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Sample records for lwr systems semiannual

  1. Long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems. Semiannual report, October 1991--March 1992: Volume 7, No.1

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on long-term thermal embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems during the six months from October 1991 to March 1992. Charpy-impact, tensile, and fracture toughness J-R curve data are presented for several heats of cast stainless steel that were aged 10,000-58,000 h at 290, 320, and 350{degree}C. The results indicate that thermal aging decreases the fracture toughness of cast stainless steels. In general, CF-3 steels are the least sensitive to thermal aging and CF-8M steels are the most sensitive. The values of fracture toughness J{sub IC} and tearing modulus for CF-8M steels can be as low as {approx}90 kJ/m{sup 2} and {approx}60, respectively. The fracture toughness data are consistent with the Charpy-impact results, i.e. unaged and aged steels that show low impact energy also exhibit lower fracture toughness. All steels reach a minimum saturation fracture toughness after thermal aging; the time to reach saturation depends on the aging temperature. The results also indicate that low-strength cast stainless steels are generally insensitive to thermal aging.

  2. Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

    1991-03-01

    A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs.

  3. LWR and defectivity improvement on EUV track system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harumoto, Masahiko; Stokes, Harold; Thouroude, Yan; Kaneyama, Koji; Pieczulewski, Charles; Asai, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is well known to be a strong candidate for next generation, single exposure sub-30nm halfpitch lithography.[1] Furthermore, high-NA EUV exposure tool(s) released two years ago gave a strong impression by finer pattern results. On the other hand, it seems that the coat-develop track process remains very similar and in many aspects returns to KrF or ArF dry process fundamentals, but in practice a 26-32nm pitch patterning coat develop track process also has challenges with EUV resists. As access to EUV lithography exposures has become more readily available over the last five (5) years, several challenges and accomplishments in the track process have been reported, such as the improvement of ultra-thin film coating, CD uniformity, defectivity, line width roughness (LWR), and so on.[2-8] The coat-develop track process has evolved along with novel materials and metrology capability. Line width roughness (LWR) control and defect reduction are demonstrated utilizing the SOKUDO DUO coat-develop track system with ASML NXE:3100 and NXE:3300 exposures in the IMEC (Leuven, Belgium) cleanroom environment. Additionally, we will show the latest lithographic results obtained by novel processing approaches in the EUV coat develop track system.

  4. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

  5. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic

  6. Development of an integrated, unattended assay system for LWR-MOX fuel pellet trays

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.E.; Hatcher, C.R.; Pollat, L.L.

    1994-08-01

    Four identical unattended plutonium assay systems have been developed for use at the new light-water-reactor mixed oxide (LWR-MOX) fuel fabrication facility at Hanau, Germany. The systems provide quantitative plutonium verification for all MOX pellet trays entering or leaving a large, intermediate store. Pellet-tray transport and storage systems are highly automated. Data from the ``I-Point`` (information point) assay systems will be shared by the Euratom and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Inspectorates. The I-Point system integrates, for the first time, passive neutron coincidence counting (NCC) with electro-mechanical sensing (EMS) in unattended mode. Also, provisions have been made for adding high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The system accumulates data for every tray entering or leaving the store between inspector visits. During an inspection, data are analyzed and compared with operator declarations for the previous inspection period, nominally one month. Specification of the I-point system resulted from a collaboration between the IAEA, Euratom, Siemens, and Los Alamos. Hardware was developed by Siemens and Los Alamos through a bilateral agreement between the German Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) and the US DOE. Siemens also provided the EMS subsystem, including software. Through the USSupport Program to the IAEA, Los Alamos developed the NCC software (NCC COLLECT) and also the software for merging and reviewing the EMS and NCC data (MERGE/REVIEW). This paper describes the overall I-Point system, but emphasizes the NCC subsystem, along with the NCC COLLECT and MERGE/REVIEW codes. We also summarize comprehensive testing results that define the quality of assay performance.

  7. LWR (Light Water Reactor) power plant simulations using the AD10 and AD100 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Chien, C.J.; Jang, J.Y.; Lin, H.C.; Mallen, A.N.; Wang, S.J.; Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan; Tawian Power Co., Taipei; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan )

    1989-01-01

    Boiling (BWR) and Pressurized (PWR) Water Reactor Power Plants are being simulated at BNL with the AD10 and AD100 Peripheral Processor Systems. The AD10 system has been used for BWR simulations since 1984 for safety analyses, emergency training and optimization studies. BWR simulation capabilities have been implemented recently on the AD100 system and PWR simulation capabilities are currently being developed under the auspices of international cooperation. Modeling and simulation methods are presented with emphasis on the simulation of the Nuclear Steam Supply System. Results are presented for BWR simulation and performance characteristics are compared of the AD10 and AD100 systems. It will be shown that the AD100 simulates two times faster than two AD10 processors operating in parallel and that the computing capacity of one AD100 (with FMU processor) is twice as large as that of two AD10 processors. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. RELAP5 two-phase fluid model and numerical scheme for economic LWR system simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, V.H.; Wagner, R.J.; Trapp, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The RELAP5 two-phase fluid model and the associated numerical scheme are summarized. The experience accrued in development of a fast running light water reactor system transient analysis code is reviewed and example of the code application are given.

  9. Propagation of Uncertainty in System Parameters of a LWR Model by Sampling MCNPX Calculations - Burnup Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Daniel de A. M.; Lima, Claubia P. B.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.

    2014-06-01

    For all the physical components that comprise a nuclear system there is an uncertainty. Assessing the impact of uncertainties in the simulation of fissionable material systems is essential for a best estimate calculation that has been replacing the conservative model calculations as the computational power increases. The propagation of uncertainty in a simulation using a Monte Carlo code by sampling the input parameters is recent because of the huge computational effort required. In this work a sample space of MCNPX calculations was used to propagate the uncertainty. The sample size was optimized using the Wilks formula for a 95th percentile and a two-sided statistical tolerance interval of 95%. Uncertainties in input parameters of the reactor considered included geometry dimensions and densities. It was showed the capacity of the sampling-based method for burnup when the calculations sample size is optimized and many parameter uncertainties are investigated together, in the same input.

  10. Hydrogen-control systems for severe LWR accident conditions - a state-of-technology report

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, R K; Postma, A K; Jeppson, D W

    1983-03-01

    This report reviews the current state of technology regarding hydrogen safety issues in light water reactor plants. Topics considered in this report relate to control systems and include combustion prevention, controlled combustion, minimization of combustion effects, combination of control concepts, and post-accident disposal. A companion report addresses hydrogen generation, distribution, and combustion. The objectives of the study were to identify the key safety issues related to hydrogen produced under severe accident conditions, to describe the state of technology for each issue, and to point out ongoing programs aimed at resolving the open issues.

  11. Optical Fourier transform scatterometry for LER and LWR metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, P.; Petit, J.; Leroux, T.; Foucher, J.; Desieres, Y.; Hazart, J.; Chaton, P.

    2005-05-01

    We present an innovating instrument based on optical Fourier transform (OFT) capable to measure simultaneously the specular and non specular diffraction pattern of sub-micronic periodic structures. The sample is illuminated at fixed wavelength (green laser) versus a large angular aperture both in incidence (0 to 80°) and azimuth (0 to 180°). In the present paper we focus on the possibility to measure line edge roughness (LER) and line width roughness (LWR) using this new technique. To understand the problem, different gratings with artificial periodic LER and LWR roughness have been fabricated and characterized precisely by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Different light scattering measurements have been performed using the OFT instrument with different illuminations in order to understand precisely the optical behavior of these systems. We show that we can distinguish LER and LWR by measuring simultaneously the diffracted contributions coming from the grating and from the periodic roughness. In phase LER with small LWR does not give first order diffraction contribution for the periodic roughness. In contrast, LER in opposite phase with large LWR gives a strong contribution for the first order of diffraction of the periodic roughness. In any case, the sensitivity to LER and LWR is better than 5nm for 500nm period gratings measured at 532nm. This result can be extended to samples with real LER and LWR. It shows without ambiguity that simultaneous measurement of the specular and diffracted light diffraction patterns is necessary to extract separately the two parameters.

  12. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels: Metrics Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Lori Braase; Rose Montgomery; Chris Stanek; Robert Montgomery; Lance Snead; Larry Ott; Mike Billone

    2013-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is conducting research and development on enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) for light water reactors (LWRs). This mission emphasizes the development of novel fuel and cladding concepts to replace the current zirconium alloy-uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The overall mission of the ATF research is to develop advanced fuels/cladding with improved performance, reliability and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions, while minimizing waste generation. The initial effort will focus on implementation in operating reactors or reactors with design certifications. To initiate the development of quantitative metrics for ATR, a LWR Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held in October 2012 in Germantown, MD. This paper summarizes the outcome of that workshop and the current status of metrics development for LWR ATF.

  13. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  14. 78 FR 44307 - Semiannual Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... July 23, 2013 Part XIV Department of the Treasury Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 141 / Tuesday, July 23, 2013 / Unified Agenda#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 31 CFR Subtitles A and B Semiannual Agenda AGENCY: Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory...

  15. Department of Defense Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... American Act. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 06/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes... DoD oversight of contractor business systems. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 01/15/10 75 FR 2457... Part V Department of Defense Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE (DOD)...

  16. Providing the Basis for Innovative Improvements in Advanced LWR Reactor Passive Safety Systems Design: An Educational R&D Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brian G. Williams; Jim C. P. Liou; Hiral Kadakia; Bill Phoenix; Richard R. Schultz

    2007-02-27

    This project characterizes typical two-phase stratified flow conditions in advanced water reactor horizontal pipe sections, following activation of passive cooling systems. It provides (1) a means to educate nuclear engineering students regarding the importance of two-phase stratified flow in passive cooling systems to the safety of advanced reactor systems and (2) describes the experimental apparatus and process to measure key parameters essential to consider when designing passive emergency core cooling flow paths that may encounter this flow regime. Based on data collected, the state of analysis capabilities can be determined regarding stratified flow in advanced reactor systems and the best paths forward can be identified to ensure that the nuclear industry can properly characterize two-phase stratified flow in passive emergency core cooling systems.

  17. LWR improvement in EUV resist process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Chawon; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Sumin; Na, Hai-Sub; Park, Chang-Min; Park, Cheolhong; Cho, Kyoung-Yong

    2011-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is the most effective way to print sub-30 nm features. The roughness of both the resist sidewall (line width roughness [LWR]) and resist top must be overcome soon for EUVL to be implemented. Currently, LWR can vary by about 1 nm according to the recipe used. We have characterized two promising techniques to improve LWR, an EUV rinse/TBAH process and an implant process, and demonstrated their efficacy. After cleaning inspection (ACI), LWR was improved with both the rinse and implant processes. After development inspection (ADI), LWR improved (0.12 nm, 2.4%) and ACI LWR improved (0.1 nm, 2.0% improvement) after using the EUV rinse process. ADI and ACI LWR improvement (0.45 nm, 9.1%, and 0.3 nm, 6.9%, respectively) was demonstrated with the EUV rinse/TBAH process. ADI LWR improvement (0.5 nm, 8.1%) and ACI LWR improvement (-0.5 nm, -16.9%) were characterized with the implant process. Critical dimension (CD) showed similar changes through pitch after the EUV rinse or TBAH process, but the degree of change depended on the initial pattern size giving CD difference of 2 nm between 30 nm HP and 50 nm HP after the implant process. For this technique, the dependence of CD change on pattern size must be minimized. Further extensive studies with rinse or implant are strongly encouraged for continued LWR improvement and real process implementation in EUVL. Demonstrating <2.2 nm LWR after pattern transfer is important in EUVL and needs to be pursued using various technical approaches. Initial resist LWR is important in assessing LWR improvements with additional process techniques. An initial EUV LWR < ~5.0 nm is required to properly assess the validity of the technique. Further study is required to improve ADI LWR and maintain better LWR after etch with advanced EUV rinse materials. Defects also need to be confirmed following the EUV rinse and TBAH developer. Further developing the implant process should focus on LWR improvement at low

  18. Task 3.0: Advanced power systems. Semi-annual report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McCollor, D.P.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Mann, M.D.; Willson, W.G.; Hurley, J.P.

    1993-07-01

    A variety of activities are incorporated into the Advanced Power Systems program. Tasks included are (1) fuel utilization properties, (2) pressurized combustion, (3) catalytic gasification, and (4) hot-gas cleanup. ATRAN is stochastic and combines initial coal inorganics in a random manner in order to predict the resulting fly ash particle size and composition. ASHPERT, is an expert system yielding a first-order estimate of fly ash size and composition. Both models are designed to emulate pulverized-coal combustion. Input data required include identity, chemistry, size, quantity, and mineral-to-coal associations. The pressurized combustion task has focused on the construction of a versatile reactor system to simulate pressurized fluidized-bed combustion. Both castable and monolithic refractories have been investigated in determining slag prevention under a variety of conditions. Catalytic gasification coupled with a molten carbonate fuel cell offers an extremely efficient and environmentally sound power generating system using coal. Work with an Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal has not been successful. Continued efforts will focus on using the more reactive low-rank coals to try to achieve this goal. Hot-gas cleanup is the critical issue in many of the proposed advanced power system operations on coal. The key to successful ash removal is an understanding of the properties of the ash to be collected as well as the interactions of this material with the barrier itself. The knowledge base under development will assist in assessing many of these barrier material issues for a variety of coal ashes.

  19. Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, February 1-July 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W. E.; DeSaro, R.; Griffith, J.; Joshi, C.

    1982-08-01

    The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

  20. System analysis with improved thermo-mechanical fuel rod models for modeling current and advanced LWR materials in accident scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Ian Edward

    A nuclear reactor systems code has the ability to model the system response in an accident scenario based on known initial conditions at the onset of the transient. However, there has been a tendency for these codes to lack the detailed thermo-mechanical fuel rod response models needed for accurate prediction of fuel rod failure. This proposed work will couple today's most widely used steady-state (FRAPCON) and transient (FRAPTRAN) fuel rod models with a systems code TRACE for best-estimate modeling of system response in accident scenarios such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In doing so, code modifications will be made to model gamma heating in LWRs during steady-state and accident conditions and to improve fuel rod thermal/mechanical analysis by allowing axial nodalization of burnup-dependent phenomena such as swelling, cladding creep and oxidation. With the ability to model both burnup-dependent parameters and transient fuel rod response, a fuel dispersal study will be conducted using a hypothetical accident scenario under both PWR and BWR conditions to determine the amount of fuel dispersed under varying conditions. Due to the fuel fragmentation size and internal rod pressure both being dependent on burnup, this analysis will be conducted at beginning, middle and end of cycle to examine the effects that cycle time can play on fuel rod failure and dispersal. Current fuel rod and system codes used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are compilations of legacy codes with only commonly used light water reactor materials, Uranium Dioxide (UO2), Mixed Oxide (U/PuO 2) and zirconium alloys. However, the events at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island accident have shown the need for exploration into advanced materials possessing improved accident tolerance. This work looks to further modify the NRC codes to include silicon carbide (SiC), an advanced cladding material proposed by current DOE funded research on accident tolerant fuels (ATF). Several

  1. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1999 through September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks.

  2. HTGR applications program advanced systems. Semiannual report, October 1, 1982-March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-05-01

    Work Breakdown Structure (WBS 41) activities emphasize the advanced HTGR modular reactor system (MRS) for reformer (R) and steam cycle/-cogeneration (SC/C) applications. This report describes progress in system performance for a 250-MW(t) MRS-R and a 300-MW(t) MRS-SC/C plant; it details the groundrules and parameters for the FY-83 nuclear core design and examines and compares fuel cycle economics. This report gives results from a study on decay heat removal transients for the MRS-R and MRS-SC/C variants. It evaluates the bypass valve system and the number and location of helium circulators, and it describes the progress on circulator component design, a prestressed concrete vessel steel closure design, and plant licensing and safety. Under the Advanced Technology Transfer Task (WBS 15), this report includes a section on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) MRS core heatup thermal model analysis. This report also gives the results of a survey on candidate reformer tube materials from GA Technologies Inc. to identify acceptable substitute materials for Inconel 617 to alleviate possible cobalt activation and carburization problems.

  3. Propulsion System Materials Program semiannual progress report for April 1995 through September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the DOE, NASA, and DOD advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a 5-year program plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. During the course of the Propulsion System Materials Program, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. To this end, the direction of the Propulsion System Materials Program is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported to include near-term (5--10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

  4. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1998 thru September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  5. Microfabricated DNA analysis system. Semi-annual report, August 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We are miniaturizing instrumentation for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) -- a bioanalytical technique that amplifies target sections of DNA through thermal cycling. This report focuses on delineating reaction chamber, design parameters through computer modeling and infrared imaging. We have also continued micro-chamber-based PCR experiments and have successfully amplified three different targets from two different biological sources. Specifically, we have amplified DNA from {beta}-globin (a subunit of hemoglobin), and two different-sized targets from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). These experiments were performed in newly-designed chambers. Reaction chambers are also being designed with detection in mind, specifically for the detection of fluorescent DNA labels. Finally, some new developments in PCR technology are described as they represent potential biological diagnostics to be evaluated in microfabricated DNA analysis systems.

  6. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program: Semiannual progress report, April 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for contributions to this report.

  7. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for October 1998 Through March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OIT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOX and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulate. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OIT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1,2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and

  8. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for April 2000 Through September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, DR

    2000-12-11

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advantages LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOx and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and

  9. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program semiannual progress report for October 1996 through March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and tribological stresses and higher temperatures of advanced designs limit the engine designers; advanced materials allow the design of components that may operate reliably at higher stresses and temperatures, thus enabling more efficient engine designs. Advanced materials also offer the opportunity to improve the emissions, NVH, and performance of diesel engines for pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. The principal areas of research are: (1) cost effective high performance materials and processing; (2) advanced manufacturing technology; (3) testing and characterization; and (4) materials and testing standards.

  10. SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

  11. 75 FR 79929 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Commission ###Semiannual Regulatory Agenda### ] FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION (FTC) FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Ch. I Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory... 22(d)(1) of the Federal Trade Commission Act, 15 U.S.C. 57b-3(d)(1), and the Regulatory......

  12. 48 CFR 1422.406-13 - Semiannual enforcement reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Semiannual enforcement reports. 1422.406-13 Section 1422.406-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Labor Standards for...

  13. 48 CFR 1422.406-13 - Semiannual enforcement reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Semiannual enforcement reports. 1422.406-13 Section 1422.406-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Labor Standards for...

  14. 48 CFR 1422.406-13 - Semiannual enforcement reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Semiannual enforcement reports. 1422.406-13 Section 1422.406-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Labor Standards for...

  15. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities). During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET team continued its efforts to complete software components needed for the ESG Gateway and Data Node. These components include: Data Versioning, Data Replication, DataMover-Lite (DML) and Bulk Data Mover (BDM), Metrics, Product Services, and Security, all joining together to form ESG-CET's first beta release. The launch of the beta release is scheduled for late October with the installation of ESG Gateways at NCAR and LLNL/PCMDI. Using the developed ESG Data Publisher, the ESG II CMIP3 (IPCC AR4) data holdings - approximately 35 TB - will be among the first datasets to be published into the new ESG enterprise system. In addition, the NCAR's ESG II data holdings will also be published into the new system - approximately 200 TB. This period also saw the testing of the ESG Data Node at various collaboration sites, including: the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, the University of Tokyo Center for

  16. Status report on assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for LWR extended service conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, S.; Soppet, W. K.; Majumdar, S.; Natesan, K.

    2014-07-09

    This report provides an update on an earlier assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor (LWR) materials under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2013, under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue in the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. The overall objective of this LWRS project is to assess the degradation by environmentally assisted cracking/fatigue of LWR materials, such as various alloy base metals and their welds used in reactor coolant system piping. This effort is to support the U.S. Department of Energy LWRS program for developing tools to predict the aging/failure mechanism and to correspondingly predict the remaining life of LWR components for anticipated 60-80 year operation.

  17. Determination of optimal LWR containment design, excluding accidents more severe than Class 8

    SciTech Connect

    Cave, L.; Min, T.K.

    1980-04-01

    Information is presented concerning the restrictive effect of existing NRC requirements; definition of possible targets for containment; possible containment systems for LWR; optimization of containment design for class 3 through class 8 accidents (PWR); estimated costs of some possible containment arrangements for PWR relative to the standard dry containment system; estimated costs of BWR containment.

  18. Federal Trade Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Part XX Federal Trade Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION (FTC) FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Ch. I Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission... published in accordance with section 22(d)(1) of the Federal Trade Commission Act, 15 U.S.C.......

  19. 76 FR 40050 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... July 7, 2011 Part VII Department of Energy Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 130 / Thursday, July 7, 2011 / Unified Agenda#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chs. II, III, and X 48 CFR Ch. 9 Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice...

  20. 78 FR 1570 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... January 8, 2013 Part VII Department of Energy Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 5 / Tuesday, January 8, 2013 / Unified Agenda#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chs. II, III, and X 48 CFR Ch. 9 Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice...

  1. Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1981-31 January 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W. E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

    1982-02-01

    The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

  2. Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1982-31 January 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W.E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

    1983-02-01

    The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

  3. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semi-annual progress report for October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  4. Fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system development. Semiannual report, August 1, 1983-January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W.E.; De Saro, R.; Patch, K.D.

    1984-02-01

    A major energy loss in industry is the heat content of the flue gases from industrial process heaters. One effective way to utilize this energy, which is applicable to all processes, is to preheat the combustion air for the process heater. Although recuperators are available to preheat this air when the flue gases are clean, recuperators to recover the heat from dirty and corrosive flue gases do not exist. The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in the fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry. In this report, the accomplishments of the preceding six-month period are described. Specifically, long duration field testing of distributor plates and on-line cleaning were conducted, as well as startup and initial testing of the laboratory test facility. 39 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system development. Semiannual report, February 1, 1983-July 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W. E.; De Saro, R.; Joshi, C.

    1983-08-01

    A major energy loss in industry is the heat content of the flue gases from industrial process heaters. One effective way to utilize this energy, which is applicable to all processes, is to preheat the combustion air from the process heater. Although recuperators are available to preheat this air when the flue gases are clean, recuperators to recover the heat from dirty and corrosive flue gases do not exist. The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry. In this report, the accomplishments of the proceeding six-month period are described.

  6. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semiannual Progress Report October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-04-02

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) from October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011. It discusses ESG-CET highlights for the reporting period, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations, and lists papers and presentations. To learn more about our project and to find previous reports, please visit the ESG-CET Web sites: http://esg-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ and/or https://wiki.ucar.edu/display/esgcet/Home. This report will be forwarded to managers in the Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), as well as national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., those involved in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES); SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science; the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP); the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)), and also to researchers working on a variety of other climate model and observation evaluation activities. The ESG-CET executive committee consists of Dean N. Williams, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ian Foster, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); and Don Middleton, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The ESG-CET team is a group of researchers and scientists with diverse domain knowledge, whose home institutions include eight laboratories and two universities: ANL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LLNL, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NCAR, Oak Ridge National

  7. LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K.; Takano, M.; Sato, S.; Shimazu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

  8. Multilevel transport solution of LWR reactor cores

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Ignacio Marquez Damian; Cassiano R.E. de Oliveira; HyeonKae Park

    2008-09-01

    This work presents a multilevel approach for the solution of the transport equation in typical LWR assemblies and core configurations. It is based on the second-order, even-parity formulation of the transport equation, which is solved within the framework provided by the finite element-spherical harmonics code EVENT. The performance of the new solver has been compared with that of the standard conjugate gradient solver for diffusion and transport problems on structured and unstruc-tured grids. Numerical results demonstrate the potential of the multilevel scheme for realistic reactor calculations.

  9. CO2 annual and semiannual cycles from multiple satellite retrievals and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xun; Crisp, David; Olsen, Edward T.; Kulawik, Susan S.; Miller, Charles E.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Liang, Maochang; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-02-01

    Satellite CO2 retrievals from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and in situ measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA-ESRL) Surface CO2 and Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) are utilized to explore the CO2 variability at different altitudes. A multiple regression method is used to calculate the CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes from different data sets. The CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes for GOSAT XCO2 and TCCON XCO2 are consistent but smaller than those seen in the NOAA-ESRL surface data. The CO2 annual and semiannual cycles are smallest in the AIRS midtropospheric CO2 compared with other data sets in the Northern Hemisphere. The amplitudes for the CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle from GOSAT, TES, and AIRS CO2 are small and comparable to each other in the Southern Hemisphere. Similar regression analysis is applied to the Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers-2 and CarbonTracker model CO2. The convolved model CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes are similar to those from the satellite CO2 retrievals, although the models tend to underestimate the CO2 seasonal cycle amplitudes in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes and underestimate the CO2 semiannual cycle amplitudes in the high latitudes. These results can be used to better understand the vertical structures for the CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle and help identify deficiencies in the models, which are very important for the carbon budget study.

  10. Thermal Properties of Structural Materials Used in LWR Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Daw; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson

    2011-01-01

    High temperature material property data for structural materials used in existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are limited. Often, extrapolated values recommended in the literature differ significantly. To reduce uncertainties in predictions relying upon extrapolated data for LWR vessel and penetration materials, high temperature tests were completed on SA533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) low alloy steel, Stainless Steel 304 (SS304), and Inconel 600 using material property measurement systems available in the High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Properties measured include thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity for temperatures up to 1200 °C. From these results, thermal conductivity and density were calculated. Results show that, in some cases, previously recommended values for these materials differ significantly from measured values at high temperatures.

  11. Small Business Administration Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... businesses. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 08/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency... Manufacturing Assistance Act of 2004 (Reauthorization Act) to regulate Small Business Lending Companies (SBLCs... Part XVI Small Business Administration Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] SMALL...

  12. LIFE vs. LWR: End of the Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Blink, J A; Shaw, H F

    2008-10-02

    The worldwide energy consumption in 2003 was 421 quadrillion Btu (Quads), and included 162 quads for oil, 99 quads for natural gas, 100 quads for coal, 27 quads for nuclear energy, and 33 quads for renewable sources. The projected worldwide energy consumption for 2030 is 722 quads, corresponding to an increase of 71% over the consumption in 2003. The projected consumption for 2030 includes 239 quads for oil, 190 quads for natural gas, 196 quads for coal, 35 quads for nuclear energy, and 62 quads for renewable sources [International Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0484, Table D1 (2006) p. 133]. The current fleet of light water reactors (LRWs) provides about 20% of current U.S. electricity, and about 16% of current world electricity. The demand for electricity is expected to grow steeply in this century, as the developing world increases its standard of living. With the increasing price for oil and gasoline within the United States, as well as fear that our CO2 production may be driving intolerable global warming, there is growing pressure to move away from oil, natural gas, and coal towards nuclear energy. Although there is a clear need for nuclear energy, issues facing waste disposal have not been adequately dealt with, either domestically or internationally. Better technological approaches, with better public acceptance, are needed. Nuclear power has been criticized on both safety and waste disposal bases. The safety issues are based on the potential for plant damage and environmental effects due to either nuclear criticality excursions or loss of cooling. Redundant safety systems are used to reduce the probability and consequences of these risks for LWRs. LIFE engines are inherently subcritical, reducing the need for systems to control the fission reactivity. LIFE engines also have a fuel type that tolerates much higher temperatures than LWR fuel, and has two safety systems to remove decay heat in the event of loss of coolant or loss of coolant flow. These features of

  13. LWR-PV damage estimate methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Wagschal, J.J.; Maerker, R.E.; Broadhead, B.L.

    1980-01-01

    A credible estimate of the pressure vessel lifetime due to neutron-induced embrittlement is studied. The first step toward this goal is the accurate prediction of fluence and neutron energy spectrum at the pressure vessel. This, in turn, is obtained from least squares unfolding techniques of dosimetry measurements at a surveillance position, transport calculations, and a translation of information obtained at the surveillance position to the damage position. Including a prototypic neutron field like the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly, in which measurements are performed to serve as benchmarks for the LWR-PV surveillance dosimetry program, involves the use of approximate calculational methods. These approximate methods are supplemented by correction factors also known as calculational bias factors, the proper utilization of which requires estimated uncertainties of these biases as well. The source of a few biases for the PCA and some biases and correlations for the group fluxes at two PCA locations are presented.

  14. Options for Burning LWR SNF in LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J

    2008-09-09

    We have pursued two processes in parallel for the burning of LWR SNF in the LIFE engine: (1) solid fuel option and (2) liquid fuel option. Approaches with both are discussed. The assigned Topical Report on liquid fuels is attached.

  15. Evaluation of FSV-1 cask for the transport of LWR irradiated fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The Model FSV-1 spent fuel shipping cask was designed by General Atomic Company (GA) to service the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) nuclear generating station, a High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). This report presents an evaluation of the suitability of the FSV-1 cask for the transport of irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies from both Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The FSV-1 cask evaluation parameters covered a wide spectrum of LWR fuel assemblies, based on burnup in Megawatt Days/Metric Ton of Heavy Metal (MWD/MTHM) and years of decay since irradiation. The criteria for suitability included allowable radiation dose rates, cask surface and interior temperatures and the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the complete shipping system.

  16. Task 3.0 -- Advanced power systems: Subtask 3.18 -- Ash behavior in power systems. Semi-annual report, June 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Zygarlicke, C.J.; McCollor, D.P.; Folkedahl, B.C.; Swanson, M.L.; Musich, M.A.

    1998-10-01

    Advanced power systems such as integrated gasifier combined cycle systems and fluidized bed systems are at the forefront of power industry research because of the need for increased efficiency and the reduction of greenhouse gases. Ash behavior in power systems can have a significant impact on the design and performance of these systems. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a focused research initiative aimed at filling gaps in the understanding of fundamental mechanisms of ash behavior, which has relevance to commercial application and marketable products associated with advanced power systems. This program develops methods and means to better understand and mitigate adverse coal ash behavior in advanced power systems and can act to relieve the US reliance on diminishing recoverable oil resources and other greenhouse-producing fossil fuels. Subtask 3.18 is structured as three tasks. Task 1 pertains to summarizing the critical issues in ash behavior, especially for advanced power systems. Task 2 focuses on fundamental ash sintering and viscosity-ash composition relationships that are critical for developing a better mechanistic understanding of ash deposit formation and for predicting ash behavior. Task 3 is aimed primarily at determining the role of the ash chemistry and phase relationships for specific ash interactions in advanced power systems. The role of sulfides in the formation of ash deposits in gasification systems and the factors that influence alloy corrosion in supercritical boilers will be specifically analyzed. Task results to date are presented.

  17. 12 CFR 8.2 - Semiannual assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... follows: If the bank's total assets (consolidated domestic and foreign subsidiaries) are: Over— But not... national bank falls into one of the asset-size brackets denoted by Columns A and B. A bank's semiannual..., which is computed on the assets of the bank up to the lower endpoint (Column A) of the bracket in...

  18. Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ...:// Not in FR www.epa.gov/lawsregs/search/regagenda.html Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda www....html issue ] Monthly Action Initiation List http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/component/ Not in FR... Rulemaking Gateway www.epa.gov/rulemaking/ Not in FR B. What Are EPA's Regulatory Goals, and What...

  19. Department of Interior Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ...: Action Date FR Cite Final Action 04/00/10 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency Contact... idle facilities. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 12/00/10 NPRM Comment Period End 02/00/11... Part IX Department of the Interior Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  20. Department of Energy Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... OF ENERGY Semiannual Regulatory Agenda 10 CFR Chs. II, III, and X 48 CFR Ch. 9 Regulatory Agenda... Review,'' 58 FR 51735, and the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601 et seq. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... and direct heating equipment. This is the second review for water heaters. Timetable: Action Date...

  1. Department of Energy Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Semiannual Regulatory Agenda 10 CFR Chs. II, III, and X 48 CFR Ch. 9 Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Department of... ``Regulatory Planning and Review,'' 58 FR 51735, and the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601 et seq... use throughout the rulemaking process. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite Notice: Public Meeting...

  2. 77 FR 8020 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... time limitations for veteran-owned small businesses. Completed: Reason Date FR Cite Withdrawn 10/24/11... Agenda for the agency. SBA's last semiannual regulatory agenda was published on July 7, 2011, at 76 FR... Industries. 465 Small Business Size 3245-AG28 Standards: Real Estate, Rental and Leasing Industries....

  3. 76 FR 40136 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... tolling of time limitations for veteran-owned small businesses. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 08/00... FR 79864. The semiannual agenda of the SBA conforms to the Unified Agenda format developed by the... Services Industries. 309 Small Business Size 3245-AG28 Standards: Real Estate, Rental and...

  4. 78 FR 44331 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... published on January 8, 2013, at 78 FR 1636. The Semiannual Agenda of the SBA conforms to the Unified Agenda... collection and use of individual SBDC client data. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 10/00/13 Regulatory... Loan Program; Export Express Program Legal Authority: 15 U.S.C. 636(a)(31) and (35) Abstract: SBA...

  5. 78 FR 11735 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mariana A. Pardo, Director, Government Contracting and Business Development... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] Vol. 78 Tuesday, No. 33... 8, 2013 (78 FR 1636). The regulatory agenda is a semiannual summary of all current and...

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). For this edition of the NRC's regulatory agenda, the most... publication of the last NRC semiannual agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). Within each group, the rules... regulations to improve the control over the distribution of source material to exempt persons and to...

  7. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... December 7, 2009 (74 FR 64572). ADDRESSES: Comments on any rule in the agenda may be sent to the Secretary... occurred on rules since publication of the last NRC semiannual agenda on December 7, 2009 (74 FR 64572... regulations to improve the control over the distribution of source material to exempt persons and to...

  8. 76 FR 40144 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Semiannual regulatory agenda. SUMMARY: This agenda... INFORMATION: DoD, GSA, and NASA, under their several statutory authorities, jointly issue and maintain the FAR..., Director, Office of Acquisition Policy and Senior Procurement Executive. DOD/GSA/NASA (FAR)--Proposed...

  9. Convergence studies of deterministic methods for LWR explicit reflector methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Canepa, S.; Hursin, M.; Ferroukhi, H.; Pautz, A.

    2013-07-01

    The standard approach in modem 3-D core simulators, employed either for steady-state or transient simulations, is to use Albedo coefficients or explicit reflectors at the core axial and radial boundaries. In the latter approach, few-group homogenized nuclear data are a priori produced with lattice transport codes using 2-D reflector models. Recently, the explicit reflector methodology of the deterministic CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system was identified to potentially constitute one of the main sources of errors for core analyses of the Swiss operating LWRs, which are all belonging to GII design. Considering that some of the new GIII designs will rely on very different reflector concepts, a review and assessment of the reflector methodology for various LWR designs appeared as relevant. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to first recall the concepts of the explicit reflector modelling approach as employed by CASMO/SIMULATE. Then, for selected reflector configurations representative of both GII and GUI designs, a benchmarking of the few-group nuclear data produced with the deterministic lattice code CASMO-4 and its successor CASMO-5, is conducted. On this basis, a convergence study with regards to geometrical requirements when using deterministic methods with 2-D homogenous models is conducted and the effect on the downstream 3-D core analysis accuracy is evaluated for a typical GII deflector design in order to assess the results against available plant measurements. (authors)

  10. ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS - ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS. INCLUDES THE SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 01, 1998 - JUNE 30, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature; Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined; Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (T{sub cv}) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt; Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles; Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems; and Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

  11. Identification of the impacts of maintenance and testing upon the safety of LWR power plants. Part II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Husseiny, A. A.; Sabri, Z. A.; Turnage, J. J.

    1980-04-01

    Information is presented concerning overview of literature relating to radiation exposure and operating experience; details of LWR-MTC3 classification system; histograms for individual BWR facilities depicting frequency of M and T mode and frequency of systems and components involved with M and T problems; histograms for individual PWR facilities depicting frequency of M and T mode and frequency of systems and components involved with M and T problems; and Fortran program for M and T data clustering.

  12. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), in collaboration with the nuclear industry, has been conducting research and development (R&D) activities on advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels for the last few years. The emphasis for these activities was on improving the fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization and increased power density for power upgrades, as well as collaborating with industry on fuel reliability. After the events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. In the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Conference Report 112-75, the U.S. Congress directed DOE-NE to: • Give “priority to developing enhanced fuels and cladding for light water reactors to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools.” • Give “special technical emphasis and funding priority…to activities aimed at the development and near-term qualification of meltdown-resistant, accident-tolerant nuclear fuels that would enhance the safety of present and future generations of light water reactors.” • Report “to the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, on its plan for development of meltdown-resistant fuels leading to reactor testing and utilization by 2020.” Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The overall draft strategy for development and demonstration is comprised of three phases: Feasibility Assessment and Down-selection; Development and Qualification; and

  13. Survey of LWR environmental control technology performance and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Lewallen, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    This study attempts to establish a ranking for species that are routinely released to the environment for a projected nuclear power growth scenario. Unlike comparisons made to existing standards, which are subject to frequent revision, the ranking of releases can be used to form a more logical basis for identifying the areas where further development of control technology could be required. This report describes projections of releases for several fuel cycle scenarios, identifies areas where alternative control technologies may be implemented, and discusses the available alternative control technologies. The release factors were used in a computer code system called ENFORM, which calculates the annual release of any species from any part of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle given a projection of installed nuclear generation capacity. This survey of fuel cycle releases was performed for three reprocessing scenarios (stowaway, reprocessing without recycle of Pu and reprocessing with full recycle of U and Pu) for a 100-year period beginning in 1977. The radioactivity releases were ranked on the basis of a relative ranking factor. The relative ranking factor is based on the 100-year summation of the 50-year population dose commitment from an annual release of radioactive effluents. The nonradioactive releases were ranked on the basis of dilution factor. The twenty highest ranking radioactive releases were identified and each of these was analyzed in terms of the basis for calculating the release and a description of the currently employed control method. Alternative control technology is then discussed, along with the available capital and operating cost figures for alternative control methods.

  14. 41 CFR 105-69.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 105-69.600 Section 105-69.600 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... Administration 69-NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 105-69.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The...

  15. 6 CFR 9.51 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 9.51 Section 9.51 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY RESTRICTIONS UPON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 9.51 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile...

  16. 38 CFR 45.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 45.600 Section 45.600 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 45.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head...

  17. 77 FR 25523 - Semi-Annual Workforce Management Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... Office of the Secretary Semi-Annual Workforce Management Conference AGENCY: U.S. Department of... of Transportation, Office of the Secretary, announces the second Semi-Annual Workforce Management... for addressing labor/management issues, and safety. Registration Space is limited. Registration...

  18. 32 CFR 28.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 28.600 Section 28.600... REGULATIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 28.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each... compilations to the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives. (h) Agencies...

  19. 6 CFR 9.51 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 9.51 Section 9.51 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY RESTRICTIONS UPON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 9.51 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile...

