Science.gov

Sample records for lymphedema prophylaxis utilizing

  1. Lymphedema

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to lymphedema is known as complete decongestive physiotherapy that involves a combination of therapeutic massage (known ... lymphedema that has not responded to complete decongestive physiotherapy and compression therapy. It is very unusual for ...

  2. Symptoms: Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Paskett, Electra D

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema is one of the main late effects from breast cancer treatment affecting 3-60% of breast cancer survivors. Primarily occurring in the hand, arm, and/or affected breast, symptoms of lymphedema include swelling, pain, redness, restriction of arm/hand movement, tightness and feelings of fullness. These symptoms not only may limit physical functioning but also negatively affect quality of life, body image, social functioning, and financial status of breast cancer survivors with lymphedema. Unfortunately, there are no standardized methods for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema. Despite its prevalence and lack of clinical guidelines, lymphedema is one of the most poorly understood, relatively underestimated, and least researched complications of cancer treatment. This chapter reviews the current problem of breast cancer-related lymphedema by investigating prevention and risk reduction strategies, diagnosis, and treatment. In addition, this chapter identifies future research opportunities focusing on prevention and risk reduction strategies, quality of life and physical function, surveillance, patient education, cost, diagnosis, and treatment. Challenges and recommendations for future research in these areas, particularly among underserved populations, are discussed. PMID:26059932

  3. Treatment for life for severe haemophilia A- A cost-utility model for prophylaxis vs. on-demand treatment.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, A; Cassar, J; Kimber, M C; Bansal, M; Fischer, K; Auserswald, G; O'Mahony, B; Tolley, K; Noone, D; Balboni, S

    2013-07-01

    Prophylaxis has been established as the treatment of choice in children with haemophilia and its continuation into the adult years has been shown to decrease morbidity throughout life. The cost of factor therapy has made the option questionable in cost-effectiveness studies. The role of prophylaxis in pharmacokinetic dosage and tolerization against inhibitor formation were used to model the cost utility of prophylaxis vs. on-demand (OD) therapy over a lifetime horizon in severe haemophilia A. The model was applied to a single provider national health system exemplified by the United Kingdom's National Health Service and a third party provider in the United States. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated and compared to threshold values used by payer agencies to guide reimbursement decisions. A cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was also estimated for Sweden. Prophylaxis was dominant over OD treatment in the UK. The model resulted in an ICER - $68 000 - within the range of treatments reimbursed in the USA. In Sweden, a cost/QALY of SEK 1.1 million was also within the range of reimbursed treatments in that country. Dosage- and treatment-induced inhibitor incidence were the most important variables in the model. Subject to continuing clinical evidence of the effectiveness of pharmacokinetic dosage and the role of prophylaxis in decreasing inhibitor incidence, treatment for life with prophylaxis is a cost-effective therapy, using current criteria for the reimbursement of health care technologies in a number of countries.

  4. Lymphedema Risk Reduction Practices

    MedlinePlus

    ... and foot hygiene maintained. For arm lymphedema, good hand hygiene and softening the cuticles with proper cuticle moisturizer ... For people at-risk for arm lymphedema, good hand hygiene and softening the cuticles with proper cuticle moisturizer ...

  5. Lymphatic mapping and lymphedema surgery in the breast cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Oscar; Sosin, Michael; Hashmi, Mahjabeen Aftab; Poysophon, Poysophon; Henderson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Upper limb lymphedema can be an unfortunate sequela following the oncologic treatment of breast cancer. The surgical treatment of lymphedema has had a recent renewed clinical interest paralleling innovative descriptions of surgical techniques and imaging modalities. In addition, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of lymphedema has allowed improved translation to the clinical condition. Various surgical options exist to decrease the symptom-burden of upper limb lymphedema, including vascularized lymph node (VLN) transfer, lymphovenous bypass (LVB), liposuction, lymphatic grafting, and excisional procedures. Modern imaging techniques help to improve the consistency and accuracy of these surgical treatment options. A multi-modal treatment plan utilizing non-operative and surgical therapies has the potential to improve various factors related to overall patient quality of life. This review details all of the current operative treatment strategies and modern imaging modalities used in the treatment of lymphedema. PMID:26161309

  6. National Lymphedema Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (174) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Click here to write ...

  7. The Lymphedema and Gynecologic Cancer (LEG) Study: Incidence, Risk Factors, and | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The proposed study, "Lymphedema and Gynecologic cancer (LEG): Incidence, Risk Factors and Impact", will innovatively utilize the cooperative group setting of the GOG (Gynecologic Oncology Group) to prospectively study 1300 women newly diagnosed with cervical, endometrial, or vulvar cancer to determine the incidence and impact of lower extremity lymphedema following surgical treatment of these diseases. |

  8. Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Gynecologic Procedures prior to and during the Utilization of Assisted Reproductive Technologies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Anne P.; Lekovich, Jovana P.; Hobeika, Elie; Elias, Rony T.

    2016-01-01

    The use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) has increased steadily. There has been a corresponding increase in the number of ART-related procedures such as hysterosalpingography (HSG), saline infusion sonography (SIS), hysteroscopy, laparoscopy, oocyte retrieval, and embryo transfer (ET). While performing these procedures, the abdomen, upper vagina, and endocervix are breached, leading to the possibility of seeding pelvic structures with microorganisms. Antibiotic prophylaxis is therefore important to prevent or treat any procedure-related infections. After careful review of the published literature, it is evident that routine antibiotic prophylaxis is generally not recommended for the majority of ART-related procedures. For transcervical procedures such as HSG, SIS, hysteroscopy, ET, and chromotubation, patients at risk for pelvic infections should be screened and treated prior to the procedure. Patients with a history of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or dilated fallopian tubes are at high risk for postprocedural infections and should be given antibiotic prophylaxis during procedures such as HSG, SIS, or chromotubation. Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended prior to oocyte retrieval in patients with a history of endometriosis, PID, ruptured appendicitis, or multiple prior pelvic surgeries. PMID:27047692

  9. Lymphedema secondary to breast cancer: how choice of measure influences diagnosis, prevalence, and identifiable risk factors.

    PubMed

    Hayes, S; Janda, M; Cornish, B; Battistutta, D; Newman, B

    2008-03-01

    Research on secondary lymphedema primarily uses indirect methods for diagnosis. This paper compares prevalence and cumulative burden following breast cancer surgery, as well as personal, treatment, and behavioral characteristics associated with lymphedema, using different assessment techniques. Lymphedema status was assessed at three-monthly intervals between six- and 18-months post-surgery in a population-based sample of Australian women with recently diagnosed, unilateral, invasive breast cancer, using three methods: bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS), difference between sum of arm circumferences (SOAC) and self-report. Depending on the method, point prevalence ranged between 8 to 28%, with 1 in 5 to 2 in 5 women experiencing lymphedema at some point in time. Of those with lymphedema defined by BIS, almost 40%-60% went undetected, and 40%-12% were misclassified as having lymphedema, based on self-report and SOAC, respectively. The choice of measure also had significant implications for identified risk factors. Over 10 characteristics were associated with lymphedema, however only one, experiencing other upper-body symptoms at baseline, influenced odds of lymphedema across all three methods. These findings highlight that secondary lymphedema poses a significant public health problem. Utilizing the most accurate and reliable method for assessment is crucial to advance our understanding of preventive and treatment strategies. PMID:18581955

  10. Lymphedema secondary to filariasis

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.C.; Humphrey, G.B.; Basmadjian, G.

    1985-03-01

    A 1-year-old immunodeficient boy developed brawny edema of the left foot. Lymphoscintigraphy revealed no evidence of left inguinal activity following pedal injection of Tc-99m-Sn phosphate. Over the next two months, the patient developed lymphedema on the right and repeat scintigraphy demonstrated no movement of isotope from the dorsum of either foot. Subsequent studies identified microfilaria in a nocturnal blood smear, which were thought to represent Brugia beaveri acquired by mosquito transmission in Oklahoma.

  11. Cost of a lymphedema treatment mandate-10 years of experience in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of chronic illness accounts for over 90 % of Medicare spending. Chronic lymphedema places over 3 million Americans at risk of recurrent cellulitis. Health insurers and legislators have taken an active role in fighting attempts to mandate the treatment of lymphedema for fear that provision of the physical therapy and compression materials would result in large and uncontrollable claim costs. The author knows of no open source of lymphedema treatment cost data based on population coverage or claims. Published studies compare cost of treatment versus cost of non-treatment for a select group of lymphedema patients. They do not provide the data necessary for insurance underwriters' estimations of expected claim costs for a larger general population with a range of severities, or for legislators' evaluations of the costs of proposed mandates to cover treatment of lymphedema according to current medical standards. These data are of interest to providers, advocates and legislators in Canada, Australia and England as well as the U.S.The Commonwealth of Virginia has had a lymphedema treatment mandate since 2004. Reported data for 2004-2013, representing 80 % of the Virginia healthcare insurance market, contains claims and utilization data and claims-based estimates of the premium impact of its lymphedema mandate. The average actual annual lymphedema claim cost was $1.59 per individual contract and $3.24 per group contract for the years reported, representing 0.053 and 0.089 % of average total claims. The estimated premium impact ranged 0.00-0.64 % of total average premium for all mandated coverage contracts. In this study actual costs are compared with pre-mandate state mandate commission estimates for proposed lymphedema mandates from Virginia, Massachusetts and California.Ten years of insurance experience with a lymphedema treatment mandate in Virginia shows that costs of lymphedema treatment are an insignificant part of insured healthcare costs, and that

  12. Cost of a lymphedema treatment mandate-10 years of experience in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of chronic illness accounts for over 90 % of Medicare spending. Chronic lymphedema places over 3 million Americans at risk of recurrent cellulitis. Health insurers and legislators have taken an active role in fighting attempts to mandate the treatment of lymphedema for fear that provision of the physical therapy and compression materials would result in large and uncontrollable claim costs. The author knows of no open source of lymphedema treatment cost data based on population coverage or claims. Published studies compare cost of treatment versus cost of non-treatment for a select group of lymphedema patients. They do not provide the data necessary for insurance underwriters' estimations of expected claim costs for a larger general population with a range of severities, or for legislators' evaluations of the costs of proposed mandates to cover treatment of lymphedema according to current medical standards. These data are of interest to providers, advocates and legislators in Canada, Australia and England as well as the U.S.The Commonwealth of Virginia has had a lymphedema treatment mandate since 2004. Reported data for 2004-2013, representing 80 % of the Virginia healthcare insurance market, contains claims and utilization data and claims-based estimates of the premium impact of its lymphedema mandate. The average actual annual lymphedema claim cost was $1.59 per individual contract and $3.24 per group contract for the years reported, representing 0.053 and 0.089 % of average total claims. The estimated premium impact ranged 0.00-0.64 % of total average premium for all mandated coverage contracts. In this study actual costs are compared with pre-mandate state mandate commission estimates for proposed lymphedema mandates from Virginia, Massachusetts and California.Ten years of insurance experience with a lymphedema treatment mandate in Virginia shows that costs of lymphedema treatment are an insignificant part of insured healthcare costs, and that

  13. A Woman with Unilateral Rash and Fever: Cellulitis in the Setting of Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Melissa; Camilon, Marissa; Kang, Tarina

    2015-01-01

    Cellulitis in the setting of lymphedema is an uncommon but clinically important presentation to the emergency department. Stagnant lymph is an ideal medium for bacterial growth and progression can be rapid due to decreased ability to fight infection in the affected area. Infections are commonly caused by gram-positive cocci, though blood cultures are often negative. Treatment should be aimed at rapid initiation of antibiotics targeting these species. There may be a role for antibiotic prophylaxis in recurrent cases. PMID:26171259

  14. Lymphedema Characteristics and the Efficacy of Complex Decongestive Physiotherapy in Malignant Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Liao, Su-Fen

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the lymphedema characteristics and the efficacy of complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) in 29 patients with malignant lymphedema. After CDP, total decreased volume of lymphedema was 306 mL, percentage of excess volume (PEV) changed from 43.4% to 22.7%, and lymphedema severity improved from severe to moderate status. The CDP efficacy-percentage reduction in excess volume (PREV) was 46.6%. The stage of lymphedema (P = .004), range of motion (P < .001), pain, heaviness, and tension scores (P < .001) were significantly improved after CDP. This shows that CDP is efficacious and useful in malignant lymphedema. PMID:25995325

  15. Prophylaxis for Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jean D.

    1987-01-01

    Although antibiotic prophylaxis for patients at risk for bacterial endocarditis has never been scientifcally tested, it is now an accepted practice in medicine. Patients at risk include all individuals with prosthetic valves, congenital or rheumatic heart disease, previous endocarditis, idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS), and mitral valve prolapse with a holosytolic murmur. Dental, upper respiratory tract, genitourinary and gastrointestinal procedures associated with bacteremia are reviewed. New antibiotic regimens utilizing oral agents for shorter periods have recently been published and are outlined here. Patients at high risk of endocarditis (especially those with prosthetic valves) should continue to receive prophylactic antibiotics by the parenteral route. PMID:21263914

  16. High risk for occupational exposure to HIV and utilization of post-exposure prophylaxis in a teaching hospital in Pune, India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amita; Anand, Shuchi; Sastry, Jayagowri; Krisagar, Anandini; Basavaraj, Anita; Bhat, Shreepad M; Gupte, Nikhil; Bollinger, Robert C; Kakrani, Arjun L

    2008-01-01

    Background The risk for occupational exposure to HIV has been well characterized in the developed world, but limited information is available about this transmission risk in resource-constrained settings facing the largest burden of HIV infection. In addition, the feasibility and utilization of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) programs in these settings are unclear. Therefore, we examined the rate and characteristics of occupational exposure to HIV and the utilization of PEP among health care workers (HCW) in a large, urban government teaching hospital in Pune, India. Methods Demographic and clinical data on occupational exposures and their management were prospectively collected from January 2003–December 2005. US Centers for Diseases Control guidelines were utilized to define risk exposures, for which PEP was recommended. Incidence rates of reported exposures and trends in PEP utilization were examined using logistic regression. Results Of 1955 HCW, 557 exposures were reported by 484 HCW with an incidence of 9.5 exposures per 100 person-years (PY). Housestaff, particularly interns, reported the greatest number of exposures with an annual incidence of 47.0 per 100 PY. Personal protective equipment (PPE) was used in only 55.1% of these exposures. The incidence of high-risk exposures was 6.8/100 PY (n = 339); 49.1% occurred during a procedure or disposing of equipment and 265 (80.0%) received a stat dose of PEP. After excluding cases in which the source tested HIV negative, 48.4% of high-risk cases began an extended PEP regimen, of whom only 49.5% completed it. There were no HIV or Hepatitis B seroconversions identified. Extended PEP was continued unnecessarily in 7 (35%) of 20 cases who were confirmed to be HIV-negative. Over time, there was a significant reduction in proportion of percutaneous exposures and high-risk exposures (p < 0.01) and an increase in PEP utilization for high risk exposures (44% in 2003 to 100% in 2005, p = 0.002). Conclusion Housestaff are

  17. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh; Franiel, Tobias; Grimm, Marc-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg). Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases. PMID:27574599

  18. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh; Franiel, Tobias; Grimm, Marc-Oliver; Horstmann, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg). Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases. PMID:27574599

  19. [Treatment of varicose veins and limb lymphedema].

    PubMed

    Vignes, S

    2014-02-01

    Two questions arise when considering the treatment of varicose veins and the development of lymphedema: can the treatment cause lymphedema? Can it worsen it? Primary lymphedema is rarely associated with varicose veins except in the lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome. Data available in the literature is essentially based on surgical treatment. Stripping on a normal limb may induce chronic lymphedema in almost 0.1% of cases. The risk of lymphedema after stripping in patients with previous pelvic surgery including lymph node excision and/or radiotherapy remains unknown. In patients with lower limb lymphedema wearing strong elastic compression stockings, stripping provides little clinical improvement and can worsen volume. The main objective is also to avoid venous complications. Lymphatic lesions related to stripping can be evaluated by lymphography or lymphoscintigraphy. New techniques for treating varicose veins (sclerotherapy, endovenous laser treatment, radiofrequency ablation) seem to induce fewer lymphatic complications. Further studies are required to confirm these results. Indications for treatment should be unquestionable and patients must be alerted to the potential risk of lymphedema or its worsening. PMID:24315933

  20. [Treatment of varicose veins and limb lymphedema].

    PubMed

    Vignes, S

    2014-02-01

    Two questions arise when considering the treatment of varicose veins and the development of lymphedema: can the treatment cause lymphedema? Can it worsen it? Primary lymphedema is rarely associated with varicose veins except in the lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome. Data available in the literature is essentially based on surgical treatment. Stripping on a normal limb may induce chronic lymphedema in almost 0.1% of cases. The risk of lymphedema after stripping in patients with previous pelvic surgery including lymph node excision and/or radiotherapy remains unknown. In patients with lower limb lymphedema wearing strong elastic compression stockings, stripping provides little clinical improvement and can worsen volume. The main objective is also to avoid venous complications. Lymphatic lesions related to stripping can be evaluated by lymphography or lymphoscintigraphy. New techniques for treating varicose veins (sclerotherapy, endovenous laser treatment, radiofrequency ablation) seem to induce fewer lymphatic complications. Further studies are required to confirm these results. Indications for treatment should be unquestionable and patients must be alerted to the potential risk of lymphedema or its worsening.

  1. Radical reduction of upper extremity lymphedema with preservation of perforators.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Christopher J; Sassu, Paolo; Gharb, Bahar Bassiri; Spanio di Spilimbergo, Stefano; Mardini, Samir; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2009-09-01

    Excisional procedures have been successfully utilized by different authors in multistage treatment of upper extremity lymphedema. We have used microsurgical principles of perforator flap surgery in order to develop a one-stage procedure that enables a radical reduction of the lymphedematous tissue with preservation of the vascular supply to the overlying skin.Between March 2000 and February 2007, 11 patients affected by late stage II lymphedema underwent radical reduction of the affected tissues with preservation of perforators. Perforator vessels from the radial and posterior interosseous arteries were identified and through medial and lateral forearm incisions, skin flaps were raised off the underlying lymphedematous tissue and the affected tissue was removed off the deep fascia. At a mean follow-up of 17.8 months the average percentage reductions above and below the elbow, at the wrist, and the hand were 15.1%, 20.7%, 0.5%, and 3.6%, respectively. Statistical analysis showed significant circumference reduction above and below the elbow (P = 0.048 and 0.022, respectively) but not at the wrist and hand. There were no cases of wound breakdown, skin necrosis, or cellulitis in the postoperative period. Four patients complained of mild numbness confined to the vicinity of the surgical incisions.Microvascular principles applied to the radical excision of the subcutaneous tissue seems to offer a new promising one-stage surgical procedure in patients affected by upper extremity lymphedema that has failed conservative therapy. PMID:19692901

  2. DESCRIBING LYMPHEDEMA IN FEMALES WITH TURNER SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Rothbauer, J; Driver, S; Callender, L

    2015-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition affecting an estimated 1 in 2,500 girls where the second X chromosome is missing, or partially formed. This abnormality affects multiple body systems and can lead to short stature, cardiac, neural, and renal abnormalities. Due to the chronic, non-life threatening nature of lymphedema in comparison to other symptoms of TS, it is often ignored by girls and women with TS and their physicians. Consequently, little is known about how lymphedema affects girls and women with TS across the lifespan. Therefore, the objective of the study was to deliver an online survey for females with TS and caregivers in the US, UK, and Canada to provide a worldwide perspective on their current experience with lymphedema within the spectrum of TS. There were 219 participants who completed the survey, and we were able to identify incidence and characteristics of lymphedema across the lifespan. In addition, we found that females with 45,X karyotyping were more likely to report lymphedema symptoms. Lymphedema is not the most significant concern of females with TS, but education, physician evaluation, and assistance with referrals for treatment and management would improve the ease of managing lymphedema in girls and women with TS.

  3. DESCRIBING LYMPHEDEMA IN FEMALES WITH TURNER SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Rothbauer, J; Driver, S; Callender, L

    2015-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition affecting an estimated 1 in 2,500 girls where the second X chromosome is missing, or partially formed. This abnormality affects multiple body systems and can lead to short stature, cardiac, neural, and renal abnormalities. Due to the chronic, non-life threatening nature of lymphedema in comparison to other symptoms of TS, it is often ignored by girls and women with TS and their physicians. Consequently, little is known about how lymphedema affects girls and women with TS across the lifespan. Therefore, the objective of the study was to deliver an online survey for females with TS and caregivers in the US, UK, and Canada to provide a worldwide perspective on their current experience with lymphedema within the spectrum of TS. There were 219 participants who completed the survey, and we were able to identify incidence and characteristics of lymphedema across the lifespan. In addition, we found that females with 45,X karyotyping were more likely to report lymphedema symptoms. Lymphedema is not the most significant concern of females with TS, but education, physician evaluation, and assistance with referrals for treatment and management would improve the ease of managing lymphedema in girls and women with TS. PMID:26939161

  4. Lymphedema (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer-related lymphedema, a condition in which lymph fluid builds up in tissues and causes swelling.

  5. Lymphedema as a Cancer Treatment Side Effect

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections or drugs to relieve pain when necessary. Physical therapy. If you have trouble swallowing or other issues ... of the head and neck, you may need physical therapy. Reducing your risk of lymphedema Research continues to ...

  6. Antibiotic prophylaxis and reflux: critical review and assessment

    PubMed Central

    Baquerizo, Bernarda Viteri

    2014-01-01

    The use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) was critical in the evolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) from a condition in which surgery was the standard of treatment to its becoming a medically managed condition. The efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in the management of VUR has been challenged in recent years, and significant confusion exists as to its clinical value. This review summarizes the critical factors in the history, use, and investigation of antibiotic prophylaxis in VUR. This review provides suggestions for assessing the potential clinical utility of prophylaxis. PMID:25580258

  7. Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema: For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

  8. Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles » My ACS » Lymphedema: What Every Woman With Breast Cancer Should Know Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) Women who have been treated for breast cancer may be at risk for lymphedema in the ...

  9. Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluid, which can trigger or worsen lymphedema. Good hygiene and careful skin care may reduce your risk of lymphedema by helping you avoid infections. Follow these tips to care for the hand and arm on the side of your body ...

  10. [Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Chagoya, Gloria Alejandra; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background: despite the proven effectiveness of preventive therapy for deep vein thrombosis, a significant proportion of patients at risk for thromboembolism do not receive prophylaxis during hospitalization. Our objective was to determine the adherence to thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines in a general hospital as a quality control strategy. Methods: a random audit of clinical charts was conducted at the Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico, to determine the degree of adherence to deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines. The instrument used was the Caprini's checklist for thrombosis risk assessment in adult patients. Results: the sample included 300 patient charts; 182 (60.7 %) were surgical patients and 118 were medical patients. Forty six patients (15.3 %) received deep vein thrombosis pharmacologic prophylaxis; 27.1 % of medical patients received deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis versus 8.3 % of surgical patients (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: our results show that adherence to DVT prophylaxis at our hospital is extremely low. Only 15.3 % of our patients at risk received treatment, and even patients with very high risk received treatment in less than 25 % of the cases. We have implemented strategies to increase compliance with clinical guidelines.

  11. [Antibiotical prophylaxy in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Záhumenský, J; Menzlová, E; Zmrhal, J; Kučera, E

    2013-08-01

    Gynecological surgery is considered to be clear with possible contamination by gram-positive cocci from the skin, gram-negatives from the perineum or groins or polymicrobial biocenosis from vagina, depending on the surgical approach. Antibiotical prophylaxy enforces the natural mechanisms of immunity and helps to exclude present infection. There were presented many studies comparing useful effect of prophylaxis in gynecological surgery. The benefits of antibiotical prophylaxy before IUD insertion, before the cervical surgery and before hysteroscopies were not verified. On the other hand the prophylaxy of vaginal surgery including vaginal hysterectomy decreases the number of postoperative febrile complications. The positive influence of prophylaxis before the simple laparoscopy and laparoscopy without bowel injury or the opening of the vagina was not evidently verified. In abdominal hysterectomy the antibiotical prophylaxy decreases the incidence of postoperative complications significantly. The administration of 2 g of cefazolin can be recommended. In procedures taking more than 3 hours the repeated administration of cefazolin is suitable. New urogynecological procedures, using mesh implants, were not sufficiently evaluated as for postoperative infections and the posible antibiotical effect. The presence of implant in possibly non sterile area should be considered as high risc of postoperative complications. PMID:24040985

  12. Systematic review: conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several conservative (i.e., nonpharmacologic, nonsurgical) treatments exist for secondary lymphedema. The optimal treatment is unknown. We examined the effectiveness of conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema, as well as harms related to these treatments. Methods We searched MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials®, AMED, and CINAHL from 1990 to January 19, 2010. We obtained English- and non-English-language randomized controlled trials or observational studies (with comparison groups) that reported primary effectiveness data on conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema. For English-language studies, we extracted data in tabular form and summarized the tables descriptively. For non-English-language studies, we summarized the results descriptively and discussed similarities with the English-language studies. Results Thirty-six English-language and eight non-English-language studies were included in the review. Most of these studies involved upper-limb lymphedema secondary to breast cancer. Despite lymphedema's chronicity, lengths of follow-up in most studies were under 6 months. Many trial reports contained inadequate descriptions of randomization, blinding, and methods to assess harms. Most observational studies did not control for confounding. Many studies showed that active treatments reduced the size of lymphatic limbs, although extensive between-study heterogeneity in areas such as treatment comparisons and protocols, and outcome measures, prevented us from assessing whether any one treatment was superior. This heterogeneity also precluded us from statistically pooling results. Harms were rare (< 1% incidence) and mostly minor (e.g., headache, arm pain). Conclusions The literature contains no evidence to suggest the most effective treatment for secondary lymphedema. Harms are few and unlikely to cause major clinical problems. PMID:22216837

  13. Low-level laser therapy in secondary lymphedema after breast cancer: systematic review.

    PubMed

    E Lima, Mariana Toledo Biscaia Raposo Mourão; E Lima, Januário Gomes Mourão; de Andrade, Mauro Figueiredo Carvalho; Bergmann, Anke

    2014-05-01

    Complex physical therapy is the main treatment for the secondary lymphedema after breast cancer. The low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used in order to stimulate lymphangiogenesis, encourage lymphatic motility, and reduce lymphostatic fibrosis. However, these factors could also favor the development of recurrence and metastasis. The objective of this study is to discuss the use of LLLT in the treatment of lymphedema after breast cancer. This study utilized a systematic review on the use of LLLT in the treatment of lymphedema after breast cancer. Evaluating quality of articles was conducted through the PEDro scale. Of the 41 articles identified, four were considered to be of high methodological quality (score ≥ 5). The low-level laser in the axillary region was performed in all studies. The control group was not similar across studies. The results presented showed that there was a reduction in limb volume in the group subjected to low-power laser when compared with other treatments. No studies have evaluated the risk of metastasis or relapse in the irradiated areas. Because no studies have included the complex physical therapy as the comparison group, we cannot claim that laser treatment is the best efficacy or effectiveness in lymphedema treatment after breast cancer. No studies have evaluated the hypothesis that the LLLT can increase the risk of recurrence or metastasis. Therefore, the questions about the safety of this procedure in cancer patients remain.

  14. Infective endocarditis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Diz Dios, P

    2014-05-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis for infective endocarditis continues to be administered empirically, although its indications are ever more restrictive. Some expert committees have even suggested that antibiotic prophylaxis is unnecessary, rekindling the controversy between those who defend the scientific evidence and those working in clinical practice; in any case, this proposal will facilitate the undertaking of prospective placebo-controlled trials, so necessary to resolve this issue. In the meantime, the most prudent approach is to adopt the recommendations proposed by the expert committees in each country. PMID:24373017

  15. Proteomic profiling of lymphedema development in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joomin; Song, Haeun; Roh, Kangsan; Cho, Sungrae; Lee, Sukchan; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Park, Seyeon

    2016-07-01

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis. Lymphedema is a chronic, progressive, and incurable condition that leads to lymphatic fluid retention; it may be primary (heritable) or secondary (acquired) in nature. Although there is a growing understanding of lymphedema, methods for the prevention and treatment of lymphedema are still limited. In this study, we investigated differential protein expressions in sham-operated and lymphedema-operated mice for 3 days, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry analysis. Male improved methodology for culturing noninbred (ICR) mice developed lymphedema in the right hindlimb. Twenty functional proteins were found to be differentially expressed between lymphedema induced-right leg tissue and normal left leg tissue. Out of these proteins, the protein levels of apolipoprotein A-1 preprotein, alpha-actinin-3, mCG21744, parkinson disease, serum amyloid P-component precursor, annexin A8, mKIAA0098 protein, and fibrinogen beta chain precursor were differentially upregulated in the lymphedema mice compared with the sham-operated group. Western blotting analysis was used to validate the proteomics results. Our results showing differential up-regulation of serum amyloid P-component precursor, parkinson disease, and apolipoprotein A-1 preprotein in lymphedema model over sham-operated model suggest important insights into pathophysiological target for lymphedema. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27151289

  16. The Use of Noninvasive Imaging Techniques in the Assessment of Secondary Lymphedema Tissue Changes as Part of Staging Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Tassenoy, An; De Strijcker, Dorien; Adriaenssens, Nele; Lievens, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Too often, in clinical settings, the diagnosis and evolution of lymphedema is determined by limb circumference measurements and/or volume calculations. Besides the unrecognition of small lymphedemas, these techniques provide little to no information concerning the stage of the lymphedema. This latter is important in choosing appropriate treatment modalities and making an accurate prognosis. Different imaging techniques are described in literature giving insights in tissue changes due to lymphedema. The aim of this article is giving an overview of possible texture changes linked to the different edema stages, visualized with noninvasive imaging procedures like ultrasonography, computed tomography, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, or magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27631582

  17. Possible Genetic Predisposition to Lymphedema after Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Beth; Lose, Felicity; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Francois, Mathias; Ferguson, Kaltin; Janda, Monika; Yates, Patsy; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Known risk factors for secondary lymphedema only partially explain who develops lymphedema following cancer, suggesting that inherited genetic susceptibility may influence risk. Moreover, identification of molecular signatures could facilitate lymphedema risk prediction prior to surgery or lead to effective drug therapies for prevention or treatment. Recent advances in the molecular biology underlying development of the lymphatic system and related congenital disorders implicate a number of potential candidate genes to explore in relation to secondary lymphedema. Methods and Results We undertook a nested case-control study, with participants who had developed lymphedema after surgical intervention within the first 18 months of their breast cancer diagnosis serving as cases (n=22) and those without lymphedema serving as controls (n=98), identified from a prospective, population-based, cohort study in Queensland, Australia. TagSNPs that covered all known genetic variation in the genes SOX18, VEGFC, VEGFD, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, RORC, FOXC2, LYVE1, ADM, and PROX1 were selected for genotyping. Multiple SNPs within three receptor genes, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, and RORC, were associated with lymphedema defined by statistical significance (p<0.05) or extreme risk estimates (OR <0.5 or >2.0). Conclusions These provocative, albeit preliminary, findings regarding possible genetic predisposition to secondary lymphedema following breast cancer treatment warrant further attention for potential replication using larger datasets. PMID:22404826

  18. Lymphaticovenular bypass surgery for lymphedema management in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, D W

    2012-12-01

    Historically, the reported incidence of upper extremity lymphedema in breast cancer survivors who have undergone axillary lymph node dissection has ranged from 9% to 41%. In the past 2 decades, sentinel lymph node biopsy has become popular as a way to minimize the morbidity associated with axillary dissection without compromising the cure rate for breast cancer patients. However, even with sentinel node biopsy, the postoperative incidence of upper limb lymphedema in breast cancer patients remains at 4-10%. Lymphedema occasionally emerges immediately after surgery but most often appears after a latent period. Obesity, postoperative seroma, and radiation therapy have been reported as major risk factors for upper extremity lymphedema, but the etiology of lymphedema is still not fully understood. Common symptoms of upper limb lymphedema are increased volume and weight of the affected limb and increased skin tension. The increased volume of the affected limb not only causes physical impairments in wearing clothes and in dexterity but also affects patients' emotional and mental status. Surgical management of lymphedema can be broadly categorized into physiologic methods and reductive techniques. Physiologic methods such as flap interposition, lymph node transfers, and lymphatic bypass procedures aim to decrease lymphedema by restoring lymphatic drainage. In contrast, reductive techniques such as direct excision or liposuction aim to remove fibrofatty tissue generated as a consequence of sustained lymphatic fluid stasis. Currently, microsurgical variations of lymphatic bypass, in which excess lymph trapped within the lymphedematous limb is redirected into other lymphatic basins or into the venous circulation, have gained popularity.

  19. Lower limb lymphedema in lung adenocarcinoma: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Misae; Akutsu, Haruka; Ohtani, Toshihiro; Tamura, Tomohiro; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Breast and gynecological cancers and their treatment may cause lymphedema of the upper and lower extremities, respectively. We herein report the cases of two patients with lung adenocarcinoma who developed lymphedema of the lower extremities. One patient harbored an epidermal growth factor receptor mutation and the other patient harbored an anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion gene. The patients had developed intra-abdominal lymph node metastases and received several lines of chemotherapy. In both patients, lymphedema in the lower extremities developed >30 months after the initiation of first-line chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of lung cancer patients who developed lymphedema in the lower extremities. Although rarely, lymphedema of the lower extremities may develop long after successful therapy with molecular-targeted therapy in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients with a specific genetic etiological background. PMID:27699046

  20. Sodium selenite and cancer related lymphedema: Biological and pharmacological effects.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Christina; Dawzcynski, Horst; Schingale, Franz-Josef

    2016-09-01

    A significant percentage of cancer patients develop secondary lymphedema after surgery or radiotherapy. The preferred treatment of secondary lymphedema is complex physical therapy. Pharmacotherapy, for example with diuretics, has received little attention, because they were not effective and only offered short-term solutions. Sodium selenite showed promise as a cost-effective, nontoxic anti-inflammatory agent. Treatment with sodium selenite lowers reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, causes a spontaneous reduction in lymphedema volume, increases the efficacy of physical therapy for lymphedema, and reduces the incidence of erysipelas infections in patients with chronic lymphedema. Besides biological effects in reducing excessive production of ROS, sodium selenite also displays various pharmacological effects. So far the exact mechanisms of these pharmacological effects are mostly unknown, but probably include inhibition of adhesion protein expression.

  1. Sodium selenite and cancer related lymphedema: Biological and pharmacological effects.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Christina; Dawzcynski, Horst; Schingale, Franz-Josef

    2016-09-01

    A significant percentage of cancer patients develop secondary lymphedema after surgery or radiotherapy. The preferred treatment of secondary lymphedema is complex physical therapy. Pharmacotherapy, for example with diuretics, has received little attention, because they were not effective and only offered short-term solutions. Sodium selenite showed promise as a cost-effective, nontoxic anti-inflammatory agent. Treatment with sodium selenite lowers reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, causes a spontaneous reduction in lymphedema volume, increases the efficacy of physical therapy for lymphedema, and reduces the incidence of erysipelas infections in patients with chronic lymphedema. Besides biological effects in reducing excessive production of ROS, sodium selenite also displays various pharmacological effects. So far the exact mechanisms of these pharmacological effects are mostly unknown, but probably include inhibition of adhesion protein expression. PMID:27267968

  2. Lower limb lymphedema in lung adenocarcinoma: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Misae; Akutsu, Haruka; Ohtani, Toshihiro; Tamura, Tomohiro; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Breast and gynecological cancers and their treatment may cause lymphedema of the upper and lower extremities, respectively. We herein report the cases of two patients with lung adenocarcinoma who developed lymphedema of the lower extremities. One patient harbored an epidermal growth factor receptor mutation and the other patient harbored an anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion gene. The patients had developed intra-abdominal lymph node metastases and received several lines of chemotherapy. In both patients, lymphedema in the lower extremities developed >30 months after the initiation of first-line chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of lung cancer patients who developed lymphedema in the lower extremities. Although rarely, lymphedema of the lower extremities may develop long after successful therapy with molecular-targeted therapy in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients with a specific genetic etiological background.

  3. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ottoline, Ana Carolina Xavier; Tomita, Shiro; Marques, Marise da Penha Costa; Felix, Felippe; Ferraiolo, Priscila Novaes; Laurindo, Roberta Silveira Santos

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim: Antibiotic prophylaxis aims to prevent infection of surgical sites before contamination or infection occurs. Prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis does not enhance the prevention of surgical infection and is associated with higher rates of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. This review of the literature concerning antibiotic prophylaxis, with an emphasis on otolaryngologic surgery, aims to develop a guide for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery in order to reduce the numbers of complications stemming from the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. PMID:25991999

  4. Prophylaxis in real life scenarios.

    PubMed

    Fischer, K; Konkle, B; Broderick, C; Kessler, C M

    2014-05-01

    Prophylaxis has become the standard mantra of care for those individuals with severe haemophilia A and B. Primary prophylaxis is advocated to prevent the occurrence of symptomatic acute spontaneous haemarthroses and to preserve joint structure and function. Typically, twice or thrice weekly infusions of factor VIII or IX concentrates are integral to this treatment approach. Secondary prophylaxis is initiated after the relentless cycle of progressive joint damage has been triggered by prior haemarthroses and is intended to preserve existing joint health by preventing additional spontaneous bleeding events. Event-driven prophylaxis involves the administration of clotting factor concentrates to prevent acute traumatic bleeds, which are anticipated to occur in association with surgical or physical trauma. This regimen enhances the effectiveness of primary or secondary prophylaxis protocols or on-demand approaches to replacement therapy. Besides the marked reduction in the so-called annual bleed rate, prophylaxis regimens frequently increase personal self-confidence to embark on a more active and physical lifestyle; however, in reality, prophylaxis must be individualized in accordance with bleeding phenotypes, with the unique pharmacokinetic profile of administered replacement clotting factor concentrates, with the specific clinical scenario, and with the degree of intensity anticipated for any physical activity. The introduction of extended half-life replacement products will also influence how these prophylaxis regimens will be accomplished. The following scenarios will discuss how prophylaxis regimens can be implemented to protect the individual from developing spontaneous and activity-induced acute bleeding complications and to maintain an improved quality of life.

  5. Self-reported information sources and perceived knowledge in individuals with lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Deng, J; Fu, M R; Armer, J M; Cormier, J N; Radina, E; Thiadens, S R J; Dietrich, M S; Weiss, J; Tuppo, C M; Ridner, S H

    2013-12-01

    Currently, a limited number of studies have been conducted that examine sources of information and knowledge level in individuals with lymphedema. This study aimed (1) to examine self-reported information sources and perceived lymphedema knowledge among individuals with lymphedema; and (2) to examine differences in self-reported information sources and perceived lymphedema knowledge among individuals with primary or secondary lymphedema; and with upper or lower extremity lymphedema. The National Lymphedema Network (NLN) conducted a survey to collect self-report data from March 2006 to January 2010. Overall, participants preferred a variety of sources of information. Participants reported low levels of knowledge about the types of lymphedema, treatment approaches and methods, and self-administrated therapies. In comparison to participants with secondary or upper extremity lymphedema, participants with primary or lower extremity lymphedema reported lower knowledge level regarding causes of lymphedema, risks for and complications of lymphedema, treatment approaches and methods for lymphedema, and self-administered therapies. Opportunities exist to expand lymphedema information sources. Healthcare professionals should focus on delivering high quality information about treatment and self-care management to individuals with lymphedema.

  6. Sexual Partnerships and Considerations for HIV Antiretroviral Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Utilization Among High-Risk Substance Using Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Closson, Elizabeth F.; Kothary, Vishesh; Mitty, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) remain at great risk of HIV in the United States, representing 65 % of incident HIV infections. One factor contributing to the high rate ofHIV infectionamongMSM isuse of“recreational”drugsthat are highly associated with unprotected anal sex. Pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis(PrEP)isanovelbiomedicalHIVprevention strategy that has the potential to reduce HIV transmission in MSM. Main and casual sex partners play a role in HIV prevention efforts for MSM. The study aimed to qualitatively explore the perceived influences of sexual relationships on promoting and inhibiting PrEP use among high-risk MSM who report regular drug use. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 participants recruited in Boston, Massachusetts. Data were analyzed using descriptive qualitative analysis. Casual partners presented a distinct set of concerns from primary partnerships. MSM generally viewed main partners as a potential source of support for taking PrEP. Given their informal and often temporary nature, PrEP disclosure to casual partners was considered unnecessary. HIV-related stigma and substance use were also perceived as barriers to discussing PrEP use with casual partners. MSM articulated a high degree of personal agency regarding their ability to take PrEP. Findings suggest that behavioral interventions to improve PrEP utilization and adherence for high-risk MSM should be tailored to sex partner type and the parameters established between sex partners. Approaches to PrEP disclosure and partner engagement should be informed by the relative benefits and limitations characterized by these different types of relationships. PMID:24243002

  7. Lymphoscintigraphy to confirm the clinical diagnosis of lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Golueke, P.J.; Montgomery, R.A.; Petronis, J.D.; Minken, S.L.; Perler, B.A.; Williams, G.M. )

    1989-09-01

    Confirmation of the diagnosis of lymphedema often requires lymphangiography, a procedure that is painful for the patient and technically demanding. Radioisotope lymphoscintigraphy is a relatively new technique that uses technetium 99 m antimony trisulfide colloid to produce a diagnostic image similar to a lymphangiogram. The procedure requires a single subcutaneous injection in the involved extremity, and images are obtained 3 hours later. It is technically easy to perform, produces minimal discomfort for the patient, and has no adverse effects. We have recently used radioisotope lymphoscintigraphy to evaluate 17 patients with extremity edema. These patients initially had a presumed diagnosis of lymphedema involving the upper or lower extremity. Lymphoscintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis of lymphedema in 12 (70.6%) patients. In five of the 17 patients (29.4%) the clinical impression of lymphedema was not supported by lymphoscintigraphy, leading to alternative diagnoses such as lipomatosis, venous insufficiency (two patients), congestive heart failure, and disuse edema. In all patients with secondary lymphedema the lymphatic system in the involved extremity could be partially visualized. Conversely, three of four patients with primary lymphedema had no ascent of the tracer from the foot and no lymphatic channels could be visualized. Lymphoscintigraphy is relatively easy to perform, safe, minimally invasive, and not uncomfortable for the patient. It is useful in differentiating lymphedema from other causes of extremity edema, allowing institution of appropriate therapy.

  8. Recent Progress in Cancer-Related Lymphedema Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Cromwell, Kate D.; Rasmussen, John C.; Stout, Nicole L.; Armer, Jane M.; Lasinski, Bonnie B.; Cormier, Janice N.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the recent developments in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer-related lymphedema. Lymphedema incidence by tumor site is evaluated. Measurement techniques and trends in patient education and treatment are also summarized to include current trends in therapeutic and surgical treatment options as well as longer-term management. Finally, an overview of the policies related to insurance coverage and reimbursement will give the clinician an overview of important trends in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of cancer-related lymphedema. PMID:25410402

  9. Giant scrotal lymphedema of unclear etiology: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Scrotal lymphedema is common in the tropics and subtropics. The giant variants can cause a lot of physical disability and psychological disturbances. Case presentation We present a 25-year-old Nigerian male with giant scrotal lymphedema with severe debilitating symptoms, immobility and emotional disturbance. He benefited from a modified Charles' procedure and reconstruction of the penile shaft using a split-thickness skin graft. Conclusion Giant scrotal lymphedema related to poverty, ignorance and neglect, is amenable to surgery. Surgery provides a cosmetically acceptable and functionally satisfying outcome. PMID:19830170

  10. Prevention and management of lymphedema after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Shaila J; Chen, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the arm after breast cancer treatment continues to challenge clinicians worldwide. In this review, we examine the main modalities, both nonsurgical and surgical, to prevent and treat this as yet incurable condition. PMID:25772311

  11. A study on the pathogenesis of postmastectomy lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Abe, R

    1976-02-01

    In order to study the causes of postmastectomy lymphedema, venography, lymphangiography and RISA absorption test were performed on the patients following radical mastectomy. Venous obstruction was a rare cause of postmastectomy lymphedema. Edema patterns in arm lymphangiography were observed in the patients with lymphedema and even in some of the non-edematous upper extremities. The finding of axillary lymphangiography was correlated with the degree of edema of the upper extremity. The absence of adequate lymphatic pathway across the axilla (type 2, collateral and type 3, blocking) was thought to provide the pathologic base for the postmastectomy lymphedema. RISA absorption test also provided precise information of the lymphatic flow in the extremity. It was lower in the patients with edema, as compared with the patients without edema.

  12. Prevention and treatment of lymphedema after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Price, J; Purtell, J R

    1997-09-01

    Through personal experience, these two health care professionals discovered that the threat of lymphedema and its risk factors is often underestimated by clinicians. What they learned may help you provide better care for your patients with breast cancer.

  13. A Review of Engineering Approaches for Lymphedema Detection.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Karina; Shah, Pratikkumar; Ramella-Roman, Jessica; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Edema is a condition characterized by excessive swelling of a tissue due to an abnormal accumulation of interstitial fluid in the subcutaneous tissue. More specifically, disruption of the lymphatic system causes what is known as lymphedema. This condition is commonly seen in breast cancer survivors postradiotherapy treatment, chemotherapy, and surgeries; this population has shown high risk of developing lymphedema in the limbs. Throughout the years, several techniques have been developed and implemented for the detection and measurement of lymphedema, including techniques to measure the diseased limb volume, electrical techniques to measure the water content in tissues, and optical techniques to measure either tissue absorbance or limb volume. However, there is still no method that allows for continuous monitoring of the disease and provides a better understanding of its progression. This study describes the different approaches that have been used and that could be used for lymphedema measurement. PMID:27333610

  14. Utility of the clinical practice of administering thrombophilic screening and antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin to healthy donors treated with G-CSF for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Luise, Francesca; Oriana, Vincenzo; Console, Giuseppe; Moscato, Tiziana; Mammì, Corrado; Messina, Giuseppe; Massara, Elisabetta; Irrera, Giuseppe; Piromalli, Angela; Lombardo, Vincenzo Trapani; Laganà, Carmelo; Iacopino, Pasquale

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the utility of the clinical practice of administering thrombophilic screening and antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin to healthy donors receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells. Thrombophilia screening comprised of testing for factor V Leiden G1691A, prothrombin G20210A, the thermolabile variant (C677T) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene, protein C, protein S, factor VIII and homocysteine plasmatic levels, antithrombin III activity, and acquired activated protein C resistance. We investigated prospectively 72 white Italian healthy donors, 39 men and 33 women, with a median age of 42 years (range, 18-65). Five donors (6.9%) were heterozygous carriers of Factor V Leiden G1691A; two healthy donors had the heterozygous prothrombin G20210A gene mutation; C677T mutation in the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene was present in 34 (47.2%) donors in heterozygous and in 7 donors (9.7%) in homozygous. Acquired activated protein C resistance was revealed in 8 donors of the study (11.1%). The protein C plasmatic level was decreased in 3 donors (4.2%); the protein S level was decreased in 7 donors (9.7%). An elevated factor VIII dosage was shown in 10 donors (13.9%) and hyperhomocysteinemia in 9 donors (12.5%). Concentration of antithrombin III was in the normal range for all study group donors. The factor V Leiden mutation was combined with the heterozygous prothrombin G20210A in 2 cases and with protein S deficiency in one case; 2 healthy donors presented an associated deficiency of protein C and protein S. Although none of these healthy subjects had a previous history of thrombosis, low-molecular-weight heparin was administered to all donors during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to prevent thrombotic events. No donor experienced short or long-term thrombotic diseases after a median follow-up of 29.2 months. Our data do not

  15. Lymphedema Outcomes in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Little, Leila G.; Skoracki, Roman J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Lewin, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to describe the presentation of external head and neck lymphedema in patients treated for head and neck cancer and examine their initial response to complete decongestive therapy. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. Subjects and Methods Patients evaluated for head and neck cancer at MD Anderson Cancer Center after treatment 01/2007-01/2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Response to complete decongestive therapy was evaluated per changes in lymphedema severity rating or surface tape measures. Predictors of therapy response were examined using regression models. Results 1,202 patients were evaluated. Most patients (62%) had soft, reversible pitting edema (MDACC Stage 1b). Treatment response was evaluated in 733 patients after receiving therapy; 439 (60%) improved after complete decongestive therapy. Treatment adherence independently predicted complete decongestive therapy response (p<0.001). Conclusions These data support the effectiveness of a head and neck cancer-specific regimen of lymphedema therapy for cancer patients with external head and neck lymphedema. Our findings suggest that head and neck lymphedema is distinct from lymphedema that affects other sites, requiring adaptations in traditional methods of management and measurement. PMID:25389318

  16. The State of Disparities in Opportunistic Infection Prophylaxis for Blacks with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Oramasionwu, Christine U.; Koeller, Jim M.; Lawson, Kenneth A.; Brown, Carolyn M.; Morse, Gene D.; Frei, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this review is to identify and analyze published studies that have evaluated disparities for opportunistic infection (OI) prophylaxis between Blacks and Whites with HIV/AIDS in the United States. Methods The authors conducted a web-based search of MEDLINE (1950 to 2009) to identify original research articles evaluating the use of OI prophylaxis between Blacks and Whites with HIV/AIDS. The search was conducted utilizing the following MeSH headings and search terms alone and in combination: HIV, AIDS, Black, race, ethnicity, disparities, differences, access, opportunistic infection, and prophylaxis. The search was then expanded to include any relevant articles from the referenced citations of the articles that were retrieved from the initial search strategy. Of the 29 articles retrieved from the literature search, 19 articles were excluded. Results Ten publications met inclusion criteria, collectively published between 1991 and 2005. The collective time periods of these studies spanned from 1987 to 2001. Four studies identified a race-based disparity in that Blacks were less likely than Whites to use OI prophylaxis, whereas five studies failed to identify such a relationship between race and OI prophylaxis. One study identified disparities for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) prophylaxis, but not for Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis. Conclusions The evidence regarding race-based disparities in opportunistic infection prophylaxis is inconclusive. Additional research is warranted to explore potential race-based disparities in OI prophylaxis. PMID:23047780

  17. A Leading Role in Lymphedema Awareness | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed lymphedema after surgery for breast cancer. When did you first experience symptoms? Was it diagnosed quickly? ... glossed over in a couple of hours. Why did you become an advocate for people with lymphedema? ...

