 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from April 1 through September 30, 1995. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large portion of which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by six primary performance measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its attainment of the outcomes established in the Office of Inspector General Strategic Plan. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. The six performance measures present outcomes of Office of Inspector General work in terms of improvements in Department programs and operations.

  3. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  4. Initial performance of a modified milestones global evaluation tool for semiannual evaluation of residents by faculty.

    PubMed

    Borman, Karen R; Augustine, Rebecca; Leibrandt, Thomas; Pezzi, Christopher M; Kukora, John S

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether faculty could successfully evaluate residents using a competency-based modified Milestones global evaluation tool. A program's leadership team modified a draft Surgery Milestones Working Group summative global assessment instrument into a modified Milestones tool (MMT) for local use during faculty meetings devoted to semiannual resident review. Residents were scored on 15 items spanning all competencies using an 8-point graphic response scale; unstructured comments also were solicited. Arithmetic means were computed at the resident and postgraduate year cohort levels for items and competency item sets. Score ranges (highest minus lowest score) were calculated; variability was termed "low" (range <2.0 points), "moderate" (range = 2.0), or "high" (range >2.0). A subset of "low" was designated "small" (1.0-1.9). Trends were sought among item, competency, and total Milestones scores. MMT correlations with examination scores and multisource (360°) assessments were explored. The success of implementing MMT was judged using published criteria for educational assessment methods. Fully accredited, independently sponsored residency. Program leaders and 22 faculty members (71% voluntary, mean 12y of experience). Twenty-six residents were assessed, yielding 7 to 13 evaluations for MMT per categorical resident and 3 to 6 per preliminary trainee. Scores spanned the entire response scale. All MMT evaluations included narrative comments. Individual resident score variability was low (96% within competencies and 92% across competencies). Subset analysis showed that small variations were common (35% within competencies and 54% across competencies). Postgraduate year cohort variability was higher (61% moderate or high within competencies and 50% across competencies). Cohort scores at the item, competency, and total score levels exhibited rising trajectories, suggesting MMT construct validity. MMT scores did not demonstrate concurrent validity, correlating poorly

  5. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Second semiannual status report, July 1988--March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee`s activities to date have focused primarily on the ``technology transfer`` aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

  6. Systematic technology evaluation program for SiC/SiC composite-based accident-tolerant LWR fuel cladding and core structures: Revision 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-08-01

    Fuels and core structures in current light water reactors (LWR’s) are vulnerable to catastrophic failure in severe accidents as unfortunately evidenced by the March 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. This vulnerability is attributed primarily to the rapid oxidation kinetics of zirconium alloys in a water vapor environment at very high temperatures. Zr alloys are the primary material in LWR cores except for the fuel itself. Therefore, alternative materials with reduced oxidation kinetics as compared to zirconium alloys are sought to enable enhanced accident-tolerant fuels and cores.

  7. Environmental restoration/waste management-applied technology semiannual report, January--June 1992. Volume 1, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Kline-Simon, K.

    1992-12-31

    This is the first issue from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Semiannual Report, a continuation of the Advanced Processing Technology (APT) Semiannual Report. The name change reflects the consolidation of the APT Program with the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program to form the Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Program. The Livermore site mirrors, on a small scale, many of the environmental and waste management problems of the DOE Complex. The six articles in this issue cover incineration- alternative technologies, process development for waste minimization, the proposed Mixed Waste Management Facility, dynamic underground stripping, electrical resistance tomography, and Raman spectroscopy for remote characterization of underground tanks.

  8. [Comparative efficacy of annual and semi-annual doses of ivermectin or diethylcarbamazine for the prevention of lymphatic filariasis].

    PubMed

    Cartel, J L; Spiegel, A; Nguyen, L; Moulia-Pelat, J P; Martin, P M; Roux, J F

    1992-01-01

    A double blind randomized trial was performed on 58 healthy Polynesian Wuchereria bancrofti carriers, they were randomly allocated to treatments with repeated annual or semi-annual doses of ivermectin 100 mcg/kg or diethylcarbamazine (DEC) 3 mg/kg, or with repeated annual doses of DEC 6 mg/kg. After the 12-month treatment, the clearance of microfilaremia was complete in 7 of the 23 carriers treated with ivermectin and in 3 of the 35 treated with DEC. Nine months after that treatment, the lowest mean microfilaremia was observed in the carriers treated with 3 successive semi-annual doses of DEC 3 mg/kg. Adverse reactions were comparable in carriers treated with ivermectin and in those treated with DEC, and did not interfere with daily activities of treated subjects.