  20. Extension of SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident models to non-LWR reactor designs. [Non-Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, C.M.; Siefken, L.J.; Hagrman, D.L. ); Cheng, T.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code has been extended to calculate the core melt progression and fission product transport that may occur in non-LWR reactors during severe accidents. The code's approach of connecting together according to user instructions all of the parts that constitute a reactor system give the code the capability to model a wide range of reactor designs. The models added to the code for analyses of non-LWR reactors include: (a) oxidation and melt progression in cores with U-Al based fuel elements, (b) movement of liquefied material from its original place in the core to other parts of the reactor systems, such as the outlet piping, (c) fission product release from U-Al based fuel and zinc release from aluminum, and (d) fission product release from a pool of molten core material. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Semiannually alternating exchange of intermediate waters east of the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Song, Lina; Li, Yuanlong; Liu, Chuanyu; Wang, Jianing; Lin, Pengfei; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Jun; Diao, Xinyuan; Zhang, Dongxiao; Hu, Dunxin

    2016-07-01

    Intermediate water exchange in the northwest tropical Pacific is explored with the temperature, salinity, and current measurements of a mooring system deployed at 8°N, 127.05°E during 2010-2014. For the first time, prominent semiannual variability (SAV; with the maximum power at ~ 187 days) of subthermocline meridional flow along the Mindanao coast is revealed. A significant correlation between meridional flow and salinity is found at intermediate depths. This provides direct evidence for the alternating transports of South Pacific and North Pacific Intermediate Waters by northward and southward undercurrents, respectively. Further analysis with an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model demonstrates that the SAV is generated locally near the western boundary, manifesting as large-scale subthermocline recirculation and leading to alternating northward and southward flows near the Mindanao coast, which plays an efficient role in the intermediate water exchange of the northwest tropical Pacific. Mechanisms underlying the observed SAV are discussed.

  2. Equipment designs for the spent LWR fuel dry storage demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, R.J.; Kurasch, D.H.; Hardin, R.T.; Schmitten, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    In conjunction with the Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program (SFHPP) equipment has been designed, fabricated and successfully utilized to demonstrate the packaging and interim dry storage of spent LWR fuel. Surface and near surface storage configurations containing PWR fuel assemblies are currently on test and generating baseline data. Specific areas of hardware design focused upon include storage cell components and the support related equipment associated with encapsulation, leak testing, lag storage, and emplacement operations.

  3. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  4. Field validation of cable monitoring and rating system (CMARS) laboratory model. Semi-annual report, 1 May 1979-31 December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Englehardt, J.; Harris, H.; Kasny, E.; Orifice, D.; Patton, R.; Sottovia, P.

    1980-01-01

    One year of research on validating the performance of the Cable Monitoring and Rating System (CMARS) is reported. The performance testing was conducted on underground 230-kV and 345-kV pipe type cable circuits owned by the New Jersey Public Service Electric and Gas Co. Laser temperature monitoring systems and a data acquisition system were installed. Software installation and development is discussed. The CMARS testing program is described. (LCL)

  5. Equatorial ionosphere semiannual oscillation investigated from Schumann resonance measurements on board the C/NOFS satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Freudenreich, Henry; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Rowland, Douglas; Bromund, Kenneth; Kepko, Larry; Le, Guan; Liebrecht, Maria Carmen; Martin, Steven; Uribe, Paulo

    2013-11-01

    of Schumann resonance signatures in the equatorial ionosphere offers remote sensing capabilities for the investigation of tropospheric and space weather effects in the ionosphere. Schumann resonances are electromagnetic oscillations in the earth-ionosphere cavity produced by lightning activity. Analysis of AC electric field measurements gathered by the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite reveals a semiannual pattern in Schumann resonance data recorded during nighttime in the equatorial ionosphere. This pattern observed in the Schumann resonance amplitude is expected to help validate—or at least constrain—potential mechanisms proposed to explain the semiannual oscillation observed in different geophysical records, such as those reported in a variety of tropospheric, ionospheric/thermospheric, and magnetospheric observations.

  6. Assessment of LWR piping design loading based on plant operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, P. O.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of this study has been to: (1) identify current Light Water Reactor (LWR) piping design load parameters, (2) identify significant actual LWR piping loads from plant operating experience, (3) perform a comparison of these two sets of data and determine the significance of any differences, and (4) make an evaluation of the load representation in current LWR piping design practice, in view of plant operating experience with respect to piping behavior and response to loading.

  7. Measurements and sensitivities of LWR in poly spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayal, Guy; Shauly, Eitan; Levi, Shimon; Siany, Amit; Adan, Ofer; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2010-03-01

    LER and LWR have long been considered a primary issue in process development and monitoring. Development of a low power process flavors emphasizes the effect of LER, LWR on different aspects of the device. Gate level performance, particularly leakage current at the front end of line, resistance and reliability in the back-end layers. Traditionally as can be seen in many publications, for the front end of line the focus is mainly on Poly and Active area layers. Poly spacers contribution to the gate leakage, for example, is rarely discussed. Following our research done on sources of gate leakage, we found leakage current (Ioff) in some processes to be highly sensitive to changes in the width of the Poly spacers - even more strongly to the actual Poly gate CDs. Therefore we decided to measure Poly spacers LWR, its correlation to the LWR in the poly, and its sensitivity to changes in layout and OPC. In our last year publication, we defined the terms LLER (Local Line Edge Roughness) and LLWR (Local Line Width Roughness). The local roughness is measured as the 3-sigma value of the line edge/width in a 5-nm segment around the measurement point. We will use these terms in this paper to evaluate the Poly roughness impact on Poly spacer's roughness. A dedicated test chip was designed for the experiments, having various transistors layout configurations with different densities to cover the all range of process design rules. Applied Materials LER and LWR innovative algorithms were used to measure and characterize the spacer roughness relative to the distance from the active edges and from other spaces. To accurately measure all structures in a reasonable time, the recipes were automatically generated from CAD. On silicon, after poly spacers generation, the transistors no longer resemble the Poly layer CAD layout, their morphology is different compared with Photo/Etch traditional structures , and dimensions vary significantly. In this paper we present metrology and

  8. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for September 2000 through March 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2001-05-22

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) and weld shields (WS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2001. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, CVS, and WS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials. or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  9. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2001 Through March 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    J. P. Moore, JPM

    2002-05-22

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  10. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for April 1, 2002 Through September 20, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2002-12-03

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  11. Computational strategies for three-dimensional flow simulations on distributed computer systems. Ph.D. Thesis Semiannual Status Report, 15 Aug. 1993 - 15 Feb. 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weed, Richard Allen; Sankar, L. N.

    1994-01-01

    An increasing amount of research activity in computational fluid dynamics has been devoted to the development of efficient algorithms for parallel computing systems. The increasing performance to price ratio of engineering workstations has led to research to development procedures for implementing a parallel computing system composed of distributed workstations. This thesis proposal outlines an ongoing research program to develop efficient strategies for performing three-dimensional flow analysis on distributed computing systems. The PVM parallel programming interface was used to modify an existing three-dimensional flow solver, the TEAM code developed by Lockheed for the Air Force, to function as a parallel flow solver on clusters of workstations. Steady flow solutions were generated for three different wing and body geometries to validate the code and evaluate code performance. The proposed research will extend the parallel code development to determine the most efficient strategies for unsteady flow simulations.

  12. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Siebenlist, F.; Shoshani, A.; Sim, A.; Bell, G.; Drach, R.; Ahrens, J.; Jones, P.; Brown, D.; Chastang, J.; Cinquini, L.; Fox, P.; Harper, D.; Hook, N.; Nienhouse, E.; Strand, G.; West, P.; Wilcox, H.; Wilhelmi, N.; Zednik, S.; Hankin, S.; Schweitzer, R.; Bernholdt, D.; Chen, M.; Miller, R.; Shipman, G.; Wang, F.; Bharathi, S.; Chervenak, A.; Schuler, R.; Su, M.

    2010-04-21

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities).

  13. First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glennan, T. Keith

    1959-01-01

    The First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 206 (a) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) to provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the Earth's atmosphere, which states: The Administration shall submit to the President for transmittal to Congress, semiannually and at such other times as it deems desirable, a report on its activities and accomplishments.

  14. Site S-7 Representative Model and Application for the Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VZMS) McClellan AFB - 1998 Semi-Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.L.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    1998-12-01

    Vadose zone data collection and enhanced data analysis are continuing for the Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VZMS) installed at site S-7 in IC 34 at McClellan MB. Data from core samples from boreholes drilled in 1998 and from VZMS continuous monitoring are evaluated and compared to previously collected data and analyses. The suite of data collected to date is used to develop and constrain a spatially averaged, one-dimensional site S-7 representative model that is implemented into T2VOC. Testing of the conceptual model under conditions of recharge of 100 mm/yr produces plausible moisture contents relative to data from several sources. Further scoping calculations involving gas-phase TCE transport in the representative model were undertaken. We investigate the role of recharge on TCE transport as well as the role of ion- and gas-phase flow driven by density and barometric pumping effects. This report provides the first example of the application of the site S-7 representative model in th e investigation of subsurface VOC movement.

  15. Hydrogen mixing study (HMS) in LWR type containments

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical technique has been developed for calculating the full three-dimensional time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations with multiple speies transport. The method is a modified form of the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique to solve the governing equations for low Mach number flows where pressure waves and local variations in compression and expansion are not significant. Large density variations, due to thermal and species concentration gradients, are accounted for without the restrictions of the classical Boussinesq approximation. Calculations of the EPRI/HEDL standard problems verify the feasibility of using this finite-difference technique for analyzing hydrogen mixing within LWR containments.

  16. Investigation of valve failure problems in LWR power plants

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    An analysis of component failures from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank shows that for both PWR and BWR plants the component category most responsible for approximately 19.3% of light water reactor (LWR) power plant shutdowns. This investigation by Burns and Roe, Inc. shows that the greatest cause of shutdowns in LWRs due to valve failures is leakage from valve stem packing. Both BWR plants and PWR plants have stem leakage problems (BWRs, 21% and PWRs, 34%).

  17. Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Sanecki, J.E.; Osborne, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel is being studied by heating fuel rod segments in flowing steam and an inert carrier gas to simulate accident conditions. Fuels with a range of irradiation histories are being subjected to several steam flow rates over a wide range of temperatures. Fission product release during each test is measured by gamma spectroscopy and by detailed examination of the collection apparatus after the test has been completed. These release results are complemented by a detailed posttest examination of samples of the fuel rod segment. Results of release measurements and fuel rod characterizations for tests at 1400 through 2000/sup 0/C are presented in this paper.

  18. LWR codes capability to address SFR BDBA scenarios: Modeling of the ABCOVE tests

    SciTech Connect

    Herranz, L. E.; Garcia, M.; Morandi, S.

    2012-07-01

    The sound background built-up in LWR source term analysis in case of a severe accident, make it worth to check the capability of LWR safety analysis codes to model accident SFR scenarios, at least in some areas. This paper gives a snapshot of such predictability in the area of aerosol behavior in containment. To do so, the AB-5 test of the ABCOVE program has been modeled with 3 LWR codes: ASTEC, ECART and MELCOR. Through the search of a best estimate scenario and its comparison to data, it is concluded that even in the specific case of in-containment aerosol behavior, some enhancements would be needed in the LWR codes and/or their application, particularly with respect to consideration of particle shape. Nonetheless, much of the modeling presently embodied in LWR codes might be applicable to SFR scenarios. These conclusions should be seen as preliminary as long as comparisons are not extended to more experimental scenarios. (authors)

  19. Iodine chemical forms in LWR severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    Calculated data from seven severe accident sequences in light water reactor plants were used to assess the chemical forms of iodine in containment. In most of the calculations for the seven sequences, iodine entering containment from the reactor coolant system was almost entirely in the form of CsI with very small contributions of I or HI. The largest fraction of iodine in forms other than CsI was a total of 3.2% as I plus HI. Within the containment, the CsI will deposit onto walls and other surfaces, as well as in water pools, largely in the form of iodide (I{sup {minus}}). The radiation-induced conversion of I{sup {minus}} in water pools into I{sub 2} is strongly dependent on pH. In systems where the pH was controlled above 7, little additional elemental iodine would be produced in the containment atmosphere. When the pH falls below 7, it may be assumed that it is not being controlled and large fractions of iodine as I{sub 2} within the containment atmosphere may be produced. 17 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Iodine chemical forms in LWR severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.; Kress, T.S.; Parker, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Calculated data from seven severe accident sequences in light-water reactor plants were used to assess the chemical forms of iodine in containment. In most of the calculations for the seven sequences, iodine entering containment from the reactor coolant system was almost entirely in the form of CsI with very small contributions of I or HI. The largest fraction of iodine in forms other than CsI was a total of 3.2% as I plus HI. Within the containment, the CsI will deposit onto walls and other surfaces, as well as in water pools, largely in the form of iodide (I{sup {minus}}). The radiation induced conversion of I{sup {minus}} in water pools into I{sub 2} is strongly dependent on pH. In systems where the pH was controlled above 7, little additional elemental iodine would be produced in the containment atmosphere. When the pH falls below 7, it may be assumed that it is not being controlled, and large fractions of iodine as I{sub 2} within the containment atmosphere may be produced. 16 refs.

  1. CO2 Annual and Semiannual Cycles from Satellite Retrievals and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Crisp, D.; Olsen, E. T.; Kulawik, S. S.; Miller, C. E.; Pagano, T. S.; Yung, Y. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have compared satellite CO2 retrievals from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) with in-situ measurements from the Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA-ESRL) Surface CO2 and Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON), and utilized zonal means to characterize variability and distribution of CO2. In general, zonally averaged CO2 from the three satellite data sets are consistent with the surface and TCCON XCO2 data. Retrievals of CO2 from the three satellites show more (less) CO2 in the northern hemisphere than that in the southern hemisphere in the northern hemispheric winter (summer) season. The difference between the three satellite CO2 retrievals might be related to the different averaging kernels in the satellites CO2 retrievals. A multiple regression method was used to calculate the CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes from different satellite CO2 retrievals. The CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes are largest at the surface, as seen in the NOAA-ESRL CO2 data sets. The CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes in the GOSAT XCO2, AIRS mid-tropospheric CO2, and TES mid-tropospheric CO2 are smaller compared with those from the surface CO2. Similar regression analysis was applied to the Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers-2 (MOZART-2) and CarbonTracker model CO2. The convolved model CO2 annual cycle and semiannual cycle amplitudes are similar to those from the satellite CO2 retrievals, although the model tends to under-estimate the CO2 seasonal cycle amplitudes in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes from the comparison with GOSAT and TES CO2 and underestimate the CO2 semi-annual cycle amplitudes in the high latitudes from the comparison with AIRS CO2. The difference between model and satellite CO2 can be used to identify possible deficiency in the model and improve the model in the future.

  2. Federal Reserve System Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Board took this action to ensure that the creditors have guidance on how to make the interest rate and... proposed rule would make comprehensive changes to the disclosures consumers receive before and after... similar to the proposed rule. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite Board Requested Comment 08/26/09 74 FR...

  3. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find...

  4. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find...

  5. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find...

  6. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find...

  7. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find...

  8. 31 CFR 359.11 - What is the semiannual inflation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the semiannual inflation rate... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.11 What is the semiannual inflation rate? The index used to determine the semiannual inflation rate is the non-seasonally adjusted CPI-U (the Consumer Price Index...

  9. 31 CFR 359.11 - What is the semiannual inflation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the semiannual inflation rate... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.11 What is the semiannual inflation rate? The index used to determine the semiannual inflation rate is the non-seasonally adjusted CPI-U (the Consumer Price Index...

  10. 31 CFR 359.11 - What is the semiannual inflation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the semiannual inflation rate... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.11 What is the semiannual inflation rate? The index used to determine the semiannual inflation rate is the non-seasonally adjusted CPI-U (the Consumer Price Index...

  11. 31 CFR 359.11 - What is the semiannual inflation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the semiannual inflation rate... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.11 What is the semiannual inflation rate? The index used to determine the semiannual inflation rate is the non-seasonally adjusted CPI-U (the Consumer Price Index...

  12. 31 CFR 359.11 - What is the semiannual inflation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the semiannual inflation rate... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.11 What is the semiannual inflation rate? The index used to determine the semiannual inflation rate is the non-seasonally adjusted CPI-U (the Consumer Price Index...

  13. A classification scheme for LWR fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.S.; Williamson, D.A.; Notz, K.J.

    1988-11-01

    With over 100 light water nuclear reactors operating nationwide, representing designs by four primary vendors, and with reload fuel manufactured by these vendors and additional suppliers, a wide variety of fuel assembly types are in existence. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, both the Systems Integration Program and the Characteristics Data Base project required a classification scheme for these fuels. This scheme can be applied to other areas and is expected to be of value to many Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management programs. To develop the classification scheme, extensive information on the fuel assemblies that have been and are being manufactured by the various nuclear fuel vendors was compiled, reviewed, and evaluated. It was determined that it is possible to characterize assemblies in a systematic manner, using a combination of physical factors. A two-stage scheme was developed consisting of 79 assembly types, which are grouped into 22 assembly classes. The assembly classes are determined by the general design of the reactor cores in which the assemblies are, or were, used. The general BWR and PWR classes are divided differently but both are based on reactor core configuration. 2 refs., 15 tabs.

  14. FMDP reactor alternative summary report: Volume 4, Evolutionary LWR alternative

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] have become surplus to national defense needs both in the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. The purpose of this report is to provide schedule, cost, and technical information that will be used to support the Record of Process (ROD). Following the screening process, DOE/MD via its national laboratories initiated a more detailed analysis activity to further evaluate each of the ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived the screening process. Three ``Alternative Teams,`` chartered by DOE and comprised of technical experts from across the DOE national laboratory complex, conducted these analyses. One team was chartered for each of the major disposition classes (borehole, immobilization, and reactors). During the last year and a half, the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) Reactor Alternative Team (RxAT) has conducted extensive analyses of the cost, schedule, technical maturity, S&S, and other characteristics of reactor-based plutonium disposition. The results of the RxAT`s analyses of the existing LWR, CANDU, and partially complete LWR alternatives are documented in Volumes 1-3 of this report. This document (Volume 4) summarizes the results of these analyses for the ELWR-based plutonium disposition option.

  15. Validation of scale-4 for LWR (Light Water Reactor) fuel in transportation and storage cask conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.; Parks, C.V. ); Bierman, S.R. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of criticality calculations performed to validate the recently released SCALE-4 modular code system for light water reactor (LWR) fuel under various conditions typical of transportation and storage casks. The modifications in SCALE-4 include NITAWL-II, an updated version of the NITAWL code that performs resonance self-shielding calculations using the Nordeim Integral Treatment. In order to validate SCALE-4 with the new resonance self-shielding treatment, the CSAS4 control module was used to calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) via the BONAMI{sup 3}, NITAWL-II, and KENO V.a{sup 4} codes. The cross section library used was the 27 group ENDF/B-IV library, which has been updated for use with NITAWL-II. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Assessment of nitrogen as an atmosphere for dry storage of spent LWR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.R.; Knox, C.A.; White, G.D.

    1985-09-01

    Interim dry storage of spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel is being developed as a licensed technology in the United States. Because it is anticipated that license agreements will specify dry storage atmospheres, the behavior of spent LWR fuel in a nitrogen atmosphere during dry storage was investigated. In particular, the thermodynamics of reaction of nitrogen compounds (expected to form in the cover gas during dry storage) and residual impurities (such as moisture and oxygen) with Zircaloy cladding and with spent fuel at sites of cladding breaches were examined. The kinetics of reaction were not considered it was assumed that the 20 to 40 years of interim dry storage would be sufficient for reactions to proceed to completion. The primary thermodynamics reactants were found to be NO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, and O/sub 2/. The evaluation revealed that the limited inventories of these reactants produced by the source terms in hermetically sealed dry storage systems would be too low to cause significant spent fuel degradation. Furthermore, the oxidation of spent fuel to degrading O/U ratios is unlikely because the oxidation potential in moist nitrogen limits O/U ratios to values less than UO/sub 2.006/ (the equilibrium stoichiometric form in equilibrium with moist nitrogen). Tests were performed with bare spent UO/sub 2/ fuel and nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets (with no Zircaloy cladding) in a nitrogen atmosphere containing moisture concentrations greater than encountered under dry storage conditions. These tests were performed for at least 1100 h at temperatures as high as 380/sup 0/C, where oxidation reactions proceed in a matter of minutes. No visible degradation was detected, and weight changes were negligible.

  17. A Review and Analysis of European Industrial Experience in Handling LWR Spent Fuel and Vitrified High-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Blomeke, J.O.

    2001-07-10

    The industrial facilities that have been built or are under construction in France, the United Kingdom, Sweden, and West Germany to handle light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and canisters of vitrified high-level waste before ultimate disposal are described and illustrated with drawings and photographs. Published information on the operating performance of these facilities is also given. This information was assembled for consideration in planning and design of similar equipment and facilities needed for the Federal Waste Management System in the United States.

  18. Characteristics Data Base: Programmer's guide to the LWR Quantities Data Base

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.E. ); Moore, R.S. )

    1990-08-01

    The LWR Quantities Data Base is a menu-driven PC data base developed as part of OCRWM's waste, technical data base on the characteristics of potential repository wastes, which also includes non-LWR spent fuel, high-level and other materials. This programmer's guide completes the documentation for the LWR Quantities Data Base, the user's guide having been published previously. The PC data base itself may be requested from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using the order form provided in Volume 1 of publication DOE/RW-0184.

  19. Collation of monthly and semiannual reports covering instrumentation at the Decade 80 house in Tucson, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Decade 80 solar house, located in Tucson, Arizona, was built to show the use of copper in home building and to demonstrate the use of solar energy to provide space heating and cooling and domestic hot water. The auxiliary energy sources are electrical resistance heating for the domestic hot water and a gas fired boiler for space heating and operation of the absorption air conditioning units. The Semi-Annual report gives an overview of the instrumentation effort with the back-up monthly reports reflecting more detail of the effort that went into the implementation of the data acquisition system.

  20. Metholology for the selection of LWR safety R and D projects. Phase I, status report

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sheikh, K. A.

    1980-03-01

    The objective of the LWR R and D Selection Methodology Program is to develop and demonstrate an R and D selection methodology appropriate for LWR safety technology. This report documents the development work from the program beginning in April, 1979 to the end of Fiscal Year 1979. The scope of work for this period included three tasks; methodology review (Task 1), measures development (Task 2), and methodology development for the first phase of application (Task 3). The accomplishments of these tasks are presented.

  1. Code System to Predict LWR Reflood Heat Transfer.

    1999-04-27

    Version: 00 REFLUX calculates the temperature-time history of a representative fuel rod during the reflood stage of a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The logic used fo selection of the appropriate flow regime for analysis of the cladding temperature transient is based on the axial position with regard to the continuous liquid level (based on a mass balance), a liquid carry-over criterion (derived from a force balance on a drop suspended in a vapor stream), andmore » the local cladding surface temperature. A generalized boiling curve is constructed, and the local flow and clad conditions determine the applicable heat transfer coefficient.« less

  2. Code System For Calculating Reactivity Transients In a LWR.

    1999-03-16

    Version 00 RETRANS is appropriate to calculate power excursions in light water reactors initiated by reactivity insertions due to withdrawal of control elements. The neutron physical model is based on the time-dependent two-group neutron diffusion equations. The equation of state of the coolant is approximated by a table built into the code. RETRANS solves the heat conduction equation and calculates the heat transfer coefficient for representative fuel rods at each time-step.

  3. 44 CFR 18.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 18.600 Section 18.600 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 18.600...

  4. 40 CFR 34.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34.600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 34.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B) and, on May 31 and November...

  5. Semiannual Report to Congress, October 1, 2002-March 31, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    This semiannual report to Congress by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), U.S. Department of Education, covers the actions of the OIG from October 1, 2002, through March 31, 2003. The report discusses four goals of the President's Management Agenda: (1) improved financial performance: includes information on financial statement audits,…

  6. 45 CFR 604.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 604.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see Appendix B) and, on May 31 and November 30 of each...

  7. 45 CFR 604.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 604.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see Appendix B) and, on May 31 and November 30 of each...

  8. 45 CFR 604.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 604.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B) and, on May 31 and November 30 of each...

  9. 45 CFR 604.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 604.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see Appendix B) and, on May 31 and November 30 of each...

  10. 45 CFR 604.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 604.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see Appendix B) and, on May 31 and November 30 of each...

  11. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600 Section 146.600 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING.... (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  12. 45 CFR 1168.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1168.600 Section 1168.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 1168.600...

  13. 45 CFR 1168.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1168.600 Section 1168.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 1168.600...

  14. 45 CFR 1168.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1168.600 Section 1168.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 1168.600...

  15. 45 CFR 1168.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1168.600 Section 1168.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 1168.600...

  16. 45 CFR 1168.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 1168.600 Section 1168.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 1168.600...

  17. Advanced multiphysics coupling for LWR fuel performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Gleicher, F. N.; Spencer, B. W.; Novascone, S. R.; Williamson, R. L.; Pastore, G.; Perez, D. M.

    2015-10-01

    Even the most basic nuclear fuel analysis is a multiphysics undertaking, as a credible simulation must consider at a minimum coupled heat conduction and mechanical deformation. The need for more realistic fuel modeling under a variety of conditions invariably leads to a desire to include coupling between a more complete set of the physical phenomena influencing fuel behavior, including neutronics, thermal hydraulics, and mechanisms occurring at lower length scales. This paper covers current efforts toward coupled multiphysics LWR fuel modeling in three main areas. The first area covered in this paper concerns thermomechanical coupling. The interaction of these two physics, particularly related to the feedback effect associated with heat transfer and mechanical contact at the fuel/clad gap, provides numerous computational challenges. An outline is provided of an effective approach used to manage the nonlinearities associated with an evolving gap in BISON, a nuclear fuel performance application. A second type of multiphysics coupling described here is that of coupling neutronics with thermomechanical LWR fuel performance. DeCART, a high-fidelity core analysis program based on the method of characteristics, has been coupled to BISON. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during a depletion or a fast transient simulation. Two-way coupling between these codes was achieved by mapping fission rate density and fast neutron flux fields from DeCART to BISON and the temperature field from BISON to DeCART while employing a Picard iterative algorithm. Finally, the need for multiscale coupling is considered. Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact fuel performance by causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity, and fission gas release. The mechanisms involved occur at the atomistic and grain scale and are therefore not the domain of a fuel performance code. However, it is possible to use

  18. Advanced multiphysics coupling for LWR fuel performance analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Gleicher, F. N.; Spencer, B. W.; Novascone, S. R.; Williamson, R. L.; Pastore, G.; Perez, D. M.

    2015-10-01

    Even the most basic nuclear fuel analysis is a multiphysics undertaking, as a credible simulation must consider at a minimum coupled heat conduction and mechanical deformation. The need for more realistic fuel modeling under a variety of conditions invariably leads to a desire to include coupling between a more complete set of the physical phenomena influencing fuel behavior, including neutronics, thermal hydraulics, and mechanisms occurring at lower length scales. This paper covers current efforts toward coupled multiphysics LWR fuel modeling in three main areas. The first area covered in this paper concerns thermomechanical coupling. The interaction of these two physics,more » particularly related to the feedback effect associated with heat transfer and mechanical contact at the fuel/clad gap, provides numerous computational challenges. An outline is provided of an effective approach used to manage the nonlinearities associated with an evolving gap in BISON, a nuclear fuel performance application. A second type of multiphysics coupling described here is that of coupling neutronics with thermomechanical LWR fuel performance. DeCART, a high-fidelity core analysis program based on the method of characteristics, has been coupled to BISON. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during a depletion or a fast transient simulation. Two-way coupling between these codes was achieved by mapping fission rate density and fast neutron flux fields from DeCART to BISON and the temperature field from BISON to DeCART while employing a Picard iterative algorithm. Finally, the need for multiscale coupling is considered. Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact fuel performance by causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity, and fission gas release. The mechanisms involved occur at the atomistic and grain scale and are therefore not the domain of a fuel performance code. However, it is

  19. Uranium nitride as LWR TRISO fuel: Thermodynamic modeling of U-C-N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Shin, Dongwon; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    2012-08-01

    TRISO coated particle fuel is envisioned as a next generation replacement for current urania pellet fuel in LWR applications. To obtain adequate fissile loading the kernel of the TRISO particle will likely need to be UN instead of UO2. In support of the necessary development effort for this new fuel system, an assessment of phase regions of interest in the U-C-N system was undertaken as the fuel will be prepared by the carbothermic reduction of the oxide followed by nitriding, will be in equilibrium with carbon within the TRISO particle, and will react with minor actinides and fission products. The phase equilibria and thermochemistry of the U-C-N system is reviewed, including nitrogen pressure measurements above various phase fields. Measurements were used to confirm an ideal solution model of UN and UC adequately represents the UC1-xNx phase. Agreement with the data was significantly improved by effectively adjusting the Gibbs free energy of UN by +12 kJ/mol. This also required adjustment of the value for the sesquinitride by +17 kJ/mol to obtain agreement with phase equilibria. The resultant model together with reported values for other phases in the system was used to generate isothermal sections of the U-C-N phase diagram. Nitrogen partial pressures were also computed for regions of interest.

  20. Proposed geomagnetic control of semiannual waves in the mesospheric zonal wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belmont, A. D.; Nastrom, G. D.; Mayr, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The polar semiannual oscillation in zonal wind explains midwinter weakening of the polar vortex and the relatively short stratospheric and mesospheric summer easterlies. The phase of the wind oscillation is equinoctial, as is the phase of the semiannual component in magnetic storm activity. For a given altitude, the contours of amplitude of the semiannual wind oscillation have less variability in geomagnetic than in geographic coordinates. It is suggested that the polar wind oscillations are caused by the semiannual maxima in magnetic storm activity, which lead to electron dissociation of O2 into O, in turn increasing ozone more rapidly than the dissociation of N2 destroys ozone, and inducing a semiannual variation in the thermal and wind fields. This implies that geomagnetic processes may cause or affect the development of sudden warmings. As the tropical semiannual wind oscillation is symmetric about the geomagnetic equator, the same processes may also influence the location of the tropical wind wave.

  1. Robot Kinematics Identification: KUKA LWR4+ Redundant Manipulator Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolyubin, Sergey; Paramonov, Leonid; Shiriaev, Anton

    2015-11-01

    This work is aimed at a comprehensive discussion of algorithms for the kinematic parameters identification of robotic manipulators. We deal with an open-loop geometric calibration task, when a full 6D robot's end-effector pose is measured. Effective solutions of such a task is of high interest in many practical applications, because it can dramatically improve key robot characteristics. On the first step, we select optimal calibration configurations. A comparative analysis of three different algorithms and two observability indexes used for numerical optimization is provided. Afterwards, using the acquired and pre-processed experimental data we identify modified Denavit-Hartenberg parameters of the manipulator. Estimates are obtained resolving original nonlinear forward kinematics relations. Finally, we compare nominal and calibrated geometric parameters and show how much deviations in these parameters affect robot positioning accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, such integrated efforts are new for the KUKA LWR4+ robot and Nikon K610 optical coordinate measuring machine (CMM), which were used in the study. Discussion of practical issues on how to organise the experiment is an additional contribution of this work. The proposed procedure is highly automated and can be implemented to improve manipulator's performance on a periodic basis.

  2. Photoresist film analysis to investigate LWR generation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shinichi; Mochida, Kenji; Kimura, Tooru; Nakanishi, Kana; Kawasaki, Naohiko; Man, Naoki

    2013-03-01

    In order to understand the mechanism of line width roughness (LWR) generation and to find control knobs for improving photoresist design, we established PAG activity analysis methods by utilizing Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). TOF-SIMS depth profiling using Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) allowed the ability to clearly identify photoresist ingredient distribution in the photoresist films from the surface to the bottom of the resist films. TEM provided distribution information of photoresist ingredients in nanometer scale. As a result, PAG function and polymer reaction mechanism can be monitored by these methods. The TOFSIMS outputs during coating, exposure, and post-exposure bake (PEB) steps provide indications of distribution change of PAGs, quenching reaction derivatives, and remaining protecting group, which correspond to acid generation distribution, acid diffusion, and diffusion of deprotection reaction in photoresist film respectively during each consecutive lithographic patterning step. The difference in activity of PAGs can also be observed. These novel analytical methods can provide remarkably helpful information about identifying proper control knobs for lithographic performance of photoresist and for next generation lithography (NGL), especially extreme ultra violet lithography (EUVL) materials, where exposure tool time is very limited.

  3. Evaluation of inorganic sorbent treatment for LWR coolant process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Roddy, J.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents results of a survey of the literature and of experience at selected nuclear installations to provide information on the feasibility of replacing organic ion exchangers with inorganic sorbents at light-water-cooled nuclear power plants. Radioactive contents of the various streams in boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors were examined. In addition, the methods and performances of current methods used for controlling water quality at these plants were evaluated. The study also includes a brief review of the physical and chemical properties of selected inorganic sorbents. Some attributes of inorganic sorbents would be useful in processing light water reactor (LWR) streams. The inorganic resins are highly resistant to damage from ionizing radiation, and their exchange capacities are generally equivalent to those of organic ion exchangers. However, they are more limited in application, and there are problems with physical integrity, especially in acidic solutions. Research is also needed in the areas of selectivity and anion removal before inorganic sorbents can be considered as replacements for the synthetic organic resins presently used in LWRs. 11 figures, 14 tables.

  4. Uranium Nitride as LWR TRISO Fuel: Thermodynamic Modeling of U-C-N

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M; Shin, Dongwon

    2012-01-01

    TRISO coated particle fuel is envisioned as a next generation replacement for current urania pellet fuel in LWR applications. To obtain adequate fissile loading the kernel of the TRISO particle will need to be UN. In support of the fuel development effort, an assessment of phase regions of interest in the U-C-N system was undertaken as the fuel will be prepared by the carbothermic reduction of the oxide and it will be in equilibrium with carbon within the TRISO particle. The phase equilibria and thermochemistry of the U-C-N system is reviewed, including nitrogen pressure measurements above various phase fields. Selected measurements were used to fit a first order model of the UC1-xNx phase, represented by the inter-solution of UN and UC. Fit to the data was significantly improved by also adjusting the heat of formation for UN by ~12 kJ/mol and the phase equilbria was best reproduced by also adjusting the heat for U2N3 by +XXX. The determined interaction parameters yielded a slightly positive deviation from ideality, which agrees with lattice parameter measurements which show positive deviation from Vegard s law. The resultant model together with reported values for other phases in the system were used to generate isothermal sections of the U-C-N phase diagram. Nitrogen partial pressures were also computed for regions of interest.

  5. Methods for incorporating effects of LWR coolant environment into ASME code fatigue evaluations.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.

    1999-04-15

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Appendix I to Section HI of the Code specifies design fatigue curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs). Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels can be a factor of {approx}70 lower in an LWR environment than in air. These results raise the issue of whether the design fatigue curves in Section III are appropriate for the intended purpose. This paper presents the two methods that have been proposed for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations. The mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs in LWR environments are discussed.

  6. Distribution of characteristics of LWR [light water reactor] spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, W.J.; Notz, K.J.; Moore, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop a collective description of the entire spent fuel inventory in terms of various fuel properties relevant to Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) using information available from the Characteristics Data Base (CBD), which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. A number of light-water reactor (LWR) characteristics were analyzed including assembly class representation, fuel burnup, enrichment, fuel fabrication data, defective fuel quantities, and, at PNL`s specific request, linear heat generation rate (LHGR) and the utilization of burnable poisons. A quantitative relationships was developed between burnup and enrichment for BWRs and PWRs. The relationship shows that the existing BWR ATM is near the center of the burnup-enrichment distribution, while the four PWR ATMs bracket the center of the burnup range but are on the low side of the enrichment range. Fuel fabrication data are based on vendor specifications for new fuel. Defective fuel distributions were analyzed in terms of assembly class and vendor design. LHGR values were calculated from utility data on burnup and effective full-power days; these calculations incorporate some unavoidable assumptions which may compromise the value of the results. Only a limited amount of data are available on burnable poisons at this time. Based on this distribution study, suggestions for additional ATMs are made. These are based on the class and design concepts and include BWR/2,3 barrier fuel, and the WE 17 {times} 17 class with integral burnable poison. Both should be at relatively high burnups. 16 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2012-11-26

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  8. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2001-12-26

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report.

  9. Review of literature on the TMI accident and correlation to the LWR Safety Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.J.

    1980-05-01

    This report is the result of approximately two man-months of effort devoted to assimilating and comprehending significant publicly available material related to Three Mile Island Unit 2 and events during and subsequent to the accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Those events were then correlated with the Preliminary LWR Safety Technology Program Plan (Preliminary Program Plan) prepared for the US Department of Energy by Sandia National Lab. This report is being submitted simultaneously with the SAI report entitled Preliminary Prioritization of Tasks in the Draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan.

  10. 40 CFR 60.1895 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? 60.1895 Section 60.1895 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION..., 1999 Model Rule-Reporting § 60.1895 If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1420 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? 60.1420 Section 60.1420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 60.1420 If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? (a) For data collected during...

  12. 40 CFR 62.15350 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? 62.15350 Section 62.15350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... it? (a) For data collected during the first half of a calendar year, submit your semiannual report...

  13. Isotope separation and advanced manufacturing technology. Volume 2, No. 2, Semiannual report, April--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Tehmanu; Carpenter, J.

    1993-12-31

    This is the second issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives of the ISAM Program include: the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) process, and advanced manufacturing technologies which include industrial laser materials processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. Topics included in this issue are: production plant product system conceptual design, development and operation of a solid-state switch for thyratron replacement, high-performance optical components for high average power laser systems, use of diode laser absorption spectroscopy for control of uranium vaporization rates, a two-dimensional time dependent hydrodynamical ion extraction model, and design of a formaldehyde photodissociation process for carbon and oxygen isotope separation.

  14. Federal Energy Resources Modernization Coordinating Committee. Semiannual Report, October 1, 1991 Through March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G B

    1992-07-01

    This report summarizes the broad range of activities supported by Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) and other federal agencies focused on meeting the President`s Executive Order on Federal Energy Management promulgated to meet energy savings goals and encourage more efficient management of all federal energy resources. These activities are reported semiannually under the auspices of the FERM Coordinating Committee, and as such include activities undertaken from October 1, 1991, through March 31, 1992. The activities reported are classified into four major categories: (1) technology-base support, which includes development of processes, software, metering and monitoring equipment and strategies, and other tools for the federal energy manager to better understand and characterize their energy resources; (2) federal energy systems testing and monitoring; (3) federal energy systems modernization projects at federal installations in cooperation with the utilities serving the sites; and (4) energy supply, distribution and end-use conservation assessment for federal agencies and/or facilities.