  18. [Prophylaxis-- what lies ahead?].

    PubMed

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2005-10-17

    Travellers to areas where poverty and pollution prevail may be exposed to the same health risks as are the local populations. In the future, prophylaxis for travellers will therefore rely upon advances in prevention being distributed equally to people in both rich and poor societies. Of the eight World Millennium Development Goals to be attained by 2015, most relate indirectly to human health, while three relate directly to the prevention and fighting of diseases. Reduction of the child mortality rate and control of major infectious diseases are among the most important goals. In endemic areas of poverty and deficient infrastructure, children risk being infected primarily by diarrhoeal diseases, hepatitis A, polio, measles and other respiratory infections, and vector-borne diseases such as dengue and malaria, as well as, increasingly, blood/sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV, hepatitis B, and syphilis. Adults as well as children travelling to such areas may be hit by the very same diseases. Eradication of polio and measles is within reach, while a number of other infections without effective vaccines will not be controlled without a large-scale global effort including protection of pesticides and antibiotics against development of resistance of disease vectors. Advances in travel medicine are thus closely linked with global advances in health and living conditions. PMID:16232393

  19. Doxycycline prophylaxis for shigellosis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yehuda, O; Cohen, D; Alkan, M; Greenbaum, A; Jelin, N; Steinherz, R

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of oral doxycycline, 100 mg/d for 14 days, in reducing the incidence of shigellosis in newcomers to an area hyperendemic for the disease was examined in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Of 107 entrants, 100 completed the study; 50 received the drug and 50 received a placebo. Diarrheal disease and associated symptoms were monitored for 8 weeks. Starting on the 3rd day of the trial, an outbreak was observed, and Shigella flexneri type 2a was isolated from 6 subjects. Eight of the subjects in the treatment group had diarrhea (16%) compared with 37 in the placebo group (74%), providing a 79% protection rate. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of accompanying symptoms between the subjects suffering from diarrhea in both groups, but the duration of disease was shorter in the treatment group. Serologic study of the outbreak showed no significant difference in antibody response to S flexneri between the treatment (14 of 43) and placebo (18 of 39) groups. Doxycycline prophylaxis apparently is effective and probably does not prevent subclinical infection.

  20. Factors Associated With External and Internal Lymphedema in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jie; Ridner, Sheila H.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Sinard, Robert J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Murphy, Barbara A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The sample included 81 patients {>=}3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. Results: The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Conclusions: Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC.

  1. Possible new autosomal recessive syndrome of lymphedema, hydroceles, atrial septal defect, and characteristic facial changes.

    PubMed

    Irons, M B; Bianchi, D W; Geggel, R L; Marx, G R; Bhan, I

    1996-12-01

    We describe two brothers with congenital lymphedema of lower limbs, atrial septal defect (ASD), and similar facial appearance. A sister had severe hydrops fetalis, ASD, omphalocele, and other anomalies. This combination of congenital lymphedema and ASD differs from other reported cases of congenital lymphedema and most likely constitutes a previously unrecognized autosomal recessive syndrome.

  2. Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Manheimer, Eric; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2011-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is often used for migraine prophylaxis but its effectiveness is still controversial. This review (along with a companion review on ’Acupuncture for tension-type headache’) represents an updated version of a Cochrane review originally published in Issue 1, 2001, of The Cochrane Library. Objectives To investigate whether acupuncture is a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b) more effective than ’sham’ (placebo) acupuncture; and c) as effective as other interventions in reducing headache frequency in patients with migraine. Search strategy The Cochrane Pain, Palliative & Supportive Care Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Trials Register were searched to January 2008. Selection criteria We included randomized trials with a post-randomization observation period of at least 8 weeks that compared the clinical effects of an acupuncture intervention with a control (no prophylactic treatment or routine care only), a sham acupuncture intervention or another intervention in patients with migraine. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers checked eligibility; extracted information on patients, interventions, methods and results; and assessed risk of bias and quality of the acupuncture intervention. Outcomes extracted included response (outcome of primary interest), migraine attacks, migraine days, headache days and analgesic use. Pooled effect size estimates were calculated using a random-effects model. Main results Twenty-two trials with 4419 participants (mean 201, median 42, range 27 to 1715) met the inclusion criteria. Six trials (including two large trials with 401 and 1715 patients) compared acupuncture to no prophylactic treatment or routine care only. After 3 to 4 months patients receiving acupuncture had higher response rates and fewer headaches. The only study with long-term follow up saw no evidence that effects dissipated up to 9 months after

  3. The Multicomponent Medication Lymphomyosot Improves the Outcome of Experimental Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Keim, Alex P.; Slis, Justin R.; Mendez, Uziel; Stroup, Emily M.; Burmeister, Yvonne; Tsolaki, Natalie; Gailing, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Secondary lymphedema is a life-long disease of painful tissue swelling that often follows axillary lymph node dissection to treat breast cancer. It is hypothesized that poor lymphatic regeneration across the obstructive scar tissue during the wound healing process may predispose the tissue to swell at a later date. Treatment for lymphedema remains suboptimal and is in most cases palliative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of Lymphomyosot to treat tissue swelling and promote lymphangiogenesis in experimental models of murine lymphedema. Methods Experimental models of mouse lymphedema were injected with varied amounts of Lymphomyosot and saline as control. Measurements of tail swelling and wound closure were taken and compared amongst the groups. Three separate groups of mice were analyzed for lymphatic capillary migration, lymphatic vessel regeneration, and macrophage recruitment. Results Lymphomyosot significantly reduced swelling and increased the rate of surgical wound closure. Lymphomyosot did not increase the migration of lymph capillaries in a mouse tail skin regeneration model or regeneration of lymph vessels following murine axillary lymph node dissection. Conclusions Lymphomyosot may act through inflammatory and wound repair pathways to reduce experimental lymphedema. Its ability to regulate inflammation as well as assist in tissue repair and extracellular formation may allow for the production of a scar-free matrix bridge through which migrating cells and accumulated interstitial fluid can freely spread. PMID:23725444

  4. Pediatric lymphedema caused by diffuse cervical lymphadenopathy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gitomer, Sarah A; Giannoni, Carla M; Cañadas, Karina T

    2016-08-01

    Pediatric head and neck lymphedema is rare and there have not been any reported cases in children. Here we discuss severe, diffuse head and neck lymphedema in a child caused by compression of the internal jugular veins by lymphadenopathy from Kawasaki's disease. With steroid and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, the lymphadenopathy improved and facial edema slowly resolved. In review of the literature, complications of head and neck lymphedema including airway obstruction and blindness are discussed. This case highlights the importance of the pediatric otolaryngologist considering lymphedema as a cause for facial swelling and monitoring for complications of lymphedema. PMID:27368445

  5. Pediatric lymphedema caused by diffuse cervical lymphadenopathy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gitomer, Sarah A; Giannoni, Carla M; Cañadas, Karina T

    2016-08-01

    Pediatric head and neck lymphedema is rare and there have not been any reported cases in children. Here we discuss severe, diffuse head and neck lymphedema in a child caused by compression of the internal jugular veins by lymphadenopathy from Kawasaki's disease. With steroid and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, the lymphadenopathy improved and facial edema slowly resolved. In review of the literature, complications of head and neck lymphedema including airway obstruction and blindness are discussed. This case highlights the importance of the pediatric otolaryngologist considering lymphedema as a cause for facial swelling and monitoring for complications of lymphedema.

  6. Time Course of Mild Arm Lymphedema After Breast Conservation Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Cheville, Andrea; Solin, Lawrence J.; Dutta, Pinaki; Both, Stefan; Harris, Eleanor

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Arm lymphedema is a potential consequence of the treatment for breast carcinoma. The objective of this retrospective study was to characterize the progression of mild arm lymphedema after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The study cohort was drawn from 1,713 consecutive Stage I or II breast cancer patients who underwent breast conservation therapy, including axillary staging followed by radiation. Arm lymphedema was documented in 266 (16%) of 1,713 patients. One hundred nine patients, 6% of the overall group and 40% of the patients with arm lymphedema, presented with mild arm lymphedema, defined as a difference of 2 cm or less between the measured circumferences of the affected and unaffected arms. Results: Among the 109 patients with mild arm lymphedema at the time of arm lymphedema diagnosis, the rate of freedom from progression to more severe lymphedema was 79% at 1 year, 66% at 3 years, and 52% at 5 years. The patients who were morbidly obese, had positive axillary lymph nodes, or received supraclavicular irradiation at the time of breast cancer treatment were at higher risk of progression from mild arm lymphedema to more severe edema. Conclusions: Mild arm lymphedema, generally considered to be a minor complication after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer, was associated with a risk of progression to a more severe grade of arm lymphedema in a substantial fraction of patients.

  7. Management of secondary lymphedema related to breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheifetz, Oren; Haley, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review recent literature on the management of secondary lymphedema following breast cancer. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PubMed, and the Internet were searched for articles published between 2005 and 2009. Articles were evaluated using Sackett’s levels of evidence. The literature search focused on primary research and systematic reviews. MAIN MESSAGE Secondary lymphedema related to breast cancer is an ongoing challenge. Evidence suggests that there are several safe and beneficial treatments, including complex decongestive therapy, physiotherapy, and exercise. Furthermore, resistive exercises, previously contraindicated on the affected side, have been found to be both beneficial and safe with careful progression and monitoring. Exercise guidelines and patient education topics are presented with a comprehensive reference list for further reading. CONCLUSION Advances in cancer treatment, cancer and exercise research, and lymphedema management require that physicians have a basic understanding of the current evidence to provide appropriate patient education and referral. PMID:21375063

  8. The Psychosocial Impact of Lymphedema-related Distress among Breast Cancer Survivors in the WHEL Study

    PubMed Central

    Dominick, Sally A.; Natarajan, Loki; Pierce, John P.; Madanat, Hala; Madlensky, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lymphedema is a distressing and chronic condition affecting up to 30% of breast cancer survivors. Using a cross-sectional study design, we examined the impact of self-reported lymphedema-related distress on psychosocial functioning among breast cancer survivors in the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) Study. The WHEL Study has a dataset that includes self-report data on lymphedema status, symptoms and distress. Methods Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression models were used to examine how specific participant characteristics, including lymphedema-related distress, were associated with physical health and mental health as measured by the SF-36 and depressive symptoms assessed by the CES-Dsf. Results Of the 2,431 participants included in the current study population, 692 (28.5%) self-reported ever having lymphedema. A total of 335 (48.9%) women reported moderate to extreme distress as a result of their lymphedema and were classified as having lymphedema-related distress. The logistic regression models showed that women with lymphedema-related distress had 50% higher odds of reporting poor physical health (p=0.01) and 73% higher odds of having poor mental health (p<0.01) when compared to women without lymphedema. In contrast, even though lymphedema-related distress was significantly associated (p=0.03) with elevated depressive symptoms in the bivariate analyses, it was not significant in the logistic regression models. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors with lymphedema-related distress had worse physical and mental health outcomes than women with lymphedema who were not distressed and women with no lymphedema. Our findings provide further evidence of the relationship between lymphedema and psychosocial outcomes in breast cancer survivors. PMID:24615880

  9. Breast Cancer–Related Lymphedema: Comparing Direct Costs of a Prospective Surveillance Model and a Traditional Model of Care

    PubMed Central

    Pfalzer, Lucinda A.; Springer, Barbara; Levy, Ellen; McGarvey, Charles L.; Danoff, Jerome V.; Gerber, Lynn H.; Soballe, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary prevention involves monitoring and screening to prevent negative sequelae from chronic diseases such as cancer. Breast cancer treatment sequelae, such as lymphedema, may occur early or late and often negatively affect function. Secondary prevention through prospective physical therapy surveillance aids in early identification and treatment of breast cancer–related lymphedema (BCRL). Early intervention may reduce the need for intensive rehabilitation and may be cost saving. This perspective article compares a prospective surveillance model with a traditional model of impairment-based care and examines direct treatment costs associated with each program. Intervention and supply costs were estimated based on the Medicare 2009 physician fee schedule for 2 groups: (1) a prospective surveillance model group (PSM group) and (2) a traditional model group (TM group). The PSM group comprised all women with breast cancer who were receiving interval prospective surveillance, assuming that one third would develop early-stage BCRL. The prospective surveillance model includes the cost of screening all women plus the cost of intervention for early-stage BCRL. The TM group comprised women referred for BCRL treatment using a traditional model of referral based on late-stage lymphedema. The traditional model cost includes the direct cost of treating patients with advanced-stage lymphedema. The cost to manage early-stage BCRL per patient per year using a prospective surveillance model is $636.19. The cost to manage late-stage BCRL per patient per year using a traditional model is $3,124.92. The prospective surveillance model is emerging as the standard of care in breast cancer treatment and is a potential cost-saving mechanism for BCRL treatment. Further analysis of indirect costs and utility is necessary to assess cost-effectiveness. A shift in the paradigm of physical therapy toward a prospective surveillance model is warranted. PMID:21921254

  10. Transnodal Lymphangiography in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Genital Lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, F. M. Martinez-Rodrigo, J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Santos, E.; Forner, I.; Lloret, M.; Perez-Enguix, D.; Garcia-Marcos, R.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To report the success of groin nodal lymphography in the diagnosis and treatment of genital lymphedema. Methods and Materials: We present one female (8 years old [patient no. 1]) and two male (69 and [patient no. 2] 31 years old [patient no. 3], respectively) patients with genital lymphedema in whom conservative treatment failed. The girl also had lymphorrhagia. Genital lymphedema was caused by radical cystectomy (patient no. 2), lymphatic hyperplasia (patient no. 1), and idiopathic lymphangitis (patient no. 3). All of them underwent ultrasound-guided bilateral groin lymph node puncture. Afterward, 4-8 ml Lipiodol Ultra-Fluide (Guerbet) were injected at a rate of 0.2 ml/s. Lipiodol progression was assessed by fluoroscopy. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis was performed immediately after and again at 24 h after the procedure to confirm the leak. The follow-up period was 15, 13, and 9 months, respectively. Technical success was considered as bilateral pelvic and abdominal filling of lymphatic vessels. Therapeutic success was considered as improvement or disappearance of genital lymphedema and/or lymphorrhagia. Results: Lipiodol leak to the scrotum was observed in patients no. 2 and 3. Lymphaticopelvic fistula and genital lymphatic hyperplasia were seen in patient no. 1. Genital lymphedema diminished within 1 week and almost disappeared in two cases (patients no. 1 and 3) or significantly improved (patient no. 2). lymphorrhagia also resolved in patient no. 1. No recurrence or worsening was detected during follow-up. Conclusion: Therapeutic lymphangiography by lymph node injection seems to be effective to treat genital lymphedema. Lymph node puncture lymphangiography is feasible and less cumbersome than pedal lymphangiography.

  11. Giant lymphedema of the penis and scrotum: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Vives, Franklin; Ocampo-Flórez, Ginna Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Lymphedema of the penis and scrotum is a rare entity characterized by enlargement of the skin and subcutaneous tissue of the genital region due to lymphatic drainage impairment. This clinical condition is more frequent in tropical countries due to a higher incidence of filariasis, which, in turn, is the main etiology. We describe the case of a 33-year-old man with large lymphedema of the scrotum and penis due to an acute and chronic inflammatory process, foreign body granuloma, and marked hyalinization. Four consecutive surgical interventions were necessary to remove the great part of the affected tissue, which enabled satisfactory results and improved the patient's quality of life. PMID:27284543

  12. Giant lymphedema of the penis and scrotum: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vives, Franklin; García-Perdomo, Herney Andrés; Ocampo-Flórez, Ginna Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Lymphedema of the penis and scrotum is a rare entity characterized by enlargement of the skin and subcutaneous tissue of the genital region due to lymphatic drainage impairment. This clinical condition is more frequent in tropical countries due to a higher incidence of filariasis, which, in turn, is the main etiology. We describe the case of a 33-year-old man with large lymphedema of the scrotum and penis due to an acute and chronic inflammatory process, foreign body granuloma, and marked hyalinization. Four consecutive surgical interventions were necessary to remove the great part of the affected tissue, which enabled satisfactory results and improved the patient's quality of life. PMID:27284543

  13. Infective endocarditis prophylaxis: moving from dental prophylaxis to global prevention?

    PubMed

    Chirouze, C; Hoen, B; Duval, X

    2012-09-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is an infectious disease which mainly affects elderly patients. Staphylococcus aureus is the main microorganism and IE, which used to be associated with a previously known heart disease, is now associated with healthcare procedures. For a long time, it was thought necessary to prevent IE with antibiotics before starting many invasive procedures. But in the last few years, there has been a change, with a drastic limitation on the situations in which antibiotic prophylaxis is required. Epidemiological studies emphasize changes in the profile of IE, which is moving from a streptococcal disease in patients with previously known heart disease to a staphylococcal healthcare-associated disease in elderly patients suffering from many comorbidities or having intracardiac devices. These changes should lead us to question the validity of our current management of antibiotic prophylaxis. There are already recommendations from the American Heart Association (AHA) for the prevention of implantable cardiovascular electronic device implantation, but apart from this particular situation, should we not extend prophylaxis to more comprehensive prevention in patients who have comorbidities? To find an answer, we need to acquire more data on the pathophysiology of IE while continuing epidemiological surveillance of the disease.

  14. Bridging the divide between pathogenesis and detection in lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Dixon, J Brandon; Weiler, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    While our understanding of the lymphatic system has improved substantially in the past few decades, the translation of this knowledge into improved healthcare solutions for patients suffering from secondary lymphedema has been severely limited. The challenge facing clinicians is two-fold. First, there is no reliable, affordable, diagnostic capable of detecting the disease before symptoms of the lymphedema develop and the efficacy of treatment options becomes limited. Second, our understanding of the disease pathogenesis, its risk factors, and the underlying physiologic mechanisms is still in its infancy. These two challenges go hand in hand as limited diagnostic options have hindered our ability to understand lymphedema progression, and the lack of known underlying mechanisms involved in the disease prohibits the development of new diagnostic targets. This review serves to discuss the recent developments in clinical and lab research settings of both lymphedema diagnostic technologies and our understanding of the mechanisms driving disease risk and progression. We will show how these two lines of research are synergistically working with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes for those suffering from this horrible disease, identifying key areas of further research that are warranted to move the field forward and provide clinical relief for this neglected patient population.

  15. Clinical and Pathological Aspects of Filarial Lymphedema and Its Management

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, transmitted by mosquitoes is the commonest cause of lymphedema in endemic countries. Among 120 million infected people in 83 countries, up to 16 million have lymphedema. Microfilariae ingested by mosquitoes grow into infective larvae. These larvae entering humans after infected mosquito bites grow in the lymphatics to adult worms that cause damage to lymphatics resulting in dilatation of lymph vessels. This earliest pathology is demonstrated in adults as well as in children, by ultrasonography, lymphoscintigraphy and histopathology studies. Once established, this damage was thought to be irreversible. This lymphatic damage predisposes to bacterial infection that causes recurrent acute attacks of dermato-lymphangio-adenitis in the affected limbs. Bacteria, mainly streptococci gain entry into the lymphatics through 'entry lesions' in skin, like interdigital fungal infections, injuries, eczema or similar causes that disrupt integrity of skin. Attacks of dermato-lymphangio-adenitis aggravates lymphatic damage causing lymphedema, which gets worse with repeated acute attacks. Elephantiasis is a late manifestation of lymphatic filariasis, which apart from limbs may involve genitalia or breasts. Lymphedema management includes use of antifilarial drugs in early stages, treatment and prevention of acute attacks through 'limb-hygiene', antibiotics and antifungals where indicated, and physical measures to reduce the swelling. In selected cases surgery is helpful. PMID:18830049

  16. Bridging the divide between pathogenesis and detection in lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Dixon, J Brandon; Weiler, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    While our understanding of the lymphatic system has improved substantially in the past few decades, the translation of this knowledge into improved healthcare solutions for patients suffering from secondary lymphedema has been severely limited. The challenge facing clinicians is two-fold. First, there is no reliable, affordable, diagnostic capable of detecting the disease before symptoms of the lymphedema develop and the efficacy of treatment options becomes limited. Second, our understanding of the disease pathogenesis, its risk factors, and the underlying physiologic mechanisms is still in its infancy. These two challenges go hand in hand as limited diagnostic options have hindered our ability to understand lymphedema progression, and the lack of known underlying mechanisms involved in the disease prohibits the development of new diagnostic targets. This review serves to discuss the recent developments in clinical and lab research settings of both lymphedema diagnostic technologies and our understanding of the mechanisms driving disease risk and progression. We will show how these two lines of research are synergistically working with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes for those suffering from this horrible disease, identifying key areas of further research that are warranted to move the field forward and provide clinical relief for this neglected patient population. PMID:25545813

  17. Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema: Implications for Family Leisure Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radina, M. Elise

    2009-01-01

    An estimated 20% of breast cancer survivors face the chronic condition of breast cancer-related lymphedema. This study explored the ways in which women with this condition experienced changes in their participation in family leisure as one indicator of family functioning. Participants (N = 27) were interviewed regarding lifestyles before and after…

  18. Antifungal Prophylaxis in Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication. PMID:27648203

  19. Antifungal Prophylaxis in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication.

  20. Antifungal Prophylaxis in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication. PMID:27648203

  1. Godoy & Godoy technique in the treatment of lymphedema for under-privileged populations

    PubMed Central

    de Godoy, José Maria Pereira; de Godoy, Maria de Fátima Guerreiro

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report new options in the treatment of lymphedema for under-privileged populations. Several articles and books have been published reporting recent advances and contributions. A new technique of manual lymph drainage, mechanisms of compression, development of active and passive exercising apparatuses and the adaptation of myolymphokinetic activities have been developed for the treatment of lymphedema. This novel approach can be adapted for the treatment of lymphedema in mass. PMID:20428336

  2. Regulatory T cell transfer ameliorates lymphedema and promotes lymphatic vessel function

    PubMed Central

    Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Proulx, Steven T.; Bachmann, Samia B.; Scholl, Jeannette; Dionyssiou, Dimitris; Demiri, Efterpi; Halin, Cornelia; Dieterich, Lothar C.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common postcancer treatment complication, but the underlying pathological processes are poorly understood and no curative treatment exists. To investigate lymphedema pathomechanisms, a top-down approach was applied, using genomic data and validating the role of a single target. RNA sequencing of lymphedematous mouse skin indicated upregulation of many T cell–related networks, and indeed depletion of CD4+ cells attenuated lymphedema. The significant upregulation of Foxp3, a transcription factor specifically expressed by regulatory T cells (Tregs), along with other Treg-related genes, implied a potential role of Tregs in lymphedema. Indeed, increased infiltration of Tregs was identified in mouse lymphedematous skin and in human lymphedema specimens. To investigate the role of Tregs during disease progression, loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies were performed. Depletion of Tregs in transgenic mice with Tregs expressing the primate diphtheria toxin receptor and green fluorescent protein (Foxp3-DTR-GFP) mice led to exacerbated edema, concomitant with increased infiltration of immune cells and a mixed TH1/TH2 cytokine profile. Conversely, expansion of Tregs using IL-2/anti–IL-2 mAb complexes significantly reduced lymphedema development. Therapeutic application of adoptively transferred Tregs upon lymphedema establishment reversed all of the major hallmarks of lymphedema, including edema, inflammation, and fibrosis, and also promoted lymphatic drainage function. Collectively, our results reveal that Treg application constitutes a potential new curative treatment modality for lymphedema. PMID:27734032

  3. Study of incidence of lymphedema in Indian patients undergoing axillary dissection for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Pramod R; Sharma, Shekhar; Ahmed, Sheikh Zahoor; Vijaykumar, D K

    2010-09-01

    Lymphedema of the upper extremity, in addition to being unsightly, can be painful, can limit the arm movements, increases the risk of infection and is psychologically distressing, serving as a constant reminder of cancer. 1. To ascertain the incidence of lymphedema in a hospital based population (in patients undergoing axillary dissection for breast cancer. 2. To determine the clinico-epidemilogical factors associated with the occurrence of lymphedema in these patients. For all patients undergoing axillary dissection, arm measurements were taken in the pre-& post-operative period from at least 3 sites; one in the arm, forearm and wrist (points fixed in reference to fixed bony landmarks). Patients included in this study were followed up for at least 12 months. Circumference difference of more than 5% was taken as mild lymphedema; more than 10% as moderate lymphedema and more than 15% as severe lymphedema. Data was analyzed using SPSS 11.0 statistical software. Of the 231 patients in this study mean age was 51.2 years, majority were housewives (71.9%) and postmenopausal (58.5%). Modified radical mastectomy (MRM), was performed on 203 (87.9%) patients. 57.2% patients had positive lymph nodes. The mean number of positive nodes was 6.52. Majority of the patients received chemo and radio therapy. Overall incidence of lymphedema was 41.1%. The definition of 5-10% increase as mild lymphedema may be a bit severe as in most patients with this increase, lymphedema is not clinically apparent. The incidence of moderate and severe lymphedema in our series is only 7.4%. The incidence of clinically significant lymphedema (moderate to severe lymphedema & symptomatic mild lymphedema) was 16.8%. Only axillary irradiation and pathological nodal status (pN3) emerged as significant risk factors for lymphedema development on multivariate analysis. Lymphedema once established is difficult to treat. Combination of axillary dissection with radiation and more nodal positivity seems to

  4. Hepatitis B reactivation and timing for prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Nazan; Karabay, Oguz

    2015-01-01

    It is known that immunotherapy and cancer chemotherapy may cause hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen carriers and inactive chronic hepatitis B patients. Guidelines recommend antiviral prophylaxis regardless of HBV DNA levels to prevent reactivation. We read from the article written by Liu et al that Lamivudine was given inadequate time for antiviral prophylaxis. PMID:25717269

  5. PROPHYLAXIS OF VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM IN ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Leme, Luiz Eugênio Garcez; Sguizzatto, Guilherme Turolla

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism and its complications in orthopedic surgery is increasingly significant. This review discusses the pathophysiology of thrombus formation in general and orthopedic surgery, its incidence, predisposing factors and complications. It also presents an updated presentation and critique of prophylaxis currently available in our environment. PMID:27047885

  6. Combined Lymphedema and Capillary Malformation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, Reid A.; Chaudry, Gulraiz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphedema and capillary malformation are independent vascular malformations that can cause overgrowth of the lower extremity. We report a series of patients who had both types of malformations affecting the same leg. The condition is unique but may be confused with other types of vascular malformation overgrowth conditions (eg, Klippel–Trenaunay and Parkes Weber). Methods: Our Vascular Anomalies Center and Lymphedema Program databases were searched for patients with both capillary malformation and lymphedema. Diagnosis of lymphedema–capillary malformation was made by history, physical examination, and imaging studies. Because lymphedema–capillary malformation has phenotypical overlap with other conditions, only patients who had imaging confirming their diagnosis were included in the analysis. Clinical and radiological features, morbidity, and treatment were recorded. Results: Eight patients (4 females and 4 males) had confirmed lymphedema–capillary malformation. Referring diagnosis was Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (n = 4), diffuse capillary malformation with overgrowth (n = 3), or lymphatic malformation (n = 1). The condition was unilateral (n = 6) or bilateral (n = 2). Morbidity included infection (n = 6), difficulty fitting clothes (n = 6), bleeding or leaking vesicles (n = 5), leg length discrepancy (n = 4), and difficulty ambulating (n = 3). All patients were managed with compression regimens. Operative management was liposuction (n = 3), treatment of phlebectatic veins (n = 3), staged skin/subcutaneous excision (n = 1), and/or epiphysiodesis (n = 1). Conclusions: Lymphedema and capillary malformation can occur together in the same extremity. Both conditions independently cause limb overgrowth primarily because of subcutaneous adipose deposition. Compression garments and suction-assisted lipectomy can improve the condition. Lymphedema–capillary malformation should not be confused with other vascular malformation overgrowth

  7. Lymphedema: A General Outline of Its Anatomical Base.

    PubMed

    Amore, M; Tapia, L; Mercado, D; Pattarone, G; Ciucci, J

    2016-01-01

    The anatomic research of the lymphatic system has been a very controversial subject throughout due to the complexity of the methods for its visualization. More than 30 years ago, together with Prof. Caplan, we began the vascular anatomy research, focusing on the lymphatic anatomy, developing and adapting different techniques of injection. On the third Normal Anatomy Chair of Buenos Aires University, we summarized the lymphatic drainage of the breast and the limbs to interpret the anatomic bases of lymphedema.

  8. [Update on special surgical approaches in the therapy for lymphedemas].

    PubMed

    Wallmichrath, J; Baumeister, R; Giunta, R E; Notohamiprodjo, M; Frick, A

    2012-12-01

    Despite recent medical progress primary and secondary lymphedemas still represent a therapeutic challenge and they often lead to a significant reduction in quality of life. Lymphedemas usually develop in the extremities, the male external genitals as well as the female breast as a consequence to the axial alignment of the lymphatic collectors. Early stages are characterized by an excess of lymph fluid increasing the volume of the affected part of the body whereas later stages represent an increasing amount of solid tissue. Thus therapeutic efforts can focus on the reduction of the surplus of liquid and/or solid components. Generally there are conservative and operative strategies. Conservative measures mainly focus on the improvement of fluid mobilization and drainage and comprise compression garments, manual lymphatic drainage, and apparative intermittent compression. Operative approaches comprise procedures for surgical tissue reduction (symptomatic/ablative approaches) and/or procedures with the intention of enhancing lymphatic transport (causal approaches). Surgical tissue reduction can be performed by open resection and/or liposuction. Traditional surgical causal techniques such as transposition of local flaps aim at leading lymph away from the congested region of the body. Modern microsurgical causal approaches contain methods of reconstruction of interrupted lymphatic pathways as well as techniques for the conduction of lymph into local veins. In this review we depict and discuss the features of the multiform spectrum of the surgical therapy of lymphedemas on the basis of literature as well as our own clinical and experimental experience.

  9. Preexposure Prophylaxis and Patient Centeredness

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, Jonathan M.; Rodriguez, Maria I.; Jackson, Skyler D.; Marcus, Julia L.

    2016-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis has transformed HIV prevention, becoming widespread in communities of gay and bisexual men in the developed world in a short time. There is a broad concern that preexposure prophylaxis will discourage condom use among gay men (i.e., “risk compensation”). This commentary argues for broadening the focus on gay men’s health beyond sexual health to address the holistic health and well-being of gay men. Gay men may benefit from being offered candid, nonjudgmental health promotion/HIV prevention messages not requiring condom use for anal sex. Lessons can be drawn from the family planning movement, which has undergone a similar shift in focus. The principle of patient centeredness supports such a shift in gay men’s health toward the goal of providing men with the knowledge to evaluate various prevention approaches according to the specifics of their life circumstances and health needs. Bringing more nuance to discussions of sexual risk and sexual pleasure could facilitate more universally healthy attitudes regarding sex among gay men, in turn enabling healthier decisions more compatible with men’s own values and preferences. PMID:27387042

  10. Microcephaly-lymphedema syndrome: report of a family with short stature as additional manifestation.

    PubMed

    Strenge, S; Froster, U G

    1998-12-28

    Patients with the rare autosomal dominant microcephaly-lymphedema syndrome have apparently normal intelligence. We report on a boy with microcephaly, lymphedema, and short stature as an additional manifestation. The family history of our patient suggests autosomal dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. However, X-linked inheritance cannot be excluded. PMID:9880217

  11. Patterns of tertiary prophylaxis in Canadian adults with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S C; Yang, M; Minuk, L; St-Louis, J; Sholzberg, M; Card, R; Iorio, A; Poon, M C

    2014-05-01

    From a young age patients with severe and moderately severe FIX deficiency (haemophilia B) can experience spontaneous or traumatic bleeding and joint destruction may result. The use of coagulation factor IX concentrate to prevent anticipated bleeding, as primary or secondary prophylaxis, has become a common and recommended practice in children. The current practice of using tertiary prophylaxis, in the presence of established joint arthropathy, in adults with haemophilia B is not well characterized. This observational study was conducted to gain a better understanding of the recent Canadian experience with tertiary prophylaxis in adults with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B. Data were collected from all eligible adult (≥ 18 years of age) males with baseline FIX:C ≤ 2% from seven Canadian Hemophilia Treatment centres over a 2-year observation period from 2009 to 2011. Thirty-four per cent of the 67 subjects with moderately severe haemophilia B were exposed to prophylaxis with the majority as continuous prophylaxis (≥45 weeks year(-1) ). The severe subgroup (FIX:C < 1%) demonstrated a 52% exposure rate. None had primary prophylaxis exposure in childhood. Eighty-one per cent used once or twice weekly infusion regimens and reported a median annual bleeding rate of five bleeds per year versus four bleeds per year for those using on-demand treatment. Annual median factor utilization for all subjects using prophylaxis was 196,283 U year(-1) compared to 46,361 U year(-1) for on demand. Approximately 50% of adults with severe haemophilia B are using continuous tertiary prophylaxis in Canada, a practice likely to increase which warrants further study.

  12. Vascularized Free Lymph Node Flap Transfer in Advanced Lymphedema Patient after Axillary Lymph Node Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Kyung Hoon; Park, Myong Chul; Lim, Seong Yoon; Jung, Yong Sik

    2016-01-01

    Lymphedema is a condition characterized by tissue swelling caused by localized fluid retention. Advanced lymphedema is characterized by irreversible skin fibrosis (stage IIIb) and nonpitting edema, with leather-like skin, skin crypts, and ulcers with or without involvement of the toes (stage IVa and IVb, respectively). Recently, surgical treatment of advanced lymphedema has been a challenging reconstructive modality. Microvascular techniques such as lymphaticovenous anastomosis and vascularized lymph node flap transfer are effective for early stage lymphedema. In this study, we performed a two-stage operation in an advanced lymphedema patient. First, a debulking procedure was performed using liposuction. A vascularized free lymph node flap transfer was then conducted 10 weeks after the first operation. In this case, good results were obtained, with reduced circumferences in various parts of the upper extremity noted immediately postoperation. PMID:27064862

  13. Assessment and measurement of head and neck lymphedema: state-of-the-science and future directions.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie; Ridner, Sheila H; Aulino, Joseph M; Murphy, Barbara A

    2015-05-01

    Currently, assessment and measurement of lymphedema in head and neck cancer patients is difficult. The aims of this report are to examine the current state of science regarding available measurement of head and neck lymphedema, to identify gaps in clinical evaluation of head and neck lymphedema, and to propose future research directions for advancing the assessment of head and neck lymphedema. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review based on PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane database, EMBASE, and PsycINFO from 1989 to 2014. Primary search terms included head and/or neck cancer, head and/or neck and/or face, lymphedema, edema, swelling, fibrosis, measurement, assessment, and evaluation. The authors also reviewed information from the Oncology Nursing Society, National Lymphedema Network, National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, and other related healthcare professional association web sites. Based on the nature/characteristics of measurement reported in the literature, methods for assessment of head and neck lymphedema can be categorized into: (1) patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures (e.g., symptom tool), (2) clinician-reported outcome (CRO) measures based on clinical grading criteria via a clinical exam (external lymphedema evaluation by physical examination and internal edema examination via endoscopy), and (3) technical capacity/measurement techniques (e.g., imaging techniques). Although a number of measures have been reported in the literature, clinically useful PRO and CRO measures, and reliable and sensitive measurement techniques need to be validated to address gaps in assessment of head and neck lymphedema, and to be easily used in early identification of lymphedema and assessment of treatment/interventional effects. PMID:25703799

  14. Prevalence and Epidemiological Factors Involved in Cellulitis in Korean Patients With Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sae In; Yang, Eun Joo; Kim, Dong Kyu; Jeong, Ho Joong; Kim, Ghi Chan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence and associated factors involved in cellulitis with lymphangitis among a group of Korean patients who were being treated for lymphedema. We present our epidemiologic research and we also report a systematic review of these types of cases. Methods This was a retrospective medical record study among 1,246 patients diagnosed with lymphedema. The study was carried out between January 2006 and December 2012 at the Kosin University Gospel Hospital and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Cases were examined for onset time, affected site, seasonal trend, and recurrence pattern of lymphedema, lymphangitis, and cellulitis. We also evaluated the history of blood-cell culture and antibiotic use. Results Ninety-nine lymphedema patients experienced complications such as cellulitis with accompanying lymphangitis. Forty-nine patients had more than two recurrences of cellulitis with lymphangitis. The incidence and recurrence of cellulitis with lymphangitis were significantly higher in the patients with lower-extremity lymphedema. There was a significant trend toward higher cellulitis prevalence in the lower-extremity lymphedema group according to the time of lymphedema onset. Among the cellulitis with lymphangitis cases, 62 cases were diagnosed through blood-cell culture; 8 of these 62 cultures were positive for β-hemolytic streptococci. Conclusion The prevalence rate of cellulitis with lymphangitis in patients with lymphedema was 7.95%, and the prevalence of recurrent episodes was 3.93%. Especially, there was high risk of cellulitis with lymphangitis after occurrence of lower-extremity lymphedema with passage of time. Lymphedema patients should be fully briefed about the associated risks of cellulitis before treatment, and physicians should be prepared to provide appropriate preventive education. PMID:27152284

  15. Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Toker, Serdar; Hak, David J.; Morgan, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are known collectively as venous thromboembolism (VTE). Venous thromboembolic events are common and potentially life-threatening complications following trauma with an incidence of 5 to 63%. DVT prophylaxis is essential in the management of trauma patients. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy for trauma patients is unknown. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been considered risk factors for VTE; however it is unclear which combination of risk factors defines a high-risk group. Modalities available for trauma patient thromboprophylaxis are classified into pharmacologic anticoagulation, mechanical prophylaxis, and inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. The available pharmacologic agents include low-dose heparin (LDH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), and factor Xa inhibitors. Mechanical prophylaxis methods include graduated compression stockings (GCSs), pneumatic compression devices (PCDs), and A-V foot pumps. IVCs are traditionally used in high risk patients in whom pharmacological prophylaxis is contraindicated. Both EAST and ACCP guidelines recommend primary use of LMWHs in trauma patients; however there are still controversies regarding the definitive VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. Large randomized prospective clinical studies would be required to provide level I evidence to define the optimal VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. PMID:22084663

  16. Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Toker, Serdar; Hak, David J; Morgan, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are known collectively as venous thromboembolism (VTE). Venous thromboembolic events are common and potentially life-threatening complications following trauma with an incidence of 5 to 63%. DVT prophylaxis is essential in the management of trauma patients. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy for trauma patients is unknown. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been considered risk factors for VTE; however it is unclear which combination of risk factors defines a high-risk group. Modalities available for trauma patient thromboprophylaxis are classified into pharmacologic anticoagulation, mechanical prophylaxis, and inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. The available pharmacologic agents include low-dose heparin (LDH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), and factor Xa inhibitors. Mechanical prophylaxis methods include graduated compression stockings (GCSs), pneumatic compression devices (PCDs), and A-V foot pumps. IVCs are traditionally used in high risk patients in whom pharmacological prophylaxis is contraindicated. Both EAST and ACCP guidelines recommend primary use of LMWHs in trauma patients; however there are still controversies regarding the definitive VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. Large randomized prospective clinical studies would be required to provide level I evidence to define the optimal VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients.

  17. EFFECTS OF COMPRESSION ON LYMPHEDEMA DURING RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER-RELATED LYMPHEDEMA: A RANDOMIZED, CROSS-OVER TRIAL.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Newton, R U; Cormie, P; Galvao, D A; Cornish, B; Reul-Hirche, H; Smith, C; Nosaka, K; Hayes, S C

    2015-06-01

    The use of compression garments during exercise is recommended for women with breast cancer-related lymphedema, but the evidence behind this clinical recommendation is unclear. The aim of this randomized, cross-over trial was to compare the acute effects of wearing versus not wearing compression during a single bout of moderate-load resistance exercise on lymphedema status and its associated symptoms in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Twenty-five women with clinically diagnosed, stable unilateral breast cancer-related lymphedema completed two resistance exercise sessions, one with compression and one without, in a randomized order separated by a minimum 6 day wash-out period. The resistance exercise session consisted of six upper-body exercises, with each exercise performed for three sets at a moderate-load (10-12 repetition maximum). Primary outcome was lymphedema, assessed using bioimpedance spectroscopy (L-Dex score). Secondary outcomes were lymphedema as assessed by arm circumferences (percent inter-limb difference and sum-of-circumferences), and symptom severity for pain, heaviness and tightness, measured using visual analogue scales. Measurements were taken pre-, immediately post- and 24 hours post-exercise. There was no difference in lymphedema status (i.e., L-Dex scores) pre- and post-exercise sessions or between the compression and non-compression condition [Mean (SD) for compression pre-, immediately post- and 24 hours post-exercise: 17.7 (21.5), 12.7 (16.2) and 14.1 (16.7), respectively; no compression: 15.3 (18.3), 15.3 (17.8), and 13.4 (16.1), respectively]. Circumference values and symptom severity were stable across time and treatment condition. An acute bout of moderate-load, upper-body resistance exercise performed in the absence of compression does not exacerbate lymphedema in women with BCRL. PMID:26714372

  18. Pharmacological prophylaxis of venous thrombo-embolism.

    PubMed

    Flute, P T

    1976-02-01

    The pathogenesis of venous thrombosis is briefly discussed as a basis for the understanding of preventive measures used in this condition. Prophylaxis in venous thrombosis is then reviewed with emphasis on pharmacological treatment, and more particularly on heparin.

  19. Individualizing prophylaxis in hemophilia: a review.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Pia; Valentino, Leonard A; Gringeri, Alessandro; Re, Wendy M; Ewenstein, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Prophylaxis is considered optimal care for patients with severe hemophilia to prevent bleeding, including hemarthroses, which may cause arthropathy with chronic pain, occupational impairment and progressive loss of mobility. Questions remain regarding the optimal delivery of prophylaxis including how to individualize prophylaxis and optimize outcomes for each patient. Designing a prophylactic regimen for severe hemophilia must account for each patient's unique disease course, bleeding pattern, presence/absence of joint damage, pharmacokinetic profile, level of physical activity and adherence to treatment. Standard weight-based prophylaxis regimens and regimens optimized by bleeding phenotype (i.e., patients are 'allowed' to bleed to dose optimization) fail to prevent complications in many patients. Pharmacokinetic-guided dosing enables precise adjustment of dosing level and frequency to maintain adequate hemostatic levels and prevent bleeding. Optimal outcomes, such as reducing or eliminating hemorrhages, preventing or minimizing joint damage, and improving quality of life, can be achieved through an individualized care approach.

  20. Lymphedema following breast cancer treatment and impact on quality of life: a review.

    PubMed

    Taghian, Nadine R; Miller, Cynthia L; Jammallo, Lauren S; O'Toole, Jean; Skolny, Melissa N

    2014-12-01

    Lymphedema resulting from breast cancer treatment is a chronic condition which can significantly compromise quality of life. We sought to review various aspects of breast-cancer related lymphedema including measurement techniques, definitions, risk factors, and specifically, impact on physical, psychological, and emotional well-being of women treated for breast cancer. For the purpose of this review, we performed a literature search using PubMed for articles on lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment published since 1997. While improvements in breast cancer therapy have contributed to a decrease in the incidence of lymphedema, the overall negative impact the condition has on patients and survivors has remained unchanged. The development of lymphedema results in physical impairments including compromised function, diminished strength, fatigue, and pain in the affected arm. Affected women may have decreased self-confidence resulting from a distorted body image. Negative emotions reported by women with lymphedema include anxiety, frustration, sadness, anger, fear, and increased self-consciousness. Lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment remains a significant quality of life issue, with known consequences related to a woman's physical, psychological, and emotional well-being.

  1. Excess Lymphangiogenesis Cooperatively Induced by Macrophages and CD4(+) T Cells Drives the Pathogenesis of Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fusa; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Matsumoto, Sahohime; Nakayama, Yukiteru; Shibata, Munehiko; Oike, Yuichi; Koshima, Isao; Watabe, Tetsuro; Nagai, Ryozo; Manabe, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    Lymphedema is a debilitating progressive condition that severely restricts quality of life and is frequently observed after cancer surgery. The mechanism underlying lymphedema development remains poorly understood, and no effective pharmacological means to prevent or alleviate the ailment is currently available. Using a mouse model of lymphedema, we show here that excessive generation of immature lymphatic vessels is essential for initial edema development and that this early process is also important for later development of lymphedema pathology. We found that CD4(+) T cells interact with macrophages to promote lymphangiogenesis, and that both lymphangiogenesis and edema were greatly reduced in macrophage-depleted mice, lymphocyte-deficient Rag2(?/?) mice or CD4(+) T-cell-deficient mice. Mechanistically, T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cells activate lesional macrophages to produce vascular endothelial growth factor-C, which promotes lymphangiogenesis, and inhibition of this mechanism suppressed not only early lymphangiogenesis, but also later development of lymphedema. Finally, we show that atorvastatin suppresses excessive lymphangiogenesis and lymphedema by inhibiting T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cell activation. These results demonstrate that the interaction between CD4(+) T cells and macrophages is a potential therapeutic target for prevention of lymphedema after surgery.