  9. The semiannual variation of great geomagnetic storms and the postshock Russell-Mcpherron effect preceding coronal mass ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Cliver, E. W.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results indicate that the intense southward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMFs) responsible for great storms can reside in the postshock plasma preceding the driver gas of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as well as in the driver gas itself. It is proposed here that strong southward fields in the postshock flow result from a major increase in the Russell-McPherron polarity effect through a systematic pattern of compression and draping within the ecliptic plane. Differential compression at the shock increases the Parker spiral angle and, consequently, the azimuthal field component that projects as a southward component onto earth's dipole axis. The resulting prediction is that southward fields in the postshock plasma maximize at the spring (fall) equinox in CMEs emerging from toward (away) sectors. This pattern produces a strong semiannual variation in postshock IMF orientation and may account at least in part for the observed semiannual variation of the occurrence of great geomagnetic storms.

  10. The semiannual variation of great geomagnetic storms and the postshock Russell-Mcpherron effect preceding coronal mass ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Cliver, E. W.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results indicate that the intense southward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMFs) responsible for great storms can reside in the postshock plasma preceding the driver gas of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as well as in the driver gas itself. It is proposed here that strong southward fields in the postshock flow result from a major increase in the Russell-McPherron polarity effect through a systematic pattern of compression and draping within the ecliptic plane. Differential compression at the shock increases the Parker spiral angle and, consequently, the azimuthal field component that projects as a southward component onto earth's dipole axis. The resulting prediction is that southward fields in the postshock plasma maximize at the spring (fall) equinox in CMEs emerging from toward (away) sectors. This pattern produces a strong semiannual variation in postshock IMF orientation and may account at least in part for the observed semiannual variation of the occurrence of great geomagnetic storms.

  11. Void reactivity feedback analysis for U-based and Th-based LWR incineration cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lindley, B.A.; Parks, G.T.; Franceschini, F.

    2013-07-01

    In reduced-moderation LWRs, an external supply of transuranic (TRU) can be incinerated by mixing it with a fertile isotope ({sup 238}U or {sup 232}Th) and recycling all the actinides after each cycle. Performance is limited by coolant reactivity feedback - the moderator density coefficient (MDC) must be kept negative. The MDC is worse when more TRU is loaded, but TRU feed is also needed to maintain criticality. To assess the performance of this fuel cycle in different neutron spectra, three LWRs are considered: 'reference' PWRs and reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs. The MDC of the equilibrium cycle is analysed by reactivity decomposition with perturbed coolant density by isotope and neutron energy. The results show that using {sup 232}Th as a fertile isotope yields superior performance to {sup 238}U. This is due essentially to the high resonance η of U bred from Th (U3), which increases the fissility of the U3-TRU isotope vector in the Th-fueled system relative to the U-fueled system, and also improves the MDC in a sufficiently hard spectrum. Spatial separation of TRU and U3 in the Th-fueled system renders further improvement by hardening the neutron spectrum in the TRU and softening it in the U3. This improves the TRU η and increases the negative MDC contribution from reduced thermal fission in U3. (authors)

  12. Final Environmental Assessment for the Semiannual Joint Integrated Fires Exercises at Avon Park Air Force Range, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE APR 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00... Type of statement: Environmental Assessment Cooperating agencies: None For further information: Paul Ebersbach 18 ASOG, DET...and Alpha Grade into the South Tactical Range. 2.1.7 Firing RRPRs into the South Tactical Range on a semiannual basis. 2.1.8

  13. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Fifth semi-annual status report, April 1990--September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  14. Application of an intermediate LWR for electricity production and hot-water district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of a 400 MWe Consolidated Nuclear Steam System (CNSS) for supplying district heat to the Minneapolis/St. Paul area. A total of three CNSS reactor sites, located various distances from the Minneapolis-St. Paul area load center, are evaluated. The distance from the load center is determined by the credited safety features of the plant design. Each site is also evaluated for three different hot water supply/return temperatures providing a total of nine CNSS study cases. The cost of district heat delivered to the load center is determined for each case.