  15. Investigation of Nuclide Importance to Functional Requirements Related to Transport and Long-Term Storage of LWR Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    The radionuclide characteristics of light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuel play key roles in the design and licensing activities for radioactive waste transportation systems, interim storage facilities, and the final repository site. Several areas of analysis require detailed information concerning the time-dependent behavior of radioactive nuclides including (1) neutron/gamma-ray sources for shielding studies, (2) fissile/absorber concentrations for criticality safety determinations, (3) residual decay heat predictions for thermal considerations, and (4) curie and/or radiological toxicity levels for materials assumed to be released into the ground/environment after long periods of time. The crucial nature of the radionuclide predictions over both short and long periods of time has resulted in an increased emphasis on thorough validation for radionuclide generation/depletion codes. Current radionuclide generation/depletion codes have the capability to follow the evolution of some 1600 isotopes during both irradiation and decay time periods. Of these, typically only 10 to 20 nuclides dominate contributions to each analysis area. Thus a quantitative ranking of nuclides over various time periods is desired for each of the analysis areas of shielding, criticality, heat transfer, and environmental dose (radiological toxicity). These rankings should allow for validation and data improvement efforts to be focused only on the most important nuclides. This study investigates the relative importances of the various actinide, fission-product, and light-element isotopes associated with LWR spent fuel with respect to five analysis areas: criticality safety (absorption fractions), shielding (dose rate fractions), curies (fractional curies levels), decay heat (fraction of total watts), and radiological toxicity (fraction of potential committed effective dose equivalent). These rankings are presented for up to six different burnup/enrichment scenarios and at decay times from 2 to

  16. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMAL AND STRUCTURAL MATERIAL PROPERTIES FOR METALS USED IN LWR VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; J. C. Crepeau

    2008-06-01

    Because of the impact that melt relocation and vessel failure may have on subsequent progression and associated consequences of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) accident, it is important to accurately predict heating and relocation of materials within the reactor vessel, heat transfer to and from the reactor vessel, and the potential for failure of the vessel and structures within it. Accurate predictions of such phenomena require high temperature thermal and structural properties. However, a review of vessel and structural steel material properties used in severe accident analysis codes reveals that the required high temperature material properties are extrapolated with little, if any, data above 1000 K. To reduce uncertainties in predictions relying upon extrapolated high temperature data, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) obtained high data for two metals used in LWR vessels: SA 533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) low alloy steel, which is used to fabricate most US LWR reactor vessels; and Type 304 Stainless Steel SS304, which is used in LWR vessel piping, penetration tubes, and internal structures. This paper summarizes the new data, and compares it to existing data.

  17. Effect of material heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2005-07-31

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the design of Class 1 components of nuclear power plants. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify design curves for applicable structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. The existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. Under certain environmental and loading conditions, fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) can be a factor of 20 lower in water than in air. This report presents experimental data on the effect of heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic Type 304 SS in LWR coolant environments. A detailed metallographic examination of fatigue test specimens was performed to characterize the crack morphology and fracture morphology. The key material, loading, and environmental parameters and their effect on the fatigue life of these steels are also described. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic SSs as a function of material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented.

  18. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 3 - partially complete LWR alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, S.R.; Fisher, S.E.; Bevard, B.B.

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 3 of a four volume report summarizes the results of these analyses for the partially complete LWR (PCLWR) reactor based plutonium disposition alternative.

  19. Automated solar cell assembly teamed process research. Semiannual subcontract report, December 6, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlan, M.

    1995-01-01

    This is the second Semiannual Technical Progress Report for the program titled `Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research` funded under National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract No. ZAG-3-11219-01. This report describes the work done on Phase II of the program in the period from December 6, 1993 to June 30, 1994. Spire`s objective in this program is to develop high throughput (5 MW/yr) automated processes for interconnecting thin (200 {mu}m) silicon solar cells. High yield will be achieved with these fragile cells through the development of low mechanical stress and low thermal stress processes. For example, a machine vision system is being developed for cell alignment without mechanically contacting the cell edges, while a new soldering process is being developed to solder metal interconnect ribbons simultaneously to a cells` front and back contacts, eliminating one of the two heating steps normally used for soldering each cell.

  20. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-06

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  1. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-01

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  2. Annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field at equatorial locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    For a year of quiet solar-activity level, geomagnetic records from American hemisphere observatories located between about 0?? and 30?? north geomagnetic latitude were used to compare the annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field associated with three separate contributions: (a) the quiet-day midnight level, MDT; (b) the solar-quiet daily variation, Sq; (c) the quiet-time lunar semidiurnal tidal variation, L(12). Four Fourier spectral constituents (24, 12, 8, 6 h periods) of Sq were individually treated. All three orthogonal elements (H, D and Z) were included in the study. The MDT changes show a dominant semiannual variation having a range of about 7 gammas in H and a dominant annual variation in Z having a range of over 8 gammas. These changes seem to be a seasonal response to the nightside distortions by magnetospheric currents. There is a slow decrease in MDT amplitudes with increasing latitude. The Sq changes follow the patterns expected from an equatorial ionospheric dynamo electrojet current system. The dominant seasonal variations occur in H having a range of over 21 gammas for the 24 h period and over 12 gammas for the 12 h period spectral components. The higher-order components are relatively smaller in size. The Sq(H) amplitudes decrease rapidly with increasing latitude. Magnetospheric contributions to the equatorial Sq must be less than a few per cent of the observed magnitude. The L(12) variation shows the ionospheric electrojet features by the dominance of H and the rapid decrease in amplitude with latitude away from the equator. However, the seasonal variation range of over 7 gammas has a maximum in early February and minimum in late June that is not presently explainable by the known ionospheric conductivity and tidal behavior. ?? 1981.

  3. Challenges in the development of high-fidelity LWR core neutronics tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Forget, B.

    2013-07-01

    Modern computing has made possible the solution of extremely large-scale reactor simulations, and the literature has numerous examples of high-resolution methods (often Monte Carlo) applied to full-core reactor problems. However, there are currently no examples in the literature of application of such 'High-Fidelity' or 'First Principles' methods to operating Light Water Reactor (LWR) analysis. This paper seeks to remind code developers, project managers, and analysts of the many important aspects of LWR simulation that must be incorporated to produce truly high-fidelity analysis tools. The authors offer a monetary prize to the first person (or group) that successfully solves a new two-cycle operational PWR depletion benchmark problem using high-fidelity tools and demonstrates acceptable accuracy by comparison with measured operational plant data (open source) provided to the reactor analysis community. (authors)

  4. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO{sub 2} fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO[sub 2] fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed.

  6. Draft report: a selection methodology for LWR safety R and D programs and proposals

    SciTech Connect

    Husseiny, A. A.; Ritzman, R. L.

    1980-03-01

    The results of work done to develop a methodology for selecting LWR safety R and D programs and proposals is described. A critical survey of relevant decision analysis methods is provided including the specifics of multiattribute utility theory. This latter method forms the basis of the developed selection methodology. Details of the methodology and its use are provided along with a sample illustration of its application.

  7. 78 FR 44341 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ...); FAR Case 2011-020; Basic Safeguarding of Contractor Information Systems Legal Authority: 40 U.S.C. 121..., to identify that entity during System For Award Management registration. Timetable: Action Date FR... issuance of regulations that are not included in this agenda. There is no legal significance to...

  8. Mechanism and estimation of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    2002-08-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters (such as steel type, strain range, strain rate, temperature, dissolved-oxygen level in water, and flow rate) on the fatigue lives of these steels. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic stainless steels as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. The influence of reactor environments on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in these steels is also discussed.

  9. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Heat Exchange Systems

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Requirements for Heat Exchange Systems 8 Table 8 to Subpart VVVVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Chemical Manufacturing Area Sources Pt. 63, Subpt. VVVVVV, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart VVVVVV... next semi-annual periodic report required by § 63.152(c)” means the next semi-annual compliance...

  10. 37 CFR 256.2 - Royalty fee for compulsory license for secondary transmission by cable systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for secondary transmission by cable systems. (a) Commencing with the second semiannual accounting... for each of the second, third and fourth distant signal equivalents; and (4) .314 of 1 per centum of... equivalent thereafter. (b) Commencing with the second semiannual accounting period of 2005 and for...

  11. 77 FR 7974 - Semiannual Agenda of Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... effects on the respiratory system, including bronchiolitis obliterans, a debilitating and potentially... period ended on November 17, 2010. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 08/17/10 75 FR 50718 NPRM Republished 10/15/10 75 FR 63425 NPRM Comment Period End 11/17/10 Final Action 12/30/11 76 FR 82117...

  12. LWR design decision methodology: Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    Techniques were identified to augment existing design process at the component and system level in order to optimize cost and safety between alternative system designs. The method was demonstrated using the Surry Low Pressure Injection System (LPIS). Three possible backfit options were analyzed for the Surry LPIS, assessing the safety level of each option and estimating the acquisition and installation costs for each. (DLC)

  13. Semiannual report, 1 April - 30 September 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The major categories of the current Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software for parallel computers. Research in these areas is discussed.

  14. Preliminary conceptual design study for a small LWR: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    An innovative midsized Boiling Water Reactor (MBWR) concept rated at 600 MWe is described. The MBWR features a reduced number of systems and simpler systems compared to current designs. There is virtually no reliance on active systems to perform safety functions. For example, a Gravity-Driven Core Cooling System (GDCS) and a Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) are employed in the MBWR. After a loss of coolant accident or other reactor inventory threatening event beyond the capability of other systems, the GDCS and PCCS keep the core covered and remove decay heat from the reactor and containment for at least three days with no operator action needed. These and other simplified safety systems as well as simplifications in the turbine island and in construction methods may result in reduced costs and substantially shortened construction periods. It is possible that the 600 MWe MBWR concept could compete economically with current higher rated plants.

  15. Semiannual report for the period October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980 of work on: (1) superconducting power transmission system development; (2) cable insulation development. Power Transmission Project Technical Note No. 106

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-07

    Progress is reported in a program whose objective is to develop an underground superconducting power transmission system which is economical and technically attractive to the utility industry. The system would be capable of carrying very large blocks of electric power, and would supplant overhead lines in urban and suburban areas and regions of natural beauty. The program consisted initially of work in the laboratory to develop suitable materials, cryostats, and cable concepts. The materials work covers the development and testing of suitable superconductors and dielectric insulation. The laboratory work has now been extended to an outside test facility which represents an intermediate step between the laboratory scale and a full-scale system. The facility will allow cables several hundred feet long to be tested under realistic conditions. In addition, the refrigerator has been designed for optimum service for utility applications.

  16. MODIS Science Team Member Semi-annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermote, Eric; ElSaleous, Nazmi; Fisher, Paul; Karakos, Damianos; Ray, James; Vermeulen, Anne

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-annual report of the MODerate resolution imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Science Team Members. The most important activities undertaken during this reporting period are the following: 1) Versions 2.1 and 2.2 surface reflectance L2/L3 DAAC/SDST delivery; 2) Version 2.0 1km and 250m VI product delivery (assist Arizona); 3) Version 2.1 surface reflectance L2 testing; 4) Land Synthetic data set generator improvements; 5) QA; 6) Surface reflectance error budget generation (SWAMP request); 7) SCF Hardware; 8) Aerosol transport modeling; 9) Aerosol optical depth retrieval from AVHRR data; 10) Aerosol characteristics retrieval from SeaWIFS/AVHRR fusioned data; 11) Validation activities; 12) Aerosol climatology; and 13) 6S code. The report includes summaries of the topics above.

  17. Semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period October 1, 1994, through March 31, 1995. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large number of which facilitated Department management`s efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by six primary performance measures: (1) Recommendations accepted by management, (2) Audit/inspection savings, recoveries, and funds identified for better use, (3) Legislative/regulatory compliance to recommendations, (4) Positive impacts on the Department after implementation of recommendations, (5) Complaints resolved, and (6) Investigation recoveries, fines, and funds identified for better use.

  18. Coprocessing solvent-extraction flowsheet studies for LWR and FBR fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.D.; Benker, D.E.; Bigelow, J.E.; Chattin, F.R.; King, L.J.; Lloyd, M.H.; Ross, R.G.; Stacy, R.G.; Savage, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    Coprocessing solvent extraction studies using irradiated LWR and FBR fuels have indicated the need for an efficient feed clarification. A potentially useful filtration method for fulfilling this need has been demonstrated. Conditions necessary for the satisfactory use of unstabilized hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) or nitrous acid as the reducing agent for Pu(IV) during reductive stripping operations have been defined. Both partial partitioning and total costripping operations have been demonstrated. In addition, solvent degradation product measurements have been made, and the effect of the presence of DBP during uranium-plutonium stripping operations has been determined.

  19. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, April 1--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Semiannual Report to Congress covers the period April 1 to September 30, 1998. The report summarizes significant Office of Inspector General (OIG) audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period.These OIG efforts facilitated Department of Energy (DOE) efforts to improve the overall management of its programs. The OIG has developed a Strategic Plan which sets out its overall goals and objectives. The Office`s significant accomplishments are grouped by the strategic goals against which the OIG measures its performance. Highlights are presented on the following items: prime contractor fees policy strengthening; low-level and low-level mixed waste management program improvement; hazardous waste training agreement cost $6 million more than necessary; controls over architect-engineering costs improvement; funds expended contrary to Congressional direction and internal budget execution guidelines; company mischarges costs on several federal contracts; year 2000 computer issues; Qui Tam investigations; task force investigations; financial assistance grantees; DOE suspect/counterfeit items information trending and analysis; and management information systems.

  20. Thermochemical Compatibility and Oxidation Resistance of Advanced LWR Fuel Cladding

    DOE PAGES

    Besmann, T. M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Unocic, K. A.

    2016-06-21

    We assessed the thermochemical compatibility of potential replacement cladding materials for zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Considered were FeCrAl steel (similar to Kanthal APMT), Nb-1%Zr (similar to PWC-11), and a hybrid SiC-composite with a metallic barrier layer. The niobium alloy was also seen as requiring an oxidation protective layer, and a diffusion silicide was investigated. Metallic barrier layers for the SiC-composite reviewed included a FeCrAl alloy, Nb-1%Zr, and chromium. Thermochemical calculations were performed to determine oxidation behavior of the materials in steam, and for hybrid SiC-composites possible interactions between the metallic layer and SiC. Additionally, experimental exposures of SiC-alloymore » reaction couples at 673K, 1073K, and 1273K for 168 h in an inert atmosphere were made and microanalysis performed. Whereas all materials were determined to oxidize under higher oxygen partial pressures in the steam environment, these varied by material with expected protective oxides forming. Finally, the computed and experimental results indicate the formation of liquid phase eutectic in the FeCrAl-SiC system at the higher temperatures.« less

  1. Modeling and Analysis of UN TRISO Fuel for LWR Application Using the PARFUME Code

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboraroty (INL) PARFUME (particle fuel model) code was used to assess the overall fuel performance of uranium nitride (UN) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) ceramic fuel under irradiation conditions typical of a Light Water Reactor (LWR). The dimensional changes of the fuel particle layers and kernel were calculated, including the formation of an internal gap. The survivability of the UN TRISO particle was estimated depending on the strain behavior of the constituent materials at high fast fluence and burn up. For nominal cases, internal gas pressure and representative thermal profiles across the kernel and layers were determined along with stress levels in the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers. These parameters were then used to evaluate fuel particle failure probabilities. Results of the study show that the survivability of UN TRISO fuel under LWR irradiation conditions might only be guaranteed if the kernel and PyC swelling rates are limited at high fast fluence and burn up. These material properties have large uncertainties at the irradiation levels expected to be reached by UN TRISO fuel in LWRs. Therefore, a large experimental effort would be needed to establish material properties, including kernel and PyC swelling rates, under these conditions before definitive conclusions can be drawn on the behavior of UN TRISO fuel in LWRs.

  2. Compatibility/Stability Issues in the Use of Nitride Kernels in LWR TRISO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Beth L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2012-02-01

    The stability of the SiC layer in the presence of free nitrogen will be dependent upon the operating temperatures and resulting nitrogen pressures whether it is at High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) temperatures of 1000-1400 C (coolant design dependent) or LWR temperatures that range from 500-700 C. Although nitrogen released in fissioning will form fission product nitrides, there will remain an overpressure of nitrogen of some magnitude. The nitrogen can be speculated to transport through the inner pyrolytic carbon layer and contact the SiC layer. The SiC layer may be envisioned to fail due to resulting nitridation at the elevated temperatures. However, it is believed that these issues are particularly avoided in the LWR application. Lower temperatures will result in significantly lower nitrogen pressures. Lower temperatures will also substantially reduce nitrogen diffusion rates through the layers and nitriding kinetics. Kinetics calculations were performed using an expression for nitriding silicon. In order to further address these concerns, experiments were run with surrogate fuel particles under simulated operating conditions to determine the resulting phase formation at 700 and 1400 C.

  3. Application of the Reactor Analysis Support Package LWR set-point analysis guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, R.E.; Sorensen, J.M.; May, R.S.; Doran, K.J.; Trikouros, N.G.; Mozzias, E.S.

    1989-07-01

    Frequently, a situation is encountered in which the technical specification setpoints established by the plant safety analysis are judged to be unacceptable from a plant operational standpoint. This report documents the application of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Reactor Analysis Support Package (RASP) Light Water Reactor (LWR) setpoint analysis guidelines to provide justification for relaxing the high pressure setpoints at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generation Station. More Specifically, the plant operation's staff determined that it was desirable to provide increased margin for measurement uncertainties in the high pressure instrument and safety valve setpoints. Previous experience had indicated that there was insufficient margin to justify the desired setpoints using conventional deterministic inputs to the safety analysis and plant performance evaluation process. Therefore, it was determined that the RASP LWR setpoint analysis guidelines, which incorporated the use of a statistical combination of uncertainties methodology, would be used to establish an acceptable set of high pressure setpoints. This report documents the results of applying the RASP setpoint analysis guidelines to provide justification for an acceptable set of high pressure setpoints for the Oyster Creek station. 14 refs., 53 figs., 28 tabs.

  4. Modeling and analysis of UN TRISO fuel for LWR application using the PARFUME code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to assess the overall fuel performance of uranium nitride (UN) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) ceramic fuel under irradiation conditions typical of a Light Water Reactor (LWR). The dimensional changes of the fuel particle layers and kernel were calculated, including the formation of an internal gap. The survivability of the UN TRISO particle was estimated depending on the strain behavior of the constituent materials at high fast fluence and burn-up. For nominal cases, internal gas pressure and representative thermal profiles across the kernel and layers were determined along with stress levels in the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers. These parameters were then used to evaluate fuel particle failure probabilities. Results of the study show that the survivability of UN TRISO fuel under LWR irradiation conditions might only be guaranteed if the kernel and PyC swelling rates are limited at high fast fluence and burn-up. These material properties have large uncertainties at the irradiation levels expected to be reached by UN TRISO fuel in LWRs. Therefore, a large experimental effort would be needed to establish material properties, including kernel and PyC swelling rates, under these conditions before definitive conclusions can be drawn on the behavior of UN TRISO fuel in LWRs.

  5. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented.

  6. Microstructure evolution in proton-irradiated austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys under LWR core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jian

    1999-11-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructure of austenitic stainless steel was investigated using proton irradiation. High-purity alloys of Fe-20Cr-9Ni (UHP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons at a dose rate of 7 × 10-6 dpa/s between 300°C and 600°C. The irradiation produced a microstructure consisting of dislocation loops and voids. The dose and temperature dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were investigated. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier hardening model. The dose and temperature dependence of microstructure and hardness change for proton irradiation follows the same trend as that for neutron irradiation at comparable irradiation conditions. Commercial purity alloys of CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 3.0 dpa. The irradiated microstructure consists of dislocation loops. No voids were detected at doses up to 3.0 dpa. Loop size distributions are in close agreement with that in the same alloys neutron-irradiated in a LWR core. The loop density also agrees with neutron irradiation data. The yield strength as a function of dose in proton irradiated commercial purity alloys is consistent with the neutron- data trend. A fast-reactor microstructure model was adapted for light water reactor (LWR) irradiation conditions (275°C, 7 × 10 -8 dpa/s) and then applied to proton irradiation under conditions (360°C, 7 × 10-6 dpa/s) relevant to LWRs. The original model was modified by including in-cascade interstitial clustering and the loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by cluster diffusion. It was demonstrated that loop nucleation for both LWR irradiation condition and proton irradiation are driven by in-cascade interstitial clustering. One important result from this modeling work is that the difference in displacement cascade between

  7. Low-rank coal research semiannual report, January 1992--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This semiannual report is a compilation of seventeen reports on ongoing coal research at the University of North Dakota. The following research areas are covered: control technology and coal preparation; advanced research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction and gasification. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Unified agenda of federal regulatory and deregulatory actions--HHS. Semiannual regulatory agenda.

    PubMed

    1998-04-27

    The President's Executive Order 12866 and the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 require the semiannual publication of an agenda which summarizes all current, projected, and recently completed rulemakings of the Department. The agenda enables the public to know about and to participate in the Department's regulations development work. The last such agenda was published on October 29, 1997.

  9. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    2000-03-01

    This is the twenty-seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components.

  10. 25 CFR 141.24 - Attendance at semi-annual meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Attendance at semi-annual meetings. 141.24 Section 141.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES BUSINESS PRACTICES ON THE NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.24 Attendance at...

  11. 25 CFR 141.24 - Attendance at semi-annual meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Attendance at semi-annual meetings. 141.24 Section 141.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES BUSINESS PRACTICES ON THE NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.24 Attendance at...

  12. 25 CFR 141.24 - Attendance at semi-annual meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Attendance at semi-annual meetings. 141.24 Section 141.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES BUSINESS PRACTICES ON THE NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.24 Attendance at...

  13. 25 CFR 141.24 - Attendance at semi-annual meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Attendance at semi-annual meetings. 141.24 Section 141.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES BUSINESS PRACTICES ON THE NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.24 Attendance at...

  14. 78 FR 1618 - Semiannual Agenda and Fiscal Year 2013 Regulatory Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... to the requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act and Executive Order (E.O.) 12866 (``Regulatory Planning and Review''), which require the publication by the Department of a semiannual agenda of regulations. E.O. 12866 also requires the publication by the Department of a regulatory plan for the...

  15. 75 FR 41878 - Semi-Annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report-Local Contracting Agencies (HUD Programs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Semi-Annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report--Local Contracting Agencies (HUD... Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20410; e-mail Leroy McKinney Jr. at Leroy.McKinneyJr@hud... public that the Department of Housing and Urban Development has submitted to OMB a request for...

  16. 25 CFR 141.24 - Attendance at semi-annual meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Attendance at semi-annual meetings. 141.24 Section 141.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES BUSINESS PRACTICES ON THE NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.24 Attendance at...

  17. State Research Coordinating Unit Activities for the Period July 1, 1971-December 31, 1971. Semiannual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.

    This semiannual report summarizes research activities of the State Research Coordinating Units conducted under Section 131(b) of the Vocational Education Amendments of 1968 during the first half of fiscal year 1972. The purpose of the report is to facilitate exchange of information and reduce duplication of effort among the states by providing…

  18. Inspector General's Semiannual Report to Congress, No. 55. April 1, 2007-September 30, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This semiannual report to Congress on the activities and accomplishments of the Office of Inspector General (OIG), U.S. Department of Education (Department) from April 1, 2007, through September 30, 2007, highlights the audits, inspections, investigations, and other activities to illustrate an ongoing commitment to promoting accountability,…

  19. Semi-Annual Report to Congress: October 1, 1983-March 31, 1984. No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    This eighth semi-annual report issued by the United States Department of Education's Office of Inspector General (OIG) summarizes the activities and accomplishments of that office during a 6-month period ending March 31, 1984. A condensation of audits of Department of Education programs presents statistics on OIG activities and the allocation of…

  20. Tools for LWR spent fuel characterization: Assembly classes and fuel designs

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.S. Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN ); Notz, K.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The Characteristics Data Base (CDB) is sponsored by the DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The CDB provides a single, comprehensive source of data pertaining to radioactive wastes that will or may require geologic disposal, including detailed data describing the physical, quantitative, and radiological characteristics of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. In developing the CDB, tools for the classification of fuel assembly types have been developed. The assembly class scheme is particularly useful for size- and handling-based describes these tools and presents results of their applications in the areas of fuel assembly type identification, characterization of projected discharges, cask accommodation analyses, and defective fuel analyses. Suggestions for additional applications are also made. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. A Model for Assessment of Failure of LWR Fuel during an RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenfeng; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a model for Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) failure of LWR fuel during an RIA. The model uses the J-integral as a driving parameter to characterize the failure potential during PCMI. The model is implemented in the FRAPTRAN code and is validated by CABRI and NSRR simulated RIA test data. Simulation of PWR and BWR conditions are conducted by FRAPTRAN to evaluate the fuel failure potential using this model. Model validation and simulation results are compared with the strain-based failure model of PNNL and the SED/CSED model of EPRI. Our fracture mechanics model has good capability to differentiate failure from non-failure cases. The results reveal significant effects of power pulse width: a wider pulse width generally increases the threshold for fuel failure. However, this effect is less obvious for highly corroded cladding. (authors)

  2. Integrated Computational Modeling of Water Side Corrosion in Zirconium Metal Clad Under Nominal LWR Operating Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanfar, Asghar; Thomas, John; Van der Ven, Anton; Xu, Donghua; Youssef, Mostafa; Yang, Jing; Yildiz, Bilge; Marian, Jaime

    2016-10-01

    A mesoscopic chemical reaction kinetics model to predict the formation of zirconium oxide and hydride accumulation light-water reactor (LWR) fuel clad is presented. The model is designed to include thermodynamic information from ab initio electronic structure methods as well as parametric information in terms of diffusion coefficients, thermal conductivities and reaction constants. In contrast to approaches where the experimentally observed time exponents are captured by the models by design, our approach is designed to be predictive and to provide an improved understanding of the corrosion process. We calculate the time evolution of the oxide/metal interface and evaluate the order of the chemical reactions that are conducive to a t 1/3 dependence. We also show calculations of hydrogen cluster accumulation as a function of temperature and depth using spatially dependent cluster dynamics. Strategies to further cohesively integrate the different elements of the model are provided.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of LWR components: areas of investigation/benefits/recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S. J.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify specific topics of investigation into design procedures, design concepts, methods of analysis, testing practices, and standards which are characterized by nonlinear behavior (both geometric and material) and which are considered to offer some economic and/or technical benefits to the LWR industry (excluding piping). In this study these topics were collected, compiled, and subjectively evaluated as to their potential benefit. The topics considered to have the greatest benefit/impact potential are discussed. The topics of investigation were found to fall basically into three areas: component, code interpretation, and load/failure mechanism. The topics are arbitrarily reorganized into six areas of investigation: Fracture, Fatigue, Vibration/Dynamic/Seismic, Plasticity, Component/Computational Considerations, and Code Interpretation.

  4. Review of Technical Issues Related to Predicting Isotopic Compositions and Source Terms for High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I. C.; Parks, C. V.

    2000-12-11

    This report has been prepared to review the technical issues important to the prediction of isotopic compositions and source terms for high-burnup, light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel as utilized in the licensing of spent fuel transport and storage systems. The current trend towards higher initial 235U enrichments, more complex assembly designs, and more efficient fuel management schemes has resulted in higher spent fuel burnups than seen in the past. This trend has led to a situation where high-burnup assemblies from operating LWRs now extend beyond the area where available experimental data can be used to validate the computational methods employed to calculate spent fuel inventories and source terms. This report provides a brief review of currently available validation data, including isotopic assays, decay heat measurements, and shielded dose-rate measurements. Potential new sources of experimental data available in the near term are identified. A review of the background issues important to isotopic predictions and some of the perceived technical challenges that high-burnup fuel presents to the current computational methods are discussed. Based on the review, the phenomena that need to be investigated further and the technical issues that require resolution are presented. The methods and data development that may be required to address the possible shortcomings of physics and depletion methods in the high-burnup and high-enrichment regime are also discussed. Finally, a sensitivity analysis methodology is presented. This methodology is currently being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a computational tool to better understand the changing relative significance of the underlying nuclear data in the different enrichment and burnup regimes and to identify the processes that are dominant in the high-burnup regime. The potential application of the sensitivity analysis methodology to help establish a range of applicability for experimental

  5. Semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from October 1, 1995, through March 31, 1996. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large portion of which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. A major accomplishment during this period was the completion of financial statement audits for Fiscal Year 1995. Annual financial statement audits are mandated by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990. Narratives of our most significant reports are grouped by measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its performance. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. During this reporting period, the Office of Inspector General issued 67 audit and 15 inspection reports. For reports issued during the period, the Office of Inspector General made audit recommendations that, when implemented by management, could result in $134.6 million being put to better use. Management committed to taking corrective actions which the Office of Inspector General estimates will result in a more efficient use of funds totaling $333.2 million. Office of Inspector General investigations led to 6 criminal convictions and 1 pretrial diversion, as well as criminal and civil prosecutions which resulted in fines and recoveries of $10,942,714. The Office of Inspector General also provided 33 investigative referrals to management for recommended positive action.

  6. Preparation of plant and system design description documents

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This standard prescribes the purpose, scope, organization, and content of plant design requirements (PDR) documents and system design descriptions (SDDs), to provide a unified approach to their preparation and use by a project as the principal means to establish the plant design requirements and to establish, describe, and control the individual system designs from conception and throughout the lifetime of the plant. The Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Requirements Document should be considered for LWR plants.

  7. Preparation of plant and system design description documents

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This standard prescribes the purpose, scope, organization, and content of plant design requirements (PDR) documents and system design descriptions (SDDs), to provide a unified approach to their preparation and use by a project as the principal means to establish the plant design requirements and to establish, describe, and control the individual system designs from conception and throughout the lifetime of the plant. The Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Requirements Document should be considered for LWR plants.

  8. Modality of semiannual to multidecadal oscillations in global sea surface temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ge; Shao, Baomin; Han, Yong; Ma, Jun; Chapron, Bertrand

    2010-03-01

    Repeating the history of study on El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the 1980s, interdecadal oscillation (IDO) in climate variability is currently an area of active research and debate, following the recognition of its emerging significance in nature and science. In this work, a two-dimensional propagating modal extraction technique is applied to a reconstructed global monthly sea surface temperature (SST) data set spanning 1854 through 2007, to examine the spatiotemporal structure of SST variability with an emphasis on the fine modal pattern of IDOs. In the time domain, it is revealed that a canonical modal spectrum of decadal-to-centennial SST variability constitutes four most distinct oscillations with periodicities at 9.0, 13.0, 21.2, and 62.2 years, which are naturally defined as primary modes and are, respectively, termed as the subdecadal mode, the quasidecadal mode, the interdecadal mode, and the multidecadal mode (modes S, Q, I, and M). They join the energetic annual mode (mode A) and two major ENSO modes at 3.7 and 5.8 years (modes B and C), as well as a dozen of secondary modes ranging from semiannual to multidecadal, in determining the key pattern of SST-related climate variability. In the space domain, seven modally dynamic areas, analogous to the Niño regions for ENSO, are clearly identified and are named as IDO zones. Contrary to ENSO, dominant IDO zones are most visible in the extratropical oceans, especially in the North Atlantic/North Pacific sectors, while secondary signatures are observed in the tropical oceans. The array of (four) primary modes with respect to (seven) major zones yields a sophisticated yet canonical pattern of IDOs, leading to a basic conclusion that multimodality (for a given region) and multiregionality (for a given mode) are fundamental features of the IDO system.

  9. The stratopause semiannual oscillation in the NCAR Community Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassi, Fabrizio; Garcia, Roland R.; Boville, Byron A.

    1993-01-01

    The middle atmospheric version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2) has been used to study the development of the equatorial semiannual oscillation (SAO) in the stratosphere. The model domain extends from the ground to about 80 km, with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Transport of nitrous oxide (N2O) with simplified photochemistry is included in the calculation to illustrate the influence of tropical circulations on the distribution of trace species. Diagnosis of model output reveals two distinct phases in the evolution of the zonal mean state on the equator. In early December, a strong and broad easterly jet appears near the stratopause in connection with a midlatitude wave event (sudden stratospheric warming) that reverses the winter westerlies of the Northern Hemisphere throughout the upper stratosphere. When the wave forcing dies out, the radiative drive allows the westerlies to recover at midlatitudes, while easterlies persist in the tropics. The resulting strong meridional gradient of the zonal mean wind provides favorable conditions for the development of inertial instability at lower latitudes. The meridional circulation associated with the instability shapes the 'nose' of the easterly jet, reducing the extension of the unstable region. In equinoctial conditions, a jet of westerlies appears in the lower equatorial mesosphere and descends to lower altitudes; positive accelerations associated with the descending westerlies are due primarily to Kelvin waves. The descent of the westerly jet does not reproduce well the observed behavior of the SAO westerly phase, either in amplitude or in the extent of downward propagation. As a consequence, the model does not simulate the 'double peak' observed in the tropical distribution of N2O. Comparison of wave amplitudes in the model with those derived from satellite observations shows that the calculated amplitudes are larger than observed in the upper stratosphere. It follows that inadequate Kelvin wave forcing is

  10. CFD Simulations of a Flow Mixing and Heat Transfer Enhancement in an Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    In, Wang-Kee; Chun, Tae-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Hwan; Oh, Dong-Seok

    2007-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to investigate a flow-mixing and heat-transfer enhancement caused by a mixing-vane spacer in a LWR fuel assembly which is a rod bundle. This paper presents the CFD simulations of a flow mixing and heat transfer in a fully heated 5x5 array of a rod bundle with a split-vane and hybrid-vane spacer. The CFD prediction at a low Reynolds number of 42,000 showed a reasonably good agreement of the initial heat transfer enhancement with the measured one for a partially heated experiment using a similar spacer structure. The CFD simulation also predicted the decay rate of a normalized Nusselt number downstream of the split-vane spacer which agrees fairly well with those of the experiment and the correlation. The CFD calculations for the split vane and hybrid vane at the LWR operating conditions(Re = 500,000) predicted hot fuel spots in a streaky structure downstream of the spacer, which occurs due to the secondary flow occurring in an opposite direction near the fuel rod. However, the split-vane and hybrid-vane spacers are predicted to significantly enhance the overall heat transfer of a LWR nuclear fuel assembly. (authors)

  11. Low leaching and low LWR photoresist development for 193 nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Nobuo; Lee, Youngjoon; Miyagawa, Takayuki; Edamatsu, Kunishige; Takemoto, Ichiki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tsuchida, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Keiko; Konishi, Shinji; Nakano, Katsushi; Tomoharu, Fujiwara

    2006-03-01

    receding contact angle become very important issue for not only defectivity but also scanner throughput. Some of our experimental results along this line of study are also included in the report. The last topic covered is LWR (Line Width Roughness) as an essential leverage for performance improvement, especially for the smaller CD that immersion lithography is aiming to define. Our recent effort to find effect and working concept to reduce LWR with low leaching materials is also described.

  12. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulations of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinbin; Ye, Bei; Mei, Zhigang; Hofman, Gerard; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2015-12-10

    Uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel has higher thermal conductivity and higher uranium density, making it a promising candidate for the accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs). However, previous studies on the fuel performance of U3Si2, including both experimental and computational approaches, have been focusing on the irradiation conditions in research reactors, which usually involve low operation temperatures and high fuel burnups. Thus, it is important to examine the fuel performance of U3Si2 at typical LWR conditions so as to evaluate the feasibility of replacing conventional uranium dioxide fuel with this silicide fuel material. As in-reactor irradiation experiments involve significant time and financial cost, it is appropriate to utilize modeling tools to estimate the behavior of U3Si2 in LWRs based on all those available research reactor experimental references and state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculation capabilities at the early development stage. Hence, in this report, a comprehensive investigation of the fission gas swelling behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is introduced. The modeling efforts mentioned in this report was based on the rate theory (RT) model of fission gas bubble evolution that has been successfully applied for a variety of fuel materials at devious reactor conditions. Both existing experimental data and DFT-calculated results were used for the optimization of the parameters adopted by the RT model. Meanwhile, the fuel-cladding interaction was captured by the coupling of the RT model with simplified mechanical correlations. Therefore, the swelling behavior of U3Si2 fuel and its consequent interaction with cladding in LWRs was predicted by the rate theory modeling, providing valuable information for the development of U3Si2 fuel as an accident

  13. BUGJEFF311.BOLIB (JEFF-3.1.1) and BUGENDF70.BOLIB (ENDF/B-VII.0) - Generation Methodology and Preliminary Testing of two ENEA-Bologna Group Cross Section Libraries for LWR Shielding and Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescarini, Massimo; Sinitsa, Valentin; Orsi, Roberto; Frisoni, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    Two broad-group coupled neutron/photon working cross section libraries in FIDO-ANISN format, dedicated to LWR shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry applications, were generated following the methodology recommended by the US ANSI/ANS-6.1.2-1999 (R2009) standard. These libraries, named BUGJEFF311.BOLIB and BUGENDF70.BOLIB, are respectively based on JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data and adopt the same broad-group energy structure (47 n + 20 γ) of the ORNL BUGLE-96 similar library. They were respectively obtained from the ENEA-Bologna VITJEFF311.BOLIB and VITENDF70.BOLIB libraries in AMPX format for nuclear fission applications through problem-dependent cross section collapsing with the ENEA-Bologna 2007 revision of the ORNL SCAMPI nuclear data processing system. Both previous libraries are based on the Bondarenko self-shielding factor method and have the same AMPX format and fine-group energy structure (199 n + 42 γ) as the ORNL VITAMIN-B6 similar library from which BUGLE-96 was obtained at ORNL. A synthesis of a preliminary validation of the cited BUGLE-type libraries, performed through 3D fixed source transport calculations with the ORNL TORT-3.2 SN code, is included. The calculations were dedicated to the PCA-Replica 12/13 and VENUS-3 engineering neutron shielding benchmark experiments, specifically conceived to test the accuracy of nuclear data and transport codes in LWR shielding and radiation damage analyses.

  14. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from October 1, 1996, through March 31, 1997. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its performance. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. Five such performance measures were used during this semiannual period to present outcomes of Office of Inspector General work in terms of improvements in Department programs and operations.

  15. Unified agenda of federal regulatory and deregulatory actions--HHS. Semiannual regulatory agenda.

    PubMed

    1998-11-01

    The President's Executive Order 12866 and the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 require the semiannual publication of an agenda which summarizes all current, projected, and recently completed rulemakings of the Department. The agenda informs the public about regulatory actions that are under development within the components of the Department, and it provides all concerned with the opportunity to participate in this work at an early stage. The last such agenda was published on April 27, 1998.

  16. National Institute for Global Environmental Change. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Werth, G.C.

    1992-04-01

    This document is the Semi-Annual Report of the National Institute for Global Environmental Change for the reporting period July 1 to December 31, 1991. The report is in two parts. Part I presents the mission of the Institute, examples of progress toward that mission, a brief description of the revised management plan, and the financial report. Part II presents the statements of the Regional Center Directors along with progress reports of the projects written by the researchers themselves.

  17. Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1998-10-16

    This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle.

  18. Burnup calculations and chemical analysis of irradiated fuel samples studied in LWR-PROTEUS phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, P.; Guenther-Leopold, I.; Berger, H. D.

    2006-07-01

    The isotopic compositions of 5 UO{sub 2} samples irradiated in a Swiss PWR power plant, which were investigated in the LWR-PROTEUS Phase II programme, were calculated using the CASMO-4 and BOXER assembly codes. The burnups of the samples range from 50 to 90 MWd/kg. The results for a large number of actinide and fission product nuclides were compared to those of chemical analyses performed using a combination of chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry. A good agreement of calculated and measured concentrations is found for many of the nuclides investigated with both codes. The concentrations of the Pu isotopes are mostly predicted within {+-}10%, the two codes giving quite different results, except for {sup 242}Pu. Relatively significant deviations are found for some isotopes of Cs and Sm, and large discrepancies are observed for Eu and Gd. The overall quality of the predictions by the two codes is comparable, and the deviations from the experimental data do not generally increase with burnup. (authors)

  19. Fission product release and survivability of UN-kernel LWR TRISO fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besmann, T. M.; Ferber, M. K.; Lin, H.-T.; Collin, B. P.

    2014-05-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from fission product recoil calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 μm diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated within a TRISO particle undergoing burnup. Creep and swelling of the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by computing the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers from internal pressure and thermomechanics of the layers. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.