  2. Excess Lymphangiogenesis Cooperatively Induced by Macrophages and CD4(+) T Cells Drives the Pathogenesis of Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fusa; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Matsumoto, Sahohime; Nakayama, Yukiteru; Shibata, Munehiko; Oike, Yuichi; Koshima, Isao; Watabe, Tetsuro; Nagai, Ryozo; Manabe, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    Lymphedema is a debilitating progressive condition that severely restricts quality of life and is frequently observed after cancer surgery. The mechanism underlying lymphedema development remains poorly understood, and no effective pharmacological means to prevent or alleviate the ailment is currently available. Using a mouse model of lymphedema, we show here that excessive generation of immature lymphatic vessels is essential for initial edema development and that this early process is also important for later development of lymphedema pathology. We found that CD4(+) T cells interact with macrophages to promote lymphangiogenesis, and that both lymphangiogenesis and edema were greatly reduced in macrophage-depleted mice, lymphocyte-deficient Rag2(?/?) mice or CD4(+) T-cell-deficient mice. Mechanistically, T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cells activate lesional macrophages to produce vascular endothelial growth factor-C, which promotes lymphangiogenesis, and inhibition of this mechanism suppressed not only early lymphangiogenesis, but also later development of lymphedema. Finally, we show that atorvastatin suppresses excessive lymphangiogenesis and lymphedema by inhibiting T helper type 1 and T helper type 17 cell activation. These results demonstrate that the interaction between CD4(+) T cells and macrophages is a potential therapeutic target for prevention of lymphedema after surgery. PMID:27015456

  3. Physical therapy management of primary lymphedema in the lower extremities: A case report.

    PubMed

    Greene, Revenda; Fowler, Rhonda

    2010-01-01

    Lymphedema is the tissue fluid accumulation that arises as a consequence of impaired lymphatic drainage. Lymphedema can result from either congenital (primary) or acquired (secondary) anomalies. Primary lymphedema affects 1-2 million people in the United States. Women are more affected by this disorder than men. The management of lymphedema by physical therapists usually includes a combination of skin care, external pressure, isotonic exercise, and massage. This case report describes the course of treatment for a 24-year-old female with stages 2 and 3 primary lymphedema. The goals of physical therapy intervention were as follows: 1) to reduce total limb girth circumference for both lower extremities; 2) to improve skin texture; 3) to promote independence with skin care to reduce the risk of infection; and 4) to facilitate independence with self-management. Following intervention, the patient met and exceeded all goals to decrease limb circumference. She had minimal fibrosis in the lower extremities, and she exhibited no signs and/or symptoms of infection. Decongestive lymphedema therapy was effective in treating this patient with primary lymphedema of the lower extremities. Continuous maintenance is required to ensure that the patient's limb size continues to reduce. PMID:20067355

  4. Lymphedema following breast cancer treatment and impact on quality of life: a review.

    PubMed

    Taghian, Nadine R; Miller, Cynthia L; Jammallo, Lauren S; O'Toole, Jean; Skolny, Melissa N

    2014-12-01

    Lymphedema resulting from breast cancer treatment is a chronic condition which can significantly compromise quality of life. We sought to review various aspects of breast-cancer related lymphedema including measurement techniques, definitions, risk factors, and specifically, impact on physical, psychological, and emotional well-being of women treated for breast cancer. For the purpose of this review, we performed a literature search using PubMed for articles on lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment published since 1997. While improvements in breast cancer therapy have contributed to a decrease in the incidence of lymphedema, the overall negative impact the condition has on patients and survivors has remained unchanged. The development of lymphedema results in physical impairments including compromised function, diminished strength, fatigue, and pain in the affected arm. Affected women may have decreased self-confidence resulting from a distorted body image. Negative emotions reported by women with lymphedema include anxiety, frustration, sadness, anger, fear, and increased self-consciousness. Lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment remains a significant quality of life issue, with known consequences related to a woman's physical, psychological, and emotional well-being. PMID:25085806

  5. Yoga protocol for treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Narahari, SR; Aggithaya, Madhur Guruprasad; Thernoe, Liselotte; Bose, Kuthaje S; Ryan, Terence J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vaqas and Ryan (2003) advocated yoga and breathing exercises for lymphedema. Narahari et al. (2007) developed an integrative medicine protocol for lower-limb lymphedema using yoga. Studies have hypothesized that yoga plays a similar role as that of central manual lymph drainage of Foldi's technique. This study explains how we have used yoga and breathing as a self-care intervention for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods: The study outcome was to create a yoga protocol for BCRL. Selection of yoga was based on the actions of muscles on joints, anatomical areas associated with different groups of lymph nodes, stretching of skin, and method of breathing in each yoga. The protocol was piloted in eight BCRL patients, observed its difficulties by interacting with patients. A literature search was conducted in PubMed and Cochrane library to identify the yoga protocols for BCRL. Results: Twenty yoga and 5 breathing exercises were adopted. They have slow, methodical joint movements which helped patients to tolerate pain. Breathing was long and diaphragmatic. Flexion of joints was coordinated with exhalation and extension with inhalation. Alternate yoga was introduced to facilitate patients to perform complex movements. Yoga's joint movements, initial positions, and mode of breathing were compared to two other protocols. The volume reduced from 2.4 to 1.2 L in eight patients after continuous practice of yoga and compression at home for 3 months. There was improvement in the range of movement and intensity of pain. Discussion: Yoga exercises were selected on the basis of their role in chest expansion, maximizing range of movements: flexion of large muscles, maximum stretch of skin, and thus part-by-part lymph drainage from center and periphery. This protocol addressed functional, volume, and movement issues of BCRL and was found to be superior to other BCRL yoga protocols. However, this protocol needs to be tested in centers routinely managing BCRL

  6. [Statins in primary prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Kobalava, Zh D; Villeval'de, S V

    2011-01-01

    The review summarises data on statins efficacy in primary prophylaxis of cardiovascular complications. Main results of the JUPITER (Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin) trial are analysed in detail. Its role in possible changes in current recommendations on prophylaxis and treatment of atherosclerosis is shown. Statins are considered as drugs essential in the strategy of improvement of life quality.

  7. Impact of carpal tunnel syndrome surgery on women with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Gunnoo, Neetish; Ebelin, Michel; Arrault, Maria; Vignes, Stéphane

    2015-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome may occur in women with ipsilateral lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Surgery on the lymphedematous arm is classically feared. Thirty-two consecutive women (mean age at cancer treatment 49 years, interquartile range (Q1;Q3) 43;56) with upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment, followed in a single lymphology unit, and symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome (electromyographically confirmed) requiring surgery were included. Lymphedema volume was calculated using the truncated cone formula, recorded before and after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery, and at each follow-up visit. Median time to lymphedema onset after cancer treatment was 19 (interquartile range (Q1;Q3) 5;73) months. Median lymphedema volume was 497 (Q1;Q3 355;793) mL before (median 4 months) and 582 (Q1;Q3 388;930) mL after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery (median 5 months) (P = 0.004). At the last follow-up post-carpal tunnel syndrome surgery (median 33 months), lymphedema volume was 447 (Q1;Q3 260;733) mL (non-significant, compared to pre-surgery volume). Regular lymphedema treatment included elastic sleeve (n = 31), low-stretch bandage (n = 20), and/or manual lymph drainage (n = 20), with no change before and after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery. All carpal tunnel syndrome clinical manifestations disappeared after surgery and none of the patients experienced local complications. Carpal tunnel syndrome may be treated surgically in women with ipsilateral upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Although lymphedema volume increased transiently, it remained stable over long-term follow-up, with no local complications.

  8. Risk Factors Associated with Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema in the WHEL Study

    PubMed Central

    Dominick, Sally A.; Madlensky, Lisa; Natarajan, Loki; Pierce, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Lymphedema is a significant health problem faced by a large percentage of breast cancer survivors. The Women’s Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) Study has a unique data set collected after the completion of breast cancer treatment, which allowed a focused analysis of risk factors for breast cancer-related lymphedema. Methods Participant characteristics, treatment modalities, and health behaviors were examined as potential predictors of lymphedema among breast cancer survivors with univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression. Results Lymphedema status was assessed for 83% of the study cohort (2431 of the 2917 WHEL participants). Among these respondents, 692 (28.5%) women reported yes to either a physician’s diagnosis of lymphedema or a question on arm/hand swelling. When compared to other participants, women with lymphedema were diagnosed at a younger age, more likely to have a higher body mass index, had a larger tumor size, had more lymph nodes removed, more likely to have a mastectomy with radiation therapy, and more likely to have chemotherapy. In the final multivariate-adjusted model, body mass index greater than 25 kg/m2 (p<0.01), the removal of 11 or more lymph nodes (p<0.01), and breast cancer surgery plus radiation therapy (p<0.01) showed a strong independent association with developing breast cancer-related lymphedema. Conclusions The results of this study highlight the importance of educating breast cancer survivors about the modifiable risk factors (e.g., body mass index) associated with the development of lymphedema. Implications for Cancer Survivors Breast cancer survivors at risk for lymphedema may benefit from interventions aimed at achieving or maintaining a healthy body weight. PMID:23212606

  9. Making rabies prophylaxis more economical

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guihua; Liu, Huazhang; Tang, Qing; Yu, Pengcheng; Shen, Xinxin; Zhang, Yibin; Liu, Xiangyi; Cao, Qing; Fu, Chuanxi; Liu, Beiyan; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rabies is fatal in nearly 100% of cases, making post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) a required measure for preventing mortality. Currently, the rabies vaccination regimen requires at least three to five clinic visits, with vaccination and transportation costs being very high. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of the 2-1 intramuscular (IM) regimen for rabies immunization with the goal of making rabies prophylaxis more economical. Methods: One-hundred and eighty-one subjects were divided into two groups: 79 subjects in test group A and 102 subjects in control group B. 2-1 IM regimen was chosen for group A and the Essen regimen was adopted for group B. Serum samples were also collected at D0, D7, D14, D45, D180, and D360 to determine the rabies serum neutralizing antibody by rapid luorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Results: There was no significant difference between groups A and B with respect to the rate of adverse events following each vaccination. Nine-hundred and nineteen blood samples were obtained. At D0 (prior to immunization), all study subjects exhibited a geometric mean titer (GMT) <0.05 IU/ml. On D14, all study subjects exhibited NAb titers >0.5 IU/ml; titers above 0.5 IU/ml were maintained in both groups through D45 and D180 before gradually declining. The percentage of subjects positive for NAbs in group A and group B on D7 were 88.6% and 87.3%, respectively, which was not statistically different (P = 0.545). On D360, the percentage of subjects positive for NAbs in group A and group B were 93.9% and 100% (P < 0.01), respectively. During the study, the GMT was highest for both groups on D14 (21.90 IU/ml, group A; 19.93 IU/ml, group B) (P = 0.045). On D45, the GMTs were 8.28 IU/ml (group A) and 7.89 IU/ml (group B) (P = 0.037). On D7, D180, and D360, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to the GMT. Conclusions: The 2-1 IM regimen demonstrates the same safety and efficacy as the

  10. Evaluating the Burden of Lymphedema Due to Lymphatic Filariasis in 2005 in Khurda District, Odisha State, India

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Victoria; Little, Kristen; Wiegand, Ryan; Rout, Jonathan; Fox, LeAnne M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Over 1.1 billion people worldwide are at risk for lymphatic filariasis (LF), and the global burden of LF-associated lymphedema is estimated at 16 million affected people, yet country-specific estimates are poor. Methodology/Principal Findings A house-to-house morbidity census was conducted to assess the burden and severity of lymphedema in a population of 1,298,576 persons living in the LF-endemic district of Khurda in Odisha State, India. The burden of lymphedema in Khurda is widespread geographically, and 1.3% (17,036) of the total population report lymphedema. 51.3% of the patients reporting lymphedema were female, mean age 49.4 years (1–99). Early lymphedema (Dreyer stages 1 & 2) was reported in two-thirds of the patients. Poisson regression analysis was conducted in order to determine risk factors for advanced lymphedema (Dreyer stages 4–7). Increasing age was significantly associated with advanced lymphedema, and persons 70 years and older had a prevalence three times greater than individuals ages 15–29 (aPR: 3.21, 95% CI 2.45, 4.21). The number of adenolymphangitis (ADL) episodes reported in the previous year was also significantly associated with advanced lymphedema (aPR 4.65, 95% CI 2.97–7.30). This analysis is one of the first to look at potential risk factors for advanced lymphedema using morbidity census data from an entire district in Odisha State, India. Significance These data highlight the magnitude of lymphedema in LF-endemic areas and emphasize the need to develop robust estimates of numbers of individuals with lymphedema in order to identify the extent of lymphedema management services needed in these regions. PMID:27548382

  11. Unravelling adherence to prophylaxis in haemophilia: a patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Schrijvers, L H; Kars, M C; Beijlevelt-van der Zande, M; Peters, M; Schuurmans, M J; Fischer, K

    2015-09-01

    Given the lifelong therapy in haemophilia patients, insight in non-adherence behaviour from a patient perspective is important to understand patients' difficulties with the following treatment recommendations. The aim of this study was to clarify the process underlying adherence (behaviour) to prophylactic treatment, from a patients' perspective. To develop a grounded theory, a qualitative study using individual in-depth interviews was performed to understand experiences, perceptions and beliefs concerning adherence to prophylaxis. From two Dutch treatment centres, 21 adults with haemophilia using prophylaxis were interviewed. Patients were asked how they experience their task to administer prophylaxis and how they adhere to this. The interviews were transcribed, coded and analysed in an iterative process, leading to the development of the grounded theory. Adherence was determined by the position of prophylaxis in life. The position of prophylaxis was determined by the perception of prophylaxis and the ability to exert prophylaxis. Patients' perception was influenced by two main factors: acceptance of haemophilia and feeling/fearing symptoms. The ability to exert prophylaxis was influenced by understanding haemophilia and prophylaxis and planning/infusion skills. The combination of different perceptions and skills led to four main positions of prophylaxis in life: (i) prophylaxis integrated in life, (ii) prophylaxis according to doctors' advice, struggling with irregular situations, (iii) prophylaxis is too much to handle, (iv) prophylaxis is a confrontation with illness. The adherence level gradually decreased from position 1 to 4. This information can be used to design tailored interventions to promote adherence.

  12. Antimicrobial Prophylaxis for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children with febrile urinary tract infection commonly have vesicoureteral reflux. Because trial results have been limited and inconsistent, the use of antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent recurrences in children with reflux remains controversial. METHODS In this 2-year, multisite, randomized, placebo-controlled trial involving 607 children with vesicoureteral reflux that was diagnosed after a first or second febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection, we evaluated the efficacy of trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis in preventing recurrences (primary outcome). Secondary outcomes were renal scarring, treatment failure (a composite of recurrences and scarring), and antimicrobial resistance. RESULTS Recurrent urinary tract infection developed in 39 of 302 children who received prophylaxis as compared with 72 of 305 children who received placebo (relative risk, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.78). Prophylaxis reduced the risk of recurrences by 50% (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.74) and was particularly effective in children whose index infection was febrile (hazard ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.64) and in those with baseline bladder and bowel dysfunction (hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.58). The occurrence of renal scarring did not differ significantly between the prophylaxis and placebo groups (11.9% and 10.2%, respectively). Among 87 children with a first recurrence caused by Escherichia coli, the proportion of isolates that were resistant to trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole was 63% in the prophylaxis group and 19% in the placebo group. CONCLUSIONS Among children with vesicoureteral reflux after urinary tract infection, antimicrobial prophylaxis was associated with a substantially reduced risk of recurrence but not of renal scarring. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others; RIVUR ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00405704.) PMID:24795142

  13. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in caesarean section delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ronghua; Lin, Lin; Wang, Dujuan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is used routinely for pre-, intra- and post-operative caesarean section. One of the most important risk factors for postpartum infection is caesarean delivery. Caesarean section shows a higher incidence of infection than vaginal delivery. It is complicated by surgical site infections, endometritis or urinary tract infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the usage of antimicrobials in women undergoing caesarean section at a Tertiary Care Hospital. A prospective study was conducted in 100 women during the period of February 2013 to August 2013 in the inpatient Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. Data collected included the age of the patient, gravidity, and type of caesarean section, which was analyzed for the nature and number of antimicrobials prescribed, duration of treatment, polypharmacy, fixed-dose combinations, generic/brand names used and failure of prophylaxis. Antimicrobial prophylaxis was administered to the patients. The most commonly prescribed antimicrobial was a combination of ceftriaxone and sulbactam. Of 100 patients, 87% were aged 20–35 years. The highest proportion of patients were primigravida 72%. Elective procedure was carried out in 38%, the remaining were emergency C-section in whom intra- and post-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis was given for a duration of 7 days. In total, 27% of patients were reported with infection even after the antimicrobial prophylaxis. In conclusion, pre-operative prophylaxis was given in the early rupture of membranes. Fixed-dose combinations were preferred. Incidence of infection even after antimicrobial prophylaxis was reported due to pre-existing infection, debilitating disease or prolonged rupture of membranes. Patients with recurrent infection were shifted to amoxicillin and clavulinic acid combination. Drugs were prescribed only by brand names which is of concern. PMID:27446303

  14. With Lymphedema, Early Treatment is Key | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... your muscles. Ask your doctor or nurse what exercises are best for you. Manual lymph drainage. See a trained specialist (a certified lymphedema therapist) to receive a type of therapeutic massage called manual lymph drainage. Therapeutic massage works ...

  15. Treatment and prophylaxis of melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Dance, David

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis, infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei, is being recognised with increasing frequency and is probably more common than currently appreciated. Treatment recommendations are based on a series of clinical trials conducted in Thailand over the past 25 years. Treatment is usually divided into two phases: in the first, or acute phase, parenteral drugs are given for ≥10 days with the aim of preventing death from overwhelming sepsis; in the second, or eradication phase, oral drugs are given, usually to complete a total of 20 weeks, with the aim of preventing relapse. Specific treatment for individual patients needs to be tailored according to clinical manifestations and response, and there remain many unanswered questions. Some patients with very mild infections can probably be cured by oral agents alone. Ceftazidime is the mainstay of acute-phase treatment, with carbapenems reserved for severe infections or treatment failures and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (co-amoxiclav) as second-line therapy. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) is preferred for the eradication phase, with the alternative of co-amoxiclav. In addition, the best available supportive care is needed, along with drainage of abscesses whenever possible. Treatment for melioidosis is unaffordable for many in endemic areas of the developing world, but the relative costs have reduced over the past decade. Unfortunately there is no likelihood of any new or cheaper options becoming available in the immediate future. Recommendations for prophylaxis following exposure to B. pseudomallei have been made, but the evidence suggests that they would probably only delay rather than prevent the development of infection. PMID:24613038

  16. A systematic review of care delivery models and economic analyses in lymphedema: health policy impact (2004-2011).

    PubMed

    Stout, N L; Weiss, R; Feldman, J L; Stewart, B R; Armer, J M; Cormier, J N; Shih, Y-C T

    2013-03-01

    A project of the American Lymphedema Framework Project (ALFP), this review seeks to examine the policy and economic impact of caring for patients with lymphedema, a common side effect of cancer treatment. This review is the first of its kind undertaken to investigate, coordinate, and streamline lymphedema policy initiatives in the United States with potential applicability worldwide. As part of a large scale literature review aiming to systematically evaluate the level of evidence of contemporary peer-reviewed lymphedema literature (2004 to 2011), publications on care delivery models, health policy, and economic impact were retrieved, summarized, and evaluated by a team of investigators and clinical experts. The review substantiates lymphedema education models and clinical models implemented at the community, health care provider, and individual level that improve delivery of care. The review exposes the lack of economic analysis related to lymphedema. Despite a dearth of evidence, efforts towards policy initiatives at the federal and state level are underway. These initiatives and the evidence to support them are examined and recommendations for translating these findings into clinical practice are made. Medical and community-based disease management interventions, taking on a public approach, are effective delivery models for lymphedema care and demonstrate great potential to improve cancer survivorship care. Efforts to create policy at the federal, state, and local level should target implementation of these models. More research is needed to identify costs associated with the treatment of lymphedema and to model the cost outlays and potential cost savings associated with comprehensive management of chronic lymphedema.

  17. "You're naked, you're vulnerable": Sexual well-being and body image of women with lower limb lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Winch, Caleb J; Sherman, Kerry A; Smith, Katriona M; Koelmeyer, Louise A; Mackie, Helen; Boyages, John

    2016-09-01

    Lower-limb lymphedema is an incurable illness manifesting as visible swelling enlarging the leg(s) and/or feet, buttocks, and genitals. This study used semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis to explore sexual well-being among women with primary (congenital) lymphedema (n=11) or secondary lymphedema associated with gynecological cancer (n=8). Five themes (subthemes) summarized women's responses, with Attractiveness and Confidence (Publicly Unattractive, Privately Unconfident, Lymphedema or Aging?) describing women's central concern. These body image-related concerns accounted for sexual well-being in association with Partner Support (Availability of Support, Languages of Support, Fears About Support) and the degree of Functional Interruptions (Lymphedema in Context, Enduring Impacts, Overcoming Interruptions). Successful Lymphedema Coping (Control, Acceptance) and self-perceived ability to fulfill a valued Sexual Role also affected sexual well-being. Few differences between women with primary versus secondary lymphedema were evident. Lymphedema clinicians should screen for sexual concerns and have referral options available.

  18. Self-Care for Management of Secondary Lymphedema: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Patricia; Gordon, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphedema is a debilitating and disfiguring sequela of an overwhelmed lymphatic system. The most common causes of secondary lymphedema are lymphatic filariasis (LF), a vector-borne, parasitic disease endemic in 73 tropical countries, and treatment for cancer in developed countries. Lymphedema is incurable and requires life-long care so identification of effective lymphedema management is imperative to improve quality of life, reduce the burden on family resources and benefit the local community. This review was conducted to evaluate the evidence for effective lymphedema self-care strategies that might be applicable to management of all types of secondary lymphedema. Methodology/Principal Findings Searches were conducted in Medline, CINAHL and Scopus databases in March 2015. Included studies reported before and after measures of lymphedema status or frequency of acute infections. The methodological quality was assessed using the appropriate Critical Appraisal Skills Program checklist. Descriptive synthesis and meta-analysis were used to evaluate effectiveness of the outcomes reported. Twenty-eight papers were included; two RCTs were found to have strong methodology, and overall 57% of studies were rated as methodologically weak. Evidence from filariasis-related lymphedema (FR-LE) studies indicated that hygiene-centred self-care reduced the frequency and duration of acute episodes by 54%, and in cancer-related lymphedema (CR-LE) home-based exercise including deep breathing delivered significant volume reductions over standard self-care alone. Intensity of training in self-care practices and frequency of monitoring improved outcomes. Cultural and economic factors and access to health care services influenced the type of intervention delivered and how outcomes were measured. Conclusions/Significance There is evidence to support the adoption of remedial exercises in the management of FR-LE and for a greater emphasis on self-treatment practices for people

  19. Levetiracetam for Pediatric Posttraumatic Seizure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nita, Dragos A; Hahn, Cecil D

    2016-03-01

    Investigators from Nationwide Children's Hospital performed an observational cohort study of early post-traumatic seizures (EPTS) among 34 children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who received levetiracetam (LEV) prophylaxis following admission to their pediatric intensive care unit. PMID:27396956

  20. Prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin-tao; Ma, Bao-tong

    2006-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which is manifested as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), represents a significant cause of death, disability, and discomfort. They are frequent complications of various surgical procedures. The aging population and the survival of more severely injured patients may suggest an increasing risk of thromboembolism in the trauma patients. Expanded understanding of the population at risk challenges physicians to carefully examine risk factors for VTE to identify high-risk patients who can benefit from prophylaxis. An accurate knowledge of evidence-based risk factors is important in predicting and preventing postoperative DVT, and can be incorporated into a decision support system for appropriate thromboprophylaxis use. Standard use of DVT prophylaxis in a high-risk trauma population leads to a low incidence of DVT. The incidence of VTE is common in Asia. The evaluation includes laboratory tests, Doppler test and phlebography. Screening Doppler sonography should be performed for surveillance on all critically injured patients to identify DVT. D-Dimer is a useful marker to monitor prophylaxis in trauma surgery patients. The optimal time to start prophylaxis is between 2 hours before and 10 hours after surgery, but the risk of PE continues for several weeks. Thromboprophylaxis includes graduated compression stockings and anticoagulants for prophylaxis. Anticoagulants include Warfarin, which belongs to Vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparins, factor Xa indirect inhibitor Fondaparinux, and the oral IIa inhibitor Melagatran and ximelagatran. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin is a new and highly effective antithrombotic agent. Prophylactic placement of vena caval filters in selected trauma patients may decrease the incidence of PE. The indications for prophylactic inferior vena cava filter insertion include prolonged immobilization with multiple injuries, closed head injury, pelvic

  1. Unilateral upper extremity lymphedema deteriorates the postural stability in breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Karadibak, Didem; Yavuzşen, Tuğba; Demirbüken, İlkşan

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study There is little known about any change in postural balance caused by asymmetrical volume increase due to unilateral upper extremity lymphedema in patients who underwent breast surgery. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a change in postural balance by measuring postural sway velocity (PSV), center of gravity (CoG) displacement and directional control (DCL) in patients with unilateral upper extremity lymphedema in breast cancer survivors. Material and methods Eighteen females 38–60 (M = 53) years old diagnosed with upper extremity lymphedema due to breast cancer surgery, and 18 healthy females with similar ages (M = 52.5) were assessed using the Balance Master system (Neuro Com, Clackamas, USA). Unilateral stance (US) and bilateral stance (BS) tests in eyes open and closed conditions and the limit of stability (LOS) test were applied to quantify postural sway velocity (PSV), CoG displacement, and directional control (DCL). Results The lymphedema group showed a significant increase in PSV in the US test on the ipsilateral leg with eyes open (p = 0.02) and eyes closed (p = 0.005) as well as on the contralateral leg with eyes open (p = 0.004) and eyes closed (p = 0.0001). Average displacement and position of the CoG were 25% of LOS (p = 0.0001) towards the lymphedema side and 60.6 degrees respectively. DCL in the lymphedema group was significantly lower in forward (p = 0.0001), back (p = 0.003), ipsilateral (p = 0.002), and contralateral (p = 0.03) directions. Conclusions These findings suggest that unilateral upper extremity lymphedema may have challenging effects on postural balance. PMID:25258587

  2. Upper extremity impairments in women with or without lymphedema following breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Josephine; Cooper, Bruce; Wanek, Linda; Topp, Kimberly; Byl, Nancy; Dodd, Marylin

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast-cancer-related lymphedema affects ∼25% of breast cancer (BC) survivors and may impact use of the upper limb during activity. The purpose of this study is to compare upper extremity (UE) impairment and activity between women with and without lymphedema after BC treatment. Methods 144 women post BC treatment completed demographic, symptom, and Disability of Arm-Shoulder-Hand (DASH) questionnaires. Objective measures included Purdue pegboard, finger-tapper, Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, vibration perception threshold, strength, range of motion (ROM), and volume. Results Women with lymphedema had more lymph nodes removed (p < .001), more UE symptoms (p < .001), higher BMI (p = .041), and higher DASH scores (greater limitation) (p < .001). For all participants there was less strength (elbow flexion, wrist flexion, grip), less shoulder ROM, and decreased sensation at the medial upper arm (p < .05) in the affected UE. These differences were greater in women with lymphedema, particularly in shoulder abduction ROM (p < .05). Women with lymphedema had bilaterally less elbow flexion strength and shoulder ROM (p < .05). Past diagnosis of lymphedema, grip strength, shoulder abduction ROM, and number of comorbidities contributed to the variance in DASH scores (R2 of 0.463, p < .001). Implications for cancer survivors UE impairments are found in women following treatment for BC. Women with lymphedema have greater UE impairment and limitation in activities than women without. Many of these impairments are amenable to prevention measures or treatment, so early detection by health care providers is essential. PMID:20373044

  3. Adjunctive Azithromycin Prophylaxis for Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tita, Alan T N; Szychowski, Jeff M; Boggess, Kim; Saade, George; Longo, Sherri; Clark, Erin; Esplin, Sean; Cleary, Kirsten; Wapner, Ron; Letson, Kellett; Owens, Michelle; Abramovici, Adi; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Cutter, Gary; Andrews, William

    2016-09-29

    Background The addition of azithromycin to standard regimens for antibiotic prophylaxis before cesarean delivery may further reduce the rate of postoperative infection. We evaluated the benefits and safety of azithromycin-based extended-spectrum prophylaxis in women undergoing nonelective cesarean section. Methods In this trial conducted at 14 centers in the United States, we studied 2013 women who had a singleton pregnancy with a gestation of 24 weeks or more and who were undergoing cesarean delivery during labor or after membrane rupture. We randomly assigned 1019 to receive 500 mg of intravenous azithromycin and 994 to receive placebo. All the women were also scheduled to receive standard antibiotic prophylaxis. The primary outcome was a composite of endometritis, wound infection, or other infection occurring within 6 weeks. Results The primary outcome occurred in 62 women (6.1%) who received azithromycin and in 119 (12.0%) who received placebo (relative risk, 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.68; P<0.001). There were significant differences between the azithromycin group and the placebo group in rates of endometritis (3.8% vs. 6.1%, P=0.02), wound infection (2.4% vs. 6.6%, P<0.001), and serious maternal adverse events (1.5% vs. 2.9%, P=0.03). There was no significant between-group difference in a secondary neonatal composite outcome that included neonatal death and serious neonatal complications (14.3% vs. 13.6%, P=0.63). Conclusions Among women undergoing nonelective cesarean delivery who were all receiving standard antibiotic prophylaxis, extended-spectrum prophylaxis with adjunctive azithromycin was more effective than placebo in reducing the risk of postoperative infection. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; C/SOAP ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01235546 .). PMID:27682034

  4. Dental procedures in children with severe congenital heart disease: a theoretical analysis of prophylaxis and non-prophylaxis procedures

    PubMed Central

    Al-Karaawi, Z; Lucas, V; Gelbier, M; Roberts, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To estimate the cumulative exposure to bacteraemia from dental procedures currently recommended for antibiotic prophylaxis and compare this with cumulative exposure from dental procedures not recommended for prophylaxis.
DESIGN—Retrospective analysis.
SETTING—University and teaching hospital maxillofacial and dental department.
PATIENTS—136 children with severe congenital cardiac disease attending for dental treatment between 1993 and 1998 and for whom full records were available. Each dental procedure was tallied.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Cumulative exposure per annum to "non-prophylaxis procedures"; cumulative exposure per annum to "prophylaxis procedures".
RESULTS—Cumulative exposure to bacteraemia from prophylaxis procedures was not significantly greater than from non-prophylaxis procedures.
CONCLUSIONS—The data raise important questions about the appropriateness of current guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis of bacterial endocarditis.


Keywords: congenital heart disease; dental treatment; cumulative risk; endocarditis PMID:11119466

  5. Unilateral lower limb lymphedema resulting from a heart surgery performed 50 years prior

    PubMed Central

    Onoda, Satoshi; Miura, Yuki; Sugiyama, Narushi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lymphedema is classified into two main types: secondary lymphedema accompanied by lymph node excision surgery or radiotherapy; and idiopathic lymphedema. Here we experienced a very rare case of lymphatic edema resulting from cardiac surgery that the patient underwent 50 years previously. Presentation of case A 62-year-old woman experienced progressive unilateral lower leg lymphedema for recent years. After undergoing cardiac surgery at another hospital at the age of 12 years, she gradually developed left lower leg edema. The cause of the edema was unclear and it remained untreated. Her edema symptoms gradually worsened in recent years, so she consulted the plastic surgery division of our hospital. Discusssion Perhaps the lymphatic structures of affected individuals differ prior to disease onset. If the mechanism of lymphatic edema outbreak is elucidated, patients needing conservative and surgical therapy might be more easily identified. Knowing the outbreak mechanism of lymphatic edema would definitely ease the investigation of an unconventional case like this one. Conservative treatments for lymphedema, such as self-massage and compression therapy using garments, were immediately started. With these treatments, the leg volume and edema symptoms reduced. Conclusion The research on the cause of this case may be important step for elucidating the source of secondary lymphatic edema. PMID:26719996

  6. WATER EXERCISE COMPARED TO LAND EXERCISE OR STANDARD CARE IN FEMALE CANCER SURVIVORS WITH SECONDARY LYMPHEDEMA.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, H; Enblom, A; Dunberger, G; Nyberg, T; Bergmark, K

    2015-06-01

    There are few studies showing that physical exercise can improve secondary lymphedema. We hypothesized that water exercise would be more effective than land exercise in reducing limb volume. Secondary objectives were joint movement, BMI, daily function, well-being, and body image. Limb volume was measured with circumference or was volumetric. Well-being and body image were measured with a study-specific questionnaire and daily function with DASH and HOOS questionnaires. Eighty-eight eligible patients with secondary lymphedema after breast or gynecological cancer participated in this controlled clinical intervention study. There was a higher proportion of women who participated in water exercises who reduced their secondary arm limb volume (p = 0.029), and there were also significant differences for BMI (p = 0.047) and self-reported frequency of swelling (p = 0.031) in the water exercise group after intervention. Women with arm lymphedema in the land exercise group improved DASH scores (p = 0.047) and outer rotation in the shoulder (p = 0.001). Our results suggest that to reduce objective and self-reported swelling, lymphedema patients may be offered water exercise training while to improve daily shoulder function, land exercises are preferred. To guide female cancer survivors with lymphedema to effective exercise resulting in reduced limb volume and improved function, adequate evidenced-based programs are needed. PMID:26714371

  7. Being prepared: bioterrorism and mass prophylaxis: part II.

    PubMed

    Weant, Kyle A; Bailey, Abby M; Fleishaker, Elise L; Justice, Stephanie B

    2014-01-01

    Although several biological agents have been recognized as presenting a significant threat to public health if used in a bioterrorist attack, those that are of greatest importance are known as the Category A agents: Bacillus anthracis (anthrax); variola major (smallpox); Yersinia pestis (plague); Francisella tularensis (tularemia); ribonucleic acid viruses (hemorrhagic fevers); and Clostridium botulinum (botulism toxin). In the previous issue, Part I of this review focused on the clinical presentation and treatment of anthrax, plague, and tularemia. In this second part of this 2-part review of these agents, the focus is on the clinical presentation and treatment of smallpox, viral hemorrhagic fevers, and botulism toxin. The utilization of mass prophylaxis to limit the morbidity and mortality associated with all these agents is also discussed along with the role emergency care personnel play in its implementation.

  8. Being prepared: bioterrorism and mass prophylaxis: part I.

    PubMed

    Weant, Kyle A; Bailey, Abby M; Fleishaker, Elise L; Justice, Stephanie B

    2014-01-01

    Bioterrorism presents a real and omnipresent risk to public health throughout the world. More than 30 biological agents have been identified as possessing the potential to be deployed in a bioterrorist attack. Those that have been determined to be of the greatest concern and possess the greatest potential of use in this arena are known as the Category A agents: Bacillus anthracis (anthrax); Variola major (smallpox); Yersinia pestis (plague); Francisella tularensis (tularemia); viral hemorrhagic fevers; and Clostridium botulinum toxin (botulism toxin). Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention utilizes surveillance systems to identify illnesses, the weight of diagnosing, effectively treating, and notifying the appropriate public health officials lies squarely on the shoulders of emergency care personnel. Part I of this two-part review will focus on the clinical presentation and treatment of anthrax, plague, and tularemia. The subsequent Part II of this review will discuss smallpox, viral hemorrhagic fevers, botulism toxin, and the provision of mass prophylaxis.

  9. Prophylaxis of human hydrophobia in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang Ree

    2014-09-01

    Domestic human hydrophobia has not been reported since the one case of 2004 in South Korea, but still a few animal rabies occur persistently since the reemerging stage of rabies from 1993. The government has made efforts to control animal rabies in many aspects, but whether prophylactic strategy for human hydrophobia is performed adequately is in question. The rate of proper post-exposure prophylaxis for animal bite case in 'high-risk region' of rabies is very low with 20% between 2011 and 2013. The National Animal Bite Patient Surveillance targeting 'high-risk region' is missing out animal bite cases who visit directly to hospitals in 'suspect-risk region' of rabies. Little data seems to exist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of domestic hydrophobia. Danger of reoccurrence of human hydrophobia always remain in South Korea. The medical personnel needs to have greater interest on the matter and the government strengthen the management system.

  10. Historical Review: Problematic Malaria Prophylaxis with Quinine.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis

    2016-08-01

    Quinine, a bitter-tasting, short-acting alkaloid drug extracted from cinchona bark, was the first drug used widely for malaria chemoprophylaxis from the 19th century. Compliance was difficult to enforce even in organized groups such as the military, and its prophylaxis potential was often questioned. Severe adverse events such as blackwater fever occurred rarely, but its relationship to quinine remains uncertain. Quinine prophylaxis was often counterproductive from a public health viewpoint as it left large numbers of persons with suppressed infections producing gametocytes infective for mosquitoes. Quinine was supplied by the first global pharmaceutical cartel which discouraged competition resulting in a near monopoly of cinchona plantations on the island of Java which were closed to Allied use when the Japanese Imperial Army captured Indonesia in 1942. The problems with quinine as a chemoprophylactic drug illustrate the difficulties with medications used for prevention and the acute need for improved compounds.

  11. Primary prophylaxis of VTE in cancer outpatients.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Davide; Benedetti, Raffaella

    2016-04-01

    Cancer patients have a significantly higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared to non-cancer patients and several studies suggest that VTE risk among ambulatory cancer patients varies widely. Recently, predictive models capable of risk-stratifying a broad range of ambulatory cancer outpatients have been developed and validated; using the Khorana model a score of 2 is associated with an intermediate-high risk for VTE. However, the use of VTE prophylaxis in ambulatory patients who have cancer remains controversial. Even if important randomized clinical trials showed decreased rates of VTE events among patients who were receiving chemotherapy, the effect of prophylaxis on morbidity, mortality, and costs has not been rigorously studied. Outpatients with active cancer should be assessed for thrombosis risk and although most do not routinely require thromboprophylaxis, it should be considered for high risk patients.

  12. [Vaccinations and malaria prophylaxis for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Alberer, Martin; Löscher, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The prevention of infectious diseases by vaccination and by counselling about malaria prophylaxis is a central aspect of travel medicine. Besides mandatory vaccinations required for entry to certain countries various vaccinations may be indicated depending on destination and type of travel as well as on individual risks of the traveler. In addition, pre-travel counselling should always include a check-up of standard vaccinations. Protection against mosquito bites is the basis of malaria prophylaxis. The addition of chemoprophylaxis is warranted in high risk areas. When regular chemoprophylaxis is not applied it is recommended to carry an appropriate antimalarial drug which can be used for emergency stand-by treatment in case of unexplained fever and when medical attention is not available within 24 hours. Travelers should realize that self-treatment is a first-aid measure and that they should still seek medical advice as soon as possible.

  13. Scale-independent stiffness measurement of upper limbs with lymphedema by a circular compression.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kataoka, Tsuyoshi; Kaneko, Makoto; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Lymphedema caused by the dissection of lymphatic node for treating a breast cancer produces serious swelling on the limbs and reduces the quality of life of the patient. For quantitative assessing the disease, this study newly proposed the stiffness measurement method of upper limb with lymphedema. A measurement system, where a roll-up belt was installed to circularly compress the limb by pulling the belt was developed. Both the belt tension and displacement were measured during the compresson of limb. Scale-independent stiffness index was newly derived from the bulk modulus and applied the measured force and displacement. The stiffness index of upper limb with lymphedema was measured. The index of affected limb was larger than that of healthy limb in a patient.

  14. New compression mechanism in penile-scrotal lymphedema and sexual rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, Jose Maria Pereira; Facio, Fernando Nestor; de Carvalho, Eleni Cássia Matias; Godoy, Maria de Fatima Guerreiro

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe a new compression mechanism in the treatment of lymphedema of the penis and scrotum and the ensuing sexual rehabilitation. The patient, a 58-year-old man, had edema of the penile and scrotal region as a result of surgery of the pancreas and spleen and chemotherapy. The patient complained of pain, discomfort, and difficulties to walk and urinate. A clinical diagnosis of lymphedema of the penis and scrotum was reached. Treatment involved the continuous use of a cotton-polyester compression garment for the region together with thorough hygiene skin care. The swelling reduced significantly within a week to almost a normal aspect which was accompanied by clinical improvements of the symptoms. The reduction in penile edema allowed sexual rehabilitation even though erectile dysfunction required the use of a specific medication (sildenafil). In conclusion, simple and low-cost options can improve lymphedema of the penis and scrotum and allow sexual rehabilitation. PMID:24669133

  15. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in minor and major surgery.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, M; Righi, E; Astilean, A; Corcione, S; Petrolo, A; Farina, E C; De Rosa, F G

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a frequent cause of morbidity following surgical procedures. Gram-positive cocci, particularly staphylococci, cause many of these infections, although Gram-negative organisms are also frequently involved. The risk of developing a SSI is associated with a number of factors, including aspects of the operative procedure itself, such as wound classification, and patient-related variables, such as preexisting medical conditions. Antimicrobial prophylaxis (AP) plays an important role in reducing SSIs, especially if patient-related risk factors for SSIs are present. The main components of antimicrobial prophylaxis are: timing, selection of drugs and patients, duration and costs. Compliance with these generally accepted preventive principles may lead to overall decreases in the incidence of these infections. Ideally the administration of the prophylactic agent should start within 30 minutes from the surgical incision. The duration of the AP should not exceed 24 hours for the majority of surgical procedures. The shortest effective period of prophylactic antimicrobial administration is not known and studies have demonstrated that post-surgical antibiotic administration is unnecessary. Furthermore, there were no proven benefits in multiple dose regimens when compared to single-dose regimens. The choice of an appropriate prophylactic antimicrobial agent should be based primarily on efficacy and safety. Broad spectrum antibiotics should be avoided due to the risk of promoting bacterial resistance. Cephalosporins are the most commonly used antibiotics in surgical prophylaxis; specifically, cefazolin or cefuroxime are mainly used in the prophylaxis regimens for cardio-thoracic surgery, vascular surgery, hip or knee arthroplasty surgery, neurosurgical procedures and gynecologic and obstetric procedures. A review of the prophylactic regimens regarding the main surgical procedures is presented.

  16. Prophylaxis of endemic goitre in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Stacpoole, Herbert H.

    1953-01-01

    The results of a survey carried out in eight States of Mexico are discussed by the author. The administrative, budgetary, and psychological difficulties encountered when attempting goitre prophylaxis by means of iodized salt are outlined. The author examines the efficacy of iodized sweets given to 50,000 schoolchildren in the Federal District and in the State of Morelos. Recent experiments in Mexico with iodated salt confirm previous statements concerning its stability. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:13094516

  17. Antibiotic prophylaxis is unnecessary in clean surgery.

    PubMed

    Hasan, G Z; Saleh, F M; Hossain, M Z; Amin, M R; Siddiqui, T H; Islam, M D; Chakraborty, S

    2013-04-01

    A significant number of paediatric surgical patients undergone clean surgical procedures. Most of the paediatric surgeon use perioperative prophylactic antibiotic in this clean procedure because of undue fear of infection in their mind. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether the use of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics have an effect to prevent post operative wound infection in clean operation in paediatric surgical patients. This study was conducted in the paediatric surgery department of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University and some private clinics of Dhaka city from January 2009 to December 2009. Two hundred patients who were undergone clean elective surgical procedure on day case basis were included in this study. They were divided into two equal groups (Group A and Group B). The patients of Group A were given intransverse Cephradine 30 minutes before incision and then oral Cephradine was advised postoperatively for 7 days. The patients of Group B were not given any perioperative antibiotic. All the patients of both groups were advised to come on 3rd, 6th and 10th postoperative day for examination of wound. In Group A (With chemo prophylaxis), five patients (5%) developed postoperative wound infection and in Group B (without chemo prophylaxis), three patients (3%) developed postoperative wound infection. Thus the rate of postoperative wound infection is slightly more in patients with chemo prophylaxis but it was not statistically significant by chi-square test. Based on the result of this study, it may be concluded that the antibiotic prophylaxis is not necessary in clean surgery in paediatric age group.

  18. Antibiotic prophylaxis in urologic prosthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gomelsky, Alex; Dmochowski, Roger R

    2003-01-01

    The implantation of prosthetic devices is an ever-increasing practice in urologic surgery. The most common devices are penile prostheses, artificial urinary sphincters, synthetic pubovaginal slings, and bone anchors used for pelvic floor reconstruction and incontinence surgery. While their efficacy has been supported over time, infection and rejection are severe complications. Explantation of the entire prosthetic device has been the standard treatment of such complications, often necessitating long-term antibiotics and prolonged recovery before future reimplantation. The dense inflammatory response associated with prosthetic surgery may obliterate tissue planes and further complicate reoperative efforts. These factors support the need for effective antibiotic prophylaxis, with the goal of preventing bacterial seeding of the prosthesis during implantation. Antibiotic regimens should be effective against biofilm-forming bacteria, especially S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa, and vancomycin should be a mainstay. Prevention of intraoperative infection by treating existing skin and urinary tract reservoirs and employing strict sterile technique cannot be overemphasized. While data is scant, it appears that routine prophylaxis prior to dental procedures, in patients with urologic prostheses, is unwarranted; however, if the patient is immunocompromised or has severe comorbidities, prophylaxis should be employed.

  19. Phototherapeutic treatment of lymphedema and other complications after mastectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Kalinin, Konstantin L.; Borisov, Andrei A.; Velsher, Leonid Z.; Stakhanov, Mikhail L.; Eskin, Vadim G.; Savin, Alexei A.; Shihkerimov, Raphiz K.

    2000-05-01

    One of the possible consequences of mastectomy is lymphedema of soft tissues of upper extremities on the side of ablated breast as result of cutting and trauma of multiple nerves, lymphatic and blood vessels. This phenomenon is often accompanied by deterioration of blood and lymphatic microcirculation, increasing of stagnation and aggregation ability of thrombocities, limitation of humeral and ulnar joint activity, severe pain and decreasing of myotonus. The developing of new phototherapeutic method based on using of light-emitting diodes (LED) arrays is attempted. This method is just directed on improvement of patient's condition in combination with other traditional methods such as drug therapy, pressure bandaging etc. The main parameters of LED arrays fixed inside cylindrical tube covering pathology region are: wavelength -- 660 nm, intensity range -- 0.5 mW/sm2. To control and study efficiency of phototreatment ultrasonic dopplerography, thermography, electromyography and viscosimetry have been used. During clinical trials in oncology department of Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry 128 patients have been treated with following results: patients felt complete disappearance of pain and weightiness sensation in arm, restoration of skin sensitivity and muscle strength. There were statistically proved amelioration of excitation spreading velocity on radial nerve, decreasing of blood viscosity, increasing of blood velocity in main arteries of shoulder and symmetry of temperature distribution.

  20. Review of the evidence of lymphedema treatment effect.

    PubMed

    Finnane, Anna; Janda, Monika; Hayes, Sandra C

    2015-06-01

    Lymphedema treatment aims to alleviate symptoms, prevent progression, and reduce risk for skin infection. Mainstream treatment options have been investigated in more than 160 studies. Findings from these studies have been included in at least 1 of more than 20 literature reviews. A critique of these reviews was undertaken to summarize efficacy findings. The quality of the reviews was evaluated, and gaps in the research were identified to better guide clinical practice. Overall, there was wide variation in review methods. The quality of studies included in reviews, in study design and reporting overall, has been poor. Reviews consistently concluded that complex physical therapy is effective at reducing limb volume. Volume reductions were also reported after the use of compression garments, pumps, and manual lymphatic drainage. However, greatest improvements were reported when these treatments formed a combined treatment program. Large, well-designed, evaluated, and reported randomised, controlled trials are needed to evaluate and compare treatments. Consistent outcome measures will allow better quality reviews and meta-analysis in the future. PMID:25741621

  1. Microcephaly/lymphedema and terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Fryns, J.P.

    1995-07-03

    Recently, we examined a 2-year-old boy with the association of microcephaly and significant pedal edema that extended to the distal parts of the legs. Prometaphase chromosome studies showed a small terminal deletion in the long arm of chromosome 13 of band 13q34, karyotype 46,XY,del(13)(q34{yields}qter). The present finding of a small terminal 13q34 deletion in this young boy with microcephaly/lymphedema is a first indication that the lymphedema/microcephaly association can be due to a small terminal 13q deletion. 2 refs.

  2. Limb Differences in the Therapeutic Effects of Complex Decongestive Therapy on Edema, Quality of Life, and Satisfaction in Lymphedema Patients

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Sujin; Yoon, Tae Hee; Chang, Hyun Ju; Chu, In Ho; Kim, Jung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changing patterns of edema, quality of life (QOL), and patient-satisfaction after complex decongestive therapy (CDT) in three trajectories: arm lymphedema (AL), secondary leg lymphedema (LL) and primary leg lymphedema (PL). Methods Candidates for AL (n=35), LL (n=35) and PL (n=14) were identified from prospective databases. The patients were treated with CDT for 2 weeks, and lymphedema volume was measured before and immediately following the therapy. Patients then self-administered home therapy for 3 months and presented for a follow-up visit. The Korean version of Short Form-36 (SF-36) was used to assess QOL, and we administered a study-specific satisfaction survey. Results There was no significant difference in the volume reductions between the 3 groups. There were no significant differences in all of the measures between PL and LL. Overall initial QOL was significantly lower in patients with LL than in patients with AL. SF-36 scores post-CDT did not differ significantly between AL and LL. Clinically significant differences were noted between AL and LL in the mean values of the satisfaction survey. Conclusion AL, LL, and PL may have different longitudinal courses. We suggest that lower extremity lymphedema patients present more favorable outcomes after CDT with respect to QOL and satisfaction than upper extremity lymphedema patients. Clinicians should approach patients with different therapeutic considerations specific to each type or region of lymphedema before using CDT in clinical practice. PMID:26161340

  3. Association between Interruptions in Chemical Prophylaxis and VTE Formation.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Gu, Zirui; Limkemann, Ashley J; Chandrasekhar, Shillika; Rensing, Edna; Mays, Cathy; Duane, Therese M

    2015-07-01

    Venous thromboembolisms (VTE) are considered preventable events with appropriate mechanical or chemical prophylaxis. However, chemical prophylaxis is frequently delayed or interrupted during hospitalization. We investigated the impact of delayed initiation and interruption of chemical prophylaxis on VTE rates. The incidence of VTE at an urban academic medical center was measured in patients hospitalized for >2 days between November 2013 and May 2014. Patients receiving prophylaxis were grouped as complete (started within 24 hours of admission and no interruptions), delayed (started >24 hours and no interruptions), and interrupted (interruption for >24 hours with or without delay). There were 9961 hospital admissions and 33 VTE (3.3 per 1000 admissions). 25.2 per cent had complete, 16.4 per cent had delayed, and 11.8 per cent had interrupted prophylaxis. 36.8 per cent received no prophylaxis. Interrupted prophylaxis was associated with more VTE than complete (10.2 vs 2.0 per 1000, P < 0.01) and 5.2 greater odds. Admission to a surgical service and prolonged hospital stay were independently associated with increased likelihood of VTE. There was a lower likelihood of getting complete prophylaxis among patients admitted to orthopedic, transplant, cardiac, plastic, and vascular surgery. Surgical patients are at higher risk for VTE and interruptions in VTE prophylaxis significantly increase the risk of VTE.