  15. Semiannual report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period 1 Oct. 1994 - 31 Mar. 1995.

  16. Analysis of Satellite sea surface temperature time series in the Brazil-Malvinas Current confluence region: Dominance of the annual and semiannual periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Christine; Garcia, Omar; GarçOn, VéRonique

    1992-11-01

    We study the dominant periodic variations of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence region from a satellite-derived data set compiled by Olson et al. (1988). This data set is composed of 202 sea surface temperature images with a 4 × 4 km resolution and extends over 3 years (from July 1984 to July 1987). Each image is a 5-day composite. The dominant signal, as already observed by Podesta et al. (1991), has a 1-year period. We first fit a single-frequency sinusoidal model of the annual cycle in order to estimate mean temperature, amplitude, and phase at 159 points uniformly distributed over the region. The residuals are generally small (less than 2°C). The largest departures from this cycle are located either in the Brazil-Malvinas frontal region or in the southeastern part of the region. Other periods in SST variations are identified by means of periodograms of the 159 residual time series in which the annual cycle has been substracted. The periodograms show that a semiannual frequency signal is present at almost every location. The ratio of the semiannual amplitude to the annual amplitude increases southward from 0% at 30°S to reach up to 45% at 50°S. In the south the semiannual signal creates an asymmetry, and the resulting (total) annual cycle has a cold period (winter) longer than the warm one (summer). In the frontal region the annual and semiannual signals have an important interannual variation. This semiannual frequency is associated with the semiannual wave present in the atmospheric forcing of the southern hemisphere. Differential heating over the mid-latitude oceans and the high-latitude ice-covered Antarctic Continent has been suggested as the cause of this semiannual wave (Van Loon, 1967).

  17. Dual phase MgO-ZrO2 ceramics for use in LWR inert matrix fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    P. G. Medvedev; M. J. Lambregts; M. K. Meyer

    2005-06-01

    To address the low thermal conductivity of the ZrO2-based inert matrix fuel and the instability in water of the MgO-based inert matrix fuel, the dual-phase MgOâââZrO2 ceramics are proposed as a matrix for light water reactor fuel for actinide transmutation and Pu burning. It is envisioned that in a dual-phase system MgO will act as efficient heat conductor while ZrO2 will provide protection from the coolant attack. This paper describes results of fabrication, characterization and hydration testing of MgOâââZrO2 ceramics containing 30âââ70wt% of MgO.

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors : semiannual report, July 2000 - December 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.; Energy Technology

    2002-04-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from July 2000 to December 2000. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of primary pressure boundary materials, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. The fatigue strain-vs.-life data are summarized for the effects of various material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Effects of the reactor coolant environment on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation are discussed. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and posttest fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) in He at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results were used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to IASCC. A fracture toughness J-R curve test was conducted on a commercial heat of Type 304 SS that was irradiated to {approx}2.0 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} in the Halden reactor. The results were compared with the data obtained earlier on steels irradiated to 0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) (0.45 and 1.35 dpa). Neutron irradiation at 288 C was found to decrease the fracture toughness of austenitic SSs. Tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens of Alloy 600 under cyclic loading to evaluate the enhancement of crack growth rates in LWR environments. Then, the existing fatigue crack growth data on Alloys 600 and 690 were analyzed to establish the effects of temperature, load ratio, frequency, and stress intensity range

  19. Evaluation of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method for measuring the subcriticality of LWR fuel storage casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1987-11-15

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method was evaluated to determine if it could be used to measure the subcriticality of storage casks of burnt LWR fuel submerged in fuel storage pools, fully loaded and as they are being loaded. The motivation for this evaluation was that measurements of k/sub eff/ would provide the parameter most directly related to the criticality safety of storage cask configurations of LWR fuel and could allow proper credit for fuel burnup without reliance on calculations. This in turn could lead to more cost-effective cask designs. Evaluation of the method for this application was based on (1) experiments already completed at a critical experiments facility using arrays of PWR fuel pins typical of the size of storage cask configurations, (2) the existence of neutron detectors that can function in shipping cask environments, and (3) the ability to construct ionization chambers containing /sup 252/Cf of adequate intensity for these measurements. These three considerations are discussed.