  20. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    DOE PAGES

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y. -J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, III, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-06-29

    In this study, the corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted inmore » the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.« less

  1. Feasibility study of a plant for LWR used fuel reprocessing by pyrochemical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bychkov, A.V.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.; Savotchkin, Yu.P.; Sokolovsky, Yu.S.; Baganz, Catherine; Lopoukhine, Serge; Maurin, Guy; Medzadourian, Michel

    2007-07-01

    In 2005, experts from AREVA and RIAR performed a joint research work on the feasibility study of a plant reprocessing 1000 t/y of LWR spent nuclear fuel by the gas-fluoride and pyro-electrochemical techniques developed at RIAR. This work was based on the RIAR experience in development of pyrochemical processes and AREVA experience in designing UNF reprocessing plants. UNF reprocessing pyrochemical processes have been developed at RIAR at laboratory scale and technology for granulated MOX fuel fabrication and manufacturing of vibro-packed fuel rods is developed at pilot scale. The research work resulted in a preliminary feasibility assessment of the reprocessing plant according to the norms and standards applied in France. The study results interpretation must integrate the fact that the different technology steps are at very different stage of development. It appears clearly however that in its present state of development, pyro-electrochemical technology is not adapted to the treatment of an important material flow issuing from thermal reactors. There is probably an economic optimum to be studied for the choice of hydrometallurgical or pyro-electrochemical technology, depending on the area of application. This work is an example of successful and fruitful collaboration between French and Russian specialists. (authors)

  2. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y.-J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. The maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ∼2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ∼300-500 μm thick cladding.

  3. Analysis of fission gas release in LWR fuel using the BISON code

    SciTech Connect

    G. Pastore; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; R.L. Williamson

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in the development of the finite-element based, multidimensional fuel performance code BISON of Idaho National Laboratory are presented. Specifically, the development, implementation and testing of a new model for the analysis of fission gas behavior in LWR-UO2 fuel during irradiation are summarized. While retaining a physics-based description of the relevant mechanisms, the model is characterized by a level of complexity suitable for application to engineering-scale nuclear fuel analysis and consistent with the uncertainties pertaining to some parameters. The treatment includes the fundamental features of fission gas behavior, among which are gas diffusion and precipitation in fuel grains, growth and coalescence of gas bubbles at grain faces, grain growth and grain boundary sweeping effects, thermal, athermal, and transient gas release. The BISON code incorporating the new model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments database, also included in the IAEA coordinated research projects FUMEX-II and FUMEX-III. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data at moderate burn-up is presented, pointing out an encouraging predictive accuracy, without any fitting applied to the model parameters.

  4. Review and Prioritization of Technical Issues Related to Burnup Credit for LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C V; DeHart, M D; Wagner, John C

    2000-03-13

    This report has been prepared to review relevant background information and provide technical discussion that will help initiate a PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables) process for use of burnup credit in light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel storage and transport cask applications. The PIRT process will be used by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to help prioritize and guide a coordinated program of research and as a means to obtain input/feedback from industry and other interested parties. The review and discussion in this report are based on knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries. Current regulatory practice and perceived industry needs are also reviewed as a background for prioritizing technical needs that will facilitate safe practice in the use of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation is given. Finally, phenomena that need to be better understood for effective licensing, together with technical issues that require resolution, are presented and discussed in the form of a prioritization ranking and initial draft program plan.

  5. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  6. Fission product release and survivability of UN-kernel LWR TRISO fuel

    SciTech Connect

    T. M. Besmann; M. K. Ferber; H.-T. Lin; B. P. Collin

    2014-05-01

    A thermomechanical assessment of the LWR application of TRISO fuel with UN kernels was performed. Fission product release under operational and transient temperature conditions was determined by extrapolation from fission product recoil calculations and limited data from irradiated UN pellets. Both fission recoil and diffusive release were considered and internal particle pressures computed for both 650 and 800 um diameter kernels as a function of buffer layer thickness. These pressures were used in conjunction with a finite element program to compute the radial and tangential stresses generated within a TRISO particle undergoing burnup. Creep and swelling of the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon layers were included in the analyses. A measure of reliability of the TRISO particle was obtained by computing the probability of survival of the SiC barrier layer and the maximum tensile stress generated in the pyrolytic carbon layers from internal pressure and thermomechanics of the layers. These reliability estimates were obtained as functions of the kernel diameter, buffer layer thickness, and pyrolytic carbon layer thickness. The value of the probability of survival at the end of irradiation was inversely proportional to the maximum pressure.

  7. Origins of the semiannual variation of geomagnetic activity in 1954 and 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E.; Svalgaard, L.; Ling, A.

    2004-01-01

    . We investigate the cause of the unusually strong semiannual variation of geomagnetic activity observed in the solar minimum years of 1954 and 1996. For 1996 we separate the contributions of the three classical modulation mechanisms (axial, equinoctial, and Russell-McPherron) to the six-month wave in the index and find that all three contribute about equally. This is in contrast to the longer run of geomagnetic activity (1868-1998) over which the equinoctial effect accounts for 70% of the semiannual variation. For both 1954 and 1996, we show that the Russell-McPherron effect was enhanced by the Rosenberg-Coleman effect (an axial polarity effect) which increased the amount of the negative (toward Sun) [positive (away from Sun)] polarity field observed during the first [second] half of the year; such fields yield a southward component in GSM coordinates. Because this favourable condition occurs only for alternate solar cycles, the marked semiannual variation in 1954 and 1996 is a manifestation of the 22-year cycle of geomagnetic activity. The 11-year evolution of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) also contributes to the strong six-month wave during these years. At solar minimum, the streamer belt at the base of the HCS is located near the solar equator, permitting easier access to high speed streams from polar coronal holes when the Earth is at its highest heliographic latitudes in March and September. Such an axial variation in solar wind speed was observed for 1996 and is inferred for 1954.

  8. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Volume 14, Semiannual report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Good, M.S.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V.

    1992-07-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWR`s); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1991 through September 1991.

  9. Analysis of the Reuse of Uranium Recovered from the Reprocessing of Commercial LWR Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    DelCul, Guillermo Daniel; Trowbridge, Lee D; Renier, John-Paul; Ellis, Ronald James; Williams, Kent Alan; Spencer, Barry B; Collins, Emory D

    2009-02-01

    This report provides an analysis of the factors involved in the reuse of uranium recovered from commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels (1) by reenrichment and recycling as fuel to LWRs and/or (2) by recycling directly as fuel to heavy-water-reactors (HWRs), such as the CANDU (registered trade name for the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor). Reuse is an attractive alternative to the current Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) baseline plan, which stores the reprocessed uranium (RU) for an uncertain future or attempts to dispose of it as 'greater-than-Class C' waste. Considering that the open fuel cycle currently deployed in the United States already creates a huge excess quantity of depleted uranium, the closed fuel cycle should enable the recycle of the major components of spent fuel, such as the uranium and the hazardous, long-lived transuranic (TRU) actinides, as well as the managed disposal of fission product wastes. Compared with the GNEP baseline scenario, the reuse of RU in the uranium fuel cycle has a number of potential advantages: (1) avoidance of purchase costs of 11-20% of the natural uranium feed; (2) avoidance of disposal costs for a large majority of the volume of spent fuel that is reprocessed; (3) avoidance of disposal costs for a portion of the depleted uranium from the enrichment step; (4) depending on the {sup 235}U assay of the RU, possible avoidance of separative work costs; and (5) a significant increase in the production of {sup 238}Pu due to the presence of {sup 236}U, which benefits somewhat the transmutation value of the plutonium and also provides some proliferation resistance.

  10. Stability of SiC-Matrix Microencapsulated Fuel Constituents at Relevant LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Katoh, Yutai; Leonard, Keith J; Perez-Bergquist, Alex G; Silva, Chinthaka M; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses certain key feasibility issues facing the application of SiC-matrix microencapsulated fuels for light water reactor application. Issues addressed are the irradiation stability of the SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix under LWR-relevant irradiation conditions, the presence or extent of reaction of the SiC matrix with zirconium-based cladding, the stability of the inner and outer pyrolytic graphite layers of the microencapsulated (TRISO) particle at this uncharacteristically low irradiation temperature, and the state of the particle-matrix interface following irradiation which could possibly effect thermal transport. In the process of determining these feasibility issues microstructural evolution and change in dimension and thermal conductivity was studied. As a general finding the SiC matrix was found to be quite stable with behavior similar to that of CVD SiC. In magnitude the irradiation-induced swelling of the matrix material was slightly higher and irradiation-degraded thermal conductivity was slightly lower as compared to CVD SiC. No significant reaction of this SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix material with Zircaloy was observed. Irradiation of the TRISO in the 320-360 C range to a maximum dose of 7.7 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) did not have significant negative impact on the constituent layers of the TRISO fuel. At the highest dose studied layer structure and interface integrity remained essentially unchanged with good apparent thermal transport through the microsphere to the surrounding matrix.

  11. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K. )

    1991-06-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels in LWR (light water reactor) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1990-10-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting fracture toughness J-R curves and impact strength of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The saturation'' fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum fracture toughness that would ever be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the degree of embrittlement at saturation. Degree of embrittlement is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. The variation of the impact energy at saturation for different materials is described in terms of a material parameter {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition and ferrite morphology. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of embrittlement, which is determined from the chemical composition. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are described. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined. 15 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Estimation of mechanical properties of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-10-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy- impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common ``lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  14. Randomized equivalence trial of intensive and semiannual applications of fluoride varnish in the primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, P; Spiekerman, C; Milgrom, P

    2009-01-01

    For children in the primary dentition with high caries prevalence the standard semiannual application of fluoride varnish may not be successful in preventing tooth decay. Oftentimes this population is mobile and does not receive consistent preventive care. This trial tested whether an intensive fluoride 5% sodium varnish regimen (three applications/2 weeks) applied annually has an equivalent effect on caries progression in the primary dentition compared to single applications applied semiannually. This study was a randomized clinical trial with two treatment groups. All participants (n = 600; mean age +/- SD = 55.3 +/- 4.6 months) received three varnish applications (active varnish or placebo) at semiannual visits over 3 years. Once per year the intensive-treatment group received one set of three active treatments and three placebo treatments 6 months later, each time within 2 weeks. The standard group received one active and two placebo treatments every 6 months. Children were assessed clinically at baseline and 12, 24 and 36 months after the initiation of the study. The mean (SD) numbers of newly decayed primary tooth surfaces observed over 3 years were 9.8 (8.6) and 7.4 (7.7) in the intensive and standard groups, respectively. The adjusted rate ratio was 1.13 (95% CI = 0.94-1.37, p = 0.20). In conclusion, the trial failed to demonstrate clear evidence of a difference in efficacy. However, differences of up to 36% greater rates of caries in the intensive group could not be ruled out, thus equivalence of the treatments cannot be concluded.

  15. Randomized Equivalence Trial of Intensive and Semiannual Applications of Fluoride Varnish in the Primary Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, P.; Spiekerman, C.; Milgrom, P.

    2009-01-01

    For children in the primary dentition with high caries prevalence the standard semiannual application of fluoride varnish may not be successful in preventing tooth decay. Oftentimes this population is mobile and does not receive consistent preventive care. This trial tested whether an intensive fluoride 5% sodium varnish regimen (three applications/2 weeks) applied annually has an equivalent effect on caries progression in the primary dentition compared to single applications applied semiannually. This study was a randomized clinical trial with two treatment groups. All participants (n = 600; mean age ± SD = 55.3 ± 4.6 months) received three varnish applications (active varnish or placebo) at semiannual visits over 3 years. Once per year the intensive-treatment group received one set of three active treatments and three placebo treatments 6 months later, each time within 2 weeks. The standard group received one active and two placebo treatments every 6 months. Children were assessed clinically at baseline and 12, 24 and 36 months after the initiation of the study. The mean (SD) numbers of newly decayed primary tooth surfaces observed over 3 years were 9.8 (8.6) and 7.4 (7.7) in the intensive and standard groups, respectively. The adjusted rate ratio was 1.13 (95% CI = 0.94–1.37, p = 0.20). In conclusion, the trial failed to demonstrate clear evidence of a difference in efficacy. However, differences of up to 36% greater rates of caries in the intensive group could not be ruled out, thus equivalence of the treatments cannot be concluded. PMID:20016179

  16. A fracture mechanics approach for estimating fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H. B.; Chopra, O. K.

    2000-04-10

    A fracture mechanics approach for elastic-plastic materials has been used to evaluate the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels. The fatigue life of such steel, defined as the number of cycles required to form an engineering-size crack, i.e., 3-mm deep, is considered to be composed of the growth of (a) microstructurally small cracks and (b) mechanically small cracks. The growth of the latter was characterized in terms of {Delta}J and crack growth rate (da/dN) data in air and LWR environments; in water, the growth rates from long crack tests had to be decreased to match the rates from fatigue S-N data. The growth of microstructurally small cracks was expressed by a modified Hobson relationship in air and by a slip dissolution/oxidation model in water. The crack length for transition from a microstructurally small crack to a mechanically small crack was based on studies on small crack growth. The estimated fatigue S-N curves show good agreement with the experimental data for these steels in air and water environments. At low strain amplitudes, the predicted lives in water can be significantly lower than the experimental values.

  17. TFE Verification Program: Semiannual report for the period ending April 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. 55 figs., 30 tabs.

  18. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    1998-09-01

    This is the twenty-fourth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

  20. TFE verification program: Semiannual report for the period ending April 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a Thermionic Fuel Element suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. 14 refs., 107 figs., 35 tabs.

  1. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1987-09-01

    This is the second in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities in the following areas: (1) Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; (2) Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and (3) Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. Separate analytics were prepared for the reports in this volume.

  2. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for the Period Ending June 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1999-09-01

    This is the twenty-sixth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and its reported separately.

  3. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliff, A.F.; Burn, G.

    1999-04-01

    This is the twenty-fifth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately.

  4. Use of phenomena identification and ranking (PIRT) process in research related to design certification of the AP600 advanced passive light water reactor (LWR)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D.; Eltawila, F.

    1996-07-01

    The AP600 LWR is a new advanced passive design that has been submitted to the USNRC for design certification. Within the certification process the USNRC will perform selected system thermal hydraulic response audit studies to help confirm parts of the vendor`s safety analysis submittal. Because of certain innovative design features of the safety systems, new experimental data and related advances in the system thermal hydraulic analysis computer code are being developed by the USNRC. The PIRT process is being used to focus the experimental and analytical work to obtain a sufficient and cost effective research effort. The objective of this paper is to describe the application and most significant results of the PIRT process, including several innovative features needed in the application to accommodate the short design certification schedule. The short design certification schedule has required that many aspects of the USNRC experimental and analytical research be performed in parallel, rather than in series as was normal for currently operating LWRS. This has required development and use of management techniques that focus and integrate the various diverse parts of the research. The original PIRTs were based on inexact knowledge of an evolving reactor design, and concentrated on the new passive features of the design. Subsequently, the PIRTs have evolved in two more stages as the design became more firm and experimental and analytical data became available. A fourth and final stage is planned and in progress to complete the PIRT development. The PIRTs existing at the end of each development stage have been used to guide the experimental program, scaling analyses and code development supporting the audit studies.

  5. 78 FR 31558 - Medicare Program; Second Semi-Annual Meeting of the Advisory Panel on Hospital Outpatient Payment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... the Advisory Panel on Hospital Outpatient Payment (HOP Panel) August 26-27, 2013 AGENCY: Centers for...: This notice announces the second semi-annual meeting of the Advisory Panel on Hospital Outpatient... Classification (APC) groups and their associated weights, and hospital outpatient therapeutic...

  6. 78 FR 13346 - Medicare Program; Changes to the Semi-Annual Meeting of the Advisory Panel on Hospital Outpatient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... Federal Register (77 FR 70447) announcing the first semi-annual meeting of the Advisory Panel on Hospital... Meeting of the Advisory Panel on Hospital Outpatient Payment (HOP Panel)--March 11 and March 12, 2013... Panel on Hospital Outpatient Payment (HOP Panel)--March 11 and 12, 2013.'' DATES: Monday, March 11,...

  7. 78 FR 59047 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-Annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-Annual Labor Standards...: Colette Pollard, Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451...

  8. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress, April 1, 1997-September 30, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    This semiannual report to Congress summarizes the activities of the Department of Education's Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the 6-month period ending September 30, 1997. The OIG gave Congressional testimony regarding the modernization of student-financial-assistance-information programs, the Loan Consolidation process, the Federal Direct…

  9. 78 FR 45260 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report- Local Contracting Agencies (HUD Programs) AGENCY: Office of Labor Relation, HUD. ACTION..., Office of labor Relation, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Room...

  10. Data Summary Report for the 1998 Semiannual Tritium Surveys for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J.

    1999-01-26

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the 1998 semiannual tritium surveys for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The project was performed under the direction of WSRC EAS/Ecology. This report was prepared under the direction of EPD/EMS.

  11. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to Employers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to Employers B Appendix B to Part 40 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. B Appendix B to Part 40—DOT Drug...

  12. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to DOT

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to DOT Mail, fax, or e-mail to: U.S. Department of Transportation, Office.... Fax: (202) 366-3897. E-mail: ODAPCWebMail@dot.gov. The following items are required on each report...-AM (number) (d) Phencyclidine (number) (e) Amphetamines (number) (1) Amphetamine (number)...

  13. Prospects for Improving Document Delivery. Minutes of the Semiannual Meeting (101st, Arlington, Virginia, October 13-14, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    This set of minutes from a semiannual meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) includes three presentations: "The Economics of Document Delivery" by Donald B. Simpson, "Electronic Journal Publishing and Libraries" by Jay K. Lucker, and "Policies and Controversies" by Hugh C. Atkinson. Atkinson reviews copyright issues,…

  14. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Volume 2, Appendices. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1994--March 27, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Bartley, D.A.; Hatcher, P.

    1996-10-15

    This semiannual progress report contains the following appendices: description of the 1,000 lb steam/h watertube research boiler; the Pennsylvania CGE model; Phase II, subtask 3.9 coal market analysis; the CGE model; and sector definition.

  15. Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 2E, Physical descriptions of LWR nonfuel assembly hardware, Appendix 2F, User's guide to the LWR nonfuel assembly data base

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-01

    This appendix includes a two to three page Physical Description report for each Non-fuel Assembly (NFA) Hardware item identified from the current data. Information was obtained via subcontracts with these NFA hardware vendors: Babcock and Wildox, Combustion Engineering and Westinghouse. Data for some NFA hardware are not available. For such hardware, the information shown in this report was obtained from the open literature. Efforts to obtain additional information are continuing. NFA hardware can be grouped into six categories: BWR Channels, Control Elements, Guide Tube Plugs/Orifice Rods, Instrumentation, Neutron Poisons, and Neutron Sources. This appendix lists Physical Description reports alphabetically by vendor within each category. Individual Physical Description reports can be generated interactively through the menu-driven LWR Non-Fuel Assembly Hardware Data Base system. These reports can be viewed on the screen, directed to a printer, or saved in a text file for later use. Special reports and compilations of specific data items can be produced on request.

  16. Radiation Damage Assessment in the Reactor Pressure Vessel of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaspoehler, Timothy; Petrovic, Bojan

    2016-02-01

    One of the major limiting factors to nuclear reactors lifetime is the radiation-induced material damage in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). While older reactors were designed assuming a 40-year operating lifetime, new reactor designs are expected to have lifetimes up to 100 years. For safe operation, the integrity of the RPV must be ensured against significant material property changes. In this work, typical neutron damage indicators are calculated in the RPV of the I2S-LWR (Integral Inherently Safe LWR) Power Plant, including DPA (displacements per atom) and fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV and >0.1MeV). I2S-LWR is a PWR of integral design, which means that its wider downcomer provides additional shielding to the vessel. However, its higher core power density and longer lifetime may offset this advantage. In order to accurately represent the neutron environment for RPV damage assessment, a detailed model based on the preliminary design specifications of the I2S-LWR was developed to be used in the MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations) sequence of the Scale6.1 code package. MAVRIC uses the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling) methodology to bias a fixed-source MC (Monte Carlo) simulation. To establish the upper limit of a bounding envelope, a flat-source distribution was used. For the low limit, a center-peaked source was generated using the KENO-VI criticality sequence assuming uniform fresh fuel core. Results based on the preliminary I2S-LWR model show that DPA rates and fast fluence rates are conservatively 75% lower than in typical PWRs being operated currently in the US.

  17. Proceedings of the First Semiannual Distributed Receiver Program Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Point focus and line focus distributed receiver solar thermal technology for the production of electric power and of industrial process heat is addressed. Concentrator, receiver, and power conversion development are covered along with hardware tests and evaluation. Mass production costing, parabolic dish applications, and trough and bowl systems are included.

  18. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, April 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from April 1 through September 30, 1995. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large portion of which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by six primary performance measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its attainment of the outcomes established in the Office of Inspector General Strategic Plan. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. The six performance measures present outcomes of Office of Inspector General work in terms of improvements in Department programs and operations.

  19. Synodic and semiannual oscillations of argon-40 in the lunar exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, R. Richard; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The neutral mass spectrometer on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft collected a trove of exospheric data, including a set of high-quality measurements of radiogenic 40Ar over a period of 142 days. Data synthesis studies, using well-established exosphere simulation tools, show that the LADEE argon data are consistent with an exosphere-regolith interaction that is dominated by adsorption and that the desorption process generates the Armand distribution of exit velocities. The synthesis work has uncovered an apparent semiannual oscillation of argon that is consistent with temporal sequestration in the seasonal cold traps created at the poles by the obliquity of the Moon. In addition, the LADEE data provide new insight into the pristine nature of lunar regolith, its spatially varying sorption properties, and the influence of sorption processes on the synodic oscillation of the argon exosphere.

  20. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s ninth Semiannual Report to Congress to be submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1 through September 30, 1993, the Department took final action on four contract and financial assistance audit reports. At the end of the period only three reports awaited final action. With regard to operational, financial, and preaward audits, final action was taken on 41 reports, resulting in 93 audit reports needing final action at the end of the period.

  1. Fusion reactor materials. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee`, S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  2. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlaw, P.D.; Minick, S.K.

    1998-07-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 48th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVIII) that were received on or before June 1, 1998.

  3. TFE Verification Program: Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized, but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern.

  4. TFE Verification Program: Semiannual report for the period ending October 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized, but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. 65 figs., 36 tabs.

  5. NNWSI waste from testing at Argonne National Laboratory. Semiannual report, July-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.

    1986-03-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. As part of the waste package development portion of this project, experiments are being performed by the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory to study the behavior of the waste forms under anticipated repository conditions. These experiments include (1) the development and performance of a test to measure waste form behavior in unsaturated conditions and (2) the performance of tests designed to study the behavior of waste package components in an irradiated environment. Previous reports document developments in these areas through 1984. This report summarizes progress in 1985. Reports will be issued semi-annually hereafter.

  6. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1997--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This Office of Inspector General (OIG) Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from October 1, 1997, through March 31, 1998. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period that facilitated Department of Energy (Department) efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. This report highlights OIG accomplishments in support of its Strategic Plan. Narratives of the Office`s most significant reports are grouped by the strategic goals against which the OIG measures its performance. To put the OIG accomplishments for this reporting period in context, the following statistical information is provided: audit and inspection reports issued -- 47; recommendations that funds be put to better use -- $356,257,856; management commitment to taking corrective actions -- $289,106,445; criminal indictments/convictions -- 8; fines and recoveries -- $1,612,932; and investigative reports to management recommending positive change -- 21.

  7. NRC regulatory agenda: Semiannual report, January--June 1997. Volume 16, Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a semiannual compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition. The agenda consists of two sections that have been updated through June 30, 1997. Section 1, ``Rules,`` includes (A) rules on which final action has been taken since December 31, 1996, the closing date of the last NRC Regulatory Agenda; (B) rules published previously as proposed rules on which the Commission has not taken final action; (C) rules published as advance notices of proposed rulemaking for which neither a proposed nor final rule has been issued; and (D) unpublished rules on which the NRC expects to take action. Section 2, ``Petitions for Rulemaking,`` includes (A) petitions denied or incorporated into final rules since December 31, 1996; (B) petitions incorporated into proposed rules; and (C) petitions pending staff review.

  8. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

  9. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Second semiannual status report, July 1988--March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee`s activities to date have focused primarily on the ``technology transfer`` aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

  10. Physics Division semiannual report, July 1-December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Trela, W.J.

    1983-09-01

    The Physics Division is organized into three major research areas: Fusion Physics, Weapons Physics, and Basic Research. In Fusion Physics, the KrF laser project reached two important milestones: successful testing of a 1-m/sup 2/ electron diode for KrF gas excitation and completion of a combined aperture demonstration showing the feasibility of accurate alignment of spherical mirrors. In the CO/sub 2/ program, the 5-kJ Helios lasers were used to evaluate many physics issues concerning the use of 10-..mu..m light for inertial fusion and the 30- to 40-kJ Antares laser construction projects is on schedule for completion in October 1983. In Weapons Physics, significant progress was made on developing continuous time-dependent imaging systems using tomographic techniques with 400-ps shuttering capability, fiber-optic Cerenkov detector systems for fast fusion measurements, and iron-doped indium-phosphide detectors with 70-ps impulse response. A proposal to build x-ray beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source was approved and we expect funding in 1984. In Basic Physics Research, we have begun new initiatives to study biomagnetism in collaboration with the Life Sciences Division and to develop a neutrino physics program. During this period numerous significant experiments were completed in our nuclear physics, condensed matter physics, and thermal physics programs.

  11. ICASE semiannual report, April 1 - September 30, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Institute conducts unclassified basic research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science in order to extend and improve problem-solving capabilities in science and engineering, particularly in aeronautics and space. The major categories of the current Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers. ICASE reports are considered to be primarily preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to appropriate research journals or that are to appear in conference proceedings.

  12. Fossil Energy Program semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers progress made during the period October 1, 1990, through March 31, 1991, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Petroleum Reserves, the DOE Fossil Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, and the US Agency for International Development. The Fossil, Energy Program organization chart is shown in the appendix. Topics include: alloys, ceramics and composite research and development; corrosion and erosion research; environmental analysis and information systems; coal conversion development; mild gasification product characterization; coal combustion research; strategic petroleum reserve planning and modeling; and coal structure and chemistry.

  13. Heat powered refrigeration compressor. Semi-annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Goad, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop and improve the design of previously started prototypes of the Heat Powered Refrigeration Compressor. To build this prototype and ready it for testing by the University of Evansville is another goal. This prototype will be of similar capacity as the compressor that will eventually be commercially produced. This unit can operate on almost any moderate temperature water heat source. This heat source could include such applications as industrial waste heat, solar, wood burning stove, resistance electrical heat produced by a windmill, or even perhaps heat put out by the condenser of another refrigeration system. Work performed in the past four months has consisted of: engineering of HX-1; comparisons of specifications from different companies to ensure state of the art applications of parts for project; coordinating project requirements with machine shop; designing condenser; and partial assembly of HX-1.

  14. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  15. Environmental restoration/waste management-applied technology semiannual report, January--June 1992. Volume 1, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Kline-Simon, K.

    1992-12-31

    This is the first issue from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Semiannual Report, a continuation of the Advanced Processing Technology (APT) Semiannual Report. The name change reflects the consolidation of the APT Program with the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program to form the Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Program. The Livermore site mirrors, on a small scale, many of the environmental and waste management problems of the DOE Complex. The six articles in this issue cover incineration- alternative technologies, process development for waste minimization, the proposed Mixed Waste Management Facility, dynamic underground stripping, electrical resistance tomography, and Raman spectroscopy for remote characterization of underground tanks.

  16. Annual and semi-annual variability of cloud covering in Abastumani and their coupling with cosmic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todua, M.; Didebulidze, G. G.

    2016-09-01

    Investigation of the influence of cosmic factors on the Earths's atmosphere is an important issue of the atmospheric and solar-terrestrial coupling studies. Contribution of cosmic factors to the climate change, included in the solar-terrestrial coupling models, is a matter of increasing interest. We studied long-term inter-annual variations of cloud covering in Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory (N41°45'; E42°49') during day- and night-time, at various helio-geophysical conditions, as well as coupling with cosmic factors. We found that these distributions are different: for cloudless days they reveal semi-annual periodicity, while for cloudless nights both annual and semi-annual ones are observed, depending also on geomagnetic activity. This may be a manifestation of possible influence of cosmic factors on cloud covering.

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, July 1998-December 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Kassner, T. F.; Ruther, W. E.; Shack, W. J.; Smith, J. L.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain; R. V.

    1999-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from July 1998 to December 1998. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of primary pressure boundary materials, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests have been conducted to determine the crack initiation and crack growth characteristics of austenitic SSs in LWR environments. Procedures are presented for incorporating the effects of reactor coolant environments on the fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping steels. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and posttest fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) in helium at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results have been used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Fracture toughness J-R curve tests were also conducted on two heats of Type 304 SS that were irradiated to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} in the Halden reactor. Crack-growth-rate tests have been conducted on compact-tension specimens of Alloys 600 and 690 under constant load to evaluate the resistance of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking in LWR environments.

  18. Analysis of Satellite sea surface temperature time series in the Brazil-Malvinas Current confluence region: Dominance of the annual and semiannual periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Christine; Garcia, Omar; GarçOn, VéRonique

    1992-11-01

    We study the dominant periodic variations of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence region from a satellite-derived data set compiled by Olson et al. (1988). This data set is composed of 202 sea surface temperature images with a 4 × 4 km resolution and extends over 3 years (from July 1984 to July 1987). Each image is a 5-day composite. The dominant signal, as already observed by Podesta et al. (1991), has a 1-year period. We first fit a single-frequency sinusoidal model of the annual cycle in order to estimate mean temperature, amplitude, and phase at 159 points uniformly distributed over the region. The residuals are generally small (less than 2°C). The largest departures from this cycle are located either in the Brazil-Malvinas frontal region or in the southeastern part of the region. Other periods in SST variations are identified by means of periodograms of the 159 residual time series in which the annual cycle has been substracted. The periodograms show that a semiannual frequency signal is present at almost every location. The ratio of the semiannual amplitude to the annual amplitude increases southward from 0% at 30°S to reach up to 45% at 50°S. In the south the semiannual signal creates an asymmetry, and the resulting (total) annual cycle has a cold period (winter) longer than the warm one (summer). In the frontal region the annual and semiannual signals have an important interannual variation. This semiannual frequency is associated with the semiannual wave present in the atmospheric forcing of the southern hemisphere. Differential heating over the mid-latitude oceans and the high-latitude ice-covered Antarctic Continent has been suggested as the cause of this semiannual wave (Van Loon, 1967).

  19. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1990--March 1991. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transpose of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  20. Nuclear technology programs. Semiannual progress report, April--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April through September 1991. These programs involve R & D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  1. Nuclear technology programs; Semiannual progress report, October 1989--March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  2. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1988--March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1990-12-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1988--March 1989. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories. 127 refs., 76 figs., 103 tabs.

  3. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

  4. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  5. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Fifth semi-annual status report, April 1990--September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  6. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  7. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-07-01

    The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies Pathway conducts targeted research and development (R&D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. This work involves two major goals: (1) to ensure that legacy analog II&C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and (2) to implement digital II&C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the nuclear power plant operating model. Resolving long-term operational concerns with the II&C systems contributes to the long-term sustainability of the LWR fleet, which is vital to the nation's energy and environmental security.

  8. Semiannual report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period 1 Oct. 1994 - 31 Mar. 1995.

  9. Investigation of nuclide importance to functional requirements related to transport and long-term storage of LWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.; DeHart, M.D.; Ryman, J.C.; Tang, J.S.; Parks, C.V.

    1995-06-01

    This study investigates the relative importances of the various actinide, fission-product, and light-element isotopes associated with LWR spent fuel with respect to five analysis areas: criticality safety (absorption fractions), shielding (dose rate fractions), curies (fractional curies levels), decay heat (fraction of total watts), and radiological toxicity (fraction of potential committed effective dose equivalent). These rankings are presented for up to six different burnup/enrichment scenarios and at decay times from 2 to 100,000 years. Ranking plots for each of these analysis areas are given in an Appendix for completeness, as well as summary tables in the main body of the report. Summary rankings are presented in terms of high (greater than 10% contribution to the total), medium (between 1% and 10% contribution), and low (less than 1% contribution) for both short- and long-term cooling. When compared with the expected measurement accuracies, these rankings show that most of the important isotopes can be characterized sufficiently for the purpose of radionuclide generation/depletion code validation in each of the analysis areas. Because the main focus of this work is on the relative importances of isotopes associated with L@ spent fuel, some conclusions may not be applicable to similar areas such as high-level waste (HLW) and nonfuel-bearing components (NFBC).

  10. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Qian, S.; Littrell, K.; Parish, C. M.; Plummer, L. K.

    2015-05-01

    A nondestructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless-steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentrations were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall thickness. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount (≈20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor can be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for determining absolute hydrogen concentrations.

  11. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO/sub 2/ oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs.

  12. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Qian, S.; Littrell, K.; Parish, C. M.; Plummer, L. K.

    2015-02-13

    A non-destructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentration were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount ( 20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor will be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for absolute hydrogen concentration determination.

  13. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Y.; Qian, S.; Littrell, K.; Parish, C. M.; Plummer, L. K.

    2015-02-13

    A non-destructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentration were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distributionmore » of circumferential hydrides across the wall. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount ( 20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor will be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for absolute hydrogen concentration determination.« less

  14. Issues for Conceptual Design of AFCF and CFTC LWR Spent Fuel Separations Influencing Next-Generation Aqueous Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hebditch; R. Henry; M. Goff; K. Pasamehmetoglu; D. Ostby

    2007-09-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) strategic plan, which aims to meet US and international energy, safeguards, fuel supply and environmental needs by harnessing national laboratory R&D, deployment by industry and use of international partnerships. Initially, two industry-led commercial scale facilities, an advanced burner reactor (ABR) and a consolidated fuel treatment center (CFTC), and one developmental facility, an advanced fuel cycle facility (AFCF) are proposed. The national laboratories will lead the AFCF to provide an internationally recognized R&D center of excellence for developing transmutation fuels and targets and advancing fuel cycle reprocessing technology using aqueous and pyrochemical methods. The design drivers for AFCF and the CFTC LWR spent fuel separations are expected to impact on and partly reflect those for industry, which is engaging with DOE in studies for CFTC and ABR through the recent GNEP funding opportunity announcement (FOA). The paper summarizes the state-of-the-art of aqueous reprocessing, gives an assessment of engineering drivers for U.S. aqueous processing facilities, examines historic plant capital costs and provides conclusions with a view to influencing design of next-generation fuel reprocessing plants.

  15. Regulatory instrument review: Aging management of LWR cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves

    SciTech Connect

    Werry, E.V.; Somasundaram, S.

    1995-09-01

    The results of Stage 2 of the Regulatory Instrument Review are presented in this volume. Selected regulatory instruments, such as the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Regulatory Guides, and ASME Codes, were investigated to determine the extent to which these regulations apply aging management to selected safety-related components in nuclear power plants. The Regulatory Instrument Review was funded by the NRC under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Stage 2 of the review focused on four safety-related structures and components; namely, cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves. The review suggests that the primary-emphasis of the regulatory instruments was on the design, construction, start-up, and operation of a nuclear power plant, and that aging issues were primarily addressed after an aging-related problem was recognized. This Stage 2 review confirms the results of the prior review; (see Regulatory Instrument Review: Management of Aging of LWR Major Safety-Related Components NUREG/CR-5490. The observations indicate that the regulations generally address management of age-related degradation indirectly. Specific age-related degradation phenomena frequently are dealt with in bulletins and notices or through generic issues, letters, etc. The major recommendation of this report, therefore, is that the regulatory instruments should more directly and explicitly address the aging phenomenon and the management of the age-related degradation process.

  16. Annual and semi-annual variability in the lower and upper atmosphere-ionosphere coupling processes by observations from Abastumani (41.75 N, 42.82 E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didebulidze, G. G.; Todua, M.; Javakhishvili, G.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of annual and semi-annual variability in the long-term variations of the ionosphere F2 layer parameters (NmF2, hmF2), the hydroxyl OH bands, the oxygen green 557.7 nm and red 630.0 line intensities observed from Abastumani is noted. The amplitudes of the semi-annual variations of these upper atmosphere-ionosphere parameters with maxima at equinoctial months depend on the value of the planetary geomagnetic Ap index, also observed in the inter-annual distribution of the total ozone content (TOC) and cloud covering over this region of South Caucasus. The observed dependence of semi-annual variations of these parameters on Ap index indicated possible influence of cosmic factors on the lower and upper atmosphere-ionosphere coupling processes.

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors : semiannual report, July 2000 - December 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.; Energy Technology

    2002-04-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from July 2000 to December 2000. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of primary pressure boundary materials, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. The fatigue strain-vs.-life data are summarized for the effects of various material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Effects of the reactor coolant environment on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation are discussed. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and posttest fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) in He at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results were used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to IASCC. A fracture toughness J-R curve test was conducted on a commercial heat of Type 304 SS that was irradiated to {approx}2.0 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} in the Halden reactor. The results were compared with the data obtained earlier on steels irradiated to 0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) (0.45 and 1.35 dpa). Neutron irradiation at 288 C was found to decrease the fracture toughness of austenitic SSs. Tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens of Alloy 600 under cyclic loading to evaluate the enhancement of crack growth rates in LWR environments. Then, the existing fatigue crack growth data on Alloys 600 and 690 were analyzed to establish the effects of temperature, load ratio, frequency, and stress intensity range

  18. Semi-annual technical report, September 30, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Dorin

    2000-04-01

    The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. (CPBR) continues to operate according to objectives outlined in the proposal funded through the cooperative agreement. The italicized objectives below are addressed in this report, which covers the period September 30,1999 through March 31, 2000. (1) Update the research agenda using information obtained from member companies. (2) Identify and implement research projects that are deemed by industrial, scientific, and sponsoring agency evaluation to address significantly the problems and future of U.S. energy resources and that are relevant to the Department of Energy's mission. Specifically: (1) Announce research grants competition through a Request for Preproposals. (2) Conduct a dual-stage review process: Stage one--industrial and DOE review of preproposals; and Stage two--peer review, scientific consultants' review, DOE review of full proposals and Project Recommendation Committee evaluation and recommendation for funding. (3) Board of Directors approval of recommended awards. (4) Conduct ongoing project management. (5) Obtain semiannual, annual and final reports for evaluation of research goals and technology transfer. (6) Present reports to DOE.

  19. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    1998-03-01

    This is the twenty-third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. A large fraction of this work, particularly in relation to fission reactor experiments, is carried out collaboratively with their partners in Japan, Russia, and the European Union. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General Audit Reports, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s twelfth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1994 through March 31, 1995, the Department took final action on 32 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 90 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on four contract and financial assistance audits, leaving four reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  1. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1991-07-01

    This is the tenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance; damage analysis and fundamental studies; special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the test of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  2. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports: April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s seventeenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1 through September 30, 1997, the Department took final action on 29 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 72 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on five contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  3. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, October 1, 1997--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s eighteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1997, through March 31, 1998, the Department took final action on 20 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 80 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on one contract and financial assistance audit, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  4. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, October 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s sixteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1996, through March 31, 1997, the Department took final action on 31 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 74 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on 11 contract and financial assistance audits, leaving no reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  5. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This is the twenty-first in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The report covers the following topics: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide composite materials; ferritic/martensitic steels; copper alloys and high heat flux materials; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; solid breeding materials; radiation effects, mechanistic studies and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; and irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods.