  4. Pilot study of the impact of sporting compression garments on composition and volume of normal and lymphedema legs.

    PubMed

    Sierakowski, K; Piller, N

    2014-12-01

    Once clinically manifested as a swollen limb, lymphedema can be difficult to manage. Our focus thus must shift from reactive treatment to proactive management and prevention. On the basis of strong evidence in the literature, lymphedema specialists now encourage exercise as it can improve lymphatic drainage through muscle pump action. However, exercise may increase the lymph load on the vulnerable limb. We aimed to examine whether low level sporting compression is a reasonable recommendation for those with early stage lymphedema by measuring whether sporting compression (SC) tights decrease limb extracellular fluid as measured by Bio-impedance Spectroscopy (BIS) and Perometry in legs following exercise in both healthy controls and those with early stage lymphedema. A group of normal subjects (n=10) and a group of Stage 1 (ISL) lymphedema patients (n=9) were enrolled. Efforts were made to match participants in each group. For those with unilateral lymphedema, the non-affected leg was used as a control. All were measured using BIS, Perometry and Indurometry before and after exercise both with and without sporting compression clothing. The exercise regime was standardized and involved treadmill walking at increasing rates within each person's activity limitation. SC tights were shown to significantly decrease the fluid build up caused by exercise in lymphedema-affected limbs as measured with BIS (p=0.0302). Perometry measurements showed that SC caused a significant decrease in limb volume post exercise of the whole cohort (p=0.0081) and of the control Group B (p=0.0348). Our findings support the notion that SC may provide a socially acceptable and effective means of lymphedema control during exercise for early lymphedema management. PMID:25915979

  5. The Impact of Radiation Therapy on the Risk of Lymphedema After Treatment for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Laura E.G.; Miller, Cynthia L.; Horick, Nora; Skolny, Melissa N.; Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N.; O'Toole, Jean A.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Specht, Michelle C.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective: Lymphedema after breast cancer treatment can be an irreversible condition with a negative impact on quality of life. The goal of this study was to identify radiation therapy-related risk factors for lymphedema. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively performed arm volume measurements on 1476 breast cancer patients at our institution using a Perometer. Treating each breast individually, 1099 of 1501 patients (73%) received radiation therapy. Arm measurements were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Lymphedema was defined as ≥10% arm volume increase occurring >3 months postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate risk factors for lymphedema. Results: At a median follow-up time of 25.4 months (range, 3.4-82.6 months), the 2-year cumulative incidence of lymphedema was 6.8%. Cumulative incidence by radiation therapy type was as follows: 3.0% no radiation therapy, 3.1% breast or chest wall alone, 21.9% supraclavicular (SC), and 21.1% SC and posterior axillary boost (PAB). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for regional lymph node radiation (RLNR) (SC ± PAB) was 1.7 (P=.025) compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. There was no difference in lymphedema risk between SC and SC + PAB (P=.96). Other independent risk factors included early postoperative swelling (P<.0001), higher body mass index (P<.0001), greater number of lymph nodes dissected (P=.018), and axillary lymph node dissection (P=.0001). Conclusions: In a large cohort of breast cancer patients prospectively screened for lymphedema, RLNR significantly increased the risk of lymphedema compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. When considering use of RLNR, clinicians should weigh the potential benefit of RLNR for control of disease against the increased risk of lymphedema.

  6. [In search of the ideal surgical treatment for lymphedema. Report of 2nd European Conference on supermicrosurgery (Barcelona - March 2012)].

    PubMed

    Rausky, J; Robert, N; Binder, J-P; Revol, M

    2012-12-01

    Since more than 50 years, many surgeons all around the world try to find the perfect surgical technique to treat limb lymphedemas. Decongestive physiotherapy associated with the use of a compressive garment has been the primary choice for lymphedema treatment. Many different surgical techniques have been developed, however, to date, there is no consensus on surgical procedure. Most surgical experts of lymphedema met in the second European Conference on supermicrosurgery, organized on March 1st and 2nd 2012, in San Pau Hospital, Barcelona. Together they tried to clarify these different options and ideally a strategy for using these techniques.

  7. Bioelectrical impedance for detecting and monitoring lymphedema in patients with breast cancer. Preliminary results of the florence nightingale breast study group.

    PubMed

    Erdogan Iyigun, Zeynep; Selamoglu, Derya; Alco, Gul; Pilancı, Kezban Nur; Ordu, Cetin; Agacayak, Filiz; Elbüken, Filiz; Bozdogan, Atilla; Ilgun, Serkan; Guler Uysal, Fusun; Ozmen, Vahit

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of bioimpedance spectroscopy for the follow-up of patients with lymphedema in Turkey and its benefits in the diagnosis of stage 0, 1, and 2 lymphedema in patients who are under treatment for breast cancer. Thirty-seven female patients with breast cancer who underwent surgical procedures in our Breast Health Centre were followed up for lymphedema using bioimpedance, and clinical measurements were taken for a minimum period of 1 year at 3-month intervals. Patients who had been monitored regularly between November, 2011, and September, 2013, were enrolled to the study. In total, 8 patients developed lymphedema with an overall rate of 21.6%. Among the 8 patients who developed lymphedema, 4 had Stage 2, 1 had Stage 1, and 3 had Stage 0 lymphedema. Stage 0 lymphedema could not be detected with clinical measurements. During the patients' 1-year follow-up period using measurements of bioimpedance, a statistically significant relationship was observed between the occurrence of lymphedema and the disease characteristics. including the number of the extracted and remaining lymph nodes and the region of radiotherapy (p=0.042, p=0.024, p=0.040). Bioimpedance analysis seems to be a practical and reliable method for the early diagnosis of lymphedema. It is believed that regular monitoring of patients in the high-risk group using bioimpedance analyses increases the ability to treat lymphedema.

  8. Integrated management of filarial lymphedema for rural communities.

    PubMed

    Narahari, S R; Ryan, T J; Mahadevan, P E; Bose, K S; Prasanna, K S

    2007-03-01

    The Global Alliance for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GAELF) has recommended exploring local health traditions of skin care and a low cost treatment paradigm for rural communities has been proposed by Vaqas and Ryan. Our case study incorporates these promising treatments for use in treating filariasis in rural communities. Patients having lymphedema of one or both lower limbs (skin: normal, thickened or with trophic/warty changes) received treatment components from ayurveda, yoga and biomedicine simultaneously: including soap wash, phanta soaking, Indian manual lymph drainage (IMLD), pre- and post-IMLD yoga exercises, and compression using bandages for 194 days, along with diet restrictions and oral herbal medicines indicated for "elephantiasis" in Ayurveda. Entry points when infected were treated with biomedical drugs. The study was conducted in the reverse pharmacology design. 112 patients and 149 lower limbs completed 194 days of treatment during 2003-2006. Significant improvements were observed in the limb circumference measurements and the frequency of acute dermatolymphangioadenitis, use of preventive antibiotics, and reduction in the number of entry points were also improved. The objective to obtain significant benefit for a common problem using locally available, sustainable and affordable means has been achieved. It has not been our purpose to show that the regimen employed is better than another but the results do pose the question--"Are there components of Ayurvedic medicine that deserve further study?" It is important to understand that the regimen has been delivered mostly at home and that participants we have treated, representing a population suffering from a common problem, have not had access to effective conservative therapy that is culturally acceptable, safe, and efficacious. PMID:17539459

  9. Complexities of Adherence and Post-Cancer Lymphedema Management

    PubMed Central

    Ostby, Pamela L.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management. Up to 40% of 3 million breast cancer survivors in the US will develop BCRL, which has no cure, is irreversible, and requires self-management with regimens that may include multiple components. The complexities of treatment can negatively affect adherence to BCRL self-management which is critical to preventing progressive swelling and infection. The aim of this review of contemporary literature published from 2005–2015 is to examine the complexities of BCRL self-management, to identify adherence-focused studies relevant to BCRL, and to summarize barriers to self-management of BCRL. Six electronic indices were searched from which 120 articles were retrieved; 17 were BCRL-focused; and eight met inclusion criteria. Seventeen of 120 articles identified barriers to self-management of BCRL such as complexities of treatment regimens, symptom burden, balance of time for treatment and life demands, and lack of education and support; however, only eight studies included outcome measures of adherence to BCRL treatment regimens with a subsequent improvement in reduced limb volumes and/or perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation. A major limitation is the few number of rigorously developed outcome measures of BCRL adherence. In addition, randomized studies are needed with larger sample sizes to establish adequate levels of evidence for establishing best practice standards for improving adherence to BCRL self-management treatment regimens. PMID:26580657

  10. Integrated management of filarial lymphedema for rural communities.

    PubMed

    Narahari, S R; Ryan, T J; Mahadevan, P E; Bose, K S; Prasanna, K S

    2007-03-01

    The Global Alliance for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GAELF) has recommended exploring local health traditions of skin care and a low cost treatment paradigm for rural communities has been proposed by Vaqas and Ryan. Our case study incorporates these promising treatments for use in treating filariasis in rural communities. Patients having lymphedema of one or both lower limbs (skin: normal, thickened or with trophic/warty changes) received treatment components from ayurveda, yoga and biomedicine simultaneously: including soap wash, phanta soaking, Indian manual lymph drainage (IMLD), pre- and post-IMLD yoga exercises, and compression using bandages for 194 days, along with diet restrictions and oral herbal medicines indicated for "elephantiasis" in Ayurveda. Entry points when infected were treated with biomedical drugs. The study was conducted in the reverse pharmacology design. 112 patients and 149 lower limbs completed 194 days of treatment during 2003-2006. Significant improvements were observed in the limb circumference measurements and the frequency of acute dermatolymphangioadenitis, use of preventive antibiotics, and reduction in the number of entry points were also improved. The objective to obtain significant benefit for a common problem using locally available, sustainable and affordable means has been achieved. It has not been our purpose to show that the regimen employed is better than another but the results do pose the question--"Are there components of Ayurvedic medicine that deserve further study?" It is important to understand that the regimen has been delivered mostly at home and that participants we have treated, representing a population suffering from a common problem, have not had access to effective conservative therapy that is culturally acceptable, safe, and efficacious.

  11. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) prophylaxis is effective against acute murine inhalational melioidosis and glanders.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Kay B; Steward, Jackie; Thwaite, Joanne E; Lever, M Stephen; Davies, Carwyn H; Armstrong, Stuart J; Laws, Thomas R; Roughley, Neil; Harding, Sarah V; Atkins, Timothy P; Simpson, Andrew J H; Atkins, Helen S

    2013-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of the disease melioidosis, which is prevalent in tropical countries and is intractable to a number of antibiotics. In this study, the antibiotic co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) was assessed for the post-exposure prophylaxis of experimental infection in mice with B. pseudomallei and its close phylogenetic relative Burkholderia mallei, the causative agent of glanders. Co-trimoxazole was effective against an inhalational infection with B. pseudomallei or B. mallei. However, oral co-trimoxazole delivered twice daily did not eradicate infection when administered from 6h post exposure for 14 days or 21 days, since infected and antibiotic-treated mice succumbed to infection following relapse or immunosuppression. These data highlight the utility of co-trimoxazole for prophylaxis both of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and the need for new approaches for the treatment of persistent bacterial infection.

  12. Antifungal prophylaxis during neutropenia and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lortholary, O; Dupont, B

    1997-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with almost all types of immunodeficiencies. These infections may be nosocomial (aspergillosis) or community acquired (cryptococcosis), or both (candidiasis). Endemic mycoses such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and penicilliosis may infect many immunocompromised hosts in some geographic areas and thereby create major public health problems. With the wide availability of oral azoles, antifungal prophylactic strategies have been extensively developed. However, only a few well-designed studies involving strict criteria have been performed, mostly in patients with hematological malignancies or AIDS. In these situations, the best dose and duration of administration of the antifungal drug often remain to be determined. In high-risk neutropenic or bone marrow transplant patients, fluconazole is effective for the prevention of superficial and/or systemic candidal infections but is not always able to prolong overall survival and potentially selects less susceptible or resistant Candida spp. Primary prophylaxis against aspergillosis remains investigative. At present, no standard general recommendation for primary antifungal prophylaxis can be proposed for AIDS patients or transplant recipients. However, for persistently immunocompromised patients who previously experienced a noncandidal systemic fungal infection, prolonged suppressive antifungal therapy is often indicated to prevent a relapse. Better strategies for controlling immune deficiencies should also help to avoid some potentially life-threatening deep mycoses. When prescribing antifungal prophylaxis, physicians should be aware of the potential emergence of resistant strains, drug-drug interactions, and the cost. Well-designed, randomized, multicenter clinical trials in high-risk immunocompromised hosts are urgently needed to better define how to prevent severe invasive mycoses. PMID:9227863

  13. Biomarker and Phenotypic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Lymphedema | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Lymphedema (LE) following treatment for breast cancer is the most common form of secondary LE in the industrialized world. It occurs in 20% to 87% of patients following treatment for breast cancer and results in significant disability. At the |

  14. Development of consensus International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) core sets for lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Viehoff, P B; Heerkens, Y F; Van Ravensberg, C D; Hidding, J; Damstra, R J; Ten Napel, H; Neumann, H A M

    2015-03-01

    To understand the challenges of patients with lymphedema it is important to describe functioning and to measure the effectiveness of treatment in changing functioning. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) offers an international framework to classify functioning of persons in their personal environment. ICF Core Sets are lists of selected ICF categories concerning those important aspects of functioning that are most likely to be affected by a specific health problem or disease. These Core Sets make it easier and faster to describe and communicate the patient's problems and to define treatment goals. Furthermore, they are available to health care providers of all professions, researchers, health insurance companies and policy-makers. The objective of this document is to present the outcomes of a consensus conference held to determine the first versions of the ICF Core Sets for lymphedema. Frequency rankings were made of the ICF categories derived from four preparatory studies, being: a) a systematic review; b) a qualitative study; c) an expert survey; and d) a cross-sectional study. By means of working group discussions and plenary sessions, a final consensus on ICF categories was achieved and Comprehensive and Brief Core Sets for lymphedema for the upper limb, lower limb, and midline lymphedema were defined. These ICF Core Sets contain different items in each region. Future validation of these Core Sets for health professions and for countries is needed.

  15. Adipose veno-lymphatic transfer for management of post-radiation lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Pho, R.W.; Bayon, P.; Tan, L.

    1989-01-01

    In a patient who had post-radiation lymphedema after excision of liposarcoma, a method is described that is called adipose veno-lymphatic transfer. The technique involves transferring adipose tissue containing lymphatic vessels that surround the long saphenous vein, from the normal, healthy leg to the irradiated leg, with the creation of an arteriovenous fistula.

  16. Effects of matrix rhythm therapy on primary lymphedema: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Narin, Ayse Neriman; Alpozgen, Ayse Zengin; Kulli, Hilal Denizoglu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Primary lymphedema occurs because of genetic predisposition and developmental insufficiency of the lymphatic system. Matrix Rhythm Therapy was developed as an external and dynamic method that supplies rhythmic mobilization of the fluids in tissues. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of Matrix Rhythm Therapy in primary lymphedema. [Subject and Methods] A 36-year-old female with left lower limb lymphedema was evaluated. Leg circumference was measured before and at the end of treatment, and 1 and 3 months later. The circumferences were converted to volumetric values. Twenty sessions of Matrix Rhythm Therapy (5 days/week) were applied to the affected leg, spine, and abdominal regions. Patient satisfaction was assessed with the Global Rating of Change scale. [Results] Volumetric values were 1,573.28 ml before treatment, 1,573.13 ml at the end of treatment, 1,516.70 ml 1 month later, and 1,441.61 ml 3 months later. At the end of treatment, the volumetric reduction was not significant; however, when compared with baseline, measurements at 1 and 3 months decreased by 3.59% and 8.36%, respectively. The Global Rating of Change score was 2. [Conclusion] Matrix Rhythm Therapy could not reduce lymphedema when used alone, but long-term treatment may show positive effects. PMID:27630447

  17. Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Enhances Formation of Edema Tissue Fluid Channels in Lymphedema of Lower Limbs

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska, Marzanna; Cakala, Marta; Cwikla, Jaroslaw; Budlewski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: In lymphedema, tissue fluid steadily accumulates in the subcutaneous space containing loose connective tissue. We documented previously that deformation of the structure of subcutaneous collagen bundles and fat by excess fluid leads to formation of “lakes” and interconnected channels with irregular shape. Since there is no force that could mobilize and propel stagnant fluid to the regions where lymphatics absorb and contract, this task should be taken over by external massage. The most effective in this respect seems to be the sequential intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC). Aim: The aim of the study was to observe whether IPC would enhance and accelerate formation of tissue fluid channels. Methods: Together with the Biocompression Systems (Moonachie, NJ), we designed a high pressure intermittent compression device and used in it our therapy protocol for patients with obstructive lymphedema of lower limbs. The study was carried out on 18 patients with lymphedema stages II–IV. The IPC was applied daily for 1–2 hours. The follow up time was 24–36 months. Lymphoscintigraphy and immunohistopathology of tissue biopsies were used for evaluation of channel formation process. Results: The forced fluid flow brought about increase of the area of fluid channels in the thigh and groin, with a decrease in the calf. Concomitantly, with decrease of channel area in the calf, there was a decrease of calf circumference. No new lymphatic collectors were observed. Conclusions: Compression of limb lymphedema tissues leads to formation of tissue channels as pathways for evacuation of edema fluid. PMID:25748341

  18. Effects of yoga on arm volume among women with breast cancer related lymphedema: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Mary Insana; Donahoe-Fillmore, Betsy; Leach, Laura; O'Malley, Colleen; Paeplow, Cheryl; Prescott, Tess; Merriman, Harold

    2014-10-01

    Lymphedema affects 3-58% of survivors of breast cancer and can result in upper extremity impairments. Exercise can be beneficial in managing lymphedema. Yoga practice has been minimally studied for its effects on breast cancer related lymphedema (BCRL). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of yoga on arm volume, quality of life (QOL), self-reported arm function, and hand grip strength in women with BCRL. Six women with BCRL participated in modified Hatha yoga 3×/week for 8 weeks. Compression sleeves were worn during yoga sessions. Arm volume, QOL, self-reported arm function, and hand grip strength were measured at baseline, half-way, and at the conclusion of yoga practice. Arm volume significantly decreased from baseline (2423.3 ml ± 597.2) to final measures (2370.8 ml ± 577.2) (p = .02). No significant changes in QOL (p = .12), self-reported arm function (p = .34), or hand grip strength (p = .26) were found. Yoga may be beneficial in the management of lymphedema.

  19. Diphtheria toxin–mediated ablation of lymphatic endothelial cells results in progressive lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Gardenier, Jason C.; Hespe, Geoffrey E.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Savetsky, Ira L.; Torrisi, Jeremy S.; Nores, Gabriela D. García; Dayan, Joseph J.; Chang, David; Zampell, Jamie; Martínez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel treatments for lymphedema has been limited by the fact that the pathophysiology of this disease is poorly understood. It remains unknown, for example, why limb swelling resulting from surgical injury resolves initially, but recurs in some cases months or years later. Finding answers for these basic questions has been hampered by the lack of adequate animal models. In the current study, we used Cre-lox mice that expressed the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) driven by a lymphatic-specific promoter in order to noninvasively ablate the lymphatic system of the hind limb. Animals treated in this manner developed lymphedema that was indistinguishable from clinical lymphedema temporally, radiographically, and histologically. Using this model and clinical biopsy specimens, we show that the initial resolution of edema after injury is dependent on the formation of collateral capillary lymphatics and that this process is regulated by M2-polarized macrophages. In addition, we show that despite these initial improvements in lymphatic function, persistent accumulation of CD4+ cells inhibits lymphangiogenesis and promotes sclerosis of collecting lymphatics, resulting in late onset of edema and fibrosis. Our findings therefore provide strong evidence that inflammatory changes after lymphatic injury play a key role in the pathophysiology of lymphedema.

  20. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  1. Yellow nails, lymphedema and pleural effusion. Treatment of chronic pleural effusion with pleuroperitoneal shunting.

    PubMed

    Brofman, J D; Hall, J B; Scott, W; Little, A G

    1990-03-01

    Pleural effusion secondary to lymphedema may be chronic, symptomatic and refractory to treatment, occasionally requiring invasive and painful procedures such as chemical pleurodesis, open pleural abrasion or pleurectomy to achieve control of the effusion and gain symptomatic relief. We report a patient with yellow nail syndrome and chronic pleural effusion successfully treated with pleuroperitoneal shunting.

  2. Effects of matrix rhythm therapy on primary lymphedema: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Narin, Ayse Neriman; Alpozgen, Ayse Zengin; Kulli, Hilal Denizoglu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Primary lymphedema occurs because of genetic predisposition and developmental insufficiency of the lymphatic system. Matrix Rhythm Therapy was developed as an external and dynamic method that supplies rhythmic mobilization of the fluids in tissues. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of Matrix Rhythm Therapy in primary lymphedema. [Subject and Methods] A 36-year-old female with left lower limb lymphedema was evaluated. Leg circumference was measured before and at the end of treatment, and 1 and 3 months later. The circumferences were converted to volumetric values. Twenty sessions of Matrix Rhythm Therapy (5 days/week) were applied to the affected leg, spine, and abdominal regions. Patient satisfaction was assessed with the Global Rating of Change scale. [Results] Volumetric values were 1,573.28 ml before treatment, 1,573.13 ml at the end of treatment, 1,516.70 ml 1 month later, and 1,441.61 ml 3 months later. At the end of treatment, the volumetric reduction was not significant; however, when compared with baseline, measurements at 1 and 3 months decreased by 3.59% and 8.36%, respectively. The Global Rating of Change score was 2. [Conclusion] Matrix Rhythm Therapy could not reduce lymphedema when used alone, but long-term treatment may show positive effects.

  3. Diphtheria toxin–mediated ablation of lymphatic endothelial cells results in progressive lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Gardenier, Jason C.; Hespe, Geoffrey E.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Savetsky, Ira L.; Torrisi, Jeremy S.; Nores, Gabriela D. García; Dayan, Joseph J.; Chang, David; Zampell, Jamie; Martínez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel treatments for lymphedema has been limited by the fact that the pathophysiology of this disease is poorly understood. It remains unknown, for example, why limb swelling resulting from surgical injury resolves initially, but recurs in some cases months or years later. Finding answers for these basic questions has been hampered by the lack of adequate animal models. In the current study, we used Cre-lox mice that expressed the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) driven by a lymphatic-specific promoter in order to noninvasively ablate the lymphatic system of the hind limb. Animals treated in this manner developed lymphedema that was indistinguishable from clinical lymphedema temporally, radiographically, and histologically. Using this model and clinical biopsy specimens, we show that the initial resolution of edema after injury is dependent on the formation of collateral capillary lymphatics and that this process is regulated by M2-polarized macrophages. In addition, we show that despite these initial improvements in lymphatic function, persistent accumulation of CD4+ cells inhibits lymphangiogenesis and promotes sclerosis of collecting lymphatics, resulting in late onset of edema and fibrosis. Our findings therefore provide strong evidence that inflammatory changes after lymphatic injury play a key role in the pathophysiology of lymphedema. PMID:27699240

  4. Effects of matrix rhythm therapy on primary lymphedema: a case report.

    PubMed

    Narin, Ayse Neriman; Alpozgen, Ayse Zengin; Kulli, Hilal Denizoglu

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] Primary lymphedema occurs because of genetic predisposition and developmental insufficiency of the lymphatic system. Matrix Rhythm Therapy was developed as an external and dynamic method that supplies rhythmic mobilization of the fluids in tissues. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of Matrix Rhythm Therapy in primary lymphedema. [Subject and Methods] A 36-year-old female with left lower limb lymphedema was evaluated. Leg circumference was measured before and at the end of treatment, and 1 and 3 months later. The circumferences were converted to volumetric values. Twenty sessions of Matrix Rhythm Therapy (5 days/week) were applied to the affected leg, spine, and abdominal regions. Patient satisfaction was assessed with the Global Rating of Change scale. [Results] Volumetric values were 1,573.28 ml before treatment, 1,573.13 ml at the end of treatment, 1,516.70 ml 1 month later, and 1,441.61 ml 3 months later. At the end of treatment, the volumetric reduction was not significant; however, when compared with baseline, measurements at 1 and 3 months decreased by 3.59% and 8.36%, respectively. The Global Rating of Change score was 2. [Conclusion] Matrix Rhythm Therapy could not reduce lymphedema when used alone, but long-term treatment may show positive effects. PMID:27630447

  5. Breast Cancer Survivors Coping with Lymphedema: What All Counselors Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, P. Paul; Tierney, Candece Glauser; Wang, Yu-Wei; Armer, Jane M.; Whitlow, Natalie M.; Reynolds, Alysia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to promote greater understanding among counselors and other helping professionals regarding the stressors associated with lymphedema, how women cope with the stressors, and the role of social support. An intensive qualitative study was conducted; data were analyzed using a consensual qualitative research approach. The…

  6. Review of antibiotics and indications for prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Adam; Dym, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infective endocarditis has been controversial through the years, with various changes made to recommendations provided to treating physicians and dentists. The dentist must always use his or her best judgment when applying any guideline. However, it is important to remember that the guidelines may be cited in any malpractice litigation as evidence of the standard of care. Early diagnosis with prompt treatment with effective antimicrobial therapy is the best way to lower the mortality and morbidity. When prescribing antibiotics, the clinician must realize that the overprescription of antibiotics has led to resistance to antibiotic regimens and the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  7. [EMPIRICAL ANTIBACTERIAL PROPHYLAXIS IN EMERGENCY SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Yarovoy, S K; Zhevelyuk, A G; Kareva, E N; Glukhova, N S

    2015-01-01

    The main principles of selecting antibacterial drugs for prophylactic therapy of patients prior to surgery of gastrointestinal tract, vessels, skin, and soft tissues are considered. Special attention is devoted to antibacterial prophylaxis in co-morbid patients, in particular those with chronic renal insufficiency, chronic liver disorder, decompensated diabetes mellitus, and allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics. All proposed schemes are optimized with respect to three criteria: clinical effectiveness, economic feasibility, and epidemiologic safety (stopping the selection of poly-resistant microbial families). PMID:26591581

  8. The prophylaxis of nonindustrial urothelial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mount, Balfour M.

    1973-01-01

    Present knowledge concerning carcinogenesis and the natural history of urothelial tumours precludes firm conclusions relative to nonindustrial prophylaxis. However, a number of measures are consistent with current data and may be instituted for those patients with a demonstrated propensity to urothelial tumours. Their acceptability is based on the lack of associated toxicity for the patient. These measures include the elimination of significant infection, cigarettes, artificial sweeteners, analgesic abuse and coffee, the administration of vitamins C and B6, and in selected cases, the use of thiotepa. It is emphasized that the merit of these steps in altering the natural history of urothelial tumours is uncertain. PMID:4197537

  9. Use of deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Awar, Zeina; Sheikh-Taha, Marwan

    2009-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a common complication and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Patients with malignancies have a four-fold greater risk of venous thromboembolism compared with patients without malignancies. Underuse of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis persists, despite guidelines supporting its use in hospitalized cancer patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the use of DVT prophylaxis and its appropriateness in hospitalized cancer patients. This retrospective study included cancer patients admitted to Rafik Hariri University Hospital, a tertiary referral center in Beirut, Lebanon, over 2-month period, who were hospitalized for at least 2 days. We evaluated the use of anticoagulants for DVT prophylaxis in the absence of contraindications for their use. The risk factor profiles of the patients were reported in addition to the choice of the anticoagulant and the use of mechanical prophylaxis in patients with contraindications to anticoagulation. One hundred and thirty patients were studied out of which 34 (26.2%) had contraindications to anticoagulation use. In addition, 21 patients out of 95 (22.1%) who qualified for DVT prophylaxis received pharmacologic DVT prophylaxis. Enoxaparin was the most frequently prescribed anticoagulant (76.2% of the patients). Of those who received anticoagulation, only 47.6% received appropriate agent and dose. Among patients with contraindications to anticoagulation, only three (8.8%) received mechanical devices as nonpharmacologic DVT prophylaxis. DVT prophylaxis in hospitalized cancer patients is significantly underutilized. Several options are available to increase physicians' awareness of the problem.

  10. Interleukin-8 reduces post-surgical lymphedema formation by promoting lymphatic vessel regeneration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inho; Lee, Yong Suk; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Choi, Dongwon; Ecoiffier, Tatiana; Lee, Ha Neul; Kim, Kyu Eui; Lee, Sunju; Park, Eun Kyung; Maeng, Yong Sun; Kim, Nam Yun; Ladner, Robert D; Petasis, Nicos A; Koh, Chester J; Chen, Lu; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Lymphedema is mainly caused by lymphatic obstruction and manifested as tissue swelling, often in the arms and legs. Lymphedema is one of the most common post-surgical complications in breast cancer patients and presents a painful and disfiguring chronic illness that has few treatment options. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of interleukin (IL)-8 in lymphatic regeneration independent of its pro-inflammatory activity. We found that IL-8 promoted proliferation, tube formation, and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) without activating the VEGF signaling. Additionally, IL-8 suppressed the major cell cycle inhibitor CDKN1C/p57(KIP2) by downregulating its positive regulator PROX1, which is known as the master regulator of LEC-differentiation. Animal-based studies such as matrigel plug and cornea micropocket assays demonstrated potent efficacy of IL-8 in activating lymphangiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse model (K14-hIL8) that expresses human IL-8 in the skin and then crossed with lymphatic-specific fluorescent (Prox1-GFP) mouse. The resulting double transgenic mice showed that a stable expression of IL-8 could promote embryonic lymphangiogenesis. Moreover, an immunodeficient IL-8-expressing mouse line that was established by crossing K14-hIL8 mice with athymic nude mice displayed an enhanced tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis. Finally, when experimental lymphedema was introduced, K14-hIL8 mice showed an improved amelioration of lymphedema with an increased lymphatic regeneration. Together, we report that IL-8 can activate lymphangiogenesis in vitro and in vivo with a therapeutic efficacy in post-surgical lymphedema.

  11. Hydrocoelom and lymphedema in dendrobatid frogs at National Aquarium, Baltimore: 2003-2011.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Meredith M; Clayton, Leigh A; Hadfield, Catherine A

    2015-03-01

    Hydrocoelom and lymphedema are common in amphibians. In the family Dendrobatidae at the National Aquarium, Baltimore, prevalence was 3.19% from 2005 to 2011. Complete review of all cases in dendrobatids from 01 January 2003 to 01 June 2011 at the National Aquarium identified annual incidence rate, associated signs, diagnostic findings, therapeutics, and outcomes using medical record review. Associated etiologies were assessed via available necropsy and histopathology reports. Hydrocoelom was defined as coelomic distention with fluid; lymphedema was defined as fluid accumulation in the lymph spaces. These two syndromes could occur concurrently, and no association between case success (36.5% overall) or etiology was found to contrast hydrocoelom and lymphedema. Species susceptibility varied, with increased prevalence and incidence rate in Adelphobates castaneoticus, Dendrobates auratus, and Phyllobates spp. D. auratus also had reduced case success overall (26.0%). Females experienced hydrocoelom and/or lymphedema at an attack rate more than three times that of males. Fluid aspiration for culture was the most predictive antemortem diagnostic to find infectious etiologies, but antemortem diagnostics were largely noncontributory in identifying other causes of fluid accumulation. Enrofloxacin treatment increased case success more than fivefold when compared to those not treated and was the only treatment positively associated with case success. Infectious etiology, renal disease, and gastrointestinal disease, including parasitism, were seen commonly on postmortem evaluation of cases. These findings underscore the importance of the ability to individually track and treat cases, with fluid culture and initiation of enrofloxacin therapy (10 mg/kg p.o.q. 24 hr) seen as the best first steps after presentation with hydrocoelom or lymphedema.

  12. Antimicrobial Postexposure Prophylaxis for Anthrax: Adverse Events and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Gabarro, Montse; Zell, Elizabeth R.; Hayslett, James; Lukacs, Susan; Goldstein, Susan; Factor, Stephanie; Jones, Joshua; Ridzon, Renee; Williams, Ian; Rosenstein, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    We collected data during postexposure antimicrobial prophylaxis campaigns and from a prophylaxis program evaluation 60 days after start of antimicrobial prophylaxis involving persons from six U.S. sites where Bacillus anthracis exposures occurred. Adverse events associated with antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent anthrax were commonly reported, but hospitalizations and serious adverse events as defined by Food and Drug Administration criteria were rare. Overall adherence during 60 days of antimicrobial prophylaxis was poor (44%), ranging from 21% of persons exposed in the Morgan postal facility in New York City to 64% of persons exposed at the Brentwood postal facility in Washington, D.C. Adherence was highest among participants in an investigational new drug protocol to receive additional antibiotics with or without anthrax vaccine—a likely surrogate for anthrax risk perception. Adherence of <60 days was not consistently associated with adverse events. PMID:12396927

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis in primary immune deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Merin; de la Morena, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Long-term prophylactic antibiotics are being widely implemented as primary or adjunctive therapy in primary immune deficiencies. This practice has transformed clinical outcomes in the setting of chronic granulomatous disease, complement deficiencies, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, hyper-IgE syndrome, Toll signaling defects, and prevented Pneumocystis in patients with T-cell deficiencies. Yet, controlled trials are few in the context of primary antibody deficiency syndromes, and most of this practice has been extrapolated from data in patients who are immune competent and with recurrent acute otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. The paucity of guidelines on the subject is reflected in recent surveys among practicing immunologists that highlight differences of habit regarding this treatment. Such discrepancies reinforce the lack of standard protocols on the subject. This review will provide evidence for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in various primary immune deficiency populations, especially highlighting the role antibiotic prophylaxis in primary antibody deficiency syndromes. We also discussed the relationship of long-term antibiotic use and the prevalence of resistant pathogens. Overall, examination of available data on the use of prophylactic antibiotics in antibody deficiency syndromes merit future investigation in well-designed multicenter prospective trials because this population has few other management options.

  14. Guidelines on prophylaxis to prevent infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, M H; Dayer, M; Lockhart, P B; McGurk, M; Shanson, D; Prendergast, B; Chambers, J B

    2016-01-22

    Infective endocarditis is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. The link to oral bacteria has been known for many decades and has caused ongoing concern for dentists, patients and cardiologists. Since 2008, the UK has been out of step with the rest of the world where antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for high-risk patients undergoing invasive dental procedures. Recent evidence that identified an increase in endocarditis incidence prompted a guideline review by NICE and the European Society for Cardiology--which produces guidance for the whole of Europe. Despite reviewing the same evidence they reached completely opposing conclusions. The resulting conflict of opinions and guidance is confusing and poses difficulties for dentists, cardiologists and their patients. Recent changes in the law on consent, however, may provide a patient-centred and pragmatic solution to these problems. This Opinion piece examines the evidence and opposing guidance on antibiotic prophylaxis in the context of the recent changes in the law on consent and provides a framework for how patients at risk of endocarditis might be managed in practice. PMID:26794105

  15. NICE and antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, M H; Lockhart, P B; Prendergast, B; Chambers, J B; Shanson, D

    2015-06-12

    Infective endocarditis is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. The link to oral bacteria has been known for many decades and has caused on going concern for dentists, patients and cardiologists. Good oral hygiene has long been advocated to prevent endocarditis. Before 2008, antibiotic prophylaxis before invasive dental procedures was also an important strategy for preventing infective endocarditis for patients at risk of the disease in the UK, and still is in most other countries of the world. In 2008, however, NICE published new guidance recommending that antibiotic prophylaxis in the UK should cease. At the time this was a highly controversial decision. New data suggests that there has been a significant increase in the incidence of infective endocarditis since the 2008 guidelines. The 2008 guidance is being reviewed and draft new guidance is being put out for public consultation. This article discusses the issues raised by the new data and the questions that should be addressed in the review and public consultation. PMID:26068156

  16. Economic Costs and Benefits of a Community-Based Lymphedema Management Program for Lymphatic Filariasis in Odisha State, India

    PubMed Central

    Stillwaggon, Eileen; Sawers, Larry; Rout, Jonathan; Addiss, David; Fox, LeAnne

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis afflicts 68 million people in 73 countries, including 17 million persons living with chronic lymphedema. The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis aims to stop new infections and to provide care for persons already affected, but morbidity management programs have been initiated in only 24 endemic countries. We examine the economic costs and benefits of alleviating chronic lymphedema and its effects through a simple limb-care program. For Khurda District, Odisha State, India, we estimated lifetime medical costs and earnings losses due to chronic lymphedema and acute dermatolymphangioadenitis (ADLA) with and without a community-based limb-care program. The program would reduce economic costs of lymphedema and ADLA over 60 years by 55%. Savings of US$1,648 for each affected person in the workforce are equivalent to 1,258 days of labor. Per-person savings are more than 130 times the per-person cost of the program. Chronic lymphedema and ADLA impose a substantial physical and economic burden on the population in filariasis-endemic areas. Low-cost programs for lymphedema management based on limb washing and topical medication for infection are effective in reducing the number of ADLA episodes and stopping progression of disabling and disfiguring lymphedema. With reduced disability, people are able to work longer hours, more days per year, and in more strenuous, higher-paying jobs, resulting in an important economic benefit to themselves, their families, and their communities. Mitigating the severity of lymphedema and ADLA also reduces out-of-pocket medical expense. PMID:27573626

  17. EFFECTS OF RESISTANCE EXERCISES AND COMPLEX DECONGESTIVE THERAPY ON ARM FUNCTION AND MUSCULAR STRENGTH IN BREAST CANCER RELATED LYMPHEDEMA.

    PubMed

    Do, J H; Kim, W; Cho, Y K; Lee, J; Song, E J; Chun, Y M; Jeon, J Y

    2015-12-01

    The incorporation of resistance exercises into the lifestyle of patients with lymphedema is understudied and an emerging interest. We investigated the effectiveness and results of adding a moderate intensity resistance exercise program for 8 weeks in conjunction with intensive CDT for 1 or 2 weeks (depending on severity) on arm volume, arm function, QOL, and muscular strength in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema. This prospective, pilot trial included forty-four patients with a history of breast cancer who were beginning complex decongestive therapy for lymphedema. They were assigned to either the intervention (n = 22) or control (n = 22). groups. The intervention comprised of resis- tance band exercises 5 times a week for 8 weeks. These were initially supervised during the intensive lymphedema treatment, but performed independently during the study period. Limb volume, muscular strength, and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), EORTC-Breast Cancer-Specific QOL Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-BR23), and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaires were assessed at baseline and at 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, the intervention group demonstrated statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in the DASH score and muscular strength compared to the control group. Our results indicate that upper body resistance exercise demonstrates a positive effect on arm function and muscular strength without increasing arm volume in breast cancer related lymphedema during and shortly post intensive CDT lymphedema treatment. PMID:27164764

  18. Pathogenicty and immune prophylaxis of cag pathogenicity island gene knockout homogenic mutants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huan-Jian; Xue, Jing; Bai, Yang; Wang, Ji-De; Zhang, Ya-Li; Zhou, Dian-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the role of cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) in the pathogenicity and immune prophylaxis of H pylori infection. METHODS: Three pairs of H pylori including 3 strains of cagPAI positive wildtype bacteria and their cagPAI knockout homogenic mutants were utilized. H pylori binding to the gastric epithelial cells was analyzed by flow cytometry assays. Apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells induced by H pylori was determined by ELISA assay. Prophylaxis effect of the wildtype and mutant strains was compared by immunization with the sonicate of the bacteria into mice model. RESULTS: No difference was found in the apoptasis between cagPAI positive and knockout H pylori strains in respective of the ability in the binding to gastric epithelial cells as well as the induction of apoptosis. Both types of the bacteria were able to protect the mice from the infection of H pylori after immunization, with no difference between them regarding to the protection rate as well as the stimulation of the proliferation of splenocytes of the mice. CONCLUSION: The role of cagPAI in the pathogenicity and prophylaxis of H pylori infection remains to be cleared. PMID:15484302

  19. HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis for women.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Anandi N; Rolle, Charlotte P; Gandhi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Women and girls comprise nearly half of HIV-infected individuals globally and 20% of new infections in the United States, indicating an urgent need to optimise HIV prevention options in this population. HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) - where antiretrovirals are administered to HIV-non-infected individuals at risk of HIV acquisition - is a promising, female-controlled HIV prevention strategy but has so far been underutilised in women. Clinical trial data demonstrate efficacy of daily oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) for reduction of HIV acquisition among women when used consistently. Limited HIV risk perception and suboptimal PrEP awareness among women and healthcare personnel are among the challenges with PrEP delivery for women. Future research into the development of new drugs and delivery systems, and integrating PrEP delivery with reproductive healthcare services, provide opportunities to optimise this prevention strategy for women. PMID:27482454

  20. [Actual problems of vaccine prophylaxis in the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Ezhlova, E B; Mel'nikova, A A

    2014-01-01

    The WHO within the framework of extended immunization program assumes a significant increase of the number of vaccine controlled infections by 2020 - 2025 to 27 - 37 including protection from diseases of parasitic etiology. Russia contributes to the international efforts of the WHO to control infections with vaccine prophylaxis. The national calendar of prophylaxis vaccinations currently provides vaccination against 11 infections--tuberculosis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis, pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, measles, rubella, epidemic parotitis, influenza, haemophilus type B infection. Significant progress in reduction of infectious morbidity controlled by means of specific prophylaxis has been made in the country. PMID:24738288

  1. [Actual problems of vaccine prophylaxis in the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Ezhlova, E B; Mel'nikova, A A

    2014-01-01

    The WHO within the framework of extended immunization program assumes a significant increase of the number of vaccine controlled infections by 2020 - 2025 to 27 - 37 including protection from diseases of parasitic etiology. Russia contributes to the international efforts of the WHO to control infections with vaccine prophylaxis. The national calendar of prophylaxis vaccinations currently provides vaccination against 11 infections--tuberculosis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis, pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, measles, rubella, epidemic parotitis, influenza, haemophilus type B infection. Significant progress in reduction of infectious morbidity controlled by means of specific prophylaxis has been made in the country.

  2. [Pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV: clinical practice and challenge].

    PubMed

    Yinzhong, Shen; Hongzhou, L U

    2016-05-25

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can not only turn HIV infection from a fatal disease into a treatable chronic disease, but also reduce HIV transmission among high-risk people. In recent years the concept "treatment as prevention" has been accepted by the public. More and more studies have shown that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV can effectively reduce the spreading of HIV in high-risk populations. Clinical trials have also shown that PrEP is safe, and can effectively prevent high-risk people from HIV infection. The guidelines of Europe, the United States and the World Health Organization (WHO) recommend that PrEP should be considered for high-risk populations including men who have sex with men (MSM), heterosexually active men and women, HIV-uninfected partner in serodiscordant couples and injection drug users(IDUs). PrEP with daily oral tenofovir/emtricitabine combination is the recommended PrEP regimen, and TDF alone can be considered as an alternative regimen for IDUs and heterosexually active adults. PrEP can provide a high level of protection against HIV, and is even more effective when it is combined with condoms, ART and other prevention methods. PrEP is currently facing great challenges including ethical issues, drugs accessibility, adherence, and low utilization rate, and should be further recommended for high-risk people to reduced HIV infection. PMID:27651184

  3. [Lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment: possibility of diagnostic and therapeutic prevention].

    PubMed

    Campisi, C; Boccardo, F; Zilli, A; Maccio, A; Napoli, F; Ferreira Azevedo, W; Fulcheri, E; Taddei, G

    2002-01-01

    We performed a prospective randomized study upon 50 patients who had undergone a breast cancer treatment, considering particularly the possibility of appearance of arm secondary lymphedema. The patients were divided in two groups of 25 patients each. In the 1st group, we performed only a clinical follow-up, whilst in the 2nd one, we used also lymphoscintigraphy. The aim of the study was to compare the incidence of arm secondary lymphedema in the two groups, and relate the data with those of the international literature, in order to identify diagnostic procedures indicative of the risk of development of lymphedema and find proper therapeutic preventive measures. It is certainty complex to foresee the appearance of arm lymphedema due to breast cancer treatment. No specific preventive therapeutic methods based upon particular diagnostic investigations were ever reported. Patients had undergone surgery and radiation for breast cancer in the period between April 1992 and June 1994, and controlled at over 5 years after operation. Upper limb lymphoscintigraphy was performed only in one of the two groups of 25 patients, before operation and, furthermore, after 1-3-6 months and 1-3 years from the treatment. Patients who presented lymphoscintigraphic alterations (dermal back flow, diffused or delayed transit of the tracer, etc.), before edema appeared clinically, underwent physical and rehabilitative therapy (bandages, manual lymphatic drainage, mechanical lymph drainage, elastic garments, etc.) and microsurgery (lymphatic-venous anastomoses at the arm), performed early (stages Ib and II) in patients not responsive to physical therapy. In the first group followed only clinically, secondary arm lymphedema occurred in 9 cases (36%), and appeared after a period variable from 1 week to 2 years (3-6 months averagely). In the second group, lymphoscintigraphy, performed preoperatively, permitted to find lymphatic impairment (absence of deltoid way, reduced axillary lymph nodal

  4. Axillary evaluation and lymphedema in women with ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Coromilas, Ellie J; Wright, Jason D; Huang, Yongmei; Feldman, Sheldon; Neugut, Alfred I; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Chen, Ling; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-07-01

    Axillary evaluation in women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is increasing; however, this may introduce additional morbidity with unclear benefit. Our objective was to examine the morbidity and mortality associated with axillary evaluation in DCIS. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 10,504 women aged 65-90 years with DCIS who underwent breast conserving surgery between 2002 and 2012 using SEER-Medicare database. Patients were categorized by receipt of axillary evaluation with either sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) or axillary node dissection (ALND). We determined the incidence of lymphedema treatment as defined by diagnostic and procedural codes, as well as 10-year breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. 18.3 % of those treated with BCS and 69.4 % of those treated with mastectomy had an axillary evaluation. One year after treatment, 8.2 % of women who had an axillary evaluation developed lymphedema, compared to 5.9 % of those who did not. In a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model, the incidence of lymphedema was higher among those who underwent axillary evaluation (HR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.04-1.45). Overall 10-year breast cancer-specific survival was similar between both groups (HR 0.83, 95 % CI 0.40-1.74). Only 44 (0.40 %) women died of breast cancer; receipt of axillary evaluation did not alter overall survival. Axillary evaluation is commonly performed in women with DCIS, especially those undergoing mastectomy. However, women who receive an axillary evaluation have higher rates of lymphedema, without breast cancer-specific or overall survival benefit. Efforts should be made to determine the population of women with DCIS who benefit from this procedure.