  20. LWR First Recycle of TRU with Thorium Oxide for Transmutation and Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Alfonsi; Gilles Youinou

    2012-07-01

    Thorium has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (thorium is approximately three times more plentiful than uranium) and as a result of concerns about proliferation and waste management (e.g. reduced production of plutonium, etc.). Since the average composition of natural Thorium is dominated (100%) by the fertile isotope Th-232, Thorium is only useful as a resource for breeding new fissile materials, in this case U-233. Consequently a certain amount of fissile material must be present at the start-up of the reactor in order to guarantee its operation. The thorium fuel can be used in both once-through and recycle options, and in both fast and thermal spectrum systems. The present study has been aimed by the necessity of investigating the option of using reprocessed plutonium/TRU, from a once-through reference LEU scenario (50 GWd/ tIHM), mixed with natural thorium and the need of collect data (mass fractions, cross-sections etc.) for this particular fuel cycle scenario. As previously pointed out, the fissile plutonium is needed to guarantee the operation of the reactor. Four different scenarios have been considered: • Thorium – recycled Plutonium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium/Americium; • Thorium – recycled Transuranic. The calculations have been performed with SCALE6.1-TRITON.

  1. LWR First Recycle of TRU with Thorium Oxide for Transmutation and Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Alfonsi; Gilles Youinou; Sonat Sen

    2013-02-01

    Thorium has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (thorium is approximately three times more plentiful than uranium) and as a result of concerns about proliferation and waste management (e.g. reduced production of plutonium, etc.). Since the average composition of natural Thorium is dominated (100%) by the fertile isotope Th-232, Thorium is only useful as a resource for breeding new fissile materials, in this case U-233. Consequently a certain amount of fissile material must be present at the start-up of the reactor in order to guarantee its operation. The thorium fuel can be used in both once-through and recycle options, and in both fast and thermal spectrum systems. The present study has been aimed by the necessity of investigating the option of using reprocessed plutonium/TRU, from a once-through reference LEU scenario (50 GWd/ tIHM), mixed with natural thorium and the need of collect data (mass fractions, cross-sections etc.) for this particular fuel cycle scenario. As previously pointed out, the fissile plutonium is needed to guarantee the operation of the reactor. Four different scenarios have been considered: • Thorium – recycled Plutonium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium/Americium; • Thorium – recycled Transuranic. The calculations have been performed with SCALE6.1-TRITON.

  2. Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E

    2006-04-30

    The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity – in particular for BWR’s, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR’s and BWR’s without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR’s and BWR’s were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density – on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR’s more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel – reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fuelled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ~2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the

  3. Material Performance of Fully-Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel under Selected LWR Design Basis Scenarios: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; R. S. Sen; M. A. Pope; A. M. Ougouag

    2011-09-01

    The extension to LWRs of the use of Deep-Burn coated particle fuel envisaged for HTRs has been investigated. TRISO coated fuel particles are used in Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel within a SiC matrix rather than the graphite of HTRs. TRISO particles are well characterized for uranium-fueled HTRs. However, operating conditions of LWRs are different from those of HTRs (temperature, neutron energy spectrum, fast fluence levels, power density). Furthermore, the time scales of transient core behavior during accidents are usually much shorter and thus more severe in LWRs. The PASTA code was updated for analysis of stresses in coated particle FCM fuel. The code extensions enable the automatic use of neutronic data (burnup, fast fluence as a function of irradiation time) obtained using the DRAGON neutronics code. An input option for automatic evaluation of temperature rise during anticipated transients was also added. A new thermal model for FCM was incorporated into the code; so-were updated correlations (for pyrocarbon coating layers) suitable to estimating dimensional changes at the high fluence levels attained in LWR DB fuel. Analyses of the FCM fuel using the updated PASTA code under nominal and accident conditions show: (1) Stress levels in SiC-coatings are low for low fission gas release (FGR) fractions of several percent, as based on data of fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2} kernels. However, the high burnup level of LWR-DB fuel implies that the FGR fraction is more likely to be in the range of 50-100%, similar to Inert Matrix Fuels (IMFs). For this range the predicted stresses and failure fractions of the SiC coating are high for the reference particle design (500 {micro}mm kernel diameter, 100 {micro}mm buffer, 35 {micro}mm IPyC, 35 {micro}mm SiC, 40 {micro}mm OPyC). A conservative case, assuming 100% FGR, 900K fuel temperature and 705 MWd/kg (77% FIMA) fuel burnup, results in a 8.0 x 10{sup -2} failure probability. For a 'best-estimate' FGR fraction