  6. Preparing for a Semiannual IACUC Inspection of a Satellite Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Facility

    PubMed Central

    Koerber, Amy S; Kalishman, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Institutions worldwide have experienced a rapid growth in the use of zebrafish as a research model for a variety of molecular and genetic studies of vertebrate development. This expansion in zebrafish research essentially has outpaced the establishment of specific recommendations for the care and use of fish in research. In some cases, this situation has created a dilemma where an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, which is responsible for oversight of vertebrate animal research, is not fully prepared to undertake this role for a decentralized zebrafish facility. IACUC inspectors will be more equipped to ask pertinent questions by understanding the basic principles of zebrafish health and facility management. Concurrently, zebrafish facility managers can contribute to the progress of a semiannual facility inspection by maintaining fully accessible operating records. In the context of presenting a well-established and useful model of zebrafish management and recordkeeping to the zebrafish facility operator, the information we present here also prepares a potential IACUC inspector to conduct a constructive and positive inspection. PMID:19245754

  7. TFE Verification Program semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern. 6 refs., 67 figs., 37 tabs.

  8. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: {sm_bullet} Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. {sm_bullet} Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. {sm_bullet} Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This is the seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance, damage analysis and fundamental studies, and special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  10. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1988-03-01

    This is the third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performances; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  11. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This is the ninth in series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development of Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  12. Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This is the twelfth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  13. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports: October 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s fourteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1995, through March 31, 1996, the Department took final action on 35 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 92 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on two contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  14. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s thirteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1, 1995, through September 30, 1995, the Department took final action on 33 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 96 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on 2 contract and financial assistance audits, leaving 2 reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  15. Interaction of the quasi-biennial oscillation and stratopause semiannual oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerton, Timothy J.; Delisi, Donald P.

    1997-11-01

    Analysis of rawinsonde and rocketsonde data at Ascension Island (7.6°S, 14.4°W) and Kwajalein (8.7°N, 167°E) in 1962-1991 suggests that the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the middle stratosphere is synchronized with the seasonal cycle and that descending westerly phases of the stratopause semiannual oscillation (SAO) are strongly influenced by the underlying QBO. The effect of the seasonal cycle on the QBO in the middle stratosphere is revealed in two, perhaps unrelated, observations: first, a tendency for deseasonalized QBO westerly maxima to occur in local winter (or to avoid local summer); second, a smooth, uninterrupted connection between descending SAO westerly shear zones and the formation of a new QBO westerly shear zone aloft. The timing of deseasonalized QBO westerly maxima in the middle stratosphere allows a simple composite of 2- and 3-year cycles to be constructed from the data, illustrating the effect of the QBO on descending westerly phases of the stratopause SAO.

  16. BWR passive plant heat removal assessment (joint EPRI/CRIEPI advanced LWR studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Abdollahian, D.; Gillis, J.; Petrokas, R. , Inc., Campbell, CA )

    1991-03-01

    An independent assessment of the simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) passive heat removal systems was performed. Information concerning required characteristics of the 600 MWe SBWR was gathered to form a basis for this assessment. Computerized models were then formulated to predict the operation of the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS), passive containment cooling system (PCCS), and the isolation condenser system. Investigation of the GDCS resulted in prediction of GDCS performance for a range of LOCAs and single failures. The ability of the GDCS to keep the core covered with a two phase mixture was determined. It was concluded that for all conditions which formed a basis for this study, the GDCS will keep the core covered and cooled. The evaluation of the PCCS showed that the containment will be cooled and that the system can operate in the presence of a significant amount of non-condensible gases. However, the PCCS will not be capable of reducing the containment pressure below approximately 40 psia. This is still significantly below the containment design pressure of 55 psig. Calculations performed to determine isolation condenser performance during reactor isolation events show that the isolation condensers remove enough decay heat to prevent the safety/relief valves from lifting. A study of the test program for the SBWR concluded that additional large scale tests may be needed to verify GDCS and PCCS performance. Finally, an investigation of larger power ratings showed that the passive systems are technically feasible for plant sizes of up to 1,000 MWe. 2 refs.

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors: Semiannual report, October 1994--March 1995. Volume 20

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J.; Hins, A.G.; Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRS) from October 1994 to March 1995. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water with several dissolvedoxygen (DO) concentrations to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Tensile properties and microstructures of several heats of Alloy 600 and 690 were characterized for correlation with EAC of the alloys in simulated LWR environments. Effects of DO and electrochemical potential on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath irradiated in boiling water reactors were determined in slow-strain-rate-tensile tests at 289{degrees}C. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  18. First Conclusions of the WPEC/Subgroup-22 Nuclear Data for Improved LEU-LWR Reactivity Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Courcelle, Arnaud

    2005-05-24

    This paper is a summary of a collective work in the framework of the Working Party in International Nuclear Data Evaluation and Co-operation (WPEC) to investigate the reasons for systematic reactivity underprediction of thermal LEU-LWR (Low-Enriched Uranium, Light-Water Reactor). This keff underprediction ({approx_equal} -500 pcm) is observed with the most recent nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B-VI.8, JENDL3.3 and JEFF3.0) This report reviews the evaluation work performed at several laboratories [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Commissariat a l'energie atomique de Bruyeres-Le-Chatel (CEA-BRC), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] as well as the integral tests (mainly at LANL, Knoll Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL), Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL), Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG-Petten, CEA and IAEA) of the successive versions of the new evaluated files. The present status of the work can be summarized as follows: Improved evaluations of 238U inelastic data proposed by LANL and CEA-BRC were tested against integral benchmarks and partially improve the reactivity prediction. The thermal capture cross-section of 238U has been revised, and a new evaluation of 238U resonance parameters, up to 20 keV, is in progress at ORNL. Integral tests have ensured that the modifications of 238U capture cross-section in the thermal and resolved range were still compatible with 238U integral measurements (238U capture rate ratios measured in critical facilities and 239Pu build-up prediction in a depleted pressurized water reactor (PWR) assembly).It is demonstrated that the combination of the new inelastic data (LANL or BRC) with the preliminary ORNL resonance parameter set gives a good correction of the reactivity under-estimation. The provisional conclusions of this collective work are expected to contribute toward the improvement of the future versions of nuclear data libraries.

  19. 78 FR 59732 - Revisions to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment, and Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... COMMISSION Revisions to Design of Structures, Components, Equipment, and Systems AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory..., Components, Equipment and Systems'' of NUREG-0800, ``Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition,'' Section 3.7.2, ``Seismic System Analysis,'' Section...

  20. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Seventh semi-annual status report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This seventh semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1991 through September 1991. It includes a summary and minutes of the General Committee meeting, progress summaries of ongoing POC contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months. The meeting included test plan with Western coal, seed regeneration economics, power management for the integrated topping cycle and status of the Clean Coal Technology Proposal activities. Appendices cover CDIF operations HRSR development, CFFF operations etc.

  1. Systematic technology evaluation program for SiC/SiC composite-based accident-tolerant LWR fuel cladding and core structures: Revision 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-08-01

    Fuels and core structures in current light water reactors (LWR’s) are vulnerable to catastrophic failure in severe accidents as unfortunately evidenced by the March 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. This vulnerability is attributed primarily to the rapid oxidation kinetics of zirconium alloys in a water vapor environment at very high temperatures. Zr alloys are the primary material in LWR cores except for the fuel itself. Therefore, alternative materials with reduced oxidation kinetics as compared to zirconium alloys are sought to enable enhanced accident-tolerant fuels and cores.

  2. Void reactivity feedback analysis for U-based and Th-based LWR incineration cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lindley, B.A.; Parks, G.T.; Franceschini, F.

    2013-07-01

    In reduced-moderation LWRs, an external supply of transuranic (TRU) can be incinerated by mixing it with a fertile isotope ({sup 238}U or {sup 232}Th) and recycling all the actinides after each cycle. Performance is limited by coolant reactivity feedback - the moderator density coefficient (MDC) must be kept negative. The MDC is worse when more TRU is loaded, but TRU feed is also needed to maintain criticality. To assess the performance of this fuel cycle in different neutron spectra, three LWRs are considered: 'reference' PWRs and reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs. The MDC of the equilibrium cycle is analysed by reactivity decomposition with perturbed coolant density by isotope and neutron energy. The results show that using {sup 232}Th as a fertile isotope yields superior performance to {sup 238}U. This is due essentially to the high resonance η of U bred from Th (U3), which increases the fissility of the U3-TRU isotope vector in the Th-fueled system relative to the U-fueled system, and also improves the MDC in a sufficiently hard spectrum. Spatial separation of TRU and U3 in the Th-fueled system renders further improvement by hardening the neutron spectrum in the TRU and softening it in the U3. This improves the TRU η and increases the negative MDC contribution from reduced thermal fission in U3. (authors)

  3. Application of an intermediate LWR for electricity production and hot-water district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of a 400 MWe Consolidated Nuclear Steam System (CNSS) for supplying district heat to the Minneapolis/St. Paul area. A total of three CNSS reactor sites, located various distances from the Minneapolis-St. Paul area load center, are evaluated. The distance from the load center is determined by the credited safety features of the plant design. Each site is also evaluated for three different hot water supply/return temperatures providing a total of nine CNSS study cases. The cost of district heat delivered to the load center is determined for each case.

  4. Ambidexter-dupic: an LWR-MSR symbiont operating on an effective and efficient fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, T.K.; Lee, Y.J.; Seo, M.H.; Oh, S.K.

    2007-07-01

    The AMBIDEXTER is an integral-type molten-salt reactor system, having been designed for the GEN IV requirements with a denatured thorium-uranium fuel cycle. And the DUPIC fuel cycle, recognized as a highly transparent reprocessing method for the PWR spent fuel, was developed through Korea-Canada-U.S. collaboration. This paper demonstrates a closed uranium-thorium fuel cycle strategy for a PWR and MSR symbiont via combining these two. This fuel cycle improves its transparency in the nuclear proliferation aspect and it does its economics in the spent-fuel management aspect. Fluorination uranium content in the PWR spent fuel, in the aftermath of which the remnants are composed of fluorides of residual uranium, plutonium, minor actinides and non-volatile fission-products, and are to be used as the feedstock of initial and daily loads of the AMBIDEXTER. Thorium fluoride is admixed at early operating stage to suppress the reactivity increase rate due to burnout of the initially loaded fission products, and through the reactor lifetime to compensate the transmutation and fission losses. On the bypass line linked to the fuel-salt recirculation stream in the reactor system, a small-scale on-line fluorination unit evaporates surplus uranium daily-fed, but not yet converted to plutonium. As {sup 232}Th converts into {sup 233}U, the maximum of 1.67% fissile uranium enrichment was achieved presently, that can improve the economics when used in PWR fuel. (authors)

  5. Semi-Annual Report to Congress: April 1, 1983-September 30, 1983; No. 7. (Submitted pursuant to Public Law 95-452).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    This semiannual report of the Department of Education's Office of Inspector General summarizes the office's activities in auditing and investigating abuses in the use of federal monies in education and in improving the management of federally funded programs. The audits for a 6-month period ending September 30, 1983, are graphed and significant…

  6. Semi-Annual Report to Congress: April 1, 1984-September 30, 1984. No. 9. (Submitted Pursuant to Public Law 95-452).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    This ninth semiannual report issued by the United States Department of Education's Office of Inspector General (OIG) summarizes the activities and accomplishments of that office during a 6-month period ending September 30, 1984. A condensation of audits of Department of Education aid programs presents statistics on OIG activities and the…

  7. Dual phase MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics for use in LWR inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, P. G.; Frank, S. M.; O'Holleran, T. P.; Meyer, M. K.

    2005-06-01

    To address the low thermal conductivity of the ZrO 2-based inert matrix fuel and the instability in water of the MgO-based inert matrix fuel, the dual-phase MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics are proposed as a matrix for light water reactor fuel for actinide transmutation and Pu burning. It is envisioned that in a dual-phase system MgO will act as efficient heat conductor while ZrO 2 will provide protection from the coolant attack. This paper describes results of fabrication, characterization and hydration testing of MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics containing 30-70 wt% of MgO.

  8. Advanced Processing Technology semiannual report, March--December 1991. Volume 1, Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Kline-Simon, K.

    1991-12-31

    This first issue of the APT Semiannual Report focuses on APT`s defense-related technologies. These technologies are a continuation of the research, development, and engineering work performed by LLNLs Special Isotope Separation (SIS) Program. SIS was the first large-scale DOE venture that had environmentally conscious manufacturing processes and facilities as its deliverables. The objectives were to create a facility where the only outputs were either usable products or disposable wastes, and to comply with existing and anticipated federal, state, and local regulations related to safeguards, security, health and safety. To meet these objectives, revolutionary changes were needed in plutonium processing operations, chemistry, and equipment. New processes had to be developed that enhanced worker safety, minimized operator radiation dose, minimized waste at the point of generation, and provided for built-in recycling of residues. The SIS Program developed and demonstrated the technology (both chemistry and physics) necessary to provide plutonium with individual isotopic tailoring. This process made it possible to transform fuel-grade plutonium into weapon-grade material. However, due to the changing world political climate, the country`s need for plutonium to make new weapons has decreased dramatically. As a result, the planned SIS plutonium-separation plant will not be built. After the SIS Program was canceled in 199 1, Congress directed that the plutonium processing technologies under development for the SIS Program be redirected to the weapons program. APT took over the development of the innovative SIS technologies and is applying them to the development of a new, reconfigured Nuclear Weapons Complex -- Complex 21. ``Close Out of the SIS Program`` describes the completion of the SIS research and development work, and the transfer of key technologies to support this reconfiguration effort.

  9. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense Facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, March 28, 1993--September 27, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Sharifi, R.

    1993-12-17

    The US DOD, through an Interagency Agreement with the US DOE, has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE and the first phase of the program is underway. A team of researchers has been assembled from Penn State, ABB Combustion Engineering Systems (CE), AMAX Research and Development Center (AMAX), and Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). These four organizations are the current members of the Consortium. Phase 1 activities are focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water slurry fuels (MCWSFs) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. Phase 2 research and development activities will continue to focus on industrial boiler retrofit technologies by addressing emissions control and pre-combustion strategies for the utilization of high ash, high sulfur coals. Phase 3 activities will examine coal-based fuel combustion systems that cofire wastes. Each phase includes an engineering cost analysis and technology assessment. The activities and status of Phase 1 are described in this report. The objective of Phase 1 is to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWSF or DMC. This will be achieved through a program of the following tasks: (1) Coal Beneficiation and Preparation; (2) Combustion Performance Evaluation; (3) Engineering Design; (4) Engineering and Economic Analysis; and (5) Final Report/Submission of Design Package. Miscellaneous activities are reported. Activities planned for the next semiannual period are listed. The project schedule, with a description of milestones, is included.

  10. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory - Semiannual Report: April 1, 1990, Through September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1990. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. MELs are equipped for the on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. This report describes the testing, test results, and suggested courses of action.

  11. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems-revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330{degrees}C (535-625{degrees}F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350{degrees}C (554-633{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of J{sub IC} are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common {open_quotes}predicted lower-bound{close_quotes} J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  12. LWR First Recycle of TRU with Thorium Oxide for Transmutation and Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Alfonsi; Gilles Youinou

    2012-07-01

    Thorium has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (thorium is approximately three times more plentiful than uranium) and as a result of concerns about proliferation and waste management (e.g. reduced production of plutonium, etc.). Since the average composition of natural Thorium is dominated (100%) by the fertile isotope Th-232, Thorium is only useful as a resource for breeding new fissile materials, in this case U-233. Consequently a certain amount of fissile material must be present at the start-up of the reactor in order to guarantee its operation. The thorium fuel can be used in both once-through and recycle options, and in both fast and thermal spectrum systems. The present study has been aimed by the necessity of investigating the option of using reprocessed plutonium/TRU, from a once-through reference LEU scenario (50 GWd/ tIHM), mixed with natural thorium and the need of collect data (mass fractions, cross-sections etc.) for this particular fuel cycle scenario. As previously pointed out, the fissile plutonium is needed to guarantee the operation of the reactor. Four different scenarios have been considered: • Thorium – recycled Plutonium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium/Americium; • Thorium – recycled Transuranic. The calculations have been performed with SCALE6.1-TRITON.

  13. LWR First Recycle of TRU with Thorium Oxide for Transmutation and Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Alfonsi; Gilles Youinou; Sonat Sen

    2013-02-01

    Thorium has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (thorium is approximately three times more plentiful than uranium) and as a result of concerns about proliferation and waste management (e.g. reduced production of plutonium, etc.). Since the average composition of natural Thorium is dominated (100%) by the fertile isotope Th-232, Thorium is only useful as a resource for breeding new fissile materials, in this case U-233. Consequently a certain amount of fissile material must be present at the start-up of the reactor in order to guarantee its operation. The thorium fuel can be used in both once-through and recycle options, and in both fast and thermal spectrum systems. The present study has been aimed by the necessity of investigating the option of using reprocessed plutonium/TRU, from a once-through reference LEU scenario (50 GWd/ tIHM), mixed with natural thorium and the need of collect data (mass fractions, cross-sections etc.) for this particular fuel cycle scenario. As previously pointed out, the fissile plutonium is needed to guarantee the operation of the reactor. Four different scenarios have been considered: • Thorium – recycled Plutonium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium/Americium; • Thorium – recycled Transuranic. The calculations have been performed with SCALE6.1-TRITON.

  14. Propulsion system materials program. Semiannual progress report, October 1995--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1996-07-01

    This portion of the program is identified as program element 1.0 within the work breakdown structure (WBS). It contains five subelements: (1) Monolithics, (2) Ceramic Composites, (3) Thermal and Wear Coatings, (4) Joining, and (5) Ceramic Machining. Ceramic research conducted within the Monolithics subelement currently includes work activities on low Cost Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder, green state ceramic fabrication, characterization, and densification, and on structural, mechanical, and physical properties of these ceramics. Research conducted within the Ceramic Composites subelement currently includes silicon nitride and oxide-based composites, and low expansion materials. Research conducted in the Thermal and Wear Coatings subelement is currently limited to oxide-based coatings and involves coating synthesis, characterization, and determination of the mechanical and physical properties of the coatings. Research conducted in the Joining subelement currently includes studies of processes to produce strong, stable joints between zirconia ceramics and iron-base alloys. As part of an expanded effort to reduce the cost of ceramic components, a new initiative in cost effective machining has been started. A major objective of the research in the Materials and Processing program element is to systematically advance the understanding of the relationships between ceramic raw materials such as powders and reactant gases, the processing variables involved in producing the ceramic materials, and the resultant microstructures and physical and mechanical properties of the ceramic materials. Success in meeting this objective will provide U.S. companies with new or improved ways for producing economical, highly reliable ceramic components for advanced heat engines.

  15. Identification of significant problems related to light water reactor piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Work on the project was divided into three tasks. In Task 1, past surveys of LWR piping system problems and recent Licensee Event Report summaries are studied to identify the significant problems of LWR piping systems and the primary causes of these problems. Pipe cracking is identified as the most recurring problem and is mainly due to the vibration of pipes due to operating pump-pipe resonance, fluid-flow fluctuations, and vibration of pipe supports. Research relevant to the identified piping system problems is evaluated. Task 2 studies identify typical LWR piping systems and the current loads and load combinations used in the design of these systems. Definitions of loads are reviewed. In Task 3, a comparative study is carried out on the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR piping systems. The study concludes that the current linear-elastic methods of analysis may not predict accurately the behavior of piping systems under seismic loads and may, under certain circumstances, result in nonconservative designs. Gaps at piping supports are found to have a significant effect on the response of the piping systems.

  16. Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E

    2006-04-30

    The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity – in particular for BWR’s, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR’s and BWR’s without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR’s and BWR’s were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density – on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR’s more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel – reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fuelled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ~2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the

  17. Material Performance of Fully-Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel under Selected LWR Design Basis Scenarios: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; R. S. Sen; M. A. Pope; A. M. Ougouag

    2011-09-01

    The extension to LWRs of the use of Deep-Burn coated particle fuel envisaged for HTRs has been investigated. TRISO coated fuel particles are used in Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel within a SiC matrix rather than the graphite of HTRs. TRISO particles are well characterized for uranium-fueled HTRs. However, operating conditions of LWRs are different from those of HTRs (temperature, neutron energy spectrum, fast fluence levels, power density). Furthermore, the time scales of transient core behavior during accidents are usually much shorter and thus more severe in LWRs. The PASTA code was updated for analysis of stresses in coated particle FCM fuel. The code extensions enable the automatic use of neutronic data (burnup, fast fluence as a function of irradiation time) obtained using the DRAGON neutronics code. An input option for automatic evaluation of temperature rise during anticipated transients was also added. A new thermal model for FCM was incorporated into the code; so-were updated correlations (for pyrocarbon coating layers) suitable to estimating dimensional changes at the high fluence levels attained in LWR DB fuel. Analyses of the FCM fuel using the updated PASTA code under nominal and accident conditions show: (1) Stress levels in SiC-coatings are low for low fission gas release (FGR) fractions of several percent, as based on data of fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2} kernels. However, the high burnup level of LWR-DB fuel implies that the FGR fraction is more likely to be in the range of 50-100%, similar to Inert Matrix Fuels (IMFs). For this range the predicted stresses and failure fractions of the SiC coating are high for the reference particle design (500 {micro}mm kernel diameter, 100 {micro}mm buffer, 35 {micro}mm IPyC, 35 {micro}mm SiC, 40 {micro}mm OPyC). A conservative case, assuming 100% FGR, 900K fuel temperature and 705 MWd/kg (77% FIMA) fuel burnup, results in a 8.0 x 10{sup -2} failure probability. For a 'best-estimate' FGR fraction

  18. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  19. NEUTRON MULTIPLICITY AND ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED FOR MARCH 2009 SEMI-ANNUAL DOE INVENTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Ayers, J.; Tietze, F.; Klapper, K.

    2010-02-05

    The Analytical Development (AD) Section field nuclear measurement group performed six 'best available technique' verification measurements to satisfy a DOE requirement instituted for the March 2009 semi-annual inventory. The requirement of (1) yielded the need for SRNL Research Operations Department Material Control & Accountability (MC&A) group to measure the Pu content of five items and the highly enrich uranium (HEU) content of two. No 14Q-qualified measurement equipment was available to satisfy the requirement. The AD field nuclear group has routinely performed the required Confirmatory Measurements for the semi-annual inventories for fifteen years using sodium iodide and high purity germanium (HpGe) {gamma}-ray pulse height analysis nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments. With appropriate {gamma}-ray acquisition modeling, the HpGe spectrometers can be used to perform verification-type quantitative assay for Pu-isotopics and HEU content. The AD nuclear NDA group is widely experienced with this type of measurement and reports content for these species in requested process control, MC&A booking, and holdup measurements assays Site-wide. However none of the AD HpGe {gamma}-ray spectrometers have been 14Q-qualified, and the requirement of reference 1 specifically excluded a {gamma}-ray PHA measurement from those it would accept for the required verification measurements. The requirement of reference 1 was a new requirement for which the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Research Operations Department (ROD) MC&A group was unprepared. The criteria for exemption from verification were: (1) isotope content below 50 grams; (2) intrinsically tamper indicating or TID sealed items which contain a Category IV quantity of material; (3) assembled components; and (4) laboratory samples. Therefore all (SRNL) Material Balance Area (MBA) items with greater than 50 grams total Pu or greater than 50 grams HEU were subject to a verification measurement. The pass

  20. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a...

  1. Title V Semi-Annual Emissions Report for Permit P100R1 July 1, 2011 - December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Whetham, Walter

    2012-03-15

    Reports of actual emissions from permitted sources in Section 2.0 shall be submitted on a 6 month basis. Reports shall not include emissions from insignificant activities. Emission estimates of criteria pollutants NOx, CO, SO2, PM and VOCs shall not include fugitive emissions. Emission estimates of HAPs shall include fugitive emissions. The reports shall include a comparison of actual emissions that occurred during the reporting period with the facility-wide allowable emission limits specified in Section 2.11 of this permit. The report required by Condition 4.1 shall be submitted within 90 days from the end of the reporting period. The semiannual report required by Condition 4.2 shall be submitted within 45 days from the end of the reporting period. The reporting periods are January 1st to June 30th and July 1st to December 31st. This condition is pursuant to 20.2.70.302.E.1 NMAC.

  2. Isotope Separation and Advanced Manufacturing Technology. ISAM semiannual report, Volume 3, Number 1, October 1993--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.; Kan, T.

    1994-10-01

    This is the fourth issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Materials Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives include: (I) the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (UAVLIS) process, which is being developed and prepared for deployment as an advanced uranium enrichment capability; (II) Advanced manufacturing technologies, which include industrial laser and E-beam material processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. This report features progress in the ISAM Program from October 1993 through March 1994. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. Advanced Researech and Technology Development fossil energy materials program: Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the ARandTD Fossil Energy Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined semiannual progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating subcontractor organizations. This report of activities on the program is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure in which projects are organized according to materials research thrust areas. These areas are (1) Structural Ceramics, (2) Alloy Development and Mechanical Properties, (3) Corrosion and Erosion of Alloys, and (4) Assessments and Technology Transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  4. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volume I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-10-30

    This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application hereafter referred to as the Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction to Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

  5. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, C.G.; Klusek, C.S.

    1993-07-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 38th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXXVIII) that were received on or before June 2, 1993.

  6. Thermal conductivity and acid dissolution behavior of MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics for use in LWR inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, P. G.; Lambregts, M. J.; Meyer, M. K.

    2006-02-01

    Dual-phase MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics are proposed for use in inert matrix fuel for disposition of plutonium and minor actinides in existing light water reactors. The concept for use of this composite material was developed with the intent to capitalize on the known advantages of the composite's constituents: high thermal conductivity of MgO, and stability of ZrO 2 in LWR coolant. The study presented in this paper addressed the thermal conductivity and nitric acid solubility of MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics. Thermal analysis, based on experimental and analytical techniques, established that the product of all investigated compositions has the thermal conductivity superior to that of UO 2. Nitric acid dissolution experiments showed that only the free MgO phase dissolves in the nitric acid, leaving behind a porous pellet consisting of a ZrO 2-based solid solution.

  7. Semi-annual sampling of Fourmile Branch and its seeplines in the F and H Areas of SRS: July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.L.; Rogers, V.A.

    1994-04-01

    In July 1992, water samples were collected from Fourmile Branch (FMB) and its seeplines in the vicinity of the F and H-Area seepage basins. The samples were collected from five seepline locations in F Area, five seepline locations in H Area, and three stream locations on FMB. The sampling event was the first in a series of three semi-annual sampling event was the first in a series of three semi-annual sampling events aimed at characterizing the shallow groundwater outcropping into FMB and its wetlands. In the past, this groundwater has been shown to contain contaminants migrating from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. The samples were analyzed for Appendix 9 metals, various radionuclides, selected volatile compounds, and selected inorganic constituents and parameters. Results from the July 1992 sampling event suggest that the seeplines in both F and H Areas and FMB continue to be influenced by contaminants migrating from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. However, when compared to 1989 measurements, the concentrations of most of the constituents have declined. Contaminant concentration measured in July 1992 were compared to primary drinking water standards (PDWS), secondary drinking water standards (SDWS), and maximum contaminant levels (MCL) enforceable in 1993. Results were also compared to 1989 measurements at corresponding sampling locations and to background samples collected as part of the July 1992 sampling event. Using two different statistical tests, concentrations of selected F- and H-Area seepline analytes were compared to background samples. These tests were designed to detect if concentrations of contaminants along the F- and H-Area seeplines were greater than background concentrations.

  8. Short-Run Learning Dynamics under a Test-Based Accountability System: Evidence from Pakistan. Policy Research Working Paper 5465

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera-Osorio, Felipe; Raju, Dhushyanth

    2010-01-01

    Low student learning is a common finding in much of the developing world. This paper uses a relatively unique dataset of five semiannual rounds of standardized test data to characterize and explain the short-term changes in student learning. The data are collected as part of the quality assurance system for a public-private partnership program…

  9. Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress - October 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2008-10-01

    On behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of Inspector General, I am pleased to submit our Semiannual Report to Congress for the period ending March 31, 2009. The Report highlights key accomplishments of the Office of Inspector General, particularly pertaining to our efforts to ensure the economy, efficiency, and effectiveness of Department of Energy operations. Details pertaining to some of our most significant reviews and projects are presented in the Report. This reporting period has been quite eventful. On February 17, 2009, the President signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The stated intent of this new legislation is to strengthen the U.S. economy through the creation of new jobs, aiding State and local governments with budget shortfalls, cutting taxes for working families, and investing in the long-term health of the Nation's economic prosperity. The Recovery Act establishes the status of the Nation's energy supply as a prime focus. Specifically, the Department of Energy will receive approximately $40 billion for various energy, environmental, and science programs and initiatives. The passage of this legislation makes the coming months an exciting and transformative time for the Department of Energy and the Office of Inspector General. In recognition of the need for effective oversight to protect taxpayer interests, the Recovery Act includes the creation of the Recovery Act Accountability and Transparency Board and mandates specific actions by the Inspectors General. I will be a permanent member of this newly created Board, along with nine other Inspectors General whose agencies are significant recipients of Recovery Act funds. Since the passage of the legislation, my office has developed a strategy consistent with the objectives outlined in the Recovery Act. The overarching goal of the strategy is to ensure that the taxpayers interests relating to the performance and results of the Recovery Act are protected. During this reporting

  10. Inertial Conference Fusion Semiannual Report October 1999 - March 2000, Volume 1, Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, B A

    2000-03-01

    This first issue of the ''ICF Semiannual Report'' contains articles whose diverse subjects attest to the broad technical and scientific challenges that are at the forefront of the ICF program at LLNL. The first article describes the progress being made at solving the surface roughness problem on capsule mandrels. All NIF capsule options, except machined beryllium, require a mandrel upon which the ablator is deposited. This mandrel sets the baseline sphericity of the final capsule. Problems involving defects in the mandrel have been overcome using various techniques so that 2-mm-size mandrels can now be made that meet the NIF design specification. The second article validates and provides a detailed numerical investigation of the shadowgraph technique currently used to diagnose the surface roughness of a fuel ice layer inside of a transparent capsule. It is crucial for the success of the indirect-drive ignition targets that the techniques used to characterize ice-surface roughness be well understood. This study identifies methods for analyzing the bright band that give an accurate measure of the ice-surface roughness. The third article describes a series of realistic laser and target modifications that can lead to 3-4 times more energy coupling and 10 times greater yield from a NIF indirect-drive ignition target. Target modifications include using various mixtures of rare-earth and other high-Z metals as hohlraum wall material and adjusting the laser-entrance-hole size and the case-to-capsule size ratio. Each option is numerically examined separately and together. The fourth article reviews how detailed x-ray and Thomson scattering measurements from a high-density and high-temperature gasbag plasma are used to test spectroscopic modeling techniques. There is good agreement between the model and experimental dielectronic capture satellite intensities. However, improvements are required in the modeling of inner shell collisionally populated satellite states. These

  11. Fall 2010 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility and the CPP 601/627/640 Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Ann

    2010-11-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report, as agreed between the Idaho Cleanup Project and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. The Permit Condition III.H. portion of this report includes a description and the results of field methods associated with groundwater monitoring of the Waste Calcining Facility. Analytical results from groundwater sampling, results of inspections and maintenance of monitoring wells in the Waste Calcining Facility groundwater monitoring network, and results of inspections of the concrete cap are summarized. The Permit Condition I.U. portion of this report includes noncompliances not otherwise required to be reported under Permit Condition I.R. (advance notice of planned changes to facility activity which may result in a noncompliance) or Permit Condition I.T. (reporting of noncompliances which may endanger human health or the environment). This report also provides groundwater sampling results for wells that were installed and monitored as part of the Phase 1 post-closure period of the landfill closure components in accordance with HWMA/RCRA Landfill Closure Plan for the CPP-601 Deep

  12. Parametric systems analysis for tandem mirror hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.; Chapin, D.L.; Chi, J.W.H.

    1980-09-01

    Fusion fission systems, consisting of fissile producing fusion hybrids combining a tandem mirror fusion driver with various blanket types and net fissile consuming LWR's, have been modeled and analyzed parametrically. Analysis to date indicates that hybrids can be competitive with mined uranium when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ cost is about 100 $/lb., adding less than 25% to present day cost of power from LWR's. Of the three blanket types considered, uranium fast fission (UFF), thorium fast fission (ThFF), and thorium fission supressed (ThFS), the ThFS blanket has a modest economic advantage under most conditions but has higher support ratios and potential safety advantages under all conditions.

  13. Technologies that affect the weaning rate in beef cattle production systems.

    PubMed

    Dill, Matheus Dhein; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Costa, João Batista Gonçalves; Canellas, Leonardo Canali; Peripolli, Vanessa; Neto, José Braccini; Sant'Anna, Danilo Menezes; McManus, Concepta; Barcellos, Júlio Otávio Jardim

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the differences between weaning rates and technologies adopted by farmers in cow-calf production systems in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Interviews were carried out with 73 farmers about 48 technologies that could affect reproductive performance. Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis using a non-hierarchical cluster method. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Three distinct clusters of farmers were created (R (2) = 0.90), named as low (LWR), intermediate (IWR), and high (HWR) weaning rate, with 100, 91, and 96 % of the farmers identified within their respective groups and average weaning rates of 59, 72, and 83 %, respectively. IWR and HWR farmers used more improved natural pasture, fixed-time artificial insemination, selection for birth weight, and proteinated salt compared to LWR. HWR farmers used more stocking rate control, and IWR farmers used more ultrasound to evaluate reproductive performance compared to the LWR group. IWR and HWR adopted more technologies related to nutrition and reproductive aspects of the herd in comparison to LWR. We concluded that farmers with higher technology use on farm had higher weaning rates which could be used to benefit less efficient farmers.

  14. Semiannual and solar activity variations of daytime plasma observed by DEMETER in the ionosphere-plasmasphere transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Yang, J. Y.; Berthelier, J. J.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2015-12-01

    Using the plasma data of Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite and the NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model, we examined the semiannual and solar activity variations of the daytime plasma and neutral composition densities in the ionosphere-plasmasphere transition region (~670-710 km). The results demonstrate that the semiannually latitudinal variation of the daytime oxygen ions (O+) is basically controlled by that of neutral atomic oxygen (O), whereas the latitude distributions of the helium and hydrogen ions (He+ and H+) do not fully depend on the neutral atomic helium (He) and hydrogen (H). The summer enhancement of the heavy oxygen ions is consistent with the neutral O enhancement in the summer hemisphere, and the oxygen ion density has significantly the summer-dense and winter-tenuous hemispheric asymmetry with respect to the dip equator. Although the winter enhancements of the lighter He+ and H+ ions are also associated with the neutral He and H enhancements in the winter hemisphere, the high-density light ions (He+ and H+) and electrons (e-) mainly appear at the low and middle magnetic latitudes (|λ| < 50°). The equatorial accumulations of the light plasma species indicate that the light charged particles (He+, H+, and e-) are easily transported by some equatorward forces (e.g., the magnetic mirror force and centrifugal force). The frequent Coulomb collisions between the charged particles probably lead to the particle trappings at different latitudes. Moreover, the neutral composition densities also influence their ion concentrations during different solar activities. From the low-F10.7 year (2007-2008) to the high-F10.7 year (2004-2005), the daytime oxygen ions and electrons increase with the increasing neutral atomic oxygen, whereas the daytime hydrogen ions tend to decrease with the decreasing neutral atomic hydrogen. The helium ion density has no obvious solar activity variation, suggesting that the

  15. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Hallbert

    2012-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  16. Nuclide Importance to Criticality Safety, Decay Heating, and Source Terms Related to Transport and Interim Storage of High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I. C.; Ryman, J. C.

    2000-12-11

    This report investigates trends in the radiological decay properties and changes in relative nuclide importance associated with increasing enrichments and burnup for spent LWR fuel as they affect the areas of criticality safety, thermal analysis (decay heat), and shielding analysis of spent fuel transport and storage casks. To facilitate identifying the changes in the spent fuel compositions that most directly impact these application areas, the dominant nuclides in each area have been identified and ranked by importance. The importance is investigated as a function of increasing burnup to assist in identifying the key changes in spent fuel characteristics between conventional- and extended-burnup regimes. Studies involving both pressurized water-reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies and boiling-water-reactor (BWR) assemblies are included. This study is seen to be a necessary first step in identifying the high-burnup spent fuel characteristics that may adversely affect the accuracy of current computational methods and data, assess the potential impact on previous guidance on isotopic source terms and decay-heat values, and thus help identify areas for methods and data improvement. Finally, several recommendations on the direction of possible future code validation efforts for high-burnup spent fuel predictions are presented.

  17. In situ infrared study of catalytic decomposition of NO. Semiannual technical progress report, February 1--August 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.; Tan, C.D.

    1996-09-20

    During the second semi-annual period, promotion of oxygen desorption to enhance direct NO decomposition over Tb-Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst has been studied. Promotion of oxygen desorption at low temperatures holds the key to the development of an effective NO decomposition catalyst. Addition of Tb-oxide to Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} allows oxygen from dissociated NO to desorb at 593 K which is significantly lower than the reported oxygen desorption temperatures for Pt catalysts. Combined temperature-programmed desorption/reaction with in situ infrared study reveals that desorbed oxygen is produced from decomposition of chelating bidentate nitrato which may be resulted from the reaction of adsorbed oxygen on Pt and adsorbed NO on Tb-oxide. The Tb-promoted Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst which possess oxygen desorption capability at low temperatures shows the activity for decomposition of NO to N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} at 723 K.

  18. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mursula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993-2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993–2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future.

  20. Sampling and analyses report for June 1992 semiannual postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, S.R.

    1992-08-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RMl) underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted from November 16, 1987 through February 26, 1988 (United Engineers and Constructors 1989) at a site approximately one mile south of Hanna, Wyoming. The test consisted of dual module operation to evaluate the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) technology, the elongated linked well (ELW) technology, and the interaction of closely spaced modules operating simultaneously. The test caused two cavities to be formed in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and associated overburden. The Hanna No. 1 coal seam is approximately 30 ft thick and lays at depths between 350 ft and 365 ft below the surface in the test area. The coal seam is overlain by sandstones, siltstones and claystones deposited by various fluvial environments. The groundwater monitoring was designed to satisfy the requirements of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) in addition to providing research data toward the development of UCG technology that minimizes environmental impacts. The June 1992 semiannual groundwater.sampling took place from June 10 through June 13, 1992. This event occurred nearly 34 months after the second groundwater restoration at the RM1 site and was the fifteenth sampling event since UCG operations ceased. Samples were collected for analyses of a limited suite set of parameters as listed in Table 1. With a few exceptions, the groundwater is near baseline conditions. Data from the field measurements and analysis of samples are presented. Benzene concentrations in the groundwater were below analytical detection limits.

