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Sample records for lycopersicon pennellii glucose

  1. Branched Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in the Biosynthesis of Lycopersicon pennellii Glucose Esters 1

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Donald S.; Steffens, John C.

    1990-01-01

    Lycopersicon pennellii Corr. (D'Arcy) an insect-resistant, wild tomato possesses high densities of glandular trichomes which exude a mixture of 2,3,4-tri-O-acylated glucose esters that function as a physical impediment and feeding deterrent to small arthropod pests. The acyl moieties are branched C4 and C5 acids, and branched and straight chain C10, C11, and C12 acids. The structure of the branched acyl constituents suggests that the branched chain amino acid biosynthetic pathway participates in their biosynthesis. [14C]Valine and deuterated branched chain amino acids (and their oxo-acid derivatives) were incorporated into branched C4 and C5 acid groups of glucose esters by a process of transamination, oxidative decarboxylation and subsequent acylation. C4 and C5 branched acids were elongated by two carbon units to produce the branched C10-C12 groups. Norvaline, norleucine, allylglycine, and methionine also were processed into acyl moieties and secreted from the trichomes as glucose esters. Changes in the acyl composition of the glucose esters following sulfonylurea herbicide administration support the participation of acetohydroxyacid synthetase and the other enzymes of branched amino acid biosynthesis in the production of glucose esters. PMID:16667654

  2. Quantitative trait locus analysis of leaf dissection in tomato using Lycopersicon pennellii segmental introgression lines.

    PubMed Central

    Holtan, Hans E E; Hake, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    Leaves are one of the most conspicuous and important organs of all seed plants. A fundamental source of morphological diversity in leaves is the degree to which the leaf is dissected by lobes and leaflets. We used publicly available segmental introgression lines to describe the quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the difference in leaf dissection seen between two tomato species, Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii. We define eight morphological characteristics that comprise the mature tomato leaf and describe loci that affect each of these characters. We found 30 QTL that contribute one or more of these characters. Of these 30 QTL, 22 primarily affect leaf dissection and 8 primarily affect leaf size. On the basis of which characters are affected, four classes of loci emerge that affect leaf dissection. The majority of the QTL produce phenotypes intermediate to the two parent lines, while 5 QTL result in transgression with drastically increased dissection relative to both parent lines. PMID:14668401

  3. Quantitative trait locus analysis of leaf dissection in tomato using Lycopersicon pennellii segmental introgression lines.

    PubMed

    Holtan, Hans E E; Hake, Sarah

    2003-11-01

    Leaves are one of the most conspicuous and important organs of all seed plants. A fundamental source of morphological diversity in leaves is the degree to which the leaf is dissected by lobes and leaflets. We used publicly available segmental introgression lines to describe the quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the difference in leaf dissection seen between two tomato species, Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii. We define eight morphological characteristics that comprise the mature tomato leaf and describe loci that affect each of these characters. We found 30 QTL that contribute one or more of these characters. Of these 30 QTL, 22 primarily affect leaf dissection and 8 primarily affect leaf size. On the basis of which characters are affected, four classes of loci emerge that affect leaf dissection. The majority of the QTL produce phenotypes intermediate to the two parent lines, while 5 QTL result in transgression with drastically increased dissection relative to both parent lines. PMID:14668401

  4. Water-use efficiency and drought tolerance in Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii and their F sub 2 crosses

    SciTech Connect

    de Soyza, A.G.; Kay, L.E.; Gutschick, V.P.; Maxwell, C. )

    1991-05-01

    In growth chamber experiments the authors compared the water-use efficiency (WUE) and drought tolerance (DT - retention of dry mass vegetative yield when droughted) of the drought intolerant common tomato, L. esculentum and the ostensibly drought tolerant tomato, L. pennellii. Drought treatment was imposed as two severe episodes of drought, each episode lasting until all leaves on the plant were silted, with a period of recovery between treatments. They measured up to 20 performance attributes to WUE and DT, including: root:shoot ratio, leaf internal CO2/ambient CO2, {delta}{sup 13}C, leaf photosynthetic rate, specific leaf mass, leaf water potential, leaf osmotic potential, and stomatal density. Water-use efficiency is negatively correlated with drought tolerance; drought tolerance is positively correlated with plants' ability to increase WUE under stress. Few other attributes are correlated with drought tolerance, and some are conspicuous by their absence. They find evidence for substantial genetic linkage among attributes that confer drought tolerance; and interplant rankings in drought tolerance depend strongly upon the type of drought stress experienced (episodic vs. continuous).

  5. Mechanisms and genetic control of interspecific crossing barriers in Lycopersicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mutschler, M.A. ); McCormick, S. . Plant Gene Expression Center)

    1993-03-27

    This study employs Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii as model systems to study the interspecific reproductive barriers unilateral incongruity (UI), hybrid breakdown and interspecific aberrant ratio syndrome (IARS).

  6. Mechanisms and genetic control of interspecific crossing barriers in Lycopersicon. Second yearly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mutschler, M.A.; McCormick, S.

    1993-03-27

    This study employs Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii as model systems to study the interspecific reproductive barriers unilateral incongruity (UI), hybrid breakdown and interspecific aberrant ratio syndrome (IARS).

  7. Glucose Polyester Biosynthesis. Purification and Characterization of a Glucose Acyltransferase1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Alice X.; Eannetta, Nancy; Ghangas, Gurdev S.; Steffens, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Glandular trichomes of the wild tomato species Lycopersicon pennellii secrete 2,3,4-O-tri-acyl-glucose (-Glc), which contributes to insect resistance. A Glc acyltransferase catalyzes the formation of diacyl-Glc by disproportionating two equivalents of 1-O-acyl-β-Glc, a high-energy molecule formed by a UDP-Glc dependent reaction. The acyltransferase was purified 4,900-fold from L. pennellii leaves by polyethylene glycol fractionation, diethylaminoethyl chromatography, concanavalin A affinity chromatography, and chromatofocusing. The acyltransferase possesses an isoelectric point of 4.8, a relative molecular mass around 110 kD, and is composed of 34- and 24-kD polypeptides as a heterotetramer. The 34- and 24-kD proteins were partially sequenced. The purified enzyme catalyzes both the disproportionation of 1-O-acyl-β-Glcs to generate 1,2-di-O-acyl-β-Glc and anomeric acyl exchange between 1-O-acyl-β-Glc and Glc. PMID:10517836

  8. Mechanisms and genetic control of interspecific crossing barriers in Lycopersicon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mutschler, M.A.

    1997-04-30

    Deficiency of Lycopersicon esculentum allele (E) was observed from the RFLP and isozyme data of the F{sub 2} populations derived from the cross L. esculentum x L. pennellii. The genome composition of the F{sub 2} populations containing L. pennellii cytoplasm (F{sub 2}{sup Lp4}) has a lower proportion of the homozygous L. pennellii (PP) genotypes and a higher proportion of heterozygote (EP) genotypes than that of the F{sub 2} populations containing L. esculentum cytoplasm (F{sub 2}{sup Le}). A lower proportion of the L. pennellii alleles (P) was also observed in F{sub 2}{sup Lp4} as compared to F{sub 2}{sup Le} when each marker locus was tested individually. To study the effects of gametic and zygotic selection on segregation distortion, the expected patterns of segregation at a marker locus were derived for ten selection models with gametic or zygotic selection at a hidden linked locus. Segregation distortion caused by four of the selection models studied can be uniquely identified by the patterns of significance expected for the likelihood ratio tests at the marker loci. Comparison of the chromosomal regions associated with specific selection models across populations (of this experiment and previous publications) indicated that the segregation distortion observed in chromosome 10 is associated with zygotic selection affecting both arms of the chromosome, and cytoplasm substitution has the effect of decreasing the segregation distortion on the long arm of the chromosome.

  9. Enzyme Activity Profiles during Fruit Development in Tomato Cultivars and Solanum pennellii1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauser, Marie-Caroline; Steinhauser, Dirk; Koehl, Karin; Carrari, Fernando; Gibon, Yves; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes interact to generate metabolic networks. The activities of more than 22 enzymes from central metabolism were profiled during the development of fruit of the modern tomato cultivar Solanum lycopersicum ‘M82’ and its wild relative Solanum pennellii (LA0716). In S. pennellii, the mature fruit remains green and contains lower sugar and higher organic acid levels. These genotypes are the parents of a widely used near introgression line population. Enzymes were also profiled in a second cultivar, S. lycopersicum ‘Moneymaker’, for which data sets for the developmental changes of metabolites and transcripts are available. Whereas most enzyme activities declined during fruit development in the modern S. lycopersicum cultivars, they remained high or even increased in S. pennellii, especially enzymes required for organic acid synthesis. The enzyme profiles were sufficiently characteristic to allow stages of development and cultivars and the wild species to be distinguished by principal component analysis and clustering. Many enzymes showed coordinated changes during fruit development of a given genotype. Comparison of the correlation matrices revealed a large overlap between the two modern cultivars and considerable overlap with S. pennellii, indicating that despite the very different development responses, some basic modules are retained. Comparison of enzyme activity, metabolite profiles, and transcript profiles in S. lycopersicum ‘Moneymaker’ revealed remarkably little connectivity between the developmental changes of transcripts and enzymes and even less between enzymes and metabolites. We discuss the concept that the metabolite profile is an emergent property that is generated by complex network interactions. PMID:20335402

  10. Divergence in the enzymatic activities of a tomato and Solanum pennellii alcohol acyltransferase impacts fruit volatile ester composition.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Charles; Kamiyoshihara, Yusuke; Lam, Nghi B; Richard, Théo; Taylor, Mark G; Tieman, Denise M; Klee, Harry J

    2015-01-01

    Tomato fruits accumulate a diverse set of volatiles including multiple esters. The content of ester volatiles is relatively low in tomato fruits (Solanum lycopersicum) and far more abundant in the closely related species Solanum pennellii. There are also qualitative variations in ester content between the two species. We have previously shown that high expression of a non-specific esterase is critical for the low overall ester content of S. lycopersicum fruit relative to S. pennellii fruit. Here, we show that qualitative differences in ester composition are the consequence of divergence in enzymatic activity of a ripening-related alcohol acyltransferase (AAT1). The S. pennellii AAT1 is more efficient than the tomato AAT1 for all the alcohols tested. The two enzymes have differences in their substrate preferences that explain the variations observed in the volatiles. The results illustrate how two related species have evolved to precisely adjust their volatile content by modulating the balance of the synthesis and degradation of esters.

  11. Solanum pennellii backcross inbred lines (BILs) link small genomic bins with tomato traits.

    PubMed

    Ofner, Itai; Lashbrooke, Justin; Pleban, Tzili; Aharoni, Asaph; Zamir, Dani

    2016-07-01

    We present a resource for fine mapping of traits derived from the wild tomato species Solanum pennellii (LA0716). The population of backcross inbred lines (BILs) is composed of 446 lines derived after a few generations of backcrosses of the wild species with cultivated tomato (cultivar M82; LA3475), followed by more than seven generations of self-pollination. The BILs were genotyped using the 10K SOL-CAP single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -Chip, and 3700 polymorphic markers were used to map recombination break points relative to the physical map of Solanum lycopersicum. The BILs carry, on average, 2.7 introgressions per line, with a mean introgression length of 11.7 Mbp. Whereas the classic 76 introgression lines (ILs) partitioned the genome into 106 mapping bins, the BILs generated 633 bins, thereby enhancing the mapping resolution of traits derived from the wild species. We demonstrate the power of the BILs for rapid fine mapping of simple and complex traits derived from the wild tomato species. PMID:27121752

  12. Transcriptomic and Reverse Genetic Analysesof Branched-Chain Fatty Acid and Acyl Sugar Production in Solanum pennellii and Nicotiana benthamiana1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Slocombe, Stephen P.; Schauvinhold, Ines; McQuinn, Ryan P.; Besser, Katrin; Welsby, Nicholas A.; Harper, Andrea; Aziz, Naveed; Li, Yi; Larson, Tony R.; Giovannoni, James; Dixon, Richard A.; Broun, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Acyl sugars containing branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) are exuded by glandular trichomes of many species in Solanaceae, having an important defensive role against insects. From isotope-feeding studies, two modes of BCFA elongation have been proposed: (1) fatty acid synthase-mediated two-carbon elongation in the high acyl sugar-producing tomato species Solanum pennellii and Datura metel; and (2) α-keto acid elongation-mediated one-carbon increments in several tobacco (Nicotiana) species and a Petunia species. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying BCFAs and acyl sugar production in trichomes, we have taken a comparative genomic approach to identify critical enzymatic steps followed by gene silencing and metabolite analysis in S. pennellii and Nicotiana benthamiana. Our study verified the existence of distinct mechanisms of acyl sugar synthesis in Solanaceae. From microarray analyses, genes associated with α-keto acid elongation were found to be among the most strongly expressed in N. benthamiana trichomes only, supporting this model in tobacco species. Genes encoding components of the branched-chain keto-acid dehydrogenase complex were expressed at particularly high levels in trichomes of both species, and we show using virus-induced gene silencing that they are required for BCFA production in both cases and for acyl sugar synthesis in N. benthamiana. Functional analysis by down-regulation of specific KAS I genes and cerulenin inhibition indicated the involvement of the fatty acid synthase complex in BCFA production in S. pennellii. In summary, our study highlights both conserved and divergent mechanisms in the production of important defense compounds in Solanaceae and defines potential targets for engineering acyl sugar production in plants for improved pest tolerance. PMID:18931142

  13. Metabolic and Molecular Changes of the Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Lines Carrying Different Solanum pennellii Wild Chromosomal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Rigano, Maria Manuela; Raiola, Assunta; Docimo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Valentino; Calafiore, Roberta; Vitaglione, Paola; Ferracane, Rosalia; Frusciante, Luigi; Barone, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    Solanum lycopersicum represents an important dietary source of bioactive compounds including the antioxidants flavonoids and phenolic acids. We previously identified two genotypes (IL7-3 and IL12-4) carrying loci from the wild species Solanum pennellii, which increased antioxidants in the fruit. Successively, these lines were crossed and two genotypes carrying both introgressions at the homozygous condition (DHO88 and DHO88-SL) were selected. The amount of total antioxidant compounds was increased in DHOs compared to both ILs and the control genotype M82. In order to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the positive interaction between the two wild regions pyramided in DHO genotypes, detailed analyses of the metabolites accumulated in the fruit were carried out by colorimetric methods and LC/MS/MS. These analyses evidenced a lower content of flavonoids in DHOs and in ILs, compared to M82. By contrast, in the DHOs the relative content of phenolic acids increased, particularly the fraction of hexoses, thus evidencing a redirection of the phenylpropanoid flux toward the biosynthesis of phenolic acid glycosides in these genotypes. In addition, the line DHO88 exhibited a lower content of free phenolic acids compared to M82. Interestingly, the two DHOs analyzed differ in the size of the wild region on chromosome 12. Genes mapping in the introgression regions were further investigated. Several genes of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway were identified, such as one 4-coumarate:CoA ligase and two UDP-glycosyltransferases in the region 12-4 and one chalcone isomerase and one UDP-glycosyltransferase in the region 7-3. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated a different expression of the detected genes in the ILs and in the DHOs compared to M82. These analyses, combined with biochemical analyses, suggested a central role of the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase in redirecting the phenylpropanoid pathways toward the biosynthesis of phenolic acids in the pyramided lines

  14. Effects of foliar applied nickel on tomato plants. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Cash, R.C.; Leone, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Shoot-applied nickel (Ni) treatments produced symptomatology, foliar Ni accumulation, and cytological changes in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) similar to those caused by treatments with root-applied nickel (Ni). Leaf damage resulting from 100 ..mu..g/ml foliar Ni-treatments consisted of interveinal chlorosis and spotting necrosis which appeared histologically as tissue collapse, cell clumping, and chloroplast disintegration. Shoot-treated plants accumulated more Ni in leaves than in roots; whereas the reverse was true in root-treated plants. Interference with root-to-shoot manganese translocation was attributed to attenuated vascular tissue and phloem blockage. Evidence of reduced nutrient transport and inhibited meristem activity due to Ni toxicity presents a potential for crop damage from excessive Ni in the atmosphere as well as in the soil environment.

  15. Tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum ) seeds: new flavonols and cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Ferreres, Federico; Taveira, Marcos; Pereira, David M; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2010-03-10

    In this study, seeds of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. were analyzed by HPLC/UV-PAD/MS(n)-ESI. Fourteen flavonoids were identified, including quercetin, kaempferol, and isorhamnetin derivatives, with 13 of them being reported for the first time in tomato seeds. The major identified compounds were quercetin-3-O-sophoroside, kaempferol-3-O-sophoroside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-sophoroside. A significant cell proliferation inhibition (>80%), against rat basophile leukemia (RBL-2H3) cell line, was observed with this extract (IC(50) = 5980 microg/mL). For acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, a concentration-dependent effect was verified (IC(20) = 2400 microg/mL). The same behavior was noted regarding antioxidant capacity, evaluated against DPPH (IC(10) = 284 microg/mL), nitric oxide (IC(25) = 396 microg/L), and superoxide radicals (IC(25) = 3 microg/mL). PMID:20131841

  16. Effect of textile waste water on tomato plant, Lycopersicon esculentum.

    PubMed

    Marwari, Richa; Khan, T I

    2012-09-01

    In this study Sanganer town, Jaipur was selected as study area. The plants of Lycopersicon esculentum var. K 21(Tomato) treated with 20 and 30% textile wastewater were analyzed for metal accumulation, growth and biochemical parameters at per, peak and post flowering stages. Findings of the study revealed that chlorophyll content was most severely affected with the increase in metal concentration. Total chlorophyll content showed a reduction of 72.44% while carbohydrate, protein and nitrogen content showed a reduction of 46.83, 71.65 and 71.65% respectively. With the increase in waste water treatment the root and shoot length, root and shoot dry weight and total dry weight were reduced to 50.55, 52.06, 69.93, 72.42, 72.10% respectively. After crop harvesting, the fruit samples of the plants treated with highest concentration of textile waste water contained 2.570 mg g(-1)d.wt. of Zn, 0.800 mg g(-1) d.wt. Cu, 1.520 mg g(-1) d.wt. Cr and 2.010 mg g(-1) d.wt. Pb.

  17. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) prevents lead-induced testicular toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Salawu, Emmanuel O; Adeeyo, Olusola A; Falokun, Olutunde P; Yusuf, Uthman A; Oyerinde, Abiodun; Adeleke, Anthony A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lead, an example of heavy metals, has, for decades, being known for its adverse effects on various body organs and systems such that their functions are compromised. AIM: In the present study, the ability of lead to adversely affect the male reproductive system was investigated and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum: Source of antioxidants) paste (TP) was administered orally to prevent the adverse effects of Pb. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifteen Sprague Dawley rats, randomised into three groups (n = 5), were used for this study. Animals in Group A served as the control and were drinking distilled water. Animals in Groups B and C were drinking 1% Pb (II) acetate (LA). Group C animals were, in addition to drinking LA, treated with 1.5 ml of TP/day. All treatments were for 8 weeks. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: A Mann–Whitney U-test was used to analyse the results obtained. RESULTS: The obtained results showed that Pb caused a significant reduction in the testicular weight, sperm count, life–death ratio, sperm motility, normal sperm morphology, and plasma and tissue superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, but a significant increase in plasma and tissue malondialdehyde concentration. But, Pb did not cause any significant change in the serum testosterone level. TP, however, significantly reduced these adverse effects of Pb. CONCLUSION: These findings lead to the conclusion that TP significantly lowered the adverse effects of Pb exposure on the kidney as well as Pb-induced oxidative stress. PMID:19562072

  18. Attenuated Lead Induced Apoptosis in Rat Hepatocytes in the Presence of Lycopersicon Esculentum.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi Ashtiani, Hamidreza; Khaki, Arash; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Anjarani, Soghra; Dadgarnejad, Manochehr; Alebouyeh, Mahmoud; Rastegar, Hossein

    2016-04-01

    Lead (Pb), has, for decades, being known for its adverse effects on various body organs and systems. In the present study, the damage of Pb on the Liver tissue apoptosis was investigated, and Lycopersicon esculentum as an antioxidants source was administered orally to prevent the adverse effects of Pb. Eighteen Wistar rats, randomized into three groups (n=6), were used for this study. Animals in Group A served as the control and were drinking distilled water. Animals in Groups B and C were drinking 1%Lead acetate (LA). Group C animals were, in addition to drinking LA, treated with 1.5 ml/day of Lycopersicon esculentum. Treatments were for three months. The obtained results showed that lead acetate caused significant reductions in the liver weight, plasma and tissue superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, but a significant increase in plasma and tissue malondialdehyde concentration but Lycopersicon esculentum have an inhibitory effect on LA liver adverse effect. So, it can be concluded that Lycopersicon esculentum have a significant protective effect on liver lead acetate adverse effects as well as, lead acetate-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27309264

  19. Mechanisms and genetic control of interspecific crossing barriers in lycopersicon. Progress report, First year, August 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Mutschler, M.A.; McCormick, S.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of this program is to use Lycopersica esculentum and L. pennellii as a model system to study the interspecific reproductive barriers unilateral incongruity (UI), hybrid breakdown and interspecific aberrant ratio syndrome (IARS). Specifically we seek to determine the functional basis of UI including the timing of the failure of incongruous crosses, the developmental step(s) interrupted by UI, the tissue and genomes involved in UI.

  20. Determination of L-ascorbic acid in Lycopersicon fruits by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Galiana-Balaguer, L; Roselló, S; Herrero-Martínez, J M; Maquieira, A; Nuez, F

    2001-09-15

    This study shows an improved method for the determination of L-ascorbic acid (l-AA) in fruits of Lycopersicon by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Two backgrounds electrolytes (BGEs) have been tested: (i) 400 mM borate at pH 8.0 and 1 x 10(-2)% hexadimethrine bromide, for the separation of Eulycopersicon subgenus species; and (ii) as in BGE(i) but supplemented with 20% (v/v) acetonitrile, for the separation of species of the Eriopersicon subgenus. The present procedures were compared with two routine methods-enzymatic assay and potentiometric titration with 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol. While these routine methods presented some difficulties in quantifying l-AA in several Lycopersicon fruits, CZE was successfully applied in all the analyzed samples. The proposed CZE protocols give lower detection limits (<0.4 microg ml(-1)); are cheaper, quicker, and highly reproducible; and can be applied to analyze large series of samples (ca. 50 samples per day) which is utmost importance, not only in screening trials for internal quality and tomato breeding programs, but also in systematic and routine characterization of Lycopersicon fruits.

  1. Effect of glutathione on phytochelatin synthesis in tomato cells. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Mendum, M.L.; Gupta, S.C.; Goldsbrough, P.B. )

    1990-06-01

    Growth of cell suspension cultures of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv VFNT-Cherry, in the presence of cadmium is inhibited by buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. Cell growth and phytochelatin synthesis are restored to cells treated with buthionine sulfoximine by the addition of glutathione to the medium. Glutathione stimulates the accumulation of phytochelatins in cadmium treated cells, indicating that availability of glutathione can limit synthesis of these peptides. Exogenous glutathione causes a disproportionate increase in the level of smaller phytochelatins, notably ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 2}-Gly. In the presence of buthionine sulfoximine and glutathione, phytochelatins that are produced upon exposure to cadmium incorporate little ({sup 35}S)cysteine, indicating that these peptides are probably not synthesized by sequential addition of cysteine and glutamate to glutathione.

  2. Effect of water treatment sludge on growth and elemental composition of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) shoots

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, H.A.; Singer, L.M. )

    1988-01-01

    The impact of a water treatment sludge on the fertility of a silt loam soil was assessed by monitoring the yield and elemental composition of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) shoots in a greenhouse study. Application of sludge at rates from 2-10% (air dry weight basis) raised the soil pH from 5.3 to 8.0 which enhanced plant growth. A substantial reduction in metal (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni) uptake was observed with sludge amendments, even at the highest rates. The alkaline nature of this sludge (pH=9.3, calcium carbonate equivalence=53%) suggest its potential use as a liming material for agricultural soils. Overly alkaline conditions should be avoided however, as high application rates combined with ammonia fertilization had an antagonistic effect on plant growth, possibly from P deficiency induced by struvite (MgNH{sub 4}PO{sub 4}) formation.

  3. Detection and quantitation of resveratrol in tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Ragab, Amr S; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Jankowski, Boris; Park, Joon-Hyun; Bobzin, Steven C

    2006-09-20

    Resveratrol is a stilbene phytoalexin well-known for its presence in grape, wine, and peanut. As a result of its antioxidant and chemopreventative properties, it has gained much attention as a functional food ingredient. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the detection of resveratrol, its 3-glucopyranoside piceid, and the cis isomers of both compounds has been developed and used to quantitate the levels of these compounds in the skin of commercially available tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). The resveratrol concentration remains relatively stable during fruit maturation, reaching a maximum concentration in the skin of 18.4 +/- 1.6 microg/g dry weight at 4 weeks postbreaker. No stilbenes were detected in the flesh of tomato fruit. PMID:16968079

  4. Glucose control.

    PubMed

    Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Stress-related hyperglycemia is a common finding in acutely ill patients, and is related to the severity and outcome of the critical illness. The pathophysiology of stress hyperglycemia includes hormonal and neural signals, leading to increased production of glucose by the liver and peripheral insulin resistance mediated by the translocation of transmembrane glucose transporters. In one pioneering study, tight glycemic control by intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients was associated with improved survival. However, this major finding was not confirmed in several other prospective randomized controlled trials. The reasons underlying the discrepancy between the first and the subsequent studies could include nutritional strategy (amount of calories provided, use of parenteral nutrition), case-mix, potential differences in the optimal blood glucose level (BG) in different types of patients, hypoglycemia and its correction, and the magnitude of glucose variability. Therefore, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of glycemic regulation during acute illness is needed. Safe and effective glucose control will need improvement in the definition of optimal BG and in the measurement techniques, perhaps including continuous monitoring of insulin algorithms and closed-loop systems. PMID:23075589

  5. Identification of resistance to Meloidogyne javanica in the Lycopersicon peruvianum complex.

    PubMed

    Veremis, J C; Roberts, P A

    1996-10-01

    Clones of Lycopersicon peruvianum PI 2704352R2, PI 270435-3MH and PI 126443-1MH expressed novel resistance to three Mi-avirulent M. javanica isolates in greenhouse experiments. Clones from PI 126443-1MH were resistant to the three M. javanica isolates at 25°C. The three isolates were able to reproduce on one embryorescue hybrid of PI 126443-1MH, but not on three L. peruvianum-L. esculentum bridge-line hybrids of PI 1264431MH when screened at 25°C (Mi-expressed temperature). Clones of PI 270435-2R2 and all its hybrids with susceptible genotypes were resistant to the three M. javanica isolates at 25°C. The bridge-line hybrid EPP-2xPI 2704352R2 was susceptible to M. javanica isolate 811 at 32°C, whereas PI 270435-2R2 and all other hybrids of PI 27043 5-2R2 crossed with susceptible genotypes were resistant at 32°C. At 32°C, one F2 progeny of PI 126443-IMHxEPP-1, and three test-cross progenies of PI 1264409MHx[PI 270435-3MHxPI 126443-1MH], and reciprocal test-cross progenies of [PI 270435-3MHxPI 2704352R2]xPI 126440-9MH, each segregated into resistant: susceptible (R∶S) ratios close to 3∶1. The results from the F2 progeny indicated that heat-stable resistance to Mi-avirulent M. javanica in PI 126443 -1MH is conferred by a single dominant gene. The results from the test-crosses indicated that this gene in PI 126443-1MH is different from the resistance gene in PI 270435-3MH. The resistance gene in PI 270435-3MH was also shown to differ from the resistance factor in PI 270435-2R2. The expression of differential susceptibility and resistance to M. javanica and M. incognita in individual plants of the bridge-line hybrid, embryo-rescue hybrid, F2, and test-crosses indicated that at least some genes governing resistance to M. javanica differ from the genes conferring resistance to M. incognita. A new source of heat-stable resistance to M. javanica was identified in Lycopersicon chilense.

  6. Enzymic cross-linkage of monomeric extensin precursors in vitro. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Everdeen, D.S.; Kiefer, S.; Willard, J.J.; Muldoon, E.P.; Dey, P.M.; Li, Xiongbiao; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Rapidly growing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cell suspension cultures contain transiently high levels of cell surface, salt-elutable, monomeric precursors to the covalently cross-linked extensin network of the primary cell wall. Thus, the authors purified a highly soluble monomeric extensin substrate from rapidly growing cells, and devised a soluble in vitro cross-linking assay based on Superose-6 fast protein liquid chromatography separation, which resolved extensin monomers from the newly formed oligomers within 25 minutes. Salt elution of slowly growing (early stationary phase) cells yielded little or no extensin monomers but did give a highly active enzymic preparation that specifically cross-linked extensin monomers in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, judging from: (a) a decrease in the extensin monomer peak on fast protein liquid chromatography gel filtration, (b) appearance of oligomeric peaks, and (c) direct electron microscopical observation of the cross-linked oligomers. The cross-linking reaction had a broad pH optimum between 5.5 and 6.5. An approach to substrate saturation of the enzyme required extensin monomer concentrations of 20 to 40 milligrams per milliliter. Preincubation with catalase completely inhibited the cross-linking reaction, which was highly dependent on hydrogen peroxide and optimal at 15 to 50 micromolar. They therefore identified the cross-linking activity as extensin peroxidase.

  7. Development of Multi-Component Transplant Mixes for Suppression of Meloidogyne incognita on Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)

    PubMed Central

    Kokalis-Burelle, N.; Martinez-Ochoa, N.; Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Kloepper, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of combinations of organic amendments, phytochemicals, and plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) germination, transplant growth, and infectivity of Meloidogyne incognita were evaluated. Two phytochemicals (citral and benzaldehyde), three organic amendments (pine bark, chitin, and hemicellulose), and three bacteria (Serratia marcescens, Brevibacterium iodinum, and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were assessed. Increasing rates of benzaldehyde and citral reduced nematode egg viability in vitro. Benzaldehyde was 100% efficacious as a nematicide against juveniles, whereas citral reduced juvenile viability to less than 20% at all rates tested. Benzaldehyde increased tomato seed germination and root weight, whereas citral decreased both. High rates of pine bark or chitin reduced plant growth but not seed germination, whereas low rates of chitin increased shoot length, shoot weight, and root weight; improved root condition; and reduced galling. The combination of chitin and benzaldehyde significantly improved tomato transplant growth and reduced galling. While each of the bacterial isolates contributed to increased plant growth in combination treatments, only Brevibacterium iodinum applied alone significantly improved plant growth. PMID:19265957

  8. Ozone-induced changes in host-plant suitability: interactions of Keiferia lycopersicella and Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Trumble, J.T.; Hare, J.D.; Musselman, R.C.; McCool, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    Tomato pinworms, Keiferia lycopersicella (Walsingham), survived better and developed faster on tomato plants, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., damaged by ozone than on plants not subjected to ozone fumigation. Other measures of fitness, including survival during pupation, sex ratio of adults, female longevity, and fecundity, were not affected. Analyses of ozonated foliage at zero, two and seven days following fumigation demonstrated a transient but significant increase (18-24%) in soluble protein concentration. Although the concentration of the total free amino acids in ozonated foliage did not increase significantly, significant changes were observed in at least 10 specific amino acids, some of which are critical for either insect development or the production of plant defensive chemicals. A reduction in total nitrogen in ozonated foliage at seven days postfumigation indicated that nitrogen was being translocated to other portions of the plant. The implications of increases in assimilable forms of nitrogen in ozonated foliage, which lead to improved host-plant suitability for insect herbivores, are discussed both in relation to some current ecological theories and in regard to pest-management strategies. 59 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  9. Biomarker discovery and gene expression responses in Lycopersicon esculentum root exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Bai, Lili; Xie, Yujia; Liu, Xinhui; Cui, Baoshan

    2015-12-15

    Gene expression analysis has shown particular promise for the identification of molecular biomarkers that can be used for further evaluation of potential toxicity of chemicals present in agricultural soil. In the study, we focused on the development of molecular markers to detect Pb toxicity in agricultural soil. Using the results obtained from microarray analysis, twelve Pb-responsive genes were selected and tested in different Pb concentrations to examine their concentration-response characteristics using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). All the Pb treatments set in our study could generally induce the differential expression of the 12 genes, while the lowest observable adverse effect concentration (LOAEC) of Pb for seed germination, root elongation, biomass and structural modification derived from 1,297, 177, 177, and 1,297 mg Pb/kg soil, respectively, suggesting that the transcriptional approach was more sensitive than the traditional end points of death, growth, and morphology for the evaluation of Pb toxicity. The relative expression of glycoalkaloid metabolism 1 (P=-0.790), ethylene-responsive transcription factor ERF017 (P=-0.686) and CASP-like protein 4C2 (P=-0.652) demonstrates a dose-dependent response with Pb content in roots, implying that the three genes can be used as sensitive bioindicators of Pb stress in Lycopersicon esculentum.

  10. Effects of Lycopersicon esculentum extract on hair growth and alopecia prevention.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Jung, Sung Kyu; Jeon, Min-Hee; Moon, Jin-Nam; Moon, Woi-Sook; Ji, Yi-Hwa; Choi, In Soon; Wook Son, Sang

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the potential hair growth-promoting activity and the expression of cell growth factors of Lycopersicon esculentum extracts, each 3% (w/w) of ethyl acetate extract (EAE), and supercritical CO2 extract (SCE) of L. esculentum and isolated lycopene Tween 80 solution (LTS) and test hair tonic (THT) containing LTS were applied on the dorsal skin of C57BL/6 mice, once a day for 4 weeks. At week 4, LTS and THT exhibited hair growth-promoting potential similar to that of 3% minoxidil as a positive control (PC). Further, in the LTS group, a significant increase of mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), keratinocyte growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was observed than PC, as well as the negative control (NC). In the THT group, increases in IGF-1 and decrease in VEGF and transforming growth factor-β expression were significant over the NC. In a histological examination in the THT group, the induction of anagen stage of hair follicles was faster than that of NC. In the Draize skin irritation study for THT, no observable edema or erythema was observed on all four sectors in the back skin after exposure for 24 or 72 h for any rabbit. Therefore, this study provides reasonable evidence that L. esculentum extracts promote hair growth and suggests that applications could be found in hair loss treatments without skin irritation at moderate doses. PMID:24397881

  11. Phosphate-Regulated Induction of Intracellular Ribonucleases in Cultured Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, Andreas; Abel, Steffen; Jost, Wolfgang; Beintema, Jaap J.; Glund, Konrad

    1992-01-01

    Four intracellular RNases were found to be induced in cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cells upon phosphate starvation. Localization studies revealed three (RNases LV 1-3) in the vacuoles and one (RNase LX) outside these organelles. All of these RNases were purified to homogeneity and were shown to be type I RNases on the basis of type of splitting, substrate, and base specificity at the cleavage site, molecular weight, isoelectric point, and pH optimum. Moreover, RNase LV 3 was shown by fingerprinting of tryptic digests on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and sequencing the N terminus and two tryptic peptides to be structurally very similar to a recently characterized extracellular RNase LE which is also phosphate regulated (Nürnberger et al. [1990] Plant Physiol 92: 970-976; Jost et al. [1991] Eur J Biochem 198: 1-6). Expression of the four intracellular RNases is induced by depleting the cells of phosphate and repressed by adding phosphate. Our studies indicate that higher plants, in addition to secreting enzymes for scavanging phosphate under starvation conditions, also induce intracellularly emergency rescue systems. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:16668816

  12. Tomato Breeding Lines Resistant and Tolerant to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Issued from Lycopersicon hirsutum.

    PubMed

    Vidavsky, F; Czosnek, H

    1998-09-01

    ABSTRACT Two tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)-resistant plants from accessions LA1777 and LA386 of the wild tomato species Lycopersicon hirsutum have been crossed. The resulting resistant F1 plants were crossed with the domesticated tomato L. esculentum, and a series of selfing was performed. At each generation, individuals were selected for resistance (no symptoms and undetectable viral DNA) and tolerance (no symptoms but with detectable viral DNA) following controlled massive and repeated inoculations with viruliferous whiteflies. A stable BC1F4 line (denominated 902) that does not segregate for resistance was obtained. This line does not support virus accumulation, even upon extensive whitefly-mediated inoculation of young seedlings, and does not need protection with nets or insecticides. Another stable BC1F4 line (denominated 908) was tolerant to the virus. Both lines have good horticultural characteristics and bear 80- to 120-g red fruits. Analysis of segregation of susceptibility, tolerance, and resistance during the BC1F1 to BC1F4 crosses indicated that tolerance is controlled by a dominant major gene and resistance by two to three additive recessive genes. The resistant and tolerant lines do not need to be protected by insecticides or nets. PMID:18944868

  13. Environmental controls over methanol production, emission, and δ13C values from Lycopersicon esculentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P.; Giebel, B. M.; Mak, J. E.; Riemer, D. D.; Swart, P. K.; Lerdau, M.

    2009-12-01

    Phytogenic methanol is the dominant source of methanol to the atmosphere, where it is the second most abundant organic compound. Beyond methanol’s role in atmospheric chemistry, it is an indicator of plant function and is linked to plant wound response. Methanol emissions are considered to be a by-product of cell wall expansion and, more specifically, the demethylation of pectin by pectin methylesterase (PME) in cell walls. Production of methanol was investigated in mature and immature tomato Lycopersicon esculentum via measurement of methanol flux, foliar PME activity, and methanol extraction from leaf, root, and stem tissues. δ13C values for mature and immature methanol emissions were also measured using a GC-IRMS system. Environmental control over methanol production and emission was studied by changing temperature and light while holding stomatal conductance constant. As seen previously, mature leaf methanol emissions were significantly less than immature emissions. Surprisingly, preliminary results suggest mature leaf methanol production to be similar to immature leaves, indicating an enhanced metabolic sink for methanol in mature leaves. These data enhance our understanding of methanol production, a term which is not well constrained in current methanol flux models.

  14. Cadmium-sulfide crystallites in Cd-. gamma. -glutamyl peptide complexes from Lycopersicon and Daucus

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, R.N. ); Winge, D.R. )

    1989-04-01

    Hydroponically-grown tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum P. Mill. cv stone) and suspension-cultured carrot cells (Daucus carota L.) exposed to 100 {mu}M cadmium salts produced metal-{gamma}-glutamyl peptide complexes containing acid labile sulfur. The properties of the complexes resemble the Cd-{gamma}-glutamyl complexes from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Candida glabrata, known to contain a CdS crystallite core. The crystallite core is stabilized by a coating of peptides of the general structure ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub n}-Gly. The Cd-peptide complexes contain predominantly peptides of n{sub 2}, n{sub 3}, n{sub 4} and n{sub 3}desGly. Zn-peptide complexes were also isolated from carrot cultures grown in MS medium supplemented with 2 mM Zn and cysteine. Results of preliminary characterization of these complexes are consistent with the presence of a colloidal particle similar to that of the Cd-complexes.

  15. Transcriptional activation by heat and cold of a thiol protease gene in tomato. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, M.A.; Fischer, R.L. )

    1990-08-01

    We previously determined that low temperature induces the accumulation in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit of a cloned mRNA, designated C14, encoding a polypeptide related to thiol proteases. We now demonstrate that C14 mRNA accumulation is a response common to both high (40{degree}C) and low (4{degree}C) temperature stresses. Exposure of tomato fruit to 40{degree}C results in the accumulation of C14 mRNA, by 8 hours. This response is more rapid than that to 4{degree}C, but slower than the induction of many heat shock messages by 40{degree}C, and therefore unique. We have also studied the mechanism by which heat and cold exposure activate C14 gene expression. Both high and low temperature regulate protease gene expression through transcriptional induction of a single C14 gene. A hypothesis for the function of C14 thiol protease gene expression in response to heat and cold is discussed.

  16. Effects of Lycopersicon esculentum extract on hair growth and alopecia prevention.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Jung, Sung Kyu; Jeon, Min-Hee; Moon, Jin-Nam; Moon, Woi-Sook; Ji, Yi-Hwa; Choi, In Soon; Wook Son, Sang

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the potential hair growth-promoting activity and the expression of cell growth factors of Lycopersicon esculentum extracts, each 3% (w/w) of ethyl acetate extract (EAE), and supercritical CO2 extract (SCE) of L. esculentum and isolated lycopene Tween 80 solution (LTS) and test hair tonic (THT) containing LTS were applied on the dorsal skin of C57BL/6 mice, once a day for 4 weeks. At week 4, LTS and THT exhibited hair growth-promoting potential similar to that of 3% minoxidil as a positive control (PC). Further, in the LTS group, a significant increase of mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), keratinocyte growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was observed than PC, as well as the negative control (NC). In the THT group, increases in IGF-1 and decrease in VEGF and transforming growth factor-β expression were significant over the NC. In a histological examination in the THT group, the induction of anagen stage of hair follicles was faster than that of NC. In the Draize skin irritation study for THT, no observable edema or erythema was observed on all four sectors in the back skin after exposure for 24 or 72 h for any rabbit. Therefore, this study provides reasonable evidence that L. esculentum extracts promote hair growth and suggests that applications could be found in hair loss treatments without skin irritation at moderate doses.

  17. Phytochemical and nutrient/antinutrient interactions in cherry tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruits.

    PubMed

    Oyetayo, Folake Lucy; Ibitoye, Muyiwa Femi

    2012-07-01

    The fruit of the cherry tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum (Solanaceae)) was analysed for mineral and antinutrient composition. Phosphorus (33.04 ± 0.21 mg/100g) was the most abundant mineral in the fruit, followed by calcium (32.04 ± 0.06 mg/100 g), and potassium (11.9 ± 0.1 mg/100 g) and manganese (9.55 ± 0.28 mg/100 g) were also present in appreciable quantities. Antinutrients, including phytate, glycoside, saponin and tannin, were screened and quantified. Phytate (112.82 ± 0.1 mg/100 g), glycoside (2.33 ± 0.00 mg/100 g), saponin (1.31 ± 0.00 mg/100g) and tannin (0.21 ± 0.00 mg/100 g) were present in the fruit but phlobatanin and glycosides with steroidal rings were not found. The calculated calcium:phytate ratio of the fruits was below the critical value and the calculated [calcium] [phytate]:[zinc] molar ratio was less than the critical value. The calcium:phosphorus ratio (0.97 mg/100 g) shows the fruit to be a good source of food nutrients, while the sodium:potassium value was less than 1. Ca/P ratio below 0.5 indicates deficiency of these minerals while Na/K ratio above 1 is detrimental because of excessive sodium levels. The results of the study generally revealed the fruit to be rich in minerals but containing insufficient quantities of antinutrients to result in poor mineral bioavailability. PMID:23533206

  18. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  19. Glucose test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... person with diabetes constantly manages their blood's sugar (glucose) levels. After a blood sample is taken and tested, it is determined whether the glucose levels are low or high. If glucose levels ...

  20. Intragenic recombination generated two distinct Cf genes that mediate AVR9 recognition in the natural population of Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium

    PubMed Central

    Van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Kruijt, Marco; Roth, Ronelle; Brandwagt, Bas F.; Joosten, Matthieu H. A. J.; De Wit, Pierre J. G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Resistance gene Cf-9 of cultivated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) confers recognition of the AVR9 elicitor protein of the fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum. The Cf-9 locus, containing Cf-9 and four homologs (Hcr9s), originates from Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium (Lp). We examined naturally occurring polymorphism in Hcr9s that confer AVR9 recognition in the Lp population. AVR9 recognition occurs frequently throughout this population. In addition to Cf-9, we discovered a second gene in Lp, designated 9DC, which also confers AVR9 recognition. Compared with Cf-9, 9DC is more polymorphic, occurs more frequently, and is more widely spread throughout the Lp population, suggesting that 9DC is older than Cf-9. The sequences of Cf-9 and 9DC suggest that Cf-9 evolved from 9DC by intragenic recombination between 9DC and another Hcr9. The fact that the 9DC and Cf-9 proteins differ in 61 aa residues, and both mediate recognition of AVR9, shows that in nature Hcr9 proteins with the same recognitional specificity can vary significantly. PMID:11517316

  1. Blood Test: Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Glucose Print A A A Text Size What's in ... de sangre: glucosa What It Is A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose (the main ...

  2. CSF glucose test

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 ... Abnormal results include higher and lower glucose levels. Abnormal ... or fungus) Inflammation of the central nervous system Tumor

  3. Modification of fatty acid composition in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) by expression of a borage delta6-desaturase.

    PubMed

    Cook, David; Grierson, Don; Jones, Craigh; Wallace, Andrew; West, Gill; Tucker, Greg

    2002-06-01

    The improvement of nutritional quality is one potential application for the genetic modification of plants. One possible target for such manipulation is the modification of fatty acid metabolism. In this work, expression of a borage delta6-desaturase cDNA in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) has been shown to produce gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:83 delta6,9,12) and octadecatetraenoic acid (OTA; 18:4 delta6,9,12,15) in transgenic leaf and fruit tissue. This genetic modification has also, unexpectedly, resulted in a reduction in the percentage of linoleic acid (LA 18:2 delta9,12) and a concomitant increase in the percentage of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3 delta9,12,15) in fruit tissue. These changes in fatty acid composition are thought to be beneficial for human health. PMID:12059112

  4. Nicotine promotes rooting in leaf explants of in vitro raised seedlings of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby.

    PubMed

    Bamel, Kiran; Gupta, Rajendra; Gupta, Shrish C

    2015-11-01

    Nicotine promotes rooting in leaf explants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby). Nicotine at 10(-9) to 10(-3) M concentrations was added to the MS basal medium. The optimum response (three-fold increase in rooting) was obtained at 10(-7) M nicotine-enriched MS medium. At the same level i.e. 10(-7) M Nicotine induced dramatic increase (11-fold) in the number of secondary roots per root. We have shown earlier that exogenous acetylcholine induces a similar response in tomato leaves. Since nicotine is an agonist of one of the two acetylcholine receptors in animals, its ability to simulate ACh action in a plant system suggests the presence of the same molecular mechanism operative in both, animal and plant cells.

  5. Cadmium-sulfide crystallites in Cd-(. gamma. EC) sub n G peptide complexes from tomato. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, R.N.; White, C.A.; Winge, D.R. Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City )

    1992-01-01

    Hydroponically grown tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum P. Mill cv Golden Boy) exposed to 100 micromolar cadmium sulfate produced metal-({gamma}EC){sub n}G peptide complexes containing acid-labile sulfur. The properties of the complexes resemble those of the cadmium-({gamma}EC){sub n}G peptide complexes from Schizo-saccharomyces pombe and Candida glabrata known to contain a cadmium sulfide crystallite core. The crystallite is stabilized by a sheath of peptides of general structure ({gamma}Glu-Cys){sub n}-Gly. The cadmium-peptide complexes of tomato contained predominantly peptides of n{sub 3}, n{sub 4}, and n{sub 5}. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the tomato cadmium-sulfide-peptide complex contained CdS crystallite core particles smaller than 2.0 nanometers in diameter.

  6. Modification of fatty acid composition in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) by expression of a borage delta6-desaturase.

    PubMed

    Cook, David; Grierson, Don; Jones, Craigh; Wallace, Andrew; West, Gill; Tucker, Greg

    2002-06-01

    The improvement of nutritional quality is one potential application for the genetic modification of plants. One possible target for such manipulation is the modification of fatty acid metabolism. In this work, expression of a borage delta6-desaturase cDNA in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) has been shown to produce gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:83 delta6,9,12) and octadecatetraenoic acid (OTA; 18:4 delta6,9,12,15) in transgenic leaf and fruit tissue. This genetic modification has also, unexpectedly, resulted in a reduction in the percentage of linoleic acid (LA 18:2 delta9,12) and a concomitant increase in the percentage of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3 delta9,12,15) in fruit tissue. These changes in fatty acid composition are thought to be beneficial for human health.

  7. Effect of Lycopersicon esculentum extract on apoptosis in the rat cerebellum, following prenatal and postnatal exposure to an electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Köktürk, Sibel; Yardimoglu, Melda; Celikozlu, Saadet D; Dolanbay, Elif Gelenli; Cimbiz, Ali

    2013-07-01

    The expansion of mobile phone technology has raised concerns regarding the effect of 900-MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on the central nervous system. At present, the developing human brain is regularly exposed to mobile telephones, pre- and postnatally. Several studies have demonstrated the acute effects of EMF exposure during pre- or postnatal periods; however, the chronic effects of EMF exposure are less understood. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the chronic effects of EMF on the pre- and postnatal rat cerebellum. The control group was maintained in the same conditions as the experimental groups, without the exposure to EMF. In the EMF1 group, the rats were exposed to EMF during pre- and postnatal periods (until postnatal day 80). In the EMF2 group, the rats were also exposed to EMF pre- and postnatally; in addition, however, they were provided with a daily oral supplementation of Lycopersicon esculentum extract (∼2 g/kg). The number of caspase-3-labeled Purkinje neurons and granule cells present in the rats in the control and experimental groups were then counted. The neurodegenerative changes were studied using cresyl violet staining, and these changes were evaluated. In comparison with the control animals, the EMF1 group demonstrated a significant increase in the number of caspase-3-labeled Purkinje neurons and granule cells present in the cerebellum (P<0.001). However, in comparison with the EMF1 group, the EMF2 group exhibited significantly fewer caspase-3-labeled Purkinje neurons and granule cells in the cerebellum. In the EMF1 group, the Purkinje neurons were revealed to have undergone dark neuron degenerative changes. However, the presence of dark Purkinje neurons was reduced in the EMF2 group, compared with the EMF1 group. The results indicated that apoptosis and neurodegeneration in rats exposed to EMF during pre- and postnatal periods may be reduced with Lycopersicon esculentum extract therapy. PMID:23935717

  8. Glucose, memory, and aging.

    PubMed

    Korol, D L; Gold, P E

    1998-04-01

    Circulating glucose concentrations regulate many brain functions, including learning and memory. Much of the evidence for this view comes from experiments assessing stress-related release of epinephrine with subsequent increases in blood glucose concentrations. One application of this work has been to investigate whether age-related memory impairments result from dysfunctions in the neuroendocrine regulation of the brain processes responsible for memory. Like humans, aged rodents exhibit some memory impairments that can be reversed by administration of epinephrine or glucose. In elderly humans, ingestion of glucose enhances some cognitive functions, with effects best documented thus far on tests of verbal contextual and noncontextual information. Glucose also effectively enhances cognition in persons with Alzheimer disease or Down syndrome. Although earlier evidence suggested that glucose does not enhance cognitive function in healthy young adults, more recent findings suggest that glucose is effective in this population, provided the tests are sufficiently difficult. In college students, glucose consumption significantly enhanced memory of material in a paragraph. Glucose also appeared to enhance attentional processes in these students. Neither face and word recognition nor working memory was influenced by treatment with glucose. The neurobiological mechanisms by which glucose acts are under current investigation. Initial evidence suggests that glucose or a metabolite may activate release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in rats when they are engaged in learning. Consequently, the issue of nutrition and cognition becomes increasingly important in light of evidence that circulating glucose concentrations have substantial effects on brain and cognitive functions.

  9. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  10. Your Glucose Meter

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Your Glucose Meter Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Español Basic Facts 7 Tips for Testing Your Blood Sugar and Caring for Your Meter Glucose meters test ...

  11. Glucose screening tests during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy; OGTT - pregnancy; Glucose challenge test - pregnancy; Gestational diabetes - glucose screening ... first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change ...

  12. Insulin and glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Sarah L

    2002-08-01

    Abnormally high or low blood glucose and insulin concentrations after standardized glucose tolerance tests can reflect disorders such as pituitary dysfunction, polysaccharide storage myopathies, and other clinical disorders. Glucose and insulin responses, however, are modified by the diet to which the animal has adapted, time since it was last fed, and what it was fed. Body fat (obesity), fitness level, physiologic status, and stress also alter glucose and insulin metabolism. Therefore, it is important to consider these factors when evaluating glucose and insulin tests, especially if only one sample it taken. This article describes the factors affecting glucose and insulin metabolism in horses and how they might influence the interpretation of standardized tests of glucose tolerance.

  13. [Glucose Metabolism: Stress Hyperglycemia and Glucose Control].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-05-01

    It is important for the anesthesiologists to understand pathophysiology of perioperative stress hyperglycemia, because it offers strategies for treatment of stress hyperglycemia. The effect of glucose tolerance is different in the choice of the anesthetic agent used in daily clinical setting. Specifically, the volatile anesthetics inhibit insulin secretion after glucose load and affects glucose tolerance. During minor surgery by the remifentanil anesthesia, the stress reaction is hard to be induced, suggesting that we should consider low-dose glucose load. Finally it is necessary to perform the glycemic control of the patients who fell into stress hyperglycemia depending on the individual patient. However, there are a lot of questions to be answered in the future. The prognosis of the perioperative patients is more likely to be greatly improved if we can control stress hyperglycemia.

  14. [Glucose Metabolism: Stress Hyperglycemia and Glucose Control].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-05-01

    It is important for the anesthesiologists to understand pathophysiology of perioperative stress hyperglycemia, because it offers strategies for treatment of stress hyperglycemia. The effect of glucose tolerance is different in the choice of the anesthetic agent used in daily clinical setting. Specifically, the volatile anesthetics inhibit insulin secretion after glucose load and affects glucose tolerance. During minor surgery by the remifentanil anesthesia, the stress reaction is hard to be induced, suggesting that we should consider low-dose glucose load. Finally it is necessary to perform the glycemic control of the patients who fell into stress hyperglycemia depending on the individual patient. However, there are a lot of questions to be answered in the future. The prognosis of the perioperative patients is more likely to be greatly improved if we can control stress hyperglycemia. PMID:27319094

  15. A physiological and genetic approach to the improvement of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. ) fruit soluble solids

    SciTech Connect

    Damon, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    Physiological processes and the genetic basis determining soluble solids content (SSC) of processing tomato fruit were addressed. Analysis of ({sup 3}H)-(fructosyl)-sucrose translocation in tomato indicates that phloem unloading in the fruit occurs, at least in part, to the apoplast. Apoplastic sucrose, glucose and fructose concentrations were estimated as 1 to 7, 12 to 49 and 8 to 63 millimolar, respectively in tomato fruit pericarp. Short-term uptake of ({sup 14}C)sucrose, -glucose and -fructose in tomato pericarp discs showes first order kinetics over the physiologically relevant concentration range. The uptake of ({sup 14}C)-(glycosyl)-1{prime}fluorosucrose was identical to the rate of ({sup 14}C) sucrose uptake suggesting sucrose may be taken up directly without prior extracellular hydrolysis. Short-term uptake of all three sugars was insensitive to 10 micromolar carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and to 10 micromolar p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonic acid. However, long-term accumulation of glucose was sensitive to carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Sugar uptake across the plasmamembrane does not appear to be energy dependent, suggesting that sugar accumulation in the tomato is driven by subsequent intracellular metabolism and/or active uptake at the tonoplast. Fourteen genomic DNA probes and ten restriction endonucleases were used to identify restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) useful in the linkage analysis of quantitative trait loci controlling the expression of SSC in a segregating F{sub 2} population from a cross between L. esculentum (UC204B) and L. cheesmanii f. minor, a wild species with high fruit soluble solids. RFLPs were detected between the DNAs of the two tomato species with all 14 probes.

  16. Multiple forms of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from tomato fruit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. Y.; Janes, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) was purified from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit to apparent homogeneity. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the enzyme migrated as two close bands with molecular weights of 50,000 and 51,000. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the purified enzyme, however, revealed at least five major protein spots that could be distinguished by their slight differences in net charge and molecular weight. Whereas all of the spots were recognized by the antiserum raised against tomato fruit AGP holoenzyme, only three of them reacted strongly with antiserum raised against the potato tuber AGP large subunit, and the other two spots (with lower molecular weights) reacted specifically with antisera raised against spinach leaf AGP holoenzyme and the potato tuber AGP small subunit. The results suggest the existence of at least three isoforms of the AGP large subunit and two isoforms of the small subunit in tomato fruit in vivo. The native molecular mass of the enzyme determined by gel filtration was 220 +/- 10 kD, indicating a tetrameric structure for AGP from tomato fruit. The purified enzyme is very sensitive to 3-phosphoglycerate/inorganic phosphate regulation.

  17. Mutations in potato virus Y genome-linked protein determine virulence toward recessive resistances in Capsicum annuum and Lycopersicon hirsutum.

    PubMed

    Moury, Benoît; Morel, Caroline; Johansen, Elisabeth; Guilbaud, Laurent; Souche, Sylvie; Ayme, Valérie; Caranta, Carole; Palloix, Alain; Jacquemond, Mireille

    2004-03-01

    The recessive resistance genes pot-1 and pvr2 in Lycopersicon hirsutum and Capsicum annuum, respectively, control Potato virus Y (PVY) accumulation in the inoculated leaves. Infectious cDNA molecules from two PVY isolates differing in their virulence toward these resistances were obtained using two different strategies. Chimeras constructed with these cDNA clones showed that a single nucleotide change corresponding to an amino acid substitution (Arg119His) in the central part of the viral protein genome-linked (VPg) was involved in virulence toward the pot-1 resistance. On the other hand, 15 nucleotide changes corresponding to five putative amino acid differences in the same region of the VPg affected virulence toward the pvr2(1) and pvr2(2) resistances. Substitution models identified six and five codons within the central and C terminal parts of the VPg for PVY and for the related potyvirus Potato virus A, respectively, which undergo positive selection. This suggests that the role of the VPg-encoding region is determined by the protein and not by the viral RNA apart from its protein-encoding capacity.

  18. Quantitative genetic analysis indicates natural selection on leaf phenotypes across wild tomato species (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon; Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Muir, Christopher D; Pease, James B; Moyle, Leonie C

    2014-12-01

    Adaptive evolution requires both raw genetic material and an accessible path of high fitness from one fitness peak to another. In this study, we used an introgression line (IL) population to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for leaf traits thought to be associated with adaptation to precipitation in wild tomatoes (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon; Solanaceae). A QTL sign test showed that several traits likely evolved under directional natural selection. Leaf traits correlated across species do not share a common genetic basis, consistent with a scenario in which selection maintains trait covariation unconstrained by pleiotropy or linkage disequilibrium. Two large effect QTL for stomatal distribution colocalized with key genes in the stomatal development pathway, suggesting promising candidates for the molecular bases of adaptation in these species. Furthermore, macroevolutionary transitions between vastly different stomatal distributions may not be constrained when such large-effect mutations are available. Finally, genetic correlations between stomatal traits measured in this study and data on carbon isotope discrimination from the same ILs support a functional hypothesis that the distribution of stomata affects the resistance to CO2 diffusion inside the leaf, a trait implicated in climatic adaptation in wild tomatoes. Along with evidence from previous comparative and experimental studies, this analysis indicates that leaf traits are an important component of climatic niche adaptation in wild tomatoes and demonstrates that some trait transitions between species could have involved few, large-effect genetic changes, allowing rapid responses to new environmental conditions.

  19. Olive mill wastewater triggered changes in physiology and nutritional quality of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum mill) depending on growth substrate.

    PubMed

    Ouzounidou, G; Asfi, M; Sotirakis, N; Papadopoulou, P; Gaitis, F

    2008-10-30

    We have studied the changes in the physiology and nutritional quality of Lycopersicon esculentum exposed to olive mill wastewater (OMW) with regard to cultivation in sand and soil. Tomato plant performance decreased with increasing concentration of OMW to both substrates. Root was more sensitive to OMW than the upper parts of the plants, grown either in sand or in soil for 10 days and 3 months, respectively, probably due to the direct OMW toxicity on roots as compared to other parts. Significant restriction on uptake and translocation of nutrients (K, Na, Fe, Ca and Mg) under OMW application was found. The decrease in the photochemical efficiency of PSII photochemistry in the light adapted state and the big decrease in photochemical quenching, indicate that OMW resulted in diminished reoxidation of Q(A)(-) and started to inactivate the reaction centers of PSII. The OMW supply on soil and sand, resulted in leaf water stress and lesser water use efficiency. Plants treated with high OMW concentration, produced fewer but bigger tomatoes as compared to plants treated with lower OMW concentration. Generally, fruit yield and nutritional value was inhibited under OMW application.

  20. Quantitative genetic analysis indicates natural selection on leaf phenotypes across wild tomato species (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon; Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Muir, Christopher D; Pease, James B; Moyle, Leonie C

    2014-12-01

    Adaptive evolution requires both raw genetic material and an accessible path of high fitness from one fitness peak to another. In this study, we used an introgression line (IL) population to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for leaf traits thought to be associated with adaptation to precipitation in wild tomatoes (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon; Solanaceae). A QTL sign test showed that several traits likely evolved under directional natural selection. Leaf traits correlated across species do not share a common genetic basis, consistent with a scenario in which selection maintains trait covariation unconstrained by pleiotropy or linkage disequilibrium. Two large effect QTL for stomatal distribution colocalized with key genes in the stomatal development pathway, suggesting promising candidates for the molecular bases of adaptation in these species. Furthermore, macroevolutionary transitions between vastly different stomatal distributions may not be constrained when such large-effect mutations are available. Finally, genetic correlations between stomatal traits measured in this study and data on carbon isotope discrimination from the same ILs support a functional hypothesis that the distribution of stomata affects the resistance to CO2 diffusion inside the leaf, a trait implicated in climatic adaptation in wild tomatoes. Along with evidence from previous comparative and experimental studies, this analysis indicates that leaf traits are an important component of climatic niche adaptation in wild tomatoes and demonstrates that some trait transitions between species could have involved few, large-effect genetic changes, allowing rapid responses to new environmental conditions. PMID:25298519

  1. Amino acid sequence of an intracellular, phosphate-starvation-induced ribonuclease from cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cells.

    PubMed

    Löffler, A; Glund, K; Irie, M

    1993-06-15

    The primary structure of an intracellular ribonuclease (RNase LX) from cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cells has been determined. Previous studies have shown that the protein is located inside the tomato cells but outside the vacuoles and that its synthesis is induced after depleting the cells for phosphate [Löffler, A., Abel, S., Jost, W., Beintema, J. J., Glund, K. (1992) Plant Physiol. 98, 1472-1478]. Sequence analysis was carried out by analysis of peptides isolated after enzymatic and chemical cleavage of the protein. RNase LX consists of 213 amino acids and has a molecular mass of 24300 Da and an isoelectric point of 5.33. The enzyme contains 10 half-cystines and there are no potential N-glycosylation sites detectable in the sequence. RNase LX, as compared to an extracellular tomato RNase (RNase LE), which is also phosphate regulated and the amino acid sequence of which was recently established [Jost, W., Bak, H., Glund, K., Terpstra, P. & Beintema, J. J. (1991) Eur. J. Biochem. 198, 1-6] has 60% of all amino acids identical and in identical positions, revealing a high degree of similarity between both proteins. In contrast to RNase LE, RNase LX has a C-terminal extension of nine amino acids. The C-terminal tetrapeptide HDEF may be a retention signal of the protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:8319673

  2. Isolation of an osmotic stress- and abscisic acid-induced gene encoding an acidic endochitinase from Lycopersicon chilense.

    PubMed

    Chen, R D; Yu, L X; Greer, A F; Cheriti, H; Tabaeizadeh, Z

    1994-10-28

    We have identified one osmotic stress- and abscisic acid-responsive member of the endochitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) gene family from leaves of drought-stressed Lycopersicon chilense plants, a natural inhabitant of extremely arid regions in South America. The 966-bp full-length cDNA (designated pcht28) encodes an acidic chitinase precursor with an amino-terminal signal peptide. The mature protein is predicted to have 229 amino acid residues with a relative molecular mass of 24,943 and pI value of 6.2. Sequence analysis revealed that pcht28 has a high degree of homology with class II chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) from tomato and tobacco. Expression of the pcht28 protein in Escherichia coli verified that it is indeed a chitinase. Northern blot analysis indicated that this gene has evolved a different pattern of expression from that of other family members reported thus far. It is highly induced by both osmotic stress and the plant hormone abscisic acid. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA suggested that the pcht28-related genes may form a small multigene family in this species. The efficiency of induction of the gene by drought stress, in leaves and stems, is significantly higher in L. chilense than in the cultivated tomato. It is speculated that, besides its general defensive function, the pcht28-encoded chitinase may play a particular role in plant development or in protecting plants from pathogen attack during water stress. PMID:7816027

  3. Polyamine metabolism in ripening tomato fruit. I. Identification of metabolites of putrescine and spermidine. [Lycopersicon esculentum Mill

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, R.; Davies, P.J. )

    1990-11-01

    The metabolism of (1,4-{sup 14}C)putrescine and (terminal methylene-{sup 3}H)spermidine was studied in the fruit pericarp (breaker stage) discs of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cv Rutgers, and the metabolites identified by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The metabolism of both putrescine and spermidine was relatively slow; in 24 hours about 15% of each amine was metabolized. The {sup 14}C label from putrescine was incorporated into spermidine, {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid, and a polar fraction eluting with sugars and organic acids. In the presence of gabaculine, a specific inhibitor of GABA:pyruvate transminase, the label going into glutamic acid, sugars and organic acids decreased by 80% while that in GABA increased about twofold, indicating that the transamination reaction is probably a major fate of GABA produced from putrescine in vivo. ({sup 3}H)Spermidine was catabolized into putrescine and {beta}-alanine. The conversion of putrescine into GABA, and that of spermidine into putrescine, suggests the presence of polyamine oxidizing enzymes in tomato pericarp tissues. The possible pathways of putrescine and spermidine metabolism are discussed.

  4. 24-Epibrassinoslide enhances plant tolerance to stress from low temperatures and poor light intensities in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Cui, Lirong; Zou, Zhirong; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yanyan; Yan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (Brs) are a newly recognized group of active steroidal hormones that occur at low concentrations in all plant parts and one of the active and stable forms is 24-epibrassinolide (EBR). We investigated the effect of EBR on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) and its mechanism when seedlings were exposed to low temperature and poor light stress conditions. Leaves of stress-tolerant 'Zhongza9' and stress-sensitive 'Zhongshu4' cultivars were pre-treated with spray solutions containing either 0.1 μM EBR or no EBR (control). The plants were then transferred to chambers where they were exposed to low temperatures of 12 °C/6 °C (day/night) under a low light (LL) level of 80 μmol · m(-2) · s(-1). Exogenous application of EBR significantly increased the antioxidant activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, and decreased the rate of O2 · (-) formation and H2O2 and malondialdehyde contents. Additionally, the ATP synthase β subunit content was increased by exogenous hormone application. Based on these results, we conclude that exogenous EBR can elicit synergism between the antioxidant enzyme systems and the ATP synthase β subunit so that scavenging of reactive oxygen species becomes more efficient. These activities enable plants to cope better under combined low temperature and poor light stresses. PMID:26337714

  5. Glucose: detection and analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucose is an aldosic monosaccharide that is centrally entrenched in the processes of photosynthesis and respiration, serving as an energy reserve and metabolic fuel in most organisms. As both a monomer and as part of more complex structures such as polysaccharides and glucosides, glucose also pla...