  4. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors: Semiannual report, October 1994--March 1995. Volume 20

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J.; Hins, A.G.; Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRS) from October 1994 to March 1995. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water with several dissolvedoxygen (DO) concentrations to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Tensile properties and microstructures of several heats of Alloy 600 and 690 were characterized for correlation with EAC of the alloys in simulated LWR environments. Effects of DO and electrochemical potential on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath irradiated in boiling water reactors were determined in slow-strain-rate-tensile tests at 289{degrees}C. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  5. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This is the ninth in series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development of Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  6. Preparing for a Semiannual IACUC Inspection of a Satellite Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Facility

    PubMed Central

    Koerber, Amy S; Kalishman, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Institutions worldwide have experienced a rapid growth in the use of zebrafish as a research model for a variety of molecular and genetic studies of vertebrate development. This expansion in zebrafish research essentially has outpaced the establishment of specific recommendations for the care and use of fish in research. In some cases, this situation has created a dilemma where an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, which is responsible for oversight of vertebrate animal research, is not fully prepared to undertake this role for a decentralized zebrafish facility. IACUC inspectors will be more equipped to ask pertinent questions by understanding the basic principles of zebrafish health and facility management. Concurrently, zebrafish facility managers can contribute to the progress of a semiannual facility inspection by maintaining fully accessible operating records. In the context of presenting a well-established and useful model of zebrafish management and recordkeeping to the zebrafish facility operator, the information we present here also prepares a potential IACUC inspector to conduct a constructive and positive inspection. PMID:19245754

  7. Global features of the semiannual oscillation in stratospheric temperatures and comparison between seasons and hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xin-Hai; Yu, Wen-Bi; Stanford, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Four years of satellite-derived microwave and infrared radiances are analyzed for the three-dimensional and seasonal variation of semiannual oscillations (SAO) in stratospheric temperatures, with particular focus on high latitudes, to investigate the effect of stratospheric warmings on SAO. Separate analyses of individual seasons in each hemisphere reveal that the strongest SAO in temperature occur in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter polar upper stratosphere. These results, together with the latitudinal structure of the temperature SAO and the fact that the NH polar SAO is nearly out of phase with the lower latitude SAO, are consistent with the existence of a global-scale, meridional circulation on the SAO time scale. The results suggest that polar stratospheric warmings are an important source of SAO in both high and low latitude stratospheric temperature fields. Interannual variations, three-dimensional phase structure, and zonal asymmetry of SAO are also detailed. The SH stratospheric SAO is dominated by a localized feature in the high-latitude, eastern hemisphere which tilts westward with height.

  8. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: {sm_bullet} Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. {sm_bullet} Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. {sm_bullet} Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This is the seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance, damage analysis and fundamental studies, and special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  10. Global features of the semiannual oscillation in stratospheric temperatures and comparison between seasons and hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xin-Hai; Yu, Wen-Bi; Stanford, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Four years of satellite-derived microwave and infrared radiances are analyzed for the three-dimensional and seasonal variation of semiannual oscillations (SAO) in stratospheric temperatures, with particular focus on high latitudes, to investigate the effect of stratospheric warmings on SAO. Separate analyses of individual seasons in each hemisphere reveal that the strongest SAO in temperature occur in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter polar upper stratosphere. These results, together with the latitudinal structure of the temperature SAO and the fact that the NH polar SAO is nearly out of phase with the lower latitude SAO, are consistent with the existence of a global-scale, meridional circulation on the SAO time scale. The results suggest that polar stratospheric warmings are an important source of SAO in both high and low latitude stratospheric temperature fields. Interannual variations, three-dimensional phase structure, and zonal asymmetry of SAO are also detailed. The SH stratospheric SAO is dominated by a localized feature in the high-latitude, eastern hemisphere which tilts westward with height.