  1. Semi-annual oscillation (SAO) of the nighttime ionospheric D-region as detected through ground-based VLF receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, I.; Price, C. G.; Rodger, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    Earth's middle and upper atmosphere exhibits several dominant large scale oscillations in many measured parameters. One of these oscillations is the semi-annual oscillation (SAO). The SAO can be detected in the ionospheric total electron content (TEC), the ionospheric transition height, the wind regime in the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT), and in the MLT temperatures. In addition, as we report for the first time in this study, the SAO is among the most dominant oscillations in nighttime very low frequencies (VLF) narrow-band subionospheric measurements. As VLF signals are reflected off the ionospheric D-region (at altitudes of ~65 and ~85 km, during the day and night, respectively), this implies that the upper part of the D-region is experiencing this oscillation as well, through changes in the dominating electron or ion densities, or by changes in the electron collision frequency, recombination rates, and attachment rates, all of which could be driven by oscillatory MLT temperature changes. We conclude that the main source of the SAO in the nighttime D-region is due to NOx molecules transport from the lower levels of the thermosphere, resulting in enhanced ionization and the creation of free electrons in the nighttime D-region, thus modulating the SAO signature in VLF NB measurements. While the cause for the observed SAO is still a subject of debate, this oscillation should be taken into account when modeling the D-region in general and VLF wave propagation in particular.

  2. Semi-annual oscillation (SAO) of the nighttime ionospheric D region as detected through ground-based VLF receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, Israel; Price, Colin; Rodger, Craig J.

    2016-03-01

    Earth's middle and upper atmosphere exhibits several dominant large-scale oscillations in many measured parameters. One of these oscillations is the semi-annual oscillation (SAO). The SAO can be detected in the ionospheric total electron content (TEC), the ionospheric transition height, the wind regime in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT), and in the MLT temperatures. In addition, as we report for the first time in this study, the SAO is among the most dominant oscillations in nighttime very low frequency (VLF) narrowband (NB) subionospheric measurements. As VLF signals are reflected off the ionospheric D region (at altitudes of ˜ 65 and ˜ 85 km, during the day and night, respectively), this implies that the upper part of the D region is experiencing this oscillation as well, through changes in the dominating electron or ion densities, or by changes in the electron collision frequency, recombination rates, and attachment rates, all of which could be driven by oscillatory MLT temperature changes. We conclude that the main source of the SAO in the nighttime D region is NOx molecule transport from the lower levels of the thermosphere, resulting in enhanced ionization and the creation of free electrons in the nighttime D region, thus modulating the SAO signature in VLF NB measurements. While the cause for the observed SAO is still a subject of debate, this oscillation should be taken into account when modeling the D region in general and VLF wave propagation in particular.

  3. HTGR Gas Turbine Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    Information on the HTGR-GT program is presented concerning systems design methods; systems dynamics methods; alternate design; miscellaneous controls and auxiliary systems; structural mechanics; shielding analysis; licensing; safety; availability; reactor turbine system integration with plant; PCRV liners, penetrations, and closures; PCRV structures; thermal barrier; reactor internals; turbomachinery; turbomachine remote maintenance; control valve; heat exchangers; plant protection system; and plant control system.

  4. NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability

  5. Development of an intelligent grinding wheel for in-process monitoring of ceramic grinding. Semi-annual report {number_sign}3

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, S.; Gao, R.; Guo, C.; Varghese, B.; Pathare, S.

    1998-03-26

    This is the third semi-annual report for the project. The overall objective of this project is to develop sensor-integrated intelligent diamond wheels for grinding of ceramics. Such wheels will be smart enough to monitor and supervise both the wheel preparation and grinding processes without the need to instrument the machine tool. Intelligent wheels will utilize re-useable cores integrated with sensors: to measure the acoustic emission (AE) and grinding force. Signals from the sensors will be transmitted from a rotating wheel to a receiver by telemetry. Wheels will be trained to recognize distinct characteristics associated with truing, dressing and grinding. The technical progress is summarized in this report.

  6. Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRS - A Preliminary Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles Youinou; R. Sonat Sen

    2013-09-01

    The severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants illustrates the need for continuous improvements through developing and implementing technologies that contribute to safe, reliable and cost-effective operation of the nuclear fleet. Development of enhanced accident tolerant fuel contributes to this effort. These fuels, in comparison with the standard zircaloy – UO2 system currently used by the LWR industry, should be designed such that they tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis events. This report presents a preliminary systems analysis related to most of these concepts. The potential impacts of these innovative LWR fuels on the front-end of the fuel cycle, on the reactor operation and on the back-end of the fuel cycle are succinctly described without having the pretension of being exhaustive. Since the design of these various concepts is still a work in progress, this analysis can only be preliminary and could be updated as the designs converge on their respective final version.

  7. ALARA assessment of spent fuel and nuclear waste transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) on transportation system costs were evaluated for LWR spent fuel, high-level commercial and defense wastes, and remotely handled TRU waste. Three dose rate specifications were used: 10 mrem/h at 2m, 5 mrem/h, and 2 mrem/h. The evaluation was done for wastes and LWR spent fuel 1, 3, 5, and 10 years old. Gamma shield materials were depleted uranium, lead, and steel; the neutron shield material was water. Results for a 7-element PWR cask show that uranium shielding is the lightest, and that the increased weight of the low dose rate casks results in 1 to 2 million dollars increase in lifetime transportation costs. 6 figures, 3 tables. (DLC)

  8. Preliminary assessment of accident-tolerant fuels on LWR performance during normal operation and under DB and BDB accident conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, L. J.; Robb, K. R.; Wang, D.

    2014-05-01

    Following the severe accidents at the Japanese Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in 2011, the US Department of Energy initiated research and development on the enhancement of the accident tolerance of light water reactors by the development of fuels/cladding that, in comparison with the standard UO2/Zircaloy (Zr) system, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time period while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations. Analyses are presented that illustrate the impact of these new candidate fuel/cladding materials on the fuel performance at normal operating conditions and on the reactor system under DB and BDB accident conditions.

  9. The impact of two semiannual treatments with albendazole alone on lymphatic filariasis and soil-transmitted helminth infections: a community-based study in the Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Pion, Sébastien D S; Chesnais, Cédric B; Bopda, Jean; Louya, Frédéric; Fischer, Peter U; Majewski, Andrew C; Weil, Gary J; Boussinesq, Michel; Missamou, François

    2015-05-01

    Implementation of mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin plus albendazole (ALB) for lymphatic filariasis (LF) has been delayed in central Africa because of the risk of serious adverse events in subjects with high Loa loa microfilaremia. We conducted a community trial to assess the impact of semiannual MDA with ALB (400 mg) alone on LF and soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections in the Republic of Congo. Evaluation at 12 months showed that ALB MDA had not significantly reduced Wuchereria bancrofti antigenemia or microfilaria (mf) rates in the community (from 17.3% to 16.6% and from 5.3% to 4.2%, respectively). However, the geometric mean mf count in mf-positive subjects was reduced from 202.2 to 80.9 mf/mL (60% reduction, P = 0.01). The effect of ALB was impressive in 38 subjects who were mf-positive at baseline and retested at 12 months: 37% had total mf clearance, and individual mf densities were reduced by 73.0%. MDA also dramatically reduced the hookworm infection rate in the community from 6.5% to 0.6% (91% reduction), with less impressive effects on Ascaris and Trichuris. These preliminary results suggest that semiannual community MDA with ALB is a promising strategy for controlling LF and STH in areas with coendemic loiasis. PMID:25758650

  10. The Impact of Two Semiannual Treatments with Albendazole Alone on Lymphatic Filariasis and Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections: A Community-Based Study in the Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Pion, Sébastien D. S.; Chesnais, Cédric B.; Bopda, Jean; Louya, Frédéric; Fischer, Peter U.; Majewski, Andrew C.; Weil, Gary J.; Boussinesq, Michel; Missamou, François

    2015-01-01

    Implementation of mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin plus albendazole (ALB) for lymphatic filariasis (LF) has been delayed in central Africa because of the risk of serious adverse events in subjects with high Loa loa microfilaremia. We conducted a community trial to assess the impact of semiannual MDA with ALB (400 mg) alone on LF and soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections in the Republic of Congo. Evaluation at 12 months showed that ALB MDA had not significantly reduced Wuchereria bancrofti antigenemia or microfilaria (mf) rates in the community (from 17.3% to 16.6% and from 5.3% to 4.2%, respectively). However, the geometric mean mf count in mf-positive subjects was reduced from 202.2 to 80.9 mf/mL (60% reduction, P = 0.01). The effect of ALB was impressive in 38 subjects who were mf-positive at baseline and retested at 12 months: 37% had total mf clearance, and individual mf densities were reduced by 73.0%. MDA also dramatically reduced the hookworm infection rate in the community from 6.5% to 0.6% (91% reduction), with less impressive effects on Ascaris and Trichuris. These preliminary results suggest that semiannual community MDA with ALB is a promising strategy for controlling LF and STH in areas with coendemic loiasis. PMID:25758650

  11. Use of separate-effects experiments in verification of system thermal-hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, P.

    1982-01-01

    In recent years, a number of advanced, best-estimate systems codes such as TRAC and RELAP5 have been developed in order to accurately predict the consequences of various postulated accidents and transients in Light Water Reactor (LWR) systems. Although these codes had to go through some verification or assessment during the developmental stage, it has been recognized that an independent assessment of these codes is necessary before they should be applied to any decision making process. The USNRC is, therefore, sponsoring such efforts at several national laboratories including BNL. The overall assessment matrix includes separate-effects, integral and plant tests. However, this paper will focus on how the separate-effects tests can be utilized in verifying the thermal-hydraulic models that control the various stages of postulated accidents and/or transients in a LWR system.

  12. Project INTREX. Semiannual Activity Report, 15 March 1972 - 15 September 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge.

    Experimentation and analysis dominate the activities with the Intrex information storage and retrieval system. Detailed analysis of the retrieval effectiveness of the Intrex-System configuration have been made in an effort to establish, quantitatively, the value of free-vocabulary and deep subject indexing; the usefulness of various fields of…

  13. Suncatcher monitoring project. Semi-annual technical report, July-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Treleven, K.; Maeda, B.T.

    1981-04-27

    Data collected during the second half of 1980 are presented for the Suncatcher - a passive solar heating system. Data include outdoor and indoor temperatures, auxiliary gas used, heating degree days, load and performance data, and storage temperatures in graphical and in tabular form. Work on the data acquisition system is briefly described. Some relevant computer codes are listed. (LEW)

  14. The effect of fuel thermal conductivity on the behavior of LWR cores during loss-of-coolant accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Wang, Dean; Ott, Larry J.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of variation in thermal conductivity of light water reactor fuel elements on core response during loss-of-coolant accident scenarios is examined. Initially, a simplified numerical analysis is utilized to determine the time scales associated with dissipation of stored energy from the fuel into the coolant once the fission reaction is stopped. The analysis is then followed by full reactor system thermal-hydraulics analysis of a typical boiling and pressurized water reactor subjected to a large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario using the TRACE code. Accordingly, sensitivity analyses to examine the effect of an increase in fuel thermal conductivity, up to 500%, on fuel temperature evolution during these transients are performed. Given the major differences in thermal-hydraulics design aspects of boiling and pressurized water reactors, different fuel and temperature responses during the simulated loss-of-coolant transients are observed.

  15. Task 3.7 -- Fuel utilization properties. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zygarlicke, C.J.

    1997-08-01

    The goal of the fuel utilization properties project was to determine the impacts of specific coal properties and additives on ash formation and deposition in advanced power systems. At the forefront of advanced power systems for coal utilization are pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) reactors and integrated gasifier-combined cycle (IGCC) reactors. Some of these systems are still in the infancy of their development and commercialization and very little is known about the types of ash deposition problems that could occur. Ash deposition in power generating systems is a significant problem that decreases efficiency and can lead to severe operational problems. During high temperature conversion of coal, the inorganic constituents in the coal are transformed into solid, liquid, and vapor species that differ in composition and size from the original inorganic constituents present in the coal. The chemical and physical properties of the intermediate ash stream are dependent in part upon the types, quantities and association of the minerals and other inorganics in the coal. There is a pressing need to obtain critical information on the aspects of inorganic transformations and deposit formation that will apply to advanced power systems so that mitigation measures can be prescribed such as predictive models, system design or operational changes, and the use of additives. The focus was on integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)-type systems, whereby small-scale furnaces were employed to simulate gasification or highly reducing conditions in order to produce entrained ash and deposits for analysis. Specific goals for this year`s work in the area of ash formation and deposition included the following: Determining the general chemical and physical properties of simulated entrained ash and deposits that may lead to operational problems, and Identifying and testing methods to mitigate deposition in IGCC-type systems.

  16. Sensor intercomparison of distributed surface radiation measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Baocheng; Wen, Jianguang; Li, Xiuhong; Liu, Qiang; Xiao, Qing; Bai, Junhua; Peng, Jingjing; Lin, Xingwen; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Xiaodan; Cai, Erli; Zhang, Jialin; Chang, Chongyan

    2015-12-01

    The Wireless Sensor Networks of Coarse-resolution Pixel Parameters (CPP-WSN) was established to monitor the heterogeneity of coarse spatial resolution pixel, with consideration of different categories of land surface parameters in Huailai, Hebei province, China (40.349°N, 115.785°E). The observation network of radiation parameters (RadNet) in CPP-WSN was developed for multi-band radiation measurement and consisted of 6 nodes covering 2km*2km area to capture its heterogeneity. Each node employed four sensors to observe the five radiation parameters. The number and location of nodes in RadNet were determined through the representativeness-based sampling method. Thus, the RadNet is a distributed observation system with nodes work synchronously and measurements used together. The intercomparison experiment for RadNet is necessary and was conducted in Huailai Remote Sensing Station from 5th Aug to 10th Aug in 2012. Time series observations from various sensors were collected and analyzed. The maximum relative differences among sensors of UVR, SWR, LWR, PAR, and LST are 4.83%, 5.3%, 3.71%, 11%, and 0.54%, respectively. Sensor/parameter differences indeed exist and are considerable large for PAR, SWR, UVR, and LWR, which cannot be ignored. The linear normalization and quadratic polynomial normalization perform similar for CUV5/UVR, PQS1/PAR, CNR4/SWR, and SI-111/LST. As for CNR4/LWR, quadratic polynomial normalization show higher accuracy than linear normalization, especially in node2, node4, and node5. Thus, the LWR measured by CNR4 is proved to be nonlinear, and should be normalized with quadratic polynomial coefficients for higher precision.

  17. Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. Semiannual technical progress report, April 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    An assessment of the HTGR opportunities from the year 2000 through 2045 was the principal activity on the Market Definition Task (WBS 03). Within the Plant Technology (WBS 13) task, there were activities to develop analytical methods for investigation of Coolant Transport Behavior and to define methods and criteria for High Temperature Structural Engineering design. The activities in support of the HTGR-SC/C Lead Plant (WBS 30 and 31) were the participation in the Lead Plant System Engineering (LPSE) effort and the plant simulation task. The efforts on the Advanced HTGR systems was performed under the Modular Reactor Systems (MRS) (WBS 41) to study the potential for multiple small reactors to provide lower costs, improved safety, and higher availability than the large monolithic core reactors.

  18. Modeling of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere system. Ph.D. Thesis Semiannual Report, 1 Nov. 1993 - 30 Apr. 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the period covered by this report we continued to investigate basic processes in magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and to develop algorithms for analyzing ultraviolet, visible, and X-ray images that will be acquired on the POLAR spacecraft. An image analysis procedure combines several numerical models to obtain a self-consistent picture of the ionosphere and thermosphere. Our ionosphere-aurora model was extended by the inclusion of the magnetic mirror force and a self-consistent parallel electric field in the ionosphere. The electron transport model which forms a critical part of the aurora model was evaluated by comparison with laboratory measurements and auroral observations. We determined the uncertainties that arise from our limited knowledge of cross sections and energy degradation functions for electron neutral interaction.

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  20. Trace element emissions. Semi-annual report, October 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pigeaud, A.; Maru, H.; Wilemski, G.; Helble, J.

    1995-02-01

    Many trace elements can exist in raw coal gas either in the form of metallic vapors or gaseous compounds which, besides their action on potentially ``very clean`` advanced power generating systems such as fuel cells and gas turbines, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when released into the atmosphere. Therefore, volatile trace contaminants from coal which can also be toxic must be removed before they become detrimental to both power plant performance/endurance and the environment. Five trace elements were selected in this project based on: abundance in solid coal, volatility during gasification, effects on downstream systems and toxicity to plant and animal life. An understanding was sought in this investigation of the interactions of these five trace elements (and their high temperature species) with the different components in integrated cleanup and power generating systems, as well as the ultimate effects with respect to atmospheric emissions. Utilizing thermodynamic calculations and various experimental techniques, it was determined that a number of trace contaminants that exist in coal may be substantially removed by flyash, and after that by different sorbent systems. High temperature cleanup of contaminants by sorbents such as zinc titanate, primarily to remove sulfur, can also absorb some metallic contaminants such as cadmium and antimony. Further polishing will be required, however, to eliminate trace contaminant species incorporating the elements arsenic, selemium, lead, and mercury.

  1. Experimentation With Computer-Assisted Instruction in Technical Education. Semi-Annual Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitzel, Harold E.; And Others

    Side-developments of an instructional systems development team which are themselves important products of a research effort are documented in this report. The five studies presented include an investigation of the comparability of computer-assisted and conventional test administration, prompting and confirmation as instructional strategies with…

  2. Project Intrex. Semiannual Activity Report, 15 September 1971 - 15 March 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge.

    Heavy emphasis was placed on experiments, and interpretation of experimental results. A set of experiments was designed to yield quantitative information on how the experimental subjects used the full-text-access system, why they used it and how effective it was. A detailed report of work on this topic to date is presented. The in-depth analysis…

  3. Task 10 - Technology Development Integration. Semiannual report, November 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Thomas A.; Daly, Daniel J.

    1997-12-31

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in conjunction with the Waste Policy Institute (WPI) will identify and integrate new technologies to meet site-specific environmental management (EM) requirements at contaminated sites appropriate to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) interests. EM technologies offered by developers will be evaluated to determine their complementary contribution to new cleanup systems focused on particular characterization and remediation problems at specific EM sites. The technology clusters identified will provide EM cleanup capabilities that are significantly faster, better, safer, and cheaper than systems that are currently available. Work will be performed under the DOE-EERC EM Cooperative Agreement (EMCA), which includes provisions to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize technologies that address environmental management needs of contaminated sites together with management activities which accelerate transfer of technologies. The effort began July 1, 1995.

  4. Investigation into continuous acoustic emission monitoring of BWR components. Semi-annual report

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, J W

    1980-06-02

    This report covers the work accomplished during the eight month period from October 1, 1977 through June 1, 1978. During this period, Peach Bottom Unit 3 was operational for the first six months and was shutdown for a refueling outage for the last two months. During the refueling outage, removal, recalibration, refurbishment, and reinstallation of all the AE instrumentation was performed. The coupling efficiency and the sensitivity of the sensors did not vary significantly with time. 5600 AE events were accepted showing several localized areas of concern. Five main steam safety relief valves suspected of leakage based on AE data were replaced. A leak in the recirculation system of the plant was clearly indicated and located by the AE system. Correlation between AE results and the results from alternate inservice inspection techniques has been initiated.

  5. Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-05-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  6. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program. QAP 49 summary of evaluations of 3217 reported analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlaw, P.D.

    1998-12-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 4 days after the reporting deadline via the Internet at www.eml.doe.gov. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 49th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIX) that were received on or before December 1, 1998.

  7. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

  8. Hindered diffusion of asphaltenes at elevated temperature and pressure. Semiannual report, March 20 - September 20, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Geelen, R.; Gregory, C.; Yang, X.

    1996-11-01

    The objectives are to: investigate the hindered diffusion of coal and petroleum asphaltenes in the pores of catalyst particles at elevated temperature and pressures; and examine the effects of concentration, temperature, solvent type, and pressure on the intraparticle diffusivity of asphaltenes. Progress was made in several areas during this time period. The high temperature/high pressure autoclave has been received from Parr Instrument Company and is in the process of being set up and checked out. During this time period we mainly worked in two areas. In the first area, we performed some measurements on the adsorption isotherms of the model compound quinoline in cyclohexane onto a Criterion 324 catalyst at three temperatures. We are looking at the effect of temperature on the adsorption isotherms of several model compounds. This area is important since the adsorptive uptake of asphaltenes is being studied and the model compound systems lend insight as to how we may expect the more complex asphaltene systems to behave during adsorption on the surface of the porous particles. We found that even for the simple model compound quinoline, the adsorption behavior vs. temperature was quite 0563 complex. The second area explored during this time period was the application of a mathematical model to adsorptive uptake data for asphaltenes on Criterion 324 catalyst particles. This adsorptive uptake data was obtained during the previous time period and was analyzed by mathematical modeling during the current time period. The detailed findings in both of these areas are presented in this report.

  9. Optics and symbolic computing. Semiannual report, 14 August 1987-31 March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Athale, R.

    1988-03-31

    Sorting is central to the solution of many knowledge-based and switching problems in advance computation and communication systems. Parallel-pipelined sorting algorithms are appropriate for applications that demand high throughput, low delay, and many data channels. One such algorithm, the bitonic sor, can be implemented with passive perfect shuffle interconnects between active stages of compare-and-exchange elements. This paper focuses on optical hardware to implement the CandE operation and show that by taking advantage of a distinctive feature of optical logic, namely bistability, comparison circuits of remarkable simplicity are attainable. Described are implementations of CandE in a Variety of optical device technologies capable of performing latching and nonlatching logic. Based on the device characteristics potential application areas for each technology are outlined.

  10. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. Semiannual report, 1 January-30 June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Walch, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  11. Task 3.9 -- Catalytic tar cracking. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Young, B.C.; Timpe, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    Tar produced in the gasification of coal is deleterious to the operation of downstream equipment including fuel cells, gas turbines, hot-gas stream cleanup filters, and pressure swing adsorption systems. Catalytic cracking of tars to smaller hydrocarbons can be an effective means to remove these tars from gas streams and, in the process, generate useful products, e.g., methane gas, which is crucial to the operation of molten carbonate fuel cells. The objectives of this project are to investigate whether gasification tars can be cracked by synthetic nickel-substituted micamontmorillonite, zeolite, or dolomite material; and whether the tars can be cracked selectively by these catalysts to produce a desired liquid and/or gas stream. Results to date are presented in the cited papers.

  12. Quality engineering and control. Semiannual progress report, November-December 1978, January-April 1979. [PCB

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R. L.

    1980-08-02

    This document reports the following: atomic absorption spectroscopy of Ir in Pu-Ir alloys; removal of Pu from soil; surface microanalysis using elemental x-ray mapping; microscopic scanning of Ga in Pu; microscopy of defects in Pu; emission spectroscopy of Ir and Y in PuO/sub 2/; gas chromatograhy of PCB's in transformer oils and water; liquid chromatography of chlorophenoxy acid herbicides in water; solution analysis by spark source mass spectrometry; a portable gas sampling system; flammability testing of HEPA filter materials; identification of Nomex and Kapton in fiberglass filters; bromine in Be density problem; x-ray fluorescence of Nb in U-Nb alloys; reactions in Pu-nitric acid-ethylene glycol; gas-fusion analysis of oxygen in chromium; analysis of sulfate and chloride in water-soluble oils; and decontamination of surface coatings. (DLC)

  13. HTGR process heat program design and analysis. Semiannual progress report, October 1, 1979-March 28, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of concept design studies implemented at General Atomic Company (GA) during the first half of FY-80. The studies relate to a plant design for an 842-MW(t) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor utilizing an intermediate helium heat transfer loop to provide high temperature thermal energy for the production of hydrogen or synthesis gas (H/sub 2/ + CO) by steam-reforming a light hydrocarbon. Basic carbon sources may be coal, residual oil, or oil shale. Work tasks conducted during this period included the 842-MW(t) plant concept design and cost estimate for an 850/sup 0/C reactor outlet temperature. An assessment of the main-loop cooling shutdown system is reported. Major component cost models were prepared and programmed into the Process Heat Reactor Evaluation and Design (PHRED) code.

  14. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report for April 1993 through September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: Project Management and Coordination; Materials and Processing; Materials Design Methodology; Data Base and Life Prediction; and Technology Transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 projects reported here.

  15. Acoustic agglomeration of power-plant fly ash. A comprehensive semi-annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.

    1980-02-01

    Results obtained during the reporting period are presented. The agglomeration of submicron fly ash particles has been studied as a function of sound pressure level, sound frequency, loading, and exposure time. A second generation model of the agglomeration process is being developed. A high-frequency, high-intensity variable speed siren delivering at least 600 W at frequencies up to 4000 Hz has been developed and tested. Details on the design and operation are presented. The agglomeration chamber has been completely cleaned and the aerosol generating system has been rebuilt. A mathematical model of the acoustics of agglomeration is being developed. Preliminary results of computerized electron microscopic scanning of fly ash particles during agglomeration are presented. (DMC)

  16. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Semiannual subcontract report, January 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    1996-02-01

    The objective of this three-year program is to advance Solarex`s cast polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology, reduce module production cost, increase module performance and expand Solarex`s commercial production capacities. Two specific objectives of this program are to reduce the manufacturing cost for polycrystalline silicon PV modules to less than $1.20/watt and to increase the manufacturing capacity by a factor of three. To achieve these objectives, Solarex is working in the following technical areas: casting, wire saws, cell process, module assembly, frameless module development, and automated cell handling. Accomplishments reported include: Cast first successful larger ingot producing 73% larger volume of usable Si; Increased the size of the ingot even further and cast an ingot yielding nine 11.4 {times} 11.4 cm bricks, representing a 125% increase in usable Si from a single casting; Operated the wire-saw in a semi-operational mode, producing 459,000 wafers at 94.1% overall yield; Reduced the cost of wire-saw consumables, spare parts, and waste disposal; Developed a cost-effective back surface field process that increases cell efficiency by 5% and began production trials; Developed a plan for increasing the capacity in the module assembly area; Completed qualification testing of modules built using Spire`s automated tabbing and stringing machine; Selected, tested, and qualified a low-cost electrical termination system; Completed long-term UV testing of experimental back sheets; Qualified the structure and adhesive-tape system for mounting frameless modules; and ARRI completed a study of the fracture properties of cast polycrystalline Si wafers and provided the information necessary to calculate the maximum stresses allowable during wafer handling.

  17. Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1995-06-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

  18. Task 9 - centrifugal membrane filtration. Semi-annual report April 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan, D.J.; Moe, T.A.; Collings, M.E.

    1997-05-01

    This report assesses a centrifugal membrane filtration technology developed by SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. The Tank Waste Focus Area was chosen for study. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{mu}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. The performance of the unit was evaluated with a statistical test design that determined the effect of temperature, pressure, membrane rotational speed, and solids loading on permeate flux. All four variables were found to be statistically significant, with the magnitude of the effect in the order of temperature, solids loading, rotor speed, and pressure. Temperature, rotor speed, and pressure had an increasing effect on flux with increasing value, while increases in solids loading showed a decrease in permeate flux. Significant interactions between rotor speed and solids loading and pressure and solids loading were also observed. The regression equation derived from test data had a correlation coefficient of 0.934, which represents a useful predictive capability for integrating the technology into DOE cleanup efforts. An extended test run performed on surrogate waste showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

  19. Office of the Inspector General. Semiannual report, April 1, 1997--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The following two sections highlight selected audits and investigations completed during this reporting period. More detailed summaries appear in subsequent sections of this report. (1) The NRC initiated a number of actions to address regulatory weaknesses. The OIG found that some of these actions may not produce a safety benefit commensurate with their cost. The OIG also found that meanings of several important regulatory terms are unclear to many NRC and licensee staff. The OIG believes a comprehensive, integrated plan could help focus agency resources on those issues with the most safety significance, and that a focus on plant safety will enhance the NRC`s credibility as an effective regulator. (2) Because of its wide-ranging potential impact, the OIG has been tracking the Year 2000 issue for some time. The OIG found that success of the NRC`s Year 2000 program could be enhanced. (3) In response to a memorandum from the NRC Chairman, the Acting Chief Financial Officer proposed an approach to developing an agency-wide, integrated financial management system. The OIG initiated an evaluation to identify and gain an understanding of the best practices for developing such a system, and recommended directions. The NRC sponsors a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) called the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, which provides the NRC with long-term technical assistance and research related to the High-Level Waste program. The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requires that, prior to extending the contract for the FFRDC, sponsors conduct a comprehensive review of their use and need. The OIG found that the draft renewal justification assesses some, but not all, of the FAR considerations.

  20. Recycle of contaminated scrap metal, Volume 1. Semi-annual report, September 1993--January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) has been demonstrated to be a robust, one-step process that is relatively insensitive to wide variations in waste composition and is applicable to a broad spectrum of DOE wastes. Catalytic Processing Unit (CPU) design models have been validated through experimentation to provide a high degree of confidence in our ability to design a bulk solids CPU for processing DOE wastes. Two commercial CEP facilities have been placed in commission and are currently processing mixed low level wastes. These facilities provide a compelling indication of the maturity, regulatory acceptance, and commercial viability of CEP. In concert with the DOE, Nolten Metal Technology designed a program which would challenge preconceptions of the limitations of waste processing technologies: demonstrate the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal could be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP would concentrate the radionuclides in a durable vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP would convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which could be used as an energy source; recover volatile heavy metals--that CEP`s off-gas treatment system would capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. The execution of this program resulted in all objectives being met. Volume I covers: executive summary; task 1.1 design CEP system; Task 1.2 experimental test plan; Task 1.3 experimental testing.

  1. Advanced development of PV encapsulants. Semiannual technical progress report, June 30, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Holley, W.A.

    1996-06-01

    The goals of the NREL PVMaT program are, among others, to reduce module manufacturing costs and improve the quality, and we might add here the reliability, of manufactured PV products. One component critical to the service life of PV modules is the useful life of the EVA resin-based encapsulant which is employed extensively by module manufacturers on a worldwide basis. This pottant has been in commercial use since 1982, and over that time has proven to be a dependable material from the standpoint of production, module fabrication, and end-use. But despite the widespread acceptance of the EVA resin-based A9918 and similar formulations for PV encapsulation, some module producers, end-users, and investigators have reported a yellowing or browning phenomenon with EVA resin-based encapsulants in the field. Wile the incidence of this discoloration/degradation appeared at comparatively few sites at the time that this present program was conceived, it raised serious concern as to the long term reliability of EVA resin-based encapsulation systems. Consequently, under the NREL PVMaT program, Springborn Laboratories proposed a comprehensive study of the EVA aging and discoloration problem and its possible solution(s). During the first year of this program, accelerated U.V. aging methods were surveyed. On careful review of the various types of accelerated U.V. aging equipment available, an Atlas Ci35A Weather-Ometer Xenon Exposure System was selected as appropriate equipment for this work. The following report summarizes how this accelerated aging technique has been used to develop a family of solutions to the discoloration problem, the most significant of which is a series of EVA-based encapsulants which are resistant to discoloration.

  2. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan

    2003-05-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for the reporting period October 1, 2002 to December 31, 2002 are described in this quarterly report. No new membership, workshops, research projects, internships, faculty fellowships or special studies were initiated during this reporting period. Contract completion is set for June 30, 2003. During the report period, six research progress reports were received (3 final reports and 3 semi-annual reports). The University of Central Florida contract SR080 was terminated during this period, as UCF was unable to secure research facilities. AGTSR now projects that it will under spend DOE obligated funds by approximately 340-350K$.

  3. Cone Penetrometer for Subsurface Heavy Metals Detection. Semiannual report, November 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Grisanti, Ames A.; Timpe, Ronald C.; Foster, H.J.; Eylands, Kurt E.; Crocker, Charlene R.

    1997-12-31

    Surface and subsurface contamination of soils by heavy metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Cd, has become an area of concern for many industrial and government organizations (1). Conventional sampling and analysis techniques for soil provide a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity for individual analytes. However, obtaining a representative sampling and analysis from a particular site using conventional techniques is time consuming and costly (2). Additionally, conventional methods are difficult to implement in the field for in situ and/or real-time applications. Therefore, there is a need for characterization and monitoring techniques for heavy metals in soils which allow cost-effective, rapid, in situ measurements. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to successfully measure metals content in a variety of matrices (3-15) including soil (16,17). Under the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) Industry Program, Science {ampersand} Engineering Associates (SEA) is developing a subsurface cone penetrometer (CPT) probe for heavy metals detection that employs LIBS (18). The LIES-CPT unit is to be applied to in situ, real-time sampling and analysis of heavy metals in soil. As part of its contract with DOE FETC, SEA is scheduled to field test its LIBS-CPT system in September 1997.

  4. Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Semiannual progress report, October 1995--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1997-04-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents which have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the capabilities and limitations of the integrity inherent in the RPV. In particular, it is vital to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPVs fracture resistance which occurs during service, since without that radiation damage, it is virtually impossible to postulate a realistic scenario that would result in RPV failure. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established with its primary goal to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior and, in particular, the fracture toughness properties of typical pressure-vessel steels as they relate to light-water RPV integrity. Effects of specimen size; material chemistry; product form and microstructure; irradiation fluence, flux, temperature, and spectrum; and postirradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties.

  5. Review of waste package verification tests. Semiannual report, October 1984-March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, P.

    1985-07-01

    The potential of WAPPA, a second-generation waste package system code, to meet the needs of the regulatory community is analyzed. The analysis includes an indepth review of WAPPA`s individual process models and a review of WAPPA`s operation. It is concluded that the code is of limited use to the NRC in the present form. Recommendations for future improvement, usage, and implementation of the code are given. This report also describes the results of a testing program undertaken to determine the chemical environment that will be present near a high-level waste package emplaced in a basalt repository. For this purpose, low carbon 1020 steel (a current BWIP reference container material), synthetic basaltic groundwater and a mixture of bentonite and basalt were exposed, in an autoclave, to expected conditions some period after repository sealing (150{sup 0}C, {approx_equal}10.4 MPa). Parameters measured include changes in gas pressure with time and gas composition, variation in dissolved oxygen (DO), pH and certain ionic concentrations of water in the packing material across an imposed thermal gradient, mineralogic alteration of the basalt/bentonite mixture, and carbon steel corrosion behavior. A second testing program was also initiated to check the likelihood of stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels and Incoloy 825 which are being considered for use as waste container materials in the tuff repository program. 82 refs., 70 figs., 27 tabs.

  6. Task 4.6 -- Biodesulfurization. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    The main focus in this task is the application of desulfurization enzymes to remove sulfur from crude oil, diesel fuel, or resid precursors for needle cokes. The most important question to be answered is how to utilize the Rhodococcus desulfurization complex in a nonaqueous solvent or medium, such as the oil itself. Successful application of nonaqueous enzymology to this problem will involve finding ways to stabilize the active conformations of the enzymes and provide for easy recovery of the enzymes, perhaps in an immobilized-enzyme packed-bed reactor. Understanding the desulfurization activity will require that they determine the regulatory and mechanistic properties of the enzymes. In the previous period, methods were developed for recovering larger amounts of the metabolic intermediates that would at the same time preserve all the labeling from oxygen isotopes by preventing exchange and avoiding displacement during derivatization for the gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis. In this period, methods were investigated for conversion of the sulfonate and the sulfite trapped on the resin to alkyl derivatives that could by analyzed by GC/MS and GC/Fourier transform infrared to determine the oxygen isotopic labeling. This information is needed to complete the understanding of the last steps occurring in the complex desulfurization system in the bacterium. The methods employed included treatment with diazomethane and trimethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate.

  7. Semiannual progress report for the Idaho Geothermal Program, October 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.T.; Smith, C.J.

    1981-09-01

    Modifications incorporated in the 5-MW Pilot Power Plant at Raft River Geothermal Test Site, system operational testing and maintenance and activities at that plant, and the water treatment program's corrosion studies are summarized. Progress is reported on performance tests of the ORNL condenser in the Prototype Power Plant, checkout of the direct contact heat exchanger, and modification of that plant. The progress of testing and continuing studies of direct-contact heat exchangers is reported - including the liquid-liquid direct contact heat exchanger, primary heat exchanger, sieve tray preheater, multiple-purpose apparatus, and packed bed studies and tests. Effects of production-injection tests at Raft River on monitor wells are summarized. Monitoring activities and studies of the environmental program at Raft River are described and plans of two successful proposers under the User-Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program are summarized. Investigation of costs for three aspects of direct use of hydrothermal energy is reported. Progress is reported on the Marketing Assistance Program, through which technical information and assistance are provided to potential users and developers of geothermal resources.

  8. Semiannual progress report for the Idaho Geothermal Program, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ihrig, R.R.

    1980-07-01

    Progress is reported for the Idaho Geothermal program between October 1, 1979 and March 31, 1980. Progress on the 5-MW Pilot Power Plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site is summarized including construction, steady-state and transient analyses by computer modeling, the geothermal water treatment program, and additional experimental and theoretical work on direct contact heat exchangers. Asbestos-cement pipe failures in the geothermal fluid supply and injection system are also summarized. The successful automatic control-mode testing of the Prototype Power Plant is reported. A continuing direct applications experiment in aquaculture is outlined, and a proposal to study various ramifications of irrigating agricultural and range lands with spent geothermal fluid is described briefly. Also outlined is the second experimental hydraulic fracture treatment of a geothermal well at Raft River as part of the National Well Stimulation Program. The improvements to the Raft River site facilities are described, and progress in providing technical information and assistance in the Outreach, or User Assistance program presented. Also presented is a new DOE program, the User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program, which is intended to reduce the financial risk of hydrothermal reservoir exploration by the private sector. Progress reports are also included on DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Program demonstration projects and Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) Program study projects.

  9. Review of waste package verification tests. Semiannual report, April 1985-September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, P.

    1986-01-01

    Several studies were completed this period to evaluate experimental and analytical methodologies being used in the DOE waste package program. The first involves a determination of the relevance of the test conditions being used by DOE to characterize waste package component behavior in a salt repository system. Another study focuses on the testing conditions and procedures used to measure radionuclide solubility and colloid formation in repository groundwaters. An attempt was also made to evaluate the adequacy of selected waste package performance codes. However, the latter work was limited by an inability to obtain several codes from DOE. Nevertheless, it was possible to comment briefly on the structures and intents of the codes based on publications in the open literature. The final study involved an experimental program to determine the likelihood of stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels and Incoloy 825 in simulated tuff repository environments. Tests for six-month exposure periods in water and air-steam conditions are described. 52 figs., 48 tabs.

  10. Semiannual progress report for the Idaho Geothermal Program, April 1 to September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ihrig, R.R.

    1981-03-01

    The completion of the 5-MW Pilot Power Plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site, modification of the similar, binary cycle Prototype Power Plant, and the water treatment program that studies environmentally safe ways to inhibit corrosion and scaling in geothermal power plants and investigates corrosion resistant materials are summarized. Studies of binary geothermal cycles using mixed hydrocarbon working fluids are described as part of the continuing search for ways to produce low-cost electricity from moderate-temperature geothermal fluids. Progress is reported on studies of direct contact heat exchanger concepts, heat rejection systems, and primary heat exchangers with augmentation. As part of the now-ended series of aquaculture experiments, an unsuccessful attempt to incubate common carp embryos in geothermal waters is reported. An experiment in revegetating disturbed land at Raft River is mentioned and progress on DOE's new User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program is described. An estimate is presented of the amount of hydrothermal energy that could be produced by the year 2000, with and without Federal assistance, for electric generation and direct applications such as industrial process heat. Progress is reported on the Marketing Assistance Program, through which technical information and assistance is provided potential users and developers of geothermal resources. Also reported is progress in DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Program demonstration projects and Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) Program study projects.