  6. Monitor blood glucose - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100220.htm Monitoring blood glucose - Series—Monitoring blood glucose: Using a self-test meter To use the ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Blood Sugar A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  7. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is localized to both the cytoplasm and plastids in developing pericarp of tomato fruit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. Y.; Wang, Y.; Janes, H. W.

    1998-01-01

    The intracellular location of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) in developing pericarp of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) has been investigated by immunolocalization. With the use of a highly specific anti-tomato fruit AGP antibody, the enzyme was localized in cytoplasm as well as plastids at both the light and electron microscope levels. The immunogold particles in plastids were localized in the stroma and at the surface of the starch granule, whereas those in the cytoplasm occurred in cluster-like patterns. Contrary to the fruit, the labeling in tomato leaf cells occurred exclusively in the chloroplasts. These data demonstrate that AGP is localized to both the cytoplasm and plastids in developing pericarp cells of tomato.

  8. Aftereffect conditions of prolonged space flight on physiological and biochemical processes and plant resistance Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. to pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Lidiya

    2016-07-01

    Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) - one of the most popular vegetables in Ukraine, they are a valuable product of therapeutic and dietetic foods because they contain a significant amount of nutrients and essential to the human body minerals and vitamins, but by the content of carotenoids - lycopene and β-carotene - is a powerful antioxidant. Therefore, tomato plants can be used successfully to astronauts on long space flights. We aftereffect was studied factors of space flight on the variety of tomato seeds Mir-1, which lasted (6 years) were on an orbital space station "Mir". Then, also after long-term storage in 2011, seeds were sown in the laboratory and received seedlings grown in field conditions Kiev region. The resulting seeds of the tomato crop in 2011 ("Space" and still) we used in our subsequent field studies in Kyiv and Poltava regions. We have previously shown that the "space" seeds had shown in 2011-2012 increased resistance to viruses PVY and PVM natural infectious background. Therefore, it is necessary continue the investigation and started to observe in future years, including 2015 and to analyze the results obtained. Because plants grown constantly in the field natural infectious background, there was a high probability of their defeat pathogens of different nature, including viruses. The works of many authors proved reduce the concentration of carotene and lycopene in tomatoes with the defeat of viruses (Raithak, 2012). In addition, the control plants were observed symptoms of such that is a viral infection, namely in 2011 - leaves curl in 2012 - except leaves curl and even mosaics. The research results were confirmed in 2013, namely on the plants of "space" seed no symptoms of, and in control - detection of potato virus Y (method RT-PCR) and symptoms of leaf curl and mosaic. During the bearing samples were taken leaves of the options and experiment conducted determination of photosynthetic pigments. It should be emphasized that in plant

  9. Efficiency of local Indonesia honey bees (Apis cerana L.) and stingless bee (Trigona iridipennis) on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) pollination.

    PubMed

    Putra, Ramadhani Eka; Kinasih, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) is considered as one of major agricultural commodity of Indonesia farming. However, monthly production is unstable due to lack of pollination services. Common pollinator agent of tomatoes is bumblebees which is unsuitable for tropical climate of Indonesia and the possibility of alteration of local wild plant interaction with their pollinator. Indonesia is rich with wild bees and some of the species already domesticated for years with prospect as pollinating agent for tomatoes. This research aimed to assess the efficiency of local honey bee (Apis cerana L.) and stingless bee (Trigona iridipennis), as pollinator of tomato. During this research, total visitation rate and total numbers of pollinated flowers by honey bee and stingless bee were compared between them with bagged flowers as control. Total fruit production, average weight and size also measured in order to correlated pollination efficiency with quantity and quality of fruit produced. Result of this research showed that A. cerana has slightly higher rate of visitation (p>0.05) and significantly shorter handling time (p < 0.05) than T. iridipennis due to their larger colony demand and low reward provide by tomato flowers. However, honey bee pollinated tomato flowers more efficient pollinator than stingless bee (80.3 and 70.2% efficiency, respectively; p < 0.05) even though the average weight and size of tomatoes were similar (p>0.05). Based on the results, it is concluded that the use of Apis cerana and Trigona spp., for pollinating tomatoes in tropical climates could be an alternative to the use of non-native Apis mellifera and bumblebees (Bombus spp.). However, more researches are needed to evaluate the cost/benefit on large-scale farming and greenhouse pollination using both bees against other bee species and pollination methods. PMID:24783783

  10. Efficiency of local Indonesia honey bees (Apis cerana L.) and stingless bee (Trigona iridipennis) on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) pollination.

    PubMed

    Putra, Ramadhani Eka; Kinasih, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) is considered as one of major agricultural commodity of Indonesia farming. However, monthly production is unstable due to lack of pollination services. Common pollinator agent of tomatoes is bumblebees which is unsuitable for tropical climate of Indonesia and the possibility of alteration of local wild plant interaction with their pollinator. Indonesia is rich with wild bees and some of the species already domesticated for years with prospect as pollinating agent for tomatoes. This research aimed to assess the efficiency of local honey bee (Apis cerana L.) and stingless bee (Trigona iridipennis), as pollinator of tomato. During this research, total visitation rate and total numbers of pollinated flowers by honey bee and stingless bee were compared between them with bagged flowers as control. Total fruit production, average weight and size also measured in order to correlated pollination efficiency with quantity and quality of fruit produced. Result of this research showed that A. cerana has slightly higher rate of visitation (p>0.05) and significantly shorter handling time (p < 0.05) than T. iridipennis due to their larger colony demand and low reward provide by tomato flowers. However, honey bee pollinated tomato flowers more efficient pollinator than stingless bee (80.3 and 70.2% efficiency, respectively; p < 0.05) even though the average weight and size of tomatoes were similar (p>0.05). Based on the results, it is concluded that the use of Apis cerana and Trigona spp., for pollinating tomatoes in tropical climates could be an alternative to the use of non-native Apis mellifera and bumblebees (Bombus spp.). However, more researches are needed to evaluate the cost/benefit on large-scale farming and greenhouse pollination using both bees against other bee species and pollination methods.

  11. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit growth and ripening as related to the biomechanical properties of fruit skin and isolated cuticle.

    PubMed

    Bargel, Hendrik; Neinhuis, Christoph

    2005-03-01

    The control of growth rate and the mechanical integrity of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit has been attributed to the exocarp. This study focused on the biomechanics of the fruit skin (FS) comprising cuticle, epidermis and a few subdermal cell layers, and the enzymatically isolated cuticular membrane (CM) during fruit growth and ripening. Morphology and mechanical properties of the FS and the CM of three cultivars were analysed separately at three distinct ripening stages by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and one-dimensional tension testing, respectively. Both were subject to significant cultivar-specific changes. Thickness of the CM increased during ripening from 7.8-8.6 to 9.9-15.7 microm and exceeded by far that of the epidermal cell wall. The mechanical properties, such as modulus of elasticity, strength, and failure strain, were highest in the FS for all cultivars at any stage, with only one exception; however, the cuticle largely mirrored these properties throughout fruit maturation. Stiffness of both isolated CM and FS increased from immature to fully ripe fruits for all cultivars, while failure stress and failure strain displayed a tendency to decrease for two of them. Stress-strain behaviour of the CM could be described as strain softening, mostly linear elastic throughout, and strain hardening, and was subject to growth-related changes. The FS displayed strain hardening throughout. The results indicate evidence for the cuticle to become increasingly important as a structural component for the integrity of the tomato fruit in addition to the epidermis. A supplementary putative model for tomato fruit growth is proposed. PMID:15710631

  12. Structural and kinetic properties of a novel purple acid phosphatase from phosphate-starved tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Bozzo, Gale G; Raghothama, Kashchandra G; Plaxton, William C

    2004-01-01

    An intracellular acid phosphatase (IAP) from P(i)-starved (-P(i)) tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum ) suspension cells has been purified to homogeneity. IAP is a purple acid phosphatase (PAP), as the purified protein was violet in colour (lambda(max)=546 nm) and was insensitive to L-tartrate. PAGE, periodic acid-Schiff staining and peptide mapping demonstrated that the enzyme exists as a 142 kDa heterodimer composed of an equivalent ratio of glycosylated and structurally dissimilar 63 (alpha-subunit) and 57 kDa (beta-subunit) polypeptides. However, the nine N-terminal amino acids of the alpha- and beta-subunits were identical, exhibiting similarity to the deduced N-terminal portions of several putative plant PAPs. Quantification of immunoblots probed with rabbit anti-(tomato acid phosphatase) immune serum revealed that the 4-fold increase in IAP activity due to P(i)-deprivation was correlated with similar increases in the amount of antigenic IAP alpha- and beta-subunits. IAP displayed optimal activity at pH 5.1, was activated 150% by 10 mM Mg(2+), but was potently inhibited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), molybdate, vanadate, fluoride and P(i). Although IAP demonstrated broad substrate selectivity, its specificity constant ( V (max)/ K (m)) with phosphoenolpyruvate was >250% greater than that obtained with any other substrate. IAP exhibited significant peroxidase activity, which was optimal at pH 9.0 and insensitive to Mg(2+) or molybdate. This IAP is proposed to scavenge P(i) from intracellular phosphate esters in -P(i) tomato. A possible secondary IAP role in the metabolism of reactive oxygen species is discussed. IAP properties are compared with those of two extracellular PAP isoenzymes that are secreted into the medium of -P(i) tomato cells [Bozzo, Raghothama and Plaxton (2002) Eur. J. Biochem. 269, 6278-6286]. PMID:14521509

  13. Microvascular circulation at cool, normal and warm temperatures in rat leg muscles examined by histochemistry using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hisashi; Kurose, Tomoyuki; Nosaka, Shinnosuke; Kawamata, Seiichi

    2014-07-01

    Local cooling and/or warming of the body are widely used for therapy. For safer and more effective therapy, microvascular hemodynamics needs to be clarified. To examine blood circulation in rat leg muscles at 20, 30, 37 and 40°C, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Lycopersicon esculentum lectin was injected into the cardiac ventricle. Endothelial cells of open and functioning blood vessels were labeled by this lectin for 3 min and detected by immunostaining for lectin. The percentage of open and functioning capillaries of leg muscles by the avidin-biotin method was 89.8±3.3% at 37°C, while capillaries were unclear or unstained at 20 and 30°C, probably due to a decrease of blood flow. The results using the tyramide-dinitrophenol method were 58.6±15.0% at 20°C, 68.5±12.3% at 30°C, 83.8±5.7% at 37°C and 83.3±7.8% at 40°C. The value at 20°C was significantly different from those at 37 and 40°C. The results by the tyramide-biotin method were 85.5±5.3% at 20°C, 87.3±9.7% at 30°C, 94.7±3.6% at 37°C and 92.5±2.1% at 40°C. Based on these results, it was concluded that the blood flow of each capillary considerably decreased at 20 and 30°C and probably increased at 40°C, whereas the proportion of open and functioning capillaries was essentially unchanged. PMID:24998628

  14. Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glucose NIH Medline Plus - Diabetes Spotlight FDA permits marketing of first system of mobile medical apps for ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  15. Vascular Glucose Sensor Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jeffrey I; Torjman, Marc C.; Strasma, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability have been associated with increased morbidity, mortality, length of stay, and cost in a variety of critical care and non–critical care patient populations in the hospital. The results from prospective randomized clinical trials designed to determine the risks and benefits of intensive insulin therapy and tight glycemic control have been confusing; and at times conflicting. The limitations of point-of-care blood glucose (BG) monitoring in the hospital highlight the great clinical need for an automated real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) that can accurately measure the concentration of glucose every few minutes. Automation and standardization of the glucose measurement process have the potential to significantly improve BG control, clinical outcome, safety and cost. PMID:26078254

  16. All about Blood Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Glucose Before meals: 80 to 130 mg/dl My Usual Results My Goals ______ to ______ ______ to ______ 2 ... the start of a meal: below 180 mg/dl below ______ below ______ What’s the best way to keep ...

  17. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  18. Glucose: Detection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Galant, A L; Kaufman, R C; Wilson, J D

    2015-12-01

    Glucose is an aldosic monosaccharide that is centrally entrenched in the processes of photosynthesis and respiration, serving as an energy reserve and metabolic fuel in most organisms. As both a monomer and as part of more complex structures such as polysaccharides and glucosides, glucose also plays a major role in modern food products, particularly where flavor and or structure are concerned. Over the years, many diverse methods for detecting and quantifying glucose have been developed; this review presents an overview of the most widely employed and historically significant, including copper iodometry, HPLC, GC, CZE, and enzyme based systems such as glucose meters. The relative strengths and limitations of each method are evaluated, and examples of their recent application in the realm of food chemistry are discussed.

  19. An acoustic glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruifen; Stevenson, Adrian C; Lowe, Christopher R

    2012-05-15

    In vivo glucose monitoring is required for tighter glycaemic control. This report describes a new approach to construct a miniature implantable device based on a magnetic acoustic resonance sensor (MARS). A ≈ 600-800 nm thick glucose-responsive poly(acrylamide-co-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) (poly(acrylamide-co-3-APB)) film was polymerised on the quartz disc (12 mm in diameter and 0.25 mm thick) of the MARS. The swelling/shrinking of the polymer film induced by the glucose binding to the phenylboronate caused changes in the resonance amplitude of the quartz disc in the MARS. A linear relationship between the response of the MARS and the glucose concentration in the range ≈ 0-15 mM was observed, with the optimum response of the MARS sensor being obtained when the polymer films contained ≈ 20 mol% 3-APB. The MARS glucose sensor also functioned under flow conditions (9 μl/min) with a response almost identical to the sensor under static or non-flow conditions. The results suggest that the MARS could offer a promising strategy for developing a small subcutaneously implanted continuous glucose monitor.

  20. A glucose sensor protein for continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Jithesh V; Jin, Sha; Ye, Kaiming

    2010-12-15

    In vivo continuous glucose monitoring has posed a significant challenge to glucose sensor development due to the lack of reliable techniques that are non- or at least minimally-invasive. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrated the development of a new glucose sensor protein, AcGFP1-GBPcys-mCherry, and an optical sensor assembly, capable of generating quantifiable FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) signals for glucose monitoring. Our experimental data showed that the engineered glucose sensor protein can generate measurable FRET signals in response to glucose concentrations varying from 25 to 800 μM. The sensor developed based on this protein had a shelf-life of up to 3 weeks. The sensor response was devoid of interference from compounds like galactose, fructose, lactose, mannose, and mannitol when tested at physiologically significant concentrations of these compounds. This new glucose sensor protein can potentially be used to develop implantable glucose sensors for continuous glucose monitoring.

  1. Non-hydraulic regulation of fruit growth in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Solairo) growing in drying soil.

    PubMed

    Mingo, Darren M; Bacon, Mark A; Davies, William J

    2003-04-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Solairo) fruit growth, fruit mesocarp and leaf epidermal cell turgor, and fruit and leaf sub-epidermal apoplastic pH were monitored as plants were allowed to dry the soil in which they were rooted. Soil drying regimes involved splitting the root system of plants between two halves of a single pot separated by a solid impervious membrane to form a split-root system. Plants were then allowed to dry the soil in both halves of the pot (a soil-drying (SD) treatment) or water was supplied to one-half of the pot (a partial root-drying (PRD) treatment), allowing only one-half of the root system to dry the soil. A well-watered control treatment watered the soil on both halves of the pot. The rate of fruit growth was highly correlated with the soil water content of both sides of the SD treatment and the dry side of the PRD treatment. Soil drying caused a significant restriction in fruit growth rate, which was independent of any changes in the turgor of expanding fruit mesocarp cells in the PRD treatment. By supplying water to half of the root system, the turgors of mesocarp cells were maintained at values above those recorded in well-watered controls. The turgor of leaf epidermal cells exhibited a similar response. The pH of the sub-epidermal apoplastic compartment in leaves and fruit increased with soil drying. The dynamics of this increase in leaves and fruit were identical, suggesting free transport of this signal from shoot to fruit. Fruit growth rate and sub-epidermal pH within the fruit showed a strong correlation. The similarity of fruit growth response in the SD and PRD treatment, suggests that tomato plants respond to a discrete measure of soil water status and do not integrate measures to determine total soil water availability. The results of this study are not consistent with Lockhartian models of growth regulation in expanding fruit of a higher plant. A non-hydraulic, chemical-based signalling control of fruit growth in plants

  2. Behavior and pollination efficiency of Nannotrigona perilampoides (Hymenoptera: Meliponini) on greenhouse tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) in subtropical México.

    PubMed

    Cauich, Orlando; Quezada-Euán, José Javier G; Macias-Macias, José Octavio; Reyes-Oregel, Vicente; Medina-Peralta, Salvador; Parra-Tabla, Victor

    2004-04-01

    The acclimation, foraging behavior, and pollination efficiency of stingless bees of the species Nannotrigona perilampoides Cresson were evaluated in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants cultivated in two greenhouses. The greenhouses were divided into three areas of 16 m2, and one of the following treatments was used for pollination: stingless bees (SB), mechanical vibration (MV), and no pollination (NP). Observations were conducted once a week from 0800 to 1600 hours during 2 mo. The acclimation of the bees to the greenhouses was estimated by the number of bees that did not return to the hive (lost bees) and by comparing the population of the colonies (brood and adults). The foraging activity of the bees across the day was evaluated by comparing the number of foragers per hour. The influence of environmental variables on the foraging activity was also analyzed. The pollination efficiency was compared among treatments through the percentage of fruit set, weight of individual fruit, kilograms of fruit produced per square meter, and the number of seed per fruit. The bees started foraging on the flowers approximately 7 d after the colonies were introduced to the greenhouse. There was a decline in the population of the colonies across the experiment, but colonies did not die out. Correlations of environmental variables with the foraging activity of the bees showed that none of them had a significant influence on pollen foraging. However, water collection was positively correlated with the temperature and negatively correlated with the humidity inside the greenhouse. The estimation of the pollination efficiency per treatment showed that there were significant differences in fruit set in SB (83 +/- 4.2) and MV (78.5 +/- 6.4) compared with NP (52.6 +/- 7.6). However, the average weight of the fruit was similar for the three treatments (65 g). There were significant differences for seed number in SB (200 +/- 15.3) and MV (232 +/- 21.4) compared with NP (120 +/- 16

  3. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  4. Blood glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Davey, Sarah

    2014-06-10

    I found the CPD article on blood glucose monitoring and management in acute stroke care interesting and informative. As I am a mental health nursing student, my knowledge of chronic physical conditions is limited, so I learned a lot. PMID:24894257

  5. Acetylcholine suppresses shoot formation and callusing in leaf explants of in vitro raised seedlings of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby.

    PubMed

    Bamel, Kiran; Gupta, Rajendra; Gupta, Shirish C

    2016-06-01

    We present experimental evidence to show that acetylcholine (ACh) causes decrease in shoot formation in leaf explants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var Pusa Ruby) when cultured on shoot regeneration medium. The optimum response was obtained at 10(-4) M ACh-enriched medium. ACh also causes decrease in percentage of cultures forming callus and reduces the callus mass. Inhibitors of enzymatic hydrolysis of ACh, neostigmine and physostigmine, also suppresses callogenesis and caulogenesis. On the other hand, the breakdown products of Ach, choline and acetate, do not alter the morphogenic response induced on the shoot regeneration medium. Neostigmine showed optimal reduction in shoot formation at 10(-5) M. The explants cultured on neostigmine augmented medium showed decline in the activity of ACh hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase. ACh and neostigmine added together showed marked reduction in callus mass. These results strongly support the role of ACh as a natural regulator of morphogenesis in tomato plants. PMID:27348536

  6. Evaluation of the effect of ecologic on root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, and tomato plant, Lycopersicon esculenum.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Debora C; Tchounwou, Paul B; Lawrence, Gary W

    2008-06-01

    Nonchemical methods and strategies for nematode management including cultural methods and engineered measures have been recommended as an alternative to methyl bromide (a major soil fumigant), due to its role in the depletion of the ozone layer. Hence, an international agreement has recently been reached calling for its reduced consumption and complete phasing out. This present research evaluates the potential of Ecologic, a biological, marine shell meal chitin material, as a soil amendment management agent for root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, control, and its effect on the growth of Floradel tomato plant, Lycopersicon esculentum. To accomplish this goal, studies were conducted during which, experimental pots were set up in greenhouse environments using sterilized soil inoculated with 5,000 root-knot eggs per 1500 g soil. There were 4 treatments and 5 replications. Treatments were: No chitin; 50 g chitin; 100 g chitin; and 200 g chitin. A two-week wait period following Ecologic amendment preceded Floradel tomato planting to allow breakdown of the chitin material into the soil. Fresh and dry weights of shoot and root materials were taken as growth end-points. A statistically significant difference (p < or = 0.05) was obtained with regard to the growth rate of L. esculentum at 100 g chitin treatment compared to the control with no chitin. Mean fresh weights of Floradel tomato were 78.0 +/- 22.3 g, 81.0 +/- 20.3 g, 109.0 +/- 25.4 g and 102.0 +/- 33.3 g at 0, 50, 100 and 200 g chitin, respectively. The analysis of root knot nematode concentrations indicated a substantial effect on reproduction rate associated with chitin amendment. Study results showed a significant decrease in both root knot nematode eggs and juveniles (J2) at 100g and 200 g Ecologic chitin levels, however, an increase in nematode concentrations was recorded at the 50 g Ecologic chitin level (p < or = 0.05). The mean amounts of J2 population, as expressed per 1500 cm3 soil, were 49

  7. Evaluation of the Effect of Ecologic on Root Knot Nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, and Tomato Plant, Lycopersicon esculenum

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Debora C.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Lawrence, Gary W.

    2008-01-01

    Nonchemical methods and strategies for nematode management including cultural methods and engineered measures have been recommended as an alternative to methyl bromide (a major soil fumigant), due to its role in the depletion of the ozone layer. Hence, an international agreement has recently been reached calling for its reduced consumption and complete phasing out. This present research evaluates the potential of Ecologic, a biological, marine shell meal chitin material, as a soil amendment management agent for root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, control, and its effect on the growth of Floradel tomato plant, Lycopersicon esculentum. To accomplish this goal, studies were conducted during which, experimental pots were set up in greenhouse environments using sterilized soil inoculated with 5,000 root-knot eggs per 1500 g soil. There were 4 treatments and 5 replications. Treatments were: No chitin; 50 g chitin; 100 g chitin; and 200 g chitin. A two-week wait period following Ecologic amendment preceded Floradel tomato planting to allow breakdown of the chitin material into the soil. Fresh and dry weights of shoot and root materials were taken as growth end-points. A statistically significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) was obtained with regard to the growth rate of L. esculentum at 100 g chitin treatment compared to the control with no chitin. Mean fresh weights of Floradel tomato were 78.0 ± 22.3g, 81.0 ± 20.3g, 109.0 ± 25.4g and 102.0 ± 33.3g at 0, 50, 100 and 200g chitin, respectively. The analysis of root knot nematode concentrations indicated a substantial effect on reproduction rate associated with chitin amendment. Study results showed a significant decrease in both root knot nematode eggs and juveniles (J2) at 100g and 200g Ecologic chitin levels, however, an increase in nematode concentrations was recorded at the 50g Ecologic chitin level (p ≤ 0.05). The mean amounts of J2 population, as expressed per 1500cm3 soil, were 49,933 ± 38,819, 86,050

  8. Evaluation of volatile metabolites as markers in Lycopersicon esculentum L. cultivars discrimination by multivariate analysis of headspace solid phase microextraction and mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Figueira, José; Câmara, Hugo; Pereira, Jorge; Câmara, José S

    2014-02-15

    To gain insights on the effects of cultivar on the volatile metabolomic expression of different tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) cultivars--Plum, Campari, Grape, Cherry and Regional, cultivated under similar edafoclimatic conditions, and to identify the most discriminate volatile marker metabolites related to the cultivar, the chromatographic profiles resulting from headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-qMS) analysis, combined with multivariate analysis were investigated. The data set composed by the 77 volatile metabolites identified in the target tomato cultivars, 5 of which (2,2,6-trimethylcyclohexanone, 2-methyl-6-methyleneoctan-2-ol, 4-octadecyl-morpholine, (Z)-methyl-3-hexenoate and 3-octanone) are reported for the first time in tomato volatile metabolomic composition, was evaluated by chemometrics. Firstly, principal component analysis was carried out in order to visualise data trends and clusters, and then, linear discriminant analysis in order to detect the set of volatile metabolites able to differentiate groups according to tomato cultivars. The results obtained revealed a perfect discrimination between the different Lycopersicon esculentum L. cultivars considered. The assignment success rate was 100% in classification and 80% in prediction ability by using "leave-one-out" cross-validation procedure. The volatile profile was able to differentiate all five cultivars and revealed complex interactions between them including the participation in the same biosynthetic pathway. The volatile metabolomic platform for tomato samples obtained by HS-SPME/GC-qMS here described, and the interrelationship detected among the volatile metabolites can be used as a roadmap for biotechnological applications, namely to improve tomato aroma and their acceptance in the final consumer, and for traceability studies. PMID:24128528

  9. Glucose and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2008-04-01

    When a human's enzymes attach glucose to proteins they do so at specific sites on a specific molecule for a specific purpose that also can include ascorbic acid (AA) at a high level such as 1 gram per hour during exposure. In an AA synthesizing animal the manifold increase of AA produced in response to illness is automatic. In contrast, the human non-enzymatic process adds glucose haphazardly to any number of sites along available peptide chains. As Cerami clarified decades ago, extensive crosslinking of proteins contributes to loss of elasticity in aging tissues. Ascorbic acid reduces the random non-enyzmatic glycation of proteins. Moreover, AA is a cofactor for hydroxylase enzymes that are necessary for the production and replacement of collagen and other structural proteins. We will discuss the relevance of ``aging is scurvy'' to the biochemistry of human aging.

  10. Effect of temperature on the occurrence of O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ insensitive photosynthesis in field grown plants. [Phaseolus vulgaris; Capsicum annum; Lycopersicon esculentum, Scrophularia desertorum; Cardaria draba, Populus fremontii

    SciTech Connect

    Sage, R.F.; Sharkey, T.D.

    1987-07-01

    The sensitivity of photosynthesis to O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ was measured in leaves from field grown plants of six species (Phaseolus vulgaris, Capsicum annuum, Lycopersicon esculentum, Scrophularia desertorum, Cardaria draba, and Populus fremontii) from 5/sup 0/C to 35/sup 0/C using gas-exchange techniques. In all species but Phaseolus, photosynthesis was insensitive to O/sub 2/ in normal air below a species dependent temperature. CO/sub 2/ insensitivity occurred under the same conditions that resulted in O/sub 2/ insensitivity. A complete loss of O/sub 2/ sensitivity occurred up to 22/sup 0/C in Lycopersicon but only up to 6/sup 0/C in Scrophularia. In Lycopersicon and Populus, O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ insensitivity occurred under conditions regularly encountered during the cooler portions of the day. Because O/sub 2/ insensitivity is an indicator of feedback limited photosynthesis, these results indicate that feedback limitations can play a role in determining the diurnal carbon gain in the field. At higher partial pressures of CO/sub 2/ the temperature at which O/sub 2/ insensitivity occurred was higher, indicating that feedback limitations in the field will become more important as the CO/sub 2/ concentration in the atmosphere increases.

  11. Effect of temperature on the occurrence of O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ insensitive photosynthesis in field grown plants. [Phaselous vulgaris; capsicum annum; lycopersicon esculentum; scrophularia desertorum; cardaria

    SciTech Connect

    Sage, R.F.; Sharkey, T.D.

    1987-04-01

    The sensitivity of photosynthesis to O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ was measured in field grown plants of six species (Phaseolus vulgaris, Capsicum annum, Lycopersicon esculentum, Scrophularia desertorum, Cardaria draba and Populus Fremontii) from 5/sup 0/C to 35/sup 0/C. Photosynthesis was insensitive to O/sub 2/ in normal air below a species dependent temperature. CO/sub 2/ insensitivity occurred under the same conditions that resulted in O/sub 2/ insensitivity. A complete loss of O/sub 2/ sensitivity was observed up to 22/sup 0/C (in Lycopersicon) but only up to 6/sup 0/C (in Scrophularia). In Lycopersicon and Populus, O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ insensitivity occurred under conditions regularly encountered during the cooler portions of the day. The authors believe that O/sub 2/ insensitivity is an indicator of feedback limited photosynthesis, and that these results indicate that feedback limitations can play a role in determining plant carbon gain in the field. At higher partial pressures of CO/sub 2/ the temperature at which O/sub 2/ insensitivity occurred was higher, indicating that feedback limitations in the field will become more important as the CO/sub 2/ concentration in the atmosphere increases.

  12. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression.

  13. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  14. Thermoresponsive amperometric glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Pinyou, Piyanut; Ruff, Adrian; Pöller, Sascha; Barwe, Stefan; Nebel, Michaela; Alburquerque, Natalia Guerrero; Wischerhoff, Erik; Laschewsky, André; Schmaderer, Sebastian; Szeponik, Jan; Plumeré, Nicolas; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The authors report on the fabrication of a thermoresponsive biosensor for the amperometric detection of glucose. Screen printed electrodes with heatable gold working electrodes were modified by a thermoresponsive statistical copolymer [polymer I: poly(ω-ethoxytriethylenglycol methacrylate-co-3-(N,N-dimethyl-N-2-methacryloyloxyethyl ammonio) propanesulfonate-co-ω-butoxydiethylenglycol methacrylate-co-2-(4-benzoyl-phenoxy)ethyl methacrylate)] with a lower critical solution temperature of around 28 °C in aqueous solution via electrochemically induced codeposition with a pH-responsive redox-polymer [polymer II: poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-allyl methacrylate-co-poly(ethylene glycol)methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate-co-2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-[Os(bpy)2(4-(((2-(2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethoxy)ethyl)amino)methyl)-N,N-dimethylpicolinamide)](2+)] and pyrroloquinoline quinone-soluble glucose dehydrogenase acting as biological recognition element. Polymer II bears covalently bound Os-complexes that act as redox mediators for shuttling electrons between the enzyme and the electrode surface. Polymer I acts as a temperature triggered immobilization matrix. Probing the catalytic current as a function of the working electrode temperature shows that the activity of the biosensor is dramatically reduced above the phase transition temperature of polymer I. Thus, the local modulation of the temperature at the interphase between the electrode and the bioactive layer allows switching the biosensor from an on- to an off-state without heating of the surrounding analyte solution. PMID:26702635

  15. Optical monitoring of glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, I. N.; Mbanu, A.

    1985-02-01

    A device for the monitoring of blood glucose levels is investigated. It measures the sugar concentration using the effect of the glucose on the optical refractive index. Light is transmitted along an optical fibre, and, as most of the internal rays are incident at the fibre surface at an angle less than the critical angle, the refractive index of the surrounding liquid can be calculated. The device can measure glucose concentrations with a sensitivity of better than 0.1%.

  16. Optoelectronic Apparatus Measures Glucose Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Rovati, Luigi L.

    2003-01-01

    An optoelectronic apparatus has been invented as a noninvasive means of measuring the concentration of glucose in the human body. The apparatus performs polarimetric and interferometric measurements of the human eye to acquire data from which the concentration of glucose in the aqueous humor can be computed. Because of the importance of the concentration of glucose in human health, there could be a large potential market for instruments based on this apparatus.

  17. Review of Glucose Oxidases and Glucose Dehydrogenases: A Bird's Eye View of Glucose Sensing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Stefano; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Sode, Koji

    2011-01-01

    The evolution from first-generation through third-generation glucose sensors has witnessed the appearance of a number of very diverse oxidoreductases, which vary tremendously in terms of origin, structure, substrate specificity, cofactor used as primary electron acceptor, and acceptable final electron acceptor. This article summarizes our present knowledge of redox enzymes currently utilized in commercially available glucose monitoring systems to promote a fuller appreciation of enzymatic properties and principles employed in blood glucose monitoring to help avoid potential errors. PMID:22027299

  18. Glucose metabolism in Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Flückiger, J; Ettlinger, L

    1977-08-26

    Acetobacter aceti NCIB 8554 grows on a minimal medium with ethanol but not with glucose as carbon and energy source. Addition of glucose to a wild type culture on ethanol has no influence on growth of the organism. Growth of a glucose sensitive mutant A5 is inhibited by the addition of glucose until all glucose has disappeared from the medium. In order to determine the routes by which glucose is metabolised in wild type and mutant, radiorespirometric, enzymatic, and uptake experiments have been performed. For the radiorespirometric experiments of the "continuous substrate feeding" type as apparatus has been constructed. Of the glucose entering the cells about 30% is excreted as gluconate and 6% metabolised with liberation of C-1 as CO2. The rest is accumulated intracellularly. No differences were found between wild type and mutant. Under different growth conditions and with different enzymatic assay methods no pyruvate kinase activity (EC 2.7.1.40) could be detected. This might explain the inability of A. aceti to grow on glucose.

  19. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Christos V; Elisaf, Moses S

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro- and macrovascular disease. Moreover, increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance. As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical. However, the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism. Indeed, angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism. However, some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis. On the other hand, diuretics and β-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism. Of note, carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of the β-blockers class, being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis. The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may, to an extent, compromise their cardiovascular protective role. As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment, especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes. PMID:25068013

  20. Alginate cryogel based glucose biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatoni, Amin; Windy Dwiasi, Dian; Hermawan, Dadan

    2016-02-01

    Cryogel is macroporous structure provides a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. In this work, an alginate cryogel based biosensor was developed to detect glucose. The cryogel was prepared using alginate cross-linked by calcium chloride under sub-zero temperature. This porous structure was growth in a 100 μL micropipette tip with a glucose oxidase enzyme entrapped inside the cryogel. The glucose detection was based on the colour change of redox indicator, potassium permanganate, by the hydrogen peroxide resulted from the conversion of glucose. The result showed a porous structure of alginate cryogel with pores diameter of 20-50 μm. The developed glucose biosensor was showed a linear response in the glucose detection from 1.0 to 5.0 mM with a regression of y = 0.01x+0.02 and R2 of 0.994. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor was showed a high operational stability up to 10 times of uninterrupted glucose detections.

  1. Glucose-stat, a glucose-controlled continuous culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kleman, G L; Chalmers, J J; Luli, G W; Strohl, W R

    1991-01-01

    A predictive and feedback proportional control algorithm, developed for fed-batch fermentations and described in a companion paper (G. L. Kleman, J. J. Chalmers, G. W. Luli, and W. R. Strohl, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:910-917, 1991), was used in this work to control a continuous culture on the basis of the soluble-glucose concentration (called the glucose-stat). This glucose-controlled continuous-culture system was found to reach and maintain steady state for 11 to 24 residence times when four different background glucose concentrations (0.27, 0.50, 0.7, and 1.5 g/liter) were used. The predictive-plus-feedback control system yielded very tight control of the continuous nutristat cultures; glucose concentrations were maintained at the set points with less than 0.003 standard error. Acetate production by Escherichia coli B in glucose-stats was found not to be correlated with the level of steady-state soluble-glucose concentration. PMID:2059050

  2. Glucose-stat, a glucose-controlled continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Kleman, G L; Chalmers, J J; Luli, G W; Strohl, W R

    1991-04-01

    A predictive and feedback proportional control algorithm, developed for fed-batch fermentations and described in a companion paper (G. L. Kleman, J. J. Chalmers, G. W. Luli, and W. R. Strohl, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:910-917, 1991), was used in this work to control a continuous culture on the basis of the soluble-glucose concentration (called the glucose-stat). This glucose-controlled continuous-culture system was found to reach and maintain steady state for 11 to 24 residence times when four different background glucose concentrations (0.27, 0.50, 0.7, and 1.5 g/liter) were used. The predictive-plus-feedback control system yielded very tight control of the continuous nutristat cultures; glucose concentrations were maintained at the set points with less than 0.003 standard error. Acetate production by Escherichia coli B in glucose-stats was found not to be correlated with the level of steady-state soluble-glucose concentration. PMID:2059050

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Renal Tubular Glucose Absorption after Glucose Load

    PubMed Central

    De Gaetano, Andrea; Panunzi, Simona; Eliopoulos, Dimitris; Hardy, Thomas; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2014-01-01

    A partial differential Progressive Tubular Reabsorption (PTR) model, describing renal tubular glucose reabsorption and urinary glucose excretion following a glucose load perturbation, is proposed and fitted to experimental data from five subjects. For each subject the Glomerular Filtration Rate was estimated and both blood and urine glucose were sampled following an Intra-Venous glucose bolus. The PTR model was compared with a model representing the conventional Renal Threshold Hypothesis (RTH). A delay bladder compartment was introduced in both formulations. For the RTH model, the average threshold for glycosuria varied between 9.90±4.50 mmol/L and 10.63±3.64 mmol/L (mean ± Standard Deviation) under different hypotheses; the corresponding average maximal transport rates varied between 0.48±0.45 mmol/min (86.29±81.22 mg/min) and 0.50±0.42 mmol/min (90.62±76.15 mg/min). For the PTR Model, the average maximal transports rates varied between 0.61±0.52 mmol/min (109.57±93.77 mg/min) and 0.83±0.95 mmol/min (150.13±171.85 mg/min). The time spent by glucose inside the tubules before entering the bladder compartment varied between 1.66±0.73 min and 2.45±1.01 min. The PTR model proved much better than RTH at fitting observations, by correctly reproducing the delay of variations of glycosuria with respect to the driving glycemia, and by predicting non-zero urinary glucose elimination at low glycemias. This model is useful when studying both transients and steady-state glucose elimination as well as in assessing drug-related changes in renal glucose excretion. PMID:24489817

  4. Involvement of Ethylene in Stress-Induced Expression of the TLC1.1 Retrotransposon from Lycopersicon chilense Dun.1[w

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Gerardo; Verdugo, Isabel; Yañez, Mónica; Ahumada, Iván; Theoduloz, Cristina; Cordero, Cecilia; Poblete, Fernando; González, Enrique; Ruiz-Lara, Simón

    2005-01-01

    The TLC1 family is one of the four families of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons identified in the genome of Lycopersicon chilense. Here, we show that this family of retroelements is transcriptionally active and its expression is induced in response to diverse stress conditions such as wounding, protoplast preparation, and high salt concentrations. Several stress-associated signaling molecules, including ethylene, methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, are capable of inducing TLC1 family expression in vivo. A representative of this family, named TLC1.1, was isolated from a genomic library from L. chilense. Transient expression assays in leaf protoplasts and stably transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants demonstrate that the U3 domain of the 5′-LTR region of this element can drive stress-induced transcriptional activation of the β-glucuronidase reporter gene. Two 57-bp tandem repeated sequences are found in this region, including an 8-bp motif, ATTTCAAA, previously identified as an ethylene-responsive element box in the promoter region of ethylene-induced genes. Expression analysis of wild-type LTR and single and double ethylene-responsive element box mutants fused to the β-glucuronidase gene shows that these elements are required for ethylene-responsive gene expression in protoplasts and transgenic plants. We suggest that ethylene-dependent signaling is the main signaling pathway involved in the regulation of the expression of the TLC1.1 element from L. chilense. PMID:16040666

  5. Bioefficacy, residue dynamics and safety assessment of the combination fungicide trifloxystrobin 25% + tebuconazole 50%-75 WG in managing early blight of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Saha, Sujoy; Purath, Ahammed Shabeer Thekkum; Jadhav, Manjusha R; Loganathan, M; Banerjee, Kaushik; Rai, A B

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the in vitro and in vivo bioefficacy of a combination fungicide trifloxystrobin (25%) + tebuconazole (50%) against early blight disease of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) caused by Alternaria solani and their corresponding pre-harvest intervals (PHI) with reference to the maximum residue limits (European Union). Bioefficacy of the test fungicide combination revealed that in vitro conditions manifested the best control (75.1%) at 350 mg kg(-1) against 76.2% control under field conditions. A sample preparation method based on ethyl acetate extraction and estimation by LC-MS multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was validated in tomato fruits at 0.01 mg/kg and dissipation studies were conducted in field at single and double doses. The residues of both the compounds on all the sampling days were below the European Union maximum residue limits (EU-MRLs) and the maximum permissible intakes (MPIs) were calculated on the basis of prescribed acceptable daily intake (ADI). The combined bioefficacy and residue dynamics information will support label-claim of this fungicide combination for the management of early blight in tomato. PMID:24328546

  6. Characterization of plant growth promoting traits of bacterial isolates from the rhizosphere of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicon L.) grown under Fe sufficiency and deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scagliola, M; Pii, Y; Mimmo, T; Cesco, S; Ricciuti, P; Crecchio, C

    2016-10-01

    Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria (PGPB) are considered a promising approach to replace the conventional agricultural practices, since they have been shown to affect plant nutrient-acquisition processes by influencing nutrient availability in the rhizosphere and/or those biochemical processes determining the uptake at root level of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and iron (Fe), that represent the major constraints for crop productivity worldwide. We have isolated novel bacterial strains from the rhizosphere of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicon L.) plants, previously grown in hydroponic solution (either Fe deficient or Fe sufficient) and subsequently transferred onto an agricultural calcareous soil. PGPB have been identified by molecular tools and characterized for their capacity to produce siderophores and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and to solubilize phosphate. Selected bacterial isolates, showing contemporarily high levels of the three activities investigated, were finally tested for their capacity to induce Fe reduction in cucumber roots two isolates, from barley and tomato plants under Fe deficiency, significantly increased the root Fe-chelate reductase activity; interestingly, another isolate enhanced the reduction of Fe-chelate reductase activity in cucumber plant roots, although grown under Fe sufficiency. PMID:27295343

  7. Comparative Studies on the Fungi and Bio-Chemical Characteristics of Snake Gourd (Trichosanthes curcumerina Linn) and Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentus Mill) in Rivers State, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuku, E. C.; Ogbonna, D. N.; Onuegbu, B. A.; Adeleke, M. T. V.

    Comparative studies on the fungi and biochemical characteristics of Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentus Mill) and the Snake gourd (Trichosanthes curcumerina Linn) products were investigated in Rivers State using various analytical procedures. Results of the proximate analysis of fresh snake gourd and tomatoes show that the essential minerals such as protein, ash, fibre, lipid, phosphorus and niacin contents were higher in snake gourd but low in carbohydrate, calcium, iron, vitamins A and C when compared to the mineral fractions of tomatoes which has high values of calcium, iron, vitamins A and C. The mycoflora predominantly associated with the fruit rot of tomato were Fusarium oxysporium, Fusarium moniliforme, Rhizopus stolonifer and Aspergillus niger, while other fungi isolates from Snake gourd include Rhizopus stolonifer, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tamari, Penicillium ita/icum and Neurospora crassa. Rhizopus stolonifer and Aspergillus niger were common spoilage fungi to both the Tomato and Snake gourd. All the fungal isolates were found to be pathogenic. The duration for storage of the fruits at room temperature (28±1°C) showed that Tomato could store for 5 days while Snake gourd stored for as much as 7 days. Sensory evaluation shows that Snake gourd is preferred to Tomatoes because of its culinary and medicinal importance.

  8. The impact of enhanced atmospheric carbon dioxide on yield, proximate composition, elemental concentration, fatty acid and vitamin C contents of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Khan, Ikhtiar; Azam, Andaleeb; Mahmood, Abid

    2013-01-01

    The global average temperature has witnessed a steady increase during the second half of the twentieth century and the trend is continuing. Carbon dioxide, a major green house gas is piling up in the atmosphere and besides causing global warming, is expected to alter the physico-chemical composition of plants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the hypothesis that increased CO(2) in the air is causing undesirable changes in the nutritional composition of tomato fruits. Two varieties of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) were grown in ambient (400 μmol mol(-1)) and elevated (1,000 μmol mol(-1)) concentration of CO(2) under controlled conditions. The fruits were harvested at premature and fully matured stages and analyzed for yield, proximate composition, elemental concentration, fatty acid, and vitamin C contents. The amount of carbohydrates increased significantly under the enhanced CO(2) conditions. The amount of crude protein and vitamin C, two important nutritional parameters, decreased substantially. Fatty acid content showed a mild decrease with a slight increase in crude fiber. Understandably, the effect of enhanced atmospheric CO(2) was more pronounced at the fully matured stage. Mineral contents of the fruit samples changed in an irregular fashion. Tomato fruit has been traditionally a source of vitamin C, under the experimental conditions, a negative impact of enhanced CO(2) on this source of vitamin C was observed. The nutritional quality of both varieties of tomato has altered under the CO(2) enriched atmosphere. PMID:22382378

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of genomic DNA from in vitro grown tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cultivars before and after plant cryopreservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntean, Cristina M.; Leopold, Nicolae; Tripon, Carmen; Coste, Ana; Halmagyi, Adela

    2015-06-01

    In this work the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of five genomic DNAs from non-cryopreserved control tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cultivars Siriana, Darsirius, Kristin, Pontica and Capriciu) respectively, have been analyzed in the wavenumber range 400-1800 cm-1. Structural changes induced in genomic DNAs upon cryopreservation were discussed in detail for four of the above mentioned tomato cultivars. The surface-enhanced Raman vibrational modes for each of these cases, spectroscopic band assignments and structural interpretations of genomic DNAs are reported. We have found, that DNA isolated from Siriana cultivar leaf tissues suffers the weakest structural changes upon cryogenic storage of tomato shoot apices. On the contrary, genomic DNA extracted from Pontica cultivar is the most responsive system to cryopreservation process. Particularly, both C2‧-endo-anti and C3'-endo-anti conformations have been detected. As a general observation, the wavenumber range 1511-1652 cm-1, being due to dA, dG and dT residues seems to be influenced by cryopreservation process. These changes could reflect unstacking of DNA bases. However, not significant structural changes of genomic DNAs from Siriana, Darsirius and Kristin have been found upon cryopreservation process of tomato cultivars. Based on this work, specific plant DNA-ligand interactions or accurate local structure of DNA in the proximity of a metallic surface, might be further investigated using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  10. The impact of enhanced atmospheric carbon dioxide on yield, proximate composition, elemental concentration, fatty acid and vitamin C contents of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Khan, Ikhtiar; Azam, Andaleeb; Mahmood, Abid

    2013-01-01

    The global average temperature has witnessed a steady increase during the second half of the twentieth century and the trend is continuing. Carbon dioxide, a major green house gas is piling up in the atmosphere and besides causing global warming, is expected to alter the physico-chemical composition of plants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the hypothesis that increased CO(2) in the air is causing undesirable changes in the nutritional composition of tomato fruits. Two varieties of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) were grown in ambient (400 μmol mol(-1)) and elevated (1,000 μmol mol(-1)) concentration of CO(2) under controlled conditions. The fruits were harvested at premature and fully matured stages and analyzed for yield, proximate composition, elemental concentration, fatty acid, and vitamin C contents. The amount of carbohydrates increased significantly under the enhanced CO(2) conditions. The amount of crude protein and vitamin C, two important nutritional parameters, decreased substantially. Fatty acid content showed a mild decrease with a slight increase in crude fiber. Understandably, the effect of enhanced atmospheric CO(2) was more pronounced at the fully matured stage. Mineral contents of the fruit samples changed in an irregular fashion. Tomato fruit has been traditionally a source of vitamin C, under the experimental conditions, a negative impact of enhanced CO(2) on this source of vitamin C was observed. The nutritional quality of both varieties of tomato has altered under the CO(2) enriched atmosphere.

  11. Phenyl derivative of pyranocoumarin precludes Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. Lycopersici infection in Lycopersicon esculentum via induction of enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, S; Sarada, D V L

    2015-01-01

    Binding of phenyl derivative of pyranocoumarin (PDP) modulated activity of fungal endopolygalacturonase in silico. Induced fit docking study of PDP with endopolygalacturonase (1HG8) showed a bifurcated hydrogen bond interaction with the protein at Lys 244 with a docking score of -3.6 and glide energy of -37.30 kcal/mol. Docking with endopolygalacturonase II (1CZF) resulted hydrogen bond formation with Lys 258 with a docking score of -2.3 and glide energy of -30.42 kcal/mol. It was hypothesized that this modulation favors accumulation of cell wall fragments (oligogalacturonides) which act as elicitors of plant defense responses. In order to prove the same, in vivo studies were carried out using a formulation developed from PDP (PDP 5EC) on greenhouse grown Lycopersicon esculentum L. The formulation was effective at different concentrations in reduction of seed infection, improvement of vigor and control of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici infection in L. esculentum. At a concentration of 2 %, PDP 5EC significant reduction in seed infection (95.83 %), improvement in seed vigor (64.31 %) and control of F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici infection (96.15 %) were observed. Further application of PDP 5EC to L. esculentum challenged with F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici significantly increased the activity of enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway, namely, peroxidase (PO), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), and enhanced the total phenolic content when compared to the control. PMID:25374140

  12. Effect of ethephon on protein degradation and the accumulation of pathogensis-related (PR) proteins in tomato leaf discs. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, P.; Conejero, V. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of ethephon (2-chloroetylphosphonic acid) on the degradation of proteins and on the induction of Lycopersicon esculentum pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins was studied in tomato leaf discs. The rate of ribulose, -1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) degradation was maximal in discs after 48 hours of incubation with 1 millimolar ethephon, leading to complete disappearance of Rubisco after 96 hours. This effect was correlated with an increase in PR protein synthesis and the induction of the previously reported alkaline proteolytic enzyme PR-P69. In vivo pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that ethephon not only affected Rubisco content but that of many other {sup 35}S-labeled proteins as well, indicating that ethylene activates a general and nonspecific mechanism of protein degradation. This effect was partially inhibited in vivo by the action of pCMB, a selective inhibitor of cysteine-proteinases such as P69. These data reinforce the hypothesis that P69 and perhaps other PR proteins are involved in the mechanism of accelerated protein degradation activated by ethylene.

  13. Antioxidant-enzyme reaction to the oxidative stress due to alpha-cypermethrin, chlorpyriphos, and pirimicarb in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Chahid, Karim; Laglaoui, Amin; Zantar, Said; Ennabili, Abdeslam

    2015-11-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) becomes one of the world's foremost vegetables, and its world production and consumption have increased fairly quickly. The capacity to induce oxidative stress in tomato plant, exposed to three xenobiotics such as alpha-cypermethrin, chlorpyriphos, and pirimicarb, was investigated by the evaluation of lipid peroxidation by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) rate; also, we studied the response of tomato to this stress by assessing the response of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR). The effect of the insecticides was observed using four concentrations (25, 50, 75, and 100%) for germinating seeds and only the recommended concentration in agriculture (100%) for growing plants. Our results show an important accumulation of MDA, demonstrating the increase of lipid peroxidation in consequence of the excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production due to insecticide treatment. In response to this oxidative stress in tomato seedlings and plants, the activities of antioxidant-enzyme system were generally enhanced. The electrophoretic analysis showed also the apparition of new isoenzymes as the case for CAT and POD.

  14. Conversion of glucose to sorbose

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Mark E.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-02-09

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing sorbose from glucose, said method comprising: (a) contacting the glucose with a silica-containing structure comprising a zeolite having a topology of a 12 membered-ring or larger, an ordered mesoporous silica material, or an amorphous silica, said structure containing Lewis acidic Ti.sup.4+ or Zr.sup.4+ or both Ti.sup.4+ and Zr.sup.4+ framework centers, said contacting conducted under reaction conditions sufficient to isomerize the glucose to sorbose. The sorbose may be (b) separated or isolated; or (c) converted to ascorbic acid.

  15. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  16. [Contribution of the kidney to glucose homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2013-09-01

    The kidney is involved in glucose homeostasis through three major mechanisms: renal gluconeogenesis, renal glucose consumption, and glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubule. Glucose reabsorption is one of the most important physiological functions of the kidney, allowing full recovery of filtered glucose, elimination of glucose from the urine, and prevention of calorie loss. Approximately 90% of the glucose is reabsorbed in the S1 segment of the proximal tubule, where glucose transporter-2 (GLUT2) and sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2) are located, while the remaining 10% is reabsorbed in the S3 segment by SGLT1 and GLUT1 transporters. In patients with hyperglycemia, the kidney continues to reabsorb glucose, thus maintaining hyperglycemia. Most of the renal glucose reabsorption is mediated by SGLT2. Several experimental and clinical studies suggest that pharmacological blockade of this transporter might be beneficial in the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24444521

  17. [Contribution of the kidney to glucose homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2013-09-01

    The kidney is involved in glucose homeostasis through three major mechanisms: renal gluconeogenesis, renal glucose consumption, and glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubule. Glucose reabsorption is one of the most important physiological functions of the kidney, allowing full recovery of filtered glucose, elimination of glucose from the urine, and prevention of calorie loss. Approximately 90% of the glucose is reabsorbed in the S1 segment of the proximal tubule, where glucose transporter-2 (GLUT2) and sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2) are located, while the remaining 10% is reabsorbed in the S3 segment by SGLT1 and GLUT1 transporters. In patients with hyperglycemia, the kidney continues to reabsorb glucose, thus maintaining hyperglycemia. Most of the renal glucose reabsorption is mediated by SGLT2. Several experimental and clinical studies suggest that pharmacological blockade of this transporter might be beneficial in the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant; OGTT - non-pregnant; Diabetes - glucose tolerance test ... The most common glucose tolerance test is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Before the test begins, a sample of blood will be taken. You will then ...

  19. Effect of Two Plant Species, Flax (Linum usitatissinum L.) and Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), on the Diversity of Soilborne Populations of Fluorescent Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Lemanceau, P.; Corberand, T.; Gardan, L.; Latour, X.; Laguerre, G.; Boeufgras, J.; Alabouvette, C.

    1995-01-01

    Suppression of soilborne disease by fluorescent pseudomonads may be inconsistent. Inefficient root colonization by the introduced bacteria is often responsible for this inconsistency. To better understand the bacterial traits involved in root colonization, the effect of two plant species, flax (Linum usitatissinum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), on the diversity of soilborne populations was assessed. Fluorescent pseudomonads were isolated from an uncultivated soil and from rhizosphere, rhizoplane, and root tissue of flax and tomato cultivated in the same soil. Species and biovars were identified by classical biochemical and physiological tests. The ability of bacterial isolates to assimilate 147 different organic compounds and to show three different enzyme activities was assessed to determine their intraspecific phenotypic diversity. Numerical analysis of these characteristics allowed the clustering of isolates showing a high level (87.8%) of similarity. On the whole, the populations isolated from soil were different from those isolated from plants with respect to their phenotypic characteristics. The difference in bacteria isolated from uncultivated soil and from root tissue of flax was particularly marked. The intensity of plant selection was more strongly expressed with flax than with tomato plants. The selection was, at least partly, plant specific. The use of 10 different substrates allowed us to discriminate between flax and tomato isolates. Pseudomonas fluorescens biovars II, III, and V and Pseudomonas putida biovar A and intermediate type were well distributed among the isolates from soil, rhizosphere, and rhizoplane. Most isolates from root tissue of flax and tomato belonged to P. putida bv. A and to P. fluorescens bv. II, respectively. Phenotypic characterization of bacterial isolates was well correlated with genotypic characterization based on repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR fingerprinting. PMID:16534950

  20. Germacrene C synthase from Lycopersicon esculentum cv. VFNT cherry tomato: cDNA isolation, characterization, and bacterial expression of the multiple product sesquiterpene cyclase.

    PubMed

    Colby, S M; Crock, J; Dowdle-Rizzo, B; Lemaux, P G; Croteau, R

    1998-03-01

    Germacrene C was found by GC-MS and NMR analysis to be the most abundant sesquiterpene in the leaf oil of Lycopersicon esculentum cv. VFNT Cherry, with lesser amounts of germacrene A, guaia-6,9-diene, germacrene B, beta-caryophyllene, alpha-humulene, and germacrene D. Soluble enzyme preparations from leaves catalyzed the divalent metal ion-dependent cyclization of [1-3H]farnesyl diphosphate to these same sesquiterpene olefins, as determined by radio-GC. To obtain a germacrene synthase cDNA, a set of degenerate primers was constructed based on conserved amino acid sequences of related terpenoid cyclases. With cDNA prepared from leaf epidermis-enriched mRNA, these primers amplified a 767-bp fragment that was used as a hybridization probe to screen the cDNA library. Thirty-one clones were evaluated for functional expression of terpenoid cyclase activity in Escherichia coli by using labeled geranyl, farnesyl, and geranylgeranyl diphosphates as substrates. Nine cDNA isolates expressed sesquiterpene synthase activity, and GC-MS analysis of the products identified germacrene C with smaller amounts of germacrene A, B, and D. None of the expressed proteins was active with geranylgeranyl diphosphate; however, one truncated protein converted geranyl diphosphate to the monoterpene limonene. The cDNA inserts specify a deduced polypeptide of 548 amino acids (Mr = 64,114), and sequence comparison with other plant sesquiterpene cyclases indicates that germacrene C synthase most closely resembles cotton delta-cadinene synthase (50% identity). PMID:9482865

  1. Exposure of Lycopersicon Esculentum to Microcystin-LR: Effects in the Leaf Proteome and Toxin Translocation from Water to Leaves and Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Campos, Alexandre; Azevedo, Joana; Neves, Joana; Freitas, Marisa; Guzmán-Guillén, Remédios; Cameán, Ana María; Renaut, Jenny; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2014-01-01

    Natural toxins such as those produced by freshwater cyanobacteria have been regarded as an emergent environmental threat. However, the impact of these water contaminants in agriculture is not yet fully understood. The aim of this work was to investigate microcystin-LR (MC-LR) toxicity in Lycopersicon esculentum and the toxin accumulation in this horticultural crop. Adult plants (2 month-old) grown in a greenhouse environment were exposed for 2 weeks to either pure MC-LR (100 μg/L) or Microcystis aeruginosa crude extracts containing 100 μg/L MC-LR. Chlorophyll fluorescence was measured, leaf proteome investigated with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF)/TOF, and toxin bioaccumulation assessed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. Variations in several protein markers (ATP synthase subunits, Cytochrome b6-f complex iron-sulfur, oxygen-evolving enhancer proteins) highlight the decrease of the capacity of plants to synthesize ATP and to perform photosynthesis, whereas variations in other proteins (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit and ribose-5-phosphate isomerase) suggest an increase of carbon fixation and decrease of carbohydrate metabolism reactions in plants exposed to pure MC-LR and cyanobacterial extracts, respectively. MC-LR was found in roots (1635.21 μg/kg fw), green tomatoes (5.15–5.41 μg/kg fw), mature tomatoes (10.52–10.83 μg/kg fw), and leaves (12,298.18 μg/kg fw). The results raise concerns relative to food safety and point to the necessity of monitoring the bioaccumulation of water toxins in agricultural systems affected by cyanotoxin contamination. PMID:24921194

  2. Exposure of Lycopersicon esculentum to microcystin-LR: effects in the leaf proteome and toxin translocation from water to leaves and fruits.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Campos, Alexandre; Azevedo, Joana; Neves, Joana; Freitas, Marisa; Guzmán-Guillén, Remédios; Cameán, Ana María; Renaut, Jenny; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2014-06-11

    Natural toxins such as those produced by freshwater cyanobacteria have been regarded as an emergent environmental threat. However, the impact of these water contaminants in agriculture is not yet fully understood. The aim of this work was to investigate microcystin-LR (MC-LR) toxicity in Lycopersicon esculentum and the toxin accumulation in this horticultural crop. Adult plants (2 month-old) grown in a greenhouse environment were exposed for 2 weeks to either pure MC-LR (100 μg/L) or Microcystis aeruginosa crude extracts containing 100 μg/L MC-LR. Chlorophyll fluorescence was measured, leaf proteome investigated with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF)/TOF, and toxin bioaccumulation assessed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. Variations in several protein markers (ATP synthase subunits, Cytochrome b6-f complex iron-sulfur, oxygen-evolving enhancer proteins) highlight the decrease of the capacity of plants to synthesize ATP and to perform photosynthesis, whereas variations in other proteins (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit and ribose-5-phosphate isomerase) suggest an increase of carbon fixation and decrease of carbohydrate metabolism reactions in plants exposed to pure MC-LR and cyanobacterial extracts, respectively. MC-LR was found in roots (1635.21 μg/kg fw), green tomatoes (5.15-5.41 μg/kg fw), mature tomatoes (10.52-10.83 μg/kg fw), and leaves (12,298.18 μg/kg fw). The results raise concerns relative to food safety and point to the necessity of monitoring the bioaccumulation of water toxins in agricultural systems affected by cyanotoxin contamination.

  3. Breakfast, blood glucose, and cognition.

    PubMed

    Benton, D; Parker, P Y

    1998-04-01

    This article compares the findings of three studies that explored the role of increased blood glucose in improving memory function for subjects who ate breakfast. An initial improvement in memory function for these subjects was found to correlate with blood glucose concentrations. In subsequent studies, morning fasting was found to adversely affect the ability to recall a word list and a story read aloud, as well as recall items while counting backwards. Failure to eat breakfast did not affect performance on an intelligence test. It was concluded that breakfast consumption preferentially influences tasks requiring aspects of memory. In the case of both word list recall and memory while counting backwards, the decline in performance associated with not eating breakfast was reversed by the consumption of a glucose-supplemented drink. Although a morning fast also affected the ability to recall a story read aloud, the glucose drink did not reverse this decline. It appears that breakfast consumption influences cognition via several mechanisms, including an increase in blood glucose. PMID:9537627

  4. Polyamines alter intestinal glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L R; Brockway, P D; Madsen, K; Hardin, J A; Gall, D G

    1995-03-01

    Polyamines are required for the growth of all eukaryotic cells. Enterocytes respond to luminal nutrients with large increases in polyamine synthesis, even though they are mature, nonproliferating cells. The role of polyamines in these cells is unknown. The current experiments examined whether polyamines affected intestinal transport of glucose, since absorption is the primary activity of enterocytes and since polyamines are known to affect membrane function and stability. Glucose transport was examined in rabbit brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV). BBMV from rabbits given 5% alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) in their drinking water 24 h before they were killed transported significantly less glucose than control vesicles [38% decrease in maximal transport rate (Jmax)]. Orogastric administration of spermine, spermidine, or putrescine to DFMO-treated animals 24 h before they were killed prevented the decrease. In rabbits receiving only orogastric spermine, glucose transport was significantly increased (64% increase in Jmax), whereas in vivo spermidine and putrescine decreased Jmax. This increase in Jmax caused by in vivo administration of spermine was not dependent on protein synthesis. Addition of polyamines whether in vivo or in vitro decreased Michaelis constant in vesicles from control and DFMO-treated animals. The change in glucose transport induced by DFMO or polyamines was not related to altered membrane lipid composition or fluidity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Glucose metabolism and cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Tian, Rong

    2011-01-01

    The most notable change in the metabolic profile of hypertrophied hearts is an increased reliance on glucose with an overall reduced oxidative metabolism, i.e. a reappearance of the foetal metabolic pattern. In animal models, this change is attributed to the down-regulation of the transcriptional cascades promoting gene expression for fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in adult hearts. Impaired myocardial energetics in cardiac hypertrophy also triggers AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased glucose uptake and glycolysis. Aside from increased reliance on glucose as an energy source, changes in other glucose metabolism pathways, e.g. the pentose phosphate pathway, the glucosamine biosynthesis pathway, and anaplerosis, are also noted in the hypertrophied hearts. Studies using transgenic mouse models and pharmacological compounds to mimic or counter the switch of substrate preference in cardiac hypertrophy have demonstrated that increased glucose metabolism in adult heart is not harmful and can be beneficial when it provides sufficient fuel for oxidative metabolism. However, improvement in the oxidative capacity and efficiency rather than the selection of the substrate is likely the ultimate goal for metabolic therapies. PMID:21502371

  6. Glucose-sensing neurons of the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Burdakov, Denis; Luckman, Simon M; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2005-01-01

    Specialized subgroups of hypothalamic neurons exhibit specific excitatory or inhibitory electrical responses to changes in extracellular levels of glucose. Glucose-excited neurons were traditionally assumed to employ a ‘β-cell’ glucose-sensing strategy, where glucose elevates cytosolic ATP, which closes KATP channels containing Kir6.2 subunits, causing depolarization and increased excitability. Recent findings indicate that although elements of this canonical model are functional in some hypothalamic cells, this pathway is not universally essential for excitation of glucose-sensing neurons by glucose. Thus glucose-induced excitation of arcuate nucleus neurons was recently reported in mice lacking Kir6.2, and no significant increases in cytosolic ATP levels could be detected in hypothalamic neurons after changes in extracellular glucose. Possible alternative glucose-sensing strategies include electrogenic glucose entry, glucose-induced release of glial lactate, and extracellular glucose receptors. Glucose-induced electrical inhibition is much less understood than excitation, and has been proposed to involve reduction in the depolarizing activity of the Na+/K+ pump, or activation of a hyperpolarizing Cl− current. Investigations of neurotransmitter identities of glucose-sensing neurons are beginning to provide detailed information about their physiological roles. In the mouse lateral hypothalamus, orexin/hypocretin neurons (which promote wakefulness, locomotor activity and foraging) are glucose-inhibited, whereas melanin-concentrating hormone neurons (which promote sleep and energy conservation) are glucose-excited. In the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, excitatory actions of glucose on anorexigenic POMC neurons in mice have been reported, while the appetite-promoting NPY neurons may be directly inhibited by glucose. These results stress the fundamental importance of hypothalamic glucose-sensing neurons in orchestrating sleep-wake cycles, energy expenditure and

  7. Urinary glucose and vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Brandt, R; Guyer, K E; Banks, W L

    1977-11-01

    The recent popularization of self-prescribed large doses of vitamin C has increased the possibility for erroneous conclusions to be drawn from standard clinical methods used in urinary glucose monitoring, due to interference with these methods by the greatly elevated excretion of vitamin C. The coupled-enzyme-chromogen strip tests showed erroneously negative glucose levels in urines of both a diabetic individual and a subject with a genetic low renal threshold for glucose when they were supplementing their normal diets with 1-2 g vitamin C per day. With this regimen, their urinary vitamin C levels reached 200 mg/dl (11.4 mmol/l). For normal urine with vitamin C added, false-positive tests for glucose were found using Benedict's reagent when vitamin C was present at 250 mg/dl (14.3 mmol/l) or higher concentrations. In diabetic individuals consuming large quantities of vitamin C, this interference with standard coupled-enzyme-chromogen strip tests or Benedict's test could present a significant problem in diagnosis and clinical management of the disease. A simple anion exchange method of treating the urine was used to correct the false results. PMID:920657

  8. [Continuous monitoring systems of glucose].

    PubMed

    Vidal, Mercè; Jansà, Margarida

    2013-04-01

    The possibility of obtaining a continuous reading of glucose may represent a breakthrough and a useful tool for the management of diabetes. Technological advances can improve the quality of life and people with diabetes metabolic control, even if this means having to learn and incorporate new technical concepts, new algorithms for pattern modification and new challenges in Therapeutic Education.

  9. Glucose polymer regimens and hypernatraemia.

    PubMed

    Verber, I G; Bain, M

    1990-06-01

    A 3 year old boy who had glutaric aciduria diagnosed at 22 months of age was admitted with a history of lethargy, vomiting, and fever. He had been receiving glucose polymers as part of his dietary management. He was severely hypernatraemic, but after resuscitation and rehydration made a good recovery. The possible aetiology of his hypernatraemia is discussed.

  10. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and glucose management.

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, Erich; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2011-09-01

    Although metabolic abnormalities have been linked with poor outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage, there are limited data addressing the impact of glycemic control or benefits of glucose management after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A systematic literature search was conducted of English-language articles describing original research on glycemic control in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Case reports and case series were excluded. A total of 22 publications were selected for this review. Among the 17 studies investigating glucose as an outcome predictor, glucose levels during hospitalization were more likely to predict outcome than admission glucose. In general, hyperglycemia was linked to worse outcome. While insulin therapy in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients was shown to effectively control plasma glucose levels, plasma glucose control was not necessarily reflective of cerebral glucose such that very tight glucose control may lead to neuroglycopenia. Furthermore, tight glycemic control was associated with an increased risk for hypoglycemia which was linked to worse outcome. PMID:21850563

  11. Microwave-Based Biosensor for Glucose Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, N. S. M.; Khalid, K.; Yusof, N. A.

    2010-07-01

    In this project, microwave-based biosensor for glucose detection has been studied. The study is based on the dielectric properties changes at microwave frequency for glucose-enzyme reaction. Glucose interaction with glucose oxidase (GOD) produced gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide. The reaction of the glucose solutions with an enzyme was carried out in 1:3 of glucose and enzyme respectively. The measurements were done using the Open Ended Coaxial Probe (OECP) coupled with computer controlled software automated network analyzer (ANA) with frequency range from 200MHz to 20GHz at room temperature (25 °C). The differences of enzyme and glucose-enzyme reaction were calculated and plotted. In the microwave interaction with the glucose-enzyme reaction, ionic conduction and dipole molecules was detected at 0.99GHz and 16.44GHz respectively based on changes of dielectric loss factor.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  13. Glucose Effect in the Acute Porphyrias

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home Diet and Nutrition The glucose effect in acute porphyrias The disorders Acute Intermittent ... are treated initially with the administration of carbohydrate/glucose. This therapy has its basis in the ability ...

  14. Glucose sensing by means of silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstaele, Ronny; Ryckeboer, Eva; Hattasan, Nannicha; De Koninck, Yannick; Muneeb, Muhammad; Verstuyft, Steven; Delbeke, Danaë; Bogaerts, Wim; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes is a fast growing metabolic disease, where the patients suffer from disordered glucose blood levels. Monitoring the blood glucose values in combination with extra insulin injection is currently the only therapy to keep the glucose concentration in diabetic patients under control, minimizing the long-term effects of elevated glucose concentrations and improving quality of life of the diabetic patients. Implantable sensors allow continuous glucose monitoring, offering the most reliable data to control the glucose levels. Infrared absorption spectrometers offer a non-chemical measurement method to determine the small glucose concentrations in blood serum. In this work, a spectrometer platform based on silicon photonics is presented, allowing the realization of very small glucose sensors suitable for building implantable sensors. A proof-of-concept of a spectrometer with integrated evanescent sample interface is presented, and the route towards a fully implantable spectrometer is discussed.

  15. 21 CFR 168.120 - Glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glucose sirup. 168.120 Section 168.120 Food and... § 168.120 Glucose sirup. (a) Glucose sirup is the purified, concentrated, aqueous solution of nutritive... equivalent), expressed as D-glucose, is not less than 20.0 percent m/m calculated on a dry basis. (2)...

  16. 21 CFR 168.120 - Glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glucose sirup. 168.120 Section 168.120 Food and... § 168.120 Glucose sirup. (a) Glucose sirup is the purified, concentrated, aqueous solution of nutritive... equivalent), expressed as D-glucose, is not less than 20.0 percent m/m calculated on a dry basis. (2)...

  17. 21 CFR 168.120 - Glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glucose sirup. 168.120 Section 168.120 Food and... § 168.120 Glucose sirup. (a) Glucose sirup is the purified, concentrated, aqueous solution of nutritive... equivalent), expressed as D-glucose, is not less than 20.0 percent m/m calculated on a dry basis. (2)...

  18. Glucose transport machinery reconstituted in cell models.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jesper S; Elbing, Karin; Thompson, James R; Malmstadt, Noah; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2015-02-11

    Here we demonstrate the production of a functioning cell model by formation of giant vesicles reconstituted with the GLUT1 glucose transporter and a glucose oxidase and hydrogen peroxidase linked fluorescent reporter internally. Hence, a simplified artificial cell is formed that is able to take up glucose and process it. PMID:25562394

  19. Glucose Transport Machinery Reconstituted in Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Elbing, Karin; Thompson, James R.; Malmstadt, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the production of a functioning cell model by formation of giant vesicles reconstituted with the GLUT1 glucose transporter and a glucose oxidase and hydrogen peroxidase linked fluorescent reporter internally. Hence, a simplified artificial cell is formed that is able to take up glucose and process it. PMID:25562394

  20. A MEMS Dielectric Affinity Glucose Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Li, Dachao; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors based on affinity detection are desirable for long-term and stable glucose management. However, most affinity sensors contain mechanical moving structures and complex design in sensor actuation and signal readout, limiting their reliability in subcutaneously implantable glucose detection. We have previously demonstrated a proof-of-concept dielectric glucose sensor that measured pre-mixed glucose-sensitive polymer solutions at various glucose concentrations. This sensor features simplicity in sensor design, and possesses high specificity and accuracy in glucose detection. However, lack of glucose diffusion passage, this device is unable to fulfill real-time in-vivo monitoring. As a major improvement to this device, we present in this paper a fully implantable MEMS dielectric affinity glucose biosensor that contains a perforated electrode embedded in a suspended diaphragm. This capacitive-based sensor contains no moving parts, and enables glucose diffusion and real-time monitoring. The experimental results indicate that this sensor can detect glucose solutions at physiological concentrations and possesses good reversibility and reliability. This sensor has a time constant to glucose concentration change at approximately 3 min, which is comparable to commercial systems. The sensor has potential applications in fully implantable CGM that require excellent long-term stability and reliability. PMID:24511215

  1. Blood Glucose Levels and Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdovinos, Maria G.; Weyand, David

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between varying blood glucose levels and problem behavior during daily scheduled activities was examined. The effects that varying blood glucose levels had on problem behavior during daily scheduled activities were examined. Prior research has shown that differing blood glucose levels can affect behavior and mood. Results of this…

  2. Non-invasive glucose monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A non-invasive method for determining blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam (e.g., at a wavelength of 700 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor in the anterior chamber is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated aqueous humor; and then determining the blood glucose level (or the level of another analyte of interest) for the subject from the Raman spectrum. Preferably, the detecting step is followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing method is also disclosed.

  3. Reimbursement for Continuous Glucose Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; DeVries, J Hans

    2016-02-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems have been available for more than 15 years by now. However, market uptake is relatively low in most countries; in other words, relatively few patients with diabetes use CGM systems regularly. One major reason for the reluctance of patients to use CGM systems is the costs associated (i.e., in most countries no reimbursement is provided by the health insurance companies). In case reimbursement is in place, like in the United States, only certain patient groups get reimbursement that fulfills strict indications. This situation is somewhat surprising in view of the mounting evidence for benefits of CGM usage from clinical trials: most meta-analyses of these trials consistently show a clinically relevant improvement of glucose control associated with a reduction in hypoglycemic events. More recent trials with CGM systems with an improved CGM technology showed even more impressive benefits, especially if CGM systems are used in different combinations with an insulin pump (e.g., with automated bolus calculators and low glucose suspend features). Nevertheless, sufficient evidence is not available for all patient groups, and more data on cost-efficacy are needed. In addition, good data from real-world studies/registers documenting the benefits of CGM usage under daily life conditions would be of help to convince healthcare systems to cover the costs of CGM systems. In view of the ongoing improvements in established needle-type CGM systems, the fact that new CGM technology will come to the market soon (e.g., implantable sensors), that CGM-like systems are quite successfully at least in certain markets (like the flash glucose monitoring systems), and that the first artificial pancreas systems will come to the market in the next few years, there is a need to make sure that this major improvement in diabetes therapy becomes more widely available for patients with diabetes, for which better reimbursement is essential. PMID:26784130

  4. Reimbursement for Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    DeVries, J. Hans

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems have been available for more than 15 years by now. However, market uptake is relatively low in most countries; in other words, relatively few patients with diabetes use CGM systems regularly. One major reason for the reluctance of patients to use CGM systems is the costs associated (i.e., in most countries no reimbursement is provided by the health insurance companies). In case reimbursement is in place, like in the United States, only certain patient groups get reimbursement that fulfills strict indications. This situation is somewhat surprising in view of the mounting evidence for benefits of CGM usage from clinical trials: most meta-analyses of these trials consistently show a clinically relevant improvement of glucose control associated with a reduction in hypoglycemic events. More recent trials with CGM systems with an improved CGM technology showed even more impressive benefits, especially if CGM systems are used in different combinations with an insulin pump (e.g., with automated bolus calculators and low glucose suspend features). Nevertheless, sufficient evidence is not available for all patient groups, and more data on cost–efficacy are needed. In addition, good data from real-world studies/registers documenting the benefits of CGM usage under daily life conditions would be of help to convince healthcare systems to cover the costs of CGM systems. In view of the ongoing improvements in established needle-type CGM systems, the fact that new CGM technology will come to the market soon (e.g., implantable sensors), that CGM-like systems are quite successfully at least in certain markets (like the flash glucose monitoring systems), and that the first artificial pancreas systems will come to the market in the next few years, there is a need to make sure that this major improvement in diabetes therapy becomes more widely available for patients with diabetes, for which better reimbursement is essential. PMID

  5. Glucose metabolism in diabetic blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.J.; Crass, M.F. III

    1986-03-05

    Since glycolysis appears to be coupled to active ion transport in vascular smooth muscle, alterations in glucose metabolism may contribute to cellular dysfunction and angiopathy in diabetes. Uptake and utilization of glucose were studied in perfused blood vessels in which pulsatile flow and perfusion pressure were similar to those measured directly in vivo. Thoracic aortae isolated from 8-wk alloxan diabetic (D) and nondiabetic control rabbits were cannulated, tethered, and perfused with oxygenated buffer containing 7 or 25 mM glucose and tracer amounts of glucose-U/sup -14/ C. Norepinephrine (NE) (10/sup -6/ M) and/or insulin (I) (150 ..mu..U/ml) and albumin (0.2%) were added. NE-induced tension development increased glucose uptake 39% and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and lactate production 2.3-fold. With 7 mM glucose, marked decreases in glucose uptake (74%), /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ (68%), lactate (30%), total tissue glycogen (75%), and tissue phospholipids (70%) were observed in D. Addition of I or elevation of exogenous glucose to 25 mM normalized glucose uptake, but had differential effects on the pattern of substrate utilization. Thus, in D, there was a marked depression of vascular glucose metabolism that was partially reversed by addition of low concentrations of insulin or D levels of glucose.

  6. Measurement of Glucose Uptake in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Norio; Ueda-Wakagi, Manabu; Sato, Takuya; Kawasaki, Kengo; Sawada, Keisuke; Kawabata, Kyuichi; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2015-12-08

    Facilitative glucose uptake transport systems are ubiquitous in animal cells and are responsible for transporting glucose across cell surface membranes. Evaluation of glucose uptake is crucial in the study of numerous diseases and metabolic disorders such as myocardial ischemia, diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Detailed in this unit are laboratory methods for assessing glucose uptake into mammalian cells. The unit is divided into five sections: (1) a brief overview of glucose uptake assays in cultured cells; (2) a method for measuring glucose uptake using radiolabeled 3-O-methylglucose; (3) a method for measuring glucose uptake using radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose (2DG); (4) a microplate method for measuring 2DG-uptake using an enzymatic, fluorometric assay; and (5) a microplate-based method using a fluorescent analog of 2DG.

  7. Remote sensing and serological analysis of the resistance of tomato plants (Lycopersicon escylentum L.) to Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Hristova, Dimitrina; Iliev, Ilko; Yanev, Tony

    Diseases caused by Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) are among the most important factors lim-iting tomato production worldwide, as they can completely destroy the crop. ToMV occurs in most countries of the world, and causes disease epidemics in many crops. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible defence mechanism that plays a central role in disease re-sistance. SAR is induced by most pathogens that cause tissue necrosis. Spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence analysis were applied to establish injury of young tomato plants (Lycopersicon escylentum L.) infected with ToMV. Leaf spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence were registered by a portable Ocean Optics spectrometer USB 2000 in the visi-ble and near infrared spectral ranges (450-850 nm) at a spectral resolution of 1.5 nm. As a model system, tomato plants of cultivar Nuton resistant to ToMV were used. The plants were grown in a green house under controlled conditions. They were divided into six groups. The first group consisted of untreated (control) plants. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, the second group was inoculated with ToMV. The other four groups were treated with following growth regulators: preparations Spermine, MEIA (beta-monomethyl ester of itaconic acid), (benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid-S-methyl ester) and Phytoxin VS. On the next day, the tomato plants of these four groups were inoculated with ToMV. The viral concentrations in the plants were determined by the serological method Double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA). All analysis were performed on detached leaves from 20 uninfected and up to 20 leaves from infected plants on the 7th and 14th day after the inocu-lation. The differences between the reflectance spectra of virus-infected and uninfected leaves were analysed in the four most informative for green plants wavelength intervals: green (520-580 nm), red (640-680 nm), red edge (690-710 nm) and near infrared (720-760 nm

  8. Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Patients with Abnormal Glucose Tolerance during Pregnancy: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Tonoike, Mie; Kishimoto, Miyako; Yamamoto, Mayumi; Yano, Tetsu; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal glucose tolerance during pregnancy is associated with perinatal complications. We used continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in pregnant women with glucose intolerance to achieve better glycemic control and to evaluate the maternal glucose fluctuations. We also used CGM in women without glucose intolerance (the control cases). Furthermore, the standard deviation (SD) and mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) were calculated for each case. For the control cases, the glucose levels were tightly controlled within a very narrow range; however, the SD and MAGE values in pregnant women with glucose intolerance were relativity high, suggesting postprandial hyperglycemia. Our results demonstrate that pregnant women with glucose intolerance exhibited greater glucose fluctuations compared with the control cases. The use of CGM may help to improve our understanding of glycemic patterns and may have beneficial effects on perinatal glycemic control, such as the detection of postprandial hyperglycemia in pregnant women. PMID:26949348

  9. A MEMS differential viscometric sensor for affinity glucose detection in continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Leduc, Charles; Ravussin, Yann; Cai, Haogang; Song, Bing; Li, Dachao; Accili, Domenico; Leibel, Rudolph; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-05-01

    Micromachined viscometric affinity glucose sensors have been previously demonstrated using vibrational cantilever and diaphragm. These devices featured a single glucose detection module that determines glucose concentrations through viscosity changes of glucose-sensitive polymer solutions. However, fluctuations in temperature and other environmental parameters might potentially affect the stability and reliability of these devices, creating complexity in their applications in subcutaneously implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). To address these issues, we present a MEMS differential sensor that can effectively reject environmental disturbances while allowing accurate glucose detection. The sensor consists of two magnetically driven vibrating diaphragms situated inside microchambers filled with a boronic-acid based glucose-sensing solution and a reference solution insensitive to glucose. Glucose concentrations can be accurately determined by characteristics of the diaphragm vibration through differential capacitive detection. Our in-vitro and preliminary in-vivo experimental data demonstrate the potential of this sensor for highly stable subcutaneous CGM applications. PMID:23956499

  10. A MEMS differential viscometric sensor for affinity glucose detection in continuous glucose monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Leduc, Charles; Ravussin, Yann; Cai, Haogang; Song, Bing; Li, Dachao; Accili, Domenico; Leibel, Rudolph; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-05-01

    Micromachined viscometric affinity glucose sensors have been previously demonstrated using vibrational cantilever and diaphragm. These devices featured a single glucose detection module that determines glucose concentrations through viscosity changes of glucose-sensitive polymer solutions. However, fluctuations in temperature and other environmental parameters might potentially affect the stability and reliability of these devices, creating complexity in their applications in subcutaneously implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). To address these issues, we present a MEMS differential sensor that can effectively reject environmental disturbances while allowing accurate glucose detection. The sensor consists of two magnetically driven vibrating diaphragms situated inside microchambers filled with a boronic-acid based glucose-sensing solution and a reference solution insensitive to glucose. Glucose concentrations can be accurately determined by characteristics of the diaphragm vibration through differential capacitive detection. Our in vitro and preliminary in vivo experimental data demonstrate the potential of this sensor for highly stable subcutaneous CGM applications.

  11. FRET-based glucose monitoring for bioprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolome, Amelita; Smalls-Mantey, Lauren; Lin, Debora; Rao, Govind; Tolosa, Leah

    2006-02-01

    The glucose-mediated conformational changes in the glucose binding protein (GBP) have been exploited in the development of fluorescence based glucose sensors. The fluorescence response is generated by a polarity sensitive dye attached to a specific site. Such fluorescent sensors respond to submicromolar glucose at diffusion-controlled rates mimicking the wild type. However, such sensors have been limited to in vitro glucose sensing because of the preliminary dye-labeling step. In the study described here, the dye-labeling step is omitted by genetically encoding the GBP with two green fluorescent mutants namely, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in the N- and C-terminal ends, respectively. These two GFP mutants comprise a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor and acceptor pair. Thus, when glucose binds with GBP, the conformational changes affect the FRET efficiency yielding a dose-dependent response. A potential application for this FRET-based glucose biosensor is online glucose sensing in bioprocessing and cell culture. This was demonstrated by the measurement of glucose consumption in yeast fermentation. Further development of this system should yield in vivo measurement of glucose in bioprocesses.

  12. Neural control of blood glucose level.

    PubMed

    Niijima, A

    1986-01-01

    All of the experimental results described above can be categorized as follows: the relationship between glucose levels and pancreatic and adrenal nerve activities; innervations of the liver and their role in the regulation of blood glucose level; central integration of blood glucose level; glucose-sensitive afferent nerve fibers in the liver and regulation of blood glucose; oral and intestinal inputs involved in reflex control of blood glucose level. We showed that an increase in blood glucose content produced an increase in the activity of the pancreatic branch of the vagus nerve, whereas it induced a decrease in the activity of the adrenal nerve. It was also shown that a decrease in blood glucose activated the sympatho-adrenal system and suppressed the vago-pancreatic system. It seems rational that these responses are involved in the maintenance of blood glucose level. Studies on the innervation of the liver led us to a conclusion that sympathetic innervation of the liver might play a role in eliciting a prompt hyperglycemic response through liberation of norepinephrine from the nerve terminals, and that the vagal innervation synergically worked with the humoral factor (insulin) for glycogen synthesis in the hyperglycemic condition. The glucose-sensitive afferents from the liver seem to initiate a reflex control of blood glucose level. The gustatory information on EIR response, reported by STEFFENS, is supported by the electrophysiological observations. MEI's reports also indicated the importance of information from the intestinal glucoreceptors in the reflex control of insulin secretion. The role of integrative functions of the hypothalamus and brainstem through neuronal networks on neural control of blood glucose levels is also evident. A schematic diagram of the nervous networks involved in the regulation of the blood glucose levels is shown in Fig. 3. PMID:3550186

  13. Coping with an exogenous glucose overload: glucose kinetics of rainbow trout during graded swimming.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kevin; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2016-03-15

    This study examines how chronically hyperglycemic rainbow trout modulate glucose kinetics in response to graded exercise up to critical swimming speed (Ucrit), with or without exogenous glucose supply. Our goals were 1) to quantify the rates of hepatic glucose production (Ra glucose) and disposal (Rd glucose) during graded swimming, 2) to determine how exogenous glucose affects the changes in glucose fluxes caused by exercise, and 3) to establish whether exogenous glucose modifies Ucrit or the cost of transport. Results show that graded swimming causes no change in Ra and Rd glucose at speeds below 2.5 body lengths per second (BL/s), but that glucose fluxes may be stimulated at the highest speeds. Excellent glucoregulation is also achieved at all exercise intensities. When exogenous glucose is supplied during exercise, trout suppress hepatic production from 16.4 ± 1.6 to 4.1 ± 1.7 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) and boost glucose disposal to 40.1 ± 13 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1). These responses limit the effects of exogenous glucose to a 2.5-fold increase in glycemia, whereas fish showing no modulation of fluxes would reach dangerous levels of 114 mM of blood glucose. Exogenous glucose reduces metabolic rate by 16% and, therefore, causes total cost of transport to decrease accordingly. High glucose availability does not improve Ucrit because the fish are unable to take advantage of this extra fuel during maximal exercise and rely on tissue glycogen instead. In conclusion, trout have a remarkable ability to adjust glucose fluxes that allows them to cope with the cumulative stresses of a glucose overload and graded exercise.

  14. Glucose oxidase activity of actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    St Vlahov, S

    1978-01-01

    The ability of 311 actiomycete, belonging to 12 species to produce glucose oxidase was studied. It was found that 174 of them formed exoenzymes on solid medium and 133 in liquid medium. The composition of the nutrient medium has an essential effect on the amount of enzyme formed. Strains with considerably higher activity form a greater amount of exoenzymes on soya meal medium and on synthetic medium with KNO2. The highest activity of the culture liquid of some strains was observed between the 6th and 7th day of cultivation. During this phase of growth the highest productivity of the biomas was established. PMID:76424

  15. Hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jones, John G

    2016-06-01

    The liver has a central role in the regulation of systemic glucose and lipid fluxes during feeding and fasting and also relies on these substrates for its own energy needs. These parallel requirements are met by coordinated control of carbohydrate and lipid fluxes into and out of the Krebs cycle, which is highly tuned to nutrient availability and heavily regulated by insulin and glucagon. During progression of type 2 diabetes, hepatic carbohydrate and lipid biosynthesis fluxes become elevated, thus contributing to hyperglycaemia and hypertriacylglycerolaemia. Over this interval there are also significant fluctuations in hepatic energy state. To date, it is not known to what extent abnormal glucose and lipid fluxes are causally linked to altered energy states. Recent evidence that the glucose-lowering effects of metformin appear to be mediated by attenuation of hepatic energy generation places an additional spotlight on the interdependence of hepatic biosynthetic and oxidative fluxes. The transition from fasting to feeding results in a significant re-direction of hepatic glucose and lipid fluxes and may also incur a temporary hepatic energy deficit. At present, it is not known to what extent these variables are additionally modified by type 2 diabetes and/or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Thus, there is a compelling need to measure fluxes through oxidative, gluconeogenic and lipogenic pathways and determine their relationship with hepatic energy state in both fasting and fed conditions. New magnetic resonance-based technologies allow these variables to be non-invasively studied in animal models and humans. This review summarises a presentation given at the symposium entitled 'The liver in focus' at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Kenneth Cusi, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3952-1 , and by Hannele Yki-Järvinen, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3944-1 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Michael

  16. Regulation of Blood Glucose by Hypothalamic Pyruvate Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Tony K. T.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Pocai, Alessandro; Rossetti, Luciano

    2005-08-01

    The brain keenly depends on glucose for energy, and mammalians have redundant systems to control glucose production. An increase in circulating glucose inhibits glucose production in the liver, but this negative feedback is impaired in type 2 diabetes. Here we report that a primary increase in hypothalamic glucose levels lowers blood glucose through inhibition of glucose production in rats. The effect of glucose requires its conversion to lactate followed by stimulation of pyruvate metabolism, which leads to activation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels. Thus, interventions designed to enhance the hypothalamic sensing of glucose may improve glucose homeostasis in diabetes.

  17. Modeling Glucose Metabolism in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Fry, Brendan C; Layton, Anita T

    2016-06-01

    The mammalian kidney consumes a large amount of energy to support the reabsorptive work it needs to excrete metabolic wastes and to maintain homeostasis. Part of that energy is supplied via the metabolism of glucose. To gain insights into the transport and metabolic processes in the kidney, we have developed a detailed model of the renal medulla of the rat kidney. The model represents water and solute flows, transmural fluxes, and biochemical reactions in the luminal fluid of the nephrons and vessels. In particular, the model simulates the metabolism of oxygen and glucose. Using that model, we have identified parameters concerning glucose transport and basal metabolism that yield predicted blood glucose concentrations that are consistent with experimental measurements. The model predicts substantial axial gradients in blood glucose levels along various medullary structures. Furthermore, the model predicts that in the inner medulla, owing to the relatively limited blood flow and low tissue oxygen tension, anaerobic metabolism of glucose dominates. PMID:27371260

  18. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar

    2013-01-01

    There have been continuous advances in the field of glucose monitoring during the last four decades, which have led to the development of highly evolved blood glucose meters, non-invasive glucose monitoring (NGM) devices and continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS). Glucose monitoring is an integral part of diabetes management, and the maintenance of physiological blood glucose concentration is the only way for a diabetic to avoid life-threatening diabetic complications. CGMS have led to tremendous improvements in diabetic management, as shown by the significant lowering of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in adults with type I diabetes. Most of the CGMS have been minimally-invasive, although the more recent ones are based on NGM techniques. This manuscript reviews the advances in CGMS for diabetes management along with the future prospects and the challenges involved. PMID:26824930

  19. Monitoring breath during oral glucose tolerance tests.

    PubMed

    Ghimenti, S; Tabucchi, S; Lomonaco, T; Di Francesco, F; Fuoco, R; Onor, M; Lenzi, S; Trivella, M G

    2013-03-01

    The evolution of breath composition during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) was analysed by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in 16 subjects and correlated to blood glucose levels. The glucose tolerance tests classified five of the subjects as diabetics, eight as affected by impaired glucose tolerance and three as normoglycaemic. Acetone levels were generally higher in diabetics (average concentration values: diabetics, 300 ± 40 ppbv; impaired glucose tolerance, 350 ± 30 ppbv; normoglycaemic, 230 ± 20 ppbv) but the large inter-individual variability did not allow us to identify the three groups by this parameter alone. The exhalation of 3-hydroxy-butan-2-one and butane-2,3-dione, likely due to the metabolization of glucose by bacteria in the mouth, was also observed. Future work will involve the extension of the analyses to other volatile compounds by attempting to improve the level of discrimination between the various classes of subjects. PMID:23446273

  20. Pancreatic regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Röder, Pia V; Wu, Bingbing; Liu, Yixian; Han, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure normal body function, the human body is dependent on a tight control of its blood glucose levels. This is accomplished by a highly sophisticated network of various hormones and neuropeptides released mainly from the brain, pancreas, liver, intestine as well as adipose and muscle tissue. Within this network, the pancreas represents a key player by secreting the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin and its opponent glucagon. However, disturbances in the interplay of the hormones and peptides involved may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) whose prevalence, comorbidities and medical costs take on a dramatic scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying the various interactions to improve existing anti-diabetic therapies and drugs on the one hand and to develop new therapeutic approaches on the other. This review summarizes the interplay of the pancreas with various other organs and tissues that maintain glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, anti-diabetic drugs and their impact on signaling pathways underlying the network will be discussed. PMID:26964835

  1. Pancreatic regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Röder, Pia V; Wu, Bingbing; Liu, Yixian; Han, Weiping

    2016-03-11

    In order to ensure normal body function, the human body is dependent on a tight control of its blood glucose levels. This is accomplished by a highly sophisticated network of various hormones and neuropeptides released mainly from the brain, pancreas, liver, intestine as well as adipose and muscle tissue. Within this network, the pancreas represents a key player by secreting the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin and its opponent glucagon. However, disturbances in the interplay of the hormones and peptides involved may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) whose prevalence, comorbidities and medical costs take on a dramatic scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying the various interactions to improve existing anti-diabetic therapies and drugs on the one hand and to develop new therapeutic approaches on the other. This review summarizes the interplay of the pancreas with various other organs and tissues that maintain glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, anti-diabetic drugs and their impact on signaling pathways underlying the network will be discussed.

  2. Pancreatic regulation of glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Röder, Pia V; Wu, Bingbing; Liu, Yixian; Han, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure normal body function, the human body is dependent on a tight control of its blood glucose levels. This is accomplished by a highly sophisticated network of various hormones and neuropeptides released mainly from the brain, pancreas, liver, intestine as well as adipose and muscle tissue. Within this network, the pancreas represents a key player by secreting the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin and its opponent glucagon. However, disturbances in the interplay of the hormones and peptides involved may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) whose prevalence, comorbidities and medical costs take on a dramatic scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying the various interactions to improve existing anti-diabetic therapies and drugs on the one hand and to develop new therapeutic approaches on the other. This review summarizes the interplay of the pancreas with various other organs and tissues that maintain glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, anti-diabetic drugs and their impact on signaling pathways underlying the network will be discussed. PMID:26964835

  3. Sex steroids and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Allan, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone levels are lower in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and also predict the onset of these adverse metabolic states. Body composition (body mass index, waist circumference) is an important mediator of this relationship. Sex hormone binding globulin is also inversely associated with insulin resistance and T2DM but the data regarding estrogen are inconsistent. Clinical models of androgen deficiency including Klinefelter's syndrome and androgen deprivation therapy in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer confirm the association between androgens and glucose status. Experimental manipulation of the insulin/glucose milieu and suppression of endogenous testicular function suggests the relationship between androgens and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional. Androgen therapy in men without diabetes is not able to differentiate the effect on insulin resistance from that on fat mass, in particular visceral adiposity. Similarly, several small clinical studies have examined the efficacy of exogenous testosterone in men with T2DM, however, the role of androgens, independent of body composition, in modifying insulin resistance is uncertain. PMID:24457840

  4. Sex steroids and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone levels are lower in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and also predict the onset of these adverse metabolic states. Body composition (body mass index, waist circumference) is an important mediator of this relationship. Sex hormone binding globulin is also inversely associated with insulin resistance and T2DM but the data regarding estrogen are inconsistent. Clinical models of androgen deficiency including Klinefelter's syndrome and androgen deprivation therapy in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer confirm the association between androgens and glucose status. Experimental manipulation of the insulin/glucose milieu and suppression of endogenous testicular function suggests the relationship between androgens and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional. Androgen therapy in men without diabetes is not able to differentiate the effect on insulin resistance from that on fat mass, in particular visceral adiposity. Similarly, several small clinical studies have examined the efficacy of exogenous testosterone in men with T2DM, however, the role of androgens, independent of body composition, in modifying insulin resistance is uncertain. PMID:24457840

  5. Is fructose sweeter than glucose for rats?

    PubMed

    Ramirez, I

    1996-11-01

    Because it is generally thought that the intensity of the taste of fructose is greater than that of glucose for rats, it seemed surprising when sham-fed rats drank substantially less of a mixture of 6% fructose plus saccharin than of a mixture of 6% glucose plus saccharin. At least 3 different factors contribute to this effect. First, the taste of fructose is less attractive to rats than is the taste of glucose; sham-fed rats strongly preferred glucose over fructose (no saccharin was used in this experiment). The second factor is experience. Rats having substantial previous experience with glucose, but not with fructose, consistently preferred glucose over fructose. Conversely, rats having substantial previous experience with fructose, but not with glucose, initially showed no consistent preference but subsequently tended to prefer glucose. The third factor is an interaction between saccharin and the type of sugar. Rats given only one solution at a time drink approximately as much fructose as glucose when the solutions contain no saccharin. The addition of 0.25% saccharin to 6% glucose stimulated intake, whereas the addition of the same amount of saccharin to 6% fructose did not stimulate intake. As a result, rats ingested substantially more of a mixture of 0.25% saccharin plus 6% glucose than they did of a comparable mixture of saccharin and fructose, even though rats ingest similar amounts of fructose and glucose without saccharin in single-bottle tests. Because the differential effect of saccharin on intake appeared within 2 h in naive rats, and did not greatly change over a 3-day period, it is probably not attributable to conditioning. These results suggest that these sugars have qualitatively different tastes. PMID:8916185

  6. A self-powered glucose biosensing system.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Gymama; Kulkarni, Tanmay

    2016-04-15

    A self-powered glucose biosensor (SPGS) system is fabricated and in vitro characterization of the power generation and charging frequency characteristics in glucose analyte are described. The bioelectrodes consist of compressed network of three-dimensional multi-walled carbon nanotubes with redox enzymes, pyroquinoline quinone glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-GDH) and laccase functioning as the anodic and cathodic catalyst, respectively. When operated in 45 mM glucose, the biofuel cell exhibited an open circuit voltage and power density of 681.8 mV and 67.86 µW/cm(2) at 335 mV, respectively, with a current density of 202.2 µA/cm(2). Moreover, at physiological glucose concentration (5mM), the biofuel cell exhibits open circuit voltage and power density of 302.1 mV and 15.98 µW/cm(2) at 166.3 mV, respectively, with a current density of 100 µA/cm(2). The biofuel cell assembly produced a linear dynamic range of 0.5-45 mM glucose. These findings show that glucose biofuel cells can be further investigated in the development of a self-powered glucose biosensor by using a capacitor as the transducer element. By monitoring the capacitor charging frequencies, which are influenced by the concentration of the glucose analyte, a linear dynamic range of 0.5-35 mM glucose is observed. The operational stability of SPGS is monitored over a period of 63 days and is found to be stable with 15.38% and 11.76% drop in power density under continuous discharge in 10mM and 20mM glucose, respectively. These results demonstrate that SPGSs can simultaneously generate bioelectricity to power ultra-low powered devices and sense glucose.

  7. Diagnosis of prediabetes in cats: glucose concentration cut points for impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Reeve-Johnson, M K; Rand, J S; Vankan, D; Anderson, S T; Marshall, R; Morton, J M

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is typically diagnosed in cats once clinical signs are evident. Diagnostic criteria for prediabetes in cats have not been defined. The objective of the study was to establish methodology and cut points for fasting and 2-h blood glucose concentrations in healthy client-owned senior cats (≥8 yr) using ear/paw samples and a portable glucose meter calibrated for feline blood. Of the 78 cats, 27 were ideal (body condition score [BCS] 4 or 5 of 9), 31 overweight (BCS 6 or 7), and 20 obese (BCS 8 or 9); 19 were Burmese and 59 non-Burmese. After an 18-24-h fast and an ear/paw blood glucose measurement using a portable glucose meter, glucose (0.5 g/kg bodyweight) was administered intravenous and blood glucose measured at 2 min and 2 h. Cut points for fasting and 2-h glucose concentrations were defined as the upper limits of 95% reference intervals using cats with BCS 4 or 5. The upper cut point for fasting glucose was 6.5 mmol/L. Of the overweight and obese cats, 1 (BCS 7) was above this cut point indicating evidence of impaired fasting glucose. The cut point for 2-h glucose was 9.8 mmol/L. A total of 7 cats (4 with BCS 8 or 9 including 1 Burmese; 3 with BCS 6 or 7, non-Burmese) were above this cut point and thus had evidence of impaired glucose tolerance. In conclusion, the methodology and cutpoints for diagnosis of prediabetes are defined for use in healthy cats 8 yr and older with a range of BCSs. PMID:27565231

  8. General aspects of muscle glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Alvim, Rafael O; Cheuhen, Marcel R; Machado, Silmara R; Sousa, André Gustavo P; Santos, Paulo C J L

    2015-03-01

    Glucose uptake in peripheral tissues is dependent on the translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters to the plasma membrane. Studies have shown the existence of two major signaling pathways that lead to the translocation of GLUT4. The first, and widely investigated, is the insulin activated signaling pathway through insulin receptor substrate-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. The second is the insulin-independent signaling pathway, which is activated by contractions. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus have reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle due to the phenomenon of insulin resistance. However, those individuals have normal glucose uptake during exercise. In this context, physical exercise is one of the most important interventions that stimulates glucose uptake by insulin-independent pathways, and the main molecules involved are adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, nitric oxide, bradykinin, AKT, reactive oxygen species and calcium. In this review, our main aims were to highlight the different glucose uptake pathways and to report the effects of physical exercise, diet and drugs on their functioning. Lastly, with the better understanding of these pathways, it would be possible to assess, exactly and molecularly, the importance of physical exercise and diet on glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, it would be possible to assess the action of drugs that might optimize glucose uptake and consequently be an important step in controlling the blood glucose levels in diabetic patients, in addition to being important to clarify some pathways that justify the development of drugs capable of mimicking the contraction pathway.

  9. Fabrication of Nanoindented Electrodes for Glucose Detection

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, Gymama

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this article was to design, fabricate, and evaluate a novel type of glucose biosensors based on the use of atomic force microscopy to create nanoindented electrodes (NIDEs) for the selective detection of glucose. Methods Atomic force microscopy nanoindentation techniques were extended to covalently immobilized glucose oxidase on NIDEs via composite hydrogel membranes composed of interpenetrating networks of inherently conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) tetramethacrylate grown within ultraviolet cross-linked hydroxyethylmethacrylate-based hydrogels to produce an in vitro amperometric NIDE biosensor for the long-term monitoring of glucose. Results The calibration curve for glucose was linear from 0.25 to 20 mM. Results showed that the NIDE glucose biosensor has a much higher detection sensitivity of 0.32 μA/mM and rapid response times (<5 seconds). There was no interference from the competing interferent (fructose) present; the only interference was from species that react with H2O2 (ascorbic acid). The linear equation was Bresponse (μA) = 0.323 [glucose] (mM) + 0.634 (μA); n = 24, r2 = 0.994. Conclusion Results showed that the resultant NIDE glucose biosensor increases the dynamic range, device sensitivity, and response time and has excellent detecting performance for glucose. PMID:20307392

  10. Glucose and insulin metabolism in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Petrides, A S; DeFronzo, R A

    1989-01-01

    Glucose intolerance, overt diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance are characteristic features of patients with cirrhosis. Insulin secretion, although increased in absolute terms, is insufficient to offset the presence of insulin resistance. The defect in insulin-mediated glucose disposal involves peripheral tissues, primarily muscle, and most likely reflects a disturbance in glycogen synthesis. Hepatic glucose production is normally sensitive to insulin; at present, it is unknown whether hepatic glucose uptake is impaired in cirrhosis. One of the more likely candidates responsible for the insulin-resistant state is insulin itself. The hyperinsulinemia results from three abnormalities: diminished hepatic extraction, portosystemic/intrahepatic shunting, and enhanced insulin secretion. PMID:2646365

  11. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress. PMID:16475003

  12. Blood Glucose Measurements in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Van Herpe, Tom; Mesotten, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Studies on tight glycemic control by intensive insulin therapy abruptly changed the climate of limited interest in the problem of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients and reopened the discussion on accuracy and reliability of glucose sensor devices. This article describes important components of blood glucose measurements and their interferences with the focus on the intensive care unit setting. Typical methodologies, organized from analytical accuracy to clinical accuracy, to assess imprecision and bias of a glucose sensor are also discussed. Finally, a list of recommendations and requirements to be considered when evaluating (time-discrete) glucose sensor devices is given. PMID:22401319

  13. Glucose Transporters in Cardiac Metabolism and Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Dan; Tian, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The heart is adapted to utilize all classes of substrates to meet the high-energy demand, and it tightly regulates its substrate utilization in response to environmental changes. Although fatty acids are known as the predominant fuel for the adult heart at resting stage, the heart switches its substrate preference toward glucose during stress conditions such as ischemia and pathological hypertrophy. Notably, increasing evidence suggests that the loss of metabolic flexibility associated with increased reliance on glucose utilization contribute to the development of cardiac dysfunction. The changes in glucose metabolism in hypertrophied hearts include altered glucose transport and increased glycolysis. Despite the role of glucose as an energy source, changes in other nonenergy producing pathways related to glucose metabolism, such as hexosamine biosynthetic pathway and pentose phosphate pathway, are also observed in the diseased hearts. This article summarizes the current knowledge regarding the regulation of glucose transporter expression and translocation in the heart during physiological and pathological conditions. It also discusses the signaling mechanisms governing glucose uptake in cardiomyocytes, as well as the changes of cardiac glucose metabolism under disease conditions. PMID:26756635

  14. Enzyme Analysis to Determine Glucose Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Charles; Ward, Robert E.

    Enzyme analysis is used for many purposes in food science and technology. Enzyme activity is used to indicate adequate processing, to assess enzyme preparations, and to measure constituents of foods that are enzyme substrates. In this experiment, the glucose content of corn syrup solids is determined using the enzymes, glucose oxidase and peroxidase. Glucose oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of glucose to form hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which then reacts with a dye in the presence of peroxidase to give a stable colored product.

  15. Naked eye detection of glucose in urine using glucose oxidase immobilized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Radhakumary, Changerath; Sreenivasan, Kunnatheeri

    2011-04-01

    Colloidal gold is extensively used for molecular sensing because of the flexibilities it offers in terms of modification of the gold nanoparticle surface with a variety of functional groups using thiol chemistry. We describe a simple assay that allows the visual detection of glucose in aqueous samples and demonstrates its applicability by estimating glucose in urine. To enable the glucose detection, we functionalized the thiol capped gold nanoparticles with glucose oxidase, the enzyme specific to β-D glucose, using carbodiimide chemistry. The visible color change of the GOD-functionalized gold nanoparticles from red to blue on interaction with glucose is the principle applied here for the sensing of urine glucose level. The solution turns blue when the glucose concentration exceeds 100 μg/mL. The approach depicted here seems to be important, particularly in third world countries where high tech diagnostics aids are inaccessible to the bulk of the population. PMID:21391552

  16. Impact of Glucose Tolerance Status, Sex, and Body Size on Glucose Absorption Patterns During OGTTs

    PubMed Central

    Færch, Kristine; Pacini, Giovanni; Nolan, John J.; Hansen, Torben; Tura, Andrea; Vistisen, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We studied whether patterns of glucose absorption during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) were abnormal in individuals with impaired glucose regulation and whether they were related to sex and body size (height and fat-free mass). We also examined how well differences in insulin sensitivity and β-cell function measured by gold-standard tests were reflected in the corresponding OGTT-derived estimates. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS With validated methods, various aspects of glucose absorption were estimated from 12-point, 3-h, 75-g OGTTs in 66 individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG), or isolated impaired glucose tolerance (i-IGT). Insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were measured with the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and intravenous glucose tolerance tests, respectively. Surrogate markers of both conditions were calculated from OGTTs. RESULTS More rapid glucose absorption (P ≤ 0.036) and reduced late glucose absorption (P ≤ 0.039) were observed in the i-IFG group relative to NGT and i-IGT groups. Women with i-IGT had a lower early glucose absorption than did men with i-IGT (P = 0.041); however, this difference did not persist when differences in body size were taken into account (P > 0.28). Faster glucose absorption was related to higher fasting (P = 0.001) and lower 2-h (P = 0.001) glucose levels and to greater height and fat-free mass (P < 0.001). All OGTT-derived measures of insulin sensitivity, but only one of three measures of β-cell function, reflected the differences for these parameters between those with normal and impaired glucose regulation as measured by gold-standard tests. CONCLUSIONS Glucose absorption patterns during an OGTT are significantly related to plasma glucose levels and body size, which should be taken into account when estimating β-cell function from OGTTs in epidemiological studies. PMID:24062321

  17. Kinetics of glucose isomerization to fructose by immobilized glucose isomerase: anomeric reactivity of D-glucose in kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Hong, J

    2001-11-30

    The substrate specificity of immobilized D-glucose isomerase (EC 5.3. 1.5) is investigated with an immobilized enzyme-packed reactor. A series of isomerization experiments with alpha-, beta-, and equilibrated D-glucose solutions indicates that beta anomer as well as alpha anomer is a substrate of the glucose isomerase at pH 7.5 and 60 degrees C. For substrate concentration of 0.028 mol l(-1) (1% w/v), the initial conversion rate of alpha-D-glucose was 43% higher than that with equilibrated glucose at the same concentration and 113% higher than beta-D-glucose conversion rate. This anomeric reactivity of glucose isomerase is mathematically described with a set of kinetic equations based on the reaction steps complying with Briggs-Haldane mechanism and the experimentally determined kinetic constants. The proposed reaction mechanism includes the mutarotation and the isomerization reactions of alpha- and beta-D-glucose with different rate constants.

  18. Development of a Robust Optical Glucose Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Gerard Laurence

    1990-01-01

    The long term objective of this research was the development of a noninvasive, optically-based, polarimetric sensor to monitor in vivo glucose concentrations. The goal of diabetes therapy is to approximate the 24-hour blood glucose profile of a normal individual. There have been major advances in the development of reliable, versatile, and accurate pumps for the delivery of insulin to diabetic patients and in the development of control algorithms for closed-loop insulin delivery, however, there remain major obstacles to the development of clinically useful, continuous glucose sensors. The development of an accurate noninvasive glucose sensor would have significant application in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitis both in conjunction with, and independent of, the glucose pump controller applications. The linear polarization vector of light routes when it interacts with an optically active material such as glucose. The amount of rotation of polarization is directly proportional to the glucose concentration and to the path length. The ability to quantitate blood glucose levels for the limited available path length in our primary sensing site, namely, the anterior chamber of the eye, therefore depends on the signal-to-noise ratio of the polarization detector. Our primary research focused on the development and testing of a prototype optical polarimetry system using D + glucose solution in a test cell, as well as using an enucleated human eye to assess the sensitivity of the system to measure physiologic glucose levels for the approximate one centimeter path length present in the anterior chamber of the eye. Our research has led to the development of a true phase technique in which helium neon laser light was coupled through a rotating linear polarizer along with two stationary linear polarizers and two detectors to produce reference and signal outputs whose amplitudes varied sinusoidally and whose phase was proportional to the rotation of light caused by

  19. Hypothalamic glucose sensing: making ends meet

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Vanessa H.; Hao, Lihong; Santiago, Ammy M.; Sheng, Zhenyu; Zhou, Chunxue

    2014-01-01

    The neuroendocrine system governs essential survival and homeostatic functions. For example, growth is needed for development, thermoregulation maintains optimal core temperature in a changing environment, and reproduction ensures species survival. Stress and immune responses enable an organism to overcome external and internal threats while the circadian system regulates arousal and sleep such that vegetative and active functions do not overlap. All of these functions require a significant portion of the body's energy. As the integrator of the neuroendocrine system, the hypothalamus carefully assesses the energy status of the body in order to appropriately partition resources to provide for each system without compromising the others. While doing so the hypothalamus must ensure that adequate glucose levels are preserved for brain function since glucose is the primary fuel of the brain. To this end, the hypothalamus contains specialized glucose sensing neurons which are scattered throughout the nuclei controlling distinct neuroendocrine functions. We hypothesize that these neurons play a key role in enabling the hypothalamus to partition energy to meet these peripheral survival needs without endangering the brain's glucose supply. This review will first describe the varied mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in neurons within discrete hypothalamic nuclei. We will then evaluate the way in which peripheral energy status regulates glucose sensitivity. For example, during energy deficit such as fasting specific hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons become sensitized to decreased glucose. This increases the gain of the information relay when glucose availability is a greater concern for the brain. Finally, changes in glucose sensitivity under pathological conditions (e.g., recurrent insulin-hypoglycemia, diabetes) will be addressed. The overall goal of this review is to place glucose sensing neurons within the context of hypothalamic control of neuroendocrine function

  20. Extraction of glucose information in blood glucose measurement by noninvasive near-infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Chen, Wenliang; Gu, Xiaoyu; Luo, Yunhan; Xu, Kexin

    2005-03-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy has been proposed as an effective way for measuring blood glucose non-invasively. However the change of spectrum due to an increase in glucose level is very small compared to the changes due to other variations such as absorption of major blood components, skin surface reflectance, temperature and pressure and so on. So the complexity of spectrum makes it difficult to identify unique glucose information. In this paper, the effect of background correction is discussed firstly. Then a simple substitution is proposed to compute the net analyte signal of glucose using the subspace spanned by the background spectra. For the in vitro experiment, the net analyte signals of glucose using the traditional methods and the subspace spanned by background have the same peaks in the absorption peaks of glucose for the glucose aqueous solution. For in vivo experiment, there is significant spectral difference between the subject who took OGTT test and the subject who took no glucose or water. And the net analyte signal of glucose is computed for OGTT test based on the subspace spanned by the spectra of subject who didn"t take glucose. Results show that, the spectral information induced by glucose taking is quite significant but it does not have the same peak at the absorption peak of glucose in near-infrared region.

  1. Thermoinactivation Mechanism of Glucose Isomerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Leng Hong; Saville, Bradley A.

    In this article, the mechanisms of thermoinactivation of glucose isomerase (GI) from Streptomyces rubiginosus (in soluble and immobilized forms) were investigated, particularly the contributions of thiol oxidation of the enzyme's cysteine residue and a "Maillard-like" reaction between the enzyme and sugars in high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Soluble GI (SGI) was successfully immobilized on silica gel (13.5 μm particle size), with an activity yield between 20 and 40%. The immobilized GI (IGI) has high enzyme retention on the support during the glucose isomerization process. In batch reactors, SGI (half-life =145 h) was more stable than IGI (half-life=27 h) at 60°C in HFCS, whereas at 80°C, IGI (half-life=12 h) was more stable than SGI (half-life=5.2 h). IGI was subject to thiol oxidation at 60°C, which contributed to the enzyme's deactivation. IGI was subject to thiol oxidation at 80°C, but this did not contribute to the deactivation of the enzyme. SGI did not undergo thiol oxidation at 60°C, but at 80°C SGI underwent severe precipitation and thiol oxidation, which caused the enzyme to deactivate. Experimental results show that immobilization suppresses the destablizing effect of thiol oxidation on GI. A "Maillard-like" reaction between SGI and the sugars also caused SGI thermoinactivation at 60, 70, and 80°C, but had minimal effect on IGI. At 60 and 80°C, IGI had higher thermostability in continuous reactors than in batch reactors, possibily because of reduced contact with deleterious compounds in HFCS.

  2. Insulin Control of Glucose Metabolism in Man

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Paul A.; Liljenquist, John E.; Tobin, Jordan D.; Sherwin, Robert S.; Watkins, Paul; Andres, Reubin; Berman, Mones

    1975-01-01

    Analyses of the control of glucose metabolism by insulin have been hampered by changes in bloog glucose concentration induced by insulin administration with resultant activation of hypoglycemic counterregulatory mechanisms. To eliminate such mechanisms, we have employed the glucose clamp technique which allows maintenance of fasting blood glucose concentration during and after the administration of insulin. Analyses of six studies performed in young healthy men in the postabsorptive state utilizing the concurrent administration of [14C]glucose and 1 mU/kg per min (40 mU/m2 per min) porcine insulin led to the development of kinetic models for insulin and for glucose. These models account quantitatively for the control of insulin on glucose utilization and on endogenous glucose production during nonsteady states. The glucose model, a parallel three-compartment model, has a central compartment (mass = 68±7 mg/kg; space of distribution = blood water volume) in rapid equilibrium with a smaller compartment (50±17 mg/kg) and in slow equilibrium with a larger compartment (96±21 mg/kg). The total plasma equivalent space for the glucose system averaged 15.8 liters or 20.3% body weight. Two modes of glucose loss are introduced in the model. One is a zero-order loss (insulin and glucose independent) from blood to the central nervous system; its magnitude was estimated from published data. The other is an insulin-dependent loss, occurring from the rapidly equilibrating compartment and, in the basal period, is smaller than the insulin-independent loss. Endogenous glucose production averaged 1.74 mg/kg per min in the basal state and enters the central compartment directly. During the glucose clamp experiments plasma insulin levels reached a plateau of 95±8 μU/ml. Over the entire range of insulin levels studied, glucose losses were best correlated with levels of insulin in a slowly equilibrating insulin compartment of a three-compartment insulin model. A proportional control

  3. Glucose-Induced Acidification in Yeast Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Alan; Bourn, Julia; Pool, Brynne

    2005-01-01

    We present an investigation (for A-level biology students and equivalent) into the mechanism of glucose-induced extracellular acidification in unbuffered yeast suspensions. The investigation is designed to enhance understanding of aspects of the A-level curriculum that relate to the phenomenon (notably glucose catabolism) and to develop key skills…

  4. Master Regulators in Plant Glucose Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Jen

    2014-01-01

    The daily life of photosynthetic plants revolves around sugar production, transport, storage and utilization, and the complex sugar metabolic and signaling networks integrate internal regulators and environmental cues to govern and sustain plant growth and survival. Although diverse sugar signals have emerged as pivotal regulators from embryogenesis to senescence, glucose is the most ancient and conserved regulatory signal that controls gene and protein expression, cell-cycle progression, central and secondary metabolism, as well as growth and developmental programs. Glucose signals are perceived and transduced by two principal mechanisms: direct sensing through glucose sensors and indirect sensing via a variety of energy and metabolite sensors. This review focuses on the comparative and functional analyses of three glucose-modulated master regulators in Arabidopsis thaliana, the hexokinase1 (HXK1) glucose sensor, the energy sensor kinases KIN10/KIN11 inactivated by glucose, and the glucose-activated target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase. These regulators are evolutionarily conserved, but have evolved universal and unique regulatory wiring and functions in plants and animals. They form protein complexes with multiple partners as regulators or effectors to serve distinct functions in different subcellular locales and organs, and play integrative and complementary roles from cellular signaling and metabolism to development in the plant glucose signaling networks. PMID:25530701

  5. Molecular pathophysiology of hepatic glucose production.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Kfir; Tavares, Clint D J; Rines, Amy K; Puigserver, Pere

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining blood glucose concentration within a relatively narrow range through periods of fasting or excess nutrient availability is essential to the survival of the organism. This is achieved through an intricate balance between glucose uptake and endogenous glucose production to maintain constant glucose concentrations. The liver plays a major role in maintaining normal whole body glucose levels by regulating the processes of de novo glucose production (gluconeogenesis) and glycogen breakdown (glycogenolysis), thus controlling the levels of hepatic glucose release. Aberrant regulation of hepatic glucose production (HGP) can result in deleterious clinical outcomes, and excessive HGP is a major contributor to the hyperglycemia observed in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Indeed, adjusting glycemia as close as possible to a non-diabetic range is the foremost objective in the medical treatment of patients with T2DM and is currently achieved in the clinic primarily through suppression of HGP. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms controlling HGP in response to nutritional and hormonal signals and discuss how these signals are altered in T2DM.

  6. Glucose stabilizes collagen sterilized with gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ohan, Mark P; Dunn, Michael G

    2003-12-15

    Gamma irradiation sterilization (gamma-irradiation) fragments and denatures collagen, drastically decreasing critical physical properties. Our goal was to maintain strength and stability of gamma-irradiated collagen by adding glucose, which in theory can initiate crosslink formation in collagen during exposure to gamma-irradiation. Collagen films prepared with and without glucose were gamma-irradiated with a standard dose of 2.5 Mrad. Relative amounts of crosslinking and denaturation were approximated based on solubility and the mechanical properties of the films after hydration, heat denaturation, or incubation in enzymes (collagenase and trypsin). After exposure to gamma-irradiation, collagen films containing glucose had significantly higher mechanical properties, greater resistance to enzymatic degradation, and decreased solubility compared with control films. The entire experiment was repeated with a second set of films that were exposed first to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) to provide higher initial strength and then gamma-irradiated. Again, films containing glucose had significantly greater mechanical properties and resistance to enzymatic degradation compared with controls. Gel electrophoresis showed that glucose did not prevent peptide fragmentation; therefore, the higher strength and stability in glucose-incorporated films may be due to glucose-derived crosslinks. The results of this study suggest that glucose may be a useful additive to stabilize collagenous materials or tissues sterilized by gamma-irradiation.

  7. Glucose Catabolism in Micrococcus sodonensis1

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jerome J.; Evans, James B.

    1967-01-01

    The inability of Micrococcus sodonensis to grow on glucose as the sole source of carbon and energy was investigated. Estimation of pathways of glucose catabolism indicated that both the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate pathways are present in this organism. Comparative studies with Escherichia coli demonstrated that key enzymes for glucose catabolism were present in M. sodonensis in quantities equivalent to those of E. coli. The glucose-6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases of M. sodonensis were nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) specific, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide specific. Transhydrogenase and reduced NADP oxidase were absent. Growth of the organism in the presence of glucose did not result in a repressed ability to oxidize tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, but these cells did have a decreased capacity for glucose degradation. The addition of substrates rich in growth-promoting substances, e.g., yeast extract, did not provide requisite nutrients for growth on glucose. Studies with 32P suggest that M. sodonensis is incapable of synthesizing energy-rich phosphate compounds during the catabolism of glucose. PMID:4381630

  8. Hydrogen production from glucose by anaerobes.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Miura, Takashi; Ishimi, Kosaku; Seki, Minoru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    Various anaerobes were cultivated in media containing glucose. When 100 mL of thioglycollate medium containing 2.0% (w/v) glucose was used, Clostridium butyricum ATCC 859, NBRC 3315, and NBRC 13949 evolved 227-243 mL of biogas containing about 180 mL of hydrogen in 1 day. Although some strains had some resistance against oxygen, C. butyricum ATCC 859 and 860 did not have it. C. butyricum NBRC 3315 and Enterobacter aerogenes NBRC 13534 produced hydrogen in the presence of glucose or pyruvic acid, and E. aerogenes NBRC 13534 produced hydrogen by not only glucose and pyruvic acid but also dextrin, sucrose, maltose, galactose, fructose, mannose, and mannitol. When a medium containing 0.5% (w/v) yeast extract and 2.0% (w/v) glucose was used, E. aerogenes NBRC 13534 evolved more biogas and hydrogen than C. butyricum NBRC 3315 in the absence of reducing agent.

  9. Glucose Recognition in Vitro Using Fluorescent Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noronha, G; Heiss, A M; Reilly, J R; Vachon, Jr, D J; Cary, D R; Zaitseva, N P; Reibold, R A; Lane, S M; Peyser, T A; Satcher, J H

    2001-04-25

    Diabetes is a disease that affects over 16 million people in the USA at a cost of 100 billion dollars annually. The ability to regulate insulin delivery in people with Type 1 diabetes is imperative as is the need to manage glucose levels in all people with this disease. Our current method for monitoring glucose is a (FDA approved) minimally invasive enzymatic sensor that can measure glucose levels in vivo for three days. We are focused on developing a noninvasive implantable glucose sensor that will be interrogated by an external device. The material must be robust, easy to process, biocompatible and resistant to biofouling. In this Presentation we will discuss the development of a new polymeric matrix that can recognize physiological levels of glucose in vitro using fluorescent spectroscopy.

  10. Diurnal Variation in Response to Intravenous Glucose*

    PubMed Central

    Whichelow, Margaret J.; Sturge, R. A.; Keen, H.; Jarrett, R. J.; Stimmler, L.; Grainger, Susan

    1974-01-01

    Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (25 g) were performed in the morning and afternoon on 13 apparently normal persons. The individual K values (rate of decline of blood sugar) were all higher in the morning tests, and the mean values were significantly higher in the morning. Fasting blood sugar levels were slightly lower in the afternoon. There was no difference between the fasting morning and afternoon plasma insulin levels, but the levels after glucose were lower in the afternoon. Growth hormone levels were low at all times in non-apprehensive subjects and unaffected by glucose. The results suggest that the impaired afternoon intravenous glucose tolerance, like oral glucose tolerance, is associated with impaired insulin release and insulin resistance. PMID:4817160

  11. Blood glucose measurement by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zeller, H; Novak, P; Landgraf, R

    1989-02-01

    For the development of an implantable artificial endocrine pancreas, a sensor for blood glucose measurement is needed providing a long-term stability. This goal can be achieved by the application of infrared spectroscopy which, unlike electrochemical sensors, responds directly to the glucose molecule. An investigation under physiological conditions revealed five glucose absorption bands in the near and middle infrared range. These are 1040, 1085, 1109, 1160 and 1365 cm-1. Only the 1040 cm-1 frequency coincides with none of the other infrared-active blood substances like proteins, lipids and urea. Nevertheless, the other absorption bands too, especially the 1109 cm-1 frequency, can be used for blood glucose measurement, if the superimposed absorptions are compensated. Methods for the compensation have been found. Technically feasible embodiments of an infrared glucose sensor are described.

  12. Glucose Biosensor Based on Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase in Platinum Nanoparticles/Graphene/Chitosan Nanocomposite Film

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Kang, Xinhuang; Wang, Chong M.; Wang, Donghai; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-09-01

    The bionanocomposite film consisting of glucose oxidase/Pt/functional graphene sheets/chitosan (GOD/Pt/FGS/chitosan) for glucose sensing was described. With the electrocatalytic synergy of FGS and Pt nanoparticles to hydrogen peroxide, a sensitive biosensor with detection limit of 0.6 µM glucose was achieved. The biosensor also had good reproducibility, long term stability and negligible interfering signals from ascorbic acid and uric acid comparing to the response to glucose. The large surface area and good conductivity of graphene suggests that graphene is a potential candidate for sensor material. The hybrid nanocomposite glucose sensor provides new opportunity for clinical diagnosis and point-of-care applications.

  13. Identification of glucose transporters in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Menino, João Filipe; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Brown, Neil Andrew; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; Savoldi, Marcela; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Rodrigues, Fernando; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the mechanisms involved in glucose transport, in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, we have identified four glucose transporter encoding genes hxtB-E. We evaluated the ability of hxtB-E to functionally complement the Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY.VW4000 strain that is unable to grow on glucose, fructose, mannose or galactose as single carbon source. In S. cerevisiae HxtB-E were targeted to the plasma membrane. The expression of HxtB, HxtC and HxtE was able to restore growth on glucose, fructose, mannose or galactose, indicating that these transporters accept multiple sugars as a substrate through an energy dependent process. A tenfold excess of unlabeled maltose, galactose, fructose, and mannose were able to inhibit glucose uptake to different levels (50 to 80 %) in these s. cerevisiae complemented strains. Moreover, experiments with cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), strongly suggest that hxtB, -C, and -E mediate glucose transport via active proton symport. The A. nidulans ΔhxtB, ΔhxtC or ΔhxtE null mutants showed ~2.5-fold reduction in the affinity for glucose, while ΔhxtB and -C also showed a 2-fold reduction in the capacity for glucose uptake. The ΔhxtD mutant had a 7.8-fold reduction in affinity, but a 3-fold increase in the capacity for glucose uptake. However, only the ΔhxtB mutant strain showed a detectable decreased rate of glucose consumption at low concentrations and an increased resistance to 2-deoxyglucose. PMID:24282591

  14. Potentiometric measurement of glucose concentration with an immobilized glucose oxidase/catalase electrode.

    PubMed

    Wingard, L B; Liu, C C; Wolfson, S K; Yao, S J; Drash, A L

    1982-01-01

    A series of enzyme electrodes for measurement of glucose have been constructed. The electrodes contain glucose oxidase immobilized on platinum, either with or without co-immobilization of catalase. When placed in buffered glucose, the enzyme electrodes show a potentiometric response to glucose with respect to a Ag/AgCl reference electrode. This response is reproducible in the physiologic range of glucose concentrations. The immobilization technique, some of the environmental variables such as oxygen concentration and pH, and several compounds that might interfere with the selectivity of the enzyme electrodes for glucose have received preliminary study. This direct potentiometric approach is undergoing further evaluation to determine the basic electrochemical mechanism responsible for the potentiometric signal and whether it can be adapted for continuous in vivo monitoring of the glucose concentration in body fluids. PMID:7172983

  15. Injectable and Glucose-Responsive Hydrogels Based on Boronic Acid-Glucose Complexation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yizhou; Wang, Weiheng; Veiseh, Omid; Appel, Eric A; Xue, Kun; Webber, Matthew J; Tang, Benjamin C; Yang, Xi-Wen; Weir, Gordon C; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2016-08-30

    Injectable hydrogels have been widely used for a number of biomedical applications. Here, we report a new strategy to form an injectable and glucose-responsive hydrogel using the boronic acid-glucose complexation. The ratio of boronic acid and glucose functional groups is critical for hydrogel formation. In our system, polymers with 10-60% boronic acid, with the balance being glucose-modified, are favorable to form hydrogels. These hydrogels are shear-thinning and self-healing, recovering from shear-induced flow to a gel state within seconds. More importantly, these polymers displayed glucose-responsive release of an encapsulated model drug. The hydrogel reported here is an injectable and glucose-responsive hydrogel constructed from the complexation of boronic acid and glucose within a single component polymeric material.

  16. Glucose and fructose 6-phosphate cycle in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Karlander, S.; Roovete, A.; Vranic, M.; Efendic, S.

    1986-11-01

    We have determined the rate of glucose cycling by comparing turnovers of (2-/sup 3/H)- and (6-/sup 3/H)glucose under basal conditions and during a glucose infusion. Moreover, the activity of the fructose 6-phosphate cycle was assessed by comparing (3-/sup 3/H)- and (6-/sup 3/H)glucose. The study included eight lean subjects with normal glucose tolerance. They participated in two randomly performed investigations. In one experiment (2-/sup 3/H)- and (6-/sup 3/H)glucose were given simultaneously, while in the other only (3-/sup 3/H)glucose was given. The basal rate of glucose cycling was 0.32 +/- 0.08 mg X kg-1 X min-1 or 17% of basal glucose production (P less than 0.005). During glucose infusion the activity of endogenous glucose cycling did not change but since glucose production was suppressed it amounted to 130% of glucose production. The basal fructose 6-phosphate cycle could be detected only in three subjects and was suppressed during glucose infusion. In conclusion, the glucose cycle is active in healthy humans both in basal conditions and during moderate hyperglycemia. In some subjects, the fructose 6-phosphate cycle also appears to be active. Thus it is preferable to use (6-/sup 3/H)glucose rather than (3-/sup 3/H)glucose when measuring glucose production and particularly when assessing glucose cycle.

  17. A glucose oxidase-coupled DNAzyme sensor for glucose detection in tears and saliva.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengcheng; Sheng, Yongjie; Sun, Yanhong; Feng, Junkui; Wang, Shijin; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Jiacui; Jiang, Dazhi

    2015-08-15

    Biosensors have been widely investigated and utilized in a variety of fields ranging from environmental monitoring to clinical diagnostics. Glucose biosensors have triggered great interest and have been widely exploited since glucose determination is essential for diabetes diagnosis. In here, we designed a novel dual-enzyme biosensor composed of glucose oxidase (GOx) and pistol-like DNAzyme (PLDz) to detect glucose levels in tears and saliva. First, GOx, as a molecular recognition element, catalyzes the oxidation of glucose forming H2O2; then PLDz recognizes the produced H2O2 as a secondary signal and performs a self-cleavage reaction promoted by Mn(2+), Co(2+) and Cu(2+). Thus, detection of glucose could be realized by monitoring the cleavage rate of PLDz. The slope of the cleavage rate of PLDz versus glucose concentration curve was fitted with a Double Boltzmann equation, with a range of glucose from 100 nM to 10mM and a detection limit of 5 μM. We further applied the GOx-PLDz 1.0 biosensor for glucose detection in tears and saliva, glucose levels in which are 720±81 μM and 405±56 μM respectively. Therefore, the GOx-PLDz 1.0 biosensor is able to determine glucose levels in tears and saliva as a noninvasive glucose biosensor, which is important for diabetic patients with frequent/continuous glucose monitoring requirements. In addition, induction of DNAzyme provides a new approach in the development of glucose biosensors.

  18. Interspecific variation in SO/sub 2/ flux: leaf surface versus internal flux, and components of leaf conductance. [Pisum sativum L. , Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. Flacca, Geranium carolinianum L. , Diplacus aurantiacus (Curtis) Jeps

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Tingey, D.T.

    1985-12-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationships among stomatal, residual, and epidermal conductances in determining the flux of SO/sub 2/ air pollution to leaves. Variations in leaf SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O vapor fluxes were determined using four plant species: Pisum sativum L. (garden pea), Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. flacca (mutant of tomato), Geranium carolinianum L. (wild geranium), and Diplacus aurantiacus (Curtis) Jeps. (a native California shrub). Fluxes were measured using the mass-balance approach during exposure to 4.56 micromoles per cubic meter (0.11 microliters per liter) SO/sub 2/ for 2 hours in a controlled environmental chamber. Flux through adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces with closed stomata ranged from 1.9 to 9.4 nanomoles per square meter per second for SO/sub 2/, and 0.3 to 1.3 millimoles per square meter per second for H/sub 2/O vapor. Flux of SO/sub 2/ into leaves through stomata ranged from approx.0 to 8.5 (dark) and 3.8 to 16.0 (light) millimoles per square meter per second. Flux of H/sub 2/O vapor from leaves through stomata ranged from approx.0 to 0.6 (dark) to 0.4 to 0.9 (light) millimole per square meter per second. Lycopersicon had internal flux rates for both SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O vapor over twice as high as for the other species. Stomatal conductance based on H/sub 2/O vapor flux averaged from 0.07 to 0.13 mole per square meter per second among the four species. Internal conductance of SO/sub 2/ as calculated from SO/sub 2/ flux was from 0.04 mole per square meter per second lower to 0.06 mole per square meter per second higher than stomatal conductance. For Pisum, Geranium, and Diplacus stomatal conductance was the same or slightly higher than internal conductance, indicating that, in general, SO/sub 2/ flux could be predicted from stomatal conductance for H/sub 2/O vapor.

  19. A Glucose Sensor in Candida albicans†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Victoria; Sexton, Jessica A.; Johnston, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The Hgt4 protein of Candida albicans (orf19.5962) is orthologous to the Snf3 and Rgt2 glucose sensors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that govern sugar acquisition by regulating the expression of genes encoding hexose transporters. We found that HGT4 is required for glucose induction of the expression of HGT12, HXT10, and HGT7, which encode apparent hexose transporters in C. albicans. An hgt4Δ mutant is defective for growth on fermentable sugars, which is consistent with the idea that Hgt4 is a sensor of glucose and similar sugars. Hgt4 appears to be sensitive to glucose levels similar to those in human serum (∼5 mM). HGT4 expression is repressed by high levels of glucose, which is consistent with the idea that it encodes a high-affinity sugar sensor. Glucose sensing through Hgt4 affects the yeast-to-hyphal morphological switch of C. albicans cells: hgt4Δ mutants are hypofilamented, and a constitutively signaling form of Hgt4 confers hyperfilamentation of cells. The hgt4Δ mutant is less virulent than wild-type cells in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. These results suggest that Hgt4 is a high-affinity glucose sensor that contributes to the virulence of C. albicans. PMID:17030998

  20. Exercising Tactically for Taming Postmeal Glucose Surges.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Elsamma

    2016-01-01

    This review seeks to synthesize data on the timing, intensity, and duration of exercise found scattered over some 39 studies spanning 3+ decades into optimal exercise conditions for controlling postmeal glucose surges. The results show that a light aerobic exercise for 60 min or moderate activity for 20-30 min starting 30 min after meal can efficiently blunt the glucose surge, with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. Exercising at other times could lead to glucose elevation caused by counterregulation. Adding a short bout of resistance exercise of moderate intensity (60%-80%  VO2max) to the aerobic activity, 2 or 3 times a week as recommended by the current guidelines, may also help with the lowering of glucose surges. On the other hand, high-intensity exercise (>80%  VO2max) causes wide glucose fluctuations and its feasibility and efficacy for glucose regulation remain to be ascertained. Promoting the kind of physical activity that best counters postmeal hyperglycemia is crucial because hundreds of millions of diabetes patients living in developing countries and in the pockets of poverty in the West must do without medicines, supplies, and special diets. Physical activity is the one tool they may readily utilize to tame postmeal glucose surges. Exercising in this manner does not violate any of the current guidelines, which encourage exercise any time.

  1. Noninvasive glucose sensing by transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wei-Chuan; Bechtel, Kate L.; Rebec, Mihailo V.

    2015-05-01

    We present the development of a transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy system and analysis algorithm for noninvasive glucose sensing. The instrument and algorithm were tested in a preclinical study in which a dog model was used. To achieve a robust glucose test system, the blood levels were clamped for periods of up to 45 min. Glucose clamping and rise/fall patterns have been achieved by injecting glucose and insulin into the ear veins of the dog. Venous blood samples were drawn every 5 min and a plasma glucose concentration was obtained and used to maintain the clamps, to build the calibration model, and to evaluate the performance of the system. We evaluated the utility of the simultaneously acquired Raman spectra to be used to determine the plasma glucose values during the 8-h experiment. We obtained prediction errors in the range of ˜1.5-2 mM. These were in-line with a best-case theoretical estimate considering the limitations of the signal-to-noise ratio estimates. As expected, the transition regions of the clamp study produced larger predictive errors than the stable regions. This is related to the divergence of the interstitial fluid (ISF) and plasma glucose values during those periods. Two key contributors to error beside the ISF/plasma difference were photobleaching and detector drift. The study demonstrated the potential of Raman spectroscopy in noninvasive applications and provides areas where the technology can be improved in future studies.

  2. Noninvasive glucose sensing by transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Wei-Chuan; Bechtel, Kate L.; Rebec, Mihailo V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present the development of a transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy system and analysis algorithm for noninvasive glucose sensing. The instrument and algorithm were tested in a preclinical study in which a dog model was used. To achieve a robust glucose test system, the blood levels were clamped for periods of up to 45 min. Glucose clamping and rise/fall patterns have been achieved by injecting glucose and insulin into the ear veins of the dog. Venous blood samples were drawn every 5 min and a plasma glucose concentration was obtained and used to maintain the clamps, to build the calibration model, and to evaluate the performance of the system. We evaluated the utility of the simultaneously acquired Raman spectra to be used to determine the plasma glucose values during the 8-h experiment. We obtained prediction errors in the range of ∼1.5−2  mM. These were in-line with a best-case theoretical estimate considering the limitations of the signal-to-noise ratio estimates. As expected, the transition regions of the clamp study produced larger predictive errors than the stable regions. This is related to the divergence of the interstitial fluid (ISF) and plasma glucose values during those periods. Two key contributors to error beside the ISF/plasma difference were photobleaching and detector drift. The study demonstrated the potential of Raman spectroscopy in noninvasive applications and provides areas where the technology can be improved in future studies. PMID:25688542

  3. Blood-Brain Glucose Transfer: Repression in Chronic Hyperglycemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjedde, Albert; Crone, Christian

    1981-10-01

    Diabetic patients with increased plasma glucose concentrations may develop cerebral symptoms of hypoglycemia when their plasma glucose is rapidly lowered to normal concentrations. The symptoms may indicate insufficient transport of glucose from blood to brain. In rats with chronic hyperglycemia the maximum glucose transport capacity of the blood-brain barrier decreased from 400 to 290 micromoles per 100 grams per minute. When plasma glucose was lowered to normal values, the glucose transport rate into brain was 20 percent below normal. This suggests that repressive changes of the glucose transport mechanism occur in brain endothelial cells in response to increased plasma glucose.

  4. Determination of glucose turnover in sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax. Comparative aspects of glucose utilization.

    PubMed

    Garin, D; Rombaut, A; Fréminet, A

    1987-01-01

    1. Parameters of in vivo glucose utilization by sea bass (132 +/- 6 g, mean +/- SEM) acclimated at 15 degrees C in sea-water were measured after single injection of labelled glucose. 2. Glucose turnover rate (RG; mumol . min-1 . kg-1) was found to be 0.55-065 (2-3H glucose) and 0.34 +/- 0.42 (U14C glucose). 3. Glucose transit time was 443-449 min, glucose mass 233-261 mumol . kg-1, and glucose recycling 37%. 4. Oxygen consumption (MO2) amounted to 94 +/- 6.2 mumol . min-1 . kg-1. 5. The comparison with other fish species, mammals and birds, taking into account body size, temperature, diet, exercise, in poikilotherms and homeotherms leads to the calculation of a glucose turnover index (RGI = RG x 6 x 100 x MO2(-1)). 6. Value of this, generally lower in ectotherm teleosts (2-9), than in endotherms: mammals, birds and thunidae (22-60), confirms the minor quantitative importance of glucose in the metabolism of most fish.

  5. The glucose/glucose-6-phosphate cycle in the periportal and perivenous zone of rat liver.

    PubMed

    Jungermann, K; Heilbronn, R; Katz, N; Sasse, D

    1982-04-01

    Periportal and perivenous hepatocytes contain different activities (V) of antagonistic key enzymes such as glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase. In order to get an insight into the metabolism of the periportal and perivenous area the flux rates (v) of the glucose/glucose-6-phosphate cycle were calculated on the basis of the Michaelis-Menten equation using the measured zonal concentrations of glucose and glucose 6-phosphate, the zonal activities of glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase previously reported and the half-saturating substrate concentrations (Km) of the two enzymes found in the literature. The concentrations of glucose were obtained as a first approximation by measuring the concentrations in portal (= periportal) and hepatovenous (= perivenous) blood; those of glucose 6-phosphate were calculated from the levels determined in microdissected periportal and perivenous liver tissue. The calculations showed (a) that the overall cycling rates agreed remarkably well with those reported for intact animals and (b) that during a normal feeding rhythm the periportal zone should catalyze net glucose output and the perivenous zone should mediate net glucose uptake, as proposed by the model of 'metabolic zonation'.

  6. Optimal glucose management in the perioperative period.

    PubMed

    Evans, Charity H; Lee, Jane; Ruhlman, Melissa K

    2015-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is a common finding in surgical patients during the perioperative period. Factors contributing to poor glycemic control include counterregulatory hormones, hepatic insulin resistance, decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, use of dextrose-containing intravenous fluids, and enteral and parenteral nutrition. Hyperglycemia in the perioperative period is associated with increased morbidity, decreased survival, and increased resource utilization. Optimal glucose management in the perioperative period contributes to reduced morbidity and mortality. To readily identify hyperglycemia, blood glucose monitoring should be instituted for all hospitalized patients. PMID:25814110

  7. Glucose and fructose metabolism in Zymomonas anaerobia

    PubMed Central

    McGill, D. J.; Dawes, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Isotopic and enzymic evidence indicates that Zymomonas anaerobia ferments glucose via the Entner–Doudoroff pathway. The molar growth yields with glucose (5.89) and fructose (5.0) are lower than those for the related organism Zymomonas mobilis and the observed linear growth suggests that energetically uncoupled growth occurs. A survey of enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism revealed the presence of weak phosphofructokinase and fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activities but phosphoketolase, transketolase and transaldolase were not detected. Fermentation balances for glucose and fructose are reported; acetaldehyde accumulated in both fermentations, to a greater extent with fructose which also yielded glycerol and dihydroxyacetone as minor products. PMID:4259336

  8. Continuous glucose monitoring in small animals.

    PubMed

    Surman, Sean; Fleeman, Linda

    2013-03-01

    The use of continuous glucose monitoring systems in veterinary patients is summarized and discussed. The current clinical uses in veterinary medicine, including monitoring of hospitalized/sick diabetic patients, long-term monitoring of stable diabetic patients, anesthetized patients, and other patients with altered blood glucose homeostasis are presented. The most important advantage of these systems over intermittent blood glucose measurements is that they facilitate detection of brief periods of hypoglycemia and provide information overnight. The accuracy and advantages/disadvantages compared with traditional monitoring are addressed. The technology involved in the currently available monitoring systems is also discussed. PMID:23522178

  9. Glucose Homeostatic Law: Insulin Clearance Predicts the Progression of Glucose Intolerance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Uda, Shinsuke; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Iwaki, Toshinao; Fukuzawa, Hiroki; Komori, Yasunori; Fujii, Masashi; Toyoshima, Yu; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Wataru; Kuroda, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic control of blood glucose is regulated by a complex feedback loop between glucose and insulin, of which failure leads to diabetes mellitus. However, physiological and pathological nature of the feedback loop is not fully understood. We made a mathematical model of the feedback loop between glucose and insulin using time course of blood glucose and insulin during consecutive hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in 113 subjects with variety of glucose tolerance including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We analyzed the correlation of the parameters in the model with the progression of glucose intolerance and the conserved relationship between parameters. The model parameters of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion significantly declined from NGT to IGT, and from IGT to T2DM, respectively, consistent with previous clinical observations. Importantly, insulin clearance, an insulin degradation rate, significantly declined from NGT, IGT to T2DM along the progression of glucose intolerance in the mathematical model. Insulin clearance was positively correlated with a product of insulin sensitivity and secretion assessed by the clamp analysis or determined with the mathematical model. Insulin clearance was correlated negatively with postprandial glucose at 2h after oral glucose tolerance test. We also inferred a square-law between the rate constant of insulin clearance and a product of rate constants of insulin sensitivity and secretion in the model, which is also conserved among NGT, IGT and T2DM subjects. Insulin clearance shows a conserved relationship with the capacity of glucose disposal among the NGT, IGT and T2DM subjects. The decrease of insulin clearance predicts the progression of glucose intolerance. PMID:26623647

  10. Postprandial glucose and insulin profiles following a glucose-loaded meal in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Hewson-Hughes, Adrian K; Gilham, Matthew S; Upton, Sarah; Colyer, Alison; Butterwick, Richard; Miller, Andrew T

    2011-10-01

    Data from intravenous (i.v.) glucose tolerance tests suggest that glucose clearance from the blood is slower in cats than in dogs. Since different physiological pathways are activated following oral administration compared with i.v. administration, we investigated the profiles of plasma glucose and insulin in cats and dogs following ingestion of a test meal with or without glucose. Adult male and female cats and dogs were fed either a high-protein (HP) test meal (15 g/kg body weight; ten cats and eleven dogs) or a HP + glucose test meal (13 g/kg body-weight HP diet + 2 g/kg body-weight D-glucose; seven cats and thirteen dogs) following a 24 h fast. Marked differences in plasma glucose and insulin profiles were observed in cats and dogs following ingestion of the glucose-loaded meal. In cats, mean plasma glucose concentration reached a peak at 120 min (10.2, 95 % CI 9.7, 10.8 mmol/l) and returned to baseline by 240 min, but no statistically significant change in plasma insulin concentration was observed. In dogs, mean plasma glucose concentration reached a peak at 60 min (6.3, 95 % CI 5.9, 6.7 mmol/l) and returned to baseline by 90 min, while plasma insulin concentration was significantly higher than pre-meal values from 30 to 120 min following the glucose-loaded meal. These results indicate that cats are not as efficient as dogs at rapidly decreasing high blood glucose levels and are consistent with a known metabolic adaptation of cats, namely a lack of glucokinase, which is important for both insulin secretion and glucose uptake from the blood. PMID:22005400

  11. Osmotic adjustment and the growth response of seven vegetable crops following water-deficit stress. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Beta vulgaris L. ; Abelmoschus esculentus; Pisum sativum L. ; Capsicum annuum L. ; Spinacia oleracea L. ; Lycopersicon esculentum Mill

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, S.D. ); Oosterhuis, D.M. )

    1991-09-01

    Growth-chamber studies were conducted to examine the ability of seven vegetable crops- Blue Lake beam (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Detroit Dark Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Burgundy okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) (Moench), Little Marvel pea (Pisum sativum L), California Wonder bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L), New Zealand spinach (Spinacia oleracea L), and Beefsteak tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) - to adjust osmotically in response to water-deficit stress. Water stress was imposed by withholding water for 3 days, and the adjustment of leaf and root osmotic potentials upon relief of the stress and rehydration were monitored with thermocouple psychrometers. Despite similar reductions in leaf water potential and stomatal conductance among the species studied reductions in lead water potential an stomatal conductance among the species, crop-specific differences were observed in leak and root osmotic adjustment. Leaf osmotic adjustment was observed for bean, pepper, and tomato following water-deficit stress. Root osmotic adjustment was significant in bean, okra, pea and tomato. Furthermore, differences in leaf and root osmotic adjustment were also observed among five tomato cultivars. Leaf osmotic adjustment was not associated with the maintenance of leaf growth following water-deficit stress, since leaf expansion of water-stressed bean and pepper, two species capable of osmotic adjustment, was similar to that of spinach, which exhibited no leaf osmotic adjustment.

  12. Anti-phytopathogen potential of endophytic actinobacteria isolated from tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) in southern Brazil, and characterization of Streptomyces sp. R18(6), a potential biocontrol agent.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Margaroni Fialho; da Silva, Mariana Germano; Van Der Sand, Sueli T

    2010-09-01

    Tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) are highly susceptible to phytopathogen attack. The resulting intensive application of pesticides on tomato crops can affect the environment and health of humans and animals. The objective of this study was to select potential biocontrol agents among actinobacteria from tomato plants, in a search for alternative phytopathogen control. We evaluated 70 endophytic actinobacteria isolated from tomato plants in southern Brazil, testing their antimicrobial activity, siderophore production, indoleacetic acid production, and phosphate solubility. The actinomycete isolate with the highest antimicrobial potential was selected using the agar-well diffusion method, in order to optimize conditions for the production of compounds with antimicrobial activity. For this study, six growth media (starch casein-SC, ISP2, Bennett's, Sahin, Czapek-Dox, and TSB), three temperatures (25 degrees C, 30 degrees C, and 35 degrees C) and different pH were tested. Of the actinobacteria tested, 88.6% showed antimicrobial activity against at least one phytopathogen, 72.1% showed a positive reaction for indoleacetic acid production, 86.8% produced siderophores and 16.2% showed a positive reaction for phosphate solubility. Isolate R18(6) was selected due to its antagonistic activity against all phytopathogenic microorganisms tested in this study. The best conditions for production were observed in the SC medium, at 30 degrees C and pH 7.0. The isolate R18(6) showed close biochemical and genetic similarity to Streptomyces pluricolorescens. PMID:20542109

  13. Anti-phytopathogen potential of endophytic actinobacteria isolated from tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) in southern Brazil, and characterization of Streptomyces sp. R18(6), a potential biocontrol agent.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Margaroni Fialho; da Silva, Mariana Germano; Van Der Sand, Sueli T

    2010-09-01

    Tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) are highly susceptible to phytopathogen attack. The resulting intensive application of pesticides on tomato crops can affect the environment and health of humans and animals. The objective of this study was to select potential biocontrol agents among actinobacteria from tomato plants, in a search for alternative phytopathogen control. We evaluated 70 endophytic actinobacteria isolated from tomato plants in southern Brazil, testing their antimicrobial activity, siderophore production, indoleacetic acid production, and phosphate solubility. The actinomycete isolate with the highest antimicrobial potential was selected using the agar-well diffusion method, in order to optimize conditions for the production of compounds with antimicrobial activity. For this study, six growth media (starch casein-SC, ISP2, Bennett's, Sahin, Czapek-Dox, and TSB), three temperatures (25 degrees C, 30 degrees C, and 35 degrees C) and different pH were tested. Of the actinobacteria tested, 88.6% showed antimicrobial activity against at least one phytopathogen, 72.1% showed a positive reaction for indoleacetic acid production, 86.8% produced siderophores and 16.2% showed a positive reaction for phosphate solubility. Isolate R18(6) was selected due to its antagonistic activity against all phytopathogenic microorganisms tested in this study. The best conditions for production were observed in the SC medium, at 30 degrees C and pH 7.0. The isolate R18(6) showed close biochemical and genetic similarity to Streptomyces pluricolorescens.

  14. A glucose-centric perspective of hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Ramasarma, T; Rafi, M

    2016-02-01

    Digestion of food in the intestines converts the compacted storage carbohydrates, starch and glycogen, to glucose. After each meal, a flux of glucose (> 200 g) passes through the blood pool (4-6 g) in a short period of 2 h, keeping its concentration ideally in the range of 80-120 mg/100 mL. Tissue-specific glucose transporters (GLUTs) aid in the distribution of glucose to all tissues. The balance glucose after meeting the immediate energy needs is converted into glycogen and stored in liver (up to 100 g) and skeletal muscle (up to 300 g) for later use. High blood glucose gives the signal for increased release of insulin from pancreas. Insulin binds to insulin receptor on the plasma membrane and activates its autophosphorylation. This initiates the post-insulin-receptor signal cascade that accelerates synthesis of glycogen and triglyceride. Parallel control by phos-dephos and redox regulation of proteins exists for some of these steps. A major action of insulin is to inhibit gluconeogensis in the liver decreasing glucose output into blood. Cases with failed control of blood glucose have alarmingly increased since 1960 coinciding with changed life-styles and large scale food processing. Many of these turned out to be resistant to insulin, usually accompanied by dysfunctional glycogen storage. Glucose has an extended stay in blood at 8 mM and above and then indiscriminately adds on to surface protein-amino groups. Fructose in common sugar is 10-fold more active. This random glycation process interferes with the functions of many proteins (e.g., hemoglobin, eye lens proteins) and causes progressive damage to heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves. Some compounds are known to act as insulin mimics. Vanadium-peroxide complexes act at post-receptor level but are toxic. The fungus-derived 2,5-dihydroxybenzoquinone derivative is the first one known to act on the insulin receptor. The safe herbal products in use for centuries for glucose control have multiple active principles and

  15. Genetics Home Reference: glucose-galactose malabsorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... mutations in SGLT1 cause glucose-galactose malabsorption by trafficking defects. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1999 Feb 24;1453( ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  16. The innovator will prevail in glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Green, M J

    2006-05-01

    As well as the expanding diabetes market for glucose-monitoring devices, there are other applications for these products and opportunities for companies with the will to innovate. One area that is explored here is the intensive care unit.

  17. A glucose-centric perspective of hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Ramasarma, T; Rafi, M

    2016-02-01

    Digestion of food in the intestines converts the compacted storage carbohydrates, starch and glycogen, to glucose. After each meal, a flux of glucose (> 200 g) passes through the blood pool (4-6 g) in a short period of 2 h, keeping its concentration ideally in the range of 80-120 mg/100 mL. Tissue-specific glucose transporters (GLUTs) aid in the distribution of glucose to all tissues. The balance glucose after meeting the immediate energy needs is converted into glycogen and stored in liver (up to 100 g) and skeletal muscle (up to 300 g) for later use. High blood glucose gives the signal for increased release of insulin from pancreas. Insulin binds to insulin receptor on the plasma membrane and activates its autophosphorylation. This initiates the post-insulin-receptor signal cascade that accelerates synthesis of glycogen and triglyceride. Parallel control by phos-dephos and redox regulation of proteins exists for some of these steps. A major action of insulin is to inhibit gluconeogensis in the liver decreasing glucose output into blood. Cases with failed control of blood glucose have alarmingly increased since 1960 coinciding with changed life-styles and large scale food processing. Many of these turned out to be resistant to insulin, usually accompanied by dysfunctional glycogen storage. Glucose has an extended stay in blood at 8 mM and above and then indiscriminately adds on to surface protein-amino groups. Fructose in common sugar is 10-fold more active. This random glycation process interferes with the functions of many proteins (e.g., hemoglobin, eye lens proteins) and causes progressive damage to heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves. Some compounds are known to act as insulin mimics. Vanadium-peroxide complexes act at post-receptor level but are toxic. The fungus-derived 2,5-dihydroxybenzoquinone derivative is the first one known to act on the insulin receptor. The safe herbal products in use for centuries for glucose control have multiple active principles and

  18. Designing a highly active soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase for efficient glucose biosensors and biofuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Fabien; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Flexer, Victoria; Andre, Isabelle; Mano, Nicolas

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} A new mutant of PQQ-GDH designed for glucose biosensors application. {yields} First mutant of PQQ-GDH with higher activity for D-glucose than the Wild type. {yields} Position N428 is a key point to increase the enzyme activity. {yields} Molecular modeling shows that the N428 C mutant displays a better interaction for PQQ than the WT. -- Abstract: We report for the first time a soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase that is twice more active than the wild type for glucose oxidation and was obtained by combining site directed mutagenesis, modelling and steady-state kinetics. The observed enhancement is attributed to a better interaction between the cofactor and the enzyme leading to a better electron transfer. Electrochemical experiments also demonstrate the superiority of the new mutant for glucose oxidation and make it a promising enzyme for the development of high-performance glucose biosensors and biofuel cells.

  19. Recent Advances in Continuous Glucose Monitoring: Biocompatibility of Glucose Sensors for Implantation in Subcutis

    PubMed Central

    Kvist, Peter H.; Jensen, Henrik E.

    2007-01-01

    Tight glycemic control slows or prevents the development of short- and long-term complications of diabetes mellitus. Continuous glucose measurements provide improved glycemic control and potentially prevent these diabetic complications. Glucose sensors, especially implantable devices, offer an alternative to classical self-monitored blood glucose levels and have shown promising glucose-sensing properties. However, the ultimate goal of implementing the glucose sensor as the glucose-sensing part of a closed loop system (artificial pancreas) is still years ahead because of malfunctions of the implanted sensor. The malfunction is partly a consequence of the subcutaneous inflammatory reaction caused by the implanted sensor. In order to improve sensor measurements and thereby close the loop, it is crucial to understand what happens at the tissue-sensor interface. PMID:19885143

  20. Pyrolysis of D-Glucose to Acrolein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chong; Zhang, Igor Ying; Fu, Gang; Xu, Xin

    2011-06-01

    Despite of its great importance, the detailed molecular mechanism for carbohydrate pyrolysis remains poorly understood. We perform a density functional study with a newly developed XYG3 functional on the processes for D-glucose pyrolysis to acrolein. The most feasible reaction pathway starts from an isomerization from D-glucose to D-fructose, which then undergoes a cyclic Grob fragmentation, followed by a concerted electrocyclic dehydration to yield acrolein. This mechanism can account for the known experimental results.

  1. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose to yield glucose

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, George T.; Ladisch, Michael R.; Bose, Arindam

    1979-01-01

    A process to yield glucose from cellulose through acid hydrolysis. Cellulose is recovered from cellulosic materials, preferably by pretreating the cellulosic materials by dissolving the cellulosic materials in Cadoxen or a chelating metal caustic swelling solvent and then precipitating the cellulose therefrom. Hydrolysis is accomplished using an acid, preferably dilute sulfuric acid, and the glucose is yielded substantially without side products. Lignin may be removed either before or after hydrolysis.

  2. Effects of fasting on plasma glucose and prolonged tracer measurement of hepatic glucose output in NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Glauber, H.; Wallace, P.; Brechtel, G.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the measurement of hepatic glucose output (HGO) with prolonged (3-/sup 3/H)glucose infusion in 14 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Over the course of 10.5 h, plasma glucose concentration fell with fasting by one-third, from 234 +/- 21 to 152 +/- 12 mg/dl, and HGO fell from 2.35 +/- 0.18 to 1.36 +/- 0.07 mg . kg-1 . min-1 (P less than .001). In the basal state, HGO and glucose were significantly correlated (r = 0.68, P = .03), and in individual patients, HGO and glucose were closely correlated as both fell with fasting (mean r = 0.79, P less than .01). Plasma (3-/sup 3/H)glucose radioactivity approached a steady state only 5-6 h after initiation of the primed continuous infusion, and a 20% overestimate of HGO was demonstrated by not allowing sufficient time for tracer labeling of the glucose pool. Assumption of steady-state instead of non-steady-state kinetics in using Steele's equations to calculate glucose turnover resulted in a 9-24% overestimate of HGO. Stimulation of glycogenolysis by glucagon injection demonstrated no incorporation of (3-/sup 3/H)glucose in hepatic glycogen during the prolonged tracer infusion. In a separate study, plasma glucose was maintained at fasting levels (207 +/- 17 mg/dl) for 8 h with the glucose-clamp technique. Total glucose turnover rates remained constant during this prolonged tracer infusion. However, HGO fell to 30% of the basal value simply by maintaining fasting hyperglycemia in the presence of basal insulin levels.

  3. Okara ameliorates glucose tolerance in GK rats.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Masaya; Katsukawa, Michiko; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Hitomi; Okuno, Sonomi; Tsuda, Kinsuke; Iritani, Nobuko

    2016-05-01

    Okara, a food by-product from the production of tofu and soy milk, is rich in three beneficial components: insoluble dietary fiber, β-conglycinin, and isoflavones. Although isoflavones and β-conglycinin have recently been shown to improve glucose tolerance, the effects of okara have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of okara on glucose tolerance in Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a representative animal model of Japanese type 2 diabetes. Male GK rats were fed a 10% lard diet with or without 5% dry okara powder for 2 weeks and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Rats were then fed each diet for another week and sacrificed. The expression of genes that are the master regulators of glucose metabolism in adipose tissue was subsequently examined. No significant differences were observed in body weight gain or food intake between the two groups of GK rats. In the oral glucose tolerance test, increases in plasma glucose levels were suppressed by the okara diet. The mRNA expression levels of PPARγ, adiponectin, and GLUT4, which up-regulate the effects of insulin, were increased in epididymal adipose tissue by the okara diet. These results suggest that okara provides a useful means for treating type 2 diabetes. PMID:27257347

  4. Bitter taste receptors influence glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dotson, Cedrick D; Zhang, Lan; Xu, Hong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Vigues, Stephan; Ott, Sandra H; Elson, Amanda E T; Choi, Hyun Jin; Shaw, Hillary; Egan, Josephine M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Li, Xiaodong; Steinle, Nanette I; Munger, Steven D

    2008-01-01

    TAS1R- and TAS2R-type taste receptors are expressed in the gustatory system, where they detect sweet- and bitter-tasting stimuli, respectively. These receptors are also expressed in subsets of cells within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, where they mediate nutrient assimilation and endocrine responses. For example, sweeteners stimulate taste receptors on the surface of gut enteroendocrine L cells to elicit an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an important modulator of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Because of the importance of taste receptors in the regulation of food intake and the alimentary responses to chemostimuli, we hypothesized that differences in taste receptor efficacy may impact glucose homeostasis. To address this issue, we initiated a candidate gene study within the Amish Family Diabetes Study and assessed the association of taste receptor variants with indicators of glucose dysregulation, including a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and high levels of blood glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test. We report that a TAS2R haplotype is associated with altered glucose and insulin homeostasis. We also found that one SNP within this haplotype disrupts normal responses of a single receptor, TAS2R9, to its cognate ligands ofloxacin, procainamide and pirenzapine. Together, these findings suggest that a functionally compromised TAS2R receptor negatively impacts glucose homeostasis, providing an important link between alimentary chemosensation and metabolic disease. PMID:19092995

  5. Zinc dosing and glucose tolerance in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Greenley, S.; Taylor, M.

    1986-03-05

    Animal data suggest the existence of a physiologic relationship between glucoregulatory hormones and zinc metabolism. In order to investigate this proposed relationship in humans, they examined the effect of moderately elevated plasma zinc levels on blood glucose clearance. Eight women (24-37 yrs) served as subjects for the study. Fasted volunteers were tested under two experimental conditions (a) ingestion of 50 g D-glucose (b) ingestion of 25 mg zinc followed 60 min later by ingestion of 50 g D-glucose. Five ml venous blood was drawn into trace-metal-free, fluoride-containing vacutainer tubes prior to and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after glucose ingestion. Plasma was analyzed for glucose and zinc; glycemic responses were quantified by computing areas under the curves and times to peak concentration. Their human data indicate varied glycemic responses to the acute elevation of plasma zinc: 4 subjects showed little apparent effect; 3 subjects marginally increased either the area under the curve or time to peak and 1 subject (classified as suspect diabetic in the non-zinc condition) showed marked improvement in glycemic response following zinc ingestion. Their preliminary results suggest that blood glucose clearance may be affected in some individuals by the acute elevation of plasma zinc.

  6. Noninvasive Continuous Monitoring of Tear Glucose Using Glucose-Sensing Contact Lenses.

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Francisco J; Huerva, Valentín

    2016-04-01

    : The incidence of diabetes mellitus is dramatically increasing in the developed countries. Tight control of blood glucose concentration is crucial to diabetic patients to prevent microvascular complications. Self-monitoring of blood glucose is widely used for controlling blood glucose levels and usually performed by an invasive test using a portable glucometer. Many technologies have been developed over the past decades with the purpose of obtaining a continuous physiological glycemic monitoring. A contact lens is the ideal vehicle for continuous tear glucose monitoring of glucose concentration in tear film. There are several research groups that are working in the development of contact lenses with embedded biosensors for continuously and noninvasively monitoring tear glucose levels. Although numerous aspects must be improved, contact lens technology is one step closer to helping diabetic subjects better manage their condition, and these contact lenses will be able to measure the level of glucose in the wearer's tears and communicate the information to a mobile phone or computer. This article reviews studies on ocular glucose and its monitoring methods as well as the attempts to continuously monitor the concentration of tear glucose by using contact lens-based sensors. PMID:26390345

  7. Glucose as substrate and signal in priming: Results from experiments with non-metabolizable glucose analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason-Jones, Kyle; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Priming of soil organic matter remains the subject of intense research, but a mechanistic explanation of the phenomenon remains to be demonstrated. This is largely due to the multiple effects of easily available carbon on the soil microbial community, and the challenge of separating these influences from one another. Several glucose analogues can be taken up by microbial glucose transporters and have similar regulatory effects on metabolism. These substances are, however, not easily catabolized by the common glycolytic pathway, limiting their energy value. Therefore, they can be used to distinguish between the action of glucose as a metabolic signal, and its influence as an energy source. We incubated an agricultural Haplic Luvisol under controlled conditions for 24 days after addition of: 1) glucose, 2) 3-O-methyl-glucose, 3) α-methylglucoside or 4) 2-deoxyglucose, at three concentration levels, along with a control treatment of water addition. CO2 efflux from soil was monitored by trapping evolved CO2 in NaOH and back-titration with HCl. On the first day after amendment, CO2 efflux from soil increased strongly for glucose and much less for the analogues, relative to the control. Only glucose caused a peak in efflux within the first two days. Peak mineralization of 2-deoxyglucose and α-methylglucoside was delayed until the third day, while CO2 from 3-O-methyl-glucose increased gradually, with a peak delayed by approximately a week. For glucose, the immediate increase in respiration was strongly dependent on the amount of glucose added, but this was not the case for the analogues, indicating that the catabolic potential for these substances was saturated. This is consistent with only a small part of the microbial community being capable of utilizing these carbon sources. In a subsequent experiment, 14C-labelled glucose or 14C-labelled 3-O-methyl-glucose were added to the same soil, enabling quantification of the priming effect. For 3-O-methyl-glucose, priming was

  8. Sodium coupled glucose co-transporters contribute to hypothalamic glucose-sensing

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Dervla; Reimann, Frank; Simpson, Anna K; Gribble, Fiona M

    2007-01-01

    Specialised neurons within the hypothalamus have the ability to sense and respond to changes in ambient glucose concentrations. We investigated the mechanisms underlying glucose-triggered activity in glucose-excited (GE) neurons, using primary cultures of rat hypothalamic neurons monitored by fluorescence calcium imaging. 35% (738/2139) of neurons were excited by increasing glucose from 3 to 15mM, but only 9% (6/64) of these GE neurons were activated by tolbutamide, suggesting the involvement of a KATP channel-independent mechanism. α-Methylglucopyranoside (αMDG, 12mM), a non-metabolisable substrate of sodium glucose co-transporters (SGLTs), mimicked the effect of high glucose in 67% of GE neurons, and both glucose and αMDG-triggered excitation were blocked by Na+ removal or by the SGLT inhibitor, phloridzin (100nM). In the presence of 0.5mM glucose and tolbutamide, responses could also be triggered by 3.5mM αMDG, supporting a role for an SGLT-associated mechanism at low as well as high substrate concentrations. By RT-PCR, we detected SGLT1, SGLT3a, SGLT3b in both cultured neurons and adult rat hypothalamus. Our findings suggest a novel role for SGLTs in glucose-sensing by hypothalamic GE neurons. PMID:17130483

  9. Noninvasive Continuous Monitoring of Tear Glucose Using Glucose-Sensing Contact Lenses.

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Francisco J; Huerva, Valentín

    2016-04-01

    : The incidence of diabetes mellitus is dramatically increasing in the developed countries. Tight control of blood glucose concentration is crucial to diabetic patients to prevent microvascular complications. Self-monitoring of blood glucose is widely used for controlling blood glucose levels and usually performed by an invasive test using a portable glucometer. Many technologies have been developed over the past decades with the purpose of obtaining a continuous physiological glycemic monitoring. A contact lens is the ideal vehicle for continuous tear glucose monitoring of glucose concentration in tear film. There are several research groups that are working in the development of contact lenses with embedded biosensors for continuously and noninvasively monitoring tear glucose levels. Although numerous aspects must be improved, contact lens technology is one step closer to helping diabetic subjects better manage their condition, and these contact lenses will be able to measure the level of glucose in the wearer's tears and communicate the information to a mobile phone or computer. This article reviews studies on ocular glucose and its monitoring methods as well as the attempts to continuously monitor the concentration of tear glucose by using contact lens-based sensors.

  10. Estriol blunts postprandial blood glucose rise in male rats through regulating intestinal glucose transporters.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Lee, Woojung; Kim, Su-Nam; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2015-03-01

    Despite increased total food intake in healthy, late-stage pregnant women, their peak postprandial blood sugar levels are normally much lower than the levels seen in healthy nonpregnant women. In this study, we sought to determine whether estriol (E3), an endogenous estrogen predominantly produced during human pregnancy, contributes to the regulation of the postprandial blood glucose level in healthy normal rats. In vivo studies using rats showed that E3 blunted the speed and magnitude of the blood glucose rise following oral glucose administration, but it did not appear to affect the total amount of glucose absorbed. E3 also did not affect insulin secretion, but it significantly reduced the rate of intestinal glucose transport compared with vehicle-treated animals. Consistent with this finding, expression of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 and 2 was significantly downregulated by E3 treatment in the brush-border membrane and basolateral membrane, respectively, of enterocytes. Most of the observed in vivo effects were noticeably stronger with E3 than with 17β-estradiol. Using differentiated human Caco-2 enterocyte monolayer culture as an in vitro model, we confirmed that E3 at physiologically relevant concentrations could directly inhibit glucose uptake via suppression of glucose transporter 2 expression, whereas 17β-estradiol did not have a similar effect. Collectively, these data showed that E3 can blunt the postprandial glycemic surge in rats through modulating the level of intestinal glucose transporters.

  11. Factors Affecting Accuracy and Time Requirements of a Glucose Oxidase-Peroxidase Assay for Determination of Glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate and rapid assays for glucose are desirable for analysis of glucose and starch in food and feedstuffs. An established colorimetric glucose oxidase-peroxidase method for glucose was modified to reduce analysis time, and evaluated for factors that affected accuracy. Time required to perform t...

  12. Studies on Electrical behavior of Glucose using Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juansah, Jajang; Yulianti, Wina

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report the electrical characteristics of glucose at different frequencies. We show the correlation between electrical properties (impedance, reactance, resistance and conductance) of glucose and glucose concentration. Electrical property measurements on glucose solution were performed in order to formulate the correlation. The measurements were conducted for frequencies between 50 Hz and 1 MHz. From the measurements, we developed a single-pole Cole-Cole graph as a function of glucose concentration.

  13. Determination of Glucose Concentration in Yeast Culture Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Seiichi; Kishimoto, Tomokazu; Muraji, Masafumi; Tsujimoto, Hiroaki; Azuma, Masayuki; Ooshima, Hiroshi

    The present paper describes a sensor for measuring the glucose concentration of yeast culture medium. The sensor determines glucose concentration by measuring the yield of hydrogen peroxide produced by glucose oxidase, which is monitored as luminescence using photomultiplier. The present sensor is able to measure low glucose concentration in media in which yeast cells keep respiration state. We herein describe the system and the characteristics of the glucose sensor.

  14. Hydroxycitric acid delays intestinal glucose absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Wielinga, Peter Y; Wachters-Hagedoorn, Renate E; Bouter, Brenda; van Dijk, Theo H; Stellaard, Frans; Nieuwenhuizen, Arie G; Verkade, Henkjan J; Scheurink, Anton J W

    2005-06-01

    In this study, we investigated in rats if hydroxycitric acid (HCA) reduces the postprandial glucose response by affecting gastric emptying or intestinal glucose absorption. We compared the effect of regulator HCA (310 mg/kg) and vehicle (control) on the glucose response after an intragastric or intraduodenal glucose load to investigate the role of altered gastric emptying. Steele's one-compartment model was used to investigate the effect of HCA on systemic glucose appearance after an intraduodenal glucose load, using [U-(13)C]-labeled glucose and d-[6,6-(2)H(2)]-labeled glucose. Because an effect on postabsorptive glucose clearance could not be excluded, the effect of HCA on the appearance of enterally administered glucose in small intestinal tissue, liver, and portal and systemic circulation was determined by [U-(14)C]glucose infusion. Data show that HCA treatment delays the intestinal absorption of enterally administered glucose at the level of the small intestinal mucosa in rats. HCA strongly attenuated postprandial blood glucose levels after both intragastric (P < 0.01) and intraduodenal (P < 0.001) glucose administration, excluding a major effect of HCA on gastric emptying. HCA delayed the systemic appearance of exogenous glucose but did not affect the total fraction of glucose absorbed over the study period of 150 min. HCA treatment decreased concentrations of [U-(14)C]glucose in small intestinal tissue at 15 min after [U-(14)C]glucose administration (P < 0.05), in accordance with the concept that HCA delays the enteral absorption of glucose. These data support a possible role for HCA as food supplement in lowering postprandial glucose profiles. PMID:15604199

  15. 21 CFR 168.121 - Dried glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dried glucose sirup. 168.121 Section 168.121 Food... Table Sirups § 168.121 Dried glucose sirup. (a) Dried glucose sirup is glucose sirup from which the... equivalent), expressed as D-glucose, is not less than 88.0 percent m/m, calculated on a dry basis; or (2)...

  16. 21 CFR 168.121 - Dried glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried glucose sirup. 168.121 Section 168.121 Food... Table Sirups § 168.121 Dried glucose sirup. (a) Dried glucose sirup is glucose sirup from which the... equivalent), expressed as D-glucose, is not less than 88.0 percent m/m, calculated on a dry basis; or (2)...

  17. 21 CFR 168.121 - Dried glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried glucose sirup. 168.121 Section 168.121 Food... Table Sirups § 168.121 Dried glucose sirup. (a) Dried glucose sirup is glucose sirup from which the... equivalent), expressed as D-glucose, is not less than 88.0 percent m/m, calculated on a dry basis; or (2)...

  18. 21 CFR 168.121 - Dried glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dried glucose sirup. 168.121 Section 168.121 Food... Table Sirups § 168.121 Dried glucose sirup. (a) Dried glucose sirup is glucose sirup from which the... equivalent), expressed as D-glucose, is not less than 88.0 percent m/m, calculated on a dry basis; or (2)...

  19. 21 CFR 168.121 - Dried glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried glucose sirup. 168.121 Section 168.121 Food... Table Sirups § 168.121 Dried glucose sirup. (a) Dried glucose sirup is glucose sirup from which the... equivalent), expressed as D-glucose, is not less than 88.0 percent m/m, calculated on a dry basis; or (2)...

  20. Hepatic glucose output in humans measured with labeled glucose to reduce negative errors

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, J.C.; Brown, G.; Matthews, D.R.; Turner, R.C. )

    1989-10-01

    Steele and others have suggested that minimizing changes in glucose specific activity when estimating hepatic glucose output (HGO) during glucose infusions could reduce non-steady-state errors. This approach was assessed in nondiabetic and type II diabetic subjects during constant low dose (27 mumol.kg ideal body wt (IBW)-1.min-1) glucose infusion followed by a 12 mmol/l hyperglycemic clamp. Eight subjects had paired tests with and without labeled infusions. Labeled infusion was used to compare HGO in 11 nondiabetic and 15 diabetic subjects. Whereas unlabeled infusions produced negative values for endogenous glucose output, labeled infusions largely eliminated this error and reduced the dependence of the Steele model on the pool fraction in the paired tests. By use of labeled infusions, 11 nondiabetic subjects suppressed HGO from 10.2 +/- 0.6 (SE) fasting to 0.8 +/- 0.9 mumol.kg IBW-1.min-1 after 90 min of glucose infusion and to -1.9 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg IBW-1.min-1 after 90 min of a 12 mmol/l glucose clamp, but 15 diabetic subjects suppressed only partially from 13.0 +/- 0.9 fasting to 5.7 +/- 1.2 at the end of the glucose infusion and 5.6 +/- 1.0 mumol.kg IBW-1.min-1 in the clamp (P = 0.02, 0.002, and less than 0.001, respectively).

  1. Ceylon cinnamon does not affect postprandial plasma glucose or insulin in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wickenberg, Jennie; Lindstedt, Sandra; Berntorp, Kerstin; Nilsson, Jan; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies on healthy subjects have shown that the intake of 6 g Cinnamomum cassia reduces postprandial glucose and that the intake of 3 g C. cassia reduces insulin response, without affecting postprandial glucose concentrations. Coumarin, which may damage the liver, is present in C. cassia, but not in Cinnamomum zeylanicum. The aim of the present study was to study the effect of C. zeylanicum on postprandial concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, glycaemic index (GI) and insulinaemic index (GII) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A total of ten subjects with IGT were assessed in a crossover trial. A standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was administered together with placebo or C. zeylanicum capsules. Finger-prick capillary blood samples were taken for glucose measurements and venous blood for insulin measurements, before and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after the start of the OGTT. The ingestion of 6 g C. zeylanicum had no significant effect on glucose level, insulin response, GI or GII. Ingestion of C. zeylanicum does not affect postprandial plasma glucose or insulin levels in human subjects. The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment in Europe has suggested the replacement of C. cassia by C. zeylanicum or the use of aqueous extracts of C. cassia to lower coumarin exposure. However, the positive effects seen with C. cassia in subjects with poor glycaemic control would then be lost.

  2. Effects of iriflophenone 3-C-β-glucoside on fasting blood glucose level and glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Pranakhon, Ratree; Aromdee, Chantana; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the biological activities of agar wood (Aquilaria sinensis Lour., Thymelaeaceae), is anti-hyperglycemic activity. The methanolic extract (ME) was proven to possess the fasting blood glucose activity in rat and glucose uptake transportation by rat adipocytes. Objective: To determine the decreasing fasting blood glucose level of constituents affordable for in vivo test. If the test was positive, the mechanism which is positive to the ME, glucose transportation, will be performed. Materials and Methods: The ME was separated by column chromatography and identified by spectroscopic methods. Mice was used as an animal model (in vivo), and rat adipocytes were used for the glucose transportation activity (in vitro). Result: Iriflophenone 3-C-β-glucoside (IPG) was the main constituent, 3.17%, and tested for the activities. Insulin and the ME were used as positive controls. The ME, IPG and insulin lowered blood glucose levels by 40.3, 46.4 and 41.5%, respectively, and enhanced glucose uptake by 152, 153, and 183%, respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that IPG is active in lowering fasting blood glucose with potency comparable to that of insulin. PMID:25709215

  3. A MEMS affinity glucose sensor using a biocompatible glucose-responsive polymer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Schultz, Jerome S; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2009-07-16

    We present a MEMS affinity sensor that can potentially allow long-term continuous monitoring of glucose in subcutaneous tissue for diabetes management. The sensing principle is based on detection of viscosity changes due to affinity binding between glucose and poly(acrylamide-ran-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) (PAA-ran-PAAPBA), a biocompatible, glucose-specific polymer. The device uses a magnetically driven vibrating microcantilever as a sensing element, which is fabricated from Parylene and situated in a microchamber. A solution of PAA-ran-PAAPBA fills the microchamber, which is separated from the surroundings by a semi-permeable membrane. Glucose permeates through the membrane and binds reversibly to the phenylboronic acid moiety of the polymer. This results in a viscosity change of the sensing solution, which is obtained by measuring the damped cantilever vibration using an optical lever setup, allowing determination of the glucose concentration. Experimental results demonstrate that the device is capable of detecting glucose at physiologically relevant concentrations from 27 mg/dL to 324 mg/dL. The glucose response time constant of the sensor is approximately 3 min, which can be further improved with device design optimization. Excellent reversibility and stability are observed in sensor responses, as highly desired for long-term, stable continuous glucose monitoring. PMID:24511207

  4. An acyltransferase catalyzing the formation of diacylglucose is a serine carboxypeptidase-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Alice X.; Steffens, John C.

    2000-01-01

    1-O-β-acyl acetals serve as activated donors in group transfer reactions involved in plant natural product biosynthesis and hormone metabolism. However, the acyltransferases that mediate transacylation from 1-O-β-acyl acetals have not been identified. We report the identification of a cDNA encoding a 1-O-β-acylglucose-dependent acyltransferase functioning in glucose polyester biosynthesis by Lycopersicon pennellii. The acyltransferase cDNA encodes a serine carboxypeptidase-like protein, with a conserved Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad. Expression of the acyltransferase cDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae conferred the ability to disproportionate 1-O-β-acylglucose to diacylglucose. The disproportionation reaction is regiospecific, catalyzing the conversion of two equivalents of 1-O-β-acylglucose to 1,2-di-O-acylglucose and glucose. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate, a transition-state analog inhibitor of serine carboxypeptidases, inhibited acyltransferase activity and covalently labeled the purified acyltransferase, suggesting the involvement of an active serine in the mechanism of the transacylation. The acyltransferase exhibits no carboxypeptidase activity; conversely, the serine carboxypeptidases we have tested show no ability to transacylate using 1-O-acyl-β-glucoses. This acyltransferase may represent one member of a broader class of enzymes recruited from proteases that have adapted a common catalytic mechanism of catabolism and modified it to accommodate a wide range of group transfer reactions used in biosynthetic reactions of secondary metabolism. The abundance of serine carboxypeptidase-like proteins in plants suggests that this motif has been used widely for metabolic functions. PMID:10829071

  5. Characterization of the intravenous glucose tolerance test and the combined glucose-insulin test in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, F J; Aguilera-Aguilera, R; Gonzalez-De Cara, C A; Toribio, R E; Estepa, J C; Perez-Ecija, A

    2015-12-01

    Glucose-insulin dynamic challenges such as the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and combined glucose-insulin test (CGIT) have not been described in donkeys. The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the IVGTT and CGIT in healthy adult donkeys, and (2) to establish normal glucose-insulin proxies. Sixteen donkeys were used and body morphometric variables obtained each. For the IVGTT, glucose (300 mg/kg) was given IV. For the CGIT, glucose (150 mg/kg) followed by recombinant insulin (0.1 IU/kg) were administered IV. Blood samples for glucose and insulin determinations were collected over 300 min. In the IVGTT the positive phase lasted 160.9 ± 13.3 min, glucose concentration peaked at 323.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL and declined at a rate of 1.28 ± 0.15 mg/dL/min. The glucose area under the curve (AUC) was 21.4 ± 1.9 × 10(3) mg/dL/min and the insulin AUC was 7.2 ± 0.9 × 10(3) µIU/mL/min. The positive phase of the CGIT curve lasted 44 ± 3 min, with a glucose clearance rate of 2.01 ± 0.18 mg/dL/min. The negative phase lasted 255.9 ± 3 min, decreasing glucose concentration at rate of -0.63 ± 0.06 mg/dL/min, and reaching a nadir (33.1 ± 3.6 mg/dL) at 118.3 ± 6.3 min. The glucose and insulin AUC values were 15.2 ± 0.9 × 10(3) mg/dL/min and 13.2 ± 0.9 × 10(3) µIU/mL/min. This is the first study characterizing CGIT and IVGTT, and glucose-insulin proxies in healthy adult donkeys. Distinct glucose dynamics, when compared with horses, support the use of species-specific protocols to assess endocrine function.

  6. Nanomaterial-mediated Biosensors for Monitoring Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Masashige; Ptitsyn, Andre; McLamore, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of physiological glucose transport is crucial for gaining new understanding of diabetes. Many techniques and equipment currently exist for measuring glucose, but these techniques are limited by complexity of the measurement, requirement of bulky equipment, and low temporal/spatial resolution. The development of various types of biosensors (eg, electrochemical, optical sensors) for laboratory and/or clinical applications will provide new insights into the cause(s) and possible treatments of diabetes. State-of-the-art biosensors are improved by incorporating catalytic nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, electrospun nanofibers, and quantum dots. These nanomaterials greatly enhance biosensor performance, namely sensitivity, response time, and limit of detection. A wide range of new biosensors that incorporate nanomaterials such as lab-on-chip and nanosensor devices are currently being developed for in vivo and in vitro glucose sensing. These real-time monitoring tools represent a powerful diagnostic and monitoring tool for measuring glucose in diabetes research and point of care diagnostics. However, concerns over the possible toxicity of some nanomaterials limit the application of these devices for in vivo sensing. This review provides a general overview of the state of the art in nanomaterial-mediated biosensors for in vivo and in vitro glucose sensing, and discusses some of the challenges associated with nanomaterial toxicity. PMID:24876594

  7. Hypothalamic NUCKS regulates peripheral glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Beiying; Shi, Xiaohe; Zhou, Qiling; Chen, Hui Shan; Lim, Joy; Han, Weiping; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate (NUCKS) is highly expressed in the brain and peripheral metabolic organs, and regulates transcription of a number of genes involved in insulin signalling. Whole-body depletion of NUCKS (NKO) in mice leads to obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, a tissue-specific contribution of NUCKS to the observed phenotypes remains unknown. Considering the pivotal roles of insulin signalling in the brain, especially in the hypothalamus, we examined the functions of hypothalamic NUCKS in the regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus was impaired in the NKO mice when insulin was delivered through intracerebroventricular injection. To validate the hypothalamic specificity, we crossed transgenic mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the Nkx2.1 promoter with floxed NUCKS mice to generate mice with hypothalamus-specific deletion of NUCKS (HNKO). We fed the HNKO and littermate control mice with a normal chow diet (NCD) and a high-fat diet (HFD), and assessed glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and metabolic parameters. HNKO mice showed mild glucose intolerance under an NCD, but exacerbated obesity and insulin resistance phenotypes under an HFD. In addition, NUCKS regulated levels of insulin receptor in the brain. Unlike HNKO mice, mice with immune-cell-specific deletion of NUCKS (VNKO) did not develop obesity or insulin-resistant phenotypes under an HFD. These studies indicate that hypothalamic NUCKS plays an essential role in regulating glucose homoeostasis and insulin signalling in vivo.

  8. Adiponectin Lowers Glucose Production by Increasing SOGA

    PubMed Central

    Cowerd, Rachael B.; Asmar, Melissa M.; Alderman, J. McKee; Alderman, Elizabeth A.; Garland, Alaina L.; Busby, Walker H.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Rusyn, Ivan; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Tisch, Roland; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth; Swenberg, James A.; Zeisel, Steven H.; Combs, Terry P.

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin is a hormone that lowers glucose production by increasing liver insulin sensitivity. Insulin blocks the generation of biochemical intermediates for glucose production by inhibiting autophagy. However, autophagy is stimulated by an essential mediator of adiponectin action, AMPK. This deadlock led to our hypothesis that adiponectin inhibits autophagy through a novel mediator. Mass spectrometry revealed a novel protein that we call suppressor of glucose by autophagy (SOGA) in adiponectin-treated hepatoma cells. Adiponectin increased SOGA in hepatocytes, and siRNA knockdown of SOGA blocked adiponectin inhibition of glucose production. Furthermore, knockdown of SOGA increased late autophagosome and lysosome staining and the secretion of valine, an amino acid that cannot be synthesized or metabolized by liver cells, suggesting that SOGA inhibits autophagy. SOGA decreased in response to AICAR, an activator of AMPK, and LY294002, an inhibitor of the insulin signaling intermediate, PI3K. AICAR reduction of SOGA was blocked by adiponectin; however, adiponectin did not increase SOGA during PI3K inhibition, suggesting that adiponectin increases SOGA through the insulin signaling pathway. SOGA contains an internal signal peptide that enables the secretion of a circulating fragment of SOGA, providing a surrogate marker for intracellular SOGA levels. Circulating SOGA increased in parallel with adiponectin and insulin activity in both humans and mice. These results suggest that adiponectin-mediated increases in SOGA contribute to the inhibition of glucose production. PMID:20813965

  9. Multispectral polarimetric system for glucose monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Gerard L.; Gorde, Harshal; Janda, Joseph; Cameron, Brent D.

    1998-05-01

    In this preliminary investigation, a two wavelength optical polarimetric system was used to show the potential of the approach to be used as an in vivo noninvasive glucose monitor. The dual wavelength method is shown as a means of overcoming two of them ore important problems with this approach for glucose monitoring, namely, motion artifact and the presence of other optically chiral components. The use of polarized light is based on the fact that the polarization vector of the light rotates when it interacts with an optically active material such as glucose. The amount of rotation of the light polarization is directly proportional to the optically active molecular concentration and to the sample path length. The end application of this system would be to estimate blood glucose concentrations indirectly by measuring the amount of rotation of the light beam's polarization state due to glucose variations within the aqueous humor of the anterior chamber of the eye. The system was evaluated in vitro in the presence of motion artifact and in combination with albumin, another interfering optical rotatory chemical component. It was shown that the dual wavelength approach has potential for overcoming these problems.

  10. MicroRNA 33 Regulates Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Cristina M.; Goedeke, Leigh; Rotllan, Noemi; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Mattison, Julie A.; Suárez, Yajaira; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases are characterized by the failure of regulatory genes or proteins to effectively orchestrate specific pathways involved in the control of many biological processes. In addition to the classical regulators, recent discoveries have shown the remarkable role of small noncoding RNAs (microRNAs [miRNAs]) in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this regard, we have recently demonstrated that miR-33a and miR33b, intronic miRNAs located within the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) genes, regulate lipid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that miR-33b also cooperates with SREBP1 in regulating glucose metabolism by targeting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC), key regulatory enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of miR-33b in human hepatic cells inhibits PCK1 and G6PC expression, leading to a significant reduction of glucose production. Importantly, hepatic SREBP1c/miR-33b levels correlate inversely with the expression of PCK1 and G6PC upon glucose infusion in rhesus monkeys. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-33b works in concert with its host gene to ensure a fine-tuned regulation of lipid and glucose homeostasis, highlighting the clinical potential of miR-33a/b as novel therapeutic targets for a range of metabolic diseases. PMID:23716591

  11. Noninvasive blood glucose monitoring with laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Chen, Jianhong; Ooi, Ean Tat; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2006-02-01

    The non-invasive measurement of blood sugar level was studied by use of near infrared laser diodes. The in vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out using six laser diodes having wavelengths range from 1550 nm to 1750nm. Several volunteers were tested for OGTT (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) experiment. We took blood from a fingertip and measured its concentration with a glucose meter while taking signal voltage from laser diodes system. The data of signal voltage were processed to do calibration and prediction; in this paper PLS (Partial Least Square) method was used to do modeling. For in vitro experiment, good linear relationship between predicted glucose concentration and real glucose concentration was obtained. For in vivo experiments, we got the blood sugar level distributions in Clarke error grid that is a reference for doctors to do diagnosis and treatment. In the Clarke error grid, 75% of all data was in area A and 25 % was in area B. From the in vitro and in vivo results we know that multiple laser diodes are suitable for non-invasive blood glucose monitoring.

  12. Blood glucose concentration in pediatric outpatient surgery.

    PubMed

    Somboonviboon, W; Kijmahatrakul, W

    1996-04-01

    Blood glucose concentration was measured in 84 pediatric patients who were scheduled for outpatient surgery at Chulalongkorn Hospital. They were allocated into 3 groups according to their ages, group 1:less than 1 year of age, group 2:1 to 5 years of age and group 3:over 5 years. The fasting times were approximately 8-12 hours. All patients received standard general anesthesia under mask. No glucose solution was given during operation. Preoperative mean blood glucose were 91.09 +/- 17.34, 89.55 +/- 18.69 and 82.14 +/- 16.14 mg/dl in group 1, 2 and 3 while the postoperative mean glucose values were 129.07 +/- 37.90, 115.62 +/- 29.63 and 111.53 +/- 23.07 mg/dl respectively. The difference between pre- and post-operative values were statistically significant difference (P < 0.01). None of the children had hypoglycemia even when fasting longer than expected. Increased postoperative glucose values may be due to stress response from surgery and anesthesia. We would suggest that the parents give the fluid to their children according to our instructions in order to prevent dehydration and hypoglycemia especially in small infants.

  13. FOXN3 Regulates Hepatic Glucose Utilization.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Santhosh; Zinkhan, Erin K; Hill, Jonathon T; Yost, H Joseph; Schlegel, Amnon

    2016-06-21

    A SNP (rs8004664) in the first intron of the FOXN3 gene is associated with human fasting blood glucose. We find that carriers of the risk allele have higher hepatic expression of the transcriptional repressor FOXN3. Rat Foxn3 protein and zebrafish foxn3 transcripts are downregulated during fasting, a process recapitulated in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. Transgenic overexpression of zebrafish foxn3 or human FOXN3 increases zebrafish hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, whole-larval free glucose, and adult fasting blood glucose and also decreases expression of glycolytic genes. Hepatic FOXN3 overexpression suppresses expression of mycb, whose ortholog MYC is known to directly stimulate expression of glucose-utilization enzymes. Carriers of the rs8004664 risk allele have decreased MYC transcript abundance. Human FOXN3 binds DNA sequences in the human MYC and zebrafish mycb loci. We conclude that the rs8004664 risk allele drives excessive expression of FOXN3 during fasting and that FOXN3 regulates fasting blood glucose. PMID:27292639

  14. Diabetes and Altered Glucose Metabolism with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Rita Rastogi; Egan, Josephine M.

    2013-01-01

    I. Synopsis Diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance affect a substantial proportion of older adults. While the aging process can be associated with alterations in glucose metabolism, including both relative insulin resistance and islet cell dysfunction, abnormal glucose metabolism is not a necessary component of aging. Instead, older adults with diabetes and altered glucose status likely represent a vulnerable subset of the population at high-risk for complications and adverse geriatric syndromes such as accelerated muscle loss, functional disability, frailty, and early mortality. Goals for treatment of diabetes in the elderly include control of hyperglycemia, prevention and treatment of diabetic complications, avoidance of hypoglycemia and preservation of quality of life. Given the heterogeneity of the elderly population with regards to the presence of comorbidities, life expectancy, and functional status, an individualized approach to diabetes management is often appropriate. A growing area of research seeks to explore associations of dysglycemia and insulin resistance with the development of adverse outcomes in the elderly and may ultimately inform guidelines on the use of future glucose-lowering therapies in this population. PMID:23702405

  15. FOXN3 regulates hepatic glucose utilization

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Santhosh; Zinkhan, Erin K.; Hill, Jonathon T.; Yost, H. Joseph; Schlegel, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY A SNP (rs8004664) in the first intron of the FOXN3 gene is associated with human fasting blood glucose. We find that carriers of the risk allele have higher hepatic expression of the transcriptional repressor FOXN3. Rat Foxn3 protein and zebrafish foxn3 transcripts are downregulated during fasting, a process recapitulated in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. Transgenic overexpression of zebrafish foxn3 or human FOXN3 increases zebrafish hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, whole-larval free glucose, and adult fasting blood glucose, and also decreases expression of glycolytic genes. Hepatic FOXN3 overexpression suppresses expression of mycb, whose ortholog MYC is known to directly stimulate expression of glucose-utilization enzymes. Carriers of the rs8004664 risk allele have decreased MYC transcript abundance. Human FOXN3 binds DNA sequences in the human FOXN3 and zebrafish mycb loci. We conclude that the rs8004664 risk allele drives excessive expression of FOXN3 during fasting and that FOXN3 regulates fasting blood glucose. PMID:27292639

  16. Glucose-lowering effects of intestinal bile acid sequestration through enhancement of splanchnic glucose utilization.

    PubMed

    Prawitt, Janne; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal bile acid (BA) sequestration efficiently lowers plasma glucose concentrations in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Because BAs act as signaling molecules via receptors, including the G protein-coupled receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor), to regulate glucose homeostasis, BA sequestration, which interrupts the entero-hepatic circulation of BAs, constitutes a plausible action mechanism of BA sequestrants. An increase of intestinal L-cell glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion upon TGR5 activation is the most commonly proposed mechanism, but recent studies also argue for a direct entero-hepatic action to enhance glucose utilization. We discuss here recent findings on the mechanisms of sequestrant-mediated glucose lowering via an increase of splanchnic glucose utilization through entero-hepatic FXR signaling.

  17. Glucose nanosensors based on redox polymer/glucose oxidase modified carbon fiber nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Fei, Junjie; Wu, Kangbing; Wang, Fang; Hu, Shengshui

    2005-02-28

    This paper describes glucose nanosensors based on the co-electrodeposition of a poly(vinylimidazole) complex of [Os(bpy)(2)Cl](+/2+) and glucose oxidase (GOD) on a low-noise carbon fiber nanoelectrodes (CFNE). The SEM image shows that the osmium redox polymer/enzyme composite film is uniform. The film modified CFNE exhibits the classical features of a kinetically fast redox couple bound to the electrode surface. A strong and stable electrocatalytic current is observed in the presence of glucose. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the nanosensor offers a highly sensitive and rapid response to glucose at an operating potential of 0.22V. A wide linear dynamic rang of 0.01-15mM range was achieved with a detection limit of 0.004mM. Compared with the conventional gold electrode, the nanosensor possessed higher sensitivity and longer stability. Successful attempts were made in real time monitoring rabbit blood glucose levels.

  18. Facilitated diffusion of 6-deoxy-D-glucose in bakers' yeast: evidence against phosphorylation-associated transport of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, A H

    1982-01-01

    6-Deoxy-D-glucose, a structural homomorph of D-glucose which lacks a hydroxyl group at carbon 6 and thus cannot be phosphorylated, is transported by Saccharomyces cerevisiae via a facilitated diffusion system with affinity equivalent to that shown with D-glucose. This finding supports the facilitated diffusion mechanism for glucose transport and contradicts theories of transport-associated phosphorylation which hold that sugar phosphorylation is necessary for high-affinity operation of the glucose carrier. PMID:6754704

  19. Stable and flexible system for glucose homeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hyunsuk; Jo, Junghyo; Sin, Sang-Jin

    2013-09-01

    Pancreatic islets, controlling glucose homeostasis, consist of α, β, and δ cells. It has been observed that α and β cells generate out-of-phase synchronization in the release of glucagon and insulin, counter-regulatory hormones for increasing and decreasing glucose levels, while β and δ cells produce in-phase synchronization in the release of the insulin and somatostatin. Pieces of interactions between the islet cells have been observed for a long time, although their physiological role as a whole has not been explored yet. We model the synchronized hormone pulses of islets with coupled phase oscillators that incorporate the observed cellular interactions. The integrated model shows that the interaction from β to δ cells, of which sign is a subject of controversy, should be positive to reproduce the in-phase synchronization between β and δ cells. The model also suggests that δ cells help the islet system flexibly respond to changes of glucose environment.

  20. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal inhibits expression of the glucose transporter genes by inactivating the cell surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Roy, Adhiraj; Hashmi, Salman; Li, Zerui; Dement, Angela D; Cho, Kyu Hong; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a cytotoxic by-product of glycolysis. MG has inhibitory effect on the growth of cells ranging from microorganisms to higher eukaryotes, but its molecular targets are largely unknown. The yeast cell-surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 function as glucose receptors that sense extracellular glucose and generate a signal for induction of expression of genes encoding glucose transporters (HXTs). Here we provide evidence that these glucose sensors are primary targets of MG in yeast. MG inhibits the growth of glucose-fermenting yeast cells by inducing endocytosis and degradation of the glucose sensors. However, the glucose sensors with mutations at their putative ubiquitin-acceptor lysine residues are resistant to MG-induced degradation. These results suggest that the glucose sensors are inactivated through ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degraded in the presence of MG. In addition, the inhibitory effect of MG on the glucose sensors is greatly enhanced in cells lacking Glo1, a key component of the MG detoxification system. Thus the stability of these glucose sensors seems to be critically regulated by intracellular MG levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that MG attenuates glycolysis by promoting degradation of the cell-surface glucose sensors and thus identify MG as a potential glycolytic inhibitor.

  1. Electropolymerized Conducting Polymers as Glucose Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadik, Omowunmi A.; Brenda, Sharin; Joasil, Patrick; Lord, John

    1999-07-01

    Conducting polymers are of considerable interest. Their electrochemical synthesis requires only inexpensive starting materials and low-cost equipment. This paper presents a laboratory-based experiment for possible inclusion in the undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory curriculum. The objectives are to perform cyclic voltammetry on electropolymerized conducting polymers, to observe the effects of various parameters on the voltammogram obtained, and to perform quantitative analysis of glucose. In a typical experiment, glucose oxidase enzyme (GOx) was immobilized at an electrode surface by the electropolymerization of pyrrole from an aqueous solution containing the enzyme. The chemical activity of the immobilized GOx was evaluated by indirectly monitoring glucose oxidation using the electropolymerized PPy-modified electrode. The amount of glucose present was then determined by observing the rate at which hydrogen peroxide was produced. The magnitude of the current was linearly proportional to the concentration of glucose over the range 1 x 10-3 to 5 x 10-5M. The limit of detection was estimated at 3 times the background noise, 8 x 10-5 M glucose. The Michaelis-Menten parameters, Km and Vmax, were calculated to be approximately 1.5 x 10-3 M and 10-9 m/s, respectively, comparable with values cited in literature. This experiment illustrates the fundamental electrochemical and biosensor concepts. It reinforces the underlying principles of dynamic electrochemistry and illustrates the potential of using conducting polymers for analytical applications. The simple low-cost procedure employed should be attractive for undergraduate research projects, particularly in departments with modest means.

  2. Age as independent determinant of glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shimokata, H; Muller, D C; Fleg, J L; Sorkin, J; Ziemba, A W; Andres, R

    1991-01-01

    It has been proposed that the decline in glucose tolerance with age is not a primary aging effect but is secondary to a combination of other age-associated characteristics, i.e., disease, medication, obesity, central and upper-body fat deposition, and inactivity. To test this hypothesis, we first eliminated from analysis the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging participants with identifiable diseases or medications known to influence glucose tolerance. Seven hundred forty-three men and women, aged 17-92 yr, remained for analysis. As indices of fatness, body mass index and percent body fat were determined. As indices of body fat distribution, waist-hip ratio and subscapular triceps skin-fold ratio were calculated. As indices of fitness, physical activity level, determined by detailed questionnaire, and maximum 02 consumption were calculated. We tested whether the effect of age on glucose tolerance remains when data were adjusted for fatness, fitness, and fat distribution; 2-h glucose values were 6.61, 6.78, and 7.83 mM for young (17-39 yr), middle-aged (40-59 yr), and old (60-92 yr) men and 6.22, 6.22, and 7.28 mM for the three groups of women, respectively. The differences between the young and middle-aged groups were not significant, but the old groups had significantly higher values than young or middle-aged groups. Fatness, fitness, and fat distribution can account for the decline in glucose tolerance from the young adult to the middle-aged years. However, age remains a significant determinant of the further decline in glucose tolerance of healthy old subjects.

  3. A bench-scale, cost effective and simple method to elicit Lycopersicon esculentum cv. PKM1 (tomato) plants against Cucumber mosaic virus attack using ozone-mediated inactivated Cucumber mosaic virus inoculum.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, N; Nagendra-Prasad, D; Mohan, N; Murugesan, K

    2007-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to evaluate ozone for inactivation of Cucumber mosaic virus present in the inoculum and to stimulate Lycopersicon esculentum cv. PKM1 (tomato) plants against Cucumber mosaic virus infection by using the inactivated Cucumber mosaic virus inoculum. Application of a T(4) (0.4mg/l) concentration of ozone to the inoculum containing Cucumber mosaic virus resulted in complete inactivation of the virus. The inactivated viral inoculum was mixed with a penetrator (delivery agent), referred to as T(4) preparation, and it was evaluated for the development of systemic acquired resistance in the tomato plants. Application of a T(4) preparation 5 days before inoculation with the Cucumber mosaic virus protected tomato plants from the effects of Cucumber mosaic virus. Among the components of the inactivated virus tested, coat protein subunits and aggregates were responsible for the acquired resistance in tomato plants. In field trials, the results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that, Cucumber mosaic virus accumulation was significantly less for all the test plants (16%) sprayed with the T(4) preparation than untreated control plants (89.5%) at 28 days postinoculation (dpi). A remarkable increase in the activities of the total soluble phenolics (10-fold) and salicylic acid (16-fold) was detected 5 days after the treatment in foliar extracts of test plants relative to untreated control plants. The results showed that treatment of tomato plants with inactivated viral inoculum led to a significant enhancement of protection against Cucumber mosaic virus attack in a manner that mimics a real pathogen and induces systemic acquired resistance.

  4. Limitations of Continuous Glucose Monitor Usage.

    PubMed

    Anhalt, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Much progress has been made in diabetes treatments since the first dose of insulin was administered in 1921. However, a truly transformational moment in diabetes care occurred when urine testing gave way to capillary blood home glucose monitoring. As improvements were made to these devices, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was introduced. The advantages of experiential learnings gleaned from seeing continuous real-time data have been borne out in numerous peer-reviewed journals. Limitations to use of CGM include patient's level of numeracy and literacy, development of alarm fatigue, interfering substances leading to erroneous readings, high rates of discontinuation, and poor reimbursement. PMID:26983025

  5. Osteopontin upregulates the expression of glucose transporters in osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, I-Shan; Yang, Rong-Sen; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone. Even after the traditional standard surgical therapy, metastasis still occurs in a high percentage of patients. Glucose is an important source of metabolic energy for tumor proliferation and survival. Tumors usually overexpress glucose transporters, especially hypoxia-responsive glucose transporter 1 and glucose transporter 3. Osteopontin, hypoxia-responsive glucose transporter 1, and glucose transporter 3 are overexpressed in many types of tumors and have been linked to tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the regulation of glucose transporters by osteopontin in osteosarcoma. We observed that both glucose transporters and osteopontin were upregulated in hypoxic human osteosarcoma cells. Endogenously released osteopontin regulated the expression of glucose transporter 1 and glucose transporter 3 in osteosarcoma and enhanced glucose uptake into cells via the αvβ3 integrin. Knockdown of osteopontin induced cell death in 20% of osteosarcoma cells. Phloretin, a glucose transporter inhibitor, also caused cell death by treatment alone. The phloretin-induced cell death was significantly enhanced in osteopontin knockdown osteosarcoma cells. Combination of a low dose of phloretin and chemotherapeutic drugs, such as daunomycin, 5-Fu, etoposide, and methotrexate, exhibited synergistic cytotoxic effects in three osteosarcoma cell lines. Inhibition of glucose transporters markedly potentiated the apoptotic sensitivity of chemotherapeutic drugs in osteosarcoma. These results indicate that the combination of a low dose of a glucose transporter inhibitor with cytotoxic drugs may be beneficial for treating osteosarcoma patients. PMID:25310823

  6. Measurement of glucose homeostasis in vivo: glucose and insulin tolerance tests.

    PubMed

    Beguinot, Francesco; Nigro, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of investigating glucose tolerance and insulin action and secretion in vivo in mouse models has provided major insights into both type 2 diabetes pathogenesis and the identification of novel strategies to treat this common disorder. When initial studies provide evidence for altered levels of insulin and/or glucose in the animal blood, a number of well-characterized tests can be adopted to estimate glucose homeostasis and insulin action and secretion in vivo. These tests include model assessments, glucose and insulin sensitivity studies, and glucose clamps. None of them can be considered appropriate under all circumstances and there is significant variation in their complexity, technical ease, and invasiveness. Thus, while the euglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp represents the gold standard for measuring in vivo insulin action, less labor-intensive as well as invasive techinques are usually considered as the initial approach to evaluate glucose homeostasis. This section focuses on glucose and insulin tolerance tests. The clamp technique is described in Chapter 15.

  7. Na+/D-glucose cotransporter based bilayer lipid membrane sensor for D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Sugao, N; Sugawara, M; Minami, H; Uto, M; Umezawa, Y

    1993-02-15

    A new type of amperometric blosensor for glucose was fabricated using a Na+/D-glucose cotransporter as the signal-transducing sensory element that exploits the D-glucose-triggered Na+ ion current through bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). The planar BLM was formed by the folding method across a small aperture of a thin Teflon film. The Na+/D-glucose cotransporter, isolated and purified from small intestinal brush border membrane of guinea pigs, was embedded into BLMs through proteoliposomes. The number of the protein molecules thus incorporated in the present sensing membrane was estimated to be ca. 10(7). The sensor response was measured as an ionic current through the BLM arising from cotransported Na+ ion flux under a constant applied potential and was only induced by D-glucose above 10(-9) M, but not by the other monosaccharides except for D-galactose. The effect of applied potentials, Na+ and K+ ion concentrations, and the addition of a competitive inhibitor, phlorizin, were scrutinized to characterize the sensor output. The results were briefly discussed in terms of the potential use of the Na+/D-glucose cotransporter as a sensory element for D-glucose.

  8. A glucose-sensing contact lens: a new approach to noninvasive continuous physiological glucose monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2004-06-01

    We have developed a new technology for the non-invasive continuous monitoring of tear glucose using a daily use, disposable contact lens, embedded with sugar-sensing boronic acid containing fluorophores. Our findings show that our approach may be suitable for the continuous monitoring of tear glucose levels in the range 50 - 500 μM, which track blood glucose levels that are typically ~ 5-10 fold higher. We initially tested the sensing concept with well-established, previously published, boronic acid probes and the results could conclude the used probes, with higher pKa values, are almost insensitive toward glucose within the contact lens, attributed to the low pH and polarity inside the lens. Subsequently, we have developed a range of probes based on the quinolinium backbone, having considerably lower pKa values, which enables them to be suitable to sense the physiological glucose in the acidic pH contact lens. Herein we describe the results based on our findings towards the development of glucose sensing contact lens and therefore an approach to non-invasive continuous monitoring of tear glucose using a contact lens.

  9. Detection of Trace Glucose on the Surface of a Semipermeable Membrane Using a Fluorescently Labeled Glucose-Binding Protein: A Promising Approach to Noninvasive Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xudong; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan; Kanjananimmanont, Sunsanee; Viscardi, Rose M.; Woo, Hyung; Tolosa, Leah

    2013-01-01

    Background Our motivation for this study was to develop a noninvasive glucose sensor for low birth weight neonates. We hypothesized that the underdeveloped skin of neonates will allow for the diffusion of glucose to the surface where it can be sampled noninvasively. On further study, we found that measurable amounts of glucose can also be collected on the skin of adults. Method Cellulose acetate dialysis membrane was used as surrogate for preterm neonatal skin. Glucose on the surface was collected by saline-moistened swabs and analyzed with glucose-binding protein (GBP). The saline-moistened swab was also tested in the neonatal intensive care unit. Saline was directly applied on adult skin and collected for analysis with two methods: GBP and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC). Results The amount of glucose on the membrane surface was found (1) to accumulate with time but gradually level off, (2) to be proportional to the swab dwell time, and (3) the concentration of the glucose solution on the opposite side of the membrane. The swab, however, failed to absorb glucose on neonatal skin. On direct application of saline onto adult skin, we were able to measure by HPAEC and GBP the amount of glucose collected on the surface. Blood glucose appears to track transdermal glucose levels. Conclusions We were able to measure trace amounts of glucose on the skin surface that appear to follow blood glucose levels. The present results show modest correlation with blood glucose. Nonetheless, this method may present a noninvasive alternative to tracking glucose trends. PMID:23439155

  10. Antipsychotics inhibit glucose transport: Determination of olanzapine binding site in Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose/H(+) symporter.

    PubMed

    Babkin, Petr; George Thompson, Alayna M; Iancu, Cristina V; Walters, D Eric; Choe, Jun-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The antipsychotic drug olanzapine is widely prescribed to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, it often causes unwanted side effects, including diabetes, due to disruption of insulin-dependant glucose metabolism through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. To determine if olanzapine can affect the first step in glucose metabolism - glucose transport inside cells - we investigated the effect of this drug on the transport activity of a model glucose transporter. The glucose transporter from Staphylococcus epidermidis (GlcPSe) is specific for glucose, inhibited by various human glucose transporter (GLUT) inhibitors, has high sequence and structure homology to GLUTs, and is readily amenable to transport assay, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. We found that olanzapine inhibits glucose transport of GlcPSe with an IC50 0.9 ± 0.1 mM. Computational docking of olanzapine to the GlcPSe structure revealed potential binding sites that were further examined through mutagenesis and transport assay to identify residues important for olanzapine inhibition. These investigations suggest that olanzapine binds in a polar region of the cytosolic part of the transporter, and interacts with residues R129, strictly conserved in all GLUTs, and N136, conserved in only a few GLUTs, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4. We propose that olanzapine inhibits GlcPSe by impeding the alternating opening and closing of the substrate cavity necessary for glucose transport. It accomplishes this by disrupting a key salt bridge formed by conserved residues R129 and E362, that stabilizes the outward-facing conformation of the transporter.

  11. Antipsychotics inhibit glucose transport: Determination of olanzapine binding site in Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose/H+ symporter

    PubMed Central

    Babkin, Petr; George Thompson, Alayna M.; Iancu, Cristina V.; Walters, D. Eric; Choe, Jun-yong

    2015-01-01

    The antipsychotic drug olanzapine is widely prescribed to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, it often causes unwanted side effects, including diabetes, due to disruption of insulin-dependant glucose metabolism through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. To determine if olanzapine can affect the first step in glucose metabolism – glucose transport inside cells – we investigated the effect of this drug on the transport activity of a model glucose transporter. The glucose transporter from Staphylococcus epidermidis (GlcPSe) is specific for glucose, inhibited by various human glucose transporter (GLUT) inhibitors, has high sequence and structure homology to GLUTs, and is readily amenable to transport assay, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. We found that olanzapine inhibits glucose transport of GlcPSe with an IC50 0.9 ± 0.1 mM. Computational docking of olanzapine to the GlcPSe structure revealed potential binding sites that were further examined through mutagenesis and transport assay to identify residues important for olanzapine inhibition. These investigations suggest that olanzapine binds in a polar region of the cytosolic part of the transporter, and interacts with residues R129, strictly conserved in all GLUTs, and N136, conserved in only a few GLUTs, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4. We propose that olanzapine inhibits GlcPSe by impeding the alternating opening and closing of the substrate cavity necessary for glucose transport. It accomplishes this by disrupting a key salt bridge formed by conserved residues R129 and E362, that stabilizes the outward-facing conformation of the transporter. PMID:25941630

  12. Enzymatic production of hydrogen from glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this research is to optimize conditions for the enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from biomass-derived glucose. This new project is funded at 0.5 PY level of effort for FY 1995. The rationale for the work is that cellulose is, potentially, a vast source of hydrogen and that enzymes offer a specific and efficient method for its extraction with minimal environmental impact. This work is related to the overall hydrogen program goal of technology development and validation. The approach is based on knowledge that glucose is oxidized by the NADP{sup +} requiring enzyme glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and that the resulting NADPH can donate its electrons to hydrogenase (H{sub 2}ase) which catalyzes the evolution of H{sub 2}. Thus hydrogen production from glucose was achieved using calf liver GDH and Pyrococcus furiosus H{sub 2}ase yielding 17% of theoretical maximum expected. The cofactor NADP{sup +} for this reaction was regenerated and recycled. Current and future work includes understanding the rate limiting steps of this process and the stabilization/immobilization of the enzymes for long term hydrogen production. Cooperative interactions with the Universities of Georgia and Bath for obtaining thermally stable enzymes are underway.

  13. Ketosis proportionately spares glucose utilization in brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Kuang, Youzhi; Xu, Kui; Harris, Donald; Lee, Zhenghong; LaManna, Joseph; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2013-08-01

    The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, as occurs with fasting, starvation, or chronic feeding of a ketogenic diet. The relationship between changes in cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRglc) and degree or duration of ketosis remains uncertain. To investigate if CMRglc decreases with chronic ketosis, 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in combination with positron emission tomography, was applied in anesthetized young adult rats fed 3 weeks of either standard or ketogenic diets. Cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (μmol/min per 100 g) was determined in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum using Gjedde-Patlak analysis. The average CMRglc significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex (23.0±4.9 versus 32.9±4.7) and cerebellum (29.3±8.6 versus 41.2±6.4) with increased plasma ketone bodies in the ketotic rats compared with standard diet group. The reduction of CMRglc in both brain regions correlates linearly by ∼9% for each 1 mmol/L increase of total plasma ketone bodies (0.3 to 6.3 mmol/L). Together with our meta-analysis, these data revealed that the degree and duration of ketosis has a major role in determining the corresponding change in CMRglc with ketosis.

  14. Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis by GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Prashant; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Holz, George G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7–36)amide (GLP-1) is a secreted peptide that acts as a key determinant of blood glucose homeostasis by virtue of its abilities to slow gastric emptying, to enhance pancreatic insulin secretion, and to suppress pancreatic glucagon secretion. GLP-1 is secreted from L cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa in response to a meal, and the blood glucose-lowering action of GLP-1 is terminated due to its enzymatic degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Released GLP-1 activates enteric and autonomic reflexes while also circulating as an incretin hormone to control endocrine pancreas function. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated directly or indirectly by blood glucose-lowering agents currently in use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These therapeutic agents include GLP-1R agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, and langlenatide) and DPP-IV inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin). Investigational agents for use in the treatment of T2DM include GPR119 and GPR40 receptor agonists that stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells. Summarized here is the role of GLP-1 to control blood glucose homeo-stasis, with special emphasis on the advantages and limitations of GLP-1-based therapeutics. PMID:24373234

  15. Enzymatic production of hydrogen from glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S. M.

    The objective of this research is to optimize conditions for the enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from biomass-derived glucose. This new project is funded at 0.5 PY level of effort for FY 1995. The rationale for the work is that cellulose is, potentially, a vast source of hydrogen and that enzymes offer a specific and efficient method for its extraction with minimal environmental impact. This work is related to the overall hydrogen program goal of technology development and validation. The approach is based on knowledge that glucose is oxidized by the NADP(sup +) requiring enzyme glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and that the resulting NADPH can donate its electrons to hydrogenase (H2ase) which catalyzes the evolution of H2. Thus hydrogen production from glucose was achieved using calf liver GDH and Pyrococcus furiosus H2ase yielding 17% of theoretical maximum expected. The cofactor NADP(sup +) for this reaction was regenerated and recycled. Current and future work includes understanding the rate limiting steps of this process and the stabilization/immobilization of the enzymes for long term hydrogen production. Cooperative interactions with the Universities of Georgia and Bath for obtaining thermally sta

  16. A new horizon for glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dovč, Klemen; Bratina, Nataša; Battelino, Tadej

    2015-01-01

    Regular self-monitoring of blood glucose is crucial for proper insulin dosing and gives a reliable foundation for reasonable glycaemic control. According to recent data, recommended values for glycated haemoglobin A1c as set by the professional associations remain out of the reach for a large proportion of the paediatric population. In the last decades, the treatment of type 1 diabetes has changed significantly as new devices gain a role in routine clinical care. Real-time glucose levels can be monitored with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), which provides a broad spectrum of information on glucose trends on a moment-to-moment basis. This information can be useful for patients' decision making and clinicians' understanding of patients' conduct. However, several barriers, including the current price, impede a broader use of CGM in most regions of the world. This review summarizes data from randomized, controlled trials that included a paediatric population, and it provides some evidence-based visions for the possible broader utilization of CGM, also for incorporation into insulin delivery devices that enable a closed-loop insulin delivery. PMID:25660230

  17. Clean conversion of cellulose into fermentable glucose.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Zhuang, Junping; Lin, Lu; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2009-01-01

    We studied the process of conversion of microcrystalline-cellulose into fermentable glucose in the formic acid reaction system using cross polarization/magic angle spinning (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicated that formic acid as an active agent was able to effectively penetrate into the interior space of the cellulose molecules, thus collapsing the rigid crystalline structure and allowing hydrolysis to occur easily in the amorphous zone as well as in the crystalline zone. The microcrystalline-cellulose was hydrolyzed using formic acid and 4% hydrochloric acid under mild conditions. The effects of hydrochloric acid concentration, the ratio of solid to liquid, temperature (55-75 degrees C) and retention time (0-9 h), and the concentration of glucose were analyzed. The hydrolysis velocities of microcrystalline-cellulose were 6.14 x 10(-3) h(-1) at 55 degrees C, 2.94 x 10(-2) h(-1) at 65 degrees C, and 6.84x10(-2) h(-1) at 75 degrees C. The degradation velocities of glucose were 0.01 h(-1) at 55 degrees C, 0.14 h(-1) at 65 degrees C, 0.34 h(-1) at 75 degrees C. The activation energy of microcrystalline-cellulose hydrolysis was 105.61 kJ/mol, and the activation energy of glucose degradation was 131.37 kJ/mol.

  18. Metabolic pathways for glucose in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, H; Hamprecht, B; Dringen, R

    1997-09-01

    Cultured astroglial cells are able to utilize the monosaccharides glucose, mannose, or fructose as well as the sugar alcohol sorbitol as energy fuel. Astroglial uptake of the aldoses is carrier-mediated, whereas a non-saturable transport mechanism is operating for fructose and sorbitol. The first metabolic step for all sugars, including fructose being generated by enzymatic oxidation of sorbitol, is phosphorylation by hexokinase. Besides glucose only mannose may serve as substrate for build-up of astroglial glycogen. Whereas glycogen synthase appears to be present in astrocytes as well as neurons, the exclusive localization of glycogen phosphorylase in astrocytes and ependymal cells of central nervous tissue correlates well with the occurrence of glycogen in these cells. The identification of lactic acid rather than glucose as degradation product of astroglial glycogen appears to render the presence of glucose-6-phosphatase in cultured astrocytes an enigma. The colocalization of pyruvate carboxylase, phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase points to astrocytes as being the gluconeogenic cell type of the CNS. PMID:9298844

  19. Design of nanostructured-based glucose biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komirisetty, Archana; Williams, Frances; Pradhan, Aswini; Konda, Rajini B.; Dondapati, Hareesh; Samantaray, Diptirani

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the design of glucose sensors that will be integrated with advanced nano-materials, bio-coatings and electronics to create novel devices that are highly sensitive, inexpensive, accurate, and reliable. In the work presented, a glucose biosensor and its fabrication process flow have been designed. The device is based on electrochemical sensing using a working electrode with bio-functionalized zinc oxide (ZnO) nano-rods. Among all metal oxide nanostructures, ZnO nano-materials play a significant role as a sensing element in biosensors due to their properties such as high isoelectric point (IEP), fast electron transfer, non-toxicity, biocompatibility, and chemical stability which are very crucial parameters to achieve high sensitivity. Amperometric enzyme electrodes based on glucose oxidase (GOx) are used due to their stability and high selectivity to glucose. The device also consists of silicon dioxide and titanium layers as well as platinum working and counter electrodes and a silver/silver chloride reference electrode. Currently, the biosensors are being fabricated using the process flow developed. Once completed, the sensors will be bio-functionalized and tested to characterize their performance, including their sensitivity and stability.

  20. Glucose metabolism in pregnant sheep when placental growth is restricted

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J.A.; Falconer, J.; Robinson, J.S. )

    1989-08-01

    The effect of restricting placental growth on glucose metabolism in pregnant sheep in late gestation was determined by primed constant infusions of D-(U-{sup 14}C)- and D-(2-{sup 3}H)glucose and antipyrine into fetuses of six control sheep and six sheep from which endometrial caruncles had been removed before pregnancy (caruncle sheep). In the latter, placental and fetal weights were reduced, as was the concentration of glucose in fetal arterial blood. Fetal glucose turnover in caruncle sheep was only 52-59% of that in controls, largely because of lower umbilical loss of glucose back to the placenta (38-39% of control) and lower fetal glucose utilization (61-74% of control). However, fetal glucose utilization on a weight-specific basis was similar in control and caruncle sheep. Significant endogenous glucose production occurred in control and caruncle fetal sheep. Maternal glucose production and partition of glucose between the gravid uterus and other maternal tissues were similar in control and caruncle sheep. In conclusion, when placental and fetal growth are restricted, fetal glucose utilization is maintained by reduced loss of glucose back to the placenta and mother and by maintaining endogenous glucose production.

  1. Insulin Signaling in the Control of Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    A continuous supply of glucose is necessary to ensure proper function and survival of all organs. Plasma glucose levels are thus maintained in a narrow range around 5 mM, which is considered the physiological set point. Glucose homeostasis is controlled primarily by the liver, fat, and skeletal muscle. Following a meal, most glucose disposals occur in the skeletal muscle, whereas fasting plasma glucose levels are determined primarily by glucose output from the liver. The balance between the utilization and production of glucose is primarily maintained at equilibrium by two opposing hormones, insulin and glucagon. In response to an elevation in plasma glucose and amino acids (after consumption of a meal), insulin is released from the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. When plasma glucose falls (during fasting or exercise), glucagon is secreted by α cells, which surround the beta cells in the pancreas. Both cell types are extremely sensitive to glucose concentrations, can regulate hormone synthesis, and are released in response to small changes in plasma glucose levels. At the same time, insulin serves as the major physiological anabolic agent, promoting the synthesis and storage of glucose, lipids, and proteins and inhibiting their degradation and release back into the circulation. This chapter will focus mainly on signal transduction mechanisms by which insulin exerts its plethora of effects in liver, muscle, and fat cells, focusing on those pathways that are crucial in the control of glucose and lipid homeostasis.

  2. Experience-dependent escalation of glucose drinking and the development of glucose preference over fructose - association with glucose entry into the brain.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Ken T; Spekterman, Laurence; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2016-06-01

    Glucose, a primary metabolic substrate for cellular activity, must be delivered to the brain for normal neural functions. Glucose is also a unique reinforcer; in addition to its rewarding sensory properties and metabolic effects, which all natural sugars have, glucose crosses the blood-brain barrier and acts on glucoreceptors expressed on multiple brain cells. To clarify the role of this direct glucose action in the brain, we compared the neural and behavioural effects of glucose with those induced by fructose, a sweeter yet metabolically equivalent sugar. First, by using enzyme-based biosensors in freely moving rats, we confirmed that glucose rapidly increased in the nucleus accumbens in a dose-dependent manner after its intravenous delivery. In contrast, fructose induced a minimal response only after a large-dose injection. Second, we showed that naive rats during unrestricted access consumed larger volumes of glucose than fructose solution; the difference appeared with a definite latency during the initial exposure and strongly increased during subsequent tests. When rats with equal sugar experience were presented with either glucose or fructose in alternating order, the consumption of both substances was initially equal, but only the consumption of glucose increased during subsequent sessions. Finally, rats with equal glucose-fructose experience developed a strong preference for glucose over fructose during a two-bottle choice procedure; the effect appeared with a definite latency during the initial test and greatly amplified during subsequent tests. Our results suggest that direct entry of glucose in the brain and its subsequent effects on brain cells could be critical for the experience-dependent escalation of glucose consumption and the development of glucose preference over fructose.

  3. Glucose Fermentation Pathway of Thermoanaerobium brockii

    PubMed Central

    Lamed, R.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermoanaerobium brockii was shown to catabolize glucose via the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway into ethanol, acetic acid, H2-CO2, and lactic acid. Radioactive tracer studies, employing specifically labeled [14C]glucose, demonstrated significant fermentation of 14CO2 from C-3 and C-4 of the substrate exclusively. All extracts contained sufficient levels of activity (expressed in micromoles per minute per milligram of protein at 40°C) to assign a catabolic role for the following enzymes: glucokinase, 0.40; fructose-1,6-diphosphate aldolase, 0.23; glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 1.73; pyruvate kinase, 0.36; lactate dehydrogenase (fructose-1,6-diphosphate activated), 0.55; pyruvate dehydrogenase (coenzyme A acetylating), 0.53; hydrogenase, 3.3; phosphotransacetylase, 0.55; acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (coenzyme A acetylating), 0.15; ethanol dehydrogenase, 1.57; and acetate kinase, 1.50. All pyridine nucleotide-linked oxidoreductases examined were specific for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, except ethanol dehydrogenase which displayed both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide- and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-linked activities. Fermentation product balances and cell growth yields supported the glucose catabolic pathway described. Representative balanced end product yields (in moles per mole of glucose fermented) were: ethanol, 0.94; l-lactate, 0.84; acetate, 0.20; CO2, 1.31; and H2, 0.50. Growth yields of 16.4 g of cells per mole of glucose were demonstrated. Both growth and end product yields varied significantly in accordance with the specific medium composition and incubation time. PMID:6767705

  4. Fabrication of Amperometric Glucose Sensor Using Glucose Oxidase-Cellulose Nanofiber Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Yasuzawa, Mikito; Omura, Yuya; Hiura, Kentaro; Li, Jiang; Fuchiwaki, Yusuke; Tanaka, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanofiber aqueous solution, which remained virtually transparent for more than one week, was prepared by using the clear upper layer of diluted cellulose nanofiber solution produced by wet jet milling. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was easily dissolved in this solution and GOx-immobilized electrode was easily fabricated by simple repetitious drops of GOx-cellulose solution on the surface of a platinum-iridium electrode. Glucose sensor properties of the obtained electrodes were examined in phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.4 at 40°C. The obtained electrode provided a glucose sensor response with significantly high response speed and good linear relationship between glucose concentration and response current. After an initial decrease of response sensitivity for a few days, relatively constant sensitivity was obtained for about 20 days. Nevertheless, the influence of electroactive compounds such as ascorbic acid, uric acid and acetoaminophen were not negletable. PMID:26561252

  5. Role for the pineal and melatonin in glucose homeostasis: pinealectomy increases night-time glucose concentrations.

    PubMed

    la Fleur, S E; Kalsbeek, A; Wortel, J; van der Vliet, J; Buijs, R M

    2001-12-01

    The effects of melatonin on glucose metabolism are far from understood. In rats, the biological clock generates a 24-h rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations, with declining concentrations in the dark period. We hypothesized that, in the rat, melatonin enhances the dark signal of the biological clock, decreasing glucose concentrations in the dark period. We measured 24-h rhythms of plasma concentrations of glucose and insulin in pinealectomized rats fed ad libitum and subjected to a scheduled feeding regimen with six meals equally distributed over the light/dark cycle and compared them with previous data of intact rats. Pinealectomy dampened the amplitude of the 24-h rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations in rats fed ad libitum, and abolished it completely in rats subjected to the scheduled feeding regimen, while plasma insulin concentrations did not change under both conditions. Pinealectomy abolished the nocturnal decline in plasma glucose concentrations irrespective of whether rats were fed ad libitum or subjected to the scheduled feeding regimen. Melatonin replacement restored 24-h mean plasma glucose concentrations in pinealectomized rats that were subjected to the scheduled feeding regimen but, interestingly, it did not restore the 24-h rhythm. Melatonin treatment also resulted in higher meal-induced insulin responses, probably mediated via an increased sensitivity of the beta-cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the pineal hormone, melatonin, influences both glucose metabolism and insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta-cell. The present study also demonstrates that removal of the pineal gland cannot be compensated by mimicking plasma melatonin concentrations only.

  6. Proximal small intestinal mucosal injury. Maintenance of glucose and glucose polymer absorption, attenuation of disaccharide absorption.

    PubMed

    Palacios, M; Madariaga, H; Heitlinger, L; Lee, P C; Lebenthal, E

    1989-03-01

    The effect of chronic intragastric infusion of hypertonic mannitol on small intestinal mucosal structure and function was studied in adult rats. Animals were gavage-fed 20% mannitol (1300 mosm) at a dose of 5 ml/100 g body weight daily for seven days. Control animals were gavage-fed tap water on the same schedule. On day 8, the animals were anesthetized, the duodenum cannulated, and a test sugar (glucose, glucose polymer, lactose, sucrose, or maltose) was infused at a dose of 0.5 g/kg body weight in 2.5 ml distilled water over less than 1 min. Portal vein glucose was measured at 30-min intervals from 0 to 120 min. Mannitol treatment resulted in histologic and biochemical alterations (reduced lactase, sucrase, maltase) limited to the proximal small intestine compared to the control group. The absorption of glucose and glucose polymers was similar in mannitol-treated and control animals. In contrast, digestion and absorption of lactose, sucrose, and maltose was significantly diminished in mannitol-treated animals when compared to controls. No changes in permeability to polyethylene glycol 4000 or Na+-coupled glucose transport were observed in mannitol-treated animals compared to controls. These data suggest that when the intestinal mucosa is exposed to hyperosmolar loads that the digestive capacity for disaccharides is suppressed more than its glucose absorptive capacities. Furthermore, glucose oligomers may be more readily digested and absorbed than disaccharides, in this setting, due, in part, to the proximal injury and less pronounced proximal-distal gradient for glucoamylase than other brush-border carbohydrases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  8. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  9. Dual-wavelength optical fluidic glucose sensor using time series analysis of d(+)-glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing-Yau; Chen, Nan-Yueh; Chen, Ming-Kun; Wang, Min-Haw; Jang, Ling-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a rising-edge time-series analysis (TSA) method that can be applied to a dual-wavelength optical fluidic glucose sensor (DWOFGS). In the experiment, the concentration of glucose in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was determined by measuring the absorbance of the solution as determined by variation in the rising edge of the photodiode (PD) voltage response waveform. The DWOFGS principle is based on near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectroscopy at selected dual wavelengths (1450 and 1650 nm) in the first overtone band. The DWOFGS comprises two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and two PD detectors. No additional fibers or lenses are required in our device. The output light level of the LEDs is adjusted to a light intensity suitable to the glucose absorption rate in an electronic circuit. Four light absorbance paths enable detection of d(+)-glucose concentrations from 0 to 20 wt % in steps of 5 wt %. The glucose light absorbance process was calculated based on the rising edge of the PD waveform under a low-intensity light source using TSA. The TSA method can be used to obtain the glucose level in PBS and reduce measurement background noise. The application of the rising-edge TSA method improves sensor sensitivity, increases the accuracy of the data analysis, and lowers measurement equipment costs.

  10. Potential-step coulometry of D-glucose using a novel FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Seiya; Kojima, Shinki; Ikeda, Tokuji; Kano, Kenji

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the construction and characterization of a batch-type coulometric system for the detection of D-glucose using a novel FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase. In order to overcome the problem of interferents, such as ascorbate and urate, a potential-step method was proposed to separate the electrolysis reactions of interferents and D-glucose by selecting a mediator possessing an appropriate formal potential. The rapid oxidative consumption of the interferents proceeded in the first step, whereas the mediator and glucose remained reduced. In the second step, the mediator was immediately oxidized, and subsequent bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of D-glucose occurred with the aid of aldose 1-epimerase. In this study, potassium octacyanomolybdate (IV) with a formal potential of 0.6 V vs. Ag|AgCl was chosen as a mediator, and the first and second electrolysis potentials were set at 0.4 V and 0.8 V, respectively, by considering the heterogeneous electron-transfer kinetics and the potential window. The background-corrected response in charge corresponded to 99+/-2 % efficiency in terms of the amount of D-glucose.

  11. Glucose oxidase-mediated gelation: a simple test to detect glucose in food products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Javvaji, Vishal; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2012-09-12

    This paper reports a simple, rapid, and sugar-selective method to induce gelation from glucose-containing samples. This method employs glucose oxidase (GOx) to selectively "recognize" and oxidize glucose to generate gluconic acid, which acts to solubilize calcium carbonate and release calcium ions. The release of calcium ions triggers gelation of the calcium-responsive polysaccharide alginate to form a calcium-alginate hydrogel. Rheological measurements confirm that gel formation is triggered by glucose but not fructose or sucrose (consistent with GOx's selectivity). Vial inversion tests demonstrate that gel formation can be readily observed without the need for instrumentation. Proof-of-concept studies demonstrate that this gel-forming method can detect glucose in food/beverage products sweetened with glucose or high-fructose corn syrups. These results indicate that the enzyme-induced gelation of alginate may provide a simple means to test for sweeteners using components that are safe for use on-site or in the home. PMID:22906038

  12. Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter Inhibitors: Effects on Renal and Intestinal Glucose Transport: From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Sunder; Polidori, David; Zambrowicz, Brian; Henry, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease with disabling micro- and macrovascular complications that lead to excessive morbidity and premature mortality. It affects hundreds of millions of people and imposes an undue economic burden on populations across the world. Although insulin resistance and insulin secretory defects play a major role in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia, several other metabolic defects contribute to the initiation/worsening of the diabetic state. Prominent among these is increased renal glucose reabsorption, which is maladaptive in patients with diabetes. Instead of an increase in renal glucose excretion, which could ameliorate hyperglycemia, there is an increase in renal glucose reabsorption, which helps sustain hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes. The sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitors are novel antidiabetes agents that inhibit renal glucose reabsorption and promote glucosuria, thereby leading to reductions in plasma glucose concentrations. In this article, we review the long journey from the discovery of the glucosuric agent phlorizin in the bark of the apple tree through the animal and human studies that led to the development of the current generation of SGLT2 inhibitors. PMID:26604280

  13. Noninvasive technique for measurement of glucose content in body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapiou, George; Theofanous, N. G.

    1998-07-01

    This work is focused on the measurement of glucose in various diluted solutions and aims to be implemented in testing the glucose content in the anterior chamber of the eye by means of an electro-optic modulation method. By using solutions containing only glucose concentrations, a calibration curve displaying the dependence of the glucose concentration on a DC field, applied to a modulator, was obtained.

  14. Glucose-sensing and -signalling mechanisms in yeast.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Filip; Winderickx, Joris; Thevelein, Johan M

    2002-05-01

    Glucose has dramatic effects on the regulation of carbon metabolism and on many other properties of yeast cells. Several sensing and signalling pathways are involved. For many years attention has focussed on the main glucose-repression pathway which is responsible for the downregulation of respiration, gluconeogenesis and the transport and catabolic capacity of alternative sugars during growth on glucose. The hexokinase 2- dependent glucose-sensing mechanism of this pathway is not well understood but the downstream part of the pathway has been elucidated in great detail. Two putative glucose sensors, the Snf3 and Rgt2 non-transporting glucose carrier homologs, control the expression of many functional glucose carriers. Recently, several new components of this glucose-induction pathway have been identified. The Ras-cAMP pathway controls a wide variety of cellular properties in correlation with cellular proliferation. Glucose is a potent activator of cAMP synthesis. In this case glucose sensing is carried out by two systems, a G-protein-coupled receptor system and a still elusive glucose-phosphorylation-dependent system. The understanding of glucose sensing and signalling in yeast has made dramatic advances in recent years and has become a strong paradigm for the elucidation of nutrient-sensing mechanisms in other eukaryotic organisms.

  15. Glucose polymers in diarrhoea--risk of hypernatraemia.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, A; Lundberg, B; Stenhammar, L

    1992-01-01

    An infant girl with congenital heart disease was fed glucose polymers as dietary supplements. During an attack of gastroenteritis with severe diarrhoea she developed hypernatraemic dehydration, probably due to the high osmotic load of the glucose polymers. This case illustrates the importance of giving adequate amounts of free water to a child on glucose polymers, especially during excessive fluid loss.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1372 - Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1372 Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations. (a) Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations are used in the production of high fructose corn syrup described in §...

  17. Critical Care Glucose Point-of-Care Testing.

    PubMed

    Narla, S N; Jones, M; Hermayer, K L; Zhu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining blood glucose concentration within an acceptable range is a goal for patients with diabetes mellitus. Point-of-care glucose meters initially designed for home self-monitoring in patients with diabetes have been widely used in the hospital settings because of ease of use and quick reporting of blood glucose information. They are not only utilized for the general inpatient population but also for critically ill patients. Many factors affect the accuracy of point-of-care glucose testing, particularly in critical care settings. Inaccurate blood glucose information can result in unsafe insulin delivery which causes poor glucose control and can be fatal. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the limitations of point-of-care glucose testing. This chapter will first introduce glucose regulation in diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia/hypoglycemia in the intensive care unit, importance of glucose control in critical care patients, and pathophysiological variables of critically ill patients that affect the accuracy of point-of-care glucose testing. Then, we will discuss currently available point-of-care glucose meters and preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical sources of variation and error in point-of-care glucose testing. PMID:27645817

  18. Enzymatic Glucose Sensor Compensation for Variations in Ambient Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Bradley B.; McShane, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes, research toward painless glucose sensing continues. Oxygen sensitive phosphors with glucose oxidase (GOx) can be used to determine glucose levels indirectly by monitoring oxygen consumption. This is an attractive combination because of its speed and specificity. Packaging these molecules together in “smart materials” for implantation will enable non-invasive glucose monitoring. As glucose levels increase, oxygen levels decrease; consequently, the luminescence intensity and lifetime of the phosphor increase. Although the response of the sensor is dependent on glucose concentration, the ambient oxygen concentration also plays a key role. This could lead to inaccurate glucose readings and increase the risk of hyper- or hypoglycemia. To mitigate this risk, the dependence of hydrogel glucose sensor response on oxygen levels was investigated and compensation methods explored. Sensors were calibrated at different oxygen concentrations using a single generic logistic equation, such that trends in oxygen-dependence were determined as varying parameters in the equation. Each parameter was found to be a function of oxygen concentration, such that the correct glucose calibration equation can be calculated if the oxygen level is known. Accuracy of compensation will be determined by developing an overall calibration, using both glucose and oxygen sensors in parallel, correcting for oxygen fluctuations in real time by intentionally varying oxygen, and calculating the error in actual and predicted glucose levels. While this method was developed for compensation of enzymatic glucose sensors, in principle it can also be implemented with other kinds of sensors utilizing oxidases. PMID:26257458

  19. Glucose cycling in islets from healthy and diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.; Chandramouli, V.; Ostenson, C.G.; Loew, H.L.; Landau, B.R.; Efendic, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Pancreatic islets from healthy (control) and neonatally streptozocin-induced diabetic (STZ-D) rats, a model for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, were incubated with {sup 3}H{sub 2}O and 5.5 or 16.7 mM glucose. At 5.5 mM glucose, no detectable ({sup 3}H)glucose was formed. At 16.7 mM, 2.2 patom.islet-1.h-1 of {sup 3}H was incorporated into glucose by the control islets and 5.4 patom.islet-1.h-1 by STZ-D islets. About 75% of the {sup 3}H was bound to carbon-2 of the glucose. Glucose utilization was 35.3 pmol.islet-1.h-1 by the control and 19.0 pmol.islet-1.h-1 by the STZ-D islets. Therefore, 4.5% of the glucose-6-phosphate formed by the control islets and 15.7% by the STZ-D islets was dephosphorylated. This presumably occurred in the beta-cells of the islets catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphatase. An increased glucose cycling, i.e., glucose----glucose-6-phosphate----glucose, in islets of STZ-D rats may contribute to the decreased insulin secretion found in these animals.

  20. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine..., potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  1. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine..., potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  2. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine..., potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  3. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine..., potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  4. The microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme of pancreatic islets.

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, I D; Burchell, A

    1988-01-01

    Microsomal fractions isolated from pancreatic islet cells were shown to contain high specific glucose-6-phosphatase activity. The islet-cell glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme has the same Mr (36,500), similar immunological properties and kinetic characteristics to the hepatic microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2849415

  5. A role for glucose in hypothermic hamsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1976-01-01

    Hypothermic hamsters at a rectal temperature of 7 C showed a fivefold increase in survival times from 20 to 100.5 hr when infused with glucose which maintained a blood level at about 45 mg/100 ml. A potential role for osmotic effects of the infusion was tested and eliminated. There was no improvement in survival of 3-O-methylglucose or dextran 40-infused animals. The fact that death eventually occurs even in the glucose-infused animal after about 4 days and that oxygen consumption undergoes a slow decrement in that period suggests that hypothermic survival is not wholly substrate limited. Radioactive tracer showed that localization of the C-14 was greatest in brain tissue and diaphragm, intermediate in heart and kidney, and lowest in skeletal muscle and liver. The significance of the label at sites important to respiration and circulation was presented.

  6. Analgesic Effect of Oral Glucose in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Jatana, S K; Dalal, S S; Wilson, C G

    2003-04-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain, has defined pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience connected with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage". It was thought that the newborn baby does not experience pain because of incompletely developed nervous system. However, it has been shown that neurological system known to be associated with pain transmission and modulation, is intact and functional. A study was conducted in our center to study the analgesic effect of administration of oral glucose in various concentrations, in neonates undergoing heel punctures, for collection of blood for investigations. This was compared with the analgesic effects of breast milk (which contains lactose). 125 full term normal neonates with no history of birth asphyxia or underlying neurological abnormality, requiring heel punctures for collection of blood for various investigations were selected for the study. They were matched for gestational age, birth weight and sex distribution and divided into 5 groups of 25 each. One group comprised control subjects and was administered sterile water. 3 groups were administered 1 ml of varying strengths of glucose solutions i.e. 10%, 25% and 50% respectively. The last group was given 1 ml of expressed breast milk (EBM). Prior to heel pricks, state of arousal, baseline heart rate (HR) and transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded by pulse oximeter in each neonate. Autolet, a mechanical device for capillary sampling, was used for heel pricks to give equal strength of painful stimulus in each procedure. Audio tape recorder was used to record the cry. The oral solution was administered slowly over 30 seconds by means of a syringe placed in the mouth. Heel puncture was done after 2 minutes, taking all aseptic precautions. HR and SpO2 were monitored using pulse oximeter. Pain response was assessed, by recording duration of crying, change in HR, change in SpO2 and facial action

  7. Facilitative glucose transporters in livestock species.

    PubMed

    Hocquette, J F; Abe, H

    2000-01-01

    The study of facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT) requires carefully done immunological experiments and sensitive molecular biology approaches to identify the various mechanisms which control GLUT expression at the RNA and protein levels. The cloning of species-specific GLUT cDNAs showed that GLUT4 and GLUT1 diverge less among species than other GLUT isoforms. The key role of GLUT in glucose homeostasis has been demonstrated in livestock species. In vitro studies have suggested specific roles of GLUT1 and GLUT3 in avian cells. In vivo studies have demonstrated a regulation of GLUTs (especially of GLUT4) by nutritional and hormonal factors in pigs and cattle, in lactating cows and goats and throughout the foetal life in the placenta and tissues of lambs and calves. All these results suggest that any changes in GLUT expression and activity (such as GLUT4 in muscles) could modify nutrient partitioning and tissue metabolism, and hence, the qualities of animal products (milk, meat).

  8. A fine pointed glucose oxidase immobilized electrode for low-invasive amperometric glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Koinkar, Pankaj; Fuchiwaki, Yusuke; Yasuzawa, Mikito

    2016-12-15

    A low invasive type glucose sensor, which has a sensing region at the tip of a fine pointed electrode, was developed for continuous glucose monitoring. Platinum-iridium alloy electrode with a surface area of 0.045mm(2) was settled at the middle of pointed PEEK (Polyetheretherketone) tubing and was employed as sensing electrode. Electrodeposition of glucose oxidase in the presence of surfactant, Triton X-100, was performed for high-density enzyme immobilization followed by the electropolymerization of o-phenylenediamine for the formation of functional entrapping and permselective polymer membrane. Ag/AgCl film was coated on the surface of PEEK tubing as reference electrode. Amperometric responses of the prepared sensors to glucose were measured at a potential of 0.60V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The prepared electrode showed the sensitivity of 2.55μA/cm(2) mM with high linearity of 0.9986, within the glucose concentration range up to 21mM. The detection limit (S/N=3) was determined to be 0.11mM. The glucose sensor properties were evaluated in phosphate buffer solution and in vivo monitoring by the implantation of the sensors in rabbit, while conventional needle type sensors as a reference were used. The results showed that change in output current of the proposed sensor fluctuated similar with one in output current of the conventional needle type sensors, which was also in similar accordance with actual blood sugar level measured by commercially glucose meter. One-point calibration method was used to calibrate the sensor output current. PMID:27336616

  9. Evaluation of MOSFET-type glucose sensor using platinum electrode with glucose oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Hamamoto, Yasutaro; Hirano, Yoshiaki

    2005-02-01

    As the population ages, health management will be one of the important issues. The development of a safe medical machine based on MEMS technologies for the human body will be the primary research project in the future. We have developed the glucose sensor, as one of the medical based devices, for use in the Health Monitoring System (HMS). HMS is the device that continuously monitors human health conditions. For example, blood is the monitoring target of HMS. The glucose sensor specifically detects the glucose levels of the blood and monitors the glucose concentration as the blood sugar level. This glucose sensor has a "separated Au electrode", which immobilizes GOx. In our previous work, GOx was immobilized onto Au electrode by the SAMs (Self-Assembled Monolayer) method, and the sensor, using this working electrode, detected the glucose concentration of an aqueous glucose solution. In this report, we used a Pt electrode, which immobilized GOx, as a working electrode. Au electrode, which was used previously, was dissolved by the application of current in the presence of chloride ions. Based on the above-mentioned fact, a new working electrode, which immobilized GOx, was produced using Pt, which did not possess such characteristics. These Pt working electrodes were produced using the covalent binding method and the cross-link method, and both the electrodes displayed a good sensing property. In addition, the electrode using glutaraldehyde (GA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as crosslinking agents was produced, and it displayed better characteristics as compared with those displayed by the electrode that used only GA. Based on the above-mentioned techniques, the improvement in performance of the sensor was confirmed.

  10. Mechanism for underestimation of isotopically determined glucose disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.C.; Consoli, A.; Nurjhan, N.; Young, A.A.; Gerich, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    Use of (3H)glucose and a one-compartment model to determine glucose kinetics frequently underestimates the rate of glucose production (Ra). To assess to what extent an isotope effect, a tracer contaminant, or inadequacy of the model was responsible, we measured glucose Ra and forearm clearance of tracer and unlabeled glucose at various concentrations of plasma insulin (approximately 50, approximately 160, and approximately 1800 microU/ml) and plasma glucose (approximately 90, approximately 160, approximately 250, and approximately 400 mg/dl) under steady-state and non-steady-state conditions. Under isotopic steady-state conditions, the clearances of tracer and unlabeled glucose across the forearm were identical, and exogenous glucose infusion rates did not differ significantly from the isotopically determined glucose Ra (10.0 +/- 1.3 vs. 10.5 +/- 1.0 mg.kg-1 fat-free mass.min-1, respectively). However, under isotopic non-steady-state conditions, the isotopically determined Ra was significantly lower than the glucose infusion rate (11.5 +/- 1.3 vs. 13.7 +/- 1.5 mg.kg-1 fat-free mass.min-1, respectively, P less than .001), and the underestimation was related to the deviation from the isotopic steady state. When (3H)glucose specific activity of plasma samples from experiments with the greatest underestimation of Ra was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, less than 7% of the underestimation could be accounted for by a contaminant. These results indicate that inadequacy of the one-compartment model is responsible for underestimation of glucose Ra under non-steady-state conditions and that there is no detectable isotopic effect or appreciable contaminant of (3-3H)glucose. We conclude that under isotopic steady-state conditions, (3-3H)glucose is a reliable tracer for glucose kinetic studies in humans.

  11. Effect of Disinfectants on Glucose Monitors

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, John J; Lim, Christine G

    2012-01-01

    Background Monitoring blood glucose levels is an integral part of routine diabetes management. To minimize the risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens during monitoring, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that glucose meters be disinfected after each use whenever they are used to test multiple patients. The objective of this study is to assess the compatibility of some common disinfectants with certain blood glucose meter systems. Methods We tested six disinfectants for adverse impact on meter performance or the exterior meter surfaces. The disinfectants tested were 0.525% sodium hypochlorite, 20% 2-propanol and 10% ethanol, 17.2% isopropanol, 55% isopropanol, 70% isopropanol, and hydrogen peroxide. To assess meter performance, we tested OneTouch® Ultra® blood glucose monitoring systems with control solution before and after application of either water or disinfectant. To assess the effect on exterior meter surfaces, we performed a soaking test to simulate long-term exposure to disinfectant. Results Paired t-test results showed that the control solution data associated with disinfectant and with water application were not significantly different for each meter type. However, most of the meter types were adversely affected by hydrogen peroxide and/or by the higher concentrations of alcohol-based disinfectants. Conclusions Although none of the six disinfectants affected meter performance, hydrogen peroxide and isopropanol >20% adversely affected the exterior surfaces of the tested meters. When complying with CDC instructions for meter disinfection, users should use caution and choose disinfectants that have been validated by the meter manufacturer. PMID:22401326

  12. A glucose biofuel cell implanted in rats.

    PubMed

    Cinquin, Philippe; Gondran, Chantal; Giroud, Fabien; Mazabrard, Simon; Pellissier, Aymeric; Boucher, François; Alcaraz, Jean-Pierre; Gorgy, Karine; Lenouvel, François; Mathé, Stéphane; Porcu, Paolo; Cosnier, Serge

    2010-05-04

    Powering future generations of implanted medical devices will require cumbersome transcutaneous energy transfer or harvesting energy from the human body. No functional solution that harvests power from the body is currently available, despite attempts to use the Seebeck thermoelectric effect, vibrations or body movements. Glucose fuel cells appear more promising, since they produce electrical energy from glucose and dioxygen, two substrates present in physiological fluids. The most powerful ones, Glucose BioFuel Cells (GBFCs), are based on enzymes electrically wired by redox mediators. However, GBFCs cannot be implanted in animals, mainly because the enzymes they rely on either require low pH or are inhibited by chloride or urate anions, present in the Extra Cellular Fluid (ECF). Here we present the first functional implantable GBFC, working in the retroperitoneal space of freely moving rats. The breakthrough relies on the design of a new family of GBFCs, characterized by an innovative and simple mechanical confinement of various enzymes and redox mediators: enzymes are no longer covalently bound to the surface of the electron collectors, which enables use of a wide variety of enzymes and redox mediators, augments the quantity of active enzymes, and simplifies GBFC construction. Our most efficient GBFC was based on composite graphite discs containing glucose oxidase and ubiquinone at the anode, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and quinone at the cathode. PPO reduces dioxygen into water, at pH 7 and in the presence of chloride ions and urates at physiological concentrations. This GBFC, with electrodes of 0.133 mL, produced a peak specific power of 24.4 microW mL(-1), which is better than pacemakers' requirements and paves the way for the development of a new generation of implantable artificial organs, covering a wide range of medical applications.

  13. Mitogen-stimulated and rapamycin-sensitive glucose transporter 12 targeting and functional glucose transport in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson-O'Brien, Amy L; Dehaan, Carrie L; Rogers, Suzanne

    2008-03-01

    We hypothesized that glucose transporter 12 (GLUT12) is involved in regulation of glucose flux in distal renal tubules in response to elevated glucose. We used the Madin-Darby canine kidney polarized epithelial cell model and neutralizing antibodies to analyze GLUT12 targeting and directional GLUT12-mediated glucose transport. At physiological glucose concentrations, GLUT12 was localized to a perinuclear position. High glucose and serum treatment resulted in GLUT12 localization to the apical membrane. This mitogen-stimulated targeting of GLUT12 was inhibited by rapamycin, the specific inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The functional role of GLUT12 was also examined. We constructed a GLUT12 cDNA containing a c-Myc epitope tag in the fifth exofacial loop. Assays of glucose transport at the apical membrane were performed using Transwell filters. By comparing transport assays in the presence of neutralizing anti-c-Myc monoclonal antibody, we specifically measured GLUT12-mediated glucose transport at the apical surface. GLUT12-mediated glucose transport was mitogen dependent and rapamycin sensitive. Our results implicate mTOR signaling in a novel pathway of glucose transporter protein targeting and glucose transport. Activity of the mTOR pathway has been associated with diabetic kidney disease. Our results provide evidence for a link between GLUT12 protein trafficking, glucose transport and signaling molecules central to the control of metabolic disease processes. PMID:18039784

  14. Nonnutritive sweeteners, energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pepino, M. Yanina; Bourne, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review To review recent work on potential mechanisms underlying a paradoxical positive association between the consumption of nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS) and weight gain. Recent findings Several potential mechanism, not mutually exclusive, are hypothesized. First, by dissociating sweetness from calories, NNS could interfere with physiological responses that control homeostasis. Second, by changing the intestinal environment, NNS could affect the microbiota and in turn trigger inflammatory processes that are associated with metabolic disorders. Third, by interacting with novel sweet-taste receptors discovered in the gut, NNS could affect glucose absorptive capacity and glucose homeostasis. This last is the mechanism that has received the most attention recently. Some animal studies, but not all, found that NNS activate gut sweet taste-pathways that control incretin release and up-regulate glucose transporters. Human studies found that, at least for healthy fasted subjects, the sole interaction of NNS with sweet-taste gut receptors is insufficient to elicit incretin responses. The reasons for discrepancy between different studies is unknown but could be related to the species of mammal tested and the dose of NNS used. Summary Whether NNS are metabolically inactive, as previously assumed, is unclear. Further research on the potential effects of NNS on human metabolism is warranted. PMID:21505330

  15. Recent advances in noninvasive glucose monitoring

    PubMed Central

    So, Chi-Fuk; Choi, Kup-Sze; Wong, Thomas KS; Chung, Joanne WY

    2012-01-01

    The race for the next generation of painless and reliable glucose monitoring for diabetes mellitus is on. As technology advances, both diagnostic techniques and equipment improve. This review describes the main technologies currently being explored for noninvasive glucose monitoring. The principle of each technology is mentioned; its advantages and limitations are then discussed. The general description and the corresponding results for each device are illustrated, as well as the current status of the device and the manufacturer; internet references for the devices are listed where appropriate. Ten technologies and eleven potential devices are included in this review. Near infrared spectroscopy has become a promising technology, among others, for blood glucose monitoring. Although some reviews have been published already, the rapid development of technologies and information makes constant updating mandatory. While advances have been made, the reliability and the calibration of noninvasive instruments could still be improved, and more studies carried out under different physiological conditions of metabolism, bodily fluid circulation, and blood components are needed. PMID:23166457

  16. Ultra-Sensitivity Glucose Sensor Based on Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A new glucose sensor based on field emitter of ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNA) was fabricated. This new type of ZNA field emitter-based sensor shows high sensitivity with experimental limit of detection of 1 nM glucose solution and a detection range from 1 nM to 50 μM in air at room temperature, which is lower than that of glucose sensors based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, fluorescence signal transmission, and electrochemical signal transduction. The new glucose sensor provides a key technique for promising consuming application in biological system for detecting low levels of glucose on single cells or bacterial cultures. PMID:20596378

  17. Optical glucose monitoring using vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi Fard, Sahba; Hofmann, Werner; Talebi Fard, Pouria; Kwok, Ezra; Amann, Markus-Christian; Chrostowski, Lukas

    2009-08-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a common chronic disease that has become a public health issue. Continuous glucose monitoring improves patient health by stabilizing the glucose levels. Optical methods are one of the painless and promising methods that can be used for blood glucose predictions. However, having accuracies lower than what is acceptable clinically has been a major concern. Using lasers along with multivariate techniques such as Partial Least Square (PLS) can improve glucose predictions. This research involves investigations for developing a novel optical system for accurate glucose predictions, which leads to the development of a small, low power, implantable optical sensor for diabetes patients.

  18. Metabolism of tritiated D-glucose in rat erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel y Keenoy, B.; Malaisse-Lagae, F.; Malaisse, W.J. )

    1991-09-01

    The metabolism of D-(U-14C)glucose, D-(1-14C)glucose, D-(6-14C)glucose, D-(1-3H)glucose, D-(2-3H)glucose, D-(3-3H)glucose, D-(3,4-3H)glucose, D-(5-3H)glucose, and D-(6-3H)glucose was examined in rat erythrocytes. There was a fair agreement between the rate of 3HOH production from either D-(3-3H)glucose and D-(5-3H)glucose, the decrease in the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate pool, its fractional turnover rate, the production of 14C-labeled lactate from D-(U-14C)glucose, and the total lactate output. The generation of both 3HOH and tritiated acidic metabolites from D-(3,4-3H)glucose indicated incomplete detritiation of the C4 during interconversion of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and triose phosphates. Erythrocytes unexpectedly generated 3HOH from D-(6-3H)glucose, a phenomenon possibly attributable to the detritiation of (3-3H)pyruvate in the reaction catalyzed by glutamate pyruvate transaminase. The production of 3HOH from D-(2-3H)glucose was lower than that from D-(5-3H)glucose, suggesting enzyme-to-enzyme tunneling of glycolytic intermediates in the hexokinase/phosphoglucoisomerase/phosphofructokinase sequence. The production of 3HOH from D-(1-3H)glucose largely exceeded that of 14CO2 from D-(1-14C)glucose, a situation tentatively ascribed to the generation of 3HOH in the phosphomannoisomerase reaction. It is further speculated that the adjustment in specific radioactivity of D-(1-3H)glucose-6-phosphate cannot simultaneously match the vastly different degrees of isotopic discrimination in velocity at the levels of the reactions catalyzed by either glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase or phosphoglucoisomerase. The interpretation of the present findings thus raises a number of questions, which are proposed as a scope for further investigations.

  19. Microwave dielectric resonator biosensor for aqueous glucose solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongchul; Babajanyan, Arsen; Hovsepyan, Artur; Lee, Kiejin; Friedman, Barry

    2008-08-01

    We report a near-field microwave biosensor based on a dielectric resonator to detect glucose concentration. A microwave biosensor with a high Q dielectric resonator allows observation of the small variation of the glucose concentration by measuring the shift of the resonance frequency and the microwave reflection coefficient S11. We observed the concentration of glucose with a detectable resolution up to 5mg/ml at an operating frequency of about f =1.68GHz. The change in the glucose concentration is directly related to the change in the reflection coefficient due to the electromagnetic interaction between the dielectric resonator and the glucose solution.

  20. Diagnostic value of fasting capillary glucose, fructosamine and glycosylated haemoglobin in detecting diabetes and other glucose tolerance abnormalities compared to oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Herdzik, E; Safranow, K; Ciechanowski, K

    2002-04-01

    New diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus recommend lowering of the fasting plasma glucose to 7.0 mmol/l. In contrast to recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), WHO recommends using the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in clinical practice. In this study. based on OGTT results and WHO 1998 criteria, we determined if measuring fasting capillary glycaemia (FCG) along with fructosamine and/or glycosylated haemoglobin allows the detection of glucose tolerance abnormalities better than FCG alone. OGTT was performed in 538 patients. Serum fructosamine was determined in 480 of the patients, and glycosylated haemoglobin in 234 of the patients. According to WHO 1998 criteria, the patients were divided into groups due to glucose tolerance abnormalities. Fructosamine correlated stronger with 2-h post-load glucose concentrations than with FCG. HbAlc correlated stronger with FCG than with 2-h post-load glucose. Combined use of fructosamine and FCG predicted 2-h post-load glucose better than combined use of FCG and HbA1c. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that FCG was the best criterion in discriminating diabetes. Combined use of FCG and fructosamine slightly improved the ability to discriminate glucose tolerance abnormalities from normal glucose tolerance. FCG is the most effective predictor of 2-h post-load glucose and the best criterion for discriminating diabetes and other glucose tolerance abnormalities from normal glucose tolerance. Fructosamine is a potentially useful post-load glycaemia index. OGTT is irreplaceable in identification of patients with high post-load glycaemia.

  1. Glucose enhances indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis without reducing primary sulfur assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Wei, Jia; Huang, Jirong; Chang, Jiaqi; Qian, Hongmei; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yanting; Sun, Bo; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glucose as a signaling molecule on induction of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis was reported in our former study. Here, we further investigated the regulatory mechanism of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis by glucose in Arabidopsis. Glucose exerted a positive influence on indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis, which was demonstrated by induced accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and enhanced expression of related genes upon glucose treatment. Genetic analysis revealed that MYB34 and MYB51 were crucial in maintaining the basal indolic glucosinolate accumulation, with MYB34 being pivotal in response to glucose signaling. The increased accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and mRNA levels of MYB34, MYB51, and MYB122 caused by glucose were inhibited in the gin2-1 mutant, suggesting an important role of HXK1 in glucose-mediated induction of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis. In contrast to what was known on the function of ABI5 in glucose-mediated aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, ABI5 was not required for glucose-induced indolic glucosinolate accumulation. In addition, our results also indicated that glucose-induced glucosinolate accumulation was due to enhanced sulfur assimilation instead of directed sulfur partitioning into glucosinolate biosynthesis. Thus, our data provide new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying glucose-regulated glucosinolate biosynthesis. PMID:27549907

  2. Glucose enhances indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis without reducing primary sulfur assimilation.

    PubMed

    Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Wei, Jia; Huang, Jirong; Chang, Jiaqi; Qian, Hongmei; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yanting; Sun, Bo; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glucose as a signaling molecule on induction of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis was reported in our former study. Here, we further investigated the regulatory mechanism of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis by glucose in Arabidopsis. Glucose exerted a positive influence on indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis, which was demonstrated by induced accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and enhanced expression of related genes upon glucose treatment. Genetic analysis revealed that MYB34 and MYB51 were crucial in maintaining the basal indolic glucosinolate accumulation, with MYB34 being pivotal in response to glucose signaling. The increased accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and mRNA levels of MYB34, MYB51, and MYB122 caused by glucose were inhibited in the gin2-1 mutant, suggesting an important role of HXK1 in glucose-mediated induction of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis. In contrast to what was known on the function of ABI5 in glucose-mediated aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, ABI5 was not required for glucose-induced indolic glucosinolate accumulation. In addition, our results also indicated that glucose-induced glucosinolate accumulation was due to enhanced sulfur assimilation instead of directed sulfur partitioning into glucosinolate biosynthesis. Thus, our data provide new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying glucose-regulated glucosinolate biosynthesis. PMID:27549907

  3. Hepatic ATGL knockdown uncouples glucose intolerance from liver TAG accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kuok Teong; Mashek, Mara T; Bu, So Young; Mashek, Douglas G

    2013-01-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the predominant triacylglycerol (TAG) hydrolase in mammals; however, the tissue-specific effects of ATGL outside of adipose tissue have not been well characterized. Hence, we tested the contribution of hepatic ATGL on mediating glucose tolerance and insulin action. Glucose or insulin tolerance tests and insulin signaling were performed in C57BL/6 mice administered control (nongene specific shRNA) or Atgl shRNA adenoviruses. Glucose and lipid metabolism assays were conducted in primary hepatocytes isolated from mice transduced with control or Atgl shRNA adenoviruses. Knocking down hepatic ATGL completely abrogated the increase in serum insulin following either 1 or 12 wk of feeding a high-fat (HF) diet despite higher hepatic TAG content. Glucose tolerance tests demonstrated that ATGL knockdown normalized glucose tolerance in HF-diet-fed mice. The observed improvements in glucose tolerance were present despite unaltered hepatic insulin signaling and increased liver TAG. Mice with suppressed hepatic ATGL had reduced hepatic glucose production in vivo, and hepatocytes isolated from Atgl shRNA-treated mice displayed a 26% decrease in glucose production and a 38% increase in glucose oxidation compared to control cells. Taken together, these data suggest that hepatic ATGL knockdown enhances glucose tolerance by increasing hepatic glucose utilization and uncouples impairments in insulin action from hepatic TAG accumulation.

  4. Molecular and industrial aspects of glucose isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, S H; Rao, M B; Deshpande, V V

    1996-01-01

    Glucose isomerase (GI) (D-xylose ketol-isomerase; EC. 5.3.1.5) catalyzes the reversible isomerization of D-glucose and D-xylose to D-fructose and D-xylulose, respectively. The enzyme has the largest market in the food industry because of its application in the production of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). HFCS, an equilibrium mixture of glucose and fructose, is 1.3 times sweeter than sucrose and serves as a sweetener for use by diabetics. Interconversion of xylose to xylulose by GI serves a nutritional requirement in saprophytic bacteria and has a potential application in the bioconversion of hemicellulose to ethanol. The enzyme is widely distributed in prokaryotes. Intensive research efforts are directed toward improving its suitability for industrial application. Development of microbial strains capable of utilizing xylan-containing raw materials for growth or screening for constitutive mutants of GI is expected to lead to discontinuation of the use of xylose as an inducer for the production of the enzyme. Elimination of Co2+ from the fermentation medium is desirable for avoiding health problems arising from human consumption of HFCS. Immobilization of GI provides an efficient means for its easy recovery and reuse and lowers the cost of its use. X-ray crystallographic and genetic engineering studies support a hydride shift mechanism for the action of GI. Cloning of GI in homologous as well as heterologous hosts has been carried out, with the prime aim of overproducing the enzyme and deciphering the genetic organization of individual genes (xylA, xylB, and xylR) in the xyl operon of different microorganisms. The organization of xylA and xylB seems to be highly conserved in all bacteria. The two genes are transcribed from the same strand in Escherichia coli and Bacillus and Lactobacillus species, whereas they are transcribed divergently on different strands in Streptomyces species. A comparison of the xylA sequences from several bacterial sources revealed the

  5. A glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase immobilized on three-dimensional porous carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyi; Zhu, Rong; Huang, Jia; Zhang, Man; Liu, Hongyu; Sun, Min; Wang, Li; Song, Yonghai

    2015-08-21

    A novel glucose biosensor was developed by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD) on a three-dimensional (3D) porous kenaf stem-derived carbon (3D-KSC) which was firstly proposed as a novel supporting material to load biomolecules for electrochemical biosensing. Here, an integrated 3D-KSC electrode was prepared by using a whole piece of 3D-KSC to load the GOD molecules for glucose biosensing. The morphologies of integrated 3D-KSC and 3D-KSC/GOD electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SEM results revealed a 3D honeycomb macroporous structure of the integrated 3D-KSC electrode. The TEM results showed some microporosities and defects in the 3D-KSC electrode. The electrochemical behaviors and electrocatalytic performance of the integrated 3D-KSC/GOD electrode were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effects of pH and scan rates on the electrochemical response of the biosensor have been studied in detail. The glucose biosensor showed a wide linear range from 0.1 mM to 14.0 mM with a high sensitivity of 1.73 μA mM(-1) and a low detection limit of 50.75 μM. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor exhibited high selectivity, good repeatability and reproducibility, and good stability.

  6. Gastric bypass alters both glucose-dependent and glucose-independent regulation of islet hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Marzieh; Woods, Stephen C.; D’Alessio, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (GB) is characterized by accentuated, but short-lived postprandial elevations of blood glucose and insulin. This profile has been attributed to effects of relative hyperglycemia to directly stimulate β-cells and an augmented incretin effect. We hypothesized additional glucose-independent stimulation of insulin secretion in GB subjects. Methods Fifteen subjects with prior GB, and six matched obese non-surgical controls, and seven lean individuals were recruited. Islet hormones were measured before and after meal ingestion during hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamps to minimize the direct effects of glycemia and glucose-dependent gastrointestinal hormones on insulin secretion. Results The GB subjects had less suppression of fasting β-cell secretion during the insulin clamp compared to controls. In addition, meal-induced insulin secretion increased in the GB subjects but not controls during fixed sub-basal glycemia. In contrast the glucagon responses to hypoglycemia and meal ingestion were lower in the GB subjects than controls. Conclusions Among subjects with GB the response of insulin and glucagon secretion to decreasing blood glucose is blunted, but meal-induced insulin secretion is stimulated even at fixed systemic sub-basal glycemia. These findings indicate that following GB islet hormone secretion is altered as a result of factors beyond circulatory glucose levels. PMID:26316298

  7. Testing the Glucose Hypothesis among Capuchin Monkeys: Does Glucose Boost Self-Control?

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Audrey E.; Emerson, Ishara D.; Rossettie, Mattea S.; Beran, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The ego-depletion hypothesis states that self-control diminishes over time and with exertion. Accordingly, the glucose hypothesis attributes this depletion of self-control resources to decreases in blood glucose levels. Research has led to mixed findings among humans and nonhuman animals, with limited evidence for such a link between glucose and self-control among closely-related nonhuman primate species, but some evidence from more distantly related species (e.g., honeybees and dogs). We tested this hypothesis in capuchin monkeys by manipulating the sugar content of a calorie-matched breakfast meal following a nocturnal fast, and then presenting each monkey with the accumulation self-control task. Monkeys were presented with food items one-by-one until the subject retrieved and ate the accumulating items, which required continual inhibition of food retrieval in the face of an increasingly desirable reward. Results indicated no relationship between self-control performance on the accumulation task and glucose ingestion levels following a fast. These results do not provide support for the glucose hypothesis of self-control among capuchin monkeys within the presented paradigm. Further research assessing self-control and its physiological correlates among closely- and distantly-related species is warranted to shed light on the mechanisms underlying self-control behavior. PMID:27527225

  8. Amperometric Glucose Biosensor Based on Self-Assembling Glucose Oxidase on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-01-01

    A flow injection amperometric glucose biosensor based on electrostatic self-assembling glucose oxidase (GOx) on a carbon nanotube (CNT)-modified glassy carbon transducer is described. GOx is immobilized on the negatively charged CNT surface by alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and a GOx layer. The unique sandwich-like layer structure (PDDA/GOx/PDDA/CNT) formed by self-assembling provides a favorable microenvironment to keep the bioactivity of GOx and to prevent enzyme molecule leakage. The direct electrochemistry behavior of GOx and electrocatalysis of H2O2 on the fabricated PDDA/GOx/PDDA/CNT electrode demonstrated that such a biosensor fabrication method preserves the activity of enzyme molecules and the mechanical and electrocatalytic properties of carbon nanotubes, enabling sensitive determination of glucose. Flow injection amperometric detection of glucose is carried out at -100 mV (vs Ag/AgCl) in 0.05 M phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) with wide linear response range of 15 uM- 6 mM and a detection limit of 7 uM. The PDDA/GOx/PDDA/CNT/GC biosensor showed excellent properties for the sensitive determination of glucose with good reproducibility, remarkable stability, and free of interference from other co-existing electroactive species. The present methods can be applied to assemble other enzyme molecules and biological molecules, such as antibody, antigen, and DNA, to the CNT surface for wide biosensor and bioassay applications.

  9. Improvement in glucose biosensing response of electrochemically grown polypyrrole nanotubes by incorporating crosslinked glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Palod, Pragya Agar; Singh, Vipul

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel enzymatic glucose biosensor has been reported in which platinum coated alumina membranes (Anodisc™s) have been employed as templates for the growth of polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube arrays using electrochemical polymerization. The PPy nanotube arrays were grown on Anodisc™s of pore diameter 100 nm using potentiostatic electropolymerization. In order to optimize the polymerization time, immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) was first performed using physical adsorption followed by measuring its biosensing response which was examined amperometrically for increasing concentrations of glucose. In order to further improve the sensing performance of the biosensor fabricated for optimum polymerization duration, enzyme immobilization was carried out using cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Approximately six fold enhancement in the sensitivity was observed in the fabricated electrodes. The biosensors also showed a wide range of linear operation (0.2-13 mM), limit of detection of 50 μM glucose concentration, excellent selectivity for glucose, notable reliability for real sample detection and substantially improved shelf life. PMID:26117773

  10. A glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase immobilized on three-dimensional porous carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyi; Zhu, Rong; Huang, Jia; Zhang, Man; Liu, Hongyu; Sun, Min; Wang, Li; Song, Yonghai

    2015-08-21

    A novel glucose biosensor was developed by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD) on a three-dimensional (3D) porous kenaf stem-derived carbon (3D-KSC) which was firstly proposed as a novel supporting material to load biomolecules for electrochemical biosensing. Here, an integrated 3D-KSC electrode was prepared by using a whole piece of 3D-KSC to load the GOD molecules for glucose biosensing. The morphologies of integrated 3D-KSC and 3D-KSC/GOD electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SEM results revealed a 3D honeycomb macroporous structure of the integrated 3D-KSC electrode. The TEM results showed some microporosities and defects in the 3D-KSC electrode. The electrochemical behaviors and electrocatalytic performance of the integrated 3D-KSC/GOD electrode were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effects of pH and scan rates on the electrochemical response of the biosensor have been studied in detail. The glucose biosensor showed a wide linear range from 0.1 mM to 14.0 mM with a high sensitivity of 1.73 μA mM(-1) and a low detection limit of 50.75 μM. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor exhibited high selectivity, good repeatability and reproducibility, and good stability. PMID:26114193

  11. Development of an Amperometric-Based Glucose Biosensor to Measure the Glucose Content of Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Lee Fung; Por, Lip Yee; Yam, Mun Fei

    2015-01-01

    An amperometric enzyme-electrode was introduced where glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized on chitosan membrane via crosslinking, and then fastened on a platinum working electrode. The immobilized enzyme showed relatively high retention activity. The activity of the immobilized enzyme was influenced by its loading, being suppressed when more than 0.6 mg enzyme was used in the immobilization. The biosensor showing the highest response to glucose utilized 0.21 ml/cm2 thick chitosan membrane. The optimum experimental conditions for the biosensors in analysing glucose dissolved in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) were found to be 35°C and 0.6 V applied potential. The introduced biosensor reached a steady-state current at 60 s. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (KMapp) of the biosensor was 14.2350 mM, and its detection limit was 0.05 mM at s/n > 3, determined experimentally. The RSD of repeatability and reproducibility of the biosensor were 2.30% and 3.70%, respectively. The biosensor was showed good stability; it retained ~36% of initial activity after two months of investigation. The performance of the biosensors was evaluated by determining the glucose content in fruit homogenates. Their accuracy was compared to that of a commercial glucose assay kit. There was no significance different between two methods, indicating the introduced biosensor is reliable. PMID:25789757

  12. Serratia marcescens Quinoprotein Glucose Dehydrogenase Activity Mediates Medium Acidification and Inhibition of Prodigiosin Production by Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Fender, James E.; Bender, Cody M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Lahr, Roni M.; Kalivoda, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a model organism for the study of secondary metabolites. The biologically active pigment prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodiginine), like many other secondary metabolites, is inhibited by growth in glucose-rich medium. Whereas previous studies indicated that this inhibitory effect was pH dependent and did not require cyclic AMP (cAMP), there is no information on the genes involved in mediating this phenomenon. Here we used transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in the inhibition of prodigiosin by glucose. Multiple genetic loci involved in quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) activity were found to be required for glucose inhibition of prodigiosin production, including pyrroloquinoline quinone and ubiquinone biosynthetic genes. Upon assessing whether the enzymatic products of GDH activity were involved in the inhibitory effect, we observed that d-glucono-1,5-lactone and d-gluconic acid, but not d-gluconate, were able to inhibit prodigiosin production. These data support a model in which the oxidation of d-glucose by quinoprotein GDH initiates a reduction in pH that inhibits prodigiosin production through transcriptional control of the prodigiosin biosynthetic operon, providing new insight into the genetic pathways that control prodigiosin production. Strains generated in this report may be useful in large-scale production of secondary metabolites. PMID:22752173

  13. Amperometric glucose biosensor utilizing FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase immobilized on nanocomposite electrode.

    PubMed

    Monošík, Rastislav; Streďanský, Miroslav; Lušpai, Karol; Magdolen, Peter; Šturdík, Ernest

    2012-04-01

    Amperometric glucose biosensors utilizing commercially available FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenases from two strains of Aspergillus species are described. Enzymes were immobilized on nanocomposite electrode consisting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by entrapment between chitosan layers. Unlike the common glucose oxidase based biosensor, the presented biosensors appeared to be O(2)-independent. The optimal amount of enzymes, working potential and pH value of working media of the glucose biosensors were determined. The biosensor utilizing enzyme isolated from Aspergillus sp. showed linearity over the range from 50 to 960 μM and from 70 to 620 μM for enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae. The detection limits were 4.45 μM and 4.15 μM, respectively. The time of response was found to be 60 s. The biosensors showed excellent operational stability - no loss of sensitivity after 100 consecutive measurements and after the storage for 4 weeks at 4 °C in phosphate buffer solution. When biosensors were held in a dessicator at room temperature without use, they kept the same response ability at least after 6 months. Finally, the results obtained from measurements of beverages and wine samples were compared with those obtained with the enzymatic-spectrophotometric and standard HPLC methods, respectively. Good correlation between results in case of analysis of real samples and good analytical performance of presented glucose biosensor allows to use presented concept for mass production and commercial use. PMID:22418262

  14. Improvement in glucose biosensing response of electrochemically grown polypyrrole nanotubes by incorporating crosslinked glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Palod, Pragya Agar; Singh, Vipul

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel enzymatic glucose biosensor has been reported in which platinum coated alumina membranes (Anodisc™s) have been employed as templates for the growth of polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube arrays using electrochemical polymerization. The PPy nanotube arrays were grown on Anodisc™s of pore diameter 100 nm using potentiostatic electropolymerization. In order to optimize the polymerization time, immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) was first performed using physical adsorption followed by measuring its biosensing response which was examined amperometrically for increasing concentrations of glucose. In order to further improve the sensing performance of the biosensor fabricated for optimum polymerization duration, enzyme immobilization was carried out using cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Approximately six fold enhancement in the sensitivity was observed in the fabricated electrodes. The biosensors also showed a wide range of linear operation (0.2-13 mM), limit of detection of 50 μM glucose concentration, excellent selectivity for glucose, notable reliability for real sample detection and substantially improved shelf life.

  15. A UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucose-1-phosphotransferase in embryonic chicken neural retina

    SciTech Connect

    Koro, L.A.; Marchase, R.B.

    1982-12-01

    A subclass of cell-surface glycoproteins from embryonic chicken neural retina contains a high mannose-type oligosaccharide that terminates with glucose linked via a phosphodiester bond to penultimate mannose. This unusual oligosaccharide seems responsible for the glycoprotein attachments to the cell-surface baseplate ligatin. Using beta-/sup 32/P-UDP-/sup 3/H-glucose, we demonstrate in retinal homogenates the existence of a UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucose-1-phosphotransferase (GlcPTase) that catalyzes the synthesis of such a linkage. Characterization of the doubly labeled product resulting from activity of the transferase reveals a family of endoglycosidase H-sensitive oligosaccharides displaying a cation-exchange profile similar to that of oligosaccharides derived from ligatin-associated proteins synthesized in vivo. Further analysis confirms that the incorporation of label is due to a terminal /sup 3/H-glucose joined via a /sup 32/P-phosphodiester linkage to carbon 6 of a penultimate mannose. We propose that GlcPTase may be a controlling enzyme for the targeting of certain newly synthesized proteins to the cell surface.

  16. Development of an amperometric-based glucose biosensor to measure the glucose content of fruit.

    PubMed

    Ang, Lee Fung; Por, Lip Yee; Yam, Mun Fei

    2015-01-01

    An amperometric enzyme-electrode was introduced where glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized on chitosan membrane via crosslinking, and then fastened on a platinum working electrode. The immobilized enzyme showed relatively high retention activity. The activity of the immobilized enzyme was influenced by its loading, being suppressed when more than 0.6 mg enzyme was used in the immobilization. The biosensor showing the highest response to glucose utilized 0.21 ml/cm2 thick chitosan membrane. The optimum experimental conditions for the biosensors in analysing glucose dissolved in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) were found to be 35°C and 0.6 V applied potential. The introduced biosensor reached a steady-state current at 60 s. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant ([Formula: see text]) of the biosensor was 14.2350 mM, and its detection limit was 0.05 mM at s/n > 3, determined experimentally. The RSD of repeatability and reproducibility of the biosensor were 2.30% and 3.70%, respectively. The biosensor was showed good stability; it retained ~36% of initial activity after two months of investigation. The performance of the biosensors was evaluated by determining the glucose content in fruit homogenates. Their accuracy was compared to that of a commercial glucose assay kit. There was no significance different between two methods, indicating the introduced biosensor is reliable. PMID:25789757

  17. Proposed structure of putative glucose channel in GLUT1 facilitative glucose transporter.

    PubMed

    Zeng, H; Parthasarathy, R; Rampal, A L; Jung, C Y

    1996-01-01

    A family of structurally related intrinsic membrane proteins (facilitative glucose transporters) catalyzes the movement of glucose across the plasma membrane of animal cells. Evidence indicates that these proteins show a common structural motif where approximately 50% of the mass is embedded in lipid bilayer (transmembrane domain) in 12 alpha-helices (transmembrane helices; TMHs) and accommodates a water-filled channel for substrate passage (glucose channel) whose tertiary structure is currently unknown. Using recent advances in protein structure prediction algorithms we proposed here two three-dimensional structural models for the transmembrane glucose channel of GLUT1 glucose transporter. Our models emphasize the physical dimension and water accessibility of the channel, loop lengths between TMHs, the macrodipole orientation in four-helix bundle motif, and helix packing energy. Our models predict that five TMHs, either TMHs 3, 4, 7, 8, 11 (Model 1) or TMHs 2, 5, 11, 8, 7 (Model 2), line the channel, and the remaining TMHs surround these channel-lining TMHs. We discuss how our models are compatible with the experimental data obtained with this protein, and how they can be used in designing new biochemical and molecular biological experiments in elucidation of the structural basis of this important protein function.

  18. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ploug, T.; Stallknecht, B.M.; Pedersen, O.; Kahn, B.B.; Ohkuwa, T.; Vinten, J.; Galbo, H. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers and an increase of approximately 33% for contraction-stimulated transport in slow-twitch red fibers compared with nonexercised sedentary muscle. A fully additive effect of insulin and contractions was observed both in trained and untrained muscle. Compared with transport in control rats subjected to an almost exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold by training in fast-twitch red muscle fibers. In parallel to this, Western blot demonstrated a approximately 47% increase in GLUT-1 protein and a approximately 31% increase in GLUT-4 protein. This indicates that the increases in maximum velocity for 3-MG transport in trained muscle is due to an increased number of glucose transporters.

  19. Serratia marcescens quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase activity mediates medium acidification and inhibition of prodigiosin production by glucose.

    PubMed

    Fender, James E; Bender, Cody M; Stella, Nicholas A; Lahr, Roni M; Kalivoda, Eric J; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2012-09-01

    Serratia marcescens is a model organism for the study of secondary metabolites. The biologically active pigment prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodiginine), like many other secondary metabolites, is inhibited by growth in glucose-rich medium. Whereas previous studies indicated that this inhibitory effect was pH dependent and did not require cyclic AMP (cAMP), there is no information on the genes involved in mediating this phenomenon. Here we used transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in the inhibition of prodigiosin by glucose. Multiple genetic loci involved in quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) activity were found to be required for glucose inhibition of prodigiosin production, including pyrroloquinoline quinone and ubiquinone biosynthetic genes. Upon assessing whether the enzymatic products of GDH activity were involved in the inhibitory effect, we observed that d-glucono-1,5-lactone and d-gluconic acid, but not d-gluconate, were able to inhibit prodigiosin production. These data support a model in which the oxidation of d-glucose by quinoprotein GDH initiates a reduction in pH that inhibits prodigiosin production through transcriptional control of the prodigiosin biosynthetic operon, providing new insight into the genetic pathways that control prodigiosin production. Strains generated in this report may be useful in large-scale production of secondary metabolites.

  20. Flurbiprofen Ameliorates Glucose Deprivation-Induced Leptin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hosoi, Toru; Suyama, Yuka; Kayano, Takaaki; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Leptin resistance is one of the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of obesity. The present study showed that glucose deprivation inhibited leptin-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) in neuronal cells. Flurbiprofen reversed glucose deprivation-mediated attenuation of STAT3, but not STAT5 activation, in leptin-treated cells. Glucose deprivation increased C/EBP-homologous protein and glucose regulated protein 78 induction, indicating the activation of unfolded protein responses (UPR). Flurbiprofen did not affect the glucose deprivation-induced activation of UPR, but did attenuate the glucose deprivation-mediated induction of AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Flurbiprofen may ameliorate glucose deprivation-induced leptin resistance in neuronal cells. PMID:27746736

  1. Glucose Biosensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe ); Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi; Ren, Zhifeng

    2004-02-12

    This paper describes the development of glucose biosensors based on carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) for the selective detection of glucose. Glucose oxidase was covalently immobilized on CNT NEEs via carbodiimide chemistry by forming amide linkages between their amine residues and carboxylic acid groups on the CNT tips. The catalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide liberated from the enzymatic reaction of glucose oxidase upon the glucose and oxygen on CNT NEEs leads to the selective detection of glucose. The biosensor effectively performs selective electrochemical analysis of glucose in the presence of common interferents (e.g. acetaminophen, uric and ascorbic acids), avoiding the generation of an overlapping signal from such interferents. Such an operation eliminates the need for permselective membrane barriers or artificial electron mediators, thus greatly simplifying the sensor design and fabrication.

  2. Evolution of glucose utilization: Glucokinase and glucokinase regulator protein

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David M.; Tan, Huanran

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is an essential nutrient that must be distributed throughout the body to provide energy to sustain physiological functions. Glucose is delivered to distant tissues via be blood stream, and complex systems have evolved to maintain the levels of glucose within a narrow physiological range. Phosphorylation of glucose, by glucokinase, is an essential component of glucose homeostasis, both from the regulatory and metabolic point-of-view. Here we review the evolution of glucose utilization from the perspective of glucokinase. We discuss the origin of glucokinase, its evolution within the hexokinase gene family, and the evolution of its interacting regulatory partner, glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR). Evolution of the structure and sequence of both glucokinase and GCKR have been necessary to optimize glucokinase in its role in glucose metabolism. PMID:24075984

  3. Role of Adrenergic Receptors in Glucose, Fructose and Galactose-Induced Increases in Intestinal Glucose Uptake in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Salman, T M; Alada, A R A; Oyebola, D D O

    2014-12-29

    The study investigated the role of adrenergic receptors in glucose, fructose-, and galactose- induced increases in intestinal glucose uptake. Experiments were carried out on fasted male anaesthetized Nigerian local dogs divided into seven groups (with five dogs per group). Group I dogs were administered normal saline and served as control. Dogs in groups II, III and IV were intravenously infused with glucose (1.1 mg/kg/min), fructose (1.1 mg/kg/min) and galactose (1.1 mg/kg/min) respectively. Another three groups, V, VI and VII were pretreated with prazosin (0.2mg/kg), propranolol (0.5mg/kg) or a combination of prazosin (0.2mg/kg) and propranolol (0.5mg/kg) followed by glucose infusion, frutose infusion or galactose infusion respectively. Through a midline laparatomy, the upper jejunum was cannulated for blood flow measurement and blood samples were obtained for measurement of glucose content of the arterial blood and venous blood from the upper jejunal segment. Glucose uptake was calculated as the product of jejunal blood flow and the difference between arterial and venous glucose levels (A-V glucose). The results showed that pretreatment of the animal with prazosin had no effect on glucose and galactose induced increases in glucose uptake. However, pretreatment with propranolol completely abolished glucose, fructose and galactose-induced increases in intestinal glucose uptake. Prazosin also significantly reduced galactose-induced increase in intestinal glucose uptake. The results suggest that the increases in intestinal glucose uptake induced by glucose and fructose are mediated mostly by beta adrenergic receptors while that of galactose is mediated by both alpha and beta adrenergic receptors.

  4. Comparison of glucose oxidases from Penicillium adametzii, Penicillium Funiculosum and Aspergillus Niger in the design of amperometric glucose biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ramanavicius, Arunas; Voronovic, Jaroslav; Semashko, Tatiana; Mikhailova, Raisa; Kausaite-Minkstimiene, Asta; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2014-01-01

    The properties of amperometric glucose biosensors based on three different glucose oxidases and various redox mediators were evaluated. Glucose oxidases (GOx) from Penicillium adametzii, Penicillium funiculosum and Aspergillus niger and artificial redox mediators, such as ferrocene, ferrocenecarboxaldehyde, α-methylferrocene methanol and ferrocenecarboxylic acid, were used for modifying the graphite rod electrode and amperometrical reagent-less glucose detection. The obtained results were compared using N-methylphenazonium methyl sulphate in the solution. Taking into account the experimental kinetic parameters and the stability of the tested enzymatic electrodes, GOx from Penicillium funiculosum proved to be more suitable for glucose biosensor design in comparison with other evaluated enzymes. PMID:25492463

  5. Mild type II diabetes markedly increases glucose cycling in the postabsorptive state and during glucose infusion irrespective of obesity.

    PubMed Central

    Efendic, S; Karlander, S; Vranic, M

    1988-01-01

    Glucose cycling (GC; G in equilibrium G6P) equals 14% of glucose production in postabsorptive man. Our aim was to determine glucose cycling in six lean and six overweight mild type II diabetics (fasting glycemia: 139 +/- 10 and 152 +/- 7 mg/dl), in postabsorptive state (PA) and during glucose infusion (2 mg/kg per min). 14 control subjects were weight and age matched. GC is a function of the enzyme that catalyzes the reaction opposite the net flux and is the difference between hepatic total glucose output (HTGO) (2-[3H]glucose) and hepatic glucose production (HGP) (6-[3H]-glucose). Postabsorptively, GC is a function of glucokinase. With glucose infusion the flux is reversed (net glucose uptake), and GC is a function of glucose 6-phosphatase. In PA, GC was increased by 100% in lean (from 0.25 +/- 0.07 to 0.43 +/- .08 mg/kg per min) and obese (from 0.22 +/- 0.05 to 0.50 +/- 0.07) diabetics. HGP and HTGO increased in lean and obese diabetics by 41 and 33%. Glucose infusion suppressed apparent phosphatase activity and gluconeogenesis much less in diabetics than controls, resulting in marked enhancement (400%) in HTGO and HGP, GC remained increased by 100%. Although the absolute responses of C-peptide and insulin were comparable to those of control subjects, they were inappropriate for hyperglycemia. Peripheral insulin resistance relates to decreased metabolic glucose clearance (MCR) and inadequate increase of uptake during glucose infusion. We conclude that increases in HGP and HTGO and a decrease of MCR are characteristic features of mild type II diabetes and are more pronounced during glucose infusion. There is also an increase in hepatic GC, a stopgap that controls changes from glucose production to uptake. Postabsorptively, this limits the increase of HGP and glycemia. In contrast, during glucose infusion, increased GC decreases hepatic glucose uptake and thus contributes to hyperglycemia. Obesity per se did not affect GC. An increase in glucose cycling and

  6. Nanostructured glucose-oxidase immobilized SnO2 thin films for glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhobale, S.; Joshee, P.; Deore, G.; Laware, S. L.; Kale, S. N.

    2011-02-01

    Polycrystalline rutile films of SnO2 (˜1500 Å) were deposited on Al2O3. Film imaging showed regular ellipsoidal nanostructured growth. Different concentrations (1000-3000 U) of glucose oxidase (GOx) were immobilized on SnO2 surface. Upon interaction with various glucose concentrations (65-300 mg/dl), films showed pronounced change in their sheet resistance with recovery and repeatability. Nanostructured SnO2 surfaces probably enhance adsorption of oxygen moieties. These convert to their ions by extracting electron/s from the conduction band of SnO2, which further interacts with H+, formed during the GOx-glucose interaction. This releases the trapped electron to the conduction band of SnO2, justifying its role as a catalyst.

  7. Electrochemical Glucose Biosensor Based on Glucose Oxidase Displayed on Yeast Surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwei; Lang, Qiaolin; Liang, Bo; Liu, Aihua

    2015-01-01

    The conventional enzyme-based biosensor requires chemical or physical immobilization of purified enzymes on electrode surface, which often results in loss of enzyme activity and/or fractions immobilized over time. It is also costly. A major advantage of yeast surface display is that it enables the direct utilization of whole cell catalysts with eukaryote-produced proteins being displayed on the cell surface, providing an economic alternative to traditional production of purified enzymes. Herein, we describe the details of the display of glucose oxidase (GOx) on yeast cell surface and its application in the development of electrochemical glucose sensor. In order to achieve a direct electrochemistry of GOx, the entire cell catalyst (yeast-GOx) was immobilized together with multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the electrode, which allowed sensitive and selective glucose detection. PMID:26060079

  8. A comparison of fasting plasma glucose and glucose challenge test for screening of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Poomalar, G K; Rangaswamy, V

    2013-07-01

    Glucose challenge test (GCT) has been used as an effective screening test for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), though it has its own limitations. Hence, we assessed the effectiveness of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) as a simpler alternative procedure. A prospective study was done in 500 pregnant women with gestational age between 22 and 37 weeks. FPG, GCT and GTT were performed in all patients using the glucose oxidase/peroxidase method. The overall sensitivity and specificity of GCT were 75.0% and 92.0%, respectively and the corresponding values for FPG were 88.8% and 95.2%. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 42.2% and 97.9% for GCT and 59.2% and 99.1% for FPG, respectively. We conclude that FPG can be used as an effective screening tool for gestational diabetes mellitus.

  9. Recommendations for standardizing glucose reporting and analysis to optimize clinical decision making in diabetes: the ambulatory glucose profile.

    PubMed

    Bergenstal, Richard M; Ahmann, Andrew J; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H; Garg, Satish K; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B; Klonoff, David C; Kruger, Davida F; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S; Olson, Beth A; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients.

  10. Recommendations for Standardizing Glucose Reporting and Analysis to Optimize Clinical Decision Making in Diabetes: The Ambulatory Glucose Profile

    PubMed Central

    Bergenstal, Richard M.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W.; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H.; Garg, Satish K.; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B.; Klonoff, David C.; Kruger, Davida F.; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S.; Olson, Beth A.; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A.; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S.; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients. PMID:23567014

  11. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Near-Infrared Optical Glucose Sensors toward In Vivo Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Kyungsuk; McNicholas, Thomas P.; Mu, Bin; Strano, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews research efforts on developing single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based near-infrared (NIR) optical glucose sensors toward long-term in vivo continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). We first discuss the unique optical properties of SWNTs and compare SWNTs with traditional organic and nanoparticle fluorophores regarding in vivo glucose-sensing applications. We then present our development of SWNT-based glucose sensors that use glucose-binding proteins and boronic acids as a high-affinity molecular receptor for glucose and transduce binding events on the receptors to modulate SWNT fluorescence. Finally, we discuss opportunities and challenges in translating the emerging technology of SWNT-based NIR optical glucose sensors into in vivo CGM for practical clinical use. PMID:23439162

  12. GnRH increases glucose transporter-1 expression and stimulates glucose uptake in the gonadotroph.

    PubMed

    Harris, Valerie M; Bendre, Sachin V; Gonzalez De Los Santos, Francina; Fite, Alemu; El-Yaman El-Dandachli, Ahmad; Kurenbekova, Lyazat; Abou-Samra, Abdul B; Buggs-Saxton, Colleen

    2012-02-01

    GnRH is the main regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (H-P-G) axis. GnRH stimulates the pituitary gonadotroph to synthesize and secrete gonadotrophins (LH and FSH), and this effect of GnRH is dependent on the availability of glucose and other nutrients. Little is known about whether GnRH regulates glucose metabolism in the gonadotroph. This study examined the regulation of glucose transporters (Gluts) by GnRH in the LβT2 gonadotroph cell line. Using real-time PCR analysis, the expression of Glut1, -2, -4, and -8 was detected, but Glut1 mRNA expression level was more abundant than the mRNA expression levels of Glut2, -4, and -8. After the treatment of LβT2 cells with GnRH, Glut1 mRNA expression was markedly induced, but there was no GnRH-induction of Glut2, -4, or -8 mRNA expression in LβT2 cells. The effect of GnRH on Glut1 mRNA expression is partly mediated by ERK activation. GnRH increased GLUT1 protein and stimulated GLUT1 translocation to the cell surface of LβT2 cells. Glucose uptake assays were performed in LβT2 cells and showed that GnRH stimulates glucose uptake in the gonadotroph. Finally, exogenous treatment of mice with GnRH increased the expression of Glut1 but not the expression of Glut2, -4, or -8 in the pituitary. Therefore, regulation of glucose metabolism by GnRH via changes in Gluts expression and subcellular location in the pituitary gonadotroph reveals a novel response of the gonadotroph to GnRH.

  13. CGM Versus FGM; or, Continuous Glucose Monitoring Is Not Flash Glucose Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Freckmann, Guido

    2015-09-01

    It remains to be seen as to what share of the market FGM will achieve if the manufacturer can supply any amount desired.Will a significant portion of the glucose monitoring market then be taken over by FGM? The availability of FGM as anew option for glucose monitoring can basically be evaluated positively and it does indeed clearly show the benefit of“more information” on the glucose trend. The relatively low price for glucose monitoring using FGM and the unusual market introduction (not first via the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Funds, as was the case with CGM) have given increased attention to the use of more glucose information. It will likely take a certain amount of time before other providers are able to bring different FGM systems to the market.The option of coupling a CGM system with an insulin pump offers the perspective of an automated insulin application,that is, a closed-loop system. Such systems are currently being tested under everyday conditions, although it is not possible to predict when they will actually reach the market.There are, however, such couplings where algorithms are responsible for shutting off insulin delivery when the glucose concentration reaches a defined level or if it will be reached in the foreseeable future. This significantly helps prevent hypoglycemia. These options are only available with CGM. The aim of this commentary is to present the differences between CGM and FGM, including the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches. We see significant benefits in both options based on the different positioning of the approaches and the different user groups. PMID:26330484

  14. Mechanisms of impaired fasting glucose and glucose intolerance induced by an approximate 50% pancreatectomy.

    PubMed

    Matveyenko, Aleksey V; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Butler, Peter C

    2006-08-01

    Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) often coexist and as such represent a potent risk factor for subsequent development of type 2 diabetes. beta-Cell mass is approximately 50% deficient in IFG and approximately 65% deficient in type 2 diabetes. To establish the effect of a approximately 50% deficit in beta-cell mass on carbohydrate metabolism, we performed a approximately 50% partial pancreatectomy versus sham surgery in 14 dogs. Insulin secretion was quantified from insulin concentrations measured in the portal vein at 1-min sampling intervals under basal conditions, after a 30-g oral glucose, and during a hyperglycemic clamp. Insulin sensitivity was measured by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp combined with isotope dilution. Partial pancreatectomy resulted in IFG and IGT. After partial pancreatectomy both basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were decreased through the mechanism of a selective approximately 50 and approximately 80% deficit in insulin pulse mass, respectively (P < 0.05). These defects in insulin secretion were partially offset by decreased hepatic insulin clearance (P < 0.05). Partial pancreatectomy also caused a approximately 40% decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (P < 0.05), insulin sensitivity after partial pancreatectomy being related to insulin pulse amplitude (r = 0.9, P < 0.01). We conclude that a approximately 50% deficit in beta-cell mass can recapitulate the alterations in glucose-mediated insulin secretion and insulin action in humans with IFG and IGT. These data support a mechanistic role of a deficit in beta-cell mass in the evolution of IFG/IGT and subsequently type 2 diabetes. PMID:16873700

  15. Characterization of transmembrane movement of glucose and glucose analogs in Streptococcus mutants Ingbritt.

    PubMed Central

    Dashper, S G; Reynolds, E C

    1990-01-01

    The transmembrane movement of radiolabeled, nonmetabolizable glucose analogs in Streptococcus mutants Ingbritt was studied under conditions of differing transmembrane electrochemical potentials (delta psi) and pH gradients (delta pH). The delta pH and delta psi were determined from the transmembrane equilibration of radiolabeled benzoate and tetraphenylphosphonium ions, respectively. Growth conditions of S. mutants Ingbritt were chosen so that the cells had a low apparent phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent glucose:phosphotransferase activity. Cells energized under different conditions produced transmembrane proton potentials ranging from -49 to -103 mV but did not accumulate 6-deoxyglucose intracellularly. An artificial transmembrane proton potential was generated in deenergized cells by creating a delta psi with a valinomycin-induced K+ diffusion potential and a delta pH by rapid acidification of the medium. Artificial transmembrane proton potentials up to -83 mV, although producing proton influx, could not accumulate 6-deoxyglucose in deenergized cells or 2-deoxyglucose or thiomethylgalactoside in deenergized, PEP-depleted cells. The transmembrane diffusion of glucose in PEP-depleted, KF-treated cells did not exhibit saturation kinetics or competitive inhibition by 6-deoxyglucose or 2-deoxyglucose, indicating that diffusion was not facilitated by a membrane carrier. As proton-linked membrane carriers have been shown to facilitate diffusion in the absence of a transmembrane proton potential, the results therefore are not consistent with a proton-linked glucose carrier in S. mutans Ingbritt. This together with the lack of proton-linked transport of the glucose analogs suggests that glucose transmembrane movement in S. mutans Ingbritt is not linked to the transmembrane proton potential. PMID:2298698

  16. Glucose metabolism and thermogenesis during glucose and insulin infusion in severely underweight patients.

    PubMed

    Gallen, I W; Macdonald, I A; Allison, S P

    1992-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of gross loss of body weight on glucose disposal (GD), storage (GS), oxidation (GO), and the thermogenic response (TR) during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose infusion in 9 underweight but nourished patients (UP) and in 3 of the patients after weight gain (WGP). In UP, baseline metabolic rate (MR) was 4.1 +/- 0.2 kJ/min and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) 0.97 +/- 0.02. During the final 30 minutes of hyperinsulinemia MR rose by 0.32 +/- 0.07 kJ/min (p less than .01) and RER rose to 1.09 +/- 0.03 (p less than .01). GD was 61 +/- 3 mumol/kg per minute, GO 35 +/- 1 mumol/kg per minute, and GS 26 +/- 4 mumol/kg per minute. The energy cost of glucose storage as glycogen was 0.15 kJ/min, and as lipid was 0.2 kJ/min. In WGP baseline MR was 4.5 +/- 0.4 kJ/min and RER was 0.91 +/- 0.03. During hyperinsulinemia MR rose by 0.63 +/- 0.2 kJ/min, RER rose to 0.93 +/- 0.02, GD was 53 +/- 4 mumol/kg per minute, GO was 30 +/- 3 mumol/kg per minute, and GS was 23 +/- 1 mumol/kg per minute. The energy cost for this glucose storage was 0.22 kJ/min. Therefore, during hyperinsulinemia in UP, GD, and TR are similar, but GO is greater and GS is less than previously reported in healthy subjects. However, this TR is entirely accounted for by the energy cost of glucose storage with no evidence of facultative thermogenesis. In WGP, all responses were similar to those in healthy subjects, and the TR was in excess of that required of the energy cost of glucose storage.

  17. CGM Versus FGM; or, Continuous Glucose Monitoring Is Not Flash Glucose Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Freckmann, Guido

    2015-09-01

    It remains to be seen as to what share of the market FGM will achieve if the manufacturer can supply any amount desired.Will a significant portion of the glucose monitoring market then be taken over by FGM? The availability of FGM as anew option for glucose monitoring can basically be evaluated positively and it does indeed clearly show the benefit of“more information” on the glucose trend. The relatively low price for glucose monitoring using FGM and the unusual market introduction (not first via the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Funds, as was the case with CGM) have given increased attention to the use of more glucose information. It will likely take a certain amount of time before other providers are able to bring different FGM systems to the market.The option of coupling a CGM system with an insulin pump offers the perspective of an automated insulin application,that is, a closed-loop system. Such systems are currently being tested under everyday conditions, although it is not possible to predict when they will actually reach the market.There are, however, such couplings where algorithms are responsible for shutting off insulin delivery when the glucose concentration reaches a defined level or if it will be reached in the foreseeable future. This significantly helps prevent hypoglycemia. These options are only available with CGM. The aim of this commentary is to present the differences between CGM and FGM, including the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches. We see significant benefits in both options based on the different positioning of the approaches and the different user groups.

  18. Chlorogenic acid differentially affects postprandial glucose and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide response in rats.

    PubMed

    Tunnicliffe, Jasmine M; Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2011-10-01

    Regular coffee consumption significantly lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Coffee contains thousands of compounds; however, the specific component(s) responsible for this reduced risk is unknown. Chlorogenic acids (CGA) found in brewed coffee inhibit intestinal glucose uptake in vitro. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which CGA acts to mediate blood glucose response in vivo. Conscious, unrestrained, male Sprague-Dawley rats were chronically catheterized and gavage-fed a standardized meal (59% carbohydrate, 25% fat, 12% protein), administered with or without CGA (120 mg·kg(-1)), in a randomized crossover design separated by a 3-day washout period. Acetaminophen was co-administered to assess the effects of CGA on gastric emptying. The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) were measured. GLP-1 response in the presence of glucose and CGA was further examined, using the human colon cell line NCI-H716. Total area under the curve (AUC) for blood glucose was significantly attenuated in rats fed CGA (p < 0.05). Despite this, no differences in plasma insulin or nonesterified fatty acids were observed, and gastric emptying was not altered. Plasma GIP response was blunted in rats fed CGA, with a lower peak concentration and AUC up to 180 min postprandially (p < 0.05). There were no changes in GLP-1 secretion in either the in vivo or in vitro study. In conclusion, CGA treatment resulted in beneficial effects on blood glucose response, with alterations seen in GIP concentrations. Given the widespread consumption and availability of coffee, CGA may be a viable prevention tool for T2D. PMID:21977912

  19. Dynamics of the reaction glucose-catalase-glucose oxidase-hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Číp, M.; Schreiberová, L.; Schreiber, I.

    2011-12-01

    Glucose-catalase-glucose oxidase-hydrogen peroxide reaction is one of the few known enzymatic systems studied in vitro in the field of nonlinear chemical dynamics. This reaction belongs to the family of oscillatory enzymatic reactions, which form a natural basis of oscillations in biological systems. A parametric study of dependence on mixing, temperature and initial concentrations of components in a batch stirred reactor was carried out. A newly proposed mathematical model of the reaction conforms to the obtained experimental data. Results of our experiments and simulations hint at further directions of research of non-linear dynamics in this reaction.

  20. Pro-Aging Effects of Glucose Signaling through a G Protein-Coupled Glucose Receptor in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Antoine E.; Leroux, Alexandre; Alaamery, Manal A.; Hoffman, Charles S.; Chartrand, Pascal; Ferbeyre, Gerardo; Rokeach, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    Glucose is the preferred carbon and energy source in prokaryotes, unicellular eukaryotes, and metazoans. However, excess of glucose has been associated with several diseases, including diabetes and the less understood process of aging. On the contrary, limiting glucose (i.e., calorie restriction) slows aging and age-related diseases in most species. Understanding the mechanism by which glucose limits life span is therefore important for any attempt to control aging and age-related diseases. Here, we use the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model to study the regulation of chronological life span by glucose. Growth of S. pombe at a reduced concentration of glucose increased life span and oxidative stress resistance as reported before for many other organisms. Surprisingly, loss of the Git3 glucose receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor, also increased life span in conditions where glucose consumption was not affected. These results suggest a role for glucose-signaling pathways in life span regulation. In agreement, constitutive activation of the Gα subunit acting downstream of Git3 accelerated aging in S. pombe and inhibited the effects of calorie restriction. A similar pro-aging effect of glucose was documented in mutants of hexokinase, which cannot metabolize glucose and, therefore, are exposed to constitutive glucose signaling. The pro-aging effect of glucose signaling on life span correlated with an increase in reactive oxygen species and a decrease in oxidative stress resistance and respiration rate. Likewise, the anti-aging effect of both calorie restriction and the Δgit3 mutation was accompanied by increased respiration and lower reactive oxygen species production. Altogether, our data suggest an important role for glucose signaling through the Git3/PKA pathway to regulate S. pombe life span. PMID:19266076

  1. Analysis of Intracellular Glucose at Single Cells Using Electrochemiluminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Huang, Peiyuan; Qin, Yu; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Here, luminol electrochemiluminescence was first applied to analyze intracellular molecules, such as glucose, at single cells. The individual cells were retained in cell-sized microwells on a gold coated indium tin oxide (ITO) slide, which were treated with luminol, triton X-100, and glucose oxidase simultaneously. The broken cellular membrane in the presence of triton X-100 released intracellular glucose into the microwell and reacted with glucose oxidase to generate hydrogen peroxide, which induced luminol luminescence under positive potential. To achieve fast analysis, the luminescences from 64 individual cells on one ITO slide were imaged in 60 s using a charge-coupled device (CCD). More luminescence was observed at all the microwells after the introduction of triton X-100 and glucose oxidase suggested that intracellular glucose was detected at single cells. The starvation of cells to decrease intracellular glucose produced less luminescence, which confirmed that our luminescence intensity was correlated with the concentration of intracellular glucose. Large deviations in glucose concentration at observed single cells revealed high cellular heterogeneity in intracellular glucose for the first time. This developed electrochemiluminescence assay will be potentially applied for fast analysis of more intracellular molecules in single cells to elucidate cellular heterogeneity. PMID:27094779

  2. Glucose uptake in Oesophagostomum dentatum and the effect of oxfendazole.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M B; Friis, C

    1998-12-31

    The uptake of 14C-glucose by adult Oesophagostomum dentatum was characterised. The uptake was a non-linear function of external glucose concentration. The maximum velocity of uptake (Vmax) was 0.964 nmol/100 mg dry weight (dw)/5 min, and the transport constant (Kt) was 10.02 microM. When phlorizin, phloretin and 3-O-methylglucose were tested for their effects on the uptake of 14C-glucose, phloretin and 3-O-methylglucose produced significant inhibitions, indicating that the uptake was mediated and occurred by facilitated diffusion. Exposure of the worms to oxfendazole prior to incubation with 14C-glucose did not affect the uptake of glucose. In another experiment worms were incubated with unlabelled glucose and the external glucose concentration was measured enzymatically. During a 7 h incubation period, the quantity of glucose remaining in the incubation medium of oxfendazole exposed worms was significantly greater than in the control group. It was concluded that oxfendazole did not influence the process of 14C-glucose uptake, but might induce changes in the parasite leading to a reduced ability to deplete the incubation medium of glucose.

  3. Sleep restriction acutely impairs glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pawan K; Foppen, Ewout; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Chronic sleep curtailment in humans has been related to impairment of glucose metabolism. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute sleep deprivation on glucose tolerance in rats. A group of rats was challenged by 4-h sleep deprivation in the early rest period, leading to prolonged (16 h) wakefulness. Another group of rats was allowed to sleep during the first 4 h of the light period and sleep deprived in the next 4 h. During treatment, food was withdrawn to avoid a postmeal rise in plasma glucose. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed immediately after the sleep deprivation period. Sleep deprivation at both times of the day similarly impaired glucose tolerance and reduced the early-phase insulin responses to a glucose challenge. Basal concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, and corticosterone remained unchanged after sleep deprivation. Throughout IVGTTs, plasma corticosterone concentrations were not different between the control and sleep-deprived group. Together, these results demonstrate that independent of time of day and sleep pressure, short sleep deprivation during the resting phase favors glucose intolerance in rats by attenuating the first-phase insulin response to a glucose load. In conclusion, this study highlights the acute adverse effects of only a short sleep restriction on glucose homeostasis. PMID:27354542

  4. Atorvastatin delays the glucose clearance rate in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Daxin; Wang, Yanli; Gao, Shoucui; Wang, Xiaojing; Sun, Wentao; Bai, Liang; Cheng, Gong; Chu, Yonglie; Zhao, Sihai; Liu, Enqi

    2015-05-01

    The administration of statin might increase the risk of new-onset diabetes in hypercholesterolemic patients based on the recent clinical evidence. However, the causal relationship must be clarified and confirmed in animal experiments. Therefore, we mimicked hypercholesterolemia by feeding rabbits a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) and performed 16 weeks of atorvastatin administration to investigate the effect of statin on glucose metabolism. The intravenous glucose tolerance test showed that plasma glucose levels in the statin-treated rabbits were consistently higher and that there was a slower rate of glucose clearance from the blood than in HCD rabbits. The incremental area under the curve for glucose in the statin-treated rabbits was also significantly larger than in the HCD rabbits. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the intravenous insulin tolerance test. The glucose-lowering ability of exogenous insulin was not impaired by statin treatment in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. The administration of a single dose of statin did not affect glucose metabolism in normal rabbits. The statin also significantly increased the levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate transaminase and decreased plasma levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the hypercholesterolemic rabbits, whereas it did not affect plasma levels of glucose and insulin. The current results showed that atorvastatin treatment resulted in a significant delay of glucose clearance in hypercholesterolemic rabbits, and this rabbit model could be suitable for studying the effects of statin on glucose metabolism.

  5. Effect of anesthesia on glucose production and utilization in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Penicaud, L.; Ferre, P.; Kande, J.; Leturque, A.; Issad, T.; Girard, J.

    1987-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of pentobarbital anesthesia (50 mg/kg ip) on glucose kinetics and individual tissue glucose utilization in vivo, in chronically catheterized rats. Glucose turnover studies were carried out using (3-/sup 3/H) glucose as tracer. A transient hyperglycemia and an increased glucose production were observed 3 min after induction of anesthesia. However, 40 min after induction of anesthesia, glycemia returned to the level observed in awake animals, whereas glucose turnover was decreased by 30% as compared with unanesthetized rats. These results are discussed with regard to the variations observed in plasma insulin, glucagon, and catecholamine levels. Glucose utilization by individual tissues was studied by the 2-(1-/sup 3/H) deoxyglucose technique. A four- to fivefold decrease in glucose utilization was observed in postural muscles (soleus and adductor longus), while in other nonpostural muscles (epitrochlearis, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm) and other tissues (white and brown adipose tissues) anesthesia did not modify the rate of glucose utilization. A decrease in glucose utilization was also observed in the brain.

  6. Characterization of mammalian glucose transport proteins using photoaffinity labeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wadzinski, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    A carrier-free radioiodinated phenylazide derivative of forskolin, 3-iodo-4-azidophenethylamido-7-O-succinyl-deacetyl-forskolin (({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin), has been shown to be a highly selective photoaffinity probe for the human erythrocyte glucose transported and the glucose transport proteins found in several mammalian tissues and cultured cells where the glucose transport protein is present at a low concentration. The photoincorporation of ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin into these glucose transporters was blocked by D- (but not L-) glucose, cytochalasin B, and forskolin. In addition to labeling the mammalian glucose transport proteins, ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin also labeled the L-arabinose transporter from E. coli. In muscle and adipose tissues, glucose transport is markedly increased in response to insulin. ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin was shown to selectivity tag the glucose transporter in membranes derived from these cells. In addition, the covalent derivatization of the transport protein in subcellular fractions of the adipocyte has provided a means to study the hormonal regulation of glucose transport. ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin has also been used to label the purified human erythrocyte glucose transporter. The site of insertion has therefore been localized by analysis of the radiolabeled peptides which were produced following chemical and proteolytic digestion of the labeled transport protein.

  7. Toward an Injectable Continuous Osmotic Glucose Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Erik; Krushinitskaya, Olga; Sokolov, Andrey; Philipp, Häfliger; Hoogerwerf, Arno; Hinderling, Christian; Kautio, Kari; Lenkkeri, Jaakko; Strömmer, Esko; Kondratyev, Vasily; Tønnessen, Tor Inge; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Jakobsen, Henrik; Zimmer, Even; Akselsen, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    Background The growing pandemic of diabetes mellitus places a stringent social and economic burden on the society. A tight glycemic control circumvents the detrimental effects, but the prerogative is the development of new more effective tools capable of longterm tracking of blood glucose (BG) in vivo. Such discontinuous sensor technologies will benefit from an unprecedented marked potential as well as reducing the current life expectancy gap of eight years as part of a therapeutic regime. Method A sensor technology based on osmotic pressure incorporates a reversible competitive affinity assay performing glucose-specific recognition. An absolute change in particles generates a pressure that is proportional to the glucose concentration. An integrated pressure transducer and components developed from the silicon micro- and nanofabrication industry translate this pressure into BG data. Results An in vitro model based on a 3.6 × 8.7 mm large pill-shaped implant is equipped with a nanoporous membrane holding 4–6 nm large pores. The affinity assay offers a dynamic range of 36–720 mg/dl with a resolution of ±16 mg/dl. An integrated 1 × 1 mm2 large control chip samples the sensor signals for data processing and transmission back to the reader at a total power consumption of 76 µW. Conclusions Current studies have demonstrated the design, layout, and performance of a prototype osmotic sensor in vitro using an affinity assay solution for up to four weeks. The small physical size conforms to an injectable device, forming the basis of a conceptual monitor that offers a tight glycemic control of BG. PMID:20663452

  8. Self-monitoring of tear glucose: the development of a tear based glucose sensor as an alternative to self-monitoring of blood glucose.

    PubMed

    La Belle, Jeffrey T; Adams, Anngela; Lin, Chi-En; Engelschall, Erica; Pratt, Breanna; Cook, Curtiss B

    2016-07-28

    Tear glucose sensing for diabetes management has long been sought as an alternative to more invasive self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). However, tear glucose sensors were known to have limitations, including correlation issues with blood glucose due to low sample volume, low concentration of glucose in the tear fluid, and evaporation of the tear sample. An engineering design approach to solve these problems led to the development of an integrated device capable of collecting the tear sample from the ocular surface with little to no stress on the eye, with an extremely low limit of detection, broad dynamic range, and rapid detection and analysis of sample. Here we present the development of a prototypical self-monitoring of tear glucose (SMTG) sensor, summarizing bench studies on the enzymes and their specificity, the development of the fluid capture device and its manufacture and performance and results of system testing in an animal study where safety, lag time and tear glucose to blood glucose correlation were assessed. PMID:27327531

  9. Dysglycemia and Glucose Control During Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Mark P; Deane, Adam M

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis predisposes to disordered metabolism and dysglycemia; the latter is a broad term that includes hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability. Dysglycemia is a marker of illness severity. Large randomized controlled trials have provided considerable insight into the optimal blood glucose targets for critically ill patients with sepsis. However, it may be that the pathophysiologic consequences of dysglycemia are dynamic throughout the course of a septic insult and also altered by premorbid glycemia. This review highlights the relevance of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability in patients with sepsis with an emphasis on a rational approach to management. PMID:27229647

  10. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, W R; Beckman, J H; Calne, D B; Adam, M J; Harrop, R; Rogers, J G; Ruth, T J; Sayre, C I; Pate, B D

    1984-02-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization was measured in patients with predominantly unilateral Parkinson's disease using 18F-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose and positron emission tomography. Preliminary results indicate the presence of asymmetric metabolic rates in the inferior basal ganglia. The structure comprising the largest portion of basal ganglia at this level is globus pallidus. These findings are consistent with metabolic studies on animals with unilateral nigrostriatal lesions in which pallidal hypermetabolism on the lesioned side has been demonstrated. Increased pallidal activity is likely secondary to a loss of inhibitory dopaminergic input to the striatum from substantia nigra.

  11. SY 10-1 RENAL GLUCOSE HANDLING AND SGLT2.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Resham

    2016-09-01

    The kidneys maintain glucose homeostasis through its utilization, gluconeogenesis, and reabsorption. Glucose is freely filtered and reabsorbed in order to retain energy essential between meals. The amount of glucose reabsorbed by the kidneys is equivalent to the amount entering the filtration system. With a daily glomerular filtration rate of 180 L, approximately 180 g (180 L/day × 100 mg/dL) of glucose must be reabsorbed each day to maintain an average fasting plasma glucose concentration of 5.6 mmol/L (100 mg/dL). The reabsorption increases with increase in plasma glucose concentration up to approximately 11 mmol/L (198 mg/dL). At this threshold level, the system becomes saturated and the maximal resabsorption rate-the glucose transport maximum (Tm G ) is reached. No more glucose can be absorbed, and the kidneys begin excreting it in the urine-the beginning of glycosuria. Reabsorption of glucose occurs mainly in the proximal tubule and is mediated by 2 different transport proteins, Sodium Glucose Cotransporter (SGLT)1 and SGLT2. SGLT1, which are found in the straight section of the proximal tubule (S3), are responsible for approximately 10% of glucose reabsorption. The other 90% of filtered glucose is reabsorbed through by SGLT2, which are located in the convoluted section on the proximal tubule (S1). The SGLT2 are located on the luminal side of the early proximal tubule S1 segment. Absorption of sodium across the cell membrane creates an energy gradient that in turn allows glucose to be absorbed. On the other side of the cell, sodium is reabsorbed through sodium-potassium ATPase pump into the bloodstream. The concentration gradient within the cell, resulting from this exchange drives glucose reabsorption into the bloodstream via the Glucose transporter (GLUT) 2. The role of kidneys in glucose regulation has been well recognized in the recent years, and inhibition of glucose reabsorption by SGLT2 inhibitors has evolved as a promising target for

  12. Construction of near-infrared photonic crystal glucose-sensing materials for ratiometric sensing of glucose in tears.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yumei; Jiang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Laiying; Fan, Jiao; Wu, Weitai

    2013-10-15

    Noninvasive monitoring of glucose in tears is highly desirable in tight glucose control. The polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) that can be incorporated into contact lens represents one of the most promising materials for noninvasive monitoring of glucose in tears. However, low sensitivity and slow time response of the PCCA reported in previous arts has limited its clinical utility. This paper presents a new PCCA, denoted as NIR-PCCA, comprising a CCA of glucose-responsive sub-micrometered poly(styrene-co-acrylamide-co-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) microgels embedded within a slightly positive charged hydrogel matrix of poly(acrylamide-co-2-(dimethylamino)ethyl acrylate). This newly designed NIR-PCCA can reflect near-infrared (NIR) light, whose intensity (at 1722 nm) would decrease evidently with increasing glucose concentration over the physiologically relevant range in tears. The lowest glucose concentration reliably detectable was as low as ca. 6.1 μg/dL. The characteristic response time τ(sensing) was 22.1±0.2s when adding glucose to 7.5 mg/dL, and the higher the glucose concentration is, the faster the time response. Such a rationally designed NIR-PCCA is well suited for ratiometric NIR sensing of tear glucose under physiological conditions, thereby likely to bring this promising glucose-sensing material to the forefront of analytical devices for diabetes.

  13. Glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase immobilized at gold nanoparticles decorated graphene-carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Mani, Veerappan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Tung; Huang, Tsung-Tao; Lin, Chun-Mao; Hwa, Kuo-Yuan; Chen, Ting-Yo; Chen, Bo-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Biopolymer pectin stabilized gold nanoparticles were prepared at graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (GR-MWNTs/AuNPs) and employed for the determination of glucose. The formation of GR-MWNTs/AuNPs was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was successfully immobilized on GR-MWNTs/AuNPs film and direct electron transfer of GOx was investigated. GOx exhibits highly enhanced redox peaks with formal potential of -0.40 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The amount of electroactive GOx and electron transfer rate constant were found to be 10.5 × 10(-10) mol cm(-2) and 3.36 s(-1), respectively, which were significantly larger than the previous reports. The fabricated amperometric glucose biosensor sensitively detects glucose and showed two linear ranges: (1) 10 μM - 2 mM with LOD of 4.1 μM, (2) 2 mM - 5.2 mM with LOD of 0.95 mM. The comparison of the biosensor performance with reported sensors reveals the significant improvement in overall sensor performance. Moreover, the biosensor exhibited appreciable stability, repeatability, reproducibility and practicality. The other advantages of the fabricated biosensor are simple and green fabrication approach, roughed and stable electrode surface, fast in sensing and highly reproducible.

  14. Glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase immobilized at gold nanoparticles decorated graphene-carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Mani, Veerappan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Tung; Huang, Tsung-Tao; Lin, Chun-Mao; Hwa, Kuo-Yuan; Chen, Ting-Yo; Chen, Bo-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Biopolymer pectin stabilized gold nanoparticles were prepared at graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (GR-MWNTs/AuNPs) and employed for the determination of glucose. The formation of GR-MWNTs/AuNPs was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was successfully immobilized on GR-MWNTs/AuNPs film and direct electron transfer of GOx was investigated. GOx exhibits highly enhanced redox peaks with formal potential of -0.40 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The amount of electroactive GOx and electron transfer rate constant were found to be 10.5 × 10(-10) mol cm(-2) and 3.36 s(-1), respectively, which were significantly larger than the previous reports. The fabricated amperometric glucose biosensor sensitively detects glucose and showed two linear ranges: (1) 10 μM - 2 mM with LOD of 4.1 μM, (2) 2 mM - 5.2 mM with LOD of 0.95 mM. The comparison of the biosensor performance with reported sensors reveals the significant improvement in overall sensor performance. Moreover, the biosensor exhibited appreciable stability, repeatability, reproducibility and practicality. The other advantages of the fabricated biosensor are simple and green fabrication approach, roughed and stable electrode surface, fast in sensing and highly reproducible. PMID:26215343

  15. Sodium-glucose linked transporter-2 inhibitors: potential for renoprotection beyond blood glucose lowering?

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    The proximal tubule's sodium-glucose linked transporter-2 (SGLT2) accounts for the vast majority of glucose reabsorption by the kidney. Its selective inhibition, accordingly, leads to substantial glycosuria, lowering blood glucose, and facilitating weight loss in individuals with diabetes. During the past year, two SGLT2 inhibitors, canagliflozin and dapagliflozin, have been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Beyond their anti-hyperglycemic properties, however, this new class of drugs has several other attributes that provide a theoretical basis for kidney protection. Like agents that block the renin-angiotensin system, SGLT2 inhibitors also reduce single-nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) in the chronically diseased kidney, though by quite different mechanisms. Additional potentially beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibition include modest reductions in blood pressure and plasma uric acid. Finally, cell culture studies indicate that glucose uptake from the tubular lumen, as well as from the basolateral compartment, can contribute to proximal tubular production of extracellular matrix proteins. Whether such attributes will translate into reducing the progression of chronic kidney disease will require the undertaking of long-term, dedicated studies.

  16. Glycolysis-induced discordance between glucose metabolic rates measured with radiolabeled fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, R F; Lear, J L

    1989-12-01

    We have developed an autoradiographic method for estimating the oxidative and glycolytic components of local CMRglc (LCMRglc), using sequentially administered [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and [14C]-6-glucose (GLC). FDG-6-phosphate accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose phosphorylation, which occurs before the divergence of glycolytic (GMg) and oxidative (GMo) glucose metabolism and is therefore related to total cerebral glucose metabolism GMt: GMg + GMo = GMt. With oxidative metabolism, the 14C label of GLC is temporarily retained in Krebs cycle-related substrate pools. We hypothesize that with glycolytic metabolism, however, a significant fraction of the 14C label is lost from the brain via lactate production and efflux from the brain. Thus, cerebral GLC metabolite concentration may be more closely related to GMo than to GMt. If true, the glycolytic metabolic rate will be related to the difference between FDG- and GLC-derived LCMRglc. Thus far, we have studied normal awake rats, rats with limbic activation induced by kainic acid (KA), and rats visually stimulated with 16-Hz flashes. In KA-treated rats, significant discordance between FDG and GLC accumulation, which we attribute to glycolysis, occurred only in activated limbic structures. In visually stimulated rats, significant discordance occurred only in the optic tectum.

  17. Glycolysis-induced discordance between glucose metabolic rates measured with radiolabeled fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, R.F.; Lear, J.L. )

    1989-12-01

    We have developed an autoradiographic method for estimating the oxidative and glycolytic components of local CMRglc (LCMRglc), using sequentially administered ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and ({sup 14}C)-6-glucose (GLC). FDG-6-phosphate accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose phosphorylation, which occurs before the divergence of glycolytic (GMg) and oxidative (GMo) glucose metabolism and is therefore related to total cerebral glucose metabolism GMt: GMg + GMo = GMt. With oxidative metabolism, the {sup 14}C label of GLC is temporarily retained in Krebs cycle-related substrate pools. We hypothesize that with glycolytic metabolism, however, a significant fraction of the {sup 14}C label is lost from the brain via lactate production and efflux from the brain. Thus, cerebral GLC metabolite concentration may be more closely related to GMo than to GMt. If true, the glycolytic metabolic rate will be related to the difference between FDG- and GLC-derived LCMRglc. Thus far, we have studied normal awake rats, rats with limbic activation induced by kainic acid (KA), and rats visually stimulated with 16-Hz flashes. In KA-treated rats, significant discordance between FDG and GLC accumulation, which we attribute to glycolysis, occurred only in activated limbic structures. In visually stimulated rats, significant discordance occurred only in the optic tectum.

  18. An Amperometric Biosensor for Glucose Determination Prepared from Glucose Oxidase Immobilized in Polyaniline-Polyvinylsulfonate Film

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Fatma; Ustabaş, Selvin; Arslan, Halit

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel amperometric glucose biosensor with immobilization of glucose oxidase on electrochemically polymerized polyaniline-polyvinylsulphonate (Pani-Pvs) films has been accomplished via the entrapment technique. Electropolymerization of aniline on the Pt surface of the Pt electrode was carried out at constant potential (0.75 V, vs. Ag/AgCl) using an electrochemical cell containing aniline and polyvinylsulphonate. Firstly, the optimum working conditions for preparing polyaniline-polyvinylsulfonate films were investigated. Determination of glucose was carried out by the oxidation of enzymatically produced H2O2 at 0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The effects of pH and temperature were investigated and the optimum pH value was found to be 7.5. The storage stability and operational stability of the enzyme electrode were also studied. The results show that 75% of the response current was retained after 16 activity assays. The prepared glucose biosensor retained 80.6% of initial activity after 40 days when stored in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution at 4 °C. PMID:22164068

  19. Glucose-fructose likely improves gastrointestinal comfort and endurance running performance relative to glucose-only.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P B; Ingraham, S J

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to determine whether glucose-fructose (GF) ingestion, relative to glucose-only, would alter performance, metabolism, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, and psychological affect during prolonged running. On two occasions, 20 runners (14 men) completed a 120-min submaximal run followed by a 4-mile time trial (TT). Participants consumed glucose-only (G) or GF (1.2:1 ratio) beverages, which supplied ∼ 1.3 g/min of carbohydrate. Substrate use, blood lactate, psychological affect [Feeling Scale (FS)], and GI distress were measured. Differences between conditions were assessed using magnitude-based inferential statistics. Participants completed the TT 1.9% (-1.9; -4.2, 0.4) faster with GF, representing a likely benefit. FS ratings were possibly higher and GI symptoms were possibly-to-likely lower with GF during the submaximal period and TT. Effect sizes for GI distress and FS ratings were relatively small (Cohen's d = ∼0.2 to 0.4). GF resulted in possibly higher fat oxidation during the submaximal period. No clear differences in lactate were observed. In conclusion, GF ingestion - compared with glucose-only - likely improves TT performance after 2 h of submaximal running, and GI distress and psychological affect are likely mechanisms. These results apply to runners consuming fluid at 500-600 mL/h and carbohydrate at 1.0-1.3 g/min during running at 60-70% VO2peak .

  20. Exercise training, glucose transporters, and glucose transport in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodnick, K. J.; Henriksen, E. J.; James, D. E.; Holloszy, J. O.

    1992-01-01

    It was previously found that voluntary wheel running induces an increase in the insulin-sensitive glucose transporter, i.e., the GLUT4 isoform, in rat plantaris muscle (K. J. Rodnick, J. O. Holloszy, C. E. Mondon, and D. E. James. Diabetes 39: 1425-1429, 1990). The present study was undertaken to determine whether 1) the increase in muscle GLUT4 protein is associated with an increase in maximally stimulated glucose transport activity, 2) a conversion of type IIb to type IIa or type I muscle fibers plays a role in the increase in GLUT4 protein, and 3) an increase in the GLUT1 isoform is a component of the adaptation of muscle to endurance exercise. Five weeks of voluntary wheel running that resulted in a 33% increase in citrate synthase activity induced a 50% increase in GLUT4 protein in epitrochlearis muscles of female Sprague-Dawley rats. The rate of 2-deoxy-glucose transport maximally stimulated with insulin or insulin plus contractions was increased approximately 40% (P less than 0.05). There was no change in muscle fiber type composition, evaluated by myosin ATPase staining, in the epitrochlearis. There was also no change in GLUT1 protein concentration. We conclude that an increase in GLUT4, but not of GLUT1 protein, is a component of the adaptive response of muscle to endurance exercise and that the increase in GLUT4 protein is associated with an increased capacity for glucose transport.

  1. Measurement of lactate formation from glucose using (6- sup 3 H)- and (6- sup 14 C)glucose in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Virkamaeki, A.P.; Puhakainen, I.; Nurjhan, N.; Gerich, J.E.; Yki-Jaervinen, H. )

    1990-09-01

    To assess the validity of determining the origin of plasma lactate from the ratio of lactate and glucose specific activities (SA) during infusion of labeled glucose, normal subjects received infusions of (6-3H)- and (6-14C)glucose for 4 h after a 12 h fast, and, on another day, cold glucose labeled with both tracers during 4-6 h of hyperinsulinemia (approximately 650 microU/ml). Basally, less lactate was derived from plasma glucose when measured with (6-3H)glucose (27 +/- 2%) than with (6-14C)glucose (40 +/- 2%, P less than 0.001). Insulin did not increase the percent of lactate derived from plasma glucose when measured with (6-3H)glucose (29 +/- 2%) but did increase when measured with (6-14C)glucose (60 +/- 4%). The arterialized blood (A) (3H)lactate SA was 30-40% higher (P less than 0.01) than deep venous blood (V) (3H)lactate SA, whereas A and V (14C)lactate SA were similar. During conversion of alanine to lactate with glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in vitro, 32 +/- 2% of 3H in (3-3H)alanine was found in water and 68 +/- 2% in lactate. During infusion of (6-3H)- and (6-14C)glucose, the ratio of (14C)alanine to lactate SA (0.88 +/- 0.05) was less than the ratio of (3H)alanine to lactate SA (0.31 +/- 0.03, P less than 0.001). In conclusion (1) loss of 3H relative to 14C from position 6 in glucose occurs during lactate formation in extrahepatic tissues possibly due to the GPT reaction (alanine conversion to pyruvate), and (2) even under supraphysiologic hyperinsulinemic conditions not all of plasma lactate originates from plasma glucose.

  2. Peritoneal Dialysate Glucose Load and Systemic Glucose Metabolism in Non-Diabetics: Results from the GLOBAL Fluid Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chess, James; Do, Jun-Young; Noh, Hyunjin; Lee, Hi-Bahl; Kim, Yong-Lim; Summers, Angela; Williams, Paul Ford; Davison, Sara; Dorval, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Glucose control is a significant predictor of mortality in diabetic peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. During PD, the local toxic effects of intra-peritoneal glucose are well recognized, but despite large amounts of glucose being absorbed, the systemic effects of this in non-diabetic patients are not clear. We sought to clarify whether dialysate glucose has an effect upon systemic glucose metabolism. Methods and Materials We analysed the Global Fluid Study cohort, a prospective, observational cohort study initiated in 2002. A subset of 10 centres from 3 countries with high data quality were selected (368 incident and 272 prevalent non-diabetic patients), with multilevel, multivariable analysis of the reciprocal of random glucose levels, and a stratified-by-centre Cox survival analysis. Results The median follow up was 5.6 and 6.4 years respectively in incident and prevalent patients. On multivariate analysis, serum glucose increased with age (β = -0.007, 95%CI -0.010, -0.004) and decreased with higher serum sodium (β = 0.002, 95%CI 0.0005, 0.003) in incident patients and increased with dialysate glucose (β = -0.0002, 95%CI -0.0004, -0.00006) in prevalent patients. Levels suggested undiagnosed diabetes in 5.4% of prevalent patients. Glucose levels predicted death in unadjusted analyses of both incident and prevalent groups but in an adjusted survival analysis they did not (for random glucose 6–10 compared with <6, Incident group HR 0.92, 95%CI 0.58, 1.46, Prevalent group HR 1.42, 95%CI 0.86, 2.34). Conclusions In prevalent non-diabetic patients, random glucose levels at a diabetic level are under-recognised and increase with dialysate glucose load. Random glucose levels predict mortality in unadjusted analyses, but this association has not been proven in adjusted analyses. PMID:27249020

  3. Carbon Nanotube Yarn-Based Glucose Sensing Artificial Muscle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghan; Ko, Sachan; Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Lima, Márcio D; Baughman, Ray H; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-04-01

    Boronic acid (BA), known to be a reversible glucose-sensing material, is conjugated to a nanogel (NG) derived from hyaluronic acid biopolymer and used as a guest material for a carbon multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) yarn. By exploiting the swelling/deswelling of the NG that originates from the internal anionic charge changes resulting from BA binding to glucose, a NG MWNT yarn artificial muscle is obtained that provides reversible torsional actuation that can be used for glucose sensing. This actuator shows a short response time and high sensitivity (in the 5-100 × 10(-3) m range) for monitoring changes in glucose concentration in physiological buffer, without using any additional auxiliary substances or an electrical power source. It may be possible to apply the glucose-sensing MWNT yarn muscles as implantable glucose sensors that automatically release drugs when needed or as an artificial pancreas. PMID:26929006

  4. New scheme for polarimetric glucose sensing without polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Amy M.; Bonnema, Garret T.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2010-02-01

    Polarimetric glucose sensing is a promising method for noninvasive estimation of blood glucose concentration. Published methods of polarimetric glucose sensing generally rely on measuring the rotation of light as it traverses the aqueous humor of the eye. In this article, an interferometer is described that can detect polarization changes due to glucose without the use of polarization control or polarization analyzing elements. Without polarizers, this system is sensitive to optical activity, inherent to glucose, but minimally sensitive to linear retardance, inherent to the cornea. The underlying principle of the system was experimentally verified using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. A detection scheme involving amplitude modulation was simulated, demonstrating sensitivity to clinically relevant glucose concentrations and an acceptable error due to time varying linear birefringence of the cornea using Clarke Error Grid Analysis.

  5. Persistent impaired glucose metabolism in a zebrafish hyperglycemia model.

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Antonioli, Régis; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects over 10% of the world's population. Hyperglycemia is the main feature for the diagnosis of this disease. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an established model organism for the study of various metabolic diseases. In this paper, hyperglycemic zebrafish, when immersed in a 111 mM glucose solution for 14 days, developed increased glycation of proteins from the eyes, decreased mRNA levels of insulin receptors in the muscle, and a reversion of high blood glucose level after treatment with anti-diabetic drugs (glimepiride and metformin) even after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. Additionally, hyperglycemic zebrafish developed an impaired response to exogenous insulin, which was recovered after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. These data suggest that the exposure of adult zebrafish to high glucose concentration is able to induce persistent metabolic changes probably underlined by a hyperinsulinemic state and impaired peripheral glucose metabolism. PMID:24704522

  6. Glucose sensor using liquid-crystal droplets made by microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeon; Khan, Mashooq; Park, Soo-Young

    2013-12-26

    Micrometer-sized, 4-cyno-4-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) droplets were developed for glucose detection in an aqueous medium by coating with poly(acrylicacid-b-4-cynobiphenyl-4-oxyundecylacrylate) (PAA-b-LCP) at the 5CB/water interface and covalently immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) to the PAA chains. This functionalized liquid-crystal (LC) droplet detected glucose from a radial to bipolar configurational change by polarized optical microscopy under crossed polarizers at concentrations as low as 0.03 mM and response times of ~3 min and showed the selective detection of glucose against galactose. This new and sensitive LC-droplet-based glucose biosensor has the merits of low production cost and easy detection by the naked eye and might be useful for prescreening the glucose level in the human body. PMID:24251831

  7. Professional Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Clinical Practice 2010

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Professional continuous glucose monitoring (PCGM) is a 3–5 day test done to evaluate diabetes control. The PCGM test uses interstitial glucose measurements done every 5 min with a glucose-oxidase-impregnated membrane. The PCGM test evaluates glucose control retrospectively with the glucose results being unknown to the patient until the results are downloaded after the testing period. The PCGM test allows the practitioner and patient to evaluate the effect of diet, physical activity, medications, and lifestyle events on glucose control during the 24 h period. Developing a PCGM program at a medical office involves understanding reimbursement issues and having trained staff and a process in place to initiate the test and download and interpret the data. PMID:20307406

  8. Engineering Synthetically Modified Insulin for Glucose-Responsive Diabetes Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Matthew J.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Summary Though a suite of different insulin variants have been used clinically to provide greater control over pharmacokinetics, no clinically used insulin can tune its potency and/or bioavailability in a glucose-dependent manner. In order to improve therapy for diabetic patients, a vision has been the development of autonomous closed-loop approaches. Toward this goal, insulin has been synthetically modified with glucose-sensing groups or groups that can compete with free glucose for binding to glucose-binding proteins and evaluated in pre-clinical models. Specifically, it was demonstrated that site-specific modification of insulin with phenylboronic acid can result in glucose-responsive activity, leading to faster recovery in diabetic mice following a glucose challenge but with less observed hypoglycemia in healthy mice. This strategy, along with several others being pursued, holds promise to improve the fidelity in glycemic control with routine insulin therapy. PMID:27570535

  9. Change in blood glucose level in rats after immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platonov, R. D.; Baskakova, G. M.; Chepurnov, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on male white rats divided into four groups. In group one the blood glucose level was determined immediately after immobilization. In the other three groups, two hours following immobilization, the blood glucose level was determined every 20 minutes for 3 hours 40 minutes by the glucose oxidase method. Preliminary immobilization for 2 hours removed the increase in the blood glucose caused by the stress reaction. By the 2nd hour of immobilization in the presence of continuing stress, the blood glucose level stabilized and varied within 42 + or - 5.5 and 47 + or - 8.1 mg %. Within 2 hours after the immobilization, the differences in the blood glucose level of the rats from the control groups were statistically insignificant.

  10. Chinese herbal medicines for people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting blood glucose

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Suzanne J; Bensoussan, Alan; Chang, Dennis; Kiat, Hosen; Klupp, Nerida L; Liu, Jian Ping; Li, Xun

    2011-01-01

    Background Around 308 million people worldwide are estimated to have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT); 25% to 75% of these will develop diabetes within a decade of initial diagnosis. At diagnosis, half will have tissue-related damage and all have an increased risk for coronary heart disease. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for the treatment of people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Search strategy We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, AMED, a range of Chinese language databases, SIGLE and databases of ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised clinical trials comparing Chinese herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions in people with IGT or IFG were considered. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data. Trials were assessed for risk of bias against key criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants, outcome assessors and intervention providers, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias. Main results This review examined 16 trials lasting four weeks to two years involving 1391 participants receiving 15 different Chinese herbal medicines in eight different comparisons. No trial reported on mortality, morbidity or costs. No serious adverse events like severe hypoglycaemia were observed. Meta-analysis of eight trials showed that those receiving Chinese herbal medicines combined with lifestyle modification were more than twice as likely to have their fasting plasma glucose levels return to normal levels (i.e. fasting plasma glucose <7.8 mmol/L and 2hr blood glucose <11.1 mmol/L) compared to lifestyle modification alone (RR 2.07; 95% confidence intervall (CI) 1.52 to 2.82). Those receiving Chinese herbs were less likely to progress to diabetes over the duration of the

  11. Impaired glucose metabolism treatment and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    MATYSZEWSKI, ARTUR; CZARNECKA, ANNA; KAWECKI, MACIEJ; KORZEŃ, PIOTR; SAFIR, ILAN J.; KUKWA, WOJCIECH; SZCZYLIK, CEZARY

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism disorders increase the risk of carcinogenesis. Diabetes mellitus alters numerous physiological processes that may encourage cancer growth. However, treating impaired glucose homeostasis may actually promote neoplasia; maintaining proper glucose plasma concentrations reduces metabolic stresses, however, certain medications may themselves result in oncogenic effects. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that metformin reduces the cancer risk. However, the use of sulfonylurea derivatives correlates with an increased risk of developing a malignancy. Another form of treatment, insulin therapy, involves using various forms of insulin that differ in pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Previous studies have indicated that certain insulin variants also affect the cancer risk. The results from analyses that address the safety of long-lasting insulin types raise the most concern regarding the increased risk of malignancy. Rapid development of novel diabetic medications and their widespread use carries the risk of potentially increased rates of cancer, unnoticeable in limited, randomized, controlled trials. In the present review, the results of clinical and epidemiological studies are evaluated to assess the safety of anti-hyperglycemic medications and their effect on cancer risk and outcomes. PMID:26622538

  12. Modification of cellulose for high glucose generation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Gu, Jian; Tian, Xiuzhi; Li, Yali; Huang, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The influence of introduction of cyanuric chloride on glucose's yield (Y) in acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) has been studied. The content of cyanuric chloride (C) in modified MCCs was determined by X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy. The chemical structures of modified MCCs were analyzed by Fourier transformation-infrared spectroscopy and cross polarization/magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. Crystal index (CI) and the ratio (R) representing the sum of content of (1 ̅10) and (110) to that of (200) were calculated based on diffraction intensity in wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Hydrolysis experiment and WAXD show that Y, CI and R vary with C. The modified MCC containing 3.9 mol% of cyanuric chloride has the highest Y, the highest R and the lowest CI. Variations of CI and R show that the chemical modification changed the proportion of crystal/amorphous and crystal planes, both of which influence glucose's generation in hydrolysis of cellulose.

  13. Sensitivity of central chemoreceptors controlling blood glucose and body temperature during glucose deprivation.

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, A; Müller, E E

    1975-01-01

    1. The rise in blood glucose and the fall in body temperature which follows the injection of a glucose analogue, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) into the lateral cerebral ventricle (I.C.V) of unanaesthetized rats were studied and found to be dose-dependent. These 2-DG induced responses are elicited by the impairment of glucose metabolism within central "glucoreceptors'. 2. 2DG induced hyperglycaemia and hypothermia were completely prevented and even the converse effects occurred when fivefold equimolar amounts of D-fructose were simultaneously injected I.C.V.; fructose, at equimolar doses, did not modify the effects of 2-DG. 3. D-xylose and D-ribose, even at high doses, did not influence 2-DG hyperglycaemia, but increased slightly the 2-DG induced hypothermia. This suggests that the pentose phosphate pathway is unable to support the metabolism within the glucoreceptors. 4. Pyruvate suppressed the 2-DG induced hyperglycaemia with a marked delay, while acetate (as ethyl ester) and a mixture of malate plus oxaloacetate did not prevent 2-DG induced effects. These results may be accounted for by the low dosage used. 5. Acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate did not prevent 2-DG hypothermia and hyperglycaemia. 6. An effective prevention of the 2-DG induced hyperglycaemia and hypothermia was achieved with fumarate and glutamate, indicating that the stimulation of the Krebs cycle within "glucoreceptors' removes the glucoprivic effects. 7. The results indicate that prevention of 2-DG induced effects occurred only with alternate source of metabolic fuel which can support high respiratory rates in brain tissue. It is concluded that central chemoreceptors are not specifically responsive to glucose, or hexoses, but to the rate of oxidative metabolism. PMID:1151783

  14. Effect of Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test on Bone Turnover Markers in Adults with Normal Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shou-Kui; Wan, Jing-Bo; Jiang, Xiao-Hong; Zhu, Yong-Hua; Ma, Jin-Hong; Hua, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background It is well known that enteral nutrients result in acute suppression of bone turnover markers (BTMs), and incretin hormones are believed to play a significant role in this physiological skeletal response. However, there is limited research exploring the impact of parenteral nutrients on BTMs. Our aim was to assess the influence of intravenous glucose on BTMs in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Material/Methods We conducted 1-h intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) in 24 subjects with NGT. Blood samples were collected before and 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60 min after administration of glucose, then serum levels of bone formation marker procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and resorption marker C-terminal cross-linking telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX) were measured. Results During IVGTT, the fasting CTX level fell gradually and reached a nadir of 80.4% of the basal value at 60 min. Conversely, the fasting P1NP level decreased mildly and reached a nadir of 90.6% of the basal value at 15 min, then gradually increased and reached 96.6% at 60 min. The CTX-to-P1NP ratio increased slightly and reached a peak of 104.3% of the basal value at 10 min, then fell gradually and reached a nadir of 83% at 60 min. Conclusions Our study indicates that intravenous glucose results in an acute suppression of BTMs in the absence of incretin hormones. The mechanism responsible for this needs further investigation. PMID:27447783

  15. The Role of Glucose Metabolism and Glucose-Associated Signalling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Rainer; Coy, Johannes F.

    2007-01-01

    Aggressive carcinomas ferment glucose to lactate even in the presence of oxygen. This particular metabolism, termed aerobic glycolysis, the glycolytic phenotype, or the Warburg effect, was discovered by Nobel laureate Otto Warburg in the 1920s. Since these times, controversial discussions about the relevance of the fermentation of glucose by tumours took place; however, a majority of cancer researchers considered the Warburg effect as a non-causative epiphenomenon. Recent research demonstrated, that several common oncogenic events favour the expression of the glycolytic phenotype. Moreover, a suppression of the phenotypic features by either substrate limitation, pharmacological intervention, or genetic manipulation was found to mediate potent tumour-suppressive effects. The discovery of the transketolase-like 1 (TKTL1) enzyme in aggressive cancers may deliver a missing link in the interpretation of the Warburg effect. TKTL1-activity could be the basis for a rapid fermentation of glucose in aggressive carcinoma cells via the pentose phosphate pathway, which leads to matrix acidification, invasive growth, and ultimately metastasis. TKTL1 expression in certain non-cancerous tissues correlates with aerobic formation of lactate and rapid fermentation of glucose, which may be required for the prevention of advanced glycation end products and the suppression of reactive oxygen species. There is evidence, that the activity of this enzyme and the Warburg effect can be both protective or destructive for the organism. These results place glucose metabolism to the centre of pathogenesis of several civilisation related diseases and raise concerns about the high glycaemic index of various food components commonly consumed in western diets. PMID:19812737

  16. Autocorrelation optical coherence tomography for glucose quantification in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Gilanie, G.; Hussain, F.; Ahmad, E.

    2015-12-01

    We report a new method for glucose monitoring in blood tissue based on the autocorrelation function (ACF) analysis in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). We have determined the changes in OCT monitoring signals’ depth to characterize the modulations in ACFs for quantitative measurements of glucose concentrations in blood. We found that an increase in the concentration of glucose in blood results in decreased OCT monitoring signal due to the increase in the refractive index of the media.

  17. Continuous detection of glucose concentration by fluorescent indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Li, Guoqing; Lu, Lou; Xu, Kexin

    Continuous glucose detection has a great significance for diabetics. On the one hand, it can fully reflect the patient blood glucose change level. On the other hand, it can better guide the insulin dosage, and achieve closed-loop control of insulin pump. A continuous detection method of glucose concentration by borate polymer fluorescent indicator is proposed in the paper. The principle of this method is based on the competing reaction between alizarin, glucose and borate polymer. The borate polymer has high specific reaction with glucose, meanwhile reacts with non fluorescent alizarin. The product of the reaction between borate polymer and alizarin is fluorescent, called as fluorescent indicator. When glucose was introduced, the glucose molecules could react with the borate polymer in fluorescent indicator because of the high specificity. This competing process leads to the decomposition of fluorescent indicator into the non-fluorescent alizarin, and the fluorescent intensity gets loss. Therefore, the change of fluorescent intensity can reflect the glucose concentration level. In this method, the fluorescent indicator can well identify the glucose molecules. According to the experiment, we know that there is a high specific and good linear reaction between glucose and borate polymer. The linear fitting is up to 0.97 and the detection limitation can reach to 10 mg/dL. The fluorescent intensity reaches strongest with the optimal proportion of alizarin: borate polymer as 1:3. The reaction of the fluorescent indicator identifying glucose molecules has a good linear relationship, the linear fitting of which can reach to 0.98. The detection limitation can reach to 30 mg/dL, which fulfills the detection requirements of glucose concentration in vivo.

  18. Integrating optical glucose sensing into a planar waveguide sensor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Aradhana; Deka, Bidyut; Sahu, Partha P.

    2013-06-01

    A device for glucose monitoring in people with diabetes is a clinical and research priority in the recent years for its accurate self management. An extensive theoretical design and development of an optical sensor is carried out incorporating planar waveguide structure in an endeavor to measure slight changes of glucose concentration. The sensor is simple and highly sensitive and has the potential to be used for online monitoring of blood glucose levels for the diabetic patients in the near future.

  19. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J.

    1986-03-05

    Pentobarbital is a common anesthetic agent used in animal research that is known to alter sympathetic function and may also affect carbohydrate metabolism. The in vivo effects of iv pentobarbital on glucose homeostasis were studied in chronically catheterized fasted rats. Whole body glucose kinetics, assessed by the constant iv infusion of (6-/sup 3/H)- and (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose, were determined in all rats in the conscious state. Thereafter, glucose metabolism was followed over the next 4 hr in 3 subgroups of rats; conscious, anesthetized with body temperature maintained, and anesthetized with body temperature not maintained. Hypothermia (a 5/sup 0/C decrease) developed spontaneously in anesthetized rats kept at ambient temperature (22/sup 0/C). No differences were seen in MABP and heart rate between conscious and normothermic anesthetized rats; however, hypothermic anesthetized rats showed a decrease in MABP (20%) and heart rate (35%). Likewise, plasma glucose and lactate concentrations, the rate of glucose appearance (Ra), recycling and metabolic clearance (MCR) did not differ between conscious and normothermic anesthetized animals. In contrast, hypothermic anesthetized rats showed a 50% reduction in plasma lactate, a 40% drop in glucose Ra, and a 30-40% decrease in glucose recycling and MCR. Thus, pentobarbital does not appear to alter in vivo glucose kinetics, compared to unanesthetized controls, provided that body temperature is maintained.

  20. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.; Danson, M.

    1996-07-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based on the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with the continuous recycling of cofactor. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value chemical commodity. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic glucose biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sachin K.; Verma, Roli; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2012-02-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based fiber optic biosensor has been fabricated and characterized for the detection of blood glucose. Optical fiber sensor was fabricated by first coating a 50 nm thick gold film on the bare core of optical fiber and then immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) over it. Aqueous glucose solutions of different concentrations were prepared. To mimic the blood glucose levels, the concentration of glucose solutions were kept equal to that in human blood. The refractive indices of these sample solutions were equal to that of water up to third decimal place. SPR spectra for the sensor were recorded for these glucose solutions. When the glucose comes in contact to glucose oxidase, chemical reactions take place and as a result, the refractive index of the immobilized GOx film changes, giving rise to a shift in the resonance wavelength. Unlike electrochemical sensors, the present sensor is based on optics and can be miniaturized because of optical fiber. The present study provides a different approach for blood glucose sensing and may be commercialized after optimization of certain parameters.

  2. Condensed matter effects on the structure of crystalline glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, C.; Parrinello, M.

    1997-08-01

    By means of ab initio simulations based on the Car-Parrinello method, we have calculated the crystalline structures of σ-D-glucose, σ-D-glucose monohydrate and β-D-glucose. The good agreement with the available experimental data gives us confidence in the applicability of the method to carbohydrates and opens the path towards the investigation of more complex problems, where a quantum mechanical description is essential. Condensed matter effects are discussed by comparing the structures of the glucose molecule in the crystalline and gas phases.

  3. Method for converting sucrose to .beta.-D-glucose

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake A.; Volponi, Joanne V.; Ingersoll, David; Walker, Andrew

    2009-07-07

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for continuously converting sucrose to .beta.-D-glucose. The method comprises a three-stage enzymatic reactor in which an aqueous solution of sucrose is first converted into a solution of fructose and .alpha.-D-glucose by passing it through a porous, packed column containing an inert media on which invertase is immobilized. This solution is then sent through a second packed column containing glucose isomerase and finally a third packed column containing mutarotase. Solution temperature and pH are adjusted to maximize glucose output.

  4. Glucose Synthesis in a Protein-Based Artificial Photosynthesis System.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hao; Yuan, Wenqiao; Zhou, Jack; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to understand glucose synthesis of a protein-based artificial photosynthesis system affected by operating conditions, including the concentrations of reactants, reaction temperature, and illumination. Results from non-vesicle-based glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and glucose synthesis showed that the initial concentrations of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), lighting source, and temperature significantly affected glucose synthesis. Higher initial concentrations of RuBP and ATP significantly enhanced GAP synthesis, which was linearly correlated to glucose synthesis, confirming the proper functions of all catalyzing enzymes in the system. White fluorescent light inhibited artificial photosynthesis and reduced glucose synthesis by 79.2 % compared to in the dark. The reaction temperature of 40 °C was optimum, whereas lower or higher temperature reduced glucose synthesis. Glucose synthesis in the vesicle-based artificial photosynthesis system reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin, F 0 F 1 ATP synthase, and polydimethylsiloxane-methyloxazoline-polydimethylsiloxane triblock copolymer was successfully demonstrated. This system efficiently utilized light-induced ATP to drive glucose synthesis, and 5.2 μg ml(-1) glucose was synthesized in 0.78-ml reaction buffer in 7 h. Light-dependent reactions were found to be the bottleneck of the studied artificial photosynthesis system. PMID:26170084

  5. Contraction stimulates muscle glucose uptake independent of atypical PKC.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyan; Fujii, Nobuharu L; Toyoda, Taro; An, Ding; Farese, Robert V; Leitges, Michael; Hirshman, Michael F; Mul, Joram D; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2015-11-01

    Exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, but the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. The atypical protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms λ and ζ (PKC-λ/ζ) have been shown to be necessary for insulin-, AICAR-, and metformin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, but not for treadmill exercise-stimulated muscle glucose uptake. To investigate if PKC-λ/ζ activity is required for contraction-stimulated muscle glucose uptake, we used mice with tibialis anterior muscle-specific overexpression of an empty vector (WT), wild-type PKC-ζ (PKC-ζ(WT)), or an enzymatically inactive T410A-PKC-ζ mutant (PKC-ζ(T410A)). We also studied skeletal muscle-specific PKC-λ knockout (MλKO) mice. Basal glucose uptake was similar between WT, PKC-ζ(WT), and PKC-ζ(T410A) tibialis anterior muscles. In contrast, in situ contraction-stimulated glucose uptake was increased in PKC-ζ(T410A) tibialis anterior muscles compared to WT or PKC-ζ(WT) tibialis anterior muscles. Furthermore, in vitro contraction-stimulated glucose uptake was greater in soleus muscles of MλKO mice than WT controls. Thus, loss of PKC-λ/ζ activity increases contraction-stimulated muscle glucose uptake. These data clearly demonstrate that PKC-λζ activity is not necessary for contraction-stimulated glucose uptake.

  6. Glucose enhancement of memory is not state-dependent.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Opezzo, J W; Baratti, C M

    1993-11-01

    Immediate post-training intraperitoneal administration of alpha-D[+]-glucose (10-300 mg/kg) significantly enhanced retention of male Swiss mice tested 24 h after training in an inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U in this range of dose. However, of the doses tested, only 30 mg/kg was effective. Glucose did not affect response latencies in mice not given the footshock on the training trial, suggesting that the actions of glucose on retention performance were not due to nonspecific effects on response latencies. The influence of glucose (30 mg/kg) was time-dependent, which suggests that glucose facilitated memory consolidation processes. Administration of glucose (30 mg/kg) 2 or 10 min prior to the retention test did not affect the retention performance of mice given post-training injections of either saline or glucose (30 mg/kg). These findings indicate that the memory-enhancing effects of post-training administration of glucose are not state-dependent and are consistent with the view that the behavioral effects of glucose are mediated through an interaction with the neural or neurohumoral processes underlying the storage of acquired information. PMID:8297314

  7. Targeting Warburg Effect in Cancers with PEGylated Glucose.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Erathodiyil, Nandanan; Gopalan, Began; Chong, Shiya; Wan, Andrew C A; Ying, Jackie Y

    2016-03-01

    In highly proliferative cancer cells, energy is predominantly produced by a high rate of glycolysis, followed by lactic acid fermentation, despite the availability of oxygen - an observation known as the Warburg effect. As a consequence, cells employing this glycolytic pathway require high uptake of glucose and increased metabolic rates to maintain their proliferation. It has been hypothesized that by blocking glucose uptake using modified glucose molecules, apoptosis in the cancer cells can be induced. In this study, it has been showed that several poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-modified glucose compounds could reduce cell proliferation in various cancer cell lines by a phenomenon that blocked the availability of the glucose transporters and reduced AKT1 (serine/threonine-specific protein kinase) activation. Xenograft cancer models that are intravenously administered with glucose-conjugated branched PEG (GBrP) daily for 14 d show little tumor development, as compared to the control group without GBrP treatment. The toxicological effects and the pharmacokinetics of the PEGylated glucose are studied in rodents. The PEGylated glucose exerts no systemic toxicity at 40 mg kg(-1) dosage. However, doses above 80 mg kg(-1) show dose-dependent toxicity in all the organs analyzed. The present results suggest PEGylated glucose as a promising "metabolic therapy" approach for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26792539

  8. 21 CFR 862.1340 - Urinary glucose (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...). Urinary glucose (nonquantitative) measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of carbohydrate metabolism disorders including diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, and hyperglycemia. (b) Classification....

  9. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  10. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Glucose Metabolism by Marine Bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Andrew S.; Millero, Frank J.; Gerchakov, Sol M.

    1982-01-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of heat production from glucose by Vibrio alginolyticus were made to assess the viability of calorimetry as a technique for studying the metabolism of marine bacteria at organic nutrient concentrations found in marine waters. The results show that the metabolism of glucose by this bacterium can be measured by calorimetry at submicromolar concentrations. A linear correlation between glucose concentration and total heat production was observed over a concentration range of 8 mM to 0.35 μM. It is suggested that these data indicate a constant efficiency of metabolism for this bacterium over the wide range of glucose concentrations studied. PMID:16346131

  11. Transport and metabolism of glucose and arabinose in Bifidobacterium breve.

    PubMed

    Degnan, B A; Macfarlane, G T

    1993-01-01

    Glucose was required for the transport of arabinose into Bifidobacterium breve. The non-metabolisable glucose analogue 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) did not facilitate assimilation of arabinose. Studies using D-[U-14C]-labelled arabinose showed that it was fermented to pyruvate, formate, lactate and acetate, whereas the principal metabolic products of D-[U-14C]-labelled glucose were acetate and formate. In contrast to glucose, arabinose was not incorporated into cellular macromolecules. A variety of metabolic inhibitors and inhibitors of sugar transport (proton ionophores, metal ionophores, compounds associated with electron transport) were used to investigate the mechanisms of sugar uptake. Only NaF, an inhibitor of substrate level phosphorylation, and 2-DG inhibited glucose assimilation. 2-DC had no effect on arabinose uptake, but NaF was stimulatory. High levels of phosphorylation of glucose and 2-DC by PEP and to a lesser degree, ATP were seen in phosphoenolpyruvate: phosphotransferase (PEP:PTS) assays. These data together with strong inhibition of glucose uptake by NaF suggest a role for phosphorylation in the transport process. Arabinose uptake in B. breve was not directly dependent on phosphorylation or any other energy-linked form of transport but may be assimilated by glucose-dependent facilitated diffusion.

  12. Point-of-Care Glucose and Ketone Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chong, Siew Kim; Reineke, Erica L

    2016-03-01

    Early and rapid identification of hypo- and hyperglycemia as well as ketosis is essential for the practicing veterinarian as these conditions can be life threatening and require emergent treatment. Point-of-care testing for both glucose and ketone is available for clinical use and it is important for the veterinarian to understand the limitations and potential sources of error with these tests. This article discusses the devices used to monitor blood glucose including portable blood glucose meters, point-of-care blood gas analyzers and continuous glucose monitoring systems. Ketone monitoring options discussed include the nitroprusside reagent test strips and the 3-β-hydroxybutyrate ketone meter. PMID:27451045

  13. Gastrointestinal transport of calcium and glucose in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Stefanie; Schröder, Bernd; Gemmer, Anja; Reimers, Julia; Breves, Gerhard; Herrmann, Jens; Wilkens, Mirja R

    2016-06-01

    During lactation, mineral and nutrient requirements increase dramatically, particularly those for Ca and glucose. In contrast to monogastric species, in ruminants, it is rather unclear to which extend this physiological change due to increased demand for milk production is accompanied by functional adaptations of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Therefore, we investigated potential modulations of Ca and glucose transport mechanisms in the GIT of lactating and dried-off sheep. Ussing-chamber technique was applied to determine the ruminal and jejunal Ca flux rates. In the jejunum, electrophysiological properties in response to glucose were recorded. Jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) served to characterize glucose uptake via sodium-linked glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), and RNA and protein expression levels of Ca and glucose transporting systems were determined. Ruminal Ca flux rate data showed a trend for higher absorption in lactating sheep. In the jejunum, small Ca absorption could only be observed in lactating ewes. From the results, it may be assumed that lactating ewes compensate for the Ca loss by increasing bone mobilization rather than by increasing supply through absorption from the GIT Presence of SGLT1 in the jejunum of both groups was shown by RNA and protein identification, but glucose uptake into BBMV could only be detected in lactating sheep. This, however, could not be attributed to electrogenic glucose absorption in lactating sheep under Ussing-chamber conditions, providing evidence that changes in jejunal glucose uptake may include additional factors, that is, posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1340 - Urinary glucose (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...). Urinary glucose (nonquantitative) measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of carbohydrate metabolism disorders including diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, and hyperglycemia. (b) Classification....

  15. Glucose Synthesis in a Protein-Based Artificial Photosynthesis System.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hao; Yuan, Wenqiao; Zhou, Jack; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to understand glucose synthesis of a protein-based artificial photosynthesis system affected by operating conditions, including the concentrations of reactants, reaction temperature, and illumination. Results from non-vesicle-based glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and glucose synthesis showed that the initial concentrations of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), lighting source, and temperature significantly affected glucose synthesis. Higher initial concentrations of RuBP and ATP significantly enhanced GAP synthesis, which was linearly correlated to glucose synthesis, confirming the proper functions of all catalyzing enzymes in the system. White fluorescent light inhibited artificial photosynthesis and reduced glucose synthesis by 79.2 % compared to in the dark. The reaction temperature of 40 °C was optimum, whereas lower or higher temperature reduced glucose synthesis. Glucose synthesis in the vesicle-based artificial photosynthesis system reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin, F 0 F 1 ATP synthase, and polydimethylsiloxane-methyloxazoline-polydimethylsiloxane triblock copolymer was successfully demonstrated. This system efficiently utilized light-induced ATP to drive glucose synthesis, and 5.2 μg ml(-1) glucose was synthesized in 0.78-ml reaction buffer in 7 h. Light-dependent reactions were found to be the bottleneck of the studied artificial photosynthesis system.

  16. A fluorescence polarization based assay for glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Brian M.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2012-03-01

    A fluorescence polarization (FP) assay was developed to determine concentrations of glucose using concanavalin A (ConA) and fluorescently-labeled dextran. Predictive FP responses to glucose were elicited for different assay configurations using mathematical modeling and displayed herein. Using 4 kDa FITC-dextran, we predicted a change of 0.120 P units from 0 mg/dL glucose to 500 mg/dL. This shows the potential that a homogenous, reproducible FP assay can be engineered to measure glucose concentrations using tetrameric ConA and 4k kDa FITC-dextran.

  17. Glucose enhancement of memory is not state-dependent.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Opezzo, J W; Baratti, C M

    1993-11-01

    Immediate post-training intraperitoneal administration of alpha-D[+]-glucose (10-300 mg/kg) significantly enhanced retention of male Swiss mice tested 24 h after training in an inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U in this range of dose. However, of the doses tested, only 30 mg/kg was effective. Glucose did not affect response latencies in mice not given the footshock on the training trial, suggesting that the actions of glucose on retention performance were not due to nonspecific effects on response latencies. The influence of glucose (30 mg/kg) was time-dependent, which suggests that glucose facilitated memory consolidation processes. Administration of glucose (30 mg/kg) 2 or 10 min prior to the retention test did not affect the retention performance of mice given post-training injections of either saline or glucose (30 mg/kg). These findings indicate that the memory-enhancing effects of post-training administration of glucose are not state-dependent and are consistent with the view that the behavioral effects of glucose are mediated through an interaction with the neural or neurohumoral processes underlying the storage of acquired information.

  18. On the possibility of nonfat frying using molten glucose.

    PubMed

    Al-Khusaibi, Mohammed; Ahmad Tarmizi, Azmil Haizam; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2015-01-01

    Fried products impose a health concerns due to considerable amount of oil they contain. Production of snack foods with minimal oil content and good management of oil during frying to minimize the production of toxic compounds continue to be challenging aims. This paper aims to investigate the possibility of producing a fat-free food snack by replacing frying oil with a nonfat medium. Glucose was melted and its temperature was then brought to 185 °C and used to fry potato strips, to obtain a product referred here as glucose fries. The resulting product was compared with French fries prepared conventionally under conditions that resulted in similar final moisture content. The resulting products were also examined for crust formation, texture parameters, color development and glucose content. Stereo microscope images showed that similar crusts were formed in the glucose fries and French fries. Texture parameters were found to be similar for both products at 5 and 2 mm penetration depth. The maximum hardness at 2 mm penetration depth was also similar for both products, but different from cooked potato. The color development that characterized French fries was also observed in glucose fries. The glucose content in glucose fries was found to be twice the content of French fries, which is to be expected because glucose absorbed or adhered to the surface. In conclusion, glucose fries, with similar texture and color characteristics to that of French fries, can be prepared by using a nonfat frying medium.

  19. Unlocking the potential of continuous glucose monitoring: a new guideline supports the development of continuous glucose monitoring devices.

    PubMed

    D'Archangelo, Melissa J

    2009-03-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is a new technology that allows patients to measure glucose levels continuously over several days. It has several advantages over traditional glucose meters in that it does not involve repeated finger sticks and can measure trends and track changes in glucose levels over time. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, working with the Diabetes Technology Society, published Performance Metrics for Continuous Interstitial Glucose Monitoring; Approved Guideline, which provides recommendations for methods for determining analytical and clinical metrics of CGMs. The document provides guidance on how CGM data should be presented, compared between devices, and compared between measurement technologies. The document serves as a roadmap for the testing of CGM devices and will ultimately advance the potential of this exciting technology. Performance Metrics for Continuous Interstitial Glucose Monitoring; Approved Guideline represents the consensus view on preparing and presenting CGM data. PMID:20144368

  20. Recommendations for standardizing glucose reporting and analysis to optimize clinical decision making in diabetes: the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP).

    PubMed

    Bergenstal, Richard M; Ahmann, Andrew J; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H; Garg, Satish K; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B; Klonoff, David C; Kruger, Davida F; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S; Olson, Beth A; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardization of analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from CGM systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP), and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This paper provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients.

  1. A reagentless enzymatic fluorescent biosensor for glucose based on upconverting glasses, as excitation source, and chemically modified glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Del Barrio, Melisa; Cases, Rafael; Cebolla, Vicente; Hirsch, Thomas; de Marcos, Susana; Wilhelm, Stefan; Galbán, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Upon near-infrared excitation Tm(3+)+Yb(3+) doped fluorohafnate glasses present upconversion properties and emit visible light. This property permits to use these glasses (UCG) as excitation sources for fluorescent optical biosensors. Taking this into account, in this work a fluorescent biosensor for glucose determination is designed and evaluated. The biosensor combines the UCG and the fluorescence of the enzyme glucose oxidase chemically modified with a fluorescein derivative (GOx-FS), whose intensity is modified during the enzymatic reaction with glucose. Optical parameters have been optimized and a mathematical model describing the behavior of the analytical signal is suggested. Working in FIA mode, the biosensor responds to glucose concentrations up to, at least, 15mM with a limit of detection of 1.9mM. The biosensor has a minimum lifetime of 9 days and has been applied to glucose determination in drinks. The applicability of the sensor was tested by glucose determination in two fruit juices.

  2. Short communication: Interrelationship between butyrate and glucose supply on butyrate and glucose oxidation by ruminal epithelial preparations.

    PubMed

    Wiese, B I; Górka, P; Mutsvangwa, T; Okine, E; Penner, G B

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether dietary Na-butyrate supplementation affects butyrate and glucose oxidation by ruminal epithelial preparations and whether this effect can be acutely modulated by substrate (glucose and butyrate) supply. Eighteen Suffolk wether lambs (6 lambs/treatment) were blocked by body weight and, within block, randomly assigned to the control treatment (CON) or to diets containing differing Na-butyrate inclusion rates (1.58 or 3.16%) equating to 1.25 (B1.25), and 2.50% (B2.50) butyrate on a dry matter basis, respectively. All lambs received their diet for a period of 14 d. After dietary adaptation, lambs were killed and the ruminal epithelium was harvested from the ventral sac, minced finely, and used for in vitro incubations. Incubation medium contained either a constant concentration of glucose (4 mM) with increasing butyrate concentrations (0, 5, 15, 25, or 40 mM) or a constant butyrate concentration (15 mM) with increasing glucose concentrations (0, 1, 2, 4, or 8 mM) to allow for the evaluation of whether acute changes in the concentration of metabolic substrates affect the oxidation of glucose and butyrate. We observed no interactions between the in vivo and in vitro treatments. Increasing dietary butyrate supplementation linearly decreased glucose oxidation by ruminal epithelial preparations, but had no effect on butyrate oxidation. Increasing butyrate concentration in vitro decreased (cubic effect) glucose oxidation when butyrate concentration ranged between 5 and 15 mM; however, glucose oxidation was increased with a butyrate concentration of 40 mM. Butyrate oxidation decreased (cubic effect) as glucose concentration increased from 1 to 4 mM; however, butyrate oxidation increased when glucose was included at 8mM. The results of this study demonstrate that dietary butyrate supplementation can decrease glucose oxidation by the ruminal epithelium, but the relative supply of glucose and butyrate has a pronounced effect on

  3. Simultaneous glucose sensing and biohydrogen evolution from direct photoelectrocatalytic glucose oxidation on robust Cu₂O-TiO₂ electrodes.

    PubMed

    Devadoss, Anitha; Sudhagar, P; Ravidhas, C; Hishinuma, Ryota; Terashima, Chiaki; Nakata, Kazuya; Kondo, Takeshi; Shitanda, Isao; Yuasa, Makoto; Fujishima, Akira

    2014-10-21

    We report simultaneous photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) glucose sensing and biohydrogen generation for the first time from the direct PEC oxidation of glucose at multifunctional and robust Cu2O-TiO2 photocatalysts. Striking improvement of 30% in overall H2 gas evolution (∼122 μmol h(-1) cm(-2)) by photoholes assisted glucose oxidation opens a new platform in solar-driven PEC biohydrogen generation.

  4. Moderate Glucose Control Is Associated With Increased Mortality Compared With Tight Glucose Control in Critically Ill Patients Without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Phillips, Gregory D.; Holmen, John; Stoddard, Gregory; Orme, James

    2013-01-01

    Background: Optimal glucose management in the ICU remains unclear. In 2009, many clinicians at Intermountain Healthcare selected a moderate glucose control (90-140 mg/dL) instead of tight glucose control (80-110 mg/dL). We hypothesized that moderate glucose control would affect patients with and without preexisting diabetes differently. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of all patients treated with eProtocol-insulin from November 2006 to March 2011, stratifying for diabetes. We performed multivariate logistic regression for 30-day mortality with covariates of age, modified APACHE (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) II score, Charlson Comorbidity score, and target glucose. Results: We studied 3,529 patients in 12 different ICUs in eight different hospitals. Patients with diabetes had higher mean glucose (132 mg/dL vs 124 mg/dL) and greater glycemic variability (SD = 41 mg/dL vs 29 mg/dL) than did patients without diabetes (P < .01 for both comparisons). Tight glucose control was associated with increased frequency of moderate and severe hypoglycemia (30.3% and 3.6%) compared with moderate glucose control (14.3% and 2.0%, P < .01 for both). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the moderate glucose target was independently associated with increased risk of mortality in patients without diabetes (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01-1.84; P = .05) but decreased risk of mortality in patients with diabetes (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.45-0.93; P = .01). Conclusions: Moderate glucose control (90-140 mg/dL) may confer greater mortality in critically ill patients without diabetes compared with tight glucose control (80-110 mg/dL). A single glucose target does not appear optimal for all critically ill patients. These data have important implications for the design of future interventional trials as well as for the glycemic management of critically ill patients. PMID:23238456

  5. Structure-Based Design of Robust Glucose Biosensors using a Thermotoga maritima Periplasmic Glucose-Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Tian,Y.; Cunco, M.; Changela, A.; Hocker, B.; Beese, L.; Hellinga, H.

    2007-01-01

    We report the design and engineering of a robust, reagentless fluorescent glucose biosensor based on the periplasmic glucose-binding protein obtained from Thermotoga maritima (tmGBP). The gene for this protein was cloned from genomic DNA and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, the identity of its cognate sugar was confirmed, ligand binding was studied, and the structure of its glucose complex was solved to 1.7 Angstroms resolution by X-ray crystallography. TmGBP is specific for glucose and exhibits high thermostability (midpoint of thermal denaturation is 119 {+-} 1 C and 144 {+-} 2 C in the absence and presence of 1 mM glucose, respectively). A series of fluorescent conjugates was constructed by coupling single, environmentally sensitive fluorophores to unique cysteines introduced by site-specific mutagenesis at positions predicted to be responsive to ligand-induced conformational changes based on the structure. These conjugates were screened to identify engineered tmGBPs that function as reagentless fluorescent glucose biosensors. The Y13C Cy5 conjugate is bright, gives a large response to glucose over concentration ranges appropriate for in vivo monitoring of blood glucose levels (1-30 mM), and can be immobilized in an orientation-specific manner in microtiter plates to give a reversible response to glucose. The immobilized protein retains its response after long-term storage at room temperature.

  6. Diet-induced obesity impairs hypothalamic glucose sensing but not glucose hypothalamic extracellular levels, as measured by microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, I S; Zemdegs, J C S; de Souza, A P; Watanabe, R L H; Telles, M M; Nascimento, C M O; Oyama, L M; Ribeiro, E B

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Glucose from the diet may signal metabolic status to hypothalamic sites controlling energy homeostasis. Disruption of this mechanism may contribute to obesity but its relevance has not been established. The present experiments aimed at evaluating whether obesity induced by chronic high-fat intake affects the ability of hypothalamic glucose to control feeding. We hypothesized that glucose transport to the hypothalamus as well as glucose sensing and signaling could be impaired by high-fat feeding. Subjects/methods: Female Wistar rats were studied after 8 weeks on either control or high-lard diet. Daily food intake was measured after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) glucose. Glycemia and glucose content of medial hypothalamus microdialysates were measured in response to interperitoneal (i.p.) glucose or meal intake after an overnight fast. The effect of refeeding on whole hypothalamus levels of glucose transporter proteins (GLUT) 1, 2 and 4, AMPK and phosphorylated AMPK levels was determined by immunoblotting. Results: High-fat rats had higher body weight and fat content and serum leptin than control rats, but normal insulin levels and glucose tolerance. I.c.v. glucose inhibited food intake in control but failed to do so in high-fat rats. Either i.p. glucose or refeeding significantly increased glucose hypothalamic microdialysate levels in the control rats. These levels showed exacerbated increases in the high-fat rats. GLUT1 and 4 levels were not affected by refeeding. GLUT2 levels decreased and phosphor-AMPK levels increased in the high-fat rats but not in the controls. Conclusions: The findings suggest that, in the high-fat rats, a defective glucose sensing by decreased GLUT2 levels contributed to an inappropriate activation of AMPK after refeeding, despite increased extracellular glucose levels. These derangements were probably involved in the abolition of hypophagia in response to i.c.v. glucose. It is proposed that ‘glucose resistance

  7. Effect of glucose load and of insulin on the metabolism of glucose and of palmitate in sheep

    PubMed Central

    West, C. E.; Passey, R. F.

    1967-01-01

    1. Simultaneous measurements of the entry rates of palmitate and glucose have been made in Merino sheep (wethers), starved for 24hr., by using constant infusions of [9,10-3H2]palmitate and [U-14C]glucose. 2. The infusion of glucose into the peripheral circulation of the sheep lowered the endogenous entry of both glucose and palmitate. Since palmitate is roughly metabolically representative of the free fatty acid fraction, there was no marked change in the calories available to the sheep. 3. The infusion of insulin into either the peripheral or portal circulation increased the uptake of glucose and decreased the uptake of palmitate by the tissues of the sheep. 4. The infusion of insulin into the peripheral circulation produced a depression in glucose entry after about 80min., whereas the infusion of insulin into the portal circulation produced an almost immediate depression in glucose entry. 5. The hypoglycaemia produced gave rise to an increase in free fatty acid production followed by an increase in glucose production. 6. No direct effect of insulin on the metabolism of free fatty acids has been demonstrated by the techniques used. The effect of insulin on the metabolism of free fatty acids is apparently mediated through its effect on glucose metabolism. PMID:6030300

  8. Allosteric regulation of the glucose:H+ symporter of Lactobacillus brevis: cooperative binding of glucose and HPr(ser-P).

    PubMed Central

    Ye, J J; Saier, M H

    1995-01-01

    Lactobacillus brevis transports glucose and the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose via a proton symport mechanism that is allosterically inhibited by the seryl-phosphorylated derivative of HPr, the small phosphocarrier protein of the phosphotransferase system. We have demonstrate that S46DHPr, a mutant analog of HPr which conformationally resembles HPr(ser-P) but not free HPr, specifically binds to membranes derived from glucose-grown L. brevis cells if and only if a substrate of the glucose permease is also present. PMID:7896720

  9. Luminal leptin induces rapid inhibition of active intestinal absorption of glucose mediated by sodium-glucose cotransporter 1.

    PubMed

    Ducroc, Robert; Guilmeau, Sandra; Akasbi, Khalil; Devaud, Hélène; Buyse, Marion; Bado, André

    2005-02-01

    The effect of leptin on glucose transport was studied in rat jejunal mucosa in Ussing chambers. Leptin was added in the luminal or the serosal compartment before the tissues were challenged with 1, 10, or 50 mmol/l glucose. In response to 10 mmol/l glucose, the increase in short-circuit current (DeltaIsc) reached 26.8 +/- 2.1 microA/cm(2). Luminal addition of leptin dramatically decreased glucose-induced Isc (90.5% for 10 nmol/l leptin). Inhibition was maximal after 5 min and dose dependent (IC(50) = 0.13 nM). Western blot analysis showed that rapid inhibition of glucose-induced Isc by leptin was associated with a parallel decrease in the abundance of sodium-glucose transporter-1 in brush border membranes. Inhibition by luminal leptin of DeltaIsc was prevented by inhibitor of conventional protein kinase C isoforms. Serosal addition of leptin did not decrease glucose-induced Isc within 5 min and reached maximum after 10 min. The effect of leptin from serosal side was blocked by cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor-2 receptor antagonist YM022. Altogether, these data demonstrate that luminal leptin induces rapid inhibition of glucose entry into enterocyte. The slower action of leptin on the serosal side of mucosa seems indirect and is likely mediated by endogenous CCK. They demonstrate that gut leptin is a major regulator of rapid intestinal glucose transport.

  10. Metabolic profile of normal glucose-tolerant subjects with elevated 1-h plasma glucose values

    PubMed Central

    Pramodkumar, Thyparambil Aravindakshan; Priya, Miranda; Jebarani, Saravanan; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan; Pradeepa, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the metabolic profiles of subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) with and without elevated 1-h postglucose (1HrPG) values during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Methodology: The study group comprised 996 subjects without known diabetes seen at tertiary diabetes center between 2010 and 2014. NGT was defined as fasting plasma glucose <100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) and 2-h plasma glucose <140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L) after an 82.5 g oral glucose (equivalent to 75 g of anhydrous glucose) OGTT. Anthropometric measurements and biochemical investigations were done using standardized methods. The prevalence rate of generalized and central obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome (MS) was determined among the NGT subjects stratified based on their 1HrPG values as <143 mg/dl, ≥143–<155 mg/dl, and ≥155 mg/dl, after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, alcohol consumption, smoking, and family history of diabetes. Results: The mean age of the 996 NGT subjects was 48 ± 12 years and 53.5% were male. The mean glycated hemoglobin for subjects with 1HrPG <143 mg/dl was 5.5%, for those with 1HrPG ≥143–<155 mg/dl, 5.6% and for those with 1HrPG ≥155 mg/dl, 5.7%. NGT subjects with 1HrPG ≥143–<155 mg/dl and ≥155 mg/dl had significantly higher BMI, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio, triglyceride/HDL ratio, leukocyte count, and gamma glutamyl aminotransferase (P < 0.05) compared to subjects with 1HrPG <143 mg/dl. The odds ratio for MS for subjects with 1HrPG ≥143 mg/dl was 1.84 times higher compared to subjects with 1HrPG <143 mg/dl taken as the reference. Conclusion: NGT subjects with elevated 1HrPG values have a worse metabolic profile than those with normal 1HrPG during an OGTT. PMID:27730069

  11. Middle infrared optoelectronic absorption systems for monitoring physiological glucose solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, W. Blake

    Tight monitoring of the glucose levels for diabetic individuals is essential to control long-term complications. A definitive diabetes management system has yet to be developed for the diabetic. This research investigates the application of middle infrared absorption frequencies for monitoring glucose levels in biological solutions. Three frequencies were identified using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and correlated to changes in glucose concentrations. The 1035 +/- 1 cm-1 frequency was determined to be the best representative frequency. Other biological molecules contributed no significant interference to monitoring glucose absorption. A second frequency at 1193 cm-1 was suggested as a representative background absorption frequency, which could be used for more accurate glucose absorption values. Next, a quantum cascade laser optoelectronic absorption system was designed and developed to monitor glucose. After careful alignment and design, the system was used to monitor physiological glucose concentrations. Correlation at 1036 cm-1 with glucose changes was comparable to the previous results. The use of the background absorption frequency was verified. This frequency essentially acts as a calibrating frequency to adjust in real-time to any changes in the background absorption that may alter the accuracy of the predicted glucose value. An evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique was explored to monitor molecules in a biological solution. Visible light at 425 nm was used to monitor hemoglobin in control urine samples. An adsorption isotherm for hemoglobin was detectable to limit of 5.8 nM. Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy would be useful for a glucose solution. Given an equivalent system designed for the middle infrared, the molar extinction coefficient of glucose allows for a detectable limit of 45 mg/dl for a free-floating glucose solution, which is below normal physiological concentrations. The future use of a hydrophobic

  12. Glucose-deprivation increases thyroid cancer cells sensitivity to metformin.

    PubMed

    Bikas, Athanasios; Jensen, Kirk; Patel, Aneeta; Costello, John; McDaniel, Dennis; Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Larin, Olexander; Hoperia, Victoria; Burman, Kenneth D; Boyle, Lisa; Wartofsky, Leonard; Vasko, Vasyl

    2015-12-01

    Metformin inhibits thyroid cancer cell growth. We sought to determine if variable glucose concentrations in medium alter the anti-cancer efficacy of metformin. Thyroid cancer cells (FTC133 and BCPAP) were cultured in high-glucose (20 mM) and low-glucose (5 mM) medium before treatment with metformin. Cell viability and apoptosis assays were performed. Expression of glycolytic genes was examined by real-time PCR, western blot, and immunostaining. Metformin inhibited cellular proliferation in high-glucose medium and induced cell death in low-glucose medium. In low-, but not in high-glucose medium, metformin induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy, and oncosis. At micromolar concentrations, metformin induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and blocked p-pS6 in low-glucose medium. Metformin increased the rate of glucose consumption from the medium and prompted medium acidification. Medium supplementation with glucose reversed metformin-inducible morphological changes. Treatment with an inhibitor of glycolysis (2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG)) increased thyroid cancer cell sensitivity to metformin. The combination of 2-DG with metformin led to cell death. Thyroid cancer cell lines were characterized by over-expression of glycolytic genes, and metformin decreased the protein level of pyruvate kinase muscle 2 (PKM2). PKM2 expression was detected in recurrent thyroid cancer tissue samples. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the glucose concentration in the cellular milieu is a factor modulating metformin's anti-cancer activity. These data suggest that the combination of metformin with inhibitors of glycolysis could represent a new strategy for the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  13. Taurine supplementation modulates glucose homeostasis and islet function.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Everardo M; Latorraca, Marcia Q; Araujo, Eliana; Beltrá, Marta; Oliveras, Maria J; Navarro, Mónica; Berná, Genoveva; Bedoya, Francisco J; Velloso, Licio A; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Franz

    2009-07-01

    Taurine is a conditionally essential amino acid for human that is involved in the control of glucose homeostasis; however, the mechanisms by which the amino acid affects blood glucose levels are unknown. Using an animal model, we have studied these mechanisms. Mice were supplemented with taurine for 30 d. Blood glucose homeostasis was assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT). Islet cell function was determined by insulin secretion, cytosolic Ca2+ measurements and glucose metabolism from isolated islets. Islet cell gene expression and translocation was examined via immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Insulin signaling was studied by Western blot. Islets from taurine-supplemented mice had: (i) significantly higher insulin content, (ii) increased insulin secretion at stimulatory glucose concentrations, (iii) significantly displaced the dose-response curve for glucose-induced insulin release to the left, (iv) increased glucose metabolism at 5.6 and 11.1-mmol/L concentrations; (v) slowed cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) oscillations in response to stimulatory glucose concentrations; (vi) increased insulin, sulfonylurea receptor-1, glucokinase, Glut-2, proconvertase and pancreas duodenum homeobox-1 (PDX-1) gene expression and (vii) increased PDX-1 expression in the nucleus. Moreover, taurine supplementation significantly increased both basal and insulin stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in skeletal muscle and liver tissues. Finally, taurine supplemented mice showed an improved IPGTT. These results indicate that taurine controls glucose homeostasis by regulating the expression of genes required for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In addition, taurine enhances peripheral insulin sensitivity. PMID:18708284

  14. Glucose homeostasis in pregnant rats submitted to dietary protein restriction.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Maria Alice Rostom; Luciano, Eliete; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; Machado de Oliveira, Camnila Aparecida; Boschero, Antonio Carlos

    2003-01-01

    In the present work, we examined the effects of feeding a low protein diet during pregnancy on glucose-induced insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis in rats. Young (60 days), pregnant (P) or non-pregnant (NP) rats were fed during pregnancy or for 21 days (the NP) a normal (17%) or a low (6%) protein diet. Serum glucose and insulin levels and pancreas insulin content in the fed state; total area under serum glucose curve (AG) after a glucose load and serum glucose disappearance rate (Kitt) after insulin administration; as well as 86Rb outflow, 45Ca uptake and insulin secretion by isolated pancreatic islets in response to glucose were evaluated. Serum glucose was lower in 17%-P (12%) and 6%-P (27%) than in corresponding NP-rats. Serum insulin was higher in 17%-P (153%) and 6%-P (77%) compared to the corresponding NP-rats. Pancreatic insulin was higher in 6%-rats (55%) than in 17%-rats. No differences were found in AG among the groups whereas Kitt was lower in 6%-NP and higher in 6%-P than in the equivalent 17% rats. Increasing glucose concentration from 2.8 to 16.7 mmol/l, reduced 86Rb outflow from isolated islets from all groups. Increasing glucose concentration from 2.8 to 16.7 mmol/l elevated 45Ca uptake by 17%-NP (47%), 17%-P (40%) and 6%-P (214%) islets but not by 6%-NP ones. The increase in 45Ca uptake was followed by an increase in insulin release by the 17%-NP (2767%), 17%-P (2850%) and 6%-P (1200%) islets. In conclusion, 6%-P rats show impaired glucose induced insulin secretion related to reduced calcium uptake by pancreatic islets. However, the poor insulin secretion did not fully compensate the high peripheral sensitivity to the hormone, resulting in hypoglycemia. PMID:15686122

  15. Glucose metabolism and effect of acetate in ovine adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y T; White, L S; Muir, L A

    1982-08-01

    Isolated ovine adipocytes were incubated in vitro with specifically labeled 14C-glucose in the presence or absence of acetate. The flux patterns of glucose carbon through major metabolic pathways were estimated. When glucose was added as the sole substrate, approximately equal portions of glucose carbon (10%) were oxidized to CO2 in the pentose phosphate pathway, in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction and in the citrate cycle. Fifteen percent of the glucose carbon was incorporated into fatty acids and 43% was released as lactate and pyruvate. Addition of acetate to the medium increased glucose carbon uptake by 1.5-fold. Most of this increase was accounted for by a sevenfold increase in the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway. Acetate increased glucose carbon fluxes via pentose phosphate pathway to triose phosphates, from triose phosphate to pyruvate, into glyceride glycerol, into lactate and pyruvate and into pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate cycle CO2. Glucose carbon incorporated into fatty acids was decreased 50% by acetate while, carbon fluxes through the phosphofructokinase-aldolase reactions were not significantly increased. Results of this study suggest that, when glucose is the sole substrate, the conversion of glucose to fatty acids in ovine adipocytes may not be limited by the maximum capacity of hexokinase, the pentose phosphate pathway or enzymes involved in the conversion of triose phosphates to pyruvate and of pyruvate to fatty acid. Acetate increased glucose utilization apparently by increasing activity of the pentose phosphate pathway as a result of enhanced NADPH utilization for fatty acid synthesis. PMID:7142048

  16. Misled by the Morning "Fasting" Plasma Glucose.

    PubMed

    King, Allen B

    2015-11-01

    Because of its ease and simplicity of its measurement, the morning fasting plasma glucose (FPG), has been as used a surrogate marker for the entire basal day when titrating once-nightly basal insulin. Common in obese insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes, late and large evening meals elevate the FPG. This has led to dosing of basal insulin well beyond the basal requirements and contributes to hypoglycemia and weight gain seen with this therapy. It is recommended that during basal insulin titration, the evening meal be limited and hypoglycemia be monitored early in the morning, that bewitching time when the "peakless" basal insulin's action is peaking and the predawn phenomenon insulin sensitivity is higher. PMID:25972281

  17. Protons and glucose metabolism in shock

    SciTech Connect

    Hochachka, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    When oxygen is limiting, animals can ferment glucose via several metabolic pathways varying in energetic efficiency and leading to various end products (such as lactate, succinate, or propionate). Because the pH dependence of H/sup +/ production by fermentation is opposite to that by hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate formed in the fermentation, the total number of moles of protons generated is always two per mole of fermentable substrate. However, two and three times more adenosine triphosphate can be turned over per mole of protons produced in succinate and propionate fermentations, respectively, than in lactate fermentation. At its limit, this advantage would achieve the same balance between H/sup +/ production and H/sup +/ consumption during ATP cycling that is observed in aerobic metabolism, a situation observed in certain alcohol fermentations. Since proton balance during anaerobiosis is clearly adaptable, we consider possible impact and functions of net H/sup +/ accumulation during carbohydrate metabolism in endotoxin shock.

  18. Glucose Suppresses Biological Ferroelectricity in Aortic Elastin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanming; Wang, Yunjie; Chow, Ming-Jay; Chen, Nataly Q.; Ma, Feiyue; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-04-01

    Elastin is an intriguing extracellular matrix protein present in all connective tissues of vertebrates, rendering essential elasticity to connective tissues subjected to repeated physiological stresses. Using piezoresponse force microscopy, we show that the polarity of aortic elastin is switchable by an electrical field, which may be associated with the recently discovered biological ferroelectricity in the aorta. More interestingly, it is discovered that the switching in aortic elastin is largely suppressed by glucose treatment, which appears to freeze the internal asymmetric polar structures of elastin, making it much harder to switch, or suppressing the switching completely. Such loss of ferroelectricity could have important physiological and pathological implications from aging to arteriosclerosis that are closely related to glycation of elastin.

  19. Determination of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zak, B; Epstein, E; Baginski, E S

    1977-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase is described. Homogenization and ultracentrifrigation were used to prepare a precipitate whose character was defined by monitoring the desire enzyme activity which serves as a marker. Activity of the enzyme was determined by means of a sensitive colorimetric reaction for the product, inorganic phosphate. Non-enzymatic hydrolysis problems with the substrate are minimized in this procedure by the masking action of citrate. The final heteropoly blue color appears to be considerably sensitized by interaction of phosphomolybdous ion with arsenite. The stability of the relatively labile enzyme was ensured by chelating any metals present with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. The overall results obtained by the procedure appear to be useful as an aid in the diagnosis of Type I glycogenosis, a glycogen storage disease called Von Gierke's disease. PMID:192125

  20. Glucose monitoring in pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Aisha; Jabbar, Abdul

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes in pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Due to variations in insulin resistance throughout pregnancy there is a continuous need to implement Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT), exercise and pharmacological treatments which have to be escalated. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is integral to the management of diabetes in pregnancy. Proper implementation of SMBG in pregnant women with diabetes requires patient education and understanding of its applications and limitations. Real-time results enable individuals to make informed daily self-care decisions regarding diet, exercise, and insulin. Retrospective analysis of SMBG data enables clinicians to develop individualized care plans, informing decisions related to insulin initiation and adjustment and the possible needs for interventions or hospitalization to improve inadequate self-monitoring. PMID:27582145

  1. Performance of Cleared Blood Glucose Monitors

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, David C.; Prahalad, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Cleared blood glucose monitor (BGM) systems do not always perform as accurately for users as they did to become cleared. We performed a literature review of recent publications between 2010 and 2014 that present data about the frequency of inaccurate performance using ISO 15197 2003 and ISO 15197 2013 as target standards. We performed an additional literature review of publications that present data about the clinical and economic risks of inaccurate BGMs for making treatment decisions or calibrating continuous glucose monitors (CGMs). We found 11 publications describing performance of 98 unique BGM systems. 53 of these 98 (54%) systems met ISO 15197 2003 and 31 of the 98 (32%) tested systems met ISO 15197 2013 analytical accuracy standards in all studies in which they were evaluated. Of the tested systems, 33 were identified by us as FDA-cleared. Among these FDA-cleared BGM systems, 24 out of 32 (75%) met ISO 15197 2003 and 15 out of 31 (48.3%) met ISO 15197 2013 in all studies in which they were evaluated. Among the non-FDA-cleared BGM systems, 29 of 65 (45%) met ISO 15197 2003 and 15 out of 65 (23%) met ISO 15197 2013 in all studies in which they were evaluated. It is more likely that an FDA-cleared BGM system, compared to a non-FDA-cleared BGM system, will perform according to ISO 15197 2003 (χ2 = 6.2, df = 3, P = 0.04) and ISO 15197 2013 (χ2 = 11.4, df = 3, P = 0.003). We identified 7 articles about clinical risks and 3 articles about economic risks of inaccurate BGMs. We conclude that a significant proportion of cleared BGMs do not perform at the level for which they were cleared or according to international standards of accuracy. Such poor performance leads to adverse clinical and economic consequences. PMID:25990294

  2. Flow-induced immobilization of glucose oxidase in nonionic micellar nanogels for glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Cardiel, Joshua J; Zhao, Ya; Tonggu, Lige; Wang, Liguo; Chung, Jae-Hyun; Shen, Amy Q

    2014-10-21

    A simple microfluidic platform was utilized to immobilize glucose oxidase (GOx) in a nonionic micellar scaffold. The immobilization of GOx was verified by using a combination of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV) techniques. Chronoamperometric measurements were conducted on nanogel-GOx scaffolds under different glucose concentrations, exhibiting linear amperometric responses. Without impacting the lifetime and denaturation of GOx, the nonionic nanogel provides a favorable microenvironment for GOx in biological media. This flow-induced immobilization method in a nonionic nanogel host matrix opens up new pathways for designing a simple, fast, biocompatible, and cost-effective process to immobilize biomolecules that are averse to ionic environments. PMID:25144867

  3. Glucose Metabolism: A Sweet Relief of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-09-12

    Patients and individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease show reduced glucose metabolism in the brain. A new study takes advantage of a fly model of Alzheimer's disease to demonstrate that enhancing glucose uptake in neurons has strong neuroprotective effects involving improved proteostasis. PMID:27623263

  4. Regional differences in adipocyte lactate production from glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, F.D.; Sykes, M.N.; DiGirolamo, M. )

    1988-11-01

    Having shown that lactate is an important product of glucose metabolism by rat epididymal adipocytes, the authors investigated possible regional differences in adipocyte lactate production and the role of the animals' nutritional state and stage of development. (U-{sup 14}C)glucose metabolism, lactate production, and response to insulin were measured in fat cells isolated from four adipose regions from young lean and older fatter rats, killed either in the fed state or after fasting for 48 h. In the absence of insulin, mesenteric fat cells from either age group metabolized significantly more glucose per cell and converted more glucose to lactate than cells from other depots, regardless of nutritional state. Adipocytes from fasted lean rats showed a significant increase in the relative glucose conversion to lactate in all depots when compared with cells from fed lean rats. Fasting of older fatter rats, however, had limited effects on the relative adipocyte glucose conversion to lactate since lactate production was already high. Mesenteric fat cells had the lowest relative response to insulin, possibly due to the high basal rate of glucose metabolism. These findings indicate that differences exist among adipose regions in the rates of glucose metabolism, lactate production and response to insulin. The anatomical location of the mesenteric adipose depot, coupled with a high metabolic rate and blood perfusion, suggests that mesenteric adipocytes may provide a unique and more direct contribution of metabolic substrates for hepatic metabolism than adipocytes from other depots.

  5. Developmental expression of the glucose transporter in brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Hohimer, A.R.; Bissonnette, J.M.; Machida, C.M. )

    1990-02-26

    Brain microvessels were isolated from late gestation fetal (55-68 days), newborn (5-9 day old) and adult guinea pigs. Glucose transport was assessed by measuring the initial uptake of ({sup 3}H)-2-deoxy-D-glucose, a glucose analog that is transported and phosphorylated but not further metabolized. At 22C and substrate concentrations of 40 mM, uptakes were linear for 8 minutes. The data reported here were uptakes over the first 2 minutes. 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake was 3.5 fold higher in newborn microvessels, 99.5{+-}18.4 (SEM) fmols/mg protein/2 minutes, compared to fetal, 27.8{+-}7.9. The number of glucose transporters was estimated using the ({sup 3}H) cytochalasin B which can be displaced by D-glucose (250 mM). Binding at 35 nM cytochalasin B was higher in newborn brain microvessels (8.2{+-}1.6 pmole/mg protein) than in fetal (3.4{+-}1.1) or adult (2.8{+-}0.6) brain microvessels. Initial RNA blot experiments using a cDNA for the brain/erythrocyte (HepG2) glucose transporter show increased expression in newborn microvessels compared to the fetus or the adult. The authors conclude that the brain microvessel glucose transporter is increased in the newborn period.

  6. Glucose and lactate kinetics in American eel Anguilla rostrata.

    PubMed

    Cornish, I; Moon, T W

    1985-07-01

    Simultaneous infusion of [6-3H]glucose and [U-14C]lactate was used to calculate the turnover rate of glucose, the irreversible replacement rate of lactate, and the rates of the exchange of carbon atoms between glucose and lactate in free-swimming American eels (Anguilla rostrata) fed or food deprived for 6, 15, and 36 (maturing) mo. The mean turnover rate of glucose in fed animals averaged 1.0 mg X min-1 X 100 g-1, while the lactate irreversible replacement rate was approximately 4.0 micrograms X min-1 X 100 g-1. The conversion of 35% of lactate carbon to glucose implied a substantial Cori cycle activity, but this amounted to less than 1% of total glucose production. Food deprivation for 6 mo altered few kinetic patterns, except for an increased lactate irreversible replacement rate and a minor increase in gluconeogenesis from lactate. After a 15-mo fast, glucose turnover decreased to 0.09 +/- 0.02 mg X min-1 X 100 g-1. Plasma lactate concentrations and production rates continuously increased during the experiment. Maturing eels that had been food deprived for 36 mo maintained glucose and lactate concentrations and kinetics similar to values in animals food deprived for only 6 mo. This study stresses the importance of carbohydrate in the metabolism of this species under fed and food-deprived conditions and further supports the tolerance of Anguillid species to food deprivation.

  7. Real-time dual wavelength polarimetry for glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Bilal H.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2009-02-01

    Proper treatment of diabetes includes maintenance of near normal blood glucose levels, which can only be achieved with frequent blood glucose monitoring. Current blood finger-stick methods for glucose sensing are invasive, often resulting in low patient compliance and poor disease control. The development of a noninvasive glucose sensor has the potential to provide optimal management of diabetes. Our proposed noninvasive approach is based on an optical polarimetry system for probing the anterior chamber of the eye. The sensor would eventually be used to measure the aqueous humor glucose concentration as a means to determine the blood glucose concentration. In this report, we present the development of a near real-time (less than 1 second) dual wavelength closed-loop polarimetric system to minimize glucose prediction error in the presence of varying birefringence due to motion artifact. The new dual wavelength polarimetric system and in vitro glucose measurement results will be presented which demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system in the presence of varying birefringence.

  8. Polarimetric glucose sensing in an artificial eye anterior chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Bilal H.; Pirnstill, Casey W.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2012-03-01

    The application of optical polarimetry to glucose sensing in the anterior chamber of the eye has emerged as a potential technique to noninvasively ascertain blood glucose levels. One of the major limiting factors preventing the realization of such a device is the time varying corneal birefringence due to motion artifact in the eye. The varying birefringence confounds the optical activity of glucose, and thus, needs to be taken into account in order to successfully predict the glucose concentration in the aqueous humor of the eye. Our group has developed a multi-spectral optical polarimetric approach which can minimize the effect of corneal birefringence coupled with motion artifact by treating it as common mode noise to multiple wavelengths. Here, we present the application of a real-time closed-loop dual wavelength polarimeter to ex vivo glucose sensing in excised New Zealand White rabbits' corneas mounted on an artificial anterior chamber. Our PID control system can reach stability in less than 100 ms which is fast enough to overcome motion artifact due to heart beat and respiration. The system can predict the glucose concentration with a standard error of less than 26 mg/dL in the physiologic glucose range of 0 - 500 mg/dL. Our results indicate that dualwavelength polarimetry has the potential to noninvasively probe glucose through the anterior chamber of the eye.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1372 - Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations... enzyme preparations. (a) Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations are used in the production of... additional requirements for enzyme preparations in the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 107, which...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1372 - Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations... enzyme preparations. (a) Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations are used in the production of... additional requirements for enzyme preparations in the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 107, which...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1372 - Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations... enzyme preparations. (a) Insoluble glucose isomerase enzyme preparations are used in the production of... additional requirements for enzyme preparations in the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 107, which...

  12. The glucosidic pathways and glucose production by frog muscle.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P A; Petrof, E O; Guderley, H

    1992-04-25

    Resting muscle is generally perceived as a glucose-utilizing organ; however, we show that resting well-oxygenated frog muscle recovering from strenuous exercise can release significant amounts of glucose. The metabolic pathway responsible for this process does not involve glucose-6-phosphatase because this enzyme is undetectable in frog muscle. The participation of amylo-1,6-glucosidase in the production of glucose is also ruled out since neither marked net phosphorolytic breakdown of glycogen nor considerable cycling between glycogen and glucose 6-phosphate occur. The glucosidic pathways of glycogen breakdown are the likely source of glucose as they are the only metabolic avenues with sufficient capacity to account for the rate at which glucose is released from post-exercised muscle. This rate of glucose production is high enough to be of physiological importance. Our results clearly indicate that to measure lactate glycogenesis in muscle, the simultaneous hydrolysis of muscle glycogen by the glucosidic pathways must be taken into account to prevent marked underestimation of the rate of glycogen synthesis. The glucosidic pathways seem the predominant avenues of glycogen breakdown in post-exercised resting frog muscle and are active enough to account for the rate of glycogen breakdown in resting muscle, suggesting that these rather than the phosphorolytic pathways are the chief routes of glycogen breakdown in resting muscle. PMID:1569076

  13. Glucose Tightly Controls Morphological and Functional Properties of Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yao; Dallérac, Glenn; Ezan, Pascal; Anderova, Miroslava; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The main energy source powering the brain is glucose. Strong energy needs of our nervous system are fulfilled by conveying this essential metabolite through blood via an extensive vascular network. Glucose then reaches brain tissues by cell uptake, diffusion and metabolization, processes primarily undertaken by astrocytes. Deprivation of glucose can however occur in various circumstances. In particular, ageing is associated with cognitive disturbances that are partly attributable to metabolic deficiency leading to brain glycopenia. Despite the crucial role of glucose and its metabolites in sustaining neuronal activity, little is known about its moment-to-moment contribution to astroglial physiology. We thus here investigated the early structural and functional alterations induced in astrocytes by a transient metabolic challenge consisting in glucose deprivation. Electrophysiological recordings of hippocampal astroglial cells of the stratum radiatum in situ revealed that shortage of glucose specifically increases astrocyte membrane capacitance, whilst it has no impact on other passive membrane properties. Consistent with this change, morphometric analysis unraveled a prompt increase in astrocyte volume upon glucose deprivation. Furthermore, characteristic functional properties of astrocytes are also affected by transient glucose deficiency. We indeed found that glucoprivation decreases their gap junction-mediated coupling, while it progressively and reversibly increases their intracellular calcium levels during the slow depression of synaptic transmission occurring simultaneously, as assessed by dual electrophysiological and calcium imaging recordings. Together, these data indicate that astrocytes rapidly respond to metabolic dysfunctions, and are therefore central to the neuroglial dialog at play in brain adaptation to glycopenia. PMID:27148048

  14. Characterization of glucose oxidation by gold nanoparticles using nanoceria.

    PubMed

    Lang, Nathan J; Liu, Biwu; Liu, Juewen

    2014-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can oxidize glucose, producing hydrogen peroxide and gluconic acid, which are the same products as those generated by glucose oxidase (GOx). In this regard, AuNPs are a nanozyme. Herein, a new colorimetric method is developed to understand the surface chemistry of gold nanoparticles for this oxidation reaction. The color of nanoceria is changed to yellow by the hydrogen peroxide generated during glucose oxidation. Using this assay, we find that adsorption of small molecules such as citrate does not deactivate AuNPs, while adsorption of polymers including serum proteins and high molecular weight polyethylene glycol inhibits glucose oxidation. In addition to glucose, AuNPs can also oxidize galactose. Therefore, this reaction is unlikely to be directly useful for glucose detection for biomedical applications. On the other hand, AuNPs might serve as a general oxidase for a broad range of substrates. The glucose oxidation reaction is slower at lower pH. Since the reaction generates an acid product, glucose oxidation becomes slower as the reaction proceeds. The effects of temperature, AuNP size, and reaction kinetics have been systematically studied. This work provides new insights regarding the surface chemistry of AuNPs as a nanozyme.

  15. Effect of ghrelin on glucose regulation in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvement of glucose metabolism after bariatric surgery appears to be from the composite effect of the alterations in multiple circulating gut hormone concentrations. However, their individual effect on glucose metabolism during different conditions is not clear. The objective of this study was to...

  16. [Intelligent interpretation of home monitoring blood glucose data].

    PubMed

    Dió, Mihály; Deutsch, Tibor; Biczók, Tímea; Mészáros, Judit

    2015-07-19

    Self monitoring of blood glucose is the cornerstone of diabetes management. However, the data obtained by self monitoring of blood glucose have rarely been used with the highest advantage. Few physicians routinely download data from memory-equipped glucose meters and analyse these data systematically at the time of patient visits. There is a need for improved methods for the display and analysis of blood glucose data along with a modular approach for identification of clinical problems. The authors present a systematic methodology for the analysis and interpretation of self monitoring blood glucose data in order to assist the management of patients with diabetes. This approach utilizes the followings 1) overall quality of glycemic control; 2) severity and timing of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia; 3) variability of blood glucose readings; 4) various temporal patterns extracted from recorded data and 5) adequacy of self monitoring blood glucose data. Based on reliable measures of the quality of glycaemic control and glucose variability, a prioritized problem list is derived along with the probable causes of the detected problems. Finally, problems and their interpretation are used to guide clinicians to choose therapeutic actions and/or recommend behaviour change in order to solve the problems that have been identified.

  17. In vitro degradation of pure Mg in response to glucose

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Xiao-Ting; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen; Han, En-Hou

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are promising biodegradable biomaterials but are still challenging to be used in person with high levels of blood glucose or diabetes. To date, the influence of glucose on magnesium degradation has not yet been elucidated, this issue requires more attention. Herein, we present pure Mg exhibiting different corrosion responses to saline and Hank’s solutions with different glucose contents, and the degradation mechanism of pure Mg in the saline solution with glucose in comparison with mannitol as a control. On one hand, the corrosion rate of pure Mg increases with the glucose concentration in saline solutions. Glucose rapidly transforms into gluconic acid, which attacks the oxides of the metal and decreases the pH of the solution; it also promotes the absorption of chloride ions on the Mg surface and consequently accelerates corrosion. On the other hand, better corrosion resistance is obtained with increasing glucose content in Hank’s solution due to the fact that glucose coordinates Ca2+ ions in Hank’s solution and thus improves the formation of Ca-P compounds on the pure Mg surface. This finding will open up new avenues for research on the biodegradation of bio-Mg materials in general, which could yield many new and interesting results. PMID:26264413

  18. Intestinal glucose transport and salinity adaptation in a euryhaline teleost

    SciTech Connect

    Reshkin, S.J.; Ahearn, G.A.

    1987-03-01

    Glucose transport by upper and lower intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles of the African tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) was characterized in fish acclimated to either freshwater of full-strength sea water. D-(/sup 3/H)-glucose uptake by vesicles was stimulated by a transmembrane Na gradient, was electrogenic, and was enhanced by countertransport of either D-glucose or D-galactose. Glucose transport was greater in the upper intestine than in the lower intestine and in sea water animals rather than in fish acclimated to freshwater. Glucose influx (10-s uptake) involved both saturable and nonsaturable transport components. Sea water adaptation increased apparent glucose influx K/sub t/, J/sub max/, apparent diffusional permeability (P), and the apparent Na affinity of the cotransport system in both intestinal segments, but the stoichiometry of Na-glucose transfer (1:1) was unaffected by differential saline conditions or gut region. It is suggested that increased sugar transport in sea water animals is due to the combination of enhanced Na-binding properties and an increase in number or transfer rate of the transport proteins. Freshwater animals compensate for reduced Na affinity of the coupled process by markedly increasing the protein affinity for glucose.

  19. Glucose Tightly Controls Morphological and Functional Properties of Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Yao; Dallérac, Glenn; Ezan, Pascal; Anderova, Miroslava; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The main energy source powering the brain is glucose. Strong energy needs of our nervous system are fulfilled by conveying this essential metabolite through blood via an extensive vascular network. Glucose then reaches brain tissues by cell uptake, diffusion and metabolization, processes primarily undertaken by astrocytes. Deprivation of glucose can however occur in various circumstances. In particular, ageing is associated with cognitive disturbances that are partly attributable to metabolic deficiency leading to brain glycopenia. Despite the crucial role of glucose and its metabolites in sustaining neuronal activity, little is known about its moment-to-moment contribution to astroglial physiology. We thus here investigated the early structural and functional alterations induced in astrocytes by a transient metabolic challenge consisting in glucose deprivation. Electrophysiological recordings of hippocampal astroglial cells of the stratum radiatum in situ revealed that shortage of glucose specifically increases astrocyte membrane capacitance, whilst it has no impact on other passive membrane properties. Consistent with this change, morphometric analysis unraveled a prompt increase in astrocyte volume upon glucose deprivation. Furthermore, characteristic functional properties of astrocytes are also affected by transient glucose deficiency. We indeed found that glucoprivation decreases their gap junction-mediated coupling, while it progressively and reversibly increases their intracellular calcium levels during the slow depression of synaptic transmission occurring simultaneously, as assessed by dual electrophysiological and calcium imaging recordings. Together, these data indicate that astrocytes rapidly respond to metabolic dysfunctions, and are therefore central to the neuroglial dialog at play in brain adaptation to glycopenia. PMID:27148048

  20. Liquid crystal-based proton sensitive glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mashooq; Park, Soo-Young

    2014-02-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid filled with 4-cyno-4-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) on the octadecyltrichloro silane-coated glass in an aqueous medium was developed to construct a glucose biosensor by coating poly(acrylicacid-b-4-cynobiphenyl-4-oxyundecylacrylate) (PAA-b-LCP) at the aqueous/5CB interface and immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) covalently to the PAA chains. The glucose was detected from a homeotropic to planar orientational transition of 5CB by polarized optical microscopy under crossed polarizers. The maximum immobilization density of the GOx, 1.3 molecules/nm(2) obtained in this TEM grid cell enabled the detection of glucose at concentrations as low as 0.02 mM with a response time of 10 s. This liquid crystal-based glucose sensor provided a linear response of birefringence of the 5CB to glucose concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 2 mM with a Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 0.32 mM. This new and sensitive glucose biosensor has the merits of low production cost and easy detection through the naked eye and might be useful for prescreening the glucose level in the human body. PMID:24432733

  1. In vitro degradation of pure Mg in response to glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Xiao-Ting; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen; Han, En-Hou

    2015-08-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are promising biodegradable biomaterials but are still challenging to be used in person with high levels of blood glucose or diabetes. To date, the influence of glucose on magnesium degradation has not yet been elucidated, this issue requires more attention. Herein, we present pure Mg exhibiting different corrosion responses to saline and Hank’s solutions with different glucose contents, and the degradation mechanism of pure Mg in the saline solution with glucose in comparison with mannitol as a control. On one hand, the corrosion rate of pure Mg increases with the glucose concentration in saline solutions. Glucose rapidly transforms into gluconic acid, which attacks the oxides of the metal and decreases the pH of the solution; it also promotes the absorption of chloride ions on the Mg surface and consequently accelerates corrosion. On the other hand, better corrosion resistance is obtained with increasing glucose content in Hank’s solution due to the fact that glucose coordinates Ca2+ ions in Hank’s solution and thus improves the formation of Ca-P compounds on the pure Mg surface. This finding will open up new avenues for research on the biodegradation of bio-Mg materials in general, which could yield many new and interesting results.

  2. Regulation of Intestinal Glucose Absorption by Ion Channels and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihong; Tuo, Biguang; Dong, Hui

    2016-01-14

    The absorption of glucose is electrogenic in the small intestinal epithelium. The major route for the transport of dietary glucose from intestinal lumen into enterocytes is the Na⁺/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1), although glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2) may also play a role. The membrane potential of small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is important to regulate the activity of SGLT1. The maintenance of membrane potential mainly depends on the activities of cation channels and transporters. While the importance of SGLT1 in glucose absorption has been systemically studied in detail, little is currently known about the regulation of SGLT1 activity by cation channels and transporters. A growing line of evidence suggests that cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt) can regulate the absorption of glucose by adjusting GLUT2 and SGLT1. Moreover, the absorption of glucose and homeostasis of Ca(2+) in IEC are regulated by cation channels and transporters, such as Ca(2+) channels, K⁺ channels, Na⁺/Ca(2+) exchangers, and Na⁺/H⁺ exchangers. In this review, we consider the involvement of these cation channels and transporters in the regulation of glucose uptake in the small intestine. Modulation of them may be a potential strategy for the management of obesity and diabetes.

  3. PTPMT1 Inhibition Lowers Glucose Through Phosphorylation of SDH

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Anjali K.; Ryu, Justine H.; Jin, Youngnam N.; Roberts, Lee D.; Dejam, Andre; Gerszten, Robert E.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Virtually all organisms seek to maximize fitness by matching fuel availability with energy expenditure. In vertebrates, glucose homeostasis is central to this process, with glucose levels finely tuned to match changing energy requirements. To discover new pathways regulating glucose levels in vivo, we performed a large-scale chemical screen in live zebrafish and identified the small molecule alexidine as a potent glucose-lowering agent. We found that alexidine inhibits the PTEN-like mitochondrial phosphatase PTPMT1, and that other pharmacological and genetic means of inactivating PTPMT1 also decrease glucose levels in zebrafish. Mutation of ptpmt1 eliminates the effect of alexidine, further confirming it as the glucose-lowering target of alexidine. We then identified succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) as a substrate of PTPMT1. Inactivation of PTPMT1 causes hyperphosphorylation and activation of SDH, providing a possible mechanism by which PTPMT1 coordinates glucose homeostasis. Therefore, PTPMT1 appears to be an important regulator of SDH phosphorylation status and glucose concentration. PMID:25660020

  4. Glucose turnover in 48-hour-fasted running rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, B.; Mikines, K.J.; Galbo, H.

    1987-03-01

    In fed rats, hyperglycemia develops during exercise. This contrasts with the view based on studies of fasted human and dog that euglycemia is maintained in exercise and glucose production (R/sub a/) controlled by feedback mechanisms. Forty-eight-hour-fasted rats (F) were compared to fed rats (C) and overnight food-restricted (FR) rats. (3-/sup 3/H)- and (U-/sup 14/C)glucose were infused and blood and tissue sampled. During running (21 m/min, 0% grade) R/sub a/ increased most in C and least in F and only in F did R/sub a/ not significantly exceed glucose disappearance. Plasma glucose increased more in C (3.3 mmol/1) than in FR (1.6 mmol/l) and only modestly (0.6 mmol/l) and transiently in F. Resting liver glycogen and exercise glycogenolysis were highest in C and similar in FR and F. Resting muscle glycogen and exercise glycogenolysis were highest in C and lowest in F. During running, lactate production and gluconeogenesis were higher in FR than in F. At least in rats, responses of production and plasma concentration of glucose to exercise depend on size of liver and muscle glycogen stores; glucose production matches increase in clearance better in fasted than in fed states. Probably glucose production is stimulated by feedforward mechanisms and feedback mechanisms are added if plasma glucose decreases.

  5. Glucose metabolism in cultured trophoblasts from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, A.J.; Farmer, D.R.; Nelson, D.M.; Smith, C.H. )

    1990-02-26

    The development of appropriate placental trophoblast isolation and culture techniques enables the study of pathways of glucose utilization by this important cell layer in vitro. Trophoblasts from normal term placentas were isolated and cultured 24 hours and 72 hours in uncoated polystyrene culture tubes or tubes previously coated with a fibrin matrix. Trophoblasts cultured on fibrin are morphologically distinct from those cultured on plastic or other matrices and generally resemble in vivo syncytium. Cells were incubated up to 3 hours with {sup 14}C-labeled glucose and reactions were stopped by addition of perchloric acid. {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production by trophoblasts increased linearly with time however the largest accumulation of label was in organic acids. Trophoblasts cultured in absence of fibrin utilized more glucose and accumulated more {sup 14}C in metabolic products compared to cells cultured on fibrin. Glucose oxidation to CO{sub 2} by the phosphogluconate (PG) pathway was estimated from specific yields of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)-D-glucose and (6-{sup 14}C)-D-glucose. Approximately 6% of glucose oxidation was by the PG pathway when cells were cultured on fibrin compared to approximately 1% by cells cultured in the absence of fibrin. The presence of a fibrin growth matrix appears to modulate the metabolism of glucose by trophoblast from human placenta in vitro.

  6. Insulin Secretory Defect and Insulin Resistance in Isolated Impaired Fasting Glucose and Isolated Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama-Sasabe, Sae; Fukushima, Mitsuo; Xin, Xin; Taniguchi, Ataru; Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Mitsui, Rie; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hideaki; Yabe, Daisuke; Yasuda, Koichiro; Kurose, Takeshi; Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the characteristics of isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), we analyzed the factors responsible for elevation of 2-hour postchallenge plasma glucose (2 h PG) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels. Methods. We investigated the relationship between 2 h PG and FPG levels who underwent 75 g OGTT in 5620 Japanese subjects at initial examination for medical check-up. We compared clinical characteristics between isolated IGT and isolated IFG and analyzed the relationships of 2 h PG and FPG with clinical characteristics, the indices of insulin secretory capacity, and insulin sensitivity. Results. In a comparison between isolated IGT and isolated IFG, insulinogenic index was lower in isolated IGT than that of isolated IFG (0.43 ± 0.34 versus 0.50 ± 0.47, resp.; p < 0.01). ISI composite was lower in isolated IFG than that of isolated IGT (6.87 ± 3.38 versus 7.98 ± 4.03, resp.; p < 0.0001). In isolated IGT group, insulinogenic index showed a significant correlation with 2 h PG (r = −0.245, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with 2 h PG (β = −0.290). In isolated IFG group, ISI composite showed a significant correlation with FPG (r = −0.162, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with FPG (β = −0.214). Conclusions. We have elucidated that decreased early-phase insulin secretion is the most important factor responsible for elevation of 2 h PG levels in isolated IGT subjects, and decreased insulin sensitivity is the most important factor responsible for elevation of FPG levels in isolated IFG subjects. PMID:26788515

  7. A novel reagentless sensing system for measuring glucose based on the galactose/glucose-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salins, L. L.; Ware, R. A.; Ensor, C. M.; Daunert, S.

    2001-01-01

    The galactose/glucose-binding protein (GBP) is synthesized in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli in a precursor form and exported into the periplasmic space upon cleavage of a 23-amino-acid leader sequence. GBP binds galactose and glucose in a highly specific manner. The ligand induces a hinge motion in GBP and the resultant protein conformational change constitutes the basis of the sensing system. The mglB gene, which codes for GBP, was isolated from the chromosome of E. coli using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Since wild-type GBP lacks cysteines in its structure, introducing this amino acid by site-directed mutagenesis ensures single-label attachment at specific sites with a sulfhydro-specific fluorescent probe. Site-directed mutagenesis by overlap extension PCR was performed to prepare three different mutants to introduce a single cysteine residue at positions 148, 152, and 182. Since these residues are not involved in ligand binding and since they are located at the edge of the binding cleft, they experience a significant change in environment upon binding of galactose or glucose. The sensing system strategy is based on the fluorescence changes of the probe as the protein undergoes a structural change on binding. In this work a reagentless sensing system has been rationally designed that can detect submicromolar concentrations of glucose. The calibration plots have a linear working range of three orders of magnitude. Although the system can sense galactose as well, this epimer is not a potential interfering substance since its concentration in blood is negligible. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. Nanomolar Caffeic Acid Decreases Glucose Uptake and the Effects of High Glucose in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Natarelli, Lucia; Ranaldi, Giulia; Leoni, Guido; Roselli, Marianna; Guantario, Barbara; Comitato, Raffaella; Ambra, Roberto; Cimino, Francesco; Speciale, Antonio; Virgili, Fabio; Canali, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that moderate and prolonged consumption of coffee is associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes but the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not known. In this study, we report the effects of physiological concentrations of caffeic acid, easily achievable by normal dietary habits, in endothelial cells cultured in 25 mM of glucose (high glucose, HG). In HG, the presence of 10 nM caffeic acid was associated with a decrease of glucose uptake but not to changes of GLUT-1 membrane localization or mRNA levels. Moreover, caffeic acid countered HG-induced loss of barrier integrity, reducing actin rearrangement and FITC-dextran passage. The decreased flux of glucose associated to caffeic acid affected HG induced apoptosis by down-regulating the expression of initiator (caspase 8 and 9) and effector caspases (caspase 7 and 3) and by increasing the levels of phosphorylated Bcl-2. We also observed that caffeic acid in HG condition was associated to a reduction of p65 subunit nuclear levels with respect to HG alone. NF-κB activation has been shown to lead to apoptosis in HG treated cells and the analysis of the expression of a panel of about 90 genes related to NF-κB signaling pathway revealed that caffeic acid significantly influenced gene expression changes induced by HG. In conclusion, our results suggest that caffeic acid, decreasing the metabolic stress induced by HG, allows the activation of survival mechanisms mediated by a different modulation of NF-κB-related signaling pathways and to the activation of anti-apoptotic proteins. PMID:26544184

  9. Glucose oxidase immobilization on different modified surfaces of platinum nanowire for application in glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Tuyen Le, Thi; Duy Tran, Phu; Pham, Xuan Tung; Hien Tong, Duy; Chien Dang, Mau

    2010-09-01

    In this work, the surface of platinum (Pt) nanowires was modified by using several chemicals, including a compound of gelatin gel with SiO2, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) with Prussian blue (PB) mediator and cysteamine self-assembled monolayers (SAM). Then, glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme was immobilized on the modified surfaces of Pt nanowire electrodes by using techniques of electrochemical adsorption and chemical binding. The GOD immobilized Pt nanowires were used for application in glucose detection by performing a cyclic voltammetry measurement. The detection results showed that GOD was immobilized on all of the tested surfaces and the highest glucose detection sensitivity of 60 μM was obtained when the Pt nanowires were modified by PVA with PB mediator. Moreover, the sensors showed very high current response when the Pt nanowires were modified with the cysteamine SAM. The stability and catalyst activity of GOD are also reported here. For instance, the catalyst activity of GOD retained about 60% of its initial value after it was stored at 4 °C in a 100 mM PBS buffer solution with a pH of 7.2 for a period of 30 days.

  10. Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase and glucose biosensing on a hydroxyl fullerenes modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yun-Fei; Yang, Tian; Yang, Xiao-Lu; Zhang, Yu-Shuai; Xiao, Bao-Lin; Hong, Jun; Sheibani, Nader; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Hong, Tao; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2014-10-15

    Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (GOD) was achieved when GOD-hydroxyl fullerenes (HFs) nano-complex was immobilized on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode and protected with a chitosan (Chit) membrane. The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrometry (UV-vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and circular dichroism spectropolarimeter (CD) methods were utilized for additional characterization of the GOD, GOD-HFs and Chit/GOD-HFs. Chit/HFs may preserve the secondary structure and catalytic properties of GOD. The cyclic voltammograms (CVs) of the modified GC electrode showed a pair of well-defined quasi-reversible redox peaks with the formal potential (E°') of 353 ± 2 mV versus Ag/AgCl at a scan rate of 0.05 V/s. The heterogeneous electron transfer constant (ks) was calculated to be 2.7 ± 0.2s(-1). The modified electrode response to glucose was linear in the concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 1.0mM, with a detection limit of 5 ± 1 μM. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km(app)) was 694 ± 8 μM. Thus, the modified electrode could be applied as a third generation biosensor for glucose with high sensitivity, selectivity and low detection limit.

  11. Study of dynamics of glucose-glucose oxidase-ferricyanide reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, A.; Schreiberová, L.; Schreiber, I.

    2011-12-01

    This work is focused on dynamics of the glucose-glucose oxidase-ferricyanide enzymatic reaction with or without sodium hydroxide in a continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and in a batch reactor. This reaction exhibits pH-variations having autocatalytic character and is reported to provide nonlinear dynamic behavior (bistability, excitability). The dynamical behavior of the reaction was examined within a wide range of inlet parameters. The main inlet parameters were the ratio of concentrations of sodium hydroxide and ferricyanide and the flow rate. In a batch reactor we observed an autocatalytic drop of pH from slightly basic to medium acidic values. In a CSTR our aim was to find bistability in the presence of sodium hydroxide. However, only a basic steady state was found. In order to reach an acidic steady state, we investigated the system in the absence of sodium hydroxide. Under these conditions the transition from the basic to the acidic steady state was observed when inlet glucose concentration was increased.

  12. Glucose oxidase-graphene-chitosan modified electrode for direct electrochemistry and glucose sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Xinhuang; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-11-01

    Direct electrochemistry of a glucose oxidase (GOD)/graphene/chitosan nanocomposite was studied. The immobilized enzyme retains its bioactivity, exhibits a surface confined, reversible two-proton and two-electron transfer reaction, and has good stability, activity and a fast heterogeneous electron transfer rate with the rate constant (ks) of 2.83 s-1. A much higher enzyme loading (1.12 × 10-9 mol/cm2) is obtained as compared to the bare glass carbon surface. This GOD/graphene/chitosan nanocomposite film can be used for sensitive detection of glucose. The biosensor exhibits a wider linearity range from 0.08 mM to 12 mM glucose with a detection limit of 0.02 mM and much higher sensitivity (37.93 μA mM-1 cm-2) as compared with other nanostructured supports. The excellent performance of the biosensor is attributed to large surface-to-volume ratio and high conductivity of graphene, and good biocompatibility of chitosan, which enhances the enzyme absorption and promotes direct electron transfer between redox enzymes and the surface of electrodes.

  13. Colorimetric Glucose Assay Based on Magnetic Particles Having Pseudo-peroxidase Activity and Immobilized Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Martinkova, Pavla; Opatrilova, Radka; Kruzliak, Peter; Styriak, Igor; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic particles (MPs) are currently used as a suitable alternative for peroxidase in the construction of novel biosensors, analytic and diagnostic methods. Their better chemical and thermal stabilities predestine them as appropriate pseudo-enzymatic catalysts. In this point of view, our research was focused on preparation of simply and fast method for immobilization of glucose oxidase onto surface of MPs with peroxidase-like activity. Spectrophotometric method (wavelength 450 nm) optimized for glucose determination using modified MPs has been successfully developed. Concentration curve for optimization of method was assayed, and Michaelis-Menten constant (K m) calculated, maximum reaction rate (V max), limit of detection, and correlation coefficient were determined to be 0.13 mmol/l (2.34 mg/dl), 1.79 pkat, 3.74 µmol/l (0.067 mg/dl), and 0.996, respectively. Interferences of other sugars such as sucrose, sorbitol, deoxyribose, maltose, and fructose were determined as well as effect of substances presenting in plasma (ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, trolox, and urea). Results in comparison with positive and negative controls showed no interferences of the other sugars and no influence of plasma substances to measuring of glucose. The constructed method showed corresponding results with linear dependence and a correlation coefficient of 0.997. Possibility of repeated use of modified MPs was successfully proved. PMID:27041274

  14. Process of converting starch to glucose and glucose to lactic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, TenLin; Sanville, C.Y.; Coleman, R.D.; Schertz, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    This document describes a method for converting starch into lactic acid of sufficient purity for use as a substrate for biodegradable plastics. The process is designed to work on industrial food waste streams such as potato wastes or cheese whey permeate. For potato waste, {alpha}-amylase and calcium chloride are added to the starch containing waste and incubated at a pH of 4--7, a temperature of 90--130{degree}C, and a pressure above 15 psi for not less than 15 minutes. At this point, glucoamylase is added and the mixture is incubated at a temperature of 50--70{degree}C and a pH below 6.5 for 4 hours. This results in the conversion of more than 90% of the starch into glucose, which is substantially free of microbial contamination. The hydrolysate is filtered, and introduced with additional nutrients to a fermentor containing a lactose producing microorganism to form a fermentation broth. This results in the fermentation of glucose to lactose, which is filtered and subjected to electrodialysis for purification. Conversion of glucose to lactic acid or lactate occurs with an efficiency of over 95%. 1 fig. (MHB)

  15. Process of converting starch to glucose and glucose to lactic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, TenLin; Sanville, C.Y.; Coleman, R.D.; Schertz, W.W.

    1990-12-31

    This document describes a method for converting starch into lactic acid of sufficient purity for use as a substrate for biodegradable plastics. The process is designed to work on industrial food waste streams such as potato wastes or cheese whey permeate. For potato waste, {alpha}-amylase and calcium chloride are added to the starch containing waste and incubated at a pH of 4--7, a temperature of 90--130{degree}C, and a pressure above 15 psi for not less than 15 minutes. At this point, glucoamylase is added and the mixture is incubated at a temperature of 50--70{degree}C and a pH below 6.5 for 4 hours. This results in the conversion of more than 90% of the starch into glucose, which is substantially free of microbial contamination. The hydrolysate is filtered, and introduced with additional nutrients to a fermentor containing a lactose producing microorganism to form a fermentation broth. This results in the fermentation of glucose to lactose, which is filtered and subjected to electrodialysis for purification. Conversion of glucose to lactic acid or lactate occurs with an efficiency of over 95%. 1 fig. (MHB)

  16. Effects of glucose administration on category exclusion recognition.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Karen R

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has produced discrepant findings as to whether glucose administration effects lead to enhanced recollection or arise only under dual-task conditions. The aim of the present research was to address these issues by firstly employing an alternative cognitively demanding paradigm that has been linked to hippocampal function, i.e. the Process Dissociation Procedure (PDP). A second aim was to use this paradigm to explore whether glucose affects qualitative aspects of memory function. To achieve these aims, the PDP task was administered to participants who had either consumed a glucose (25 g) or aspartame-sweetened control drink. Results demonstrated glucose facilitation effects only under difficult task conditions and with no such effect emerging for the process of recollection. The present results support the contention that the beneficial effects of glucose arise under hippocampally driven, cognitively demanding task conditions, and that this effect enhances quantitative but not qualitative aspects of recognition memory. PMID:25693890

  17. Second generation biofuels: Thermochemistry of glucose and fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Osmont, A.; Escot Bocanegra, P.; Goekalp, I.; Thollas, B.; Kozinski, J.A.

    2010-06-15

    The energetic conversion of biomass into syngas or biogas is a more and more important topic. In the framework of these studies, improved understanding of glucose and fructose thermal decomposition and oxidation appears crucial. For this task, thermodynamic data are needed to make possible, for instance, the building of a detailed chemical kinetic model of glucose and fructose reactivity at high temperature. A semitheoretical protocol, presented elsewhere, is used for the estimation of the thermodynamic data of glucose and fructose in the gas phase. Five isomers of glucose and five isomers of fructose are considered and the lowest-energy conformers are found to be {beta}-D-glucopyranose for glucose and {beta}-D-fructopyranose for fructose. The data for all 10 isomers are provided in the CHEMKIN-NASA format. (author)

  18. A Renal Olfactory Receptor Aids in Kidney Glucose Handling

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Blythe D.; Cheval, Lydie; Peterlin, Zita; Firestein, Stuart; Koepsell, Hermann; Doucet, Alain; Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are G protein-coupled receptors which serve important sensory functions beyond their role as odorant detectors in the olfactory epithelium. Here we describe a novel role for one of these ORs, Olfr1393, as a regulator of renal glucose handling. Olfr1393 is specifically expressed in the kidney proximal tubule, which is the site of renal glucose reabsorption. Olfr1393 knockout mice exhibit urinary glucose wasting and improved glucose tolerance, despite euglycemia and normal insulin levels. Consistent with this phenotype, Olfr1393 knockout mice have a significant decrease in luminal expression of Sglt1, a key renal glucose transporter, uncovering a novel regulatory pathway involving Olfr1393 and Sglt1. In addition, by utilizing a large scale screen of over 1400 chemicals we reveal the ligand profile of Olfr1393 for the first time, offering new insight into potential pathways of physiological regulation for this novel signaling pathway. PMID:27739476

  19. Preparation of Amperometric Glucose Biosensor Based on 4-Mercaptobenzoic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huihui; Ohnuki, Hitoshi; Endo, Hideaki; Izumi, Mitsuru

    A novel glucose biosensor was fabricated by a combination of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid and the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Because of the catalysis of Prussian Blue contained in the LB film layers, the prepared amperometric biosensor worked at a very low potential range around 0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The optimum operating conditions for glucose biosensor were investigated by varying the glucose oxidase immobilization time, the applied potential and the pH of buffer solution. The steady-state current responses of the glucose biosensor showed a good linear relationship to glucose concentrations from 0.1 mM to 154 mM.

  20. Concentration effect on the diffusion of glucose in ocular tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Carbajal, Esteban F.; Befrui, Natasha A.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2008-12-01

    In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) was utilized in the functional imaging of glucose diffusion through scleral tissues. Permeability coefficients for different concentrations of glucose were quantified nondestructively. Obtained results indicate an inverse proportionality between the permeability coefficient and the concentration of the analyte in epithelial tissues: in-depth diffusion of solutions with lower glucose concentration was faster than those with a higher concentration. The permeability coefficient decreased from (1.67±0.17)×10 -5 cm/s of 10% glucose solution to (5.08±0.23)×10 -6 cm/s of 25% glucose solution. The dependence of the permeability on the concentration of hyperosmotic analytes could potentially be used in various basic science and clinical fields, such as optical clearing of tissues and cells as well as in clinical pharmacology.

  1. Diabetic ketoacidosis, sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibitors and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J; Taylor, Simeon I; Weir, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious metabolic condition that may occur in patients with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. The accumulation of ketoacids in the serum is a consequence of insulin deficiency and glucagon excess. Sodium Glucose Transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are novel therapeutic treatments for improving glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes. Through reductions in glucose reabsorption by the kidney, they lower serum glucose in patients with Type 2 diabetes and they improve glucose control whether used alone or in combination with other therapies. Mechanistically, these drugs increase serum ketoacids and increase glucagon production, which in some individuals, can lead to formation of diabetic ketoacidosis. This review will first focus in how the kidney normally handles ketoacids, and second will discuss how the SGLT2 inhibitors affect the kidney in such a way so as to enhance the risk for development of ketoacidosis in susceptible individuals. PMID:27240541

  2. Hollow spherical nanostructured polydiphenylamine for direct electrochemistry and glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, P; Manesh, K M; Uthayakumar, S; Gopalan, A I; Lee, K-P

    2009-03-15

    Nanostructured, hollow spheres of polydiphenylamine (HS-PDPA) are prepared through a "soft template assisted self-assembly" approach. An enzymatic glucose biosensor is fabricated through immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) into HS-PDPA matrix. The HS-PDPA-GOx electrode exhibits a pair of well-defined reversible redox peaks with a fast heterogeneous electron transfer rate. At an applied potential of +0.65V, HS-PDPA-GOx electrode possesses high sensitivity (1.77 microAmM(-1)cm(-2)), stability and reproducibility towards glucose. The amperometric current response of HS-PDPA-GOx to glucose is linear in the concentration range between 1 and 28 mM with a detection limit of 0.05 mM (S/N=3). Also, HS-PDPA-GOx electrode shows high selectivity towards glucose in the presence of ascorbic acid, uric acid and acetaminophen at their maximum physiological concentrations.

  3. Improved operational stability of peroxidases by coimmobilization with glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    van de Velde, F; Lourenço, N D; Bakker, M; van Rantwijk, F; Sheldon, R A

    2000-08-01

    The operational stability of peroxidases was considerably enhanced by generating hydrogen peroxide in situ from glucose and oxygen. For example, the total turnover number of microperoxidase-11 in the oxidation of thioanisole was increased sevenfold compared with that obtained with continuous addition of H(2)O(2). Coimmobilization of peroxidases with glucose oxidase into polyurethane foams afforded heterogeneous biocatalysts in which the hydrogen peroxide is formed inside the polymeric matrix from glucose and oxygen. The total turnover number of chloroperoxidase in the oxidation of thioanisole and cis-2-heptene was increased to new maxima of 250. 10(3) and 10. 10(3), respectively, upon coimmobilization with glucose oxidase. Soybean peroxidase, which normally shows only classical peroxidase activity, was transformed into an oxygen-transfer catalyst when coimmobilized with glucose oxidase. The combination catalyst mediated the enantioselective oxidation of thioanisole [50% ee (S)] with 210 catalyst turnovers. PMID:10861408

  4. Hourly analysis of cerebrospinal fluid glucose shows large diurnal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Marcel M; Leen, Wilhelmina G; Willemsen, Michèl A; Slats, Diane; Claassen, Jurgen A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is important in the diagnostics of many neurological disorders. Since the influence of food intake on the cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio is largely unknown, we studied fluctuations in these parameters in healthy adult volunteers during a period of 36 h. Our observations show large physiological fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid glucose and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio, and their relation to food intake. These findings provide novel insights into the physiology of cerebral processes dependent on glucose levels such as energy formation (e.g. glycolysis), enzymatic reactions (e.g. glycosylation), and non-enzymatic reactions (e.g. advanced endproduct glycation).

  5. Diabetic ketoacidosis, sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibitors and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J; Taylor, Simeon I; Weir, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious metabolic condition that may occur in patients with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. The accumulation of ketoacids in the serum is a consequence of insulin deficiency and glucagon excess. Sodium Glucose Transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are novel therapeutic treatments for improving glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes. Through reductions in glucose reabsorption by the kidney, they lower serum glucose in patients with Type 2 diabetes and they improve glucose control whether used alone or in combination with other therapies. Mechanistically, these drugs increase serum ketoacids and increase glucagon production, which in some individuals, can lead to formation of diabetic ketoacidosis. This review will first focus in how the kidney normally handles ketoacids, and second will discuss how the SGLT2 inhibitors affect the kidney in such a way so as to enhance the risk for development of ketoacidosis in susceptible individuals.

  6. Analysis of tear glucose concentration with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Christopher R; Baca, Justin T; Asher, Sanford A; Grabowski, Joseph J; Finegold, David N

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method that allows one to accurately determine the glucose concentration of tear fluid. We used a 1 microL micro-capillary to collect tear fluid from the tear meniscus with minimal irritation of the eye. We analyzed the 1 muL volume of collected tear fluid with liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with the use of D-glucose-6,6-d2 as an internal standard. Repeated measurements and a recovery experiment on pooled, onion-induced tears showed that the analysis of the glucose in tears was precise (4% relative standard deviation) and provided 100% recovery. We found the tear glucose concentration of one fasting nondiabetic subject to be 13 to 51 microM while the onion-induced tear glucose concentration of a different nondiabetic subject to be 211 to 256 microM. PMID:17084090

  7. Analysis of Tear Glucose Concentration with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taormina, Christopher R.; Baca, Justin T.; Finegold, David N.; Asher, Sanford A.; Grabowski, Joseph J.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method which allows one to accurately determine the glucose concentration of tear fluid. We used a 1 μL micro-capillary to collect tear fluid from the tear meniscus with minimal irritation of the eye. We analyzed the 1 μL volume of collected tear fluid with liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with the use of D-glucose-6,6-d2 as an internal standard. Repeated measurements and a recovery experiment on pooled, onion-induced tears showed that the analysis of the glucose in tears was precise (4% relative standard deviation) and provided 100% recovery. We found the tear glucose concentration of one fasting non-diabetic subject to be 13 to 51 μM while the onion-induced tear glucose concentration of a different non-diabetic subject to be 211 to 256 μM. PMID:17084090

  8. Effects of glucose administration on category exclusion recognition.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Karen R

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has produced discrepant findings as to whether glucose administration effects lead to enhanced recollection or arise only under dual-task conditions. The aim of the present research was to address these issues by firstly employing an alternative cognitively demanding paradigm that has been linked to hippocampal function, i.e. the Process Dissociation Procedure (PDP). A second aim was to use this paradigm to explore whether glucose affects qualitative aspects of memory function. To achieve these aims, the PDP task was administered to participants who had either consumed a glucose (25 g) or aspartame-sweetened control drink. Results demonstrated glucose facilitation effects only under difficult task conditions and with no such effect emerging for the process of recollection. The present results support the contention that the beneficial effects of glucose arise under hippocampally driven, cognitively demanding task conditions, and that this effect enhances quantitative but not qualitative aspects of recognition memory.

  9. Oligodendroglial NMDA Receptors Regulate Glucose Import and Axonal Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saab, Aiman S; Tzvetavona, Iva D; Trevisiol, Andrea; Baltan, Selva; Dibaj, Payam; Kusch, Kathrin; Möbius, Wiebke; Goetze, Bianka; Jahn, Hannah M; Huang, Wenhui; Steffens, Heinz; Schomburg, Eike D; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando; Bakhtiari, Davood; Matute, Carlos; Löwel, Siegrid; Griesinger, Christian; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Kirchhoff, Frank; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes make myelin and support axons metabolically with lactate. However, it is unknown how glucose utilization and glycolysis are adapted to the different axonal energy demands. Spiking axons release glutamate and oligodendrocytes express NMDA receptors of unknown function. Here we show that the stimulation of oligodendroglial NMDA receptors mobilizes glucose transporter GLUT1, leading to its incorporation into the myelin compartment in vivo. When myelinated optic nerves from conditional NMDA receptor mutants are challenged with transient oxygen-glucose deprivation, they show a reduced functional recovery when returned to oxygen-glucose but are indistinguishable from wild-type when provided with oxygen-lactate. Moreover, the functional integrity of isolated optic nerves, which are electrically silent, is extended by preincubation with NMDA, mimicking axonal activity, and shortened by NMDA receptor blockers. This reveals a novel aspect of neuronal energy metabolism in which activity-dependent glutamate release enhances oligodendroglial glucose uptake and glycolytic support of fast spiking axons. PMID:27292539

  10. Effect of Global ATGL Knockout on Murine Fasting Glucose Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Margarida; Nunes, Patricia; Mendes, Vera M.; Manadas, Bruno; Heerschap, Arend; Jones, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Mice deficient in adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL−/−) present elevated ectopic lipid levels but are paradoxically glucose-tolerant. Measurement of endogenous glucose production (EGP) and Cori cycle activity provide insights into the maintenance of glycemic control in these animals. These parameters were determined in 7 wild-type (ATGL+/−) and 6 ATGL−/− mice by a primed-infusion of [U-13C6]glucose followed by LC-MS/MS targeted mass-isotopomer analysis of blood glucose. EGP was quantified by isotope dilution of [U-13C6]glucose while Cori cycling was estimated by analysis of glucose triose 13C-isotopomers. Fasting plasma free fatty-acids were significantly lower in ATGL−/− versus control mice (0.43 ± 0.05 mM versus 0.73 ± 0.11 mM, P < 0.05). Six-hour fasting EGP rates were identical for both ATGL−/− and control mice (79 ± 11 versus 71 ± 7 μmol/kg/min, resp.). Peripheral glucose metabolism was dominated by Cori cycling (80 ± 2% and 82 ± 7% of glucose disposal for ATGL−/− and control mice, resp.) indicating that peripheral glucose oxidation was not significantly upregulated in ATGL−/− mice under these conditions. The glucose 13C-isotopomer distributions in both ATGL−/− and control mice were consistent with extensive hepatic pyruvate recycling. This suggests that gluconeogenic outflow from the Krebs cycle was also well compensated in ATGL−/− mice. PMID:26236747

  11. Stable-label intravenous glucose tolerance test minimal model

    SciTech Connect

    Avogaro, A.; Bristow, J.D.; Bier, D.M.; Cobelli, C.; Toffolo, G. )

    1989-08-01

    The minimal model approach to estimating insulin sensitivity (Sl) and glucose effectiveness in promoting its own disposition at basal insulin (SG) is a powerful tool that has been underutilized given its potential applications. In part, this has been due to its inability to separate insulin and glucose effects on peripheral uptake from their effects on hepatic glucose inflow. Prior enhancements, with radiotracer labeling of the dosage, permit this separation but are unsuitable for use in pregnancy and childhood. In this study, we labeled the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) dosage with (6,6-{sup 2}H{sub 2})glucose, (2-{sup 2}H)glucose, or both stable isotopically labeled glucose tracers and modeled glucose kinetics in six postabsorptive, nonobese adults. As previously found with the radiotracer model, the tracer-estimated S*l derived from the stable-label IVGTT was greater than Sl in each case except one, and the tracer-estimated SG* was less than SG in each instance. More importantly, however, the stable-label IVGTT estimated each parameter with an average precision of +/- 5% (range 3-9%) compared to average precisions of +/- 74% (range 7-309%) for SG and +/- 22% (range 3-72%) for Sl. In addition, because of the different metabolic fates of the two deuterated tracers, there were minor differences in basal insulin-derived measures of glucose effectiveness, but these differences were negligible for parameters describing insulin-stimulated processes. In conclusion, the stable-label IVGTT is a simple, highly precise means of assessing insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness at basal insulin that can be used to measure these parameters in individuals of all ages, including children and pregnant women.

  12. The utility of blood glucose meters in biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Jennifer; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2005-06-01

    Most methods used to measure glucose concentrations in biotechnological settings are labour-intensive and/or expensive. With this in mind we have investigated the possibility of employing blood glucose meters, the use of which has the benefit of being fast, convenient and inexpensive, for this purpose. Accu-Chek Advantage (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A.) and Precision QID (Medisense, Abbott Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A.) meters were tested using glucose samples of known concentration, at pH 7.5 and 4.8. The Accu-Chek Advantage meter uses strips containing the enzyme glucose dehydrogenase. This meter showed a linear response for glucose concentrations between 0.50 and 6.0 g/litre, and the effect of pH was small. The Precision QID meter uses strips containing the enzyme glucose oxidase and is more sensitive to pH. The displayed glucose concentrations at low pH values were consistently lower than at higher pH values. At both pH values the response curve reached a plateau, which limited the effective range of this meter to a range of 0.30-2.5 g/litre. Unlike the Precision QID meter, the Accu-Chek Advantage meter also responded to xylose and arabinose. A synergistic effect of combining sugars was observed when a mixture of sugars consisting of glucose and arabinose, or glucose and xylose, was applied: the displayed concentrations were consistently higher than was expected on the basis of the individual calibration curves. The use of glucose meters is a fast and convenient alternative to existing methods and may be of particular use for screening purposes where a high degree of accuracy is not crucial. The choice of meter should depend on the application, and in this respect the pH, expected concentration range and the presence of other sugars are among the factors that should be considered.

  13. Biology of glucose transport in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2014-03-01

    Glucose is the major precursor of lactose, which is synthesized in Golgi vesicles of mammary secretory alveolar epithelial cells during lactation. Glucose is taken up by mammary epithelial cells through a passive, facilitative process, which is driven by the downward glucose concentration gradient across the plasma membrane. This process is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs), of which there are 14 known isoforms. Mammary glands mainly express GLUT1 and GLUT8, and GLUT1 is the predominant isoform with a Km of ~10 mM and transport activity for mannose and galactose in addition to glucose. Mammary glucose transport activity increases dramatically from the virgin state to the lactation state, with a concomitant increase in GLUT expression. The increased GLUT expression during lactogenesis is not stimulated by the accepted lactogenic hormones. New evidence indicates that a possible low oxygen tension resulting from increased metabolic rate and oxygen consumption may play a major role in stimulating glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in mammary epithelial cells during lactogenesis. In addition to its primary presence on the plasma membrane, GLUT1 is also expressed on the Golgi membrane of mammary epithelial cells and is likely involved in facilitating the uptake of glucose and galactose to the site of lactose synthesis. Because lactose synthesis dictates milk volume, regulation of GLUT expression and trafficking represents potentially fruitful areas for further research in dairy production. In addition, this research will have pathological implications for the treatment of breast cancer because glucose uptake and GLUT expression are up-regulated in breast cancer cells to accommodate the increased glucose need.

  14. SREBP-1c regulates glucose-stimulated hepatic clusterin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gukhan; Kim, Geun Hyang; Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin; Kim, Hae Won; Kim, Min-Seon; Kim, Seung-Whan

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first report to show nutrient-regulated clusterin expression. {yields} Clusterin expression in hepatocytes was increased by high glucose concentration. {yields} SREBP-1c is directly involved in the transcriptional activation of clusterin by glucose. {yields} This glucose-stimulated activation process is mediated through tandem E-box motifs. -- Abstract: Clusterin is a stress-response protein that is involved in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, tissue differentiation, inflammation, and lipid transport. Its expression is upregulated in a broad spectrum of diverse pathological states. Clusterin was recently reported to be associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their sequelae. However, the regulation of clusterin expression by metabolic signals was not addressed. In this study we evaluated the effects of glucose on hepatic clusterin expression. Interestingly, high glucose concentrations significantly increased clusterin expression in primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines, but the conventional promoter region of the clusterin gene did not respond to glucose stimulation. In contrast, the first intronic region was transcriptionally activated by high glucose concentrations. We then defined a glucose response element (GlRE) of the clusterin gene, showing that it consists of two E-box motifs separated by five nucleotides and resembles carbohydrate response element (ChoRE). Unexpectedly, however, these E-box motifs were not activated by ChoRE binding protein (ChREBP), but were activated by sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Furthermore, we found that glucose induced recruitment of SREBP-1c to the E-box of the clusterin gene intronic region. Taken together, these results suggest that clusterin expression is increased by glucose stimulation, and SREBP-1c plays a crucial role in the metabolic regulation of clusterin.

  15. Respiratory inhibitors affect incorporation of glucose into Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, but not the activity of glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M C; Smits, H P; van Dam, K

    1994-12-01

    Incubation of starved galactose-grown S. cerevisiae cells with cyanide reduced glucose uptake as measured over a 5-s period. The Vmax for glucose uptake was decreased by over a factor of two but the apparent affinity for glucose doubled. When measured in the sub-second time scale, however, there was no significant inhibition of glucose uptake, by cyanide, up to 200-ms, clearly demonstrating that, in cyanide treated cells, glucose uptake was not linear for the first 5-s. After a 200-ms exposure of untreated cells to radio-labelled glucose, less than 10% of the intracellular label resided in soluble uncharged compounds. In cyanide-treated cells up to 43% of the labelled compounds were uncharged, with a concurrent reduction of intracellular label residing in anionic compounds. The results suggest that, in the presence of 10 mM cyanide when respiration is inhibited, a reduction in the cellular ATP concentration causes a reduction in hexose-kinase activity which results in an accumulation of internal free glucose, which in turn causes a reduction in net glucose transport.

  16. A Simple Laboratory Experiment to Determine the Kinetics of Mutarotation of D-Glucose Using a Blood Glucose Meter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perles, Carlos E.; Volpe, Pedro L. O.

    2008-01-01

    A simple commercial blood glucose meter is used to follow the kinetics of mutarotation of D-glucose in aqueous solution. The results may be compared with those obtained using an automatic polarimeter, if this is available This experiment is proposed for use by students in a general chemistry, biology, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry…

  17. Abnormal transient rise in hepatic glucose production after oral glucose in non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Thorburn, A; Litchfield, A; Fabris, S; Proietto, J

    1995-05-01

    A transient rise in hepatic glucose production (HGP) after an oral glucosa load has been reported in some insulin-resistant states such as in obese fa/fa Zucker rats. The aim of this study was to determine whether this rise in HGP also occurs in subjects with established non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Glucose kinetics were measured basally and during a double-label oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 NIDDM subjects and 12 non-diabetic 'control' subjects. Twenty minutes after the glucose load, HGP had increased 73% above basal in the NIDDM subjects (7.29 +/- 0.52 to 12.58 +/- 1.86 mumol/kg/min, P < 0.02). A transient rise in glucagon (12 pg/ml above basal, P < 0.004) occurred at a similar time. In contrast, the control subjects showed no rise in HGP or plasma glucagon. HGP began to suppress 40-50 min after the OGTT in both the NIDDM and control subjects. A 27% increase in the rate of gut-derived glucose absorption was also observed in the NIDDM group, which could be the result of increased gut glucose absorption or decreased first pass extraction of glucose by the liver. Therefore, in agreement with data in animal models of NIDDM, a transient rise in HGP partly contributes to the hyperglycemia observed after an oral glucose load in NIDDM subjects. PMID:7587920

  18. Palmitate stimulates glucose transport in rat adipocytes by a mechanism involving translocation of the insulin sensitive glucose transporter (GLUT4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, R. W.; Ladenson, J. H.; Henriksen, E. J.; Holloszy, J. O.; McDonald, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    In rat adipocytes, palmitate: a) increases basal 2-deoxyglucose transport 129 +/- 27% (p less than 0.02), b) decreases the insulin sensitive glucose transporter (GLUT4) in low density microsomes and increases GLUT4 in plasma membranes and c) increases the activity of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Palmitate-stimulated glucose transport is not additive with the effect of insulin and is not inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine and sphingosine. In rat muscle, palmitate: a) does not affect basal glucose transport in either the soleus or epitrochlearis and b) inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose transport by 28% (p less than 0.005) in soleus but not in epitrochlearis muscle. These studies demonstrate a potentially important differential role for fatty acids in the regulation of glucose transport in different insulin target tissues.

  19. Self-monitoring of blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Hirsch, I B

    2011-02-01

    Many would argue that the introduction of modern-day diabetes management started 30 years ago with the introduction of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) at home. While that may be true, it is interesting that many of today's fundamental questions have yet to be answered. Furthermore, the technology itself continues to change, to improve and to better exist with our non-diabetes technology. For example, the first SMBG 'apps' are available now for smart-phones (iPhone), and we can expect the phones themselves to participate more directly with SMBG and diabetes management. Still, both researchers (and payors) continue to ask some fundamental questions. 1. What is the efficacy of SMBG for patients not requiring insulin therapy? 2. What is the optimum frequency of SMBG for patients who do require insulin therapy? 3. What is the role of software to assist in data management for SMBG (for both patients and clinicians)? 4. What is the cost effectiveness of SMBG for all of the different patient populations with diabetes? 5. What is the ideal chemistry which results in the least amount of interfering substances with SMBG? 6. What is an acceptable accuracy for SMBG both at home and in the hospital? The accuracy question is more important than ever since all continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for now are calibrated with SMBG results. 7 What is the best strategy for teaching patients how best to use their SMBG data? 8. What is the best way to integrate SMBG with insulin pump therapy? 9. What is the role of SMBG with today's CGM devices? 10. What will the role of SMBG be 5-10 years from now with future CGM devices? These are just some of the questions which need more thought and study as we move into 2011. In this chapter we have selected papers that appeared in the PubMed on this topic and chose those we thought were most influential in this area. We have then addressed many of these topics although answers are far from clear for many of them. Although SMBG is not 'new

  20. Diminished brain glucose metabolism is a significant determinant for falling rates of systemic glucose utilization during sleep in normal humans.

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, P J; Scott, J C; Krentz, A J; Nagy, R J; Comstock, E; Hoffman, C

    1994-01-01

    Systemic glucose utilization declines during sleep in man. We tested the hypothesis that this decline in utilization is largely accounted for by reduced brain glucose metabolism. 10 normal subjects underwent internal jugular and radial artery cannulation to determine cerebral blood flow by N2O equilibrium technique and to quantitate cross-brain glucose and oxygen differences before and every 3 h during sleep. Sleep stage was graded by continuous electroencephalogram, and systemic glucose turnover was estimated by isotope dilution. Brain glucose metabolism fell from 33.6 +/- 2.2 mumol/100 g per min (mean +/- SE) before sleep (2300 h) to a mean nadir of 24.3 +/- 1.1 mumol/100 g per min at 0300 h during sleep (P = 0.001). Corresponding rates of systemic glucose utilization fell from 13.2 +/- 0.8 to 11.0 +/- 0.5 mumol/kg per min (P = 0.003). Diminished brain glucose metabolism was the product of a reduced arteriovenous glucose difference, 0.643 +/- 0.024 to 0.546 +/- 0.020 mmol/liter (P = 0.002), and cerebral blood flow, 50.3 +/- 2.8 to 44.6 +/- 1.4 cc/100 g per min (P = 0.021). Brain oxygen metabolism fell commensurately from 153.4 +/- 11.8 to 128.0 +/- 8.4 mumol/100 g per min (P = 0.045). The observed reduction in brain metabolism occurred independent of stage of central nervous system electrical activity (electroencephalographic data), and was more closely linked to duration of sleep. We conclude that a decline in brain glucose metabolism is a significant determinant of falling rates of systemic glucose utilization during sleep. Images PMID:8113391