  11. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s fifteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1, 1996, through September 30, 1996, the Department took final action on 34 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 87 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on seven contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector Generator audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective action on each of these reports.

  12. TFE Verification Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE (thermionic fuel element) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern.

  13. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports: October 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s fourteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1995, through March 31, 1996, the Department took final action on 35 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 92 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on two contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  14. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s thirteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1, 1995, through September 30, 1995, the Department took final action on 33 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 96 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on 2 contract and financial assistance audits, leaving 2 reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  15. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General Audit Reports, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s twelfth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1994 through March 31, 1995, the Department took final action on 32 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 90 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on four contract and financial assistance audits, leaving four reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  16. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This is the twenty-first in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The report covers the following topics: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide composite materials; ferritic/martensitic steels; copper alloys and high heat flux materials; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; solid breeding materials; radiation effects, mechanistic studies and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; and irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods.

  17. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    1998-03-01

    This is the twenty-third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. A large fraction of this work, particularly in relation to fission reactor experiments, is carried out collaboratively with their partners in Japan, Russia, and the European Union. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, October 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s sixteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1996, through March 31, 1997, the Department took final action on 31 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 74 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on 11 contract and financial assistance audits, leaving no reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  19. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1988-03-01

    This is the third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performances; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  20. TFE Verification Program semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern. 6 refs., 67 figs., 37 tabs.

  1. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, October 1, 1997--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s eighteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1997, through March 31, 1998, the Department took final action on 20 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 80 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on one contract and financial assistance audit, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  2. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports: April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s seventeenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1 through September 30, 1997, the Department took final action on 29 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 72 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on five contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  3. NRC regulatory agenda: Semiannual report, January--June 1995. Volume 14, Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a semiannual compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition. The agenda consists of two sections that have been updated through June 30, 1995. Section 1, ``Rules,`` includes (A) rules on which final action has been taken since December 30, 1994, the closing date of the last NRC Regulatory Agenda; (B) rules published previously as proposed rules on which the Commission has not taken final action; (C) rules published as advance notices of proposed rulemaking for which neither a proposed nor final rule has been issued; and (D) unpublished rules on which the NRC expects to take action. Section 2, ``Petitions for Rulemaking,`` includes (A) petitions denied or incorporated into final rules since December 30, 1994; (B) petitions incorporated into proposed rules; (C) petitions pending staff review, and (D) petitions with deferred action.

  4. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This is the sixteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following Progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. The individual papers in this paper have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  5. Semiannual variations of great geomagnetic storms: Solar sources of great storms. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E.W.; Crooker, N.U.; Cane, H.V.

    1992-01-01

    The authors report preliminary results of an investigation of the solar sources of 25 great geomagnetic storms with D sub st < or = {minus}250 nT occurring from 1957-1990. These storms exhibit a clear semiannual variation with 14 events occurring within {+-} 30 days of the equinoxes vs. 5 storms within {+-} 30 days of the solstices. This seasonal variation appears to result from a variable threshold for the size of a solar event required to produce a great geomagnetic storm, in the sense that weaker solar events, such as disappearing solar filaments, are more likely to produce great storms at the equinoxes than near the solstices. The great problem storms of the last four solar cycles, i.e., those storms lacking commensurate preceding solar activity, are all found to occur relatively near the equinoxes. Conversely, four of the five great storms that occurred near the solstices were preceded by truly outstanding solar flares. About half (11/25) of the great storms had obvious precursor geomagnetic activity, i.e., periods of approximately > 1 day with D sub st approximately < {minus}30 nT. The precursors can enable some weaker solar events to be more geoeffective than would otherwise be the case in two ways: (1) compression and amplification of pre-existing southward (precursor) fields by the transient shock, and (2) establishment of a lower D sub st baseline , making it easier for transient events to drive D sub st to values < or = {minus}250 nT.