  11. Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Second semiannual report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Sirilumpen, M.; Tharapiwattananon, N.

    1997-08-01

    During the first six months of the program, the work has progressed as planned. We have constructed a reactor system and assembled all laboratory essentials for conducting the three-year project. First, the catalytic activities of the Cu(2+) ion exchanged alumina-pillared clay for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ethylene were measured. The temperature range was 250-500{degrees}C. The activities of this catalyst were substantially higher than the catalyst that has been extensively studied in the literature, Cu-ZSM-5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the acidity of the catalyst. The second part of the work was an in-depth FTIR study of the NO decomposition mechanism on the catalyst. This was planned as the first and the key step to obtain an understanding of the reaction mechanism. Key surface intermediates were identified from the FTIR spectra, and a redox type Eley-Rideal mechanism was proposed for the NO decomposition on this catalyst. This report will be divided into two parts. In Part One, we report results on the catalytic activities of the Cu-alumina-pillared clay and a direct comparison with other known catalysts. In Part two, we focus on the FTIR study and from the results, we propose a NO decomposition mechanism on this new catalyst. Plans for the next six months include tests of different pillared clays as well as the catalytic mechanism. The micro reactor will continue to be the key equipment for measuring the catalytic activities. FTIR will continue to be the major technique for identifying surface species and hence understanding the reaction mechanism.

  12. Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Semiannual progress report, September 1993--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-04-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only component in the primary pressure boundary for which, if it should rupture, the engineering safety systems cannot assure protection from core damage. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the capabilities and limitations of the integrity inherent in the RPV. In particular, ft is vital to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV`s fracture resistance that occurs during service. The Heavy-Section Steel (HSS) Irradiation Program has been established; its primary goal is to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior, and in particular the fracture toughness properties of typical pressure-vessel steels, as they relate to light-water RPV integrity. The program includes the direct continuation of irradiation studies previously conducted within the HSS Technology Program augmented by enhanced examinations of the accompanying microstructural changes. During this period, the report on the duplex-type crack-arrest specimen tests from Phase 11 of the K{sub la} program was issued, and final preparations for testing the large, irradiated crack-arrest specimens from the Italian Committee for Research and Development of Nuclear Energy and Alternative Energies were completed. Tests on undersize Charpy V-notch (CVN) energy specimens in the irradiated and annealed weld 73W were completed. The results are described in detail in a draft NUREG report. In addition, the ORNL investigation of the embrittlement of the High Flux Isotope RPV indicated that an unusually large ratio of the high-energy gamma-ray flux to fast-neutron flux is most likely responsible for the apparently accelerated embrittlement.

  13. Recycle of contaminated scrap metal, Volume 2. Semi-annual report, September 1993--January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) has been demonstrated to be a robust, one-step process that is relatively insensitive to wide variations in waste composition and is applicable to a broad spectrum of DOE wastes. Catalytic Processing Unit (CPU) design models have been validated through experimentation to provide a high degree of confidence in our ability to design a bulk solids CPU for processing DOE wastes. Two commercial CEP facilities have been placed in commission and are currently processing mixed low level wastes. These facilities provide a compelling indication of the maturity, regulatory acceptance, and commercial viability of CEP. In concert with the DOE, Nolten Metal Technology designed a program which would challenge preconceptions of the limitations of waste processing technologies: demonstrate the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal could be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP would concentrate the radionuclides in a durable vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP would convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which could be used as an energy source; recover volatile heavy metals--that CEP`s off-gas treatment system would capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. The execution of this program resulted in all objectives being met. Volume II contains: Task 1.4, optimization of the vitreous phase for stabilization of radioactive species; Task 1.5, experimental testing of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes; and Task 1.6, conceptual design of a CEP facility.

  14. Ceramic Technology Project, semiannual progress report for October 1993 through March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1994-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990, the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The original objective of the project was to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. The direction of the Ceramic Technology Project is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned.

  15. Irradiation Planning for Fully-Ceramic Micro-encsapsulated fuel in ATR at LWR-relevant conditions: year-end report on FY-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; R. Sonat Sen; Michael A. Pope; Brian Boer

    2011-09-01

    This report presents the estimation of required ATR irradiation levels for the DB-FCM fuel design (fueled with Pu and MAs). The fuel and assembly designs are those considered in a companion report [R. S. Sen et al., FCR&D-2011- 00037 or INL/EXT-11-23269]. These results, pertaining to the DB-FCM fuel, are definitive in as much as the design of said fuel is definitive. In addition to the work performed, as required, for DB-FCM fuel, work has started in a preliminary fashion on single-cell UO2 and UN fuels. These latter activities go beyond the original charter of this project and although the corresponding work is incomplete, significant progress has been achieved. However, in this context, all that has been achieved is only preliminary because the corresponding fuel designs are neither finalized nor optimized. In particular, the UO2 case is unlikely to result in a viable fuel design if limited to enrichment at or under 20 weight % in U-235. The UN fuel allows reasonable length cycles and is likely to make an optimal design possible. Despite being limited to preliminary designs and offering only preliminary conclusions, the irradiation planning tasks for UO2 and UN fuels that are summarized in this report are useful to the overall goal of devising and deploying FCM-LWR fuel since the methods acquired and tested in this project and the overall procedure for planning will be available for planning tests for the finalized fuel design. Indeed, once the fuel design is finalized and the expected burnup level is determined, the methodology that has been assembled will allow the prompt finalization of the neutronic planning of the irradiation experiment and would provide guidance on the expected experimental performance of the fuel. Deviations from the expected behavior will then have to be analyzed and the outcome of the analysis may be corrections or modifications for the assessment models as well as, possibly, fuel design modifications, and perhaps even variation of

  16. [ICASE Semiannual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at ICASE in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, computer science, and structures and material sciences during the period October 1, 2001 through March 31, 2002.

  17. Semiannual status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The work performed in the previous six months can be divided into three main cases: (1) transmission of images over local area networks (LAN's); (2) coding of color mapped (pseudo-color) images; and (3) low rate video coding. A brief overview of the work done in the first two areas is presented. The third item is reported in somewhat more detail.

  18. Environmental Restoration/Waste Management - applied technology. Semiannual report, July 1992--June 1993, Volume 1, Number 2, and Volume 2, Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P.W.; Bruner, J.M.; Price, M.E.; Talaber, C.J.

    1993-12-31

    The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Program is developing restoration and waste treatment technologies needed for the ongoing environmental cleanup of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and treatment technologies for wastes generated in the nuclear weapons production complex. These technologies can find application to similar problems nationally and even worldwide. They can be demonstrated at the Livermore site, which mirrors (on a small scale) many of the environmental and waste management problems of the rest of the DOE complex. Their commercialization should speed cleanup, and the scope of the task should make it attractive to US industry. The articles in this semi-annual report cover the following areas: ceramic final forms for residues of mixed waste treatment; treatment of wastes containing sodium nitrate; actinide volatility in thermal oxidation processes; in situ microbial filters for remediating contaminated soils; collaboration with scientists in the former Soviet Union on new ER/WM technologies; and fiber-optic sensors for chlorinated organic solvents.

  19. Thermal Hydraulic Computer Code System.

    1999-07-16

    Version 00 RELAP5 was developed to describe the behavior of a light water reactor (LWR) subjected to postulated transients such as loss of coolant from large or small pipe breaks, pump failures, etc. RELAP5 calculates fluid conditions such as velocities, pressures, densities, qualities, temperatures; thermal conditions such as surface temperatures, temperature distributions, heat fluxes; pump conditions; trip conditions; reactor power and reactivity from point reactor kinetics; and control system variables. In addition to reactor applications,more » the program can be applied to transient analysis of other thermal‑hydraulic systems with water as the fluid. This package contains RELAP5/MOD1/029 for CDC computers and RELAP5/MOD1/025 for VAX or IBM mainframe computers.« less

  20. Three-Dimensional (X,Y,Z) Deterministic Analysis of the PCA-Replica Neutron Shielding Benchmark Experiment using the TORT-3.2 Code and Group Cross Section Libraries for LWR Shielding and Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescarini, Massimo; Orsi, Roberto; Frisoni, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    The PCA-Replica 12/13 (H2O/Fe) neutron shielding benchmark experiment was analysed using the ORNL TORT-3.2 3D SN code. PCA-Replica, specifically conceived to test the accuracy of nuclear data and transport codes employed in LWR shielding and radiation damage calculations, reproduces a PWR ex-core radial geometry with alternate layers of water and steel including a PWR pressure vessel simulator. Three broad-group coupled neutron/photon working cross section libraries in FIDO-ANISN format with the same energy group structure (47 n + 20 γ) and based on different nuclear data were alternatively used: the ENEA BUGJEFF311.BOLIB (JEFF-3.1.1) and BUGENDF70.BOLIB (ENDF/B-VII.0) libraries and the ORNL BUGLE-96 (ENDF/B-VI.3) library. Dosimeter cross sections derived from the IAEA IRDF-2002 dosimetry file were employed. The calculated reaction rates for the Rh-103(n,n')Rh-103 m, In-115(n,n')In-115m and S-32(n,p)P-32 threshold activation dosimeters and the calculated neutron spectra are compared with the corresponding experimental results.

  1. Planetary system detection by POINTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The final report and semiannual reports 1, 2, and 3 in response to the study of 'Planetary System Detection by POINTS' is presented. The grant covered the period from 15 Jun. 1988 through 31 Dec. 1989. The work during that period comprised the further development and refinement of the POINTS concept. The status of the POINTS development at the end of the Grant period was described by Reasenberg in a paper given at the JPL Workshop on Space Interferometry, 12-13 Mar. 1990, and distributed as CfA Preprint 3138. That paper, 'POINTS: a Small Astrometric Interferometer,' follows as Appendix-A. Our proposal P2276-7-09, dated July 1990, included a more detailed description of the state of the development of POINTS at the end of the tenure of Grant NAGW-1355. That proposal, which resulted in Grant NAGW-2497, is included by reference.

  2. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress, April 1, 1998-September 30, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    This report from the Department of Education's (ED) Office of Inspector General (OIG) examines information-systems technology, financial systems and controls, and postsecondary education in the ED. The review focuses on postsecondary schools, lenders, and guaranty agencies. Significant investigative efforts revealed that fraud had been committed…

  3. Spherically-Convergent, Advanced-Fuel Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. C.; Nebel, R. A.; Schauer, M. M.; Umstadter, K. R.

    1998-11-01

    Combining nonneutral electron confinement with spherical ion convergence leads to a cm sized reactor volume with high power density.(R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol.), to appear (1998); D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. of Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998). This concept is being investigated experimentally,(D. C. Barnes, T. B. Mitchell, and M. M. Schauer, Phys. Plasmas) 4, 1745 (1997). and results will be reported. We argue that D-D operation of such a system offers all the advantages of aneutronic fusion cycles. In particular, no breeding or large tritium inventory is required, and material problems seem tractable based on previous LWR experience. In addition the extremely small unit size leads to a massively modular system which is easily maintained and repaired, suggesting a very high availability. It may also be possible to operate such a system with low or aneutronic fuels. Preliminary work in this direction will be presented.

  4. Advanced Technology Section semiannual progress report, April 1-September 30, 1977. Volume 1. Biotechnology and environmental programs. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, W.W. Jr.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1980-06-01

    Research efforts in six areas are reported. They include: centrifugal analyzer development; advanced analytical systems; environmental research; bioengineering research;bioprocess development and demonstration; and, environmental control technology. Individual abstracts were prepared for each section for ERA/EDB. (JCB)

  5. Improving process and system for EUV coat-develop track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harumoto, Masahiko; Stokes, Harold; Thouroude, Yan; Miyagi, Tadashi; Kaneyama, Koji; Pieczulewski, Charles; Asai, Masaya

    2015-03-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is well known to be a strong candidate for next generation, single exposure sub-30nm half-pitch lithography.[1] Furthermore, a high-NA EUV exposure tool released two years ago gave a strong impression for finer pattern results. On one hand, it seems that the coat develop track process remains very similar and in many aspects returns to KrF or ArF dry process fundamentals, but in practice the 26-32nm pitch patterning coat-develop track process also has challenges with EUV resist. As access to EUV lithography exposures has become more readily available over the last five (5) years, several challenges and accomplishments in the track process have been reported, such as the improvement of ultra-thin film coating, CD uniformity, defectivity, line width roughness (LWR) and so on.[2-6] The coat-develop track process has evolved along with novel materials and metrology capability improvements. Line width roughness (LWR) and defect control are demonstrated utilizing the SOKUDO DUO coat-develop track system with an ASML NXE:3100 in the IMEC (Leuven, Belgium) clean room environment. Additionally, we will show the latest lithographic results obtained by novel processing approaches in an EUV coat-develop track system.

  6. Dual cure low-VOC coating process: Phase 3. Semi-annual technical progress report, October 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzer, K.E.

    1993-11-01

    Objective of Phase 3 is to complete proof-of-principle testing in full-scale systems of the dual cure photocatalyst technology developed in earlier phases. Phase 3 commercial applications are aerospace topcoats, aerospace primers, and solventless manufacture of tape backings. Progress was made in improving urethane/acrylate formulation for aerospace topcoats, particularly in reverse impact, initial gloss, and loss retention during accelerated weathering. Formulations have now been developed which meet all initial criteria; the formulation was optimized. Aerospace primer formulations based on epoxy/flexibilizer systems were evaluated. Because of cure consistency problems and the increased need for non-chromated primers, work on aerospace primer system was de-emphasized to allow greater effort on development and commercialization of aerospace topcoat. Work on solventless backing saturants for electrical tape backings has been completed; optimal dual cure resin formulations have been used in preparing complete tape constructions.

  7. Amorphous silicon PVMaT Phase 2A. Semiannual subcontract report, 1 May 1992--31 October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.; Mackamul, K.; Metcalf, D.; Stern, M.; Volltrauer, H.; Varar, T.; Urbanski, E.; DiBiaso, T.; Skinner, D.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes work done under a subcontract to significantly advance the photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, reduce module production costs, increase average module performance, and increase the production capacity existing at Utility Power Group (UPG) and Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS). Areas of focus include (1) encapsulation and termination, (2) product design, (3) process and quality control, and (4) automation. UPG will improve its encapsulation system through the development of advanced encapsulation materials and processes that result in a module that does not require backing glass. In addition, UPG will work to develop advanced termination materials and processes. APS will perform development activities centered on the EUREKA manufacturing line. Developments in the APS EUREKA encapsulation system will be in addition to the UPG activity on encapsulation, and will offer an alternative approach to the problems of encapsulating large-area thin-film modules.

  8. Theoretical studies of resonance enhance stimulated raman scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor. Semiannual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of a real atomic level which is nearly resonant with the pump field can greatly enhance the Raman emission cross section. In order to accurately calculate the Raman gain in systems where resonance enhancement plays a dominant role, expressions for the pump and signal susceptibilities must be derived. These expressions should be valid for arbitrary field strengths in order to allow for pump and signal saturation. In addition, the theory should allow for arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates. This latter point is extremely vital for three level atomic systems such as the alkali earth metals since they do not have population reservoirs and can have widely varying spontaneous lifetimes on the three pertinent transitions. Moreover, the dephasing rates are strong functions of electron states and are therefore also different for the three coupled pairs of levels. These considerations are not as important when molecular systems are concerned since the large reservoir of rotational states serve to produce essentially equal longitudinal recovery rates for the population of the three levels. The three level system with three arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates was solved. There is no need for setting either pair of rates equal and the expressions are valid for arbitrarily strong fields.

  9. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress, April 1-September 30, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    This report from the Office of Inspector General (OIG) identifies systemic weaknesses in the operations and programs of the U.S. Department of Education (ED). The office provides accurate financial information to make informed decisions, manage for results, and ensure operation integrity. Vigorous fraud investigations are continuing. Audits reveal…

  10. U.S. Department of Education, Office of the Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress, April 1-September 30, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    The Office of Inspector General (OIG) continues to focus its energies on some of the significant challenges facing the U.S. Department of Education. It completed implementation and end-to-end testing of its internal systems for Y2K compliance, though it could not ensure compliance of its trading partners. The OIG advised the Department as it…

  11. Task 3.13 - Hot-Gas Filter Testing: Semi-annual report, July 1- December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.L.

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of the hot-gas cleanup (HGC) work on the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU) located at the Energy {ampersand} Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to demonstrate acceptable performance of hot-gas filter elements in a pilot-scale system prior to long-term demonstration tests. The primary focus of the experimental effort in the 2-year project is the testing of hot-gas filter element performance (particulate collection efficiency, filter pressure differential, filter cleanability, and durability) as a function of temperature and filter face velocity during short-term operation (100-200 hours). The filter vessel is used in combination with the TRDU to evaluate the performance of selected hot-gas filter elements under gasification operating conditions. This work directly supports the power systems development facility (PSDF) utilizing the M.W. Kellogg transport reactor located at Wilsonville, Alabama (1) and, indirectly, the Foster Wheeler advanced pressurized fluid-bed combustor, also located at Wilsonville.

  12. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Semiannual report, October 1990--March 1991: Volume 13

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V.

    1992-07-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties.

  13. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 2A. Semiannual subcontract report, 1 May 1993--31 October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.; Mackamul, K.; Metcalf, D.; Volltrauer, H.

    1994-04-01

    Utility Power Group (UPG) and its lower-tier subcontractor, Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS), continued work to develop their manufacturing lines. UPG focused on the automation of encapsulation and termination processes developed in Phase 1. APS focused on completion of the encapsulation and module design tasks while continuing process quality control, and automation projects. The goal is to produce 55-W (stabilized) EP50 modules in a new facility.

  14. Utah State Prison Space Heating with Geothermal Heat Third Semi-Annual Report for the Period January 1981 - July 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-11-01

    Facing certain cost overruns and lacking information about the long term productivity of the Crystal Hot Springs geothermal resource, costs of construction for the geothermal retrofit, and the method of disposal of geothermal waste water, the Energy Office embarked on a strategy that would enable the project participants to develop accurate cost information on the State Prison Space Heating Program through the completion of Task 5-Construction. The strategy called for: (1) Completion of the resource assessment to determine whether test well USP/TH-1 could be used as a production well. If well USP/TH-1 was found to have sufficient production capacity, money would not have to be expended on drilling another production well. (2) Evaluation of disposal alternatives and estimation of the cost of each alternative. There was no contingency in the original budget to provide for a reinjection disposal system. Cooperative agreement DE EC07-ET27027 indicated that if a disposal system requiring reinjection was selected for funding that task would be negotiated with DOE and the budget amended accordingly. (3) Completion of the preliminary engineering and design work. Included in this task was a thorough net present value cash flow analysis and an assessment of the technical feasibility of a system retrofit given the production characteristics of well USP/TH-1 . In addition, completion of the preliminary design would provide cost estimates for the construction and commissioning of the minimum security geothermal space heating system. With this information accurate costs for each task would be available, allowing the Energy Office to develop strategies to optimize the use of money in the existing budget to ensure completion of the program. Reported herein is a summary of the work towards the completion of these three objectives conducted during the period of January 1981 through June 1981.

  15. Continuous roll-to-roll amorphous silicon photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Semiannual subcontract report, 1 April 1993--30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M

    1994-06-01

    This report describes work for this reporting period under a 3-year program to advance Energy Conversion Device`s (ECD) roll-to-roll, triple-junction photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing technologies, to reduce the module production costs, to increase the stabilized module performance, and to expand commercial production capacity utilizing ECD technology. The specific 3-year goal is to develop advanced large-scale manufacturing technology incorporating ECD`s earlier research advances with the capability of producing modules with stable 11% efficiency at a cost of approximately $1.00 per peak watt. Major accomplishments during this reporting period include (1) the design, construction. amd testomg of a continuous roll-to-roll multipurpose amorphous silicon alloy solar cell deposition machine that incorporates improvements necessary to obtain higher efficiency solar cells; (2) development of a photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) technique for evaluating back-reflector systems; (3) the development of an improved textured Ag/ZnO back-reflector system demonstrating 25% gain in J{sub sc} over previous textured Al back-reflector systems; and (4) the design of a serpentine web continuous roll-to-roll deposition chamber.

  16. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Volume 15, Semiannual report: October 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1991 through March 1992.

  17. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Semiannual report, April 1992--September 1992: Volume 16

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1993-11-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs);using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a programs report covering the programmatic work from April 1992 through September 1992.

  18. Plan to develop predictive capability for equatorial scintillation storms. Semi-annual report, 1 July-31 December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mendillo, M.; Aarons, J.

    1997-01-27

    To begin the assembly of a coordinated, multiparameter data base suitable for testing various approaches to prediction the team went to Tucuman, Argentina and set up an airglow imaging system to record the 6300 A airglow depletions that mark the boundaries of low latitude irregularity patterns. A successful series of measurements were made during the campaign. Optical observations at Arequipa, Peru were made. The data are being reduced as of this time with interesting comparisons of phase and amplitude scintillation with optical and radar data. Localized differences are considerable so that on some days the occurrence of scintillation was different for stations 500 km apart.

  19. Advanced light water reactor requirements document: Chapter 4, Reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this chapter of the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Plant Requirements Document is to establish utility requirements for the design of the Reactor Systems of Advanced LWR plants consistent with the objectives and principles of the ALWR program. The scope of this chapter covers the following for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR): reactor pressure vessel, nozzles and safe-ends, reactor internals, in-vessel portions of fluid systems (including reactor internal pumps (Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) piping and spargers), nuclear fuel, and the control rods and control rod drive system (including hydraulic supply and accumulators). Special tools required for reactor system maintenance, inspection and testing are also covered.

  20. Online Learning Flight Control for Intelligent Flight Control Systems (IFCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niewoehner, Kevin R.; Carter, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The research accomplishments for the cooperative agreement 'Online Learning Flight Control for Intelligent Flight Control Systems (IFCS)' include the following: (1) previous IFC program data collection and analysis; (2) IFC program support site (configured IFC systems support network, configured Tornado/VxWorks OS development system, made Configuration and Documentation Management Systems Internet accessible); (3) Airborne Research Test Systems (ARTS) II Hardware (developed hardware requirements specification, developing environmental testing requirements, hardware design, and hardware design development); (4) ARTS II software development laboratory unit (procurement of lab style hardware, configured lab style hardware, and designed interface module equivalent to ARTS II faceplate); (5) program support documentation (developed software development plan, configuration management plan, and software verification and validation plan); (6) LWR algorithm analysis (performed timing and profiling on algorithm); (7) pre-trained neural network analysis; (8) Dynamic Cell Structures (DCS) Neural Network Analysis (performing timing and profiling on algorithm); and (9) conducted technical interchange and quarterly meetings to define IFC research goals.

  1. Subtask 2.7 -- Mercury capture on solid surfaces and aerosols. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    Determining the fly ash properties responsible for the capture of mercury in coal-fired power generation systems is key to understanding and controlling mercury emissions in these systems. Several capture mechanisms and interactions may be possible, such as condensation, chemical adsorption, physical adsorption, chemical bonding, and amalgamation. The chemical nature of the exposed surfaces and the amount of surface area are likely to affect the amount of mercury capture, so both of these parameters must be explored. Since much of the fly ash surface area is concentrated on submicron particles, the interaction of mercury with submicron particles needs to be evaluated. Another possible explanation of mercury capture on fly ash is the formation of amalgams with other metal species that may be present in the fly ash; if this is true, amalgamation may be a viable control technology. The project objectives are to relate mercury capture by fly ash to chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, determine mercury associations with submicron aerosols, evaluate mercury capture on metal sorbents, and relate experimental results to predictions based on state-of-the-art models. Results to date on these activities are described.

  2. Task 3.17 -- Hot-gas cleanup. Semi-annual report, July 1--December, 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Timpe, R.C.; Mann, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    The programmatic goal in advanced power systems will be to develop advanced methods for gas stream cleanup in combustion and gasification systems, using in situ and back-end technologies. The characteristics of the fuel, its ash, and sorbents will be evaluated to determine their impact on overall performance, including the reduction of gas stream contaminants. Objectives for the work to be performed under this subtask include the following: identifying effective means for hot-gas cleanup and testing in-bed sorbents for accomplishing 99% alkali capture as well as effective capture of sulfur and chlorine during PFBC; developing catalysts and effective operating ranges for removing tar from gasification process streams. Accomplishments to date and conclusions from the literature survey, thermogravimetric testing, and bench-scale testing on the capture of alkali during PFBC using in-bed sorbents are described. In addition Englehard EMcat Elite S-3699 was tested for its ability to crack coal tar produced during steam gasification of bituminous coal. Preliminary results are described.

  3. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan

    2003-05-01

    The quarterly activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in this quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter as dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading. No new memberships, workshops, research projects, internships, faculty fellowships or special studies were initiated during this reporting period. Contract completion is set for June 30, 2003. During the report period, nine subcontractor reports were received (5 final reports and 4 semi-annual reports). The report technology distribution is as follows: 3--aero-heat transfer, 2--combustion and 4--materials. AGTSR continues to project that it will under spend DOE obligated funds by approximately $329K.

  4. Task 2.8 -- Mercury speciation and capture in scrubber solutions. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, S.R.

    1997-08-01

    Investigations into mercury control across conventional scrubber systems have precipitated questions concerning (1) the initial speciation between oxidized and elemental forms of mercury in flue gas from coal-fired boilers and, subsequently, (2) the effects of scrubber slurry composition and pH on the mercury forms. Mercury capture in scrubber slurry is highly dependent on its form. Oxidized mercury is highly water-soluble and can be removed by scrubber slurry, whereas elemental mercury is not and passes through the scrubber to the stack. The objectives of this project are to determine whether scrubber solutions convert either form of mercury to another and whether mercury capture is affected by pH.

  5. Tools for placing the radiological health hazard in perspective following a severe emergency at a light water reactor (LWR) or its spent fuel pool.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Thomas; Welter, Phillip Vilar; Callen, Jessica; Martincic, Rafael; Dodd, Brian; Kutkov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Experience from past nuclear and radiological emergencies shows that placing the radiological health hazard in perspective and having a definition of "safe" are required in order to prevent members of the public, those responsible for protecting the public (i.e., decision makers), and others from taking inappropriate and damaging actions that are not justified based on the radiological health hazard. The principle concerns of the public during a severe nuclear power plant or spent fuel pool emergency are "Am I safe?" and "What should I do to be safe?" However, these questions have not been answered to the satisfaction of the public, despite various protective actions being implemented to ensure their safety. Instead, calculated doses or various measured quantities (e.g., ambient dose rate or radionuclide concentrations) are used to describe the situation to the public without placing them into perspective in terms of the possible radiological health hazard, or if they have, it has been done incorrectly. This has contributed to members of the public taking actions that do more harm than good in the belief that they are protecting themselves. Based on established international guidance, this paper provides a definition of "safe" for the radiological health hazard for use in nuclear or radiological emergencies and a system for putting the radiological health hazard in perspective for quantities most commonly measured after a release resulting from a severe emergency at a light water reactor or its spent fuel pool.

  6. Dual cure low-VOC coating process. Phase 3, Semi-annual report, April 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzer, K.E.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of 3M`s contract with the US Department of Energy is to complete proof-of-principle testing in full-scale systems of the dual cure photocatalyst technology developed in earlier Phases of the program. The Phase 3 commercial applications to be demonstrated are aerospace topcoats, aerospace primers, and solventless manufacture of tape backings. This report details activities of Phase 3 during this reporting period. In the second six months of Phase 3, work has continued in all three applications. Significant progress has been made in improving the performance of the urethane/acrylate formulation being used for the aerospace topcoat application. Key improvements have been made in obtaining increased reverse impact, initial gloss and gloss retention during accelerated weathering. Technical challenges have continued with the aerospace primer formulation. Efforts in this six months have continued to focus on establishing a good baseline epoxy/acrylate formulation with reliable cure conditions. Work on the third demonstration application, development of solventless backing saturants for electrical tape backings, has essentially been completed. Optimal dual cure resin formulations have been identified and utilized in preparing complete tape constructions. These tapes have been evaluated and characterized in terms of benchmark UL and internal 3M specifications for electrical tape performance.

  7. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Semiannual subcontract report, 8 December 1993--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes work done under a 3-year program to advance Solarex`s cast polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology, reduce module production cost, increase module performance, and expand Solarex`s commercial production capacities. The accomplishments described in this report are as follows: (1) the authors designed modifications to casting stations, ceramic molds, and sizing saws to allow for casting and sizing of larger ingots; (2) they demonstrated the casting of ingots with 17% larger volume; (3) the selected and purchased a new wire saw from HCT Shaping Systems; (4) they demonstrated wafering of eight bricks (2,400 wafers or {approximately}4.4 kilowatts at the cell level) in a 6.5-h run; (5) they demonstrated 14% average cell efficiency in the laboratory using an aluminum paste back surface field; (6) the Automation and Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) completed a modeling study of the Solarex module assembly process; (7) they identified and qualified three new lower-cost back sheet materials through accelerated environmental tests; and (8) they designed and built a test structure for mounting frameless modules, and selected two adhesives and began testing their ability to hold modules to the structure.

  8. Surfactant-polymer interaction for improved oil recovery. Semi-annual report, September 1, 1996--March 1, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The goal of the proposed research is to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, adsorption and mobility control. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation, high adsorption and viscous/heterogeneity fingering. The strategy of the proposed research is to use a scaled physical areal model to monitor surfactant-polymer slug movement in well-defined laboratory-scale surfactant-polymer floods. Suitable surfactant and polymer systems will be identified from phase behavior and coreflood experiments. Polymers and surfactant concentrations will be varied and the stability of the surfactant movement will be measured in the scaled physical areal model. Vertical and horizontal injection will be studied. The scaled model, fluids and all rock-fluid properties will be adequately characterized. Mechanistic simulations will be made to capture the mechanisms of fluid flow. This simulation will be used for process scale-up and optimization. The proposed research will supply experimental data and mechanistic principles for optimum surfactant-polymer slug design.

  9. HTGR-process steam/cogeneration and HTGR-steam cycle program. Semiannual report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Progress in the design of an 1170-MW(t) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Nuclear Steam Supply (NSS) is described. This NSS can integrate favorably into present petrochemical and primary metal process industries, heavy oil recovery operations, and future shale oil recovery and synfuel processes. The economics appear especially attractive in comparison with alternative coal-fired steam generation. Cost estimates for central station power-generating 2240- and 3360-MW(t) HTGR-Steam Cycle (HTGR-SC) plants are updated. The 2240-MW(t) HTGR-SC is treated to a probabilistic risk evaluation. Compared with the earlier 3000-MW(t) design, the results predict a slightly increased risk of core heatup, owing to the result of eliminating the capability of the boiler feed pump to operate at atmospheric backpressure. The differences in risk, however, are within the calculational uncertainties. Preliminary results of the ranking of safety enhancement features for the 1170-MW(t) HTGR indicate that the following modifications offer the most promise: (1) capability for main loop rundown, (2) natural circulation core auxiliary cooling, and (3) PCRV blowdown capability through the helium purification system to minimize activity release during some core heatups.

  10. Shuttle flight test of an advanced gamma-ray detection system. Semi-annual technical report, 1 July-31 December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Rester, A.C.

    1984-02-28

    In August of 1983 the Gamma-Ray Advanced Detector (GRAD) Project was assigned to the AFP-675 Program for flight on a future space-shuttle mission. In order to adapt the experiment to the requirements of AFP-675, a number of changes were made both in hardware and software. However, the necessity for such changes is more than affected by an expansion in scope of the experiment made possible by the introduction of a Payload Specialist into the operation. The principal changes to be made are in the avionics, as GRAD was originally designed for operation through ground-based telemetry. This complete redesigning of our avionics to accomodate operation by a Payload Specialist from the aft flight deck of the Orbiter allows us to take advantage of very recent findings on radiation-induced microprocessor failure in other space shuttle experiments in order to make the GRAD avionics less vulnerable to such latch-ups. Advances in bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator technology during the year since construction of the prototype GRAD now make it possible to construct a BGO shield with a closed-ended geometry. This improvement will enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, a new type of decay-vetoed calibration probe using an alpha-rather than a beta-emitting radioactive source is being investigated.

  11. Investigation of vanadium and hot/corrosion resistance of chromium and silicon base coating systems. Semiannual report, 1 April 1980-20 September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, R.G.; Barkalow, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    A continuing program to evaluate candidate coating alloys for gas turbines which are subjected to hot corrosion by furnace gases is discussed. Hot corrosion test on 10 candidate coating alloys were run at 700 to 900/sup 0/C using air with mixtures of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ + NaVO/sub 3/ and V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ + PbO. All of the test materials except Si-34Cr-23Ta were severely attacked in these experiments. Weight change data were compromised by breakage of some of the samples, which in turn was probably attributable to extreme brittleness and/or corrosion of grain boundaries in the cast structure. Trends in weight change versus alloy and salt chemistry and correlation of ..delta.. M/A values with degradation microstructure were therefore difficult to establish. The baseline CoCrAlY coating on Mar-M509 was severely attacked but not completely consumed by any of the sodium-vanadium melts; a systematic variation in depth of attack or degradation microstructure with Na:V ratio was not apparent. The attack front of all of the samples was characterized by a beta-denuded zone averaging about 20 mu-m in thickness. Depth of attack was uniform in many areas, but there were numerous incidences of deeper, more irregular corrosion of the type shown in Figure 2. Again, however, the attack front exhibited a well-defined beta-denuded zone in advance of the scale, showing that leaching of Al by the liquid salt deposit was a precursor to metal consumption.

  12. Functionally graded materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems research. Semi-annual report, May 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    A combination of two new production methods, reaction-bonded metal oxide (RBMO) and electrochemical processing, have been utilized to create a functionally graded thermal barrier coating. Electrochemical processing, which includes both electrodeposition (EDEP) and electrophoretic deposition (EPD), has been used to deposit both the metallic and ceramic layers of the coating. EPD has been used to deposit the RBMO precursor powders, which exhibit the dual properties of both a metal and ceramic due to its composite nature. A summary of the FGM production methods and resulting characterization of the produced coatings for the eleventh and twelfth quarters (5/96--12/96), as well as a project summary, are outlined in this final report.

  13. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Semiannual technical report, 1 January 1996--30 June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J

    1997-01-01

    Two specific objectives of Solarex`s program are to reduce the manufacturing cost for polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic modules to less than $1.20/watt and to increase the manufacturing capacity by a factor of three. This report highlights accomplishments during the period of January 1 through June 30, 1996. Accomplishments include: began the conversion of production casting stations to increase ingot size; operated the wire saw in a production mode with higher yields and lower costs than achieved on the ID saws; developed and qualified a new wire guide coating material that doubles the wire guide lifetime and produces significantly less scatter in wafer thickness; completed a third pilot run of the cost-effective Al paste back-surface-field (BSF) process, verifying a 5% increase in cell efficiency and demonstrating the ability to process and handle the BSF paste cells; completed environmental qualification of modules using cells produced by an all-print metallization process; optimized the design of the 15.2-cm by 15.2-cm polycrystalline silicon solar cells; demonstrated the application of a high-efficiency process in making 15.2-cm by 15.2-cm solar cells; demonstrated that cell efficiency increases with decreasing wafer thickness for the Al paste BSF cells; qualified a vendor-supplied Tedlar/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) laminate to replace the combination of separate sheets of EVA and Tedlar backsheet; demonstrated the operation of a prototype unit to trim/lead attach/test modules; and demonstrated the operation of a wafer pull-down system for cassetting wet wafers.

  14. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program. Volume 2, No. 1: Semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1994-07-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the capabilities and limitations of the integrity inherent in the RPV. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established with its primary goal to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior, and in particular the fracture toughness properties, of typical pressure-vessel steels as they relate to light-water reactor pressure-vessel integrity. The HSSI Program is arranged into nine tasks: (1) program management, (2) K{sub ic} curve shift in high-copper welds, (3) K{sub ia} curve shift in high-copper welds, (4) irradiation effects on cladding, (5) K{sub ic} and K{sub ia} curve shifts in low upper-shelf (LUS) weld, (6) irradiation effects in a commercial LUS weld, (7) microstructural analysis of irradiation, (8) in-service aged material evaluations, and (9) correlation monitor materials. During this period, additional analyses on the effects of precleavage stable ductile tearing on the toughness of high-copper welds 72W and 73W demonstrated that the size effects observed in the transition region are not due to substantial differences in ductile tearing behavior. Possible modifications to irradiated duplex crack-arrest specimens were examined to increase the likelihood of their successful testing. Characterization of a second batch of 72W and 73W welds was begun and results of the Charpy V-notch testing is provided. A review of literature on the annealing response of reactor pressure vessel steels was initiated.

  15. Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Volume 4, No. 2. Semiannual progress report, April 1993--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-03-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents which have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. In particular, it is vital to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV`s fracture resistance which occurs during service, since without that radiation damage, it is virtually impossible to postulate a realistic scenario that would result in RPV failure. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established to provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior and, in particular, the fracture toughness properties of typical pressure-vessel steels. Effects of specimen size; material chemistry; product form and microstructure; irradiation fluence, flux, temperature, and spectrum; and postirradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties. The HSSI Program is arranged into 14 tasks: (1) program management, (2) fracture toughness (K{sub lc}) curve shift in high-copper welds, (3) crack-arrest toughness (K{sub la}) curve shift in high-copper welds, (4) irradiation effects on cladding, (5) K{sub lc} and K{sub la} curve shifts in low upper-shelf (LUS) welds, (6) annealing effects in LUS welds, (7) irradiation effects in a commercial LUS weld, (8) microstructural analysis of irradiation effects, (9) in-service aged material evaluations, (10) correlation monitor materials, (11) special technical assistance, (12) Japan Power Development Reactor steel examination, (13) technical assistance for Joint Coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS) Working Groups 3 and 12, and (14) additional requirements for materials.

  16. 3D neutronic codes coupled with thermal-hydraulic system codes for PWR, and BWR and VVER reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbuch, S.; Velkov, K.; Lizorkin, M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the objectives of code development for coupling 3D neutronics codes with thermal-hydraulic system codes. The present status of coupling ATHLET with three 3D neutronics codes for VVER- and LWR-reactors is presented. After describing the basic features of the 3D neutronic codes BIPR-8 from Kurchatov-Institute, DYN3D from Research Center Rossendorf and QUABOX/CUBBOX from GRS, first applications of coupled codes for different transient and accident scenarios are presented. The need of further investigations is discussed.

  17. Notes on the system TV Geminorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    Low-resolution SWP spectra and high-resolution LWR spectra of the SRc variable star TV Gem have been studied. The available ultraviolet spectrophotometry and UBV photometry of the system can be interpreted in terms of the blended light from a B3.5 IV star and an M1 Iab star. The separation of the two stars is less than about 3 arc sec. Since the magnitude difference is a minimum in the B filter, being about 1.6 mag there, direct observation of TV Gem in a passband at 4400 A under conditions of good seeing might reveal the blue companion. No evidence was found for absorption lines of Mg II formed in the part of the wind of the M star which is projected against the disk of the B star.