  5. Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema and Resistance Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicole L

    2016-09-01

    Nelson, NL. Breast cancer-related lymphedema and resistance exercise: a systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2656-2665, 2016-Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is characterized by the accumulation of fluid in the interstitial tissues in the arm, shoulder, neck, or torso and attributed to the damage of lymph nodes during breast cancer treatments involving radiation and axillary node dissection. Resistance exercise training (RET) has recently shown promise in the management of BCRL. The aims of this review were twofold: (a) To summarize the results of recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of resistance exercise in those with, or at risk for, BCRL. (b) To determine whether breast cancer survivors can perform RET at sufficient intensities to elicit gains in strength without causing BCRL flare-up or incidence. A search was performed on the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, and Science Direct, up to July 10, 2015, using the following keywords: breast cancer-related lymphedema, strength training, resistance training, systematic review, and breast cancer. Manual searches of references were also conducted for additional relevant studies. A total of 6 RCTs, involving 805 breast cancer survivors, met the inclusion criteria and corresponded to the aims of this review. The methodological quality of included RCTs was good, with a mean score 6.8 on the 10-point PEDro scale. The results of this review indicate that breast cancer survivors can perform RET at high-enough intensities to elicit strength gains without triggering changes to lymphedema status. There is strong evidence indicating that RET produces significant gains in muscular strength without provoking BCRL. PMID:26840439

  6. The need for preoperative baseline arm measurement to accurately quantify breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fangdi; Skolny, Melissa N; Swaroop, Meyha N; Rawal, Bhupendra; Catalano, Paul J; Brunelle, Cheryl L; Miller, Cynthia L; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a feared outcome of breast cancer treatment, yet the push for early screening is hampered by a lack of standardized quantification. We sought to determine the necessity of preoperative baseline in accounting for temporal changes of upper extremity volume. 1028 women with unilateral breast cancer were prospectively screened for lymphedema by perometry. Thresholds were defined: relative volume change (RVC) ≥10 % for clinically significant lymphedema and ≥5 % including subclinical lymphedema. The first postoperative measurement (pseudo-baseline) simulated the case of no baseline. McNemar's test and binomial logistic regression models were used to analyze BCRL misdiagnoses. Preoperatively, 28.3 and 2.9 % of patients had arm asymmetry of ≥5 and 10 %, respectively. Without baseline, 41.6 % of patients were underdiagnosed and 40.1 % overdiagnosed at RVC ≥ 5 %, increasing to 50.0 and 54.8 % at RVC ≥ 10 %. Increased pseudo-baseline asymmetry, increased weight change between baselines, hormonal therapy, dominant use of contralateral arm, and not receiving axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) were associated with increased risk of underdiagnosis at RVC ≥ 5 %; not receiving regional lymph node radiation was significant at RVC ≥ 10 %. Increased pseudo-baseline asymmetry, not receiving ALND, and dominant use of ipsilateral arm were associated with overdiagnosis at RVC ≥ 5 %; increased pseudo-baseline asymmetry and not receiving ALND were significant at RVC ≥ 10 %. The use of a postoperative proxy even early after treatment results in poor sensitivity for identifying BCRL. Providers with access to patients before surgery should consider the consequent need for proper baseline, with specific strategy tailored by institution. PMID:27154787

  7. Manual lymphatic drainage for lymphedema following breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ezzo, Jeanette; Manheimer, Eric; McNeely, Margaret L; Howell, Doris M; Weiss, Robert; Johansson, Karin I; Bao, Ting; Bily, Linda; Tuppo, Catherine M; Williams, Anne F; Karadibak, Didem

    2016-01-01

    Background More than one in five patients who undergo treatment for breast cancer will develop breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). BCRL can occur as a result of breast cancer surgery and/or radiation therapy. BCRL can negatively impact comfort, function, and quality of life (QoL). Manual lymphatic drainage (MLD), a type of hands-on therapy, is frequently used for BCRL and often as part of complex decongestive therapy (CDT). CDT is a fourfold conservative treatment which includes MLD, compression therapy (consisting of compression bandages, compression sleeves, or other types of compression garments), skin care, and lymph-reducing exercises (LREs). Phase 1 of CDT is to reduce swelling; Phase 2 is to maintain the reduced swelling. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of MLD in treating BCRL. Search methods We searched Medline, EMBASE, CENTRAL, WHO ICTRP (World Health Organization’s International Clinical Trial Registry Platform), and Cochrane Breast Cancer Group’s Specialised Register from root to 24 May 2013. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of women with BCRL. The intervention was MLD. The primary outcomes were (1) volumetric changes, (2) adverse events. Secondary outcomes were (1) function, (2) subjective sensations, (3) QoL, (4) cost of care. Data collection and analysis We collected data on three volumetric outcomes. (1) LE (lymphedema) volume was defined as the amount of excess fluid left in the arm after treatment, calculated as volume in mL of affected arm post-treatment minus unaffected arm post-treatment. (2) Volume reduction was defined as the amount of fluid reduction in mL from before to after treatment calculated as the pretreatment LE volume of the affected arm minus the post-treatment LE volume of the affected arm. (3) Per cent reduction was defined as the proportion of fluid reduced relative to the baseline excess volume, calculated as volume

  8. Antibiotics in dentistry: Bacteremia, antibiotic prophylaxis, and antibiotic misuse.

    PubMed

    Dinsbach, Nathan A

    2012-01-01

    What is known regarding bacteremia? How effective is antibiotic prophylaxis for distant-site infections (late prosthetic joint infections and infective endocarditis)? Antibiotic resistance poses a growing danger to mankind. The misuse of antibiotics is a main cause of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The author undertook a Medline search and a hand search of the literature regarding bacteremia, antibiotic prophylaxis for late prosthetic joint infections and infective endocarditis, antibiotic misuse, and antibiotic resistance. The findings indicate a clearer understanding of bacteremia emerging in the past 30 years, which has led to recent changes in antibiotic prophylaxis regimens. Dentists should understand how bacteremia affects their at-risk patients, the rationale for antibiotic prophylaxis, and how antibiotic misuse poses a threat to all.

  9. A change in the NICE guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, M H; Dayer, M; Lockhart, P B; McGurk, M; Shanson, D; Prendergast, B; Chambers, J B

    2016-08-12

    Since 2008, NICE clinical guidelines have stated: 'Antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis is not recommended for people undergoing dental procedures'. This put UK guidance at odds with guidance in the rest of the world, where antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for patients at high-risk of infective endocarditis undergoing invasive dental procedures. Many dentists also felt this wording prohibited the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, regardless of the wishes of the patient or their personal risk of infective endocarditis and made it difficult for them to use their clinical judgment to deliver individualised care in the best interests of their patients. NICE have now changed this guidance to 'Antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis is not recommended routinely for people undergoing dental procedures.' This article examines the implications of this small but important change. PMID:27514339

  10. Lymphedema in Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome: Is It Possible to Normalize?

    PubMed Central

    Río, Angela; Domingo Garcia, Paloma; de Fatima Guerreiro Godoy, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report the results of intensive therapy of lymphedema associated with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. A 24-year-old female patient reported that her family had observed edema in her right leg and port wine stains from birth. For ten years, they consulted with different specialists in the region but the prognosis did not change and no specific treatment was found. In 2014, at the age of 24, with massive lymphedema, a leg ulcer, and recurrent infections, she started treatment at the Clínica Godoy in São José do Rio Preto. She was evaluated by clinical history, physical examination, water displacement volumetry, and bioimpedance. Intensive therapy (8 hours daily) was proposed using Manual Lymphatic Therapy (Godoy & Godoy), Cervical Stimulation Therapy, Mechanical Lymphatic Therapy, a grosgrain stocking adjusted several times a day, and the use of Unna boot in the region of the ulcer. The volume of edema was reduced by about 44% within the first week with further reductions in the following weeks and healing of the ulcer. Subsequently, it was possible to control and maintain the reduction in swelling with less intense treatment. It is possible to reduce and maintain the treatment results of lymphedema associated with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. PMID:27529050

  11. Evaluation of kinesthetic sense and hand function in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Karadibak, Didem; Yavuzsen, Tugba

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the functional ability and kinesthetic sense of the hands of women with breast cancer-related lymphedema. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-seven women experiencing lymphedema after breast surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were included. The patients were divided into two groups: women with hand edema (HE+, n = 29) and without hand edema (HE-, n = 28) after breast cancer treatment. Arm edema severity, hand size, functional mobility and kinesthetic sense of the hand, and daily living skills were evaluated. [Results] The mean age of the patients was 55.8 years. In both groups, functional mobility, kinesthetic sense, and daily living skills decreased significantly with increasing edema severity. However, there was no significant difference between groups with respect to functional mobility or daily living skills. The kinesthetic sense of the hand was better in the HE- group than the HE+ group. There was a significant negative relationship between the severity of edema and hand function. [Conclusion] Breast cancer-related lymphedema can negatively impact women's functional mobility and kinesthetic sense of the hands as well as daily living skills. PMID:26180295

  12. Pseudosarcoma of the thigh: a rare case of massive localized lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Ronaghan, Joseph Edward; O-Yurvati, A H

    2015-03-01

    Massive localized lymphedema, also called pseudosarcoma, is a rare condition associated with morbid obesity. Accurate identification of this entity helps the physician make the distinction between this condition and other soft tissue tumors, especially with the increasing rate of obesity worldwide. Obesity and increased caloric intake lead to storage of the excess energy in the form of adipose tissue. The excess adipose tissue disturbs the lymphatic vessels, leading to massive edema localized mostly in the lower extremity, reaching a substantial size and weight that interferes with the quality of life of the individual in question. The mass can cause cosmetic but more importantly functional and structural defects, leading to altered biomechanics with increased risk of deep vein thromboembolism. Below is a presentation of a patient presenting with complaint of a massive medial thigh mass. After much investigation, consultation, and use of diagnostic radiologic modalities it was diagnosed as what is referred to in the literature as massive localized lymphedema, or pseudosarcoma. This mass was managed by surgical excision and the diagnosis was further confirmed by pathologic analysis. After the excision, our patient regained his ability to ambulate on his own, with the help of a rehabilitation program and physical therapy. Massive localized lymphedema needs to be on the differential diagnosis of any morbidly obese patient presenting with mass, especially in the lower extremities. Adequate knowledge about this condition enables the physician to make the distinction between pseudosarcoma and true soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:25785328

  13. Surveillance Recommendations in Reducing Risk of and Optimally Managing Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Ostby, Pamela L.; Armer, Jane M.; Dale, Paul S.; Van Loo, Margaret J.; Wilbanks, Cassie L.; Stewart, Bob R.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, and disfiguring condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management of symptoms. It has been reported that over 40% of the 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States may meet the criteria for BCRL during their lifetimes. Ongoing surveillance, beginning with pre-operative assessment, has been effective in identifying subclinical lymphedema (LE). A prospective model for surveillance is necessary in order to detect BCRL at an early stage when there is the best chance to reduce risk or slow progression. Physical methods for monitoring and assessment, such as circumferential arm measures, perometry, bioimpedance; exercise programs; prophylactic and early-intervention compression garments; and referral for complete decongestive therapy are all interventions to consider in the development of a BCRL surveillance program. In addition, supportive-educative programs and interactive engagement for symptom self-management should also be implemented. The importance of interdisciplinary collaboration is integral to the success of an effective personalized medicine program in breast cancer-related lymphedema surveillance. PMID:25563360

  14. Final program evaluation methods and results of a National Lymphedema Management Program in Togo, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Ziperstein, Josh; Dorkenoo, Monique; Datagni, Michel; Drexler, Naomi; Murphy, Monica; Sodahlon, Yao; Mathieu, Els

    2014-06-01

    In order to eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) as a public health problem, the World Health Assembly recommends an approach which includes interruption of transmission of infection and the alleviation of morbidity. In 2000, the Togolese National Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (PNELF) started the annual mass drug administrations and in 2007, the program added a morbidity component for the management of lymphedema. This manuscript describes the methods of an evaluation aimed at assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the Togolese National Lymphedema Morbidity Program. The evaluation was conducted through in-depth interviews with stakeholders at each programmatic level. Interviews focused on message dissemination, health provider training, patient self-care practices, social dynamics, and program impact. The evaluation demonstrated that the program strengths include the standardization and in-depth training of health staff, dissemination of the program's treatment message, a positive change in the community's perception of lymphedema, and successful patient recruitment and training in care techniques. The lessons learned from this evaluation helped to improve Togo's program, but may also provide guidance and strategies for other countries desiring to develop a morbidity program. The methods of program evaluation described in this paper can serve as a model for monitoring components of other decentralized national health programs in low resource settings.

  15. Aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds - Guiding lymphangiogenesis for treatment of acquired lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Hadamitzky, Catarina; Zaitseva, Tatiana S; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Paukshto, Michael V; Hou, Luqia; Strassberg, Zachary; Ferguson, James; Matsuura, Yuka; Dash, Rajesh; Yang, Phillip C; Kretchetov, Shura; Vogt, Peter M; Rockson, Stanley G; Cooke, John P; Huang, Ngan F

    2016-09-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common disorder associated with acquired functional impairment of the lymphatic system. The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds (BioBridge) positioned across the area of lymphatic obstruction in guiding lymphatic regeneration. In a porcine model of acquired lymphedema, animals were treated with BioBridge scaffolds, alone or in conjunction with autologous lymph node transfer as a source of endogenous lymphatic growth factor. They were compared with a surgical control group and a second control group in which the implanted BioBridge was supplemented with exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C). Three months after implantation, immunofluorescence staining of lymphatic vessels demonstrated a significant increase in lymphatic collectors within close proximity to the scaffolds. To quantify the functional impact of scaffold implantation, bioimpedance was used as an early indicator of extracellular fluid accumulation. In comparison to the levels prior to implantation, the bioimpedance ratio was significantly improved only in the experimental BioBridge recipients with or without lymph node transfer, suggesting restoration of functional lymphatic drainage. These results further correlated with quantifiable lymphatic collectors, as visualized by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. They demonstrate the therapeutic potential of BioBridge scaffolds in secondary lymphedema. PMID:27348849

  16. Effect of complete decongestive therapy and a home program for patients with post mastectomy lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Buragadda, Syamala; Alhusaini, Adel A; Melam, Ganeswara Rao; Arora, Nisha

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] Post mastectomy lymphedema is common among breast cancer survivors. It leads to physical discomfort and functional impairment. Rehabilitation forms the mainstay of treatment and is multidisciplinary. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty post mastectomy patients were allocated randomly and assigned to either a conventional treatment group (n=30) or a complete decongestive therapy (CDT) group (n=30). The conventional treatment group received manual lymphatic drainage, wore a low elastic compression garment, received glenohumeral mobilization, and performed deep breathing exercises, and the complete decongestive therapy group received CDT from a trained physiotherapist and a daily home program along with the conventional treatment, 5 days a week for 6 weeks. [Results] Arm circumference measurements were taken at five levels: the wrist, mid forearm, elbow, mid-upper arm, and axilla. The upper extremity function was evaluated using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, and pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale. Measurements were taken at baseline, and at 4th and 6th weeks after the start of intervention. Within and between group comparisons showed significant improvements in the CDT group. [Conclusion] Complete decongestive therapy and a home program assists breast cancer related lymphedema survivors in regaining their lost functions. It also helps to improve their independence in daily activities, reduce their need for caregivers, and thereby improving their quality of life. Therefore, the results of this study showed that the CDT with a home program is an effective treatment for reducing post mastectomy lymphedema. PMID:26504284

  17. Evaluation of kinesthetic sense and hand function in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Karadibak, Didem; Yavuzsen, Tugba

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the functional ability and kinesthetic sense of the hands of women with breast cancer-related lymphedema. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-seven women experiencing lymphedema after breast surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were included. The patients were divided into two groups: women with hand edema (HE+, n = 29) and without hand edema (HE−, n = 28) after breast cancer treatment. Arm edema severity, hand size, functional mobility and kinesthetic sense of the hand, and daily living skills were evaluated. [Results] The mean age of the patients was 55.8 years. In both groups, functional mobility, kinesthetic sense, and daily living skills decreased significantly with increasing edema severity. However, there was no significant difference between groups with respect to functional mobility or daily living skills. The kinesthetic sense of the hand was better in the HE− group than the HE+ group. There was a significant negative relationship between the severity of edema and hand function. [Conclusion] Breast cancer-related lymphedema can negatively impact women’s functional mobility and kinesthetic sense of the hands as well as daily living skills. PMID:26180295

  18. A US Policy Perspective on Oral Preexposure Prophylaxis for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Karen Byrnes; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2011-01-01

    Orally administered preexposure prophylaxis is an innovative and controversial HIV prevention strategy involving the regular use of antiretroviral medications by uninfected individuals. Antiretroviral medications protect against potential HIV infection by reducing susceptibility to the virus. Recent clinical trial results indicate that preexposure prophylaxis can be safe and efficacious for men who have sexual intercourse with men, yet there remain policy considerations surrounding costs, opportunity costs, and ethical issues that must be addressed before broad implementation in the United States. PMID:21493945

  19. Cytomegalovirus Hyper Immunoglobulin for CMV Prophylaxis in Thoracic Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rea, Federico; Potena, Luciano; Yonan, Nizar; Wagner, Florian; Calabrese, Fiorella

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection negatively influences both short- and long-term outcomes after cardiothoracic transplantation. In heart transplantation, registry analyses have shown that CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) with or without virostatic prophylaxis is associated with a significant reduction in mortality and graft loss versus no prophylaxis, particularly in high-risk donor (D)+/recipient (R)- transplants. Randomized comparative trials are lacking but retrospective data suggest that addition of CMVIG to antiviral prophylaxis may reduce rates of CMV-related events after heart transplantation, including the incidence of acute rejection or chronic allograft vasculopathy. However, available data consistently indicate that when CMVIG is used, it should be administered with concomitant antiviral therapy, and that evidence concerning preemptive management with CMVIG is limited, but promising. In lung transplantation, CMVIG should again only be used with concomitant antiviral therapy. Retrospective studies have shown convincing evidence that addition of CMVIG to antiviral prophylaxis lowers CMV endpoints and mortality. The current balance of evidence suggests that CMVIG prophylaxis reduces the risk of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, but a controlled trial is awaited. Overall, the relatively limited current data set suggests that prophylaxis with CMVIG in combination with antiviral therapy appears effective in D+/R- heart transplant patients, whereas in lung transplantation, addition of CMVIG in recipients of a CMV-positive graft may offer an advantage in terms of CMV infection and disease.

  20. "You're naked, you're vulnerable": Sexual well-being and body image of women with lower limb lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Winch, Caleb J; Sherman, Kerry A; Smith, Katriona M; Koelmeyer, Louise A; Mackie, Helen; Boyages, John

    2016-09-01

    Lower-limb lymphedema is an incurable illness manifesting as visible swelling enlarging the leg(s) and/or feet, buttocks, and genitals. This study used semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis to explore sexual well-being among women with primary (congenital) lymphedema (n=11) or secondary lymphedema associated with gynecological cancer (n=8). Five themes (subthemes) summarized women's responses, with Attractiveness and Confidence (Publicly Unattractive, Privately Unconfident, Lymphedema or Aging?) describing women's central concern. These body image-related concerns accounted for sexual well-being in association with Partner Support (Availability of Support, Languages of Support, Fears About Support) and the degree of Functional Interruptions (Lymphedema in Context, Enduring Impacts, Overcoming Interruptions). Successful Lymphedema Coping (Control, Acceptance) and self-perceived ability to fulfill a valued Sexual Role also affected sexual well-being. Few differences between women with primary versus secondary lymphedema were evident. Lymphedema clinicians should screen for sexual concerns and have referral options available. PMID:27434105

  1. The Long-term Risk of Upper-extremity Lymphedema is Two-fold Higher in Breast Cancer Patients than in Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Rachel K.; Cromwell, Kate D.; Chiang, Yi-Ju; Armer, Jane M.; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Stewart, Bob R.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Cormier, Janice N.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives We assessed the cumulative incidence, symptoms, and risk factors for upper-extremity lymphedema in breast cancer and melanoma patients undergoing sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection. Methods Patients were recruited preoperatively (time 0) and assessed at 6, 12, and 18 months postoperatively. Limb volume change (LVC) was measured by perometry. Lymphedema was categorized as none, mild (LVC 5–9.9%), or moderate/severe (LVC≥10%). Symptoms were assessed with a validated lymphedema instrument. Longitudinal logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify risk factors associated with moderate/severe lymphedema. Results Among 205 breast cancer and 144 melanoma patients, the cumulative incidence of moderate/severe lymphedema at 18 months was 36.5% and 35.0, respectively. However, in adjusted analyses, factors associated with moderate/severe lymphedema were breast cancer (OR 2.0, p=0.03), body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 (OR 1.6, p=0.04), greater number of lymph nodes removed (OR 1.05, p<0.01), and longer interval since surgery (OR 2.33 at 18 months, p<0.01). Conclusions: Lymphedema incidence increased over time in both cohorts. However, the adjusted risk of moderate/severe lymphedema was two-fold higher in breast cancer patients. These results may be attributed to surgical treatment of the primary tumor in the breast and more frequent use of radiation. PMID:26477877

  2. Update on the prophylaxis of migraine.

    PubMed

    Schürks, Markus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Goadsby, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Migraine prophylaxis is a stepwise procedure with lifestyle advice followed by consideration of medications. Patients should be advised to try to maintain a regular lifestyle, with regular sleep, meals, exercise, and management of stress, perhaps through relaxation techniques or other ways that are sensible for them. If this regimen does not adequately control their migraines, preventatives are indicated. Patients can choose between evidence-based nutraceuticals such as riboflavin, feverfew, butterbur, or coenzyme Q10, or more traditional pharmacotherapeutics. Medicine choices are somewhat limited by what is available in each country, but from the full range, the medicines of first choice are beta-adrenoceptor blockers, flunarizine, topiramate, and valproic acid. Beta-adrenoceptor blockers are particularly useful in patients also suffering from hypertension or tachycardia. Following recent studies, topiramate has become a first choice for episodic as well as chronic migraine. It is the only prophylactic drug that may lead to weight loss, but it is sometimes associated with adverse cognitive effects. Valproic acid and flunarizine also have very good prophylactic properties. However, valproic acid is often associated with adverse effects, and flunarizine is unavailable in many countries, including the United States. If sequential monotherapies are ineffective, combinations of first-line drugs should be tried before advancing to drugs of second choice, which are associated with more adverse effects or have less well-established prophylactic properties. Amitriptyline should be used carefully because of its anticholinergic effects, although it is useful in comorbid tension-type headache, depression, and sleep disorders. Methysergide is very effective, but it has been supplanted or even made unavailable in many countries because of its well-described association with retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pizotifen has a slightly better safety profile but is unavailable in the United

  3. The Health Deviation of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema: Symptom Assessment and Impact on Self-Care Agency.

    PubMed

    Armer, Jane M; Henggeler, Mary H; Brooks, Constance W; Zagar, Eris A; Homan, Sherri; Stewart, Bob R

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women world-wide, affecting 1 of 8 women during their lifetimes. In the US alone, some 2 million breast cancer survivors comprise 20% of all cancer survivors. Conservatively, it is estimated that some 20-40% of all breast cancer survivors will develop the health deviation of lymphedema or treatment-related limb swelling over their lifetimes. This chronic accumulation of protein-rich fluid predisposes to infection, leads to difficulties in fitting clothing and carrying out activities of daily living, and impacts self-esteem, self-concept, and quality of life. Lymphedema is associated with self-care deficits (SCD) and negatively impacts self-care agency (SCA) and physiological and psychosocial well-being. Objectives of this report are two-fold: (1) to explore four approaches of assessing and diagnosing breast cancer lymphedema, including self-report of symptoms and the impact of health deviations on SCA; and (2) to propose the development of a clinical research program for lymphedema based on the concepts of Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT). Anthropometric and symptom data from a National-Institutes-of-Health-funded prospective longitudinal study were examined using survival analysis to compare four definitions of lymphedema over 24 months post-breast cancer surgery among 140 of 300 participants (all who had passed the 24-month measurement). The four definitions included differences of 200 ml, 10% volume, and 2 cm circumference between pre-op baseline and/or contralateral limbs, and symptom self-report of limb heaviness and swelling. Symptoms, SCA, and SCD were assessed by interviews using a validated tool. Estimates of lymphedema occurrence varied by definition and time since surgery. The 2 cm girth change provided the highest estimation of lymphedema (82% at 24 months), followed by 200 ml volume change (57% at 24 months). The 10% limb volume change converged with symptom report of heaviness and swelling at 24 months

  4. The Health Deviation of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema: Symptom Assessment and Impact on Self-Care Agency

    PubMed Central

    Armer, Jane M.; Henggeler, Mary H; Brooks, Constance W.; Zagar, Eris A.; Homan, Sherri; Stewart, Bob R.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women world-wide, affecting 1 of 8 women during their lifetimes. In the US alone, some 2 million breast cancer survivors comprise 20% of all cancer survivors. Conservatively, it is estimated that some 20-40% of all breast cancer survivors will develop the health deviation of lymphedema or treatment-related limb swelling over their lifetimes. This chronic accumulation of protein-rich fluid predisposes to infection, leads to difficulties in fitting clothing and carrying out activities of daily living, and impacts self-esteem, self-concept, and quality of life. Lymphedema is associated with self-care deficits (SCD) and negatively impacts self-care agency (SCA) and physiological and psychosocial well-being. Objectives of this report are two-fold: (1) to explore four approaches of assessing and diagnosing breast cancer lymphedema, including self-report of symptoms and the impact of health deviations on SCA; and (2) to propose the development of a clinical research program for lymphedema based on the concepts of Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT). Anthropometric and symptom data from a National-Institutes-of-Health-funded prospective longitudinal study were examined using survival analysis to compare four definitions of lymphedema over 24 months post-breast cancer surgery among 140 of 300 participants (all who had passed the 24-month measurement). The four definitions included differences of 200 ml, 10% volume, and 2 cm circumference between pre-op baseline and/or contralateral limbs, and symptom self-report of limb heaviness and swelling. Symptoms, SCA, and SCD were assessed by interviews using a validated tool. Estimates of lymphedema occurrence varied by definition and time since surgery. The 2 cm girth change provided the highest estimation of lymphedema (82% at 24 months), followed by 200 ml volume change (57% at 24 months). The 10% limb volume change converged with symptom report of heaviness and swelling at 24 months

  5. HIV Post-Exposure Prophylaxis for Child Rape Survivors in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Who Qualifies and Who Complies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Steven J.; Bugwandeen, Shikaar R.; Wiles, Wendy A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to audit the provision and utilization of HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to child rape survivors in the Province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods: A prospective design was used to collect data from a convenience sample of 200 consecutive cases of child rape referred for medico-legal assessment to a state…

  6. Prevalence of lymphedema in women undergoing treatment for breast cancer in a referral center in southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lymphedema is a highly prevalent condition in women who have undergone treatment for breast cancer. Lymphedema negatively affects the quality of life. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lymphedema and associated factors in women treated for breast cancer in the municipality of Juiz de Fora. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study that evaluated 250 women who were being treated for breast cancer. Pre-screening of the sample by analysis of medical records was performed to select women who met the inclusion criteria as follows: women who had an operation more than 6 months ago; absence of active disease, locoregional or distant; the absence of functional change in the affected limb before surgery, which could lead to swelling of the limb; and simulating or masking symptoms of lymphedema, such as bursitis, tendonitis, and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Women with bilateral breast cancer, absence of axillary intervention (partial or complete axillary dissection and/or SLN biopsy), active disease in the region, or lympho-venous alteration of the limb before surgery were excluded. Data were collected from the medical records of the selected cases, and they subsequently underwent an interview and a physical assessment. Results The prevalence of lymphedema was 44.8%. There were medical records on the presence of this condition in 5.4% of cases. With regard to shoulder joint mobility, restrictions on abduction movements, internal and external rotation, and anterior shoulder adduction were significantly associated with lymphedema. Variables, including the presence of seroma, vascular changes, time elapsed after surgery, episodes of redness in the extremities, and cuticle removal from the hand with pliers were considered as major associated factors for lymphedema (p<0.05). Conclusions The prevalence of 44.8% for lymphedema found in this study is considered to be relevant because it is a morbidity that produces psychological

  7. Correlates of Lymphedema in Women with Breast Cancer: a Case Control Study in Shiraz, Southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Honarvar, Behnam; Sayar, Negin; Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Zakeri, Zeinab; Talei, Asra; Rostami, Sara; Khademi, Sahar; Sabzi Sarvestani, Amene; Sekhavati, Eghbal

    2016-01-01

    Globally, the burden of breast cancer (BC) continues to increase. BC related lymphedema (BCRL) is currently non curable and as a life time risk it affects at least 25% of BC patients. Knowing more about BCRL and appropriate control of its modifiable risk factors can improve quality of life (QOL) of the affected patients. In this case control study to detect factors, 400 women with BCRL (as the case group) and 283 patients with BC without lymphedema (as the control group) that were referred to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences affiliated BC clinic center were assessed. The data were analyzed in SPSS. The mean age of the case group was 52.3±11.0 years and of the control group was 50.1±10.9 years. In patients with BCRL, 203(50.7%) had left (Lt) side BC and in non- lymphedema group 151 (53.3%) had Lt side BC. Out of all BCRL patients, 204 (51%) had lymphedema in all parts of their affected upper extremities, 100 (25%) had swelling in the arm and forearm and 23 (5.7%) had edema in both the upper extremity and trunk. Edema, heaviness, concern about changing body image, pain and paresthesia were the most common signs/symptoms among patients with BCRL. In BCRL patients, the difference of circumference between the affected upper limb and non-affected limb was 4.4±2.5 cm and the difference in volume displacement was 528.7±374.4 milliliters. Multiple variable analysis showed that moderate to severe activity (OR; odds ratio =14, 95% CI: 2.6-73.3 ), invasiveness of BC (OR =13.7, 95% CI: 7.3-25.6), modified radical mastectomy (OR=4.3, 95% CI: 2.3-7.9), BMI =>25 (OR=4.2, 95% CI: 2-8.7), radiotherapy (OR=3.9, 95% CI: 1.8-8.2 ), past history of limb damage (OR=1.7, 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) and the number of excised lymph nodes (OR=1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.09) were the significant predictors of lymphedema in women with BC. Modifiable risk factors of BCRL such as non-guided moderate to severe physical activity, high BMI and trauma to the limb should be controlled as early as possible in

  8. High-resolution 3D volumetry versus conventional measuring techniques for the assessment of experimental lymphedema in the mouse hindlimb

    PubMed Central

    Frueh, Florian S.; Körbel, Christina; Gassert, Laura; Müller, Andreas; Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Lindenblatt, Nicole; Giovanoli, Pietro; Laschke, Matthias W.; Menger, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment characterized by chronic limb swelling with interstitial inflammation. The rodent hindlimb is a widely used model for the evaluation of novel lymphedema treatments. However, the assessment of limb volume in small animals is challenging. Recently, high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been introduced for rodent limb volumetry. In the present study we evaluated the validity of microcomputed tomography (μCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in comparison to conventional measuring techniques. For this purpose, acute lymphedema was induced in the mouse hindlimb by a modified popliteal lymphadenectomy. The 4-week course of this type of lymphedema was first assessed in 6 animals. In additional 12 animals, limb volumes were analyzed by μCT, 9.4 T MRI and 30 MHz ultrasound as well as by planimetry, circumferential length and paw thickness measurements. Interobserver correlation was high for all modalities, in particular for μCT analysis (r = 0.975, p < 0.001). Importantly, caliper-measured paw thickness correlated well with μCT (r = 0.861), MRI (r = 0.821) and ultrasound (r = 0.800). Because the assessment of paw thickness represents a time- and cost-effective approach, it may be ideally suited for the quantification of rodent hindlimb lymphedema. PMID:27698469

  9. Living with lymphedema: a qualitative study of women's perspectives on prevention and management following breast cancer-related treatment.

    PubMed

    Greenslade, M Victoria; House, Colleen J

    2006-01-01

    A phenomenological research method was used to investigate the experience of lymphedema in 13 women following breast cancer-related treatment. The women, ranging in age from 45 to 82, living on the east coast of Canada, had lymphedema of the upper extremity for at least one year, and had no evidence of active cancer disease. Semi-structured interviews were used to examine the physical and psychosocial suffering that women with lymphedema experienced. The lack of appropriate pre-intervention education and post-intervention support by health care professionals as well as the lack of effective protocols to prevent lymphedema combined to intensify the suffering. Data analysis incorporated van Manen's (1990) six research activities which give human science its vigor. These non-sequential steps assisted in identifying five major themes: 1) Constancy; 2) Yearning for Normalcy; 3) Continually Searching; 4) Emotional Impact; and 5) Abandonment. The prevailing thread or essence salient to all five themes in this study is denoted as Existential Aloneness as each participant expressed a sense of isolation, of being on their own, of being set adrift to discover what they could about lymphedema, in the best way that they could. Nursing implications and recommendations for change are highlighted. PMID:17523577

  10. Evaluation of the effectiveness of kinesio taping application in a patient with secondary lymphedema in breast cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Halski, Tomasz; Zduńczyk, Małgorzata; Rajfur, Joanna; Pasternok, Małgorzata; Chmielewska, Daria; Piecha, Magdalena; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema is one of the complications resulting from treatment. It is defined as arm oedema in the breast cancer patients caused by interruption of the flow of the axillary lymphatic system from surgery or radiation therapy, which results in the accumulation of fluid in the subcutaneous tissue of the arm, with a decrease in tissue distensibility around the joints and an increased weight of the extremity. Decongestive lymphatic therapy is common management for lymphedema. A program combining skin care, manual lymphatic drainage, exercise, and compression therapy (multilayer bandage or garment) is recognised as the best practice in lymphedema management. Kinesio taping (KT) for lymphatic drainage is a new choice in the field of physical therapy. The material and the original concept of the taping technique were introduced by Dr Kenso Kase in 1973. K-tape had been designed to allow 30-40% longitudinal stretch. It is composed of 100% cotton fibers and acrylic heat sensitive glue. Development of the technique for its administration is still ongoing. The paper discusses the case of a woman with breast cancer, in whom lymphedema occurred. The patient had three weeks of therapy. The treatment consisted of 12 manual lymphatic drainage, 12 pneumatic compressions and 3 applications of the KT method (due to the lack of standard multi-layer bandaging). During the measurement of oedema it was noted that KT had a significant effect on the reduction of lymphedema and accelerates healing effects compared to standard methods. PMID:26327833

  11. Evaluation of the effectiveness of kinesio taping application in a patient with secondary lymphedema in breast cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taradaj, Jakub; Halski, Tomasz; Zduńczyk, Małgorzata; Rajfur, Joanna; Pasternok, Małgorzata; Chmielewska, Daria; Piecha, Magdalena; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema is one of the complications resulting from treatment. It is defined as arm oedema in the breast cancer patients caused by interruption of the flow of the axillary lymphatic system from surgery or radiation therapy, which results in the accumulation of fluid in the subcutaneous tissue of the arm, with a decrease in tissue distensibility around the joints and an increased weight of the extremity. Decongestive lymphatic therapy is common management for lymphedema. A program combining skin care, manual lymphatic drainage, exercise, and compression therapy (multilayer bandage or garment) is recognised as the best practice in lymphedema management. Kinesio taping (KT) for lymphatic drainage is a new choice in the field of physical therapy. The material and the original concept of the taping technique were introduced by Dr Kenso Kase in 1973. K-tape had been designed to allow 30-40% longitudinal stretch. It is composed of 100% cotton fibers and acrylic heat sensitive glue. Development of the technique for its administration is still ongoing. The paper discusses the case of a woman with breast cancer, in whom lymphedema occurred. The patient had three weeks of therapy. The treatment consisted of 12 manual lymphatic drainage, 12 pneumatic compressions and 3 applications of the KT method (due to the lack of standard multi-layer bandaging). During the measurement of oedema it was noted that KT had a significant effect on the reduction of lymphedema and accelerates healing effects compared to standard methods.

  12. Kinesiology Taping reduces lymphedema of the upper extremity in women after breast cancer treatment: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Rosseger, Agnieszka; Hanuszkiewicz, Justyna; Woźniewski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Secondary lymphedema affects approximately 40% of women treated for breast cancer and is recognized as a major problem associated with the therapy of malignant tumors. Consequently, new therapeutic methods are constantly being sought to effectively eliminate the condition. One of the new forms of edema management, especially in the initial stages of edematous development, is Kinesiology Taping (KT). Aim of the study The aim of the study was to assess the effects of KT applications on the extent of lymphedema of the upper extremity in women post cancer treatment. Material and methods The study group consisted of 28 women after axillary lymphadenectomy due to breast cancer. All the patients were diagnosed with grade I secondary lymphedema. Kinesiology Taping was applied to a total of 14 randomly selected women. The remaining 14 patients constituted a control group. The extent of lymphedema was measured using a centimeter tape and Limb Volumes Professional 5.0 software. Results A significant reduction in the extent of lymphedema (p = 0.0009) was achieved in the KT group between baseline and post-treatment assessments. No such reduction, however, was found in the control group (p = 0.36). Conclusions Kinesiology Taping applications are an effective method of early-stage edema management. Kinesiology Taping may be a safe new therapeutic option in patients who are contraindicated for the use of other methods. PMID:26327858

  13. Diet as prophylaxis and treatment for venous thromboembolism?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Both prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE: deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary emboli (PE)) with anticoagulants are associated with significant risks of major and fatal hemorrhage. Anticoagulation treatment of VTE has been the standard of care in the USA since before 1962 when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began requiring randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) showing efficacy, so efficacy trials were never required for FDA approval. In clinical trials of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients before the 1980s, anticoagulant prophylaxis was clearly beneficial (fatal pulmonary emboli (FPE) without anticoagulants = 0.99%, FPE with anticoagulants = 0.31%). However, observational studies and RCTs of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients from the 1980s until 2010 show that FPE deaths without anticoagulants are about one-fourth the rate that occurs during prophylaxis with anticoagulants (FPE without anticoagulants = 0.023%, FPE while receiving anticoagulant prophylaxis = 0.10%). Additionally, an FPE rate of about 0.012% (35/28,400) in patients receiving prophylactic anticoagulants can be attributed to 'rebound hypercoagulation' in the two months after stopping anticoagulants. Alternatives to anticoagulant prophylaxis should be explored. Methods and Findings The literature concerning dietary influences on VTE incidence was reviewed. Hypotheses concerning the etiology of VTE were critiqued in relationship to the rationale for dietary versus anticoagulant approaches to prophylaxis and treatment. Epidemiological evidence suggests that a diet with ample fruits and vegetables and little meat may substantially reduce the risk of VTE; vegetarian, vegan, or Mediterranean diets favorably affect serum markers of hemostasis and inflammation. The valve cusp hypoxia hypothesis of DVT/VTE etiology is consistent with the development of VTE being affected directly or indirectly by diet. However, it is less consistent with the rationale of using

  14. [Prophylaxis of Pulmonary Aspiration during General Anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mori, Yosuke; Sumikura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary aspiration of gastric or esophageal contents is uncommon; however, it is one of the most severe complications in the perioperative period. The aspiration is associated with possible clinical outcomes, ranging from mild asymptomatic limited episodes of bronchial injury up to the development of a severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. To reduce the incidence of pulmonary aspiration, rapid sequence induction and intubation and awake tracheal intubation are commonly chosen anesthetic techniques for the management of patients at risk of aspiration of gastric or esophageal contents. Although there have been innumerable reports that describe prophylaxis of pulmonary aspiration, currently, there is insufficient evidence to prevent passive regurgitation in at-risk anesthetized patients. Some techniques to prevent pulmonary aspiration entered medical practice on a limited evidence base, but with common sense supporting its use. Properly applied techniques are probably effective at preventing regurgitation in the perioperative period although more randomized controlled trials are awaited to confirm this. Pulmonary aspiration should be prevented using multidisciplinary techniques and considerations that have been shown to improve effectiveness of prophylaxes. However, further research is necessary to support this strategy. PMID:27004384

  15. Anthrax prophylaxis: recent advances and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, E. Diane; Dyson, Edward Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is a serious, potentially fatal disease that can present in four distinct clinical patterns depending on the route of infection (cutaneous, gastrointestinal, pneumonic, or injectional); effective strategies for prophylaxis and therapy are therefore required. This review addresses the complex mechanisms of pathogenesis employed by the bacterium and describes how, as understanding of these has developed over many years, so too have current strategies for vaccination and therapy. It covers the clinical and veterinary use of live attenuated strains of anthrax and the subsequent identification of protein sub-units for incorporation into vaccines, as well as combinations of protein sub-units with spore or other components. It also addresses the application of these vaccines for conventional prophylactic use, as well as post-exposure use in conjunction with antibiotics. It describes the licensed acellular vaccines AVA and AVP and discusses the prospects for a next generation of recombinant sub-unit vaccines for anthrax, balancing the regulatory requirement and current drive for highly defined vaccines, against the risk of losing the “danger” signals required to induce protective immunity in the vaccinee. It considers novel approaches to reduce time to immunity by means of combining, for example, dendritic cell vaccination with conventional approaches and considers current opportunities for the immunotherapy of anthrax. PMID:26441934

  16. Prophylaxis of migraine in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kacperski, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    While it has been established that headaches in the pediatric age group are relatively common, the characterization of headache disorders and their treatment in this group has historically been limited. Due to the paucity of controlled studies on prophylaxis of the primary headache disorders in children, the diagnosis of migraine often rests on criteria similar to those used in adults. Data from adult studies are often extrapolated and applied to the pediatric patient. Although it appears that many prophylactic agents are safe, well tolerated and efficacious in children, currently only topiramate is FDA-approved for use in patients 12 years and over. As a result, despite often experiencing significant disability, many children who present to their physician with migraines do not receive preventive therapy. One-third of adolescents meet the criteria for warranting prophylactic therapy, yet few are offered a preventative medication. Moreover, controlled clinical trials investigating the use of both abortive and prophylactic medications in children have suffered from high placebo response rates. A diverse group of medications are used to prevent migraine attacks, including antidepressants, antiepileptics, antihistamines and antihypertensive agents, yet there still remains a serious lack of controlled studies on the pharmacological treatment of pediatric migraine.

  17. Streamlining HIV Testing for HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Leigler, Teri; Kallas, Esper; Schechter, Mauro; Sharma, Usha; Glidden, David; Grant, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-testing algorithms for preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) should be optimized to minimize the risk of drug resistance, the time off PrEP required to evaluate false-positive screening results, and costs and to expedite the start of therapy for those confirmed to be infected. HIV rapid tests (RTs) for anti-HIV antibodies provide results in less than 1 h and can be conducted by nonlicensed staff at the point of care. In many regions, Western blot (WB) testing is required to confirm reactive RT results. WB testing, however, causes delays in diagnosis and adds expense. The iPrEx study evaluated the safety and efficacy of daily oral emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate among HIV-seronegative men and transgender women who have sex with men: HIV infection was assessed with two RTs plus WB confirmation, followed by HIV-1 plasma viral load testing. During the iPrEx study, there were 51,260 HIV status evaluations among 2,499 volunteers using RTs: 142 (0.28%) had concordant positive results (100% were eventually confirmed) and 19 (0.04%) had discordant results among 14 participants; 11 were eventually determined to be HIV infected. A streamlined approach using only one RT to screen and a second RT to confirm (without WB) would have had nearly the same accuracy. Discrepant RT results are best evaluated with nucleic acid testing, which would also increase sensitivity. PMID:25378570

  18. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation without fluconazole and fluoroquinolone prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, D; Kreil, S; Nolte, F; Reinwald, M; Hofmann, W-K; Klein, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) and fluconazole prophylaxis is recommended for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). However, due to an uncertain scientific basis and the increasing emergence of resistant germs, this policy should be questioned. Therefore, FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis was omitted in alloHCT at our center. In this retrospective analysis, all consecutive patients (n = 63) who underwent first alloHCT at our institution from September 2010 to September 2013 were included. Patients neither received FQ nor fluconazole prophylaxis. Day 100 mortality, incidence of febrile neutropenia, bacterial infections, and invasive fungal diseases (IFD) were assessed. Sixteen patients who started conditioning under antimicrobial treatment/prophylaxis due to pre-existing neutropenia (3/16), IFD (12/16), or aortic valve replacement (1/16) were excluded from the analysis. Finally, 47 patients were transplanted without prophylaxis as intended. Day 100 mortality was 9 %. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 62 % (29/47); 17/47 patients (36 %) experienced a blood stream infection (BSI) with detection of Gram-positive bacteria in 14 patients, Gram-negative bacteria in five patients, and candida in one patient, respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacteria; 12/21 isolated Gram-positive and 3/6 Gram-negative bacteria were FQ resistant. In 21 % (10/47) of the patients, IFD (1x proven, 1x probable, and 8x possible) were diagnosed. To conclude, all three criteria, day 100 mortality, the incidence of IFD, and BSI, are in the range of published data for patients transplanted with FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis. These data demonstrate that alloHCT is feasible without FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis.

  19. [The theory of lymphangion and current approaches to the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of lymphedema of the lower extremities].

    PubMed

    Bubnova, N A; Borisova, R P; Borisov, A V

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the results of examination carried out by the Sankt-Peterburg school of lymphologists, pertaining to the structure, physiological properties and function of lymphangions responsible for active lymph transport. The problems of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of lymphedema of the lower extremities used in clinical practice are reviewed from the standpoint of the new theory. The data obtained as a result of the clinico-morphofunctional studies allowed to delineate the stages of lymphedema as dependent on the degree of lymphocytic structure and function integrity. Based on the aforesaid the new approaches to the diagnosis and selection of the treatment methods for lymphedema of the lower extremities have been formulated. PMID:12811377

  20. Complex decongestive physical therapy and low-level laser therapy for the treatment of pediatric congenital lymphedema: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Woon Taek; Chung, Sin Ho; Lee, Ju Sang

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] We report the case of a pediatric patient with congenital lymphedema treated with complex decongestive physical therapy and low-level laser therapy. [Subjects and Methods] The patient was a 2 year-old girl who had lymphedema in the left upper limb since birth. Complex decongestive physical therapy and low-level laser therapy were administered for 7 sessions. [Results] The circumferences of the middle of the forearm, elbow joint, wrist, and hand of the left upper limb decreased 0.5, 3, 0.5, and 2 cm, respectively. The moisture content of the left upper limb decreased 70 mL (6.66%), while moisture ratio increased by 0.007%. [Conclusion] Complex decongestive physical therapy and low-level laser therapy are effective for reducing lymphedema in pediatric patients. PMID:26180372

  1. Amifostine Prophylaxis on Bone Densitometry, Biomechanical Strength and Union in Mandibular Pathologic Fracture Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N.; Donneys, Alexis; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Poushanchi, Behdod; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Weiss, Daniela M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathologic fractures (Fx) of the mandibles are severely debilitating consequences of radiation (XRT) in the treatment of craniofacial malignancy. We have previously demonstrated Amifostine’s effect (AMF) in the remediation of radiation-induced cellular damage. We posit that AMF prophylaxis will preserve bone strength and drastically reverse radiotherapy-induced non-union in a murine mandibular model of pathologic fracture repair. Materials and Methods Twenty-nine rats were randomized into 3 groups: Fx, XRT/Fx, and AMF/XRT/Fx. A fractionated human equivalent dose of radiation was delivered to the left hemimandibles of XRT/Fx and AMF/XRT/Fx. AMF/XRT/Fx was pre-treated with AMF. All groups underwent left mandibular osteotomy with external fixation and setting of a 2.1mm fracture gap post-operatively. Utilizing micro-computed tomography and biomechanical testing, the healed fracture was evaluated for strength. Results All radiomorphometrics and biomechanical properties were significantly diminished in XRT/Fx compared to both Fx and AMF/XRT/Fx. No difference was demonstrated between Fx and AMF/XRT/Fx in both outcomes. Conclusion Our investigation establishes the significant and substantial capability of AMF prophylaxis to preserve and enhance bone union, quality and strength in the setting of human equivalent radiotherapy. Such novel discoveries establish the true potential to utilize pharmacotherapy to prevent and improve the treatment outcomes of radiation-induced late pathologic fractures. PMID:23860272

  2. [Antibody detection after antepartal rhesus prophylaxis: normal values or sensitization].

    PubMed

    Behrens, O; Bader, W; Holle, W; Maas, D H; Schneider, J

    1993-05-01

    Antibody screening tests were performed in 29 unsensitized pregnant women after antepartum Rh immune prophylaxis, using the indirect Coombs test (ICT) and a more sensitive ID-microtyping-system (IDM). With the ICT, anti-D antibodies were detected in 85% for at least 4 weeks and at most 8 weeks after immunisation. The maximum titer was 1:8. With the IDM, 97% showed antibodies against 'D' for at least 4 weeks and at most 11 weeks with a maximum of 1:16. The IDM titer was always 1 to 3 steps more sensitive than the ICT. After postpartum Rh immune prophylaxis, anti-D titers were again positive in many of the patients (ICT: 42%; IDM: 60%). In conclusion, it is nearly always possible to measure antibodies against 'D' after antepartum Rh immune prophylaxis and IDM was superior in comparison to ICT. However, maternal isoimmunisation to the rhesus antigen cannot be excluded for sure and patients have then to be controlled. As isoimmunisation could not be confirmed in any of our patients, postpartum Rh immune prophylaxis has to be administered even after detection of an antibody titer against 'D' after antepartum Rh prophylaxis.

  3. Effects of an Educational Module in Rationalizing Surgical Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nagdeo, Neena; Sonarkar, R; Thombare, V R; Akhtar, M; Dasgupta, S

    2015-08-01

    Assessment of current antibiotic prescribing patterns is an important step towards appropriate use of antimicrobial agents. This study was planned to know the surgical prophylaxis practices and the influence of educational intervention. In this educational interventional study, only clean and clean-contaminated surgeries were included. Preinterventional study was done by collecting data regarding the use of surgical prophylaxis in the Department of Surgery. After analyzing the preinterventional data, educational intervention was done. A pretest questionnaire was given to all the surgeons to assess knowledge and practice of surgical prophylaxis in our institute. The questionnaire was designed to collect information regarding the use of prophylactic antibiotic, its duration, time of administration, and prevention of surgical site infections (SSI). In our study, third-generation cephalosporin was used in maximum cases in preinterventional analysis and prophylaxis was continued for 3-5 days. Surgeon's decision in selecting a prophylactic agent was based on information taken from departmental colleagues or drug companies. Two or more doses of antibiotic were used even when duration of surgery did not exceed more than two and half hours. Definite improvement was seen after the education where single antibiotic was used as prophylactic drug and the first dose of antibiotic was administered 30 to 60 min before incision. This shows that educational intervention makes a change in antibiotic prescribing habit. Hence, there is an urgent need for adoption of specific guidelines to ensure standardization of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis practices in hospitals. PMID:26702236

  4. Prophylaxis of migraine: general principles and patient acceptance

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Domenico; Tepper, Stewart J

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a chronic neurological condition with episodic exacerbations. Migraine is highly prevalent, and associated with significant pain, disability, and diminished quality of life. Migraine management is an important health care issue. Migraine management includes avoidance of trigger factors, lifestyle modifications, non-pharmacological therapies, and medications. Pharmacological treatment is traditionally divided into acute or symptomatic treatment, and preventive treatment or prophylaxis. Many migraine patients can be treated using only acute treatment. Patients with severe and/or frequent migraines require long-term preventive therapy. Prophylaxis requires daily administration of anti-migraine compounds with potential adverse events or contraindications, and may also interfere with other concurrent conditions and treatments. These problems may induce patients to reject the idea of a preventive treatment, leading to poor patient adherence. This paper reviews the main factors influencing patient acceptance of anti-migraine prophylaxis, providing practical suggestions to enhance patient willingness to accept pharmacological anti-migraine preventive therapy. We also provide information about the main clinical characteristics of migraine, and their negative consequences. The circumstances warranting prophylaxis in migraine patients as well as the main characteristics of the compounds currently used in migraine prophylaxis will also be briefly discussed, focusing on those aspects which can enhance patient acceptance and adherence. PMID:19337456

  5. [Antibody detection after antepartal rhesus prophylaxis: normal values or sensitization].

    PubMed

    Behrens, O; Bader, W; Holle, W; Maas, D H; Schneider, J

    1993-05-01

    Antibody screening tests were performed in 29 unsensitized pregnant women after antepartum Rh immune prophylaxis, using the indirect Coombs test (ICT) and a more sensitive ID-microtyping-system (IDM). With the ICT, anti-D antibodies were detected in 85% for at least 4 weeks and at most 8 weeks after immunisation. The maximum titer was 1:8. With the IDM, 97% showed antibodies against 'D' for at least 4 weeks and at most 11 weeks with a maximum of 1:16. The IDM titer was always 1 to 3 steps more sensitive than the ICT. After postpartum Rh immune prophylaxis, anti-D titers were again positive in many of the patients (ICT: 42%; IDM: 60%). In conclusion, it is nearly always possible to measure antibodies against 'D' after antepartum Rh immune prophylaxis and IDM was superior in comparison to ICT. However, maternal isoimmunisation to the rhesus antigen cannot be excluded for sure and patients have then to be controlled. As isoimmunisation could not be confirmed in any of our patients, postpartum Rh immune prophylaxis has to be administered even after detection of an antibody titer against 'D' after antepartum Rh prophylaxis. PMID:8514107

  6. ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS IN LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECISTECTOMY: IS IT WORTH DOING?

    PubMed Central

    PASSOS, Márcio Alexandre Terra; PORTARI-FILHO, Pedro Eder

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy has very low risk for infectious complications, ranging the infection rate from 0.4% to 1.1%. Many surgeons still use routine antibiotic prophylaxis Aim: Evaluate the real impact of antibiotic prophylaxis in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomies in low risk patients. Method: Prospective, randomized and double-blind study. Were evaluated 100 patients that underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy divided in two groups: group A (n=50), patients that received prophylaxis using intravenous Cephazolin (2 g) during anesthetic induction and group B (n=50), patients that didn't receive any antibiotic prophylaxis. The outcome evaluated were infeccious complications at surgical site. The patients were reviewed seven and 30 days after surgery. Results: There was incidence of 2% in infection complications in group A and 2% in group B. There was no statistical significant difference of infectious complications (p=0,05) between the groups. The groups were homogeneous and comparable. Conclusion: The use of the antibiotic prophylaxis in laparoscopic cholecystectomy in low risk patients doesn't provide any significant benefit in the decrease of surgical wound infection. PMID:27759780

  7. Clinical aspects of antimicrobial prophylaxis for invasive urological procedures.

    PubMed

    Mirone, Vincenzo; Franco, Marco

    2014-10-01

    The essential value of antimicrobial prophylaxis is to defend the patient undergoing invasive diagnostic procedures or surgery against infectious complications by reducing the bacterial load. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen (70-80%) isolated in acute community-acquired uncomplicated infections, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus (10 to 15%). Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Proteus species, and enterococci infrequently cause uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis. The pathogens traditionally associated with UTI are altering many of their features, particularly because of antimicrobial resistance. Currently, only transurethral resection of prostate and prostate biopsy has been well studied and has high and moderately high levels of evidence in favor of using antibiotic prophylaxis. Other urological interventions have not been well studied. The moderate to low evidence suggests that there is no need for antibiotic prophylaxis in cystoscopy, urodynamic investigations, and extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy, whereas the low evidence favors the use of antibiotic prophylaxis for therapeutic ureterorenoscopy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. The scarce data from studies on transurethral resection of bladder tumors cannot provide a definitive indication for antibiotic prophylaxis for this intervention. PMID:25245706

  8. Topical treatment of acute hindlimb lymphedema of the rat using a troxerutin-phosphatidylcholine complex in liposomal-like microdispersion.

    PubMed

    Casley-Smith, J R; Casley-Smith, J R; Curri, S; Földi, M

    1993-03-01

    A new reversible complex between troxerutin and phosphatidylcholine (85-90mg/kg per day), in the form of a liposome-like water microdispersion, was topically applied to the rat thigh in an experimental counterpart of acute lymphedema. After four days there was 75% less hindlimb edema (mean decrease 40% of normal compared to control 10% of normal) in the treated compared with the untreated rats. These findings suggest that this drug preparation may be useful to minimize acute peripheral lymphedema in patients.

  9. Penile and scrotal lymphedema as an unusual presentation of Crohn's disease: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, W; Wiegman, M J; Damstra, R J

    2012-03-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory intestinal disease that primarily causes abdominal pain and diarrhea. We report a male patient who presented with penile and scrotal lymphedema and inguinal fistulas as the first manifestations of Crohn's disease. Extraintestinal or metastatic Crohn's disease initially presenting as genital lymphedema with fistula formation is rare. Skin lesions in extraintestinal Crohn's disease typically show non-caseating, sarcoidal granulomas with numerous foreign body- and Langhans-type multinucleated giant cells, which are separated from intestinal involvement by normal skin. Treatment options are limited and include multi-immunosuppressant medications.

  10. Effects of a paste-free prophylaxis polishing cup and various prophylaxis polishing pastes on tooth enamel and restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Covey, David A; Barnes, Caren; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W

    2011-01-01

    The application of cleaning and polishing agents to a patient's dentition is a routine part of many dental practices. This study measured the surface roughness and surface gloss of tooth enamel, composite resin, and dental porcelain restorative materials when exposed to a paste-free prophylaxis polishing cup as well as a conventional prophylaxis polishing paste. Samples of human tooth enamel, a composite resin restorative material, and dental porcelain were prepared by a series of polishing papers to produce a flat smooth surface. The baseline average surface roughness (Ra) was measured using a contact stylus profilometer, and the surface gloss was measured with a glossmeter. The test samples were subjected to a standardized polishing routine using a paste-free prophylaxis polishing cup and a fine- or coarse-particle prophylaxis paste. Post-treatment surface roughness and gloss measurements were compared using a paired t statistical test. The conventional prophylaxis pastes increased surface roughness and decreased the gloss of the composite resin and tooth enamel test groups. The paste-free cups did not significantly affect the surface roughness of the enamel or the restorative materials. Dental porcelain surface roughness essentially was not affected by the application of paste-free cups and the fine and coarse pastes.

  11. Intracameral cefuroxime: prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2013-02-01

    Results of the landmark European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons trial and additional prospective and retrospective studies support the use of intracameral cefuroxime in the prophylaxis of endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. Prophylaxis with intracameral cefuroxime at the recommended dose appears to be well tolerated in patients undergoing cataract surgery. However, off-label use of intracameral cefuroxime usually requires a two-step dilution process with the potential for dilution errors, and there are also concerns regarding the risk of contamination. Aprokam® (intracameral cefuroxime) has been approved in the EU for the prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. After reconstitution of Aprokam®, no further dilution is required and each vial is only indicated for single-patient use; this has the potential to reduce the risk of both dilution errors and contamination.

  12. Role of vaccinations and prophylaxis in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Despoina; Tsoulas, Christos; Tragiannidis, Athanassios; Sipsas, Nikolaos V

    2015-04-01

    Targeted strategies for reducing the increased risk of infection in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases include vaccinations as well as antibiotic prophylaxis in selected patients. However, there are still issues under debate: Is vaccination in patients with rheumatic diseases immunogenic? Is it safe? What is the impact of immunosuppressive drugs on vaccine immunogenicity and safety? Does vaccination cause disease flares? In which cases is prophylaxis against Pneumocystis jirovecii required? This review addresses these important questions to which clinicians and researchers still do not have definite answers. The first part includes immunization recommendations and reviews current data on vaccine efficacy and safety in patients with rheumatic diseases. The second part discusses prophylaxis for Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  13. Mechanical thromboembolic prophylaxis with risk stratification in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, William G; Reeves, James D; Fricka, Kevin B; Goyal, Nitin; Engh, Gerard A; Parks, Nancy L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of thromboembolic and bleeding complications when using mechanical prophylaxis with preoperative risk stratification following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Between 1994 and 2007, 4037 TKAs were performed on 3144 patients at our institution. Mechanical VTE prophylaxis was used for standard risk patients, which included AV impulse foot pumps, thigh high stockings, and early mobilization. Chemoprophylaxis was only given to patients who were at increased thromboembolic risk. The incidence of DVT identified by ultrasound following TKA was 2.1%. A retrospective review showed 1 patient had a fatal pulmonary embolism, and 5 patients had bleeding complications in the knee. We conclude that mechanical thromboembolic prophylaxis using risk stratification is safe and effective following TKA.

  14. Standardized Method for Quantification of Developing Lymphedema in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ancukiewicz, Marek; Russell, Tara A.; Otoole, Jean; Specht, Michelle; Singer, Marybeth; Kelada, Alexandra; Murphy, Colleen D.; Pogachar, Jessica; Gioioso, Valeria; Patel, Megha; Skolny, Melissa; Smith, Barbara L.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To develop a simple and practical formula for quantifying breast cancer-related lymphedema, accounting for both the asymmetry of upper extremities' volumes and their temporal changes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed bilateral perometer measurements of the upper extremity in a series of 677 women who prospectively underwent lymphedema screening during treatment for unilateral breast cancer at Massachusetts General Hospital between August 2005 and November 2008. Four sources of variation were analyzed: between repeated measurements on the same arm at the same session; between both arms at baseline (preoperative) visit; in follow-up measurements; and between patients. Effects of hand dominance, time since diagnosis and surgery, age, weight, and body mass index were also analyzed. Results: The statistical distribution of variation of measurements suggests that the ratio of volume ratios is most appropriate for quantification of both asymmetry and temporal changes. Therefore, we present the formula for relative volume change (RVC): RVC = (A{sub 2}U{sub 1})/(U{sub 2}A{sub 1}) - 1, where A{sub 1}, A{sub 2} are arm volumes on the side of the treated breast at two different time points, and U{sub 1}, U{sub 2} are volumes on the contralateral side. Relative volume change is not significantly associated with hand dominance, age, or time since diagnosis. Baseline weight correlates (p = 0.0074) with higher RVC; however, baseline body mass index or weight changes over time do not. Conclusions: We propose the use of the RVC formula to assess the presence and course of breast cancer-related lymphedema in clinical practice and research.

  15. Identification of Prognostic Risk Factors for Transient and Persistent Lymphedema after Multimodal Treatment for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungsoo; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Chung, Seung Hyun; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Tae Hyun; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors for transient lymphedema (TLE) and persistent lymphedema (PLE) following treatment for breast cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 1,073 patients who underwent curative breast surgery were analyzed. TLE was defined as one episode of arm swelling that had resolved spontaneously by the next follow-up; arm swelling that persisted over two consecutive examinations was considered PLE. Results At a median follow-up period of 5.1 years, 370 cases of lymphedema were reported, including 120 TLE (11.2%) and 250 PLE (23.3%). Initial grade 1 swelling was observed in 351 patients, of which 120 were limited to TLE (34%), while the other 231 progressed to PLE (66%). All initial swelling observed in TLE patients was classified as grade 1. In multivariate analysis, chemotherapy with taxane and supraclavicular radiation therapy (SCRT) were associated with development of TLE, whereas SCRT, stage III cancer and chemotherapy with taxane were identified as risk factors for PLE (p < 0.05). The estimated incidence of TLE among initial grade 1 patients was calculated using up to three treatment-related risk factors (number of dissected axillary lymph nodes, SCRT, and taxane chemotherapy). The approximate ratios of TLE and PLE based on the number of risk factors were 7:1 (no factor), 1:1 (one factor), 1:2 (two factors), and 1:3 (three factors). Conclusion One-third of initial swelling events were transient, whereas the other two-thirds of patients experienced PLE. Estimation of TLE and PLE based on known treatment factors could facilitate prediction of this life-long complication. PMID:26875199

  16. Role of physiotherapy and patient education in lymphedema control following breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shiang-Ru; Hong, Rong-Bin; Chou, Willy; Hsiao, Pei-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether education in combination with physiotherapy can reduce the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods We analyzed 1,217 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer between January 2007 and December 2011 who underwent tumor resection and axillary lymph node dissection. The patients were divided into three groups: Group A (n=415), who received neither education nor physiotherapy postsurgery; Group B (n=672), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery; and Group C (n=130), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery, followed by a physiotherapy program. All patients were monitored until October 2013 to determine whether BCRL developed. BCRL risk factors were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results During the follow-up, 188 patients (15.4%) developed lymphedema, including 77 (18.6%) in Group A, 101 (15.0%) in Group B, and 10 (7.7%) in Group C (P=0.010). The median period from surgery to lymphedema was 0.54 years (interquartile range =0.18–1.78). The independent risk factors for BCRL included positive axillary lymph node invasion, a higher (>20) number of dissected axillary lymph nodes, and having undergone radiation therapy, whereas receiving an educational program followed by physiotherapy was a protective factor against BCRL (hazard ratio =0.35, 95% confidence interval =0.18–0.67, P=0.002). Conclusion Patient education that begins within the first week postsurgery and is followed by physiotherapy is effective in reducing the risk of BCRL in women with breast cancer. PMID:25750536

  17. The Effectiveness of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression in Long-Term Therapy of Lymphedema of Lower Limbs

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska, Marzanna; Durlik, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The manual lymphatic drainage in lymphedema has proved to be successful; however, this method cannot be applied to millions of patients around the world. The only solution is to offer inexpensive, easily accessible mechanical devices for pneumatic compression (IPC). These devices should be designed on parameters of edema fluid hydromechanics. Recent data point to high pressures and long time of compression. Aim: To validate the effects of 3 years daily high pressure, long inflation time IPC therapy in terms of decrease of limb circumference/volume, tissue elasticity, histological changes, and incidental complications. Methods: A group of 18 patients with unilateral leg lymphedema stage II to IV was treated for a period of 3 years using an 8-chamber sleeve, sequential inflation of chambers to 100–120 mmHg for 50 sec (total 400 sec). Limb circumference and tissue tonicity were measured at monthly intervals. Correlation between decrease in calf and thigh circumference and increase in elasticity was done. Results: The treatment revealed durable permanent decrease of limb circumference and increased elasticity of tissues. The improvement was most expressed in the calf above the ankle and mid-calf. No complications as thigh ring or chronic genital edema were observed. There was no direct correlation between the decrease in limb circumference and increase in elasticity, most likely due to different mass of fibrous tissue. Conclusions: IPC takes over the permanently missing function of the obliterated lymphatics by squeezing edema tissue fluid to the regions with normal lymphatic drainage. The limb circumference is decreased or at least does not further increase, elasticity of tissue is increased and maintained. No complications in limb tissues were observed. The long-term, high pressure IPC, long inflation timed therapy can be safely be recommended to patients with lower limb lymphedema. PMID:24927065

  18. Evidence-based or traditional treatment of cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Johansson, K; Karlsson, K; Nikolaidis, P

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of lymphedema (LE) related to treatment of women's cancer (breast and gynecologic) is as high as 40%. Treatment of LE varies around the world but was decades ago initially based on programs including manual lymph drainage (MLD), compression, skin care and easy exercise. With accumulating evidence and experience, it is time to consider if altering these treatment principles is needed. Based on accumulating evidence, we suggest less emphasis on manual lymph drainage and more on early diagnosis, compression, weight control and exercise for improvement of strength and circulation. PMID:26333211

  19. Massive Localized Lymphedema in the Morbidly Obese Patient: A Clinical Entity Mimicking Lymphosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kotidis, Efstathios; Cepaityte, Dainora; Petrakis, Georgios; Sapalidis, Konstantinos; Kanellos, Ioannis

    2015-09-01

    Massive localized lymphedema (MLL) is a rare benign soft tissue lesion that develops in morbidly obese patients, most commonly on the medial thigh (though other locations have also been described). The cause of MLL remains unknown, but the common denominator in all reported cases is obesity. The diagnosis of MLL is usually made based on clinical history and presentation but it is believed to be underdiagnosed due to a lack of awareness of this distinct entity. When left untreated, MLL can degenerate into angiosarcoma. This report describes a case of MLL of the right lower abdominal wall in an obese 61-year-old female (BMI = 42 kg/m(2)). PMID:26367787

  20. Methodologic considerations for trials of lung cancer prophylaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    Prophylaxis is likely to be of increasing importance in the control of lung cancer. Areas already suggested as potential fields of investigation include the use of specific immunoprophylaxis or synthetic retinoids. Thorough evaluation of the effects and hazards of such prophylaxis will be required, and the most satisfactory approach is to conduct controlled prophylactic trials. Such trials must rest on the same basic principles as those established for therapeutic trials. However, new problems bearing on ethical requirements, the sampling procedure, and the practical conduct of the trials will arise. Compliance, adverse effects, end points for analysis of the prophylactic effects, and rules for when to stop a trial are discussed. PMID:7363245

  1. Management of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Paydar, Shahram; Sabetian, Golnar; Khalili, Hosseinali; Fallahi, Javad; Tahami, Mohammad; Ziaian, Bizhan; Abbasi, Hamid Reza; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Ghahramani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PTE) are known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). DVT occurs when a thrombus (a blood clot) forms in deep veins of the body, usually in the lower extremities. It can cause swelling or leg pain, but sometimes may occur with no symptoms. Awareness of DVT is the best way to prevent the VTE. Patients with trauma are at increased risk of DVT and subsequent PE because of coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, DVT prophylaxis is essential but the VTE prophylaxis strategy is controversial for the trauma patients. The risk factors for VTE includes pelvic and lower extremity fractures, and head injury. PMID:27162921

  2. Considerations in individualizing prophylaxis in patients with haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Valentino, L A

    2014-09-01

    Prophylaxis is considered optimal care for children and adults with severe haemophilia A because of its proven ability to reduce joint and other bleeding episodes. However, a 'one size fits all' approach to prophylaxis is not ideal, potentially leading to over-treatment in some individuals and under-treatment in others. Moreover, a generic plan fails to take into account a patient's lifestyle and personal preferences. This article reviews the factors contributing to bleeding risk and joint damage and uses case studies to illustrate how these contributors can be weighed to individualize the prophylactic regimen, thereby increasing the likelihood of therapeutic success.

  3. Randomized comparison of prophylaxis and on-demand regimens with FEIBA NF in the treatment of haemophilia A and B with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, S V; Tangada, S; Stasyshyn, O; Mamonov, V; Phillips, J; Guzman-Becerra, N; Grigorian, A; Ewenstein, B; Wong, W-Y

    2014-01-01

    Factor replacement therapy for the treatment of moderate to severe haemophilia A and B can be complicated by the production of inhibitory alloantibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX. Treatment with the nanofiltered anti-inhibitor coagulant complex, Factor Eight Inhibitor Bypassing Activity (FEIBA NF), is a key therapeutic option for controlling acute haemorrhages in patients with high-titre inhibitors or low-titre inhibitors refractory to replacement therapy. Given the high risk for morbidity and mortality in haemophilia patients with inhibitors to FVIII or FIX, we conducted this Phase 3 prospective study to evaluate whether prophylaxis with FEIBA NF is a safe and effective treatment option. Over a 1-year period, 17 subjects were treated prophylactically (85 ± 15 U kg−1 every other day) while 19 subjects were treated on demand. The median (IQR) annualized bleeding rate (ABR) during prophylaxis was 7.9 (8.1), compared to 28.7 (32.3) during on-demand treatment, which amounts to a 72.5% reduction and a statistically significant difference in ABRs between arms (P = 0.0003). Three (17.6%) subjects (ITT) on prophylaxis experienced no bleeding episodes, whereas none treated on demand were bleeding episode-free. Total utilization of FEIBA NF for the treatment of bleeding episodes was significantly higher during on-demand therapy than prophylaxis (P = 0.0067). There were no differences in the rates of related adverse events between arms. This study demonstrates that FEIBA prophylaxis significantly reduces all types of bleeding compared with on-demand treatment, and the safety of prophylaxis is comparable to that of on-demand treatment. PMID:23910578

  4. The effects of reduction operation with genital lymphedema on the frequency of erysipelas and the quality of life.

    PubMed

    Zvonik, M; Földi, E; Felmerer, G

    2011-09-01

    Genital lymphedema represents a severe disability for patients particularly when complicated by erysipelas, the most frequent complication. The objectives of this study were: to investigate the frequency of erysipelas in patients with genital lymphedema and genital lymphatic cysts who underwent evaluation for surgical treatment, to observe the influence of resection operations on the frequency of erysipelas, and to measure changes in the quality of life due to the resection. A total of 93 patients with genital lymphedema were studied. All patients underwent integrated care treatment in the Földi Clinic, Hinterzarten and the Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery of the University Hospital Freiburg during the period between 1997 and 2007. 44 of these patients underwent surgical treatment of genital lymphedema. The results indicate that lymphatic cysts were the most important risk-aggravating factor for recurrent erysipelas with lymphorrhea in the genital region (p < 0.001). Following the resection operation, however, the number of erysipelas incidents significantly decreased (p < 0.001). In addition, the antibiotic dose could be reduced after surgery (p = 0.039) and an improved quality of life was achieved (p < 0.001).

  5. Effect of Kinesiology Taping on breast cancer-related lymphedema: a randomized single-blind controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Smykla, A; Walewicz, K; Trybulski, R; Halski, T; Kucharzewski, M; Kucio, C; Mikusek, W; Klakla, K; Taradaj, J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of Kinesiology Taping (KT) for treating breast cancer-related lymphedema. Sixty-five women with unilateral stage II and III lymphedema were randomly grouped into the KT group (K-tapes, n = 20), the Quasi KT group (quasi K-tapes, n = 22), or the MCT group (multilayered compression therapy group, n = 23). Skin care, 45 min pneumatic compression therapy, 1 h manual lymphatic drainage, and application of K-tape/Quasi K-tapes/multilayered short-stretch bandages were given every treatment session, 3 times per week for 1 month. Patient evaluation items included limb size and percentage edema. Comparing the changes in K-tapes with quasi K-tapes changes, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05). The edema reduction of multilayered bandages was much better than in results observed in taping groups. The KT appeared to be ineffective at secondary lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. The single-blind, controlled pilot study results suggest that K-tape could not replace the bandage, and at this moment it must not be an alternative choice for the breast cancer-related lymphedema patient. The trial is registered with ACTRN12613001173785.

  6. Massive localized lymphedema revisited: a quickly rising complication of the obesity epidemic.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Karan; Tadisina, Kashyap K; Brewer, Michael; Holton, Luther H; Banda, Abhishake K; Singh, Devinder P

    2015-01-01

    Massive localized lymphedema (MLL) is a rising and potentially fatal complication of the obesity epidemic. Described as a benign lymphoproliferative overgrowth of obese patients, MLL is a form of secondary lymphedema, caused by the obstruction of lymphatic flow, with characteristic clinical and histological presentation. Patients have a large mass with classic skin changes often accompanied by lymphatic weeping that require complex reconstruction. Although oftentimes benign, if left untreated, MLL can progress to angiosarcoma, further supporting the need for more research into MLL and its sequelae. We present a unique case of MLL of the mons pubis in a 52-year-old man with a body mass index of 75.7 kg/m. The literature was comprehensively reviewed with a total of 65 cases of MLL being described, 9 of which resulted in angiosarcoma (10.3% of all cases), 6 of which resulted in death (9.2% of all cases). We found a female predominance of 1.24 to 1, an average weight of 183 kg, and a 48.5% majority of cases in the thigh.

  7. Ceftriaxone as prophylaxis in endourology and extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL).

    PubMed

    Kühn, W; Michaelis, F; Bortfeld, S; Weissbach, L

    1989-07-01

    The high risk of infection in endourological surgery is caused by manipulation of the occluded and frequently infected upper urinary tract with instruments. The results show a significant decrease of infection by antibiotic prophylasix with ceftriaxone. However prophylaxis is not necessary in ESWL.

  8. [Experience with iodine prophylaxis in the province of Bolzano].

    PubMed

    Franzellin, F

    1998-01-01

    Since 1981 in the province of Bolzano a "free-choice" iodine prophylaxis with iodinated dietary salt has been implemented. An epidemiological survey carried out in 1982 in 3109 schoolchildren living in this region showed an incidence of endemic goiter grade 1B-3 (WHO classification) of 23.6 +/- 14.0% and an urinary iodine excretion of 10.2 +/- 8.0 micrograms/l (colorimetric analysis) compared to the values of 39.6 +/- 17.7 micrograms/l found in a similar population of schoolchildren living in a non goitrous urban area in Northern Italy (Padua). This program of iodine prophylaxis was advertised through the local mass media. A further epidemiological survey, performed in the whole province in the year 1990, involving 1046 schoolchildren, randomly selected, showed an average goiter incidence of 1.6 +/- 1.3% and a urinary iodine excretion of 137.1 +/- 104.4 micrograms/l (ICP-MS analysis) in comparison to the values of 182.6 +/- 131.7 micrograms/l seen in the schoolchildren of the town of Padua. During the period of iodine prophylaxis the content of iodine in the commercially available iodinated dietary salt was also estimated. In 1990 the average content was 31.0 mg/kg and in 1997 was 27.1 mg/kg. These data therefore confirm the usefulness of iodinated salt in the prophylaxis of endemic goiter.

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis in adult and child patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fouzan, Afnan F.; Al-Shinaiber, Rafif M.; Al-Baijan, Refal S.; Al-Balawi, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate dentists’ knowledge regarding the prevention of infective endocarditis in Saudi Arabia and their implementation of the 2007 American Heart Association guidelines. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, in March 2014, 801 dentists who practice in different regions of Saudi Arabia completed a questionnaire regarding the need for antibiotic prophylaxis for specific cardiac conditions and specific dental procedures, prophylaxis regimens in adults and children, and recommendations for patients on chronic antibiotics, and in dental emergencies. The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and independent t-tests, and a p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The total knowledge level regarding antibiotic prophylaxis among all participants was 52.2%, with a significant difference between dentists who graduated before and after 2007. Comparing the level of knowledge among different dental specialists, surgeons and periodontists had the highest level of knowledge regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Amoxicillin was prescribed as the drug of choice by 63.9% of the participants. Conclusion: This study emphasized the need for continuous education and for formal inclusion of the guidelines in the students’ curriculum, as well as for strategic placement of the guidelines in locations throughout dental clinics. PMID:25935175

  10. Actinomycosis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation despite penicillin prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Barraco, F; Labussière-Wallet, H; Valour, F; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, S; Nicolini, F-E; Thomas, X; Ferry, T; Dumitrescu, O; Michallet, M; Ader, F

    2016-08-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare chronic and multifaceted disease caused by Actinomyces species frequently mimicking malignancy or other chronic granulomatous lung diseases. We report 4 original presentations of actinomycosis arising under supposed penicillin prophylaxis in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. PMID:27203624

  11. The impact of breast cancer-related lymphedema on the ability to perform upper extremity activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Jean A; Ferguson, Chantal M; Swaroop, Meyha N; Horick, Nora; Skolny, Melissa N; Brunelle, Cheryl L; Miller, Cynthia L; Jammallo, Lauren S; Specht, Michelle C; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2015-04-01

    We sought to assess the association of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) with the ability to perform upper extremity activities of daily living (ADL) in our patient population. 324 breast cancer patients who had received treatment for unilateral breast cancer at our institution between 2005 and 2014 were prospectively screened for lymphedema. Bilateral arm measurements were performed pre-operatively and during post-operative follow-up using a Perometer. Patients completed an extensive quality of life (QOL) questionnaire at the time of each study assessment. Lymphedema was defined as a relative volume change (RVC) of ≥10% from the patient's pre-operative baseline measurement. Linear regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between post-operative arm function score (as a continuous variable) and RVC, demographic, clinical, and QOL factors. By multivariate analysis, greater fear of lymphedema (p < 0.0001), more pain (p < 0.0001), body mass index >25 (p = 0.0015), mastectomy (p = 0.0001), and having an axillary node dissection (p = 0.0045) were all associated with lower functional scores. Higher emotional well-being score (p < 0.0001) and adjuvant chemotherapy (p = 0.0005) were associated with higher post-operative functional score. Neither low-level volume changes (5-10 % RVC) nor BCRL (RVC ≥10 %) were associated with ability to perform upper extremity ADL as measured by self-report (p = 0.99, p = 0.79). This prospective study demonstrates that low-level changes in arm volume (RVC 5-10 %) as well as clinically significant BCRL (RVC ≥10 %) did not impact the self-reported ability to use the affected extremity for ADL. These findings may help to inform clinicians and patients on the importance of prospective screening for lymphedema and QOL which enables early detection and intervention. PMID:25749734

  12. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  13. Treatment of physiotherapy-refractory secondary upper limb lymphedema with vascularized lymph node transfer: A case report with clinical and bioimpedance analysis correlation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Melody Man-Kuen; Liu, Hin-Lun

    2015-01-01

    With radical treatment of cancer, lymphedema of limb has become a commonly faced adverse effect. The introduction of vascularized lymph node transfer (VLNT) has provided a possible treatment option for this troublesome condition. In this case report, we describe a 66-year-old lady who developed upper limb lymphedema after operation and radiotherapy for the cancer of her left breast. Her lymphedema did not improve despite wearing pressure garment and receiving six months of regular decongestive physiotherapy. VLNT was performed for this patient, the pre- and post-operative limb circumference and bioimpedance measurements were compared. After operation, the patient continued with her previous physiotherapy regimen. Complete resolution of pitting edema was demonstrated five months after VLNT. In addition, there was a marked improvement in both limb circumference and bioimpedance measurements. From this case report, VLNT appears to be a promising treatment option for secondary lymphedema. We suggest this case report can serve as a model for future studies. PMID:26397769

  14. A longitudinal analysis of the effect of mass drug administration on acute inflammatory episodes and disease progression in lymphedema patients in Leogane, Haiti.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Brittany A; Blackstock, Anna J; Williamson, John M; Addiss, David G; Streit, Thomas G; Beau de Rochars, Valery M; Fox, Leanne M

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a longitudinal analysis of 117 lymphedema patients in a filariasis-endemic area of Haiti during 1995-2008. No difference in lymphedema progression between those who received or did not receive mass drug administration (MDA) was found on measures of foot (P = 0.24), ankle (P = 0.87), or leg (P = 0.46) circumference; leg volume displacement (P = 0.09), lymphedema stage (P = 0.93), or frequency of adenolymphangitis (ADL) episodes (P = 0.57). Rates of ADL per year were greater after initiation of MDA among both groups (P < 0.01). Nevertheless, patients who received MDA reported improvement in four areas of lymphedema-related quality of life (P ≤ 0.01). Decreases in foot and ankle circumference and ADL episodes were observed during the 1995-1998 lymphedema management study (P ≤ 0.01). This study represents the first longitudinal, quantitative, leg-specific analysis examining the clinical effect of diethylcarbamazine on lymphedema progression and ADL episodes. PMID:24218408

  15. [PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION: PRINCIPLE CHARACTERISTICS, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, VACCINE PROPHYLAXIS].

    PubMed

    Lopukhov, P D; Briko, N I; Khaldin, A A; Tsapkova, N N; Lupashko, O V

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are a large and diverse group of viruses. It includes approximately 200 fully described types that have been detected in humans. Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are etiologic agents during various, benign and malignant lesions of mucous membrane and skin epithelium. Very importantly, persistent HPV infection of certain types is a leading cause of carcinoma of uterine cervix, penis, vulva; vagina, anal canal and fauces (including tongue base and tonsils). HPV infection prophylaxis is the best means to control HPV-conditioned diseases, and vaccination, as had been demonstrated, --the most effective method of its prophylaxis. In this paper principle characteristics and clinical manifestations of papillomavirus infection, as well as effectiveness of vaccination against HPV are examined.

  16. Malaria prophylaxis in long-term expatriate mineworkers in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Fegan, D; Glennon, J

    1993-08-01

    The role of malaria chemoprophylaxis for long-term expatriates has not been re-evaluated since the emergence of widespread multidrug resistance. A survey of 106 expatriates working in a mine in Ghana (holoendemic for malaria) was conducted to determine the compliance with malaria chemoprophylaxis. Overall 64 per cent took regular chemoprophylaxis. Of the long-term expatriates (5 or more years in areas with holoendemic malaria), 48.4 per cent either took malaria prophylaxis very irregularly or not at all. The main reasons for failing to comply were fear of long-term side effects and conflicting advice on prophylaxis. This reluctance to take long-term chemoprophylaxis highlights the need to re-emphasise the importance of anti-mosquito measures, prompt treatment of fevers, and perhaps consider abandoning chemoprophylaxis in those expatriate workers with ready access to hospital care.

  17. EFFICACY OF LITHIUM PROPHYLAXIS IN BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Manu R.K.; Chandrasekaran, R.; Shreeram, S.S.; Anand, I.

    1995-01-01

    Forty four patients attending the affective disorder clink at J1PMER Hospital who were on prophylactic lithium for bipolar affective disorder were studied, Intra-individual comparison for severity of illness was made between periods of similar duration with and without lithium prophylaxis. It was found that during lithium prophylaxis patients did significantly better on the following parameters: number of episodes of illness, duration of episodes, hospital admission, neuroleptic dosages and duration of antidepressant treatment. Of the 44 patients included in the study, 45% were good responders, 39% were partial responders and 16% were poor responders. Late age of onset was found to be a significant predictor of good response to lithium. PMID:21743706

  18. [Classical dengue transmission dynamics involving mechanical control and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Toro-Zapata, Hernán D; Restrepo, Leonardo D; Vergaño-Salazar, Juan G; Muñoz-Loaiza, Aníbal

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever transmission dynamics were studied in an endemic region considering the use of preventative measures and mechanical control in reducing transmission of the disease. A system of ordinary differential equations was proposed, describing the dynamics and their evolution as determined by numerical simulation. Different mechanical control and prophylaxis strategies were compared to the situation without control. The basic reproduction number R₀ was determined R₀ to show that if R₀ > 1 there would be a risk of an epidemic and otherwise the disease would have low impact levels. The basic reproduction number helps determine the dynamics' future pattern and contrast the results so obtained with those obtained numerically. It was concluded that although prophylaxis and mechanical control alone provide effective results in controlling the disease, if both controls are combined then infection levels become significantly reduced. Around 60 % mechanical control and prevention levels are needed to provide suitable results in controlling dengue outbreaks.

  19. [PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION: PRINCIPLE CHARACTERISTICS, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, VACCINE PROPHYLAXIS].

    PubMed

    Lopukhov, P D; Briko, N I; Khaldin, A A; Tsapkova, N N; Lupashko, O V

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are a large and diverse group of viruses. It includes approximately 200 fully described types that have been detected in humans. Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are etiologic agents during various, benign and malignant lesions of mucous membrane and skin epithelium. Very importantly, persistent HPV infection of certain types is a leading cause of carcinoma of uterine cervix, penis, vulva; vagina, anal canal and fauces (including tongue base and tonsils). HPV infection prophylaxis is the best means to control HPV-conditioned diseases, and vaccination, as had been demonstrated, --the most effective method of its prophylaxis. In this paper principle characteristics and clinical manifestations of papillomavirus infection, as well as effectiveness of vaccination against HPV are examined. PMID:27029121

  20. The diagnosis and treatment of peripheral lymphedema: 2013 Consensus Document of the International Society of Lymphology.

    PubMed

    2013-03-01

    This International Society of Lymphology (ISL) Consensus Document is the current revision of the 1995 Document for the evaluation and management of peripheral lymphedema (1) for discussion at the XXIV International Congress of Lymphology. It is based upon modifications: [A] suggested and published following the 1997 XVI International Congress of Lymphology (ICL) in Madrid, Spain (2) discussed at the 1999 XVII ICL in Chennai, India (3) and considered/ confirmed at the 2000 (ISL) Executive Committee meeting in Hinterzarten, Germany (4); [B] derived from integration of discussions and written comments obtained during and following the 2001 XVIII ICL in Genoa, Italy as modified at the 2003 ISL Executive Committee meeting in Cordoba, Argentina (5); [C] suggested from comments, criticisms, and rebuttals as published in the December 2004 issue of Lymphology (6); [D] discussed in both the 2005 XX ICL in Salvador, Brazil and the 2007 XXI ICL in Shanghai, China and modified at the 2008 Executive Committee Meeting in Naples, Italy (7,8); and [E] modified from discussions and written comments from the 2009 XXII ICL in Sydney, Australia, the 2011 XXIII ICL in Malmo, Sweden and 2012 Executive Committee Meetings. The document attempts to amalgamate the broad spectrum of protocols advocated worldwide for the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral lymphedema into a coordinated proclamation representing a "Consensus" of the international community. The document is not meant to override individual clinical considerations for problematic patients nor to stifle progress. It is also not meant to be a legal formulation from which variations define medical malpractice. The Society understands that in some clinics the method of treatment derives from national standards while in others access to medical equipment and supplies is limited, and therefore the suggested treatments are impractical. Adaptability and inclusiveness does come at the price that members can rightly be critical of what

  1. Pharmacist initiation of postexposure doxycycline for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anita N; Orr, K Kelly; Bratberg, Jeffrey P; Silverblatt, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To enhance public access to prophylaxis for Lyme disease following an identified Ixodes scapularis tick bite through pharmacist-initiated antibiotic therapy and to assess patient satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service provided. SETTING Independent community pharmacy in Charlestown, RI, from May to October 2012. PRACTICE DESCRIPTION Under a collaborative practice agreement, trained pharmacists at an independent pharmacy identified patients eligible for postexposure antibiotic prophylaxis following attachment and removal of an I. scapularis tick (commonly known as a deer tick) and dispensed two 100 mg tablets of doxycycline. Patients were included if they were 18 years or older, provided informed consent, had an estimated time of tick attachment of 36 hours or more, had the tick removed within 72 hours of visit, denied contraindications to doxycycline therapy, and reported telephone access for follow-up. Patients enrolled in the study protocol were given counseling related to doxycycline, signs and symptoms of Lyme disease, and future tick prevention strategies. PRACTICE INNOVATION Pharmacist initiation of doxycycline prophylaxis has not been described in the literature previously. Successful pharmacist initiation of antibiotic prophylaxis may have broader implications for states with endemic Lyme disease or other infectious disease public health concerns. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient self-reported adverse outcomes and satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service. RESULTS Eight patients enrolled in the study and completed the follow-up survey. The results indicated a high level of satisfaction with the pharmacy services provided, with no reports of the subsequent development of Lyme disease symptoms or major adverse events. CONCLUSION The project has expanded to three community pharmacy sites in southern Rhode Island based on this experience. Similar pharmacy-based collaborative practice models should be considered in highly endemic Lyme disease

  2. Posaconazole: Use in the Prophylaxis and Treatment of Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nina M; Grim, Shellee A; Lynch, Joseph P

    2015-10-01

    Posaconazole, a fluorinated triazole antifungal drug, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for (1) prophylaxis against Aspergillus and Candida infections in immunocompromised patients at high risk for these infections and (2) oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), including cases refractory to fluconazole and/or itraconazole. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has approved posaconazole for (1) treatment of aspergillosis, fusariosis, chromoblastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis in patients who are refractory to or intolerant of other azoles or amphotericin B; (2) first-line therapy for OPC for severe disease or in those unlikely to respond to topical therapy; and (3) prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in high-risk hematologic patients and stem cell transplant recipients. In addition to approved indications, posaconazole has been used with success as salvage therapy for invasive mold infections and endemic mycoses in patients who are refractory to or intolerant of other antifungal agents, and as prophylaxis or salvage therapy in children, for whom indications are more limited owing to a paucity of data. Posaconazole has potent in vitro activity against a broad range of fungi and molds, including Aspergillus, Candida, Cryptococcus, filamentous fungi, and endemic mycoses including coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, and blastomycosis. Importantly, posaconazole is much more active than other azoles against many Mucorales species and the combination of posaconazole with other antifungal agents may be synergistic. Hence, posaconazole is a potential candidate as a single or combination agent for difficult-to-treat fungal infections. Posaconazole has an excellent safety profile; to date, serious side effects are rare, even with prolonged use. However, newer posaconazole formulations achieve higher blood levels and it remains to be seen whether this may lead to an increase in the rate of adverse effects. Currently, posaconazole is used predominantly

  3. Maintenance of tooth color after prophylaxis: comparison of three dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, R L; Bartizek, R D; Owens, T S; Walters, P A; Gerlach, R W

    2001-01-01

    Pellicle rapidly accumulates on tooth surfaces after prophylaxis and may acquire cosmetically unacceptable levels of stain. A three-month clinical trial was conducted to evaluate stain prevention by a new silica-based tartar control whitening dentifrice (Crest Extra Whitening) compared to marketed tartar control baking soda peroxide whitening and regular dentifrice controls. Prior to the trial, a one-month screening exercise was conducted to identify adult subjects who accumulated extrinsic tooth stain after dental prophylaxis. A total of 672 subjects were stratified based on tooth whiteness, gender and tobacco usage, then given a dental prophylaxis and randomized into one of three dentifrice treatment groups. All product use was unsupervised. Change in tooth whiteness (delta L*) was determined by comparing colorimeter measurements collected on the facial surfaces of the four central incisors at months 1 and 3 to baseline. Ninety-six percent of subjects completed the three-month study. At both one and three months, the two whitening dentifrices did not differ from baseline in terms of delta L*. In contrast, the regular control had delta L* values of -0.26 and -0.39 at one and three months, respectively, differing significantly from baseline at both time points. Each of the whitening dentifrices differed statistically from the regular control in stain accumulation (p < or = 0.001) at one and three months, but were not different from each other. In general, all three test dentifrices were well tolerated. These data demonstrate the effectiveness of the new tartar control whitening dentifrice in preventing stain accumulation after dental prophylaxis compared to the marketed regular dentifrice control. PMID:11476015

  4. Pharmacist initiation of postexposure doxycycline for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anita N; Orr, K Kelly; Bratberg, Jeffrey P; Silverblatt, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To enhance public access to prophylaxis for Lyme disease following an identified Ixodes scapularis tick bite through pharmacist-initiated antibiotic therapy and to assess patient satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service provided. SETTING Independent community pharmacy in Charlestown, RI, from May to October 2012. PRACTICE DESCRIPTION Under a collaborative practice agreement, trained pharmacists at an independent pharmacy identified patients eligible for postexposure antibiotic prophylaxis following attachment and removal of an I. scapularis tick (commonly known as a deer tick) and dispensed two 100 mg tablets of doxycycline. Patients were included if they were 18 years or older, provided informed consent, had an estimated time of tick attachment of 36 hours or more, had the tick removed within 72 hours of visit, denied contraindications to doxycycline therapy, and reported telephone access for follow-up. Patients enrolled in the study protocol were given counseling related to doxycycline, signs and symptoms of Lyme disease, and future tick prevention strategies. PRACTICE INNOVATION Pharmacist initiation of doxycycline prophylaxis has not been described in the literature previously. Successful pharmacist initiation of antibiotic prophylaxis may have broader implications for states with endemic Lyme disease or other infectious disease public health concerns. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient self-reported adverse outcomes and satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service. RESULTS Eight patients enrolled in the study and completed the follow-up survey. The results indicated a high level of satisfaction with the pharmacy services provided, with no reports of the subsequent development of Lyme disease symptoms or major adverse events. CONCLUSION The project has expanded to three community pharmacy sites in southern Rhode Island based on this experience. Similar pharmacy-based collaborative practice models should be considered in highly endemic Lyme disease

  5. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-11-15

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  6. Tailored versus standard dose prophylaxis in children with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Cristina; Baldacci, Erminia; Mercanti, Caterina; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella

    2013-10-01

    Prophylaxis is universally recognized as the treatment of choice in people with hemophilia, and tailored prophylaxis is the consistent modification of the standard weight-based dosing regimen. A large number of factors guide the choice of a specific tailored regimen, and different regimens are under evaluation. Tailored low-dose frequent regimens are likely to be cost-effective, but they are less accepted by patients. Escalating dose regimens seem to be quite effective in preventing bleedings and, consequently, arthropathy, although data on long-term outcomes are still not available. Pharmacokinetic-driven approaches have been also proposed. Sensitive and validated tools able to reliably measure the different outcomes are necessary in this setting. With regard to the evaluation of arthropathy, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are promising imaging techniques in detecting early joint damage. Factor VIII trough levels can be considered a measure of the efficacy of FVIII infused, although other factors influence the bleeding pattern. Global assays of coagulation could provide more complete information on the hemostatic potential of a sample and predict bleeding phenotype. These techniques are also promising for the individualization of prophylaxis regimens, potentially resulting in less frequent dosing, more comfortable and less expensive approaches.

  7. Twisting Tourniquet(©) Technique: introducing Schnogh, a novel device and its effectiveness in treating primary and secondary lymphedema of extremities.

    PubMed

    Chanwimalueang, Narumon; Ekataksin, Wichai; Piyaman, Parkpoom; Pattanapen, Gedsuda; Hanboon, Borimas K

    2015-10-01

    Twisting Tourniquet(©) or in Thai "Schnogh" is a new invention for compression therapy of lymphedema. Twisting Tourniquet(©) Technique (TTT) is totally noninvasive for lymphedema management. After the amazing successful evidence in the first series of 28 patients, we have conducted preliminary studies in lymphedema clinics. It was found that the combination of gradually increasing constriction force by Schnogh until desired pressure was reached and maintained for 15 min, followed by a 5-min release, doing repeatedly this compression-decompression for at least 10 sessions a day, can generate acceptable results. The aim of the study was to evaluate the scientific effectiveness and establish a treatment protocol of TTT proposed as a therapeutic approach for clinical management of lymphedema. During 2006-2013, from over 3500 patients, 647 with primary/secondary lymphedema passed inclusion criteria, 307 for upper, and 340 for lower extremity. In the 5-day course of TTT, each day patients underwent 10 sessions of a 15-min compression followed by a 5-min decompression. Vegan diet was encouraged as an adjuvant therapy. Among lymphedema patients whose spectrum of edema severity ranged from mild to gigantic, TTT yielded an average volume reduction rate (VR) at 50.2% and 55.6%, making the average edema reduction volume attained at 463 and 1856 mL for upper and lower limb, respectively. The uniformed practice by Schnogh which supports a continual compression-decompression maneuver over 3.5 h daily for five consecutive days could induce an average VR at above half of the swelling in extremities of 647 patients. Schnogh is therefore effective in clinical management of lymphedema under TTT treatment of fibroblastic interstitium. PMID:26247407

  8. Universal fungal prophylaxis and risk of coccidioidomycosis in liver transplant recipients living in an endemic area.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Allon; Carey, Elizabeth J; Blair, Janis E

    2015-03-01

    Recipients of liver transplantation (LT) are at increased risk for symptomatic coccidioidomycosis, primarily because of chronic immunosuppression and impaired cellular immunity. Unfortunately, no consensus exists regarding optimal posttransplant prophylaxis. In a prior study at our institution, we observed both de novo and recurrent coccidioidomycosis despite targeted antifungal prophylaxis. In response, in February 2011, we instituted a universal prophylaxis program consisting of fluconazole (200 mg daily) for the first posttransplant year. In the current study, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent LT between the initiation of universal prophylaxis and July 11, 2013. Patients receiving a second transplant or dual-organ transplant and those who died or did not have follow-up in the 12-month post-LT period were excluded. Data from the universal prophylaxis cohort were compared with previously published data from the targeted prophylaxis era. Of the 160 patients undergoing LT during the study period, 143 met criteria for data analysis. When compared with the 349 patients in the targeted prophylaxis cohort, patients in the universal prophylaxis group were older and had higher rates of pre-LT coccidioidomycosis, asymptomatic coccidioidal seropositivity, posttransplant diabetes mellitus, and renal insufficiency. Fluconazole-related toxicity occurred in 13 of the universal prophylaxis patients, 7 of whom were required to discontinue use of the medication. Coccidioidomycosis developed in 10 of the 391 patients (2.6%) in the targeted prophylaxis cohort and in none of the patients in the universal prophylaxis group (P = 0.04). These data strongly support the use of a 1-year antifungal prophylaxis regimen for LT recipients in endemic regions.

  9. Predictive lymphatic mapping: a method for mapping lymphatic channels in patients with advanced unilateral lymphedema using indocyanine green lymphography.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Makoto; Seki, Yukio; Hara, Hisako; Iida, Takuya; Oka, Aiko; Kikuchi, Kazuki; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Haragi, Makiko; Furniss, Dominic; Hin-Lun, Lawrence; Mitsui, Kito; Murai, Noriyuki; Koshima, Isao

    2014-01-01

    In severe lymphedema, indocyanine green lymphography cannot be used to map lymphatic channels before lymphaticovenular anastomosis (LVA) because linear lymphatics cannot be detected in a severely affected leg. Here, we describe a new method, which we refer to as predictive lymphatic mapping, to predict the location of lymphatics for anastomosis in unilateral lymphedema, thereby improving surgical accuracy and efficiency. The approach consists of marking anatomical landmarks and joining selected landmarks with fixed lines. The distance from these fixed lines to lymphatic channels mapped by indocyanine green lymphography in the unaffected leg is then measured, scaled up based on the difference in circumference between the legs, and transposed to the affected leg. To date, we have used this method in 5 cases of unilateral or asymmetric lymphedema of the lower extremities. In no cases have we failed to find a lymphatic channel suitable for LVA within a 2-cm incision. These results suggest that predictive lymphatic mapping is a useful additional tool for surgeons performing LVA under local anesthesia, which will help to improve the accuracy of incisions and the efficiency of surgery.

  10. Appropriate Enoxaparin Dose for Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Patients with Extreme Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Shelkrot, Max; Miraka, Jonida

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the appropriate dose of enoxaparin for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in patients with extreme obesity. Methods: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE (1950-April 2013) to analyze all English-language articles that evaluated incidence of VTE and/or anti-Xa levels with enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis in patients with extreme obesity. Results: Eight studies were included in the analysis. Six of the studies were done in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Mean body mass index ranged from 44.9 to 63.4 kg/m2 within studies. Studies done with bariatric surgery patients utilized doses of enoxaparin that ranged from the standard dose of 30 mg subcutaneous (SQ) every 12 hours to 60 mg SQ every 12 hours. Other studies evaluated doses ranging from 40 mg SQ every 24 hours to 0.5 mg/kg/day. Only 3 studies evaluated the incidence of VTE as the primary endpoint; the other studies evaluated anti-Xa levels. The studies showed that appropriate anti-Xa levels were achieved more often with higher than standard doses of enoxaparin. One study showed that enoxaparin 40 mg SQ every 12 hours decreased the incidence of VTE in patients undergoing bariatric surgery compared to standard doses. Overall risk of bleeding was similar between study groups. Conclusions: Higher than standard doses of enoxaparin may be needed for patients with extreme obesity. Patients undergoing bariatric surgery may benefit from enoxaparin 40 mg SQ every 12 hours. Additional large randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine the efficacy and safety of higher than standard doses of enoxaparin for VTE prophylaxis in patients with extreme obesity. PMID:25477599

  11. Prophylaxis against Frey's syndrome in parotid surgery.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, P C; Palaia, D; Rosenberg, M; Casson, P

    2000-05-01

    In 1990 the authors reported their preliminary study of the prevention of Frey's syndrome in 55 patients utilizing a superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) flap in parotid gland surgery. During the past 10 years, numerous studies have supported their original thesis that interposition of living tissue between the resected gland bed and the skin could prevent the development of this complication. The authors have expanded their own patient population and now consider this a definitive study on the prevention of Frey's syndrome. A total of 160 patients are presented with a follow-up period of 5 to 22 years. All patients underwent subtotal or total parotidectomy performed by one of the authors. A history was acquired and testing for Frey's syndrome (Minor's starch iodine test) was performed. As a result of this approach, and in spite of the intensive search for it, no cases of Frey's syndrome were encountered. The hoped-for secondary benefit of preventing the postparotidectomy retromandibular depression was somewhat less satisfactory, although most patients remain satisfied with their appearance. The debilitating symptoms in Frey's syndrome, which is reported to have an incidence of 5% to 50% in the typical parotidectomy patient, can be avoided with thoughtful preoperative planning. The authors favor an aesthetic incision followed by the development of an SMAS flap. The parotidectomy is then performed using the surgeon's preferred technique. The SMAS flap is then placed into the bed of the resected parotid gland. This institutes a protective tissue barrier guarding against the aberrant anastomotic communication between the postganglionic secretomotor fibers intended for the parotid gland, and the now adjacent sweat glands. Their patient population is large enough to provide significant evidence that Frey's syndrome can be prevented, compared with a meta-analysis of parotid patients in multiple other studies in the literature. Assuming the patient's history and

  12. Lymphedema (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems for patients. The lymph system is a network of lymph vessels, tissues, and organs that carry ... that uses a magnet, radio waves , and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of ...

  13. Experimental assessment of pro-lymphangiogenic growth factors in the treatment of post-surgical lymphedema following lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Lymphedema is a frequent consequence of lymph node excision during breast cancer surgery. Current treatment options are limited mainly to external compression therapies to limit edema development. We investigated previously, postsurgical lymphedema in a sheep model following the removal of a single lymph node and determined that autologous lymph node transplantation has the potential to reduce or prevent edema development. In this report, we examine the potential of lymphangiogenic therapy to restore lymphatic function and reduce postsurgical lymphedema. Methods Lymphangiogenic growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C)) and angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2) were loaded into a gel-based drug delivery system (HAMC; a blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose). Drug release rates and lymphangiogenic signaling in target endothelial cells were assessed in vitro and vascular permeability biocompatibility tests were examined in vivo. Following, the removal of a single popliteal lymph node, HAMC with the growth factors was injected into the excision site. Six weeks later, lymphatic functionality was assessed by injecting 125Iodine radiolabeled bovine serum albumin (125I-BSA) into prenodal vessels and measuring its recovery in plasma. Circumferential leg measurements were plotted over time and areas under the curves used to quantify edema formation. Results The growth factors were released over a two-week period in vitro by diffusion from HAMC, with 50% being released in the first 24 hr. The system induced lymphangiogenic signaling in target endothelial cells, while inducing only a minimal inflammatory response in sheep. Removal of the node significantly reduced lymphatic functionality (nodectomy 1.9 ± 0.9, HAMC alone 1.7 ± 0.8) compared with intact groups (3.2 ± 0.7). In contrast, there was no significant difference between the growth factor treatment group (2.3 ± 0.73) and the intact group indicating improved function with the molecular factors. An

  14. 9-Cis Retinoic Acid Promotes Lymphangiogenesis and Enhances Lymphatic Vessel Regeneration: Therapeutic Implications of 9-Cis Retinoic Acid for Secondary Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inho; Lee, Sunju; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yong Suk; Kim, Kyu Eui; Choi, Dongwon; Park, Eun Kyung; Yang, Dongyun; Ecoiffier, Tatiana; Monahan, John; Chen, Wen; Aguilar, Berenice; Lee, Ha Neul; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Koh, Chester J.; Chen, Lu; Wong, Alex K.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Background The lymphatic system plays a key role in tissue fluid homeostasis and lymphatic dysfunction due to genetic defects or lymphatic vessel obstruction can cause lymphedema, disfiguring tissue swellings often associated with fibrosis and recurrent infections without available cures to date. In this study, retinoic acids (RAs) were determined to be a potent therapeutic agent that is immediately applicable to reduce secondary lymphedema. Methods and Results We report that RAs promote proliferation, migration and tube formation of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) by activating FGF-receptor signaling. Moreover, RAs control the expression of cell-cycle checkpoint regulators such as p27Kip1, p57Kip2 and the aurora kinases through both an Akt-mediated non-genomic action and a transcription-dependent genomic action that is mediated by Prox1, a master regulator of lymphatic development. Moreover, 9-cisRA was found to activate in vivo lymphangiogenesis in animals based on mouse trachea, matrigel plug and cornea pocket assays. Finally, we demonstrate that 9-cisRA can provide a strong therapeutic efficacy in ameliorating the experimental mouse tail lymphedema by enhancing lymphatic vessel regeneration. Conclusions These in vitro and animal studies demonstrate that 9-cisRA potently activates lymphangiogenesis and promotes lymphatic regeneration in an experimental lymphedema model, presenting it as a promising novel therapeutic agent to treat human lymphedema patients. PMID:22275501

  15. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in hospitalised medically ill patients. The ENDORSE Global Survey.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jean-Francois; Cohen, Alexander T; Tapson, Victor F; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay K; Deslandes, Bruno; Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A

    2010-04-01

    Limited data are available regarding the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE prophylaxis use in hospitalised medically ill patients. We analysed data from the global ENDORSE survey to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis use in this population according to diagnosis, baseline characteristics, and country. Data on patient characteristics, VTE risk, and prophylaxis use were abstracted from hospital charts. VTE risk and prophylaxis use were evaluated according to the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify factors associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Data were evaluated for 37,356 hospitalised medical patients across 32 countries. VTE risk varied according to medical diagnosis, from 31.2% of patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary diseases to 100% of patients with acute heart failure, active non-infectious respiratory disease, or pulmonary infection (global rate, 41.5%). Among those at risk for VTE, ACCP-recommended prophylaxis was used in 24.4% haemorrhagic stroke patients and 40-45% of cardiopulmonary disease patients (global rate, 39.5%). Large differences in prophylaxis use were observed among countries. Markers of disease severity, including central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, and admission to intensive care units, were strongly associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. In conclusion, VTE risk varies according to medical diagnosis. Less than 40% of at-risk hospitalised medical patients receive ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Prophylaxis use appears to be associated with disease severity rather than medical diagnosis. These data support the necessity to improve implementation of available guidelines for evaluating VTE risk and providing prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients.

  16. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in hospitalised medically ill patients. The ENDORSE Global Survey.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jean-Francois; Cohen, Alexander T; Tapson, Victor F; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay K; Deslandes, Bruno; Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A

    2010-04-01

    Limited data are available regarding the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE prophylaxis use in hospitalised medically ill patients. We analysed data from the global ENDORSE survey to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis use in this population according to diagnosis, baseline characteristics, and country. Data on patient characteristics, VTE risk, and prophylaxis use were abstracted from hospital charts. VTE risk and prophylaxis use were evaluated according to the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify factors associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Data were evaluated for 37,356 hospitalised medical patients across 32 countries. VTE risk varied according to medical diagnosis, from 31.2% of patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary diseases to 100% of patients with acute heart failure, active non-infectious respiratory disease, or pulmonary infection (global rate, 41.5%). Among those at risk for VTE, ACCP-recommended prophylaxis was used in 24.4% haemorrhagic stroke patients and 40-45% of cardiopulmonary disease patients (global rate, 39.5%). Large differences in prophylaxis use were observed among countries. Markers of disease severity, including central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, and admission to intensive care units, were strongly associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. In conclusion, VTE risk varies according to medical diagnosis. Less than 40% of at-risk hospitalised medical patients receive ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Prophylaxis use appears to be associated with disease severity rather than medical diagnosis. These data support the necessity to improve implementation of available guidelines for evaluating VTE risk and providing prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients. PMID:20135072

  17. Vesicoureteral reflux and antibiotic prophylaxis: why cohorts and methodologies matter

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Saul P.; Cheng, Earl; DeFoor, William; Kropp, Bradley; Rushton, H. Gil; Skoog, Steve; Carpenter, Myra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Published cohorts of children with vesicoureteral reflux placed on antibiotic prophylaxis differ in baseline characteristics and methodology. These data have been combined in meta-analyses to derive treatment recommendations. We analyzed these cohorts in an attempt to understand the disparate outcomes reported. Materials and Methods Eighteen studies were identified from 1987 to 2013. These either retrospectively or prospectively evaluated children with VUR who were on long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. The presenting demographic data, criteria and methods of evaluation were tabulated. Outcomes were compared—specifically recurrent urinary infection and renal scarring. Results Significant differences in baseline characteristics and methodology were identified: gender, circumcision status, grade of reflux, evaluation of bowel and bladder dysfunction (BBD), methodology of urine collection, definition of urinary infection (UTI), measurement of compliance, means of identifying renal scarring. Cohorts with larger numbers of uncircumcised boys had more breakthrough UTI’s. Both infection and renal scarring rates were higher in series with higher grades of reflux. Bagged urine specimens were allowed in 6 series, rendering the data suspect. Children with BBD were excluded from 3 cohorts; only in 1 was BBD correlated with outcome. Compliance was monitored in only 6 studies. Conclusions Sub-populations as well as methodologies vary significantly in published series of children with VUR on anti-biotic prophylaxis. It is inappropriate to combine outcome data from these series in a meta-analysis, since this serves to blur distinctions between these sub-populations. Broad recommendations or guidelines based upon meta-analyses should be viewed with caution. PMID:22910235

  18. Antibiotic prophylaxis in children with relapsing urinary tract infections: review.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, P; Pizzini, C; Fanos, V

    2000-04-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are observed in 30-50% of children after the first UTI. Of these, approximately 90% occur within 3 months of the initial episode. The basic aim of antibiotic prophylaxis in children with malformative uropathy and/or recurrent UTIs, is to reduce the frequency of UTIs. The bacteria most frequently responsible for UTI are gram-negative organisms, with Escherichia coli accounting for 80% of urinary tract pathogens. In children with recurrent UTIs and in those treated with antibiotic prophylaxis there is a greater incidence of UTI due to Proteus spp., Klebsiella spp. and Enterobacter spp., whereas Pseudomonas spp., Serratia spp. and Candida spp. are more frequent in children with urogenital abnormalities and/or undergoing invasive instrumental investigations. Several factors are involved in the pathogenesis of UTI, the main ones being circumcision, periurethral flora, micturition disorders, bowel disorders, local factors and hygienic measures. Several factors facilitate UTI relapse: malformative uropathies, particularly of the obstructive type; vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR); previous repeated episodes of cystitis and/or pyelonephritis (3 or more episodes a year), even in the absence of urinary tract abnormalities; a frequently catheterized neurogenic bladder; kidney transplant. The precise mechanism of action of low-dose antibiotics is not yet fully known. The characteristics of the ideal prophylactic agent are presented in this review, as well as indications, dosages, side effects, clinical data of all molecules. While inappropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis encourages the emergence of microbial resistance, its proper use may be of great value in clinical practice, by reducing the frequency and clinical expression of UTIs and, in some cases such as VUR, significantly helping to resolve the underlying pathology.

  19. Roughness of human enamel surface submitted to different prophylaxis methods.

    PubMed

    Castanho, Gisela Muassab; Arana-Chavez, Victor E; Fava, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate alterations in the surface roughness and micromorphology of human enamel submitted to three prophylaxis methods. Sixty-nine caries-free molars with exposed labial surfaces were divided into three groups. Group I was treated with a rotary instrument set at a low speed, rubber cup and a mixture of water and pumice; group II with a rotary instrument set at a low speed, rubber cup and prophylaxis paste Herjos-F (Vigodent S/A Indústria e Comércio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); and group III with sodium bicarbonate spray Profi II Ceramic (Dabi Atlante Indústrias Médico Odontológicas Ltda, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil). All procedures were performed by the same operator for 10 s, and samples were rinsed and stored in distilled water Pre and post-treatment surface evaluation was completed using a surface profilometer (Perthometer S8P, Marh, Perthen, Germany) in 54 samples. In addition, the other samples were coated with gold and examined in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of this study were statistically analyzed with the paired t-test (Student), the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Dunn (5%) test. The sodium bicarbonate spray led to significantly rougher surfaces than the pumice paste. The use of prophylaxis paste showed no statistically significant difference when compared with the other methods. Based on SEM analysis, the sodium bicarbonate spray presented an irregular surface with granular material and erosions. Based on this study, it can be concluded that there was an increased enamel surface roughness when teeth were treated with sodium bicarbonate spray when compared with teeth treated with pumice paste. PMID:18767461

  20. Intrapartum GBS screening and antibiotic prophylaxis: a European consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, G C; Melin, P; Berardi, A; Blennow, M; Carbonell-Estrany, X; Donzelli, G P; Hakansson, S; Hod, M; Hughes, R; Kurtzer, M; Poyart, C; Shinwell, E; Stray-Pedersen, B; Wielgos, M; El Helali, N

    2015-05-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) remains worldwide a leading cause of severe neonatal disease. Since the end of the 1990s, various strategies for prevention of the early onset neonatal disease have been implemented and have evolved. When a universal antenatal GBS screening-based strategy is used to identify women who are given an intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis, a substantial reduction of incidence up to 80% has been reported in the USA as in other countries including European countries. However recommendations are still a matter of debate due to challenges and controversies on how best to identify candidates for prophylaxis and to drawbacks of intrapartum administration of antibiotics. In Europe, some countries recommend either antenatal GBS screening or risk-based strategies, or any combination, and others do not have national or any other kind of guidelines for prevention of GBS perinatal disease. Furthermore, accurate population-based data of incidence of GBS neonatal disease are not available in some countries and hamper good effectiveness evaluation of prevention strategies. To facilitate a consensus towards European guidelines for the management of pregnant women in labor and during pregnancy for the prevention of GBS perinatal disease, a conference was organized in 2013 with a group of experts in neonatology, gynecology-obstetrics and clinical microbiology coming from European representative countries. The group reviewed available data, identified areas where results were suboptimal, where revised procedures and new technologies could improve current practices for prevention of perinatal GBS disease. The key decision issued after the conference is to recommend intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis based on a universal intrapartum GBS screening strategy using a rapid real time testing.

  1. Roughness of human enamel surface submitted to different prophylaxis methods.

    PubMed

    Castanho, Gisela Muassab; Arana-Chavez, Victor E; Fava, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate alterations in the surface roughness and micromorphology of human enamel submitted to three prophylaxis methods. Sixty-nine caries-free molars with exposed labial surfaces were divided into three groups. Group I was treated with a rotary instrument set at a low speed, rubber cup and a mixture of water and pumice; group II with a rotary instrument set at a low speed, rubber cup and prophylaxis paste Herjos-F (Vigodent S/A Indústria e Comércio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); and group III with sodium bicarbonate spray Profi II Ceramic (Dabi Atlante Indústrias Médico Odontológicas Ltda, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil). All procedures were performed by the same operator for 10 s, and samples were rinsed and stored in distilled water Pre and post-treatment surface evaluation was completed using a surface profilometer (Perthometer S8P, Marh, Perthen, Germany) in 54 samples. In addition, the other samples were coated with gold and examined in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of this study were statistically analyzed with the paired t-test (Student), the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Dunn (5%) test. The sodium bicarbonate spray led to significantly rougher surfaces than the pumice paste. The use of prophylaxis paste showed no statistically significant difference when compared with the other methods. Based on SEM analysis, the sodium bicarbonate spray presented an irregular surface with granular material and erosions. Based on this study, it can be concluded that there was an increased enamel surface roughness when teeth were treated with sodium bicarbonate spray when compared with teeth treated with pumice paste.

  2. Thromboembolic Complications and Prophylaxis Patterns in Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important complication of colorectal surgery, but its incidence is unclear in the era of VTE prophylaxis. OBJECTIVE To describe the incidence of and risk factors associated with thromboembolic complications and contemporary VTE prophylaxis patterns following colorectal surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective data from the Washington State Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program (SCOAP) linked to a statewide hospital discharge database. At 52 Washington State SCOAP hospitals, participants included consecutive patients undergoing colorectal surgery between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Venous thromboembolism complications in-hospital and up to 90 days after surgery. RESULTS Among 16 120 patients (mean age, 61.4 years; 54.5% female), the use of perioperative and in-hospital VTE chemoprophylaxis increased significantly from 31.6% to 86.4% and from 59.6% to 91.4%, respectively, by 2011 (P < .001 for trend for both). Overall, 10.6% (1399 of 13 230) were discharged on a chemoprophylaxis regimen. The incidence of VTE was 2.2% (360 of 16 120). Patients undergoing abdominal operations had higher rates of 90-day VTE compared with patients having pelvic operations (2.5% [246 of 9702] vs 1.8% [114 of 6413], P = .001). Those having an operation for cancer had a similar incidence of 90-day VTE compared with those having an operation for nonmalignant processes (2.1% [128 of 6213] vs 2.3% [232 of 9902], P = .24). On adjusted analysis, older age, nonelective surgery, history of VTE, and operations for inflammatory disease were associated with increased risk of 90-day VTE (P < .05 for all). There was no significant decrease in VTE over time. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Venous thromboembolism rates are low and largely unchanged despite increases in perioperative and postoperative prophylaxis. These data should be considered in developing future guidelines. PMID:26060977

  3. [Antibiotic prophylaxis with enoxacin in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Knipper, A; Böhle, A; Pensel, J; Hofstetter, A G

    1989-01-01

    According to literature, 16 to 35% of operatively removed renal stones harbour bacteria. The efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis with enoxacin in reducing the rate of bacteriuria after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was investigated in a prospective randomized study. Twenty-five patients received a single 400 mg dose of enoxacin one hour before ESWL, 25 patients did not receive an antibiotic. It was found that a single 400 mg dose of enoxacin one hour before ESWL can reduce the rate of bacteriuria significantly.

  4. From prophylaxis to atomic cocktail: circulation of radioiodine.

    PubMed

    Santesmases, María Jesús

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a history of iodine. To trace the trajectory of this element, goiter is used as a guideline for the articulation of a historical account, as a representation of thyroid disorders and of the spaces of knowledge and practices related to iodine. Iodine's journey from goiter treatment and prophylaxis in the late interwar period took on a new course after WWII by including the element's radioactive isotopes. I intend to show how the introduction of radioiodine contributed to stabilize the epistemic role of iodine, in both its non-radioactive and radioactive form, in thyroid gland studies and in the treatment of its disorders.

  5. Association between postoperative thromboembolism prophylaxis and complications following urological surgery

    PubMed Central

    CERRUTO, MARIA ANGELA; D'ELIA, CAROLINA; PICCOLI, MARCO; CACCIAMANI, GIOVANNI; DE MARCHI, DAVIDE; CORSI, PAOLO; DE MARCO, VINCENZO; CAVALLERI, STEFANO; ARTIBANI, WALTER

    2016-01-01

    Thromboembolism represents the most significant complication and cause of non-surgical mortality in major urological surgery. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between the type of pharmacological thromboembolism prophylaxis and the postoperative complication rate in a cohort of patients undergoing major urological surgery. All consecutive patients treated with major urological surgery between December 2011 and March 2013 were evaluated. For each patient, clinical and demographic data, as well as information on the post-surgical complications and the type of pharmacological thromboembolism prophylaxis, were collected. In total, 453 patients (mean age, 63.36±12.05 years) were recruited (43.5% for prostate surgery, 33.1% for renal surgery, 12.1% for bladder surgery and 11.3% for other surgery). Postoperative blood transfusions were required in 50 cases (11.0%). A total of 32 patients (7.1%) underwent re-intervention due to the occurrence of grade ≥3 complications, with a readmission rate of 2.0%. According to the Clavien-Dindo Classification, the complications were grade 1 in 36.0% of the cases, grade 2 in 19.4%, grade 3 in 6.0%, grade 4 in 2.0% and grade 5 (mortality) in 0.7%. Only 1 case of deep venous thrombosis not associated with pulmonary thromboembolism was observed. Univariate analyses showed a significant negative association (higher risk of complications) between the use of >4,000 IU enoxaparin as the thromboembolism prophylaxis and postoperative blood transfusion rate (P=0.045), re-intervention rate (P=0.001) and the occurrence of grade ≥3 complications (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between the use of >4,000 IU enoxaparin and both re-intervention rate (P=0.013) and occurrence of grade ≥3 complications (P=0.002). High doses of enoxaparin (>4,000 IU) may lead to an increased risk of re-intervention and severe postoperative complications following major urological surgery. Randomised

  6. Quality of Life in Patients with Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema and Reconstructive Breast Surgery.

    PubMed

    Penha, Tiara R Lopez; Botter, Bente; Heuts, Esther M; Voogd, Adri C; von Meyenfeldt, Maarten F; van der Hulst, René R

    2016-07-01

    Background To evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of breast cancer survivors who have undergone breast reconstruction and have breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods Patients with a unilateral mastectomy with or without breast reconstruction were evaluated for BCRL and their QOL. Patients were divided into a non-BCRL and a BCRL group. Patients with subjective complaints of arm swelling and/or an interlimb volume difference of >200 mL, or undergoing treatment for arm lymphedema were defined as having BCRL. QOL was assessed using cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-B23) and disease specific (Lymph-ICF) questionnaires. Results In total, 253 patients with a mean follow-up time of 51.7 (standard deviation = 18.5) months since mastectomy completed the QOL questionnaires. Of these patients, 116 (46%) underwent mastectomy alone and 137 (54%) had additional breast reconstruction. A comparison of the QOL scores of 180 patients in the non-BCRL group showed a significantly better physical function (p = 0.004) for patients with reconstructive surgery compared with mastectomy patients. In the 73 patients with BCRL, a comparison of the QOL scores showed no significant differences between patients with mastectomy and reconstructive surgery. After adjusting for potential confounders, multivariate analysis showed a significant impact of BCRL on physical function (β =  - 7.46; p = 0.009), role function (β =  - 15.75; p = 0.003), cognitive function (β =  - 11.56; p = 0.005), body vision (β =  - 11.62; p = 0.007), arm symptoms (β = 20.78; p = 0.000), and all domains of the Lymph-ICF questionnaire. Conclusions This study implies that BCRL has a negative effect on the QOL of breast cancer survivors, potentially negating the positive effects on QOL reconstructive breast surgery has. PMID:26919383

  7. 75 FR 58415 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Prevention, Prophylaxis, Cure, Amelioration, and/or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ..., Prophylaxis, Cure, Amelioration, and/or Treatment of Infection and/or the Effects Thereof of Chikungunya... envelope proteins, and in particular Chikungunya ] virus (CHIKV) envelope proteins. The invention also..., prophylaxis, cure, amelioration, and/or treatment of infection and/or the effects thereof of...

  8. Inhibitors and prophylaxis in paediatric haemophilia patients: focus on the German experience.

    PubMed

    Kurnik, Karin; Auerswald, Günter; Kreuz, Wolfhart

    2014-11-01

    Prophylaxis is now an established treatment standard in haemophilia in Western Europe and the US with multiple studies demonstrating the clinical benefits of prophylaxis over on-demand treatment. In Western Europe in particular, prophylactic use of factor VIII (FVIII) is high as a result of the findings from the early prophylaxis studies and adherence to national guidelines. Unfortunately, prophylaxis has not yet been implemented on a worldwide basis. The introduction of prophylaxis by haemophilia treatment centres in Bremen, Frankfurt and Munich, as recommended in German guidelines, has significantly improved outcomes for our young haemophilia patients. In the Frankfurt centre, a decreasing rate of inhibitors has been observed since prophylaxis was started early, dosing was individualized, and the importance of treatment continuity was recognized. The centres in Munich and Bremen have explored the possibility of further reducing inhibitor rates using early tolerization - a new prophylaxis regimen that introduces low FVIII doses administered once weekly as soon as a bleeding tendency is observed - with excellent results. All three centres avert the induction of immunological danger signals by avoiding the use of central venous catheters, postponing vaccination wherever possible and not undertaking elective surgery during the early FVIII exposure days. The benefits of using this approach have been confirmed by the remarkably low rates of inhibitors in previously untreated patients reported at these centres. Hopefully, as we and others explore new prophylaxis regimens for our paediatric patients, we can work towards the goal of one day overcoming this serious complication of haemophilia treatment.

  9. Comparison between valganciclovir and aciclovir/valaciclovir for CMV prophylaxis in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fila, M; Dechartes, A; Maisin, A; Dossier, C; Zhao, W; Deschênes, G; Baudouin, V

    2015-01-01

    Prophylaxis has dramatically decreased the occurrence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after renal transplantation. Optimal regimens of treatment remain controversial, especially in pediatric recipients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of valganciclovir (VGC) versus aciclovir/valaciclovir (ACV) in a pediatric renal transplant population. Data from 101 renal transplantations were retrospectively analyzed. Except those with R-/Dstatus, all patients received prophylaxis either with ACV, n = 39 or VGC, n = 38. Incidences of positive CMV antigenemia and disease, as well as the delay in relation to the prophylaxis, were collected during at least 12 months after the end of treatment. Positive CMV antigenemia was reported in 34 patients (ACV: 16, VGC: 16, no prophylaxis: 2). CMV disease occurred in 15 patients (ACV: 5; VGC: 8) (ns). For the majority of patients under VGC, positive CMV antigenemia occurred within the year following the withdrawal of prophylaxis (VGC: 14; ACV: 5, P <0.05), whereas it occurred during prophylaxis in 11 patients under ACV versus two under VGC (P <0.05). The over-all incidence of positive CMV antigenemia was similar between ACV and VGC prophylaxis. However, VGC was more efficient to prevent early CMV infection while patients treated with ACV had less CMV infection or disease after the end of the prophylaxis. PMID:26022014

  10. ONE WEEK VERSUS FOUR WEEK HEPARIN PROPHYLAXIS AFTER LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY FOR COLORECTAL CANCER.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-28

    The Primary Study Objective is to Assess the Efficacy and; Safety of Extended 4-week Heparin Prophylaxis Compared to; Prophylaxis Given for 8±2 Days After Planned Laparoscopic; Surgery for Colorectal Cancer.; The Clinical Benefit Will be Evaluated as the Difference in; the Incidence of VTE or VTE-related Death Occurring Within 30 Days; From Surgery in the Two Study Groups.

  11. Comparison between valganciclovir and aciclovir/valaciclovir for CMV prophylaxis in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fila, M; Dechartes, A; Maisin, A; Dossier, C; Zhao, W; Deschênes, G; Baudouin, V

    2015-01-01

    Prophylaxis has dramatically decreased the occurrence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after renal transplantation. Optimal regimens of treatment remain controversial, especially in pediatric recipients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of valganciclovir (VGC) versus aciclovir/valaciclovir (ACV) in a pediatric renal transplant population. Data from 101 renal transplantations were retrospectively analyzed. Except those with R-/Dstatus, all patients received prophylaxis either with ACV, n = 39 or VGC, n = 38. Incidences of positive CMV antigenemia and disease, as well as the delay in relation to the prophylaxis, were collected during at least 12 months after the end of treatment. Positive CMV antigenemia was reported in 34 patients (ACV: 16, VGC: 16, no prophylaxis: 2). CMV disease occurred in 15 patients (ACV: 5; VGC: 8) (ns). For the majority of patients under VGC, positive CMV antigenemia occurred within the year following the withdrawal of prophylaxis (VGC: 14; ACV: 5, P <0.05), whereas it occurred during prophylaxis in 11 patients under ACV versus two under VGC (P <0.05). The over-all incidence of positive CMV antigenemia was similar between ACV and VGC prophylaxis. However, VGC was more efficient to prevent early CMV infection while patients treated with ACV had less CMV infection or disease after the end of the prophylaxis.

  12. Case report: Manual lymphatic drainage and kinesio taping in the secondary malignant breast cancer-related lymphedema in an arm with arteriovenous (A-V) fistula for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ya-Hui; Li, Shu-Hua; Liao, Su-Fen; Tang, Hao-Wei

    2013-08-01

    Lymphedema is a dreaded complication of breast cancer treatment. The standard care for lymphedema is complex decongestive physiotherapy, which includes manual lymphatic drainage (MLD), short stretch bandaging, exercise, and skin care. The Kinesio Taping could help to improve lymphatic uptake. We reported a patient with unilateral secondary malignant breast cancer-related lymphedema and arteriovenous (A-V) fistula for hemodialysis happened in the same arm, and used kinesio taping, MLD, and exercise to treat this patient because no pressure could be applied to the A-V fistula. The 12-session therapy created an excellent effect. We do not think the kinesio taping could replace short stretch bandaging, but it could be another choice for contraindicating pressure therapy patients, and we should pay attention to wounds induced by kinesio tape.

  13. Preliminary consultation on preferred product characteristics of benzathine penicillin G for secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Wyber, Rosemary; Boyd, Ben J; Colquhoun, Samantha; Currie, Bart J; Engel, Mark; Kado, Joseph; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Sullivan, Mark; Saxena, Anita; Sheel, Meru; Steer, Andrew; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Zühlke, Liesl; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic fever is caused by an abnormal immune reaction to group A streptococcal infection. Secondary prophylaxis with antibiotics is recommended for people after their initial episode of rheumatic fever to prevent recurrent group A streptococcal infections, recurrences of rheumatic fever and progression to rheumatic heart disease. This secondary prophylaxis must be maintained for at least a decade after the last episode of rheumatic fever. Benzathine penicillin G is the first line antibiotic for secondary prophylaxis, delivered intramuscularly every 2 to 4 weeks. However, adherence to recommended secondary prophylaxis regimens is a global challenge. This paper outlines a consultation with global experts in rheumatic heart disease on the characteristics of benzathine penicillin G formulations which could be changed to improve adherence with secondary prophylaxis. Characteristics included dose interval, pain, administration mechanism, cold chain independence and cost. A sample target product profile for reformulated benzathine penicillin G is presented. PMID:27465618

  14. Preliminary consultation on preferred product characteristics of benzathine penicillin G for secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Wyber, Rosemary; Boyd, Ben J; Colquhoun, Samantha; Currie, Bart J; Engel, Mark; Kado, Joseph; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Sullivan, Mark; Saxena, Anita; Sheel, Meru; Steer, Andrew; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Zühlke, Liesl; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic fever is caused by an abnormal immune reaction to group A streptococcal infection. Secondary prophylaxis with antibiotics is recommended for people after their initial episode of rheumatic fever to prevent recurrent group A streptococcal infections, recurrences of rheumatic fever and progression to rheumatic heart disease. This secondary prophylaxis must be maintained for at least a decade after the last episode of rheumatic fever. Benzathine penicillin G is the first line antibiotic for secondary prophylaxis, delivered intramuscularly every 2 to 4 weeks. However, adherence to recommended secondary prophylaxis regimens is a global challenge. This paper outlines a consultation with global experts in rheumatic heart disease on the characteristics of benzathine penicillin G formulations which could be changed to improve adherence with secondary prophylaxis. Characteristics included dose interval, pain, administration mechanism, cold chain independence and cost. A sample target product profile for reformulated benzathine penicillin G is presented.

  15. Efficacy of Favipiravir (T-705) in Rabies Postexposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kentaro; Noguchi, Kazuko; Komeno, Takashi; Furuta, Yousuke; Nishizono, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal encephalitis caused by rabies virus (RABV), and no antiviral drugs for RABV are currently available. We report for the first time the efficacy of favipiravir (T-705) against RABV in vitro and in vivo. T-705 produced a significant, 3–4 log10 reduction in the multiplication of street and fixed RABV strains in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of 32.4 µM and 44.3 µM, respectively. T-705 significantly improved morbidity and mortality among RABV-infected mice when orally administered at a dose of 300 mg/kg/day for 7 days, beginning 1 hour after inoculation. T-705 significantly reduced the rate of virus positivity in the brain. Furthermore, the effectiveness of T-705 was comparable to that of equine rabies virus immunoglobulin for postexposure prophylaxis. Collectively, our results suggest that T-705 is active against RABV and may serve as a potential alternative to rabies immunoglobulin in rabies postexposure prophylaxis. PMID:26655300

  16. Anti-D prophylaxis: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    de Haas, M; Finning, K; Massey, E; Roberts, D J

    2014-02-01

    The new British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) guidelines for the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in pregnancy provide a welcome clarification of the use of anti-D in ectopic pregnancy and after red cell salvage during caesarean section, of dosing with different preparations and distinguishing non-immune and immune anti-D. The routine use of anti-D prophylaxis (RAADP) to prevent Rhesus (Rh) D alloimmunisation during the third trimester is well established and requires careful and well-audited local implementation to achieve the maximum public health benefit. In the UK, such scrutiny may be provided by the reporting of failed anti-D prophylaxis at women who have produced an immune anti-D that is detectable for the first time in the current pregnancy through the voluntary Serious Hazards of Transfusion reporting scheme (SHOT). Application of fetal RHD genotyping would avoid giving anti-D to RhD negative women carrying an RhD negative fetus. RAADP is directed by fetal RHD genotyping in some countries in Northern Europe led by the Netherlands and Denmark. The economic case for RAADP directed by fetal RHD genotyping needs to be carefully evaluated and in England is under consideration by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Possible future developments include the use of monoclonal anti-D preparations, now in advanced clinical trials, and also testing the hypothesis that directed RAADP from early in the second trimester may further reduce anti-D immunisation. PMID:25121157

  17. Pharmacologic Considerations for Preexposure Prophylaxis in Transgender Women

    PubMed Central

    Reirden, Daniel; Castillo-Mancilla, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Studies of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-emtricitabine (FTC)–based preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have not focused on transgendered women who are at disproportionate risk of HIV acquisition. Concerns exist for drug interactions between cross-sex therapy (estradiol, progestins, and spironolactone) with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate–emtricitabine. This review assessed the experimental and theoretical risk for such drug interactions. It was found that none of these medications are implicated as major perpetrators of drug interactions, and the classes use different metabolic pathways for clearance, suggesting a low likelihood for interactions in either direction. Subanalyses of transgender women in Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative suggested PrEP efficacy if adherence was high. Nevertheless, several research gaps were identified, particularly the need for controlled interaction studies in transgendered women, including effects on renal clearance, intracellular tenofovir diphosphate and emtricitabine triphosphate in target cells, as well as hormone effects on HIV susceptibility and immunity. PrEP should continue to be offered to transgender women while additional research is planned or pending. PMID:27429188

  18. Non-Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Beerepoot, Mariëlle; Geerlings, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance has stimulated interest in non-antibiotic prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Well-known steps in the pathogenesis of UTIs are urogenital colonization and adherence of uropathogens to uroepithelial cell receptors. To prevent colonization in postmenopausal women, vaginal, but not oral, estrogens have been shown to restore the vagina lactobacilli flora, reduce vaginal colonization with Enterobacteriaceae, and reduce the number of UTIs compared to placebo. Different lactobacilli strains show different results in the prevention of recurrent UTIs. Intravaginal suppositories with Lactobacillus crispatus in premenopausal women and oral capsules with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 in postmenopausal women are promising. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) cannot be recommended for the prevention of UTIs. Cranberries are thought to contain proanthocyanidins that can inhibit adherence of P-fimbriated E. coli to the uroepithelial cell receptors. Cranberry products decreased UTI recurrences about 30%-40% in premenopausal women with recurrent UTIs, but are less effective than low-dose antimicrobial prophylaxis. However, the optimal dose of cranberry product has still to be determined. Initially OM-89, a vaccine with 18 heat-killed E. coli extracts, seemed promising, but this was not confirmed in a recently randomized trial. PMID:27092529

  19. Anti-D prophylaxis: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    de Haas, M; Finning, K; Massey, E; Roberts, D J

    2014-02-01

    The new British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) guidelines for the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in pregnancy provide a welcome clarification of the use of anti-D in ectopic pregnancy and after red cell salvage during caesarean section, of dosing with different preparations and distinguishing non-immune and immune anti-D. The routine use of anti-D prophylaxis (RAADP) to prevent Rhesus (Rh) D alloimmunisation during the third trimester is well established and requires careful and well-audited local implementation to achieve the maximum public health benefit. In the UK, such scrutiny may be provided by the reporting of failed anti-D prophylaxis at women who have produced an immune anti-D that is detectable for the first time in the current pregnancy through the voluntary Serious Hazards of Transfusion reporting scheme (SHOT). Application of fetal RHD genotyping would avoid giving anti-D to RhD negative women carrying an RhD negative fetus. RAADP is directed by fetal RHD genotyping in some countries in Northern Europe led by the Netherlands and Denmark. The economic case for RAADP directed by fetal RHD genotyping needs to be carefully evaluated and in England is under consideration by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Possible future developments include the use of monoclonal anti-D preparations, now in advanced clinical trials, and also testing the hypothesis that directed RAADP from early in the second trimester may further reduce anti-D immunisation.

  20. A New Approach to the Prophylaxis of Cyclic Vomiting: Topiramate

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Oya B; Sezer, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of topiramate and propranolol in preventing pediatric cyclic vomiting syndrome. Methods A retrospective medical-record review of patients who underwent prophylaxis after receiving a diagnosis of cyclic vomiting syndrome was performed. Patients who completed at least 12 months of treatment were included in the analysis. Responder rate, and adverse-event rates were also calculated from all patients. Response to treatment was assessed as the total number of vomiting attacks per year. Patients in whom the frequency of vomiting attack reduced greater or equal to 50% were defined as responders, and the remaining patients were classified as nonresponders. Results A total of 38 patients who were treated prophylactically with either topiramate (16 patients) or propranolol (22 patients) were identified. Fifty-nine percent of the patients in the propranolol group and 81% of the patients in the topiramate group reported freedom from attacks. A decrease of more than 50% in attacks per year occurred in 23% of patients in the propranolol group and 13% of patients in the topiramate group. The responder rates were 81% for propranolol group and 94% for topiramate group (P = 0.001). Despite minor adverse effects (drowsiness, nervousness, and dizziness) observed in a few patients, the adverse event rates were not significantly different between the 2 groups (P = 0.240). Conclusions The efficacy of topiramate was superior to propranolol for the prophylaxis of pediatric cyclic vomiting syndrome. PMID:27302967

  1. Efficacy of Favipiravir (T-705) in Rabies Postexposure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kentaro; Noguchi, Kazuko; Komeno, Takashi; Furuta, Yousuke; Nishizono, Akira

    2016-04-15

    Rabies is a fatal encephalitis caused by rabies virus (RABV), and no antiviral drugs for RABV are currently available. We report for the first time the efficacy of favipiravir (T-705) against RABV in vitro and in vivo. T-705 produced a significant, 3-4 log10 reduction in the multiplication of street and fixed RABV strains in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of 32.4 µM and 44.3 µM, respectively. T-705 significantly improved morbidity and mortality among RABV-infected mice when orally administered at a dose of 300 mg/kg/day for 7 days, beginning 1 hour after inoculation. T-705 significantly reduced the rate of virus positivity in the brain. Furthermore, the effectiveness of T-705 was comparable to that of equine rabies virus immunoglobulin for postexposure prophylaxis. Collectively, our results suggest that T-705 is active against RABV and may serve as a potential alternative to rabies immunoglobulin in rabies postexposure prophylaxis.

  2. Non-Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Beerepoot, Mariëlle; Geerlings, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance has stimulated interest in non-antibiotic prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Well-known steps in the pathogenesis of UTIs are urogenital colonization and adherence of uropathogens to uroepithelial cell receptors. To prevent colonization in postmenopausal women, vaginal, but not oral, estrogens have been shown to restore the vagina lactobacilli flora, reduce vaginal colonization with Enterobacteriaceae, and reduce the number of UTIs compared to placebo. Different lactobacilli strains show different results in the prevention of recurrent UTIs. Intravaginal suppositories with Lactobacillus crispatus in premenopausal women and oral capsules with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 in postmenopausal women are promising. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) cannot be recommended for the prevention of UTIs. Cranberries are thought to contain proanthocyanidins that can inhibit adherence of P-fimbriated E. coli to the uroepithelial cell receptors. Cranberry products decreased UTI recurrences about 30%–40% in premenopausal women with recurrent UTIs, but are less effective than low-dose antimicrobial prophylaxis. However, the optimal dose of cranberry product has still to be determined. Initially OM-89, a vaccine with 18 heat-killed E. coli extracts, seemed promising, but this was not confirmed in a recently randomized trial. PMID:27092529

  3. The economics of hemodialysis catheter-related infection prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Kosa, S Daisy; Lok, Charmaine E

    2013-01-01

    Hemodialysis central venous catheter (CVC) use is associated with the highest morbidity, mortality, and cost of all types of hemodialysis vascular access. CVC-related infection drives much of the cost associated with CVC use. The magnitude of the cost associated with CVC-related infection varies depending on the type and severity of that infection; however, estimates of the total direct and indirect costs associated with hospitalizations due to hemodialysis CVC-related infections range from 17,000 USD to 32,000 USD per episode. Thus, it is critically important, to not only have effective strategies to limit CVC-related infection but also evaluate whether these strategies are an efficient use of resources. Prophylactic strategies can be considered economically efficient only if the value of its implementation and the corresponding drop in infection rate offer greater value than standard care. The optimal CVC-related infection prophylaxis strategy should work to limit infection risk with minimal risk, inconvenience, and discomfort to the patient, and at minimal cost. The aim of this review was to examine the clinical and economic impact of some commonly described interventions used for CVC infection prophylaxis.

  4. Pharmacologic Considerations for Preexposure Prophylaxis in Transgender Women.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter L; Reirden, Daniel; Castillo-Mancilla, Jose

    2016-08-15

    Studies of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-emtricitabine (FTC)-based preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have not focused on transgendered women who are at disproportionate risk of HIV acquisition. Concerns exist for drug interactions between cross-sex therapy (estradiol, progestins, and spironolactone) with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-emtricitabine. This review assessed the experimental and theoretical risk for such drug interactions. It was found that none of these medications are implicated as major perpetrators of drug interactions, and the classes use different metabolic pathways for clearance, suggesting a low likelihood for interactions in either direction. Subanalyses of transgender women in Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative suggested PrEP efficacy if adherence was high. Nevertheless, several research gaps were identified, particularly the need for controlled interaction studies in transgendered women, including effects on renal clearance, intracellular tenofovir diphosphate and emtricitabine triphosphate in target cells, as well as hormone effects on HIV susceptibility and immunity. PrEP should continue to be offered to transgender women while additional research is planned or pending. PMID:27429188

  5. Migraine prophylaxis, ischemic depolarizations and stroke outcomes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yalcin, Nilufer; Yu, Esther Sori; Daneshmand, Ali; Wei, Ying; Zheng, Yi; Can, Anil; Sengul, Buse; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Ayata, Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine with aura is an established stroke risk factor, and excitatory mechanisms such as spreading depression are implicated in the pathogenesis of both migraine and stroke. Spontaneous spreading depression waves originate within the peri-infarct tissue and exacerbate the metabolic mismatch during focal cerebral ischemia. Genetically enhanced spreading depression susceptibility facilitates anoxic depolarizations and peri-infarct spreading depressions and accelerates infarct growth, suggesting that susceptibility to spreading depression is a critical determinant of vulnerability to ischemic injury. Because chronic treatment with migraine prophylactic drugs suppresses spreading depression susceptibility, we tested whether migraine prophylaxis can also suppress ischemic depolarizations and improve stroke outcome. Methods We measured the cortical susceptibility to spreading depression and ischemic depolarizations, and determined tissue and neurological outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion in wild type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 knock-in mice treated with vehicle, topiramate or lamotrigine daily for 7 weeks or as a single dose shortly before testing. Results Chronic treatment with topiramate or lamotrigine reduces the susceptibility to KCl- or electrical stimulation-induced spreading depressions as well as ischemic depolarizations in both wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice. Consequently, both tissue and neurological outcomes are improved. Notably, treatment with a single dose of either drug is ineffective. Conclusions These data underscore the importance of hyperexcitability as a mechanism for increased stroke risk in migraineurs, and suggest that migraine prophylaxis may not only prevent migraine attacks but also protect migraineurs against ischemic injury. PMID:25424478

  6. Endocarditis Prophylaxis in Cardiac Patients: Knowledge among General Dental Practitioners in Tabriz

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Amir; Abolfazli, Nader; Lafzi, Ardeshir

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims Dental procedures injuring oral tissues may induce bacterial release to blood stream that can cause infective endocarditis in susceptible patients. The aim of this study was to determine the level of knowledge of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Tabriz, Northwest of Iran, regarding endocarditis prophylaxis in cardiac pa-tients receiving dental treatments. Materials and methods This was a cross-sectional, descriptive, analytical study that included 150 GDPs. All practitioners were given a self-administered questionnaire which consisted of three parts assessing their knowledge of cardiac diseases requiring prophylaxis, dental procedures requiring prophylaxis, and antibiotic regimen for endocarditis prophylaxis. Statistical analysis of data was carried out using independent t-test, one-way ANOVA and chi-square test. Results The level of knowledge among GDPs in three areas of cardiac diseases requiring prophylax-is, dental procedures requiring prophylaxis, and antibiotic regimen for endocarditis prophylaxis were 63.7%, 66.8% and 47.7%, respectively. Their overall level of knowledge regarding endocarditis prophylaxis was 59%. Association of the level of knowledge with age and practice period was statis-tically significant (P < 0.05). However, the level of knowledge was not significantly associated with gender or university of graduation in either of three areas evaluated (P > 0.05). Conclusion According to our results, the knowledge of endocarditis prophylaxis among GDPs in Tabriz was in a moderate level. Regarding the importance of endocarditis prophylaxis in sus-ceptible patients, it should be more emphasized in the curriculum of dental schools and continuing dental education programs. PMID:23285324

  7. Complex karyotype in a case of cutaneous lymphangiosarcoma associated with chronic lymphedema of the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Marando, Alessandro; Bernasconi, Barbara; Sabatino, Daniele; Militti, Lucia; Capella, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    Lymphangiosarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of endothelial cells. The term is used to describe an angiosarcoma associated with chronic lymphedema. The skin of the head and neck region is the most common site of origin. Rather few cytogenetic studies on lymphangiosarcoma are reported in the literature. We here describe a case of an 87-year-old woman, with a history of recurring lymphangitis and with an ulcerated nodular lesion of the leg. The histological diagnosis was a malignant neoplasm of vascular origin, with the morphological and immunohistochemical features of a lymphangiosarcoma. A series of antibodies (CD31, CD34, vimentin, podoplanin and HHV-8), conventional and molecular cytogenetic and Spectral Karyotyping (SKY-FISH) analyses were used to study this case. The immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that the neoplasm was positive for vimentin, CD31, CD34 and podoplanin and negative for HHV-8. The proliferation rate (Ki-67) was about 70%. Karyotype was defined using conventional cytogenetic and SKY-FISH. In addition, high-level of amplification was observed with MYC split signal probe. The morphological and immunohistochemical evaluations supported the diagnosis of lymphangiosarcoma. Moreover, the cytogenetic and molecular findings contributed towards accurately defining the karyotypic aberrations of this rare sarcoma.

  8. Lipidomic Profiling of Adipose Tissue Reveals an Inflammatory Signature in Cancer-Related and Primary Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Sedger, Lisa M.; Tull, Dedreia L.; McConville, Malcolm J.; De Souza, David P.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W. T.; Williams, Spencer J.; Dayalan, Saravanan; Lanzer, Daniel; Mackie, Helen; Lam, Thomas C.; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related and primary lymphedema (LE) are associated with the production of adipose tissue (AT). Nothing is known, however, about the lipid-based molecules that comprise LE AT. We therefore analyzed lipid molecules in lipoaspirates and serum obtained from LE patients, and compared them to lipoaspirates from cosmetic surgery patients and healthy control cohort serum. LE patient serum analysis demonstrated that triglycerides, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol and lipid transport molecules remained within the normal range, with no alterations in individual fatty acids. The lipidomic analysis also identified 275 lipid-based molecules, including triacylglycerides, diacylglycerides, fatty acids and phospholipids in AT oil and fat. Although the majority of lipid molecules were present in a similar abundance in LE and non-LE samples, there were several small changes: increased C20:5-containing triacylglycerides, reduced C10:0 caprinic and C24:1 nervonic acids. LE AT oil also contained a signature of increased cyclopropane-type fatty acids and inflammatory mediators arachidonic acid and ceramides. Interestingly C20:5 and C22:6 omega-3-type lipids are increased in LE AT, correlating with LE years. Hence, LE AT has a normal lipid profile containing a signature of inflammation and omega-3-lipids. It remains unclear, however, whether these differences reflect a small-scale global metabolic disturbance or effects within localised inflammatory foci. PMID:27182733

  9. Lower limb gigantism, lymphedema, and painful varicosities following a thigh vascular access graft.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael; Mathuram Thiyagarajan, Umasankar; Akoh, Jacob A

    2014-07-01

    Prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are associated with greater morbidity than autogenous arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), but their use is indicated when AVF formation is not possible. This report adds to the literature a case of lower limb gigantism, painful varicosities, and lymphedema following long-term use of AVG in the upper thigh. The patient's past medical history included renal transplantation on the same side well before the AVG was inserted and right leg deep vein thrombosis. Suspicion of AVG thrombosis was excluded by Doppler ultrasound, which demonstrated an access flow of 1700 mL/min. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis did not identify the cause of her symptoms. Whereas functional incompetence of the iliac vein valve might be responsible for the varicosities, the extent of hypertrophy in this case raises the suspicion of lymphatic blockage possibly secondary to groin dissection undertaken at the time of graft insertion, in addition to the previous dissection at the time of transplantation. This case highlights the need for minimal groin dissection during AVG insertion, particularly in patients with a history of previous abdominopelvic surgery. PMID:24467313

  10. Physiotherapeutic stimulation: Early prevention of lymphedema following axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    SARRI, ALMIR JOSÉ; MORIGUCHI, SONIA MARTA; DIAS, ROGÉRIO; PERES, STELA VERZINHASSE; DA SILVA, EDUARDO TINÓIS; KOGA, KÁTIA HIROMOTO; ZUCCA MATTHES, ÂNGELO GUSTAVO; DOS SANTOS, MARCELO JOSÉ; DA ROCHA, EUCLIDES TIMÓTEO; HAIKEL, RAPHAEL LUIZ

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm the effectiveness of early physiotherapeutic stimulation for lymphatic flow progression in patients with breast cancer undergoing axillary dissection. This was a randomized experimental study on 22 patients who underwent lymphoscintigraphy in their arms on two different occasions, firstly without stimulation and secondly after randomization into two groups: without physiotherapeutic stimulation (WOPS; n=10) and with physiotherapeutic stimulation (WPS; n=12). The lymphoscintigraphy scan was performed with 99mTc-phytate administered into the second interdigital space of the hand, ipsilaterally to the dissected axilla, in three phases: dynamic, static, and delayed whole body imaging. Physiotherapeutic stimulation was carried out using Földi's technique. In both groups, images from the two examinations of each patient were compared. Flow progression was considered positive when, on the second examination, the radiopharmaceutical reached areas more distant from the injection site. Statistical analysis was used to evaluate frequencies, percentages and central trend measurements, and non-parametric tests were conducted. Descriptive analysis showed that the WPS and WOPS groups were similar in terms of mean age, weight, height, body mass index and number of lymph nodes removed. There were statistically significant associations between physiotherapeutic stimulation and radiopharmaceutical progression at all three phases of the study (p<0.0001). Early physiotherapeutic stimulation in breast cancer patients undergoing radical axillary dissection is effective, and can therefore be indicated as a preventive measure against lymphedema. PMID:23136607

  11. Endermologie (with and without compression bandaging)--a new treatment option for secondary arm lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Moseley, A L; Esplin, M; Piller, N B; Douglass, J

    2007-09-01

    Two treatment protocols are presented using the LPG Endermologie system in combination with compression bandaging as a new treatment option for secondary arm lymphedema. Both protocols were applied 4 days a week for 4 weeks but differed in Trial II in time spent clearing the regions of the trunk adjacent to the swollen limb and the addition of a larger treatment head so that a greater area could be covered more quickly. The first protocol involved 24 women and the second involved 10 women. At the end of the treatment period, both protocols demonstrated overall reductions in limb volume (134mls; 18.3% p = 0.000 and 185mls; 28%, p = 0.002), limb fluid (182mls; 28%, p = 0.000 and 216mls; 33%. p = 0.014), truncal fluid (342mls; p = 0.002 and 290mls; p = 0.066), improvements in fibrotic induration in some lymphatic territories, and significant improvements in subject reporting of heaviness, tightness, tissue hardness and limb size. Trial II demonstrated additional benefits in terms of reduction in whole arm volume at 24 hours, improved fluid and arm volume reductions, and a significant improvement in subject reported arm range of movement. The additional time spent clearing the regions adjacent to the swollen limb in the second protocol appears to produce an increase in limb volume and limb fluid loss compared to the original treatment protocol.

  12. Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Women with and without Lymphedema following Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Smoot, Betty; Johnson, Morgan; Duda J, John; Krasnoff, Joanne; Dodd, Marylin

    2013-01-01

    Following breast cancer (BC) treatment, many women develop impairments that may impact cardiorespiratory (CR) fitness. The aims of this study were to 1) evaluate CR fitness in women following BC treatment, 2) evaluate differences in CR fitness in those with and without breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) and compare these to age-matched norms, and 3) evaluate the contribution of predictor variables to CR fitness. 136 women post-BC treatment completed testing: 67 with BCRL, and 69 without. VO2 peak was lower in participants compared to published healthy age-matched norms. VO2 peak was statistically significantly lower in women with BCRL. Age, BMI, meeting recommended exercise criteria, and DASH scores explained 50% of the variance in VO2 peak (R=0.708, p<0.001). Following BC treatment CR fitness may be impaired, more-so in women with BCRL. This should be considered when providing rehabilitation for women following BC treatment as cardiorespiratory fitness has linked to improved health outcomes and survivorship. PMID:24058390

  13. Lower limb gigantism, lymphedema, and painful varicosities following a thigh vascular access graft.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael; Mathuram Thiyagarajan, Umasankar; Akoh, Jacob A

    2014-07-01

    Prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are associated with greater morbidity than autogenous arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), but their use is indicated when AVF formation is not possible. This report adds to the literature a case of lower limb gigantism, painful varicosities, and lymphedema following long-term use of AVG in the upper thigh. The patient's past medical history included renal transplantation on the same side well before the AVG was inserted and right leg deep vein thrombosis. Suspicion of AVG thrombosis was excluded by Doppler ultrasound, which demonstrated an access flow of 1700 mL/min. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis did not identify the cause of her symptoms. Whereas functional incompetence of the iliac vein valve might be responsible for the varicosities, the extent of hypertrophy in this case raises the suspicion of lymphatic blockage possibly secondary to groin dissection undertaken at the time of graft insertion, in addition to the previous dissection at the time of transplantation. This case highlights the need for minimal groin dissection during AVG insertion, particularly in patients with a history of previous abdominopelvic surgery.

  14. Evaluation of the duration of thromboembolic prophylaxis after high-risk orthopaedic surgery: the ETHOS observational study.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, David; Arcelus, Juan I; Felicissimo, Paulo

    2012-02-01

    Real-life data on post-discharge venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis practices and treatments are lacking. We assessed post-operative VTE prophylaxis prescribed and received in a prospective registry, compared with the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines in high-risk orthopaedic surgery patients. Consecutive patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA), hip fracture surgery (HFS), or knee arthroplasty (KA) were enrolled at discharge from 161 centres in 17 European countries if they had received in-hospital VTE prophylaxis that was considered in accordance with the ACCP guidelines by the treating physician. Data on prescribed and actual prophylaxis were obtained from hospital charts and patient post-discharge diaries. Post-operative prophylaxis prescribed and actual prophylaxis received were considered adherent or adequate, respectively, if recommended therapies were used for ≥28 days (HFS and THA) or ≥10 days (KA). Among 4,388 patients, 69.9% were prescribed ACCP-adherent VTE prophylaxis (THA: 1,411/2,217 [63.6%]; HFS: 701/1,112 [63.0%]; KA: 955/1,059 [90.2%]). Actual prophylaxis received was described in 3,939 patients with an available diary after discharge (non-evaluability rate of 10%). Mean actual durations of pharmacological prophylaxis from surgery were: 28.4 ± 13.7 (THA), 29.3 ± 13.9 (HFS), and 28.7 ± 14.1 days (KA). ACCP-adequate VTE prophylaxis was received by 66.5% of patients (60.9% THA, 55.4% HFS, and 88.7% KA). Prophylaxis inadequacies were mainly due to inadequate prescription, non-recommended prophylaxis prescription at discharge, or too short prophylaxis prescribed. In high-risk orthopaedic surgery patients with hospital-initiated prophylaxis, there is a gap between ACCP recommendations, prescribed and actual prophylaxis received, mainly due to inadequate prescription at discharge.

  15. Acute Inflammatory Response to Low-, Moderate-, and High-Load Resistance Exercise in Women With Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Cormie, Prue; Singh, Benjamin; Hayes, Sandi; Peake, Jonathan M; Galvão, Daniel A; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Nosaka, Kazunori; Cornish, Bruce; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Newton, Robert U

    2016-09-01

    Background Resistance exercise is emerging as a potential adjunct therapy to aid in the management of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). However, the mechanisms underlying the relationships between the acute and long-term benefits of resistance exercise on BCRL are not well understood. Purpose To examine the acute inflammatory response to upper-body resistance exercise in women with BCRL and to compare these effects between resistance exercises involving low, moderate, and high loads. The impact on lymphedema status and associated symptoms was also compared. Methods A total of 21 women, 62 ± 10 years old, with BCRL participated in the study. Participants completed low-load (15-20 repetition maximum [RM]), moderate-load (10-12 RM), and high-load (6-8 RM) exercise sessions consisting of 3 sets of 6 upper-body resistance exercises. Sessions were completed in a randomized order separated by a 7- to 10-day wash-out period. Venous blood samples were obtained to assess markers of exercise-induced muscle damage and inflammation. Lymphedema status was assessed using bioimpedance spectroscopy and arm circumferences, and associated symptoms were assessed using Visual Analogue Scales for pain, heaviness, and tightness. Measurements were conducted before and 24 hours after the exercise sessions. Results No significant changes in creatine kinase, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were observed following the 3 resistance exercise sessions. There were no significant changes in arm swelling or symptom severity scores across the 3 resistance exercise conditions. Conclusions The magnitude of acute exercise-induced inflammation following upper-body resistance exercise in women with BCRL does not vary between resistance exercise loads.

  16. Establishing and sustaining a prospective screening program for breast cancer-related lymphedema at the massachusetts general hospital: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Brunelle, Cheryl; Skolny, Melissa; Ferguson, Chantal; Swaroop, Meyha; O'Toole, Jean; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing call to prospectively screen patients with breast cancer for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) following their breast cancer treatment. While the components of a prospective screening program have been published, some centers struggle with how to initiate, establish, and sustain a screening program of their own. The intent of this manuscript is to share our experience and struggles in establishing a prospective surveillance program within the infrastructure of our institution. It is our hope that by sharing our history other centers can learn from our mistakes and successes to better design their own prospective screening program to best serve their patient population. PMID:26011383

  17. Advances in hemophilia and the role of current and emerging prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Suchitra S

    2016-04-01

    The primary goal of hemophilia treatment and management is the prevention of painful, disabling, and costly joint arthropathy that results from its characteristic bleeding into joints and muscles. Prophylactic treatment with clotting-factor concentrates has been shown to prevent hemophilic arthropathy and is, therefore, the standard of care for hemophilia A and B. Data has demonstrated the clinical efficacy and overall benefits of prophylaxis in young children, adolescents, and adults. Early initiation with prima-ry prophylaxis is ideal, but secondary prophylaxis in adolescents and adults has also demonstrated significant success. Because the standard of care includes prophylaxis with factor-concentrate replacement in order to prevent joint damage in patients with hemophilia, prophylaxis is now more common and needs to be addressed in all clinical settings, including managed care. However, further research is needed to help clinicians develop individualized factor-replacement protocols and under-stand the impact of long-term use into adulthood. World Federation of Hemophilia guidelines do not have definitive recommendations on continuation of prophylaxis into adulthood. The optimal regimen for initiating prophylaxis, duration of treatment, and dosing regimens continue to be studied.

  18. Health Technology Assessment Fireside: Antibiotic Prophylaxis and Dental Treatment in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Brondani, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. This paper discusses the controversies surrounding the antibiotic prophylaxis preceding dental interventions within the following research question: how effective is dental antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing comorbidity and complications in those at risk? Methods. A synthesis of the available literature regarding antibiotic prophylaxis in dentistry was conducted under the lenses of Kazanjian's framework for health technology assessment with a focus on economic concerns, population impact, social context, population at risk, and the effectiveness of the evidence to support its use. Results. The papers reviewed show that we have been using antibiotic prophylaxis without a clear and full understanding of its benefits. Although the first guideline for antibiotic prophylaxis was introduced in 1990, it has been revised on several occasions, from 1991 to 2011. Evidence-based clinical guidelines are yet to be seen. Conclusions. Any perceived potential benefit from administering antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures must be weighed against the known risks of lethal toxicity, allergy, and development, selection, and transmission of microbial resistance. The implications of guideline changes and lack of evidence for the full use of antibiotic prophylaxis for the teaching of dentistry have to be further discussed. PMID:26555974

  19. Spanish Consensus Guidelines on prophylaxis with bypassing agents in patients with haemophilia and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, Maria Fernanda; Altisent Roca, Carmen; Álvarez-Román, Maria Teresa; Canaro Hirnyk, Mariana Isabel; Mingot-Castellano, Maria Eva; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; Cid Haro, Ana Rosa; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Sedano Balbas, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Prophylaxis with the blood clotting factor, factor VIII (FVIII) is ineffective for individuals with haemophilia A and high-titre inhibitors to FVIII. Prophylaxis with the FVIII bypassing agents activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCC; FEIBA® Baxalta) or recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa; Novo-Seven®, Novo Nordisk) may be an effective alternative. It was our aim to develop evidence -and expert opinion- based guidelines for prophylactic therapy for patients with high-titre inhibitors to FVIII. A panel of nine Spanish haematologists undertook a systematic review of the literature to develop consensus-based guidance. Particular consideration was given to prophylaxis in patients prior to undergoing immune tolerance induction (ITI) (a process of continued exposure to FVIII that can restore sensitivity for some patients), during the ITI period and for those not undergoing ITI or for whom ITI had failed. These guidelines offer guidance for clinicians in deciding which patients might benefit from prophylaxis with FVIII bypassing agents, the most appropriate agents in various clinical settings related to ITI, doses and dosing regimens and how best to monitor the efficacy of prophylaxis. The paper includes recommendations on when to interrupt or stop prophylaxis and special safety concerns during prophylaxis. These consensus guidelines offer the most comprehensive evaluation of the clinical evidence base to date and should be of considerable benefit to clinicians facing the challenge of managing patients with severe haemophilia A with high-titre FVIII inhibitors. PMID:26842562

  20. Seizure Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Inglet, Shannon; Baldwin, Margaret; Quinones, Amie H; Majercik, Sarah; Collingridge, Dave S

    2016-01-01

    The use of prophylactic anticonvulsants to prevent early post-traumatic seizures (PTSs) is recommended but inconsistently employed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors evaluated outcomes associated with prophylaxis administration in patients with TBI at a Level 1 trauma center. All patients admitted with TBI from October 2007 through May 2012 were included. Our primary outcome was the incidence of early PTSs. Secondary outcomes included mortality, length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays, and incidence of late seizures. Of the 2,111 patients with TBI, 557 (26.4%) received seizure prophylaxis and 1,554 (73.6%) did not. Two early PTSs occurred in the prophylaxis group (0.4%), whereas 21 occurred in the non-prophylaxis group (1.4%) (p = 0.05). The overall mortality rate was higher in patients who received prophylaxis (14.2% vs. 6.2%; p < 0.001), and the mean hospital length of stay (LOS) was longer (6.8 ± 6.9 vs. 3.8 ± 5 days; p < 0.001). In patients with severe and moderate TBI, the rate of prophylaxis administration was approximately half, whereas significantly fewer patients with mild TBI received prophylaxis than did not (20.2% vs 79.8%, p < 0.001). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and longer hospital LOS were associated with early PTS (p = 0.008 for both comparisons), but sex and age were not. Brain hemorrhage was present in 78.3% of those patients who experienced early seizures. In our cohort, patients who received seizure prophylaxis had a lower GCS score, higher overall mortality rate, longer LOS, and more frequent ICU admissions, suggesting that patients who received prophylaxis were likely more severely injured.

  1. Seizure Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Inglet, Shannon; Baldwin, Margaret; Quinones, Amie H; Majercik, Sarah; Collingridge, Dave S

    2016-01-01

    The use of prophylactic anticonvulsants to prevent early post-traumatic seizures (PTSs) is recommended but inconsistently employed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors evaluated outcomes associated with prophylaxis administration in patients with TBI at a Level 1 trauma center. All patients admitted with TBI from October 2007 through May 2012 were included. Our primary outcome was the incidence of early PTSs. Secondary outcomes included mortality, length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays, and incidence of late seizures. Of the 2,111 patients with TBI, 557 (26.4%) received seizure prophylaxis and 1,554 (73.6%) did not. Two early PTSs occurred in the prophylaxis group (0.4%), whereas 21 occurred in the non-prophylaxis group (1.4%) (p = 0.05). The overall mortality rate was higher in patients who received prophylaxis (14.2% vs. 6.2%; p < 0.001), and the mean hospital length of stay (LOS) was longer (6.8 ± 6.9 vs. 3.8 ± 5 days; p < 0.001). In patients with severe and moderate TBI, the rate of prophylaxis administration was approximately half, whereas significantly fewer patients with mild TBI received prophylaxis than did not (20.2% vs 79.8%, p < 0.001). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and longer hospital LOS were associated with early PTS (p = 0.008 for both comparisons), but sex and age were not. Brain hemorrhage was present in 78.3% of those patients who experienced early seizures. In our cohort, patients who received seizure prophylaxis had a lower GCS score, higher overall mortality rate, longer LOS, and more frequent ICU admissions, suggesting that patients who received prophylaxis were likely more severely injured. PMID:27688990

  2. Seizure Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Inglet, Shannon; Baldwin, Margaret; Quinones, Amie H; Majercik, Sarah; Collingridge, Dave S; MacDonald, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The use of prophylactic anticonvulsants to prevent early post-traumatic seizures (PTSs) is recommended but inconsistently employed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors evaluated outcomes associated with prophylaxis administration in patients with TBI at a Level 1 trauma center. All patients admitted with TBI from October 2007 through May 2012 were included. Our primary outcome was the incidence of early PTSs. Secondary outcomes included mortality, length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays, and incidence of late seizures. Of the 2,111 patients with TBI, 557 (26.4%) received seizure prophylaxis and 1,554 (73.6%) did not. Two early PTSs occurred in the prophylaxis group (0.4%), whereas 21 occurred in the non-prophylaxis group (1.4%) (p = 0.05). The overall mortality rate was higher in patients who received prophylaxis (14.2% vs. 6.2%; p < 0.001), and the mean hospital length of stay (LOS) was longer (6.8 ± 6.9 vs. 3.8 ± 5 days; p < 0.001). In patients with severe and moderate TBI, the rate of prophylaxis administration was approximately half, whereas significantly fewer patients with mild TBI received prophylaxis than did not (20.2% vs 79.8%, p < 0.001). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and longer hospital LOS were associated with early PTS (p = 0.008 for both comparisons), but sex and age were not. Brain hemorrhage was present in 78.3% of those patients who experienced early seizures. In our cohort, patients who received seizure prophylaxis had a lower GCS score, higher overall mortality rate, longer LOS, and more frequent ICU admissions, suggesting that patients who received prophylaxis were likely more severely injured. PMID:27688990

  3. Pre-exposure prophylaxis in Southern Africa: feasible or not?

    PubMed Central

    Venter, Willem Daniel François; Cowan, Frances; Black, Vivian; Rebe, Kevin; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Southern and Eastern Africa bear the brunt of the AIDS epidemic, and current prevention interventions remain inadequate. Antiretroviral-based pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is gaining momentum as an effective prevention intervention. Discussion Discussions have been started on how this strategy could be employed in Africa such that the populations most in need can be reached urgently for the greatest impact. This requires the selection of specific risk groups and service environments in which PrEP can be distributed safely and cost effectively while being mindful of any ethical issues. Conclusions Given the need for an integrated public health approach to this, a number of potential populations and opportunities for PrEP distribution exist and are discussed in this commentary. PMID:26198344

  4. [Non-vaccinal prophylaxis for orally transmitted diseases].

    PubMed

    Buisson, Y; Teyssou, R; Nicand, E

    1997-01-01

    Many diseases are transmitted to man by consumption of contaminated food and drinking water. Orally transmitted diseases are among the main risks for travelers in developing and tropical countries. A variety of clinical manifestations can be observed but the diarrhea is the most common. In many cases bacterial gastroenteritis, typho-paratyphoidal fever, brucellosis, viral hepatitis, and various parasitic diseases can develop after various periods of incubation following consumption of contaminated food or drink with no initial reaction. Vaccination can afford protection against only few diseases. Prevention by applying good hygiene and common sense is the best method. By following the standard list of food precautions, travelers can minimize the main risks. Drug prophylaxis is recommended only under special circumstances. Travel medicine providers must have up-to-date information and possess the persuasive powers necessary to convince travelers to apply recommendations despite the major inconveniences.

  5. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Plastic Surgery: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Sergio; Valdes, Jorge; Salama, Moises

    2016-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major health concern because it increases morbidity and mortality after a surgical procedure. A number of well-defined, evidence-based guidelines are available delineating suitable use of prophylaxis to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Despite the available literature, there are clear gaps between recommendations and clinical practice, affecting the incidence of VTE. Plastic surgeons underuse the substantiated literature and risk stratification tools that are available to decrease the incidence of VTE in the office-based surgical setting because of fear of bleeding or hematoma complications postoperatively. Venous thromboembolism creates an economic burden on both the patient and the healthcare system. The intent of this literature review is to determine existing VTE risk using assessment models available to aid in the implementation of protocols for VTE prevention, specifically for high-risk cosmetic surgical patients in office-based settings.

  6. Indications of antibiotic prophylaxis in dental practice- review.

    PubMed

    Ramu, C; Padmanabhan, T V

    2012-09-01

    Antibiotics are frequently used in dental practice. Clinical and bacteriological epidemiological factors determine the indications of antibiotics in dentistry. Antibiotics are used in addition to appropriate treatment to aid the host defences in the elimination of remaining bacteria. It is indicated when there is evidence of clinical sign involvement and spread of infection. Antibiotics are prescribed in dental practice for treating odontoge nic infections, non-odontogenic infections, as prophylaxis against focal and local infection. Special care needs to be addressed to patients with organ transplants, poorly controlled diabetes and pregnancy. Antibiotics should be used only as an adjunct to dental treatment and never alone as the first line of care. The present paper reviews the indications of antibiotics in dental practice.

  7. Selection of dental procedures for antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tan, S Y; Gill, G

    1992-12-01

    A dental source of infection remains the most common identifiable risk factor in infective endocarditis and this may be particularly important in patients at 'high risk'. We therefore performed a questionnaire survey of dental practitioners to assess acceptance of The British Society of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) recommendations, especially with regards to selection of dental procedures for antibiotic prophylaxis. The results showed that the dental practitioners surveyed treated the 'high risk' patient group differently by extending the range of dental procedures covered by antibiotics but the BSAC only recommend that they be treated differently by hospital treatment and/or parenteral antibiotics. This must be an area of concern and deserves further attention, especially with regards to the need for wider publicity and the range of dental procedures that should be covered in the 'high risk' group where morbidity and mortality from infective endocarditis are higher.

  8. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Plastic Surgery: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Sergio; Valdes, Jorge; Salama, Moises

    2016-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major health concern because it increases morbidity and mortality after a surgical procedure. A number of well-defined, evidence-based guidelines are available delineating suitable use of prophylaxis to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Despite the available literature, there are clear gaps between recommendations and clinical practice, affecting the incidence of VTE. Plastic surgeons underuse the substantiated literature and risk stratification tools that are available to decrease the incidence of VTE in the office-based surgical setting because of fear of bleeding or hematoma complications postoperatively. Venous thromboembolism creates an economic burden on both the patient and the healthcare system. The intent of this literature review is to determine existing VTE risk using assessment models available to aid in the implementation of protocols for VTE prevention, specifically for high-risk cosmetic surgical patients in office-based settings. PMID:27501651

  9. Selection of dental procedures for antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tan, S Y; Gill, G

    1992-12-01

    A dental source of infection remains the most common identifiable risk factor in infective endocarditis and this may be particularly important in patients at 'high risk'. We therefore performed a questionnaire survey of dental practitioners to assess acceptance of The British Society of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) recommendations, especially with regards to selection of dental procedures for antibiotic prophylaxis. The results showed that the dental practitioners surveyed treated the 'high risk' patient group differently by extending the range of dental procedures covered by antibiotics but the BSAC only recommend that they be treated differently by hospital treatment and/or parenteral antibiotics. This must be an area of concern and deserves further attention, especially with regards to the need for wider publicity and the range of dental procedures that should be covered in the 'high risk' group where morbidity and mortality from infective endocarditis are higher. PMID:1452880

  10. Pharmacological prophylaxis in the kindling model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wada, J A

    1977-07-01

    Review of antiepileptic drug assessment to date by means of the kindling model of epilepsy suggests that it fills a gap that is evident in standard screening methods such as maximum electroshock or pentylenetetrazol screening tests. However, in order to obtain a comprehensive profile of antiepileptic drugs regarding prophylaxis of developing seizures and treatment of well-established seizures through the kindling preparation, it is desirable to have the following: (1) standardization of kindling techniques, (2) examination of drug effects on developing as opposed to developed seizures, (3) use of a variety of animal species, involving different functional brain sites, and (4) monitoring of plasma levels of the drug administered. It is envisaged that judicious use of the kindling preparation might also enable us to gain some insight into the mechanisms by which drugs produce their prophylactic or therapeutic effect.

  11. Animal Bites and Rabies Prophylaxis in Rural Children: Indian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Moumita; Mondal, Rakesh; Shah, Ankit; Hazra, Avijit; Ray, Somosri; Dhar, Goutam; Biswas, Rupa; Sabui, Tapas Kumar; Raychaudhuri, Dibyendu; Chatterjee, Kaushani; Kundu, Chanchal; Sarkar, Sumantra

    2016-02-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital to study clinicoepidemiological profile of potentially rabid animal bite cases from rural India. Total of 308 children (median age 6 years) admitted to hospital, were recruited over 1 year and followed up till completion of antirabies vaccine course. Dog was the commonest (77.27%) offending animal. Of the exposures, 66.88% were scratches, 88.96% were unprovoked and 27.27% were categorized as Class III. The median times to wound toileting and reporting to health facility were 1 and 6 h, respectively. Majority received prompt PEP in hospital, and RIG was administered in 34.55% of Class II and 90.48% of Class III exposures. Compared with their older counterparts, children aged <5 years suffered more bites on face and trunk and more Class III exposures. The rabies prophylaxis scenario is encouraging, when compared with earlier studies, but there are gaps to be addressed.

  12. Treatment and Prophylaxis in Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nickavar, Azar; Sotoudeh, Kambiz

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common serious bacterial infection in early life. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment prevent complications such as hypertension, proteinuria and end stage renal disease. A computerized search of MEDLINE, Embase and other databases was done to find the latest results about the treatment and prevention in pediatric UTI. Randomized control trials, systematic reviews and original articles were assessed. Search terms were “UTI, treatment, prophylaxis, prevention, and children”. All children with complicated or simple UTI were included in our search study from neonatal period to late childhood and medical aspects of treatment were reviewed. Recently, treatment approaches have been changed by simplification of drug administration. Oral treatment is recommended especially in older infants and children instead of strict intravenous treatment and patient admission. In addition, prophylactic treatment becomes easier and limited to certain cases. In this article, we review the recent information and approaches in this setting. PMID:21448397

  13. Monodrug efficacies of sulfonamides in prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W T; Killmar, J

    1996-01-01

    A remarkably high rate of adverse events is associated with the use of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. We examined the efficacies of sulfonamides alone in the prevention of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonitis, with the assumption that at least some of the adverse events with the drug combination might be due to trimethoprim. With the immunosuppressed rat model, eight sulfonamides were studied at 100, 10, and 1.0 mg/kg/day (10 rats per dosage and drug). P. carinii infection was prevented in all animals (100%) receiving dosages of as little as 1.0 mg of sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfadimethoxine per kg per day, as little as 10 mg of sulfameter, sulfachlorpyridazine, and sulfaquinoxaline per kg per day; and 100 mg of sulfaguanidine and sulfanilamide per kg per day. These studies suggest that a sulfonamide, such as sulfamethoxazole, might provide effective prophylaxis for P. carinii pneumonitis without trimethoprim. PMID:8849260

  14. Heterotopic ossification prophylaxis following operative treatment of acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E E; Kay, R M; Dorey, F J

    1994-08-01

    Eighty seven patients with 88 fractures were retrospectively reviewed to assess the effect of postoperative prophylaxis on the formation of heterotopic ossification (HO). Sixty eight patients with 69 acetabular fractures were followed for an average of 21 months (range, 3-98 months). The grade of HO was assessed using the Brooker classification system. Thirty four fractures had no prophylactic treatment, 30 were treated prophylactically with indomethacin, two with radiation therapy, and three with both indomethacin and radiation. Twenty (59%) of 34 untreated fractures developed HO, of which nine (26%) were Grade III or IV. Thirteen (43%) of 30 fractures treated with indomethacin developed HO, of which 5 (16%) were Grade III and none were Grade IV. Twenty one of 24 fractures were stabilized through the extended iliofemoral approach; 13 of these had no prophylaxis. Eleven of the 13 developed HO; eight were Grade III or IV (62%). Seven of eight fractures treated with indomethacin following the extended iliofemoral approach developed HO; one was Grade III (13%) and non Grade IV. There was no significant difference between 13 patients who were not treated prophylactically and 18 indomethacin treated patients stabilized through the Kocher-Langenbeck approach. Only one of 11 patients had HO (Grade I) following an ilioinguinal approach. Postoperative radiation therapy, with or without indomethacin, resulted in three patients with Grade 0 HO (all radiated 1-4 days post surgery), one with Grade II (radiated postoperative Day 8), and one with Grade III HO (significant delay in surgery with preoperative Grade III HO of the hip).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Current perspectives in HIV post-exposure prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Binta; Benn, Paul; Waters, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continues to rise among core groups and efforts to reduce the numbers of new infections are being redoubled. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is the use of short-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) to reduce the risk of acquisition of HIV infection following exposure. Current guidelines recommend a 28-day course of ART within 36–72 hours of exposure to HIV. As long as individuals continue to be exposed to HIV there will be a role for PEP in the foreseeable future. Nonoccupational PEP, the vast majority of which is for sexual exposure (PEPSE), has a significant role to play in HIV prevention efforts. Awareness of PEP and its availability for both clinicians and those who are eligible to receive it are crucial to ensure that PEP is used to its full potential in any HIV prevention strategy. In this review, we provide current evidence for the use of PEPSE, assessment of the risk of HIV transmission, indications for PEP, drug regimens, and management of patients started on PEP. We summarize national and international guidelines for the use of PEPSE. We explore the place of PEP within the wider strategy of reducing HIV incidence rates in the era of treatment as prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis. We also consider the implications of recent data from interventional and observational studies demonstrating significant reductions in the risk of HIV transmission within a serodiscordant relationship if the HIV-positive partner is taking effective ART upon PEP guidelines. PMID:25368534

  16. Topical azithromycin or ofloxacin for endophthalmitis prophylaxis after intravitreal injection

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro; Sararols, Laura; Arias, Lluis; Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Bassaganyas, Francisca

    2012-01-01

    Background The number of patients who have undergone intravitreal injections has increased enormously in recent years, but a consensus is still lacking on prophylaxis for endophthalmitis. The aim of this prospective, observational study was to evaluate the prophylactic effect of azithromycin eye drops versus ofloxacin eye drops. Methods The study was conducted in five hospitals in Spain and included all patients undergoing intravitreal injections of triamcinolone, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, or pegaptanib over one year. Patients received azithromycin 15 mg/g eye drops (twice daily on the day prior to injection and for another 2 days) or ofloxacin 3 mg/g eye drops (every 6 hours on the day prior to injection and for another 7 days). Results In the azithromycin group, there were 4045 injections in 972 eyes of 701 patients. In the ofloxacin group, there were 4151 injections in 944 eyes of 682 patients. There were two cases of endophthalmitis (0.049%) in the azithromycin group and five (0.12%) in the ofloxacin group. The odds ratio of presenting with endophthalmitis in the ofloxacin group compared with the azithromycin group was 2.37 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32–3.72, P < 0.001). There were two cases of noninfectious uveitis after triamcinolone injection in the azithromycin group (0.049%) and two (0.048%) in the ofloxacin group; no significant differences were observed (odds ratio 0.902, 95% CI 0.622–1.407, P = 0.407). Conjunctival hyperemia was observed in 12 cases in the azithromycin group and none in the ofloxacin group. Conclusion The risk of endophthalmitis was significantly greater with ofloxacin than with azithromycin. These findings provide a valuable addition to the ever-increasing pool of information on endophthalmitis prophylaxis after intravitreal injection, although further large-scale studies are required to provide definitive conclusions. PMID:23109798

  17. Cranial radiation necessary for CNS prophylaxis in pediatric NHL

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, L.R.; Wollner, N.; Fuks, Z.

    1987-03-01

    The records of 95 consecutive children less than or equal to 21 years of age with previously untreated diffuse histology NHL registered in our protocols from 1978 to 1983 were reviewed. Seventy-nine patients were considered eligible for analysis. The histologic subtypes represented included lymphoblastic (LB) 37%; histiocytic (DHL) 29%; undifferentiated (DU) 19%; poorly differentiated (DPDL) 9%; and unclassified (UNHL) 6%. Distribution of the patients according to stage showed Stage I, 0%; Stage II, 11%; Stage III, 53%; Stage IV, 36%. Four different Memorial Hospital protocols for systemic chemotherapy were used (LSA2L2 73%; L10 9%; L17 10%; L17M 8%); however, the IT (intrathecal) chemotherapy was uniform (Methotrexate: 6.0-6.25 mg/M2 per treatment course) and was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was not included in the CNS prophylaxis program. The overall median time of follow-up was 43 months. The overall CNS relapse rate was 6.3%; however, the incidence of CNS lymphoma presenting as the first isolated site of relapse in patients in otherwise complete remission (minimum follow-up of 19 months with 97% of patients off treatment) was only 1/58 (1.7%). Our data suggest that IT chemotherapy when given in combination with modern aggressive systemic combination chemotherapy, and without cranial radiation appears to be a highly effective modality for CNS prophylaxis regardless of stage, histology, or bone marrow or mediastinal involvement. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Fluoroquinolone prophylaxis against febrile neutropenia in areas with high fluoroquinolone resistance--an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Ng, Esther Shu-Ting; Liew, Yixin; Koh, Liang Piu; Hsu, Li Yang

    2010-09-01

    Febrile neutropenia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients receiving chemotherapy. Major prophylactic strategies include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and antibiotics, the most widely used of which are fluoroquinolones. While fluoroquinolone prophylaxis has been shown to be effective in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is low, this same efficacy has not been proven in areas where resistance is high, such as in Asia. Given the increase in antimicrobial resistance with the use of prophylaxis, the risks and benefits of this strategy need to be carefully considered. This review presents the evidence for and against fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in areas of high fluoroquinolone resistance.

  19. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of lymphatics in head and neck lymphedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, I.-Chih; Maus, Erik A.; Rasmussen, John C.; Marshall, Milton V.; Fife, Caroline E.; Smith, Latisha A.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of lymphatic disease is complicated and controversial, due in part to the limited understanding of the lymphatic system. Lymphedema (LE) is a frequent complication after surgical resection and radiation treatment in cancer survivors, and is especially debilitating in regions where treatment options are limited. Although some extremity LE can be effectively treated with manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) therapy or compression devices to direct proximal lymph transport, head and neck LE is more challenging, due to complicated geometry and complex lymphatic structure in head and neck region. Herein, we describe the compassionate use of an investigatory technique of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging to understand the lymphatic anatomy and function, and to help direct MLD in a patient with head and neck LE. Immediately after 9 intradermal injections of 25 μg indocyanine green each around the face and neck region, NIR fluorescence images were collected using a custom-built imaging system with diffused excitation light illumination. These images were then used to direct MLD therapy. In addition, 3-dimensional (3D) surface profilometry was used to monitor response to therapy. NIR fluorescence images of functioning lymphatic vessels and abnormal structures were obtained. Precise geometries of facial structures were obtained using 3D profilometry, and detection of small changes in edema between therapy sessions was achieved. NIR fluorescence imaging provides a mapping of lymphatic architecture to direct MLD therapy and thus improve treatment efficacy in the head and neck LE, while 3D profilometry allowed longitudinal assessment of edema to evaluate the efficacy of therapy.

  20. Cancer-related lymphedema risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and impact: a review.

    PubMed

    Paskett, Electra D; Dean, Julie A; Oliveri, Jill M; Harrop, J Phil

    2012-10-20

    PURPOSE Cancer-related lymphedema (LE) is an incurable condition associated with lymph-involved cancer treatments and is an increasing health, quality of life (QOL), and cost burden on a growing cancer survivor population. This review examines the evidence for causes, risk, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and impact of this largely unexamined survivorship concern. METHODS PubMed and Medline were searched for cancer-related LE literature published since 1990 in English. The resulting references (N = 726) were evaluated for strength of design, methods, sample size, and recent publication and sorted into categories (ie, causes/prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and QOL). Sixty studies were included. Results Exercise and physical activity and sentinel lymph node biopsy reduce risk, and overweight and obesity increase risk. Evidence that physiotherapy reduces risk and that lymph node status and number of malignant nodes increase risk is less strong. Perometry and bioimpedence emerged as attractive diagnostic technologies, replacing the use of water displacement in clinical practice. Swelling can also be assessed by measuring arm circumference and relying on self-report. Symptoms can be managed, not cured, with complex physical therapy, low-level laser therapy, pharmacotherapy, and surgery. Sequelae of LE negatively affect physical and mental QOL and range in severity. However, the majority of reviewed studies involved patients with breast cancer; therefore, results may not be applicable to all cancers. CONCLUSION Research into causes, prevention, and effect on QOL of LE and information on LE in cancers other than breast is needed. Consensus on definitions and measurement, increased patient and provider awareness of signs and symptoms, and proper and prompt treatment/access, including psychosocial support, are needed to better understand, prevent, and treat LE.

  1. Factors Associated With the Development of Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema After Whole-Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, John Ben; Baschnagel, Andrew; Ghilezan, Mihai; Riutta, Justin; Dekhne, Nayana; Balaraman, Savitha; Mitchell, Christina; Wallace, Michelle; Vicini, Frank

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the rates of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) in patients undergoing whole-breast irradiation as part of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and to identify clinical, pathologic, and treatment factors associated with its development. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,861 patients with breast cancer were treated at William Beaumont Hospital with whole-breast irradiation as part of their BCT from January 1980 to February 2006, with 1,497 patients available for analysis. Determination of BCRL was based on clinical assessment. Differences in clinical, pathologic, and treatment characteristics between patients with BCRL and those without BCRL were evaluated, and the actuarial rates of BCRL by regional irradiation technique were determined. Results: The actuarial rate of any BCRL was 7.4% for the entire cohort and 9.9%, 14.7%, and 8.3% for patients receiving a supraclavicular field, posterior axillary boost, and internal mammary irradiation, respectively. BCRL was more likely to develop in patients with advanced nodal status (11.4% vs. 6.3%, p = 0.001), those who had a greater number of lymph nodes removed (14 nodes) (9.5% vs. 6.0%, p = 0.01), those who had extracapsular extension (13.4% vs. 6.9%, p = 0.009), those with Grade II/III disease (10.8% vs. 2.9%, p < 0.001), and those who received adjuvant chemotherapy (10.5% vs. 6.7%, p = 0.02). Regional irradiation showed small increases in the rates of BCRL (p = not significant). Conclusions: These results suggest that clinically detectable BCRL will develop after traditional BCT in up to 10% of patients. High-risk subgroups include patients with advanced nodal status, those with more nodes removed, and those who receive chemotherapy, with patients receiving regional irradiation showing a trend toward increased rates.

  2. Race/ethnicity, genetic ancestry, and breast cancer-related lymphedema in the Pathways Study.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Marilyn L; Yao, Song; Lee, Valerie S; Roh, Janise M; Zhu, Qianqian; Ergas, Isaac J; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Yali; Kutner, Susan E; Quesenberry, Charles P; Ambrosone, Christine B; Kushi, Lawrence H

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a serious chronic condition after breast cancer (BC) surgery and treatment. It is unclear if BCRL risk varies by race/ethnicity. In a multiethnic prospective cohort study of 2953 BC patients, we examined the association of self-reported BCRL status with self-reported race/ethnicity and estimated genetic ancestry. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, with follow-up starting 6 months post-BC diagnosis. Estimates were further stratified by body mass index (BMI). By 48 months of follow-up, 342 (11.6 %) women reported having BCRL. Younger age at BC diagnosis, higher BMI at baseline, and lower physical activity were associated with greater BCRL risk. African American (AA) women had a 2-fold increased risk of BCRL compared with White women (HR = 2.04; 95 % CI 1.35-3.08). African genetic ancestry was also associated with an increased risk (HR = 2.50; 95 % CI 1.43, 4.36). Both risks were attenuated but remained elevated after adjusting for known risk factors and became more pronounced when restricted to the nonobese women (adjusted HR = 2.31 for AA and HR = 3.70 for African ancestry, both p < 0.05). There was also evidence of increased BCRL risk with Hispanic ethnicity in the nonobese women. Nonobese AA women had a higher risk of BCRL than White women, which cannot be fully explained by known risk factors. This is the first large-scale, prospective study demonstrating differences in BCRL risk according to race/ethnicity as assessed by both self-report and genetic ancestry data, with a potential ancestry-obesity interaction. PMID:27449493

  3. Does Axillary Boost Increase Lymphedema Compared With Supraclavicular Radiation Alone After Breast Conservation?

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Shelly B. Freedman, Gary M.; Li Tianyu; Anderson, Penny R.; Ross, Eric

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To determine independent predictors of lymphedema (LE) after breast radiotherapy and to quantify added risks of LE from regional node irradiation (RNI). Materials and Methods: A total of 2,579 women with T1-2, N 0-3, M0 breast cancer treated with breast conservation between 1970 and 2005 were studied. A total of 2,169 patients (84%) received radiation to the breast (B), 226 (8.8%) to the breast and supraclavicular LNs (B+SC), and 184 (7.1%) to the breast, supraclavicular LNs, and a posterior axillary boost (B+SC+PAB). Median follow-up was 81 months (range, 3-271). Results: Eighteen percent of patients developed LE. LE risks were as follows: 16% (B), 23% (B+SC), and 31% (B+SC+PAB) (p < 0.0001). LE severity was greater in patients who had RNI (p = 0.0002). On multivariate analysis, RT field (p < 0.0001), obesity index (p = 0.0157), systemic therapy (p = 0.0013), and number of LNs dissected (p < 0.0001) independently predicted for LE. In N1 patients, the addition of a SC to tangents (p < 0.0001) and the addition of a PAB to tangents (p = 0.0017) conferred greater risks of LE, but adding a PAB to B+SC RT did not (p = 0.8002). In the N2 patients, adding a PAB increased the risk of LE 4.5-fold over B+SC RT (p = 0.0011). Conclusions: LE predictors included number of LNs dissected, RNI, obesity index, and systemic therapy. LE risk increased when a SC or PAB were added in the N1 subgroup. In the N2 patients, a PAB increased the risk over B+SC. The decision to boost the axilla must be weighed against the increased risk of LE that it imposes.

  4. Evaluation by lymphoscintigraphy of the effect of a micronized flavonoid fraction (Daflon 500 mg) in the treatment of upper limb lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Pecking, A P

    1995-09-01

    Upper limb lymphedema after conventional treatment of breast cancer occurs in about 20% of all treated cases, even after conservative therapy. Women with mild to severe upper limb lymphedema expect a decongestive therapy, which usually associates physiotherapy and medical treatment. Upper limb lymphoscintigraphy using rhenium colloids labelled with technetium 99m can be used as a lymphatic functional test in order to evaluate the efficacy of a therapy. We report here the results of a pilot, open study carried out on 10 female patients, age ranging from 44 to 64 years, previously treated for a breast cancer. The average time delay for the occurrence [correction of occurence] of