  6. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1991-07-01

    This is the tenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance; damage analysis and fundamental studies; special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the test of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  7. Middle atmosphere dynamical sources of the semiannual oscillation in the thermosphere and ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M.; Emmert, J. T.; Drob, D. P.; Siskind, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    The strong global semiannual oscillation (SAO) in thermospheric density has been observed for five decades, but definitive knowledge of its source has been elusive. We use the National Center of Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) to study how middle atmospheric dynamics generate the SAO in the thermosphere-ionosphere (T-I). The "standard" TIME-GCM simulates, from first principles, SAOs in thermospheric mass density and ionospheric total electron content that agree well with observed climatological variations. Diagnosis of the globally averaged continuity equation for atomic oxygen ([O]) shows that the T-I SAO originates in the upper mesosphere, where an SAO in [O] is forced by nonlinear, resolved-scale variations in the advective, net tidal, and diffusive transport of O. Contrary to earlier hypotheses, TIME-GCM simulations demonstrate that intra-annually varying eddy diffusion by breaking gravity waves may not be the primary driver of the T-I SAO: A pronounced SAO is produced without parameterized gravity waves.

  8. Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This is the twelfth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  9. Semi-annual technical report, September 30, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Dorin

    2000-04-01

    The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. (CPBR) continues to operate according to objectives outlined in the proposal funded through the cooperative agreement. The italicized objectives below are addressed in this report, which covers the period September 30,1999 through March 31, 2000. (1) Update the research agenda using information obtained from member companies. (2) Identify and implement research projects that are deemed by industrial, scientific, and sponsoring agency evaluation to address significantly the problems and future of U.S. energy resources and that are relevant to the Department of Energy's mission. Specifically: (1) Announce research grants competition through a Request for Preproposals. (2) Conduct a dual-stage review process: Stage one--industrial and DOE review of preproposals; and Stage two--peer review, scientific consultants' review, DOE review of full proposals and Project Recommendation Committee evaluation and recommendation for funding. (3) Board of Directors approval of recommended awards. (4) Conduct ongoing project management. (5) Obtain semiannual, annual and final reports for evaluation of research goals and technology transfer. (6) Present reports to DOE.

  10. Critical Problems in Very Large Scale Computer Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-30

    SYSTEMS Semiannual Technical Report for the period April 1, 1988 to September 30, 1988 Massachusetts Institute of Technology D T 1C Cambridge...4 System s Software...1988. Also, MIT VLSI Memo No. 88-465, August 1988. *Paul Y. Song, Design of a Network for Concurrent Message Passing Systems M. S. Thesis, Department of

  11. Identification of significant problems related to light water reactor piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Work on the project was divided into three tasks. In Task 1, past surveys of LWR piping system problems and recent Licensee Event Report summaries are studied to identify the significant problems of LWR piping systems and the primary causes of these problems. Pipe cracking is identified as the most recurring problem and is mainly due to the vibration of pipes due to operating pump-pipe resonance, fluid-flow fluctuations, and vibration of pipe supports. Research relevant to the identified piping system problems is evaluated. Task 2 studies identify typical LWR piping systems and the current loads and load combinations used in the design of these systems. Definitions of loads are reviewed. In Task 3, a comparative study is carried out on the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR piping systems. The study concludes that the current linear-elastic methods of analysis may not predict accurately the behavior of piping systems under seismic loads and may, under certain circumstances, result in nonconservative designs. Gaps at piping supports are found to have a significant effect on the response of the piping systems.

  12. Thermal conductivity and acid dissolution behavior of MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics for use in LWR inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, P. G.; Lambregts, M. J.; Meyer, M. K.

    2006-02-01

    Dual-phase MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics are proposed for use in inert matrix fuel for disposition of plutonium and minor actinides in existing light water reactors. The concept for use of this composite material was developed with the intent to capitalize on the known advantages of the composite's constituents: high thermal conductivity of MgO, and stability of ZrO 2 in LWR coolant. The study presented in this paper addressed the thermal conductivity and nitric acid solubility of MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics. Thermal analysis, based on experimental and analytical techniques, established that the product of all investigated compositions has the thermal conductivity superior to that of UO 2. Nitric acid dissolution experiments showed that only the free MgO phase dissolves in the nitric acid, leaving behind a porous pellet consisting of a ZrO 2-based solid solution.