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking in LWR materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Park, J.H.; Shack, W.J.; Zhang, J.; Brust, F.W.; Dong, P.

    1998-03-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen level on fatigue life of austenitic stainless steels is discussed and the results of a detailed study of the effect of the environment on the growth of cracks during fatigue initiation are presented. Initial test results are given for specimens irradiated in the Halden reactor. Impurities introduced by shielded metal arc welding that may affect susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking are described. Results of calculations of residual stresses in core shroud weldments are summarized. Crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys under cyclic loading with R ratios from 0.2--0.95 in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 C are summarized.

  19. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Kassner, T. F.; Park, J. H.; Shack, W. J.; Zhang, J.; Brust, F. W.; Dong, P.

    1997-12-05

    The effect of dissolved oxygen level on fatigue life of austenitic stainless steels is discussed and the results of a detailed study of the effect of the environment on the growth of cracks during fatigue initiation are presented. Initial test results are given for specimens irradiated in the Halden reactor. Impurities introduced by shielded metal arc welding that may affect susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking are described. Results of calculations of residual stresses in core shroud weldments are summarized. Crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys under cyclic loading with R ratios from 0.2-0.95 in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 C are summarized.

  20. Results of LWR snubber aging research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D P; Werry, E V; Blahnik, D E

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the aging research results and recommendations for snubbers used in commercial nuclear power plants. Snubbers are safety-related devices used to restrain undesirable dynamic loads at various piping and equipment locations in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Each snubber must accommodate a plant's normal thermal movements and must be capable of restraining the maximum off-normal dynamic loads, such as a seismic event or a transient, postulated for its specific location. The effects of snubber aging and the factors that contribute to the degradation of their safety performance need to be better understood. Thus, Phase II of Nuclear Plant Aging Research was conducted to enhance the understanding of snubber aging and its consequences. Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff and their subcontractors, Lake Engineering and Wyle Laboratories, visited eight sites (encompassing thirteen plants) to conduct interviews with NPP staff and to collect data on snubber aging, testing, and maintenance. The Phase II research methodology, evaluation, results, conclusions, and recommendations are described in the report. Effective methods for service-life monitoring of snubbers are included in the recommendations.

  1. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289{degree}C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320{degree}C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections.

  2. Corrosion Tests of LWR Fuels - Nuclide Release

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Finn; Y. Tsai; J.C. Cunnane

    2001-12-14

    Two BWR fuels [64 and 71 (MWd)/kgU], one of which contained 2% Gd, and two PWR fuels [30 and 45 (MWd)/kgU], are tested by dripping groundwater on the fuels under oxidizing and hydrologically unsaturated conditions for times ranging from 2.4 to 8.2 yr at 90 C. The {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 97}Mo, and {sup 90}Sr releases are presented to show the effects of long reaction times and of gadolinium on nuclide release. This investigation showed that the five nuclides at long reaction times have similar fractional release rates and that the presence of 2% Gd reduced the {sup 99}Tc cumulative release fraction by about an order of magnitude over that of a fuel with a similar burnup.

  3. 76 FR 40114 - Semiannual Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... evolving segment of the money services business (MSB) community. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 06/28/10 75 FR 36589 NPRM Comment Period End 07/28/10 NPRM Comment Period Extended........ 08/28/10 75 FR... provide continuing education programs. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 12/00/11 Regulatory...

  4. Semi-Annual Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin

    1998-01-01

    This 6 month period continued the effort on absolute spectrally continuous stellar calibration begun in January 1991. The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) DCATT team has continued its analysis and intercomparisons of the Spatial Infrared Imaging Telescope (SPIRIT-III) ground calibration, the on-orbit stellar calibration (using our stellar spectra), and the on-orbit observations of the MIT Lincoln Labs. "emissive spheres". All three approaches are in very good agreement, at about the +/-3% level (absolute). This demonstrates the consistency of our overall calibration scheme and validates the context in which Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and MSX data also reside. Final "globalization" of the overall MSX calibration is in progress, combining calibrations by stars, by the "emissive spheres" experiments, and by the NIST-traceable ground calibration. The work in support of the Infrared Telescope Satellite (IRTS) continues. I am currently calculating the contribution of diffuse starlight to the background in "dark" regions of the sky observed by the IRTS Near-IR Spectrometer. To accomplish this I am using the SKY model with a new extended wavelength capability, covering the 1.00-2.00 micron region for the first time. These calculations, together with models of the zodiacal light, will be used to seek the presence of a cosmic near-IR background. Papers VIII and IX in the calibration series appeared in this 6 month period. These describe our results on asteroid thermal nodes and anticipate the eventual production of a new network of stellar calibrators, numbering over 400 and extending over the whole sky. These will be constructed as stellar "templates", building on the legacy of our series of calibration papers. The first analyses of star counts from MSX are under way using SKY.

  5. Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent BWR fuel in BWR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waris, A.; Sumbono, Prayudhatama, Dythia; Novitrian, Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-01

    Spent fuel management is considered to be one of the main problems in energy nuclear utilization. Recycling after reprocessing is one of the options for dealing with nuclear reactor spent fuel. Reprocessing is very costly and needs remote handling since spent fuel is very hazard high level waste. On top of that, only a small number of countries can manage a reprocessing plant. If country likes Indonesia decide to "go nuclear", it should find another way to deal with the nuclear spent fuel. Korea has proposed the DUPIC (Direct Utilization of Spent PWR fuel In CANDU) concept. Nevertheless, DUPIC concept requires two types of nuclear power plants, i.e., pressurized water reactor (PWR) and CANadian Deuterium Uranium reactor (CANDU). In this study, we evaluate a scheme of direct recycling of spent BWR fuel in BWR system, under the concept that we have called as a SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario. Several spent BWR fuel compositions in loaded BWR fuel has been evaluated to achieve the criticality of reactor.

  6. Cermet composite thermal spray coatings for erosion and corrosion protection in combustion environments of advanced coal-fired boilers. Semiannual technical progress report, August 14, 1996--January 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1997-02-01

    Research is presently being conducted to determine the optimum ceramic/metal combination in thermally sprayed metal matrix composite coatings for erosion and corrosion resistance in new coal-fired boilers. The research will be accomplished by producing model cermet composites using powder metallurgy and electrodeposition methods in which the effect of ceramic/metal combination for the erosion and corrosion resistance will be determined. These results will provide the basis for determining the optimum hard phase constituent size and volume percent in thermal spray coatings. Thermal spray coatings will be applied by our industrial sponsor and tested in our erosion and corrosion laboratories. In the first six months of this project, bulk powder processed Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were produced at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The results of microstructural characterization of these alloys were presented in the first semiannual report. The composite samples contained 0, 21, 27, 37, and 45 volume percent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with an average particle size of 12 um. An increase in the volume fraction of alumina in the nickel matrix from 0 to 45% led to a significant increase in hardness of these composites.

  7. Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process

    SciTech Connect

    E. R. Johnson; R. E. Best

    2009-12-28

    materials were produced and consumed in a fleet of 100 1,000 MWe LWRs and in FRs. The model also included recycle and reuse of extant inventories of spent LWR fuel. The results of the simulations allowed comparisons of the two fuel cycles from the standpoints of cost, non-proliferation, radiological health, wastes generated, and sustainability. Results of the research also provide insights regarding (i) multiple recycling of uranium and plutonium from spent MOX fuel in LWRs, (ii) costs and benefits of reenriching and reusing uranium from spent LWR fuel; (iii) effects of using uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides from LWR spent fuels to produce fuel for FRs; (iv) net rates of consumption (burning) in FRs of actinide elements produced in LWRs, and (v) ependencies of and interactions among the different systems of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle -- and the flows of nuclear materials between these systems.

  8. The Physics of transmutation systems : system capabilities and performances.

    SciTech Connect

    Finck, P. J.

    2002-08-21

    This document is complementary to a document produced by Prof. Salvatores on ''The Physics of Transmutation in Critical or Subcritical Reactors and the Impact on the Fuel Cycle''. In that document, Salvatores describes the fundamental of transmutation, through basic physics properties and general parametric studies. In the present document we try to go one step further towards practical implementation (while recognizing that the practical issues such as technology development and demonstration, and economics, can only be mentioned in a very superficial manner). Section 1 briefly overviews the possible objectives of transmutation systems, and links these different objectives to possible technological paths. It also describes the overall constraints which have to be considered when developing and implementing transmutation systems. In section 2 we briefly overview the technological constraints which need to be accounted for when designing transmutation systems. In section 3 we attempt to provide a simplified classification of transmutation systems in order to clarify later comparisons. It compares heterogeneous and homogeneous recycle strategies, and single and multi-tier systems. Section 4 presents case analyses for assessing the transmutation performance of various individual systems, starting with LWR's (1. generic results; 2. multirecycle of plutonium; 3. an alternative: transmutation based on a Thorium fuel cycle), followed by Gas-Cooled Reactors (with an emphasis on the ''deep burn'' approach), and followed by Fast Reactors and Accelerator Driven systems (1. generic results; 2. homogeneous recycle of transuranics; 3. practical limit between Fast Reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems) Section 5 summarizes recent results on integrated system performances. It focuses first on interface effects between the two elements of a dual tier system, and then summarizes the major lessons learned from recent global physics studies.

  9. Fuel Cycle System Analysis Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Dirk Gombert; Edward A. Hoffman; Gretchen E. Matthern; Kent A. Williams

    2009-06-01

    This Handbook aims to improve understanding and communication regarding nuclear fuel cycle options. It is intended to assist DOE, Campaign Managers, and other presenters prepare presentations and reports. When looking for information, check here. The Handbook generally includes few details of how calculations were performed, which can be found by consulting references provided to the reader. The Handbook emphasizes results in the form of graphics and diagrams, with only enough text to explain the graphic, to ensure that the messages associated with the graphic is clear, and to explain key assumptions and methods that cause the graphed results. Some of the material is new and is not found in previous reports, for example: (1) Section 3 has system-level mass flow diagrams for 0-tier (once-through), 1-tier (UOX to CR=0.50 fast reactor), and 2-tier (UOX to MOX-Pu to CR=0.50 fast reactor) scenarios - at both static and dynamic equilibrium. (2) To help inform fast reactor transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio and uranium supply behavior, section 5 provides the sustainable fast reactor growth rate as a function of TRU conversion ratio. (3) To help clarify the difference in recycling Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, and all-TRU, section 5 provides mass fraction, gamma, and neutron emission for those four cases for MOX, heterogeneous LWR IMF (assemblies mixing IMF and UOX pins), and a CR=0.50 fast reactor. There are data for the first 10 LWR recycle passes and equilibrium. (4) Section 6 provides information on the cycle length, planned and unplanned outages, and TRU enrichment as a function of fast reactor TRU conversion ratio, as well as the dilution of TRU feedstock by uranium in making fast reactor fuel. (The recovered uranium is considered to be more pure than recovered TRU.) The latter parameter impacts the required TRU impurity limits specified by the Fuels Campaign. (5) Section 7 provides flows for an 800-tonne UOX separation plant. (6) To complement 'tornado' economic uncertainty

  10. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems, Volume 1: Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This is the first annual technical progress report for The Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems Program. Two semi-annual technical progress reports were previously issued. This program was initially by the Department of Energy as an R D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular three-stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO/sub x/ formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; coal ash and sulfur is subsequently removed from the combustion gases by an impact separator in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage. 27 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Annual Collection and Storage of Solar Energy for the Heating of Buildings, Report No. 3. Semi-Annual Progress Report, August 1977 - January 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, J. Taylor; And Others

    This report is part of a series from the Department of Energy on the use of solar energy in heating buildings. Described here is a new system for year around collection and storage of solar energy. This system has been operated at the University of Virginia for over a year. Composed of an underground hot water storage system and solar collection,…

  12. Advanced light water reactor requirements document: Chapter 3, Reactor coolant system and reactor non-safety auxiliary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this chapter of the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Plant Requirements Document is to establish utility requirements for the design of the Reactor Coolant System and the Reactor Non-safety Auxiliary Systems of Advanced LWR plants consistent with the objectives and principles of the ALWR program. The scope of this chapter covers the reactor coolant system and reactor non-safety auxiliary systems for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Non-safety auxiliaries include systems which are required for normal operation of the plant but are not required to operate for accident mitigation or to bring the plant to a safe shutdown condition. For PWRs, the reactor coolant system, steam generator system, chemical and volume control system and boron recycle system are included. For BWRs, the reactor coolant system and reactor water cleanup system are included. The chapter also includes requirements for the above systems which are common to BWRs and PWRs and requirements for process sampling for BWRs and PWRs.

  13. Transportation systems analyses: Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The principal objective of this study is to accomplish a systems engineering assessment of the nation's space transportation infrastructure. This analysis addresses the necessary elements to perform man delivery and return, cargo transfer, cargo delivery, payload servicing, and the exploration of the Moon and Mars. Specific elements analyzed, but not limited to, include the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), the National Launch System (NLS), the current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) fleet, ground facilities, the Space Station Freedom (SSF), and other civil, military and commercial payloads. The performance of this study entails maintaining a broad perspective on the large number of transportation elements that could potentially comprise the U.S. space infrastructure over the next several decades. To perform this systems evaluation, top-level trade studies are conducted to enhance our understanding of the relationships between elements of the infrastructure. This broad 'infrastructure-level perspective' permits the identification of preferred infrastructures. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assure the credibility and usefulness of study results. This executive summary of the transportation systems analyses (TSM) semi-annual report addresses the SSF logistics resupply. Our analysis parallels the ongoing NASA SSF redesign effort. Therefore, there could be no SSF design to drive our logistics analysis. Consequently, the analysis attempted to bound the reasonable SSF design possibilities (and the subsequent transportation implications). No other strategy really exists until after a final decision is rendered on the SSF configuration.

  14. Pyrochemical separations technologies envisioned for the U. S. accelerator transmutation of waste system

    SciTech Connect

    Laidler, J. J.

    2000-02-17

    A program has been initiated for the purpose of developing the chemical separations technologies necessary to support a large Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) system capable of dealing with the projected inventory of spent fuel from the commercial nuclear power stations in the United States. The baseline process selected combines aqueous and pyrochemical processes to enable the efficient separation of uranium, technetium, iodine, and the transuranic elements from LWR spent fuel. The diversity of processing methods was chosen for both technical and economic factors. A six-year technology evaluation and development program is foreseen, by the end of which an informed decision can be made on proceeding with demonstration of the ATW system.

  15. System-level line-edge roughness limits in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Juanita; Naulleau, Patrick P; Niakoula, Dimitra; Zhang, Guojing

    2008-02-13

    As critical dimensions shrink, line edge and width roughness (LER and LWR) become of increasing concern. Traditionally LER is viewed as a resist-limited effect; however, as critical dimensions shrink and LER requirements become proportionally more stringent, system-level effects begin to play an important role. Recent advanced EUV resist testing results have demonstrated lower bounds on achievable LER at the level of approximately 2 to 3 nm. Here we use modeling to demonstrate that a significant portion of this low bound may in fact be do to system-level effects and in particular the mask. Of concern are both LER on the mask as well as roughness of the multilayer reflector. Modeling also shows roughness (flare) in the projection optics not to be of concern.

  16. The influence of external source intensity in accelerator/target/blanket system on conversion ratio and fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochurov, Boris P.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of neutron balance relation for a subcritical system with external source shows that a high ratio of neutron utilization (conversion ratio, breeding ratio) much exceeding similar values for nuclear reactors (both thermal or fast spectrum) is reachable in accelerator/target/blanket system with high external neutron source intensity. An accelerator/target/blanket systems with thermal power in blanket about 1850 Mwt and operating during 30 years have been investigated. Continual feed up by plutonium (fissile material) and Tc-99 (transmuted material) was assumed. Accelerator beam intensity differed 6.3 times (16 mA-Case 1, and 100 mA-Case 2). Conversion ratio (CR) was defined as the ratio of Tc-99 nuclei transmuted to the number of Pu nuclei consumed. The results for two cases are as follows: Case 1Case 2CR 0.77 1.66N(LWR) 8.6 19.1Power MWt(el) 512 225 where N(LWR)-number of LWRs(3000 MWt(th)) from which yearly discharge of Tc-99 is transmuted during 30 years. High value of conversion ratio considerably exceeding 1 (CR=1.66) was obtained in the system with high source intensity as compared with low source system (CR=0.77). Net output of electric power of high source intensity system is about twice lower due to consumption of electric power for accelerator feed up. The loss of energy for Tc-99 transmutation is estimated as 40 Mev(el)/nuclei. Yet high conversion ratio (or breeding ratio) achievable in electronuclear installations with high intensity of external source can effectively be used to close fuel cycle (including incineration of wastes) or to develop growing nuclear power production system.

  17. Computational control of networks of dynamical systems: Application to the National Airspace System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayen, Alexandre M.

    The research presented in this thesis is motivated by the need for efficient analysis, automation, and optimization tools for the National Airspace System (NAS). A modeling framework based on hybrid system theory is developed, which captures congestion propagation into the Air Traffic Control (ATC) system. This model is validated against Enhanced Traffic Management System (ETMS) data and used for analyzing low level actuation of the human Air Traffic Controller. This model enables us to quantify the capacity limit of the airspace in terms of geometry and traffic patterns, as well as the speed of propagation of congestion in the system. Once this setting is in place, maneuver assignment problems are posed as Mixed Integer Linear Programs (MILPs). Problem specific algorithms are designed to show that certain MILPs can be solved exactly in polynomial time. These algorithms are shown to run faster than CPLEX (the leading commercial software to solve MILPs). For other problems, approximation algorithms are designed, with guaranteed bounds on running time and performance. Flow control problems in the NAS are modeled using an Eulerian framework. A partial differential equation (PDE) model of high altitude traffic is derived, using a modified Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) PDE. High altitude traffic is modeled as a network of LWR PDEs linked through their boundary conditions. An adjoint-based method is developed for controlling network flow problems and applied to scenarios for the airspace between Chicago and the east coast. Accurate numerical analysis schemes are used and run very fast on this set of coupled one dimensional problems. The resulting simulations provide NAS-wide ATC control strategies in the form of flow patterns to apply to streams of aircraft. Finally, tactical control problems at the level of the dynamics of individual aircraft are studied. The problem of proving safety of conflict avoidance protocols is posed in the Hamilton-Jacobi framework. A proof

  18. Instrument Development of Real Time Holographic Water Drop Size Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Springston, Stephen

    2007-02-09

    BNL participated with multiple correspondences with Physical Optics Corporation (POC) on the design considerations of an airbome instrument. A pod for extemal deployment ofthe POC unit on the DOE Research Aircraft Facility (RAF), an instrumented, Grumman G-1 aircraft was loaned to POC. BNL proposed evaluation flight tests between the POC unit and the BNL Cloud Aerosol Probe Spectrometer (CAPS) as a reference method. BNL's involvement is described in the semi-annual report ofPOC to DOE. Because of unanticipated technical and engineering difficulties, POC was unable to fit their instrument into an aircraft pod. As a result they are now focusing on a ground-based version first. A prototype laboratory version of the Real-Time Holographic Water Drop Size Measurement (WDSM) System has been constructed.

  19. Task 3.14 -- Demonstration of technologies for remote power generation in Alaska. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The overall goal of this project is a site specific demonstration of a small, environmentally acceptable electric generating system fueled on indigenous fuels and waste materials to serve the microgrid or stand alone power distribution systems typical of remote, isolated Alaska Native communities. The objective of the project is to develop a commercialization plan that includes an analysis of the quantity, quality, and cost of the available fuels; a mapping of the electricity and district heating needs of a selected community, including electrical distribution layout and interconnecting steam piping; a step by step review of the environmental regulations and permit applications that need to be met; and a preliminary design and budget for the demonstration of a 0.5 to 6 MWe power system to be completed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in a manner that provides technical and regulatory readiness to proceed with implementation of the demonstration.

  20. Large-area, triple-junction a-Si alloy production scale-up. Semiannual technical progress report, 17 March 1992--18 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; O`Dowd, J.

    1993-04-01

    This report describes Solarex`s work to advance its photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, reduce its a-Si:H module production costs, increase module performance, and expand the Solarex commercial production capacity. Solarex will meet these objectives by improving the deposition and quality of the transport front contact; optimizing the laser patterning process; scaling up the semiconductor deposition process; improving the back-contact deposition; and scaling up and improving the encapsulation and testing of its a-Si:H modules. In the Phase 1 portion of this subcontract, Solarex focused on scaling up components of the chemical vapor deposition system for deposition of the system contact, scaling up laser scribing techniques; triple-junction recipes for module production; and metal-oxide back contacts. The goal of these efforts is to adopt all portions of the manufacturing line to handle substrates larger than 0.37 m{sup 2}.

  1. On-chip IR spectral sensors by superconducting detector arrays. Semiannual report {number_sign} 2, 18 January 1995--18 July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, D.B.; Carangelo, R.M.; Kung, P.J.

    1995-09-29

    The overall objective of Phase 2 is to bring this new spectrometer-on-a-chip technology concept to a sufficiently mature stage of development that it can attract commercial support and be carried to market. The specific technical missions of the Phase 2 program are those for the Project Tasks listed below. These mission objectives are: (1) to establish and prove-out the fabrication processing of silicon wafers into arrays of interference-filter plates; (2) to demonstrate that the linear-array HTS detector technology can be scaled up into square arrays of sufficient size and performance to meet the design requirements developed in the Phase 1 effort; (3) to expand the view of the technology so as to see it in a full engineering-systems context, and thus ensure that at the earliest stage possible conflicts can be resolved, thus a systems design can be accomplished that will realistically encompass all the interacting components; (4) to demonstrate, by fabrication and testing, that the components in this systems design can be combined and will deliver the functionality (e.g., spectral region, bandwidth, and resolution) predicted by the design, and in the context of one or two simple emission-line-spectroscopy prototype applications; (5) to identify and resolve conflicts in the design and fabrication methods/processes such that the new spectrometer can meet the desired goal of multiple applications potential. A brief description of each of these 5 tasks is given along with the progress made on each.

  2. Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, D.W.; Tullis, J.A.; Dolenc, M.R.; Thurow, T.L.; Skiba, P.A.

    1982-09-01

    Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells are not continuously pumped; thus, some wells that are sampled one season cannot be sampled the next. In addition, information on well construction, completion, and production is often unreliable or not available. These data are to be supplemented by establishing a series of monitor wells in the proposed geothermal withdrawal and injection area. These wells were to be located and designed to provide data necessary for evaluating and predicting the impact of geothermal development on the Shallow Aquifer system.

  3. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Volume 1, Technical report. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1994--March 27, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Bartley, D.A.; Hatcher, P.

    1996-10-15

    This program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium for Coal Water Mixture Technology and the U.S. Department of Energy. Activities this reporting period are summarized by phase. Phase I is nearly completed. During this reporting period, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, engineering designs and economics for retrofitting the Crane, Indiana boiler to fire coal-based fuels, and a 1,000-hour demonstration of dry, micronized coal were completed. In addition, a demonstration-scale micronized-coal water mixture (MCWM) preparation circuit was constructed and a 1,000-hour demonstration firing MCWM began. Work in Phase II focused on emissions reductions, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, and economic analyses of coal use. Emissions reductions investigations involved literature surveys of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, trace metals, volatile organic compounds, and fine particulate matter capture. In addition, vendors and engineering firms were contacted to identify the appropriate emissions technologies for the installation of commercial NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} removal systems on the demonstration boiler. Information from the literature surveys and engineering firms will be used to identify, design, and install a control system(s). Work continued on the refinement and optimization of coal grinding and MCWM preparation procedures, and on the development of advanced processes for beneficiating high ash, high sulfur coals. Work also continued on determining the basic cost estimation of boiler retrofits, and evaluating environmental, regulatory, and regional economic impacts. In addition, the feasibility of technology adoption, and the public`s perception of the benefits and costs of coal usage was studied. A coal market analysis was completed. Work in Phase III focused on coal preparation studies, emissions reductions and economic analyses of coal use.

  4. Coal-water slurry fuel combustion testing in an oil-fired industrial boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, February 15--August 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.

    1997-06-03

    The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) expanded demonstration and evaluation (installing a CWSF preparation circuit, performing baseline tests firing No. 6 fuel oil, and conducting additional CWSF testing). The boiler testing and evaluation will determine if the CWSF combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion tendencies, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in a boiler system designed to fire heavy fuel oil. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of a CWSF and its parent coal affect boiler performance. The economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers is also evaluated. The first three phases have been completed and the combustion performance of the burner that was provided with the boiler did not meet performance goals. A maximum coal combustion efficiency of 95% (compared to a target of 98%) was achieved and natural gas cofiring (15% of the total thermal input) was necessary to maintain a stable flame. Consequently, the first demonstration was terminated after 500 hours. The second CWSF demonstration (Phase 4) was conducted with a proven coal-designed burner. Prior to starting the second demonstration, a CWSF preparation circuit was constructed to provide flexibility in CWSF production. The circuit initially installed involved single-stage grinding. A regrind circuit was recently installed and was evaluated. A burner was installed from ABB Combustion Engineering (ABB/CE) and was used to generate baseline data firing No. 6 fuel oil and fire CWSF. A temporary storage system for No. 6 fuel oil was installed and modifications to the existing CWSF handling and preheating system were made to accommodate No. 6 oil.

  5. Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, August 15, 1992--February 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

    1993-04-21

    The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

  6. Determination of the forms of nitrogen released in coal tar during rapid devolatilization. Semi-annual report, November 1, 1995--April 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, T.H.

    1996-04-30

    Control of emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from coal combustion systems is becoming a major design and retrofit consideration. Most NO{sub x} in coal combustion systems comes from nitrogen in the fuel, rather than from nitrogen in the air. Practical emission control strategies include burner design strategies (e.g., low NO{sub x} burners), overfire air, reburning, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) using reduction agents such as NH{sub 3} or urea, and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The order listed also reflects the order of increasing costs for implementation. It is therefore most economically desirable to perform burner modifications to reduce NO{sub x} emissions rather than other control measures. Low-NO{sub x} burners work on the principle that devolatilized nitrogen species will form N{sub 2} rather than NO{sub x} under locally fuel-rich conditions with sufficient residence time at appropriate temperatures. The amount and form of nitrogen released during devolatilization influence the degree of NO{sub x} reduction attainable using burner design strategies for a given coal. Nitrogen in the char following devolatilization is released by heterogeneous oxidation, and may not be controlled by aerodynamic burner modifications. The objectives of this work are to perform detailed chemical measurements of the nitrogen in coal, tar, and char.

  7. Task 3.14 - demonstration of technologies for remote power generation in Alaska. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.L.

    1998-12-31

    This paper very briefly summarizes progress in the demonstration of a small (up to 6 MWe), environmentally acceptable electric generating system fueled by indigenous fuels and waste materials to serve power distribution systems typical of Alaskan Native communities. Two detailed appendices supplement the report. The project is focused on two primary technologies: (1) atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC), and (2) coalbed methane and coal-fired diesel technologies. Two sites have been selected as possible locations for an AFBC demonstration, and bid proposals are under review. The transfer of a coal-fired diesel clean coal demonstration project from Maryland to Fairbanks, Alaska was approved, and the environmental assessment has been initiated. Federal support for a fuel cell using coalbed methane is also being pursued. The appendices included in the report provide: (1) the status of the conceptual design study for a 600-kWe coal-fired cogeneration plant in McGrath, Alaska; and (2) a global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

  8. Development of a low-temperature, low-cost, black liquid solar collector. Phase II. Semi-annual report, September 1, 1979-February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Landstrom, D. K.; Talbert, S. G.; McGinniss, V. D.

    1980-03-20

    The research efforts during these first 6 months of Phase II have been directed toward (1) evaluating the long-term durability of various plastic materials and solar collector designs, (2) obtaining sufficient outdoor performance data to design a full-scale demonstration of a black-liquid solar collector for a commercial application, (3) teaming with a company willing to commercialize black liquid plastic collectors, and (4) incorporating improved black liquids with the identified plastic collector designs. Besides conducting indoor weathering tests of various plastic materials, two outdoor automated test facilities have been built. One unit has been in use for about 2 winter months at Battelle in Columbus, Ohio, and the other unit is ready for testing in Phoenix, Arizona, by Ramada Energy Systems, Inc., a collector manufacturing company. Since Ramada Energy Systems has been working with extruded polycarbonate panels, Battelle has been working to date with extruded acrylic panel designs. Other potential plastics for solar collectors will be evaluated later in this program.

  9. Proceedings of the 7th Semiannual Meeting of the Nozzle Initiative Industry Advisory Committee on Standardization of Carbon-Phenolic Test Methods and Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, William B. (Compiler); Pinoli, Pat C. (Compiler); Upton, Cindy G. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    The application of carbon fibers and fabrics (CF) for producing rocket nozzles is discussed. These materials which are essential for fabricating the carbon composites used in aerospace systems gasify when exposed to high temperatures and the mechanical properties of the composites degrade. The oxidation kinetics under isothermal (IC) and non-isothermal (NIC) conditions are examined and a comparison is made between the characteristics of IC and NIC oxidation. Several CF, chars, and carbon blacks were examined, including a microporous char, a graphitized rayon fabric, and several carbonized rayon fabrics. A summary is given of the advantages and drawbacks of isothermal and non-isothermal oxidation of carbons. The proceedings are assembled in the form of a roundtable discussion.

  10. Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, August 15, 1991--February 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, Jianyang; Walsh, P.M.; Schobert, H.H.; Scaroni, A.W.

    1992-05-29

    The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with less than 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in an oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels.

  11. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity: Semi-annual technical progress report (No. 1), October 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1989-04-01

    The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of a small aquarium fish, the Japanese Medaka, as a predictor of potential health effects following exposure to the carcinogen diethyl nitrosamine (DEN). Research efforts will investigate the dose response relationship that exists between a suite of molecular parameters and the carcinogenic agent with respect to external dose, dose at the target organ/tissue, appearance of preneoplastic lesions and foci, and the occurrence of tumors. The two tasks that are being pursued this fiscal year are: to evaluate, in the liver of the Japanese Medaka exposed to the carcinogen DEN, the integrity of DNA and the status of the detoxification system (biotransformation capabilities); and to evaluate the kinetics of formation of various liver cell types subsequent to exposure to DEN. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Acquisition and production of skilled behavior in dynamic decision-making tasks. Semiannual Status Report M.S. Thesis - Georgia Inst. of Tech., Nov. 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirlik, Alex; Kossack, Merrick Frank

    1993-01-01

    This status report consists of a thesis entitled 'Ecological Task Analysis: A Method for Display Enhancements.' Previous use of various analysis processes for the purpose of display interface design or enhancement has run the risk of failing to improve user performance due to the analysis resulting in only a sequencial listing of user tasks. Adopting an ecological approach to performing the task analysis, however, may result in the necessary modeling of an unpredictable and variable task domain required to improve user performance. Kirlik has proposed an Ecological Task Analysis framework which is designed for this purpose. It is the purpose of this research to measure this framework's effectiveness at enhancing display interfaces in order to improve user performance. Following the proposed framework, an ecological task analysis of experienced users of a complex and dynamic laboratory task, Star Cruiser, was performed. Based on this analysis, display enhancements were proposed and implemented. An experiment was then conducted to compare this new version of Star Cruiser to the original. By measuring user performance at different tasks, it was determined that during early sessions, use of the enhanced display contributed to better user performance compared to that achieved using the original display. Furthermore, the results indicate that the enhancements proposed as a result of the ecological task analysis affected user performance differently depending on whether they are enhancements which aid in the selection of a possible action or in the performance of an action. Generalizations of these findings to larger, more complex systems were avoided since the analysis was only performed on this one particular system.

  13. Research on high-efficiency, single-junction, monolithic, thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells: Phase 2 Semiannual subcontract report, 1 February 1985--31 July 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.E.; Ayra, R.R.; Bennett, M.S.; Catalano, A.W.; D'Aiello, R.V.; Dickson, C.R.; Newton, J.L.; O'Dowd, J.G.; Oswald, R.S.

    1988-09-01

    This report presents results of the second phase of research in high-efficiency, single-junction, monolithic, thin-film a-Si solar cells. Five glow-discharge deposition systems, including a new in-line, multichamber system, were used to grow both doped and undoped a-Si:H. Strong correlations were found between the breakdown voltage, the deposition rate, and the diffusion length for varying cathode-anode separations in a DC glow-discharge deposition mode. Tin oxide films were grown by chemical vapor deposition using either tetramethyl tine (TMT) or tin tetrachloride (TTC). The best films were grown with TMT, but those grown with TTC had a more controlled texture for light trapping and provided a better contact to the p-layer. Tests indicated that Ti/Al provides a stable, low-resistance back metal contact. Efficiencies of more than 10% were obtained with a p-i-n structure in which a thin, undoped a-Si:C:H layer is first deposited on the tin-oxide-coated glass. The stability of a-Si:H cells was improved by light doping of the i-layer, but the doping also caused a loss in initial performance. A new baseline submodule was designed and an active-area (350 cmS) efficiency of 6.7% was obtained. An active-area (82.5 cmS) efficiency of 6.7% was also obtained with laser scribing techniques. 7 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. The ISIS project: Fault-tolerance in large distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.; Marzullo, Keith

    1990-01-01

    The semi-annual status report covers activities of the ISIS project during the second half of 1989. The project had several independent objectives: (1) At the level of the ISIS Toolkit, ISIS release V2.0 was completed, containing bypass communication protocols. Performance of the system is greatly enhanced by this change, but the initial software release is limited in some respects. (2) The Meta project focused on the definition of the Lomita programming language for specifying rules that monitor sensors for conditions of interest and triggering appropriate reactions. This design was completed, and implementation of Lomita is underway on the Meta 2.0 platform. (3) The Deceit file system effort completed a prototype. It is planned to make Deceit available for use in two hospital information systems. (4) A long-haul communication subsystem project was completed and can be used as part of ISIS. This effort resulted in tools for linking ISIS systems on different LANs together over long-haul communications lines. (5) Magic Lantern, a graphical tool for building application monitoring and control interfaces, is included as part of the general ISIS releases.

  15. Preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the Satellite Power System (SPS) and alternative electric energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsom, D. E.; Wolsko, T.

    1980-04-01

    A preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS), other solar technologies, and alternative electric energy technologies was conducted. The alternative technologies are coal gasification/combined-cycle, coal fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), light water reactor (LWR), liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), terrestrial photovoltaics (TPV), solar thermal electric (STE), and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The major issues of a land use assessment are the quantity, purpose, duration, location, and costs of the required land use. The phased methodology described treats the first four issues, but not the costs. Several past efforts are comparative or single technology assessment are reviewed briefly. The current state of knowledge about land use is described for each technology. Conclusions are drawn regarding deficiencies in the data on comparative land use and needs for further research.

  16. Preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the Satellite Power System (SPS) and alternative electric energy technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, D. E.; Wolsko, T.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS), other solar technologies, and alternative electric energy technologies was conducted. The alternative technologies are coal gasification/combined-cycle, coal fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), light water reactor (LWR), liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), terrestrial photovoltaics (TPV), solar thermal electric (STE), and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The major issues of a land use assessment are the quantity, purpose, duration, location, and costs of the required land use. The phased methodology described treats the first four issues, but not the costs. Several past efforts are comparative or single technology assessment are reviewed briefly. The current state of knowledge about land use is described for each technology. Conclusions are drawn regarding deficiencies in the data on comparative land use and needs for further research.

  17. Development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense Facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, March 28, 1997--September 27, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Miller, S.F.; Morrison, J.L.

    1998-01-06

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of developing technologies which can potentially decrease DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE. Phase I was completed on November 1, 1995. Work in Phase II focused on emissions reductions, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, and economic analyses of coal use. Emissions reductions investigations included performing pilot-scale air toxics (i.e., trace elements and volatile organic compounds) testing and evaluating a ceramic filtering device on the demonstration boiler. Also, a sodium bicarbonate duct injection system was installed on the demonstration boiler. An economic analysis was conducted which investigated the benefits of decreased dependence on imported oil by using new coal combustion technologies. Work related to coal preparation and utilization was primarily focused on preparing the final report. Work in Phase III focused on coal preparation studies, pilot-scale NO{sub x} reduction studies, economic analyses of coal use, and evaluation of deeply-cleaned coal as boiler fuel. Coal preparation studies were focused on continuing activities on particle size control, physical separations, and surface-based separation processes. The evaluation of deeply-cleaned coal as boiler fuel included receiving three cleaned coals from Cyprus-Amax.

  18. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1992--March 27, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; Hogg, R.

    1993-05-13

    The US Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE and the first phase of the program is underway. Phase I activities are focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water mixtures (MCWMs) and dry, micronized coal (MC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. Phase II research and development activities will continue to focus on industrial boiler retrofit technologies by addressing emissions control and pre-combustion (i.e., slagging combustion and/or gasification) strategies for the utilization of high ash and high sulfur coals. Phase III activities will examine coal-based fuel combustion systems that cofire wastes. Each phase includes an engineering cost analysis and technology assessment. The activities and status of Phase I are described below. The objective in Phase I is to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil- designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWM or MC. This will be achieved through a program consisting of the following five tasks: (1) Coal Beneficiation and Preparation; (2) Combustion Performance Evaluation; (3) Engineering Design; (4) Engineering and Economic Analysis; (5) Final Report/Submission of Design Package.

  19. An analysis of carrier phase jitter in an MPSK receiver utilizing map estimation. Ph.D. Thesis Semiannual Status Report, Jul. 1993 - Jan. 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, William P.

    1994-01-01

    The use of 8 and 16 PSK TCM to support satellite communications in an effort to achieve more bandwidth efficiency in a power-limited channel has been proposed. This project addresses the problem of carrier phase jitter in an M-PSK receiver utilizing the high SNR approximation to the maximum aposteriori estimation of carrier phase. In particular, numerical solutions to the 8 and 16 PSK self-noise and phase detector gain in the carrier tracking loop are presented. The effect of changing SNR on the loop noise bandwidth is also discussed. These data are then used to compute variance of phase error as a function of SNR. Simulation and hardware data are used to verify these calculations. The results show that there is a threshold in the variance of phase error versus SNR curves that is a strong function of SNR and a weak function of loop bandwidth. The M-PSK variance thresholds occur at SNR's in the range of practical interest for the use of 8 and 16-PSK TCM. This suggests that phase error variance is an important consideration in the design of these systems.

  20. Continuous roll-to-roll a-Si photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Semiannual technical progress report, 1 April 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work performed by ECD to advance its roll-to-roll, triple-junction photovoltaic manufacturing technologies; to reduce the module production costs; to increase the stabilized module performance; and to expand the commercial capacity utilizing ECD technology. The 3-year goal is to develop advanced large-scale manufacturing technology incorporating ECD`s earlier research advances with the capability of producing modules with stable 11% efficiency at a cost of approximately $1/W{sub p}. Major efforts during Phase I are (1) the optimization of the high-performance back-reflector system, (2) the optimization of a-Si-Ge narrow band-gap solar cell, and (3) the optimization of the stable efficiency of the module. The goal is to achieve a stable 8% efficient 0.3-m {times} 1.2-m (1-ft {times} 4-ft) module. Also, the efforts include work on a proprietary, high-deposition-rate, microwave plasma, CVD manufacturing technology; and on the investigation of material cost reduction.