  13. Thermal Conductivity and Acid Dissolution Behavior of MgO-ZrO2 Ceramics for Use in LWR Inert Matrix Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    P. G. Medvedev; M. J. Lambregts; M. K. Meyer

    2006-02-01

    Dual-phase MgO–ZrO2 ceramics are proposed for use in inert matrix fuel for disposition of plutonium and minor actinides in existing light water reactors. The concept for use of this composite material was developed with the intent to capitalize on the known advantages of the composite’s constituents: high thermal conductivity of MgO, and stability of ZrO2 in LWR coolant. The study presented in this paper addressed the thermal conductivity and nitric acid solubility of MgO–ZrO2 ceramics. Thermal analysis, based on experimental and analytical techniques, established that the product of all investigated compositions has the thermal conductivity superior to that of UO2. Nitric acid dissolution experiments showed that only the free MgO phase dissolves in the nitric acid, leaving behind a porous pellet consisting of a ZrO2-based solid solution.

  14. Development of New Cladding Materials Applied for Advanced LWR Aiming at Ultra-high Burn-up and Fast Neutron Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kiuchi, K.; Ogawa, H.; Ioka, I.; Kuroda, Y.; Anegawa, T.

    2002-07-01

    The ultra-high burnup more than 100 GWd/t and fast neutron spectrum tailoring are considered to be the most promising technologies applied to the advanced MOX LWRs for minimizing the electrical cost and waste management. The development of new cladding materials with the excellent irradiation properties has been conducted to realize these needs. Comparing with UO{sub 2}, to increase the internal pressure by FP gas release is accelerated with the co-production of Xe and He in MOX fuels. New stainless steels with the excellent irradiation properties, creep strength and compatibilities to high temperature water were selected to attain the reliability. The irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking through the past experience in LWR plants is possible to inhibit by new steel making process. The problems of tritium release and PCMI is possible to inhibit by ductile niobium alloy lining. (authors)

  15. H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-10-30

    This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereinafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereinafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction of Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

  16. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Seventh semi-annual status report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This seventh semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1991 through September 1991. It includes a summary and minutes of the General Committee meeting, progress summaries of ongoing POC contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months. The meeting included test plan with Western coal, seed regeneration economics, power management for the integrated topping cycle and status of the Clean Coal Technology Proposal activities. Appendices cover CDIF operations HRSR development, CFFF operations etc.

  17. Contributions of Lower Atmospheric Drivers to the Semiannual Oscillation in Thermospheric Global Mass Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M., Jr.; Emmert, J. T.; Drob, D. P.; Siskind, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    The thermosphere exhibits intra-annual variations (IAV) in globally averaged mass density that noticeably impact the drag environment of satellites in low Earth orbit. Particularly, the annual and semiannual oscillations (AO and SAO) are collectively the second largest component, after solar variability, of thermospheric global mass density variations. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the oscillations, but they have yet to be reproduced by first-principles modeling simulations. Recent studies have focused on estimating the SAO in eddy diffusion required to explain the thermospheric SAO in mass density. Less attention has been paid to the effect of lower and middle atmospheric drivers on the lower boundary of the thermosphere. In this study, we utilize the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM), to elucidate how the different lower atmospheric drivers influence IAV, and in particular the SAO of globally-averaged thermospheric mass density. We performed numerical simulations of a continuous calendar year assuming constant solar forcing, manipulating the lower atmospheric tidal forcing and gravity wave parameterization in order to quantify the SAO in thermospheric mass density attributable to different lower atmospheric drivers. The prominent initial results are as follows: (1) The "standard" TIME-GCM is capable of simulating the SAO in globally-averaged mass density at 400 km from first-principles, and its amplitude and phase compare well with empirical models; (2) The simulations suggest that seasonally varying Kzz driven by breaking GWs is not the primary driver of the SAO in upper thermospheric globally averaged mass density; (3) Preliminary analysis suggests that the SAO in the upper thermospheric mass density could be a by-product of dynamical wave transport in the mesopause region.

  18. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a holder...

  19. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a holder...

  20. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a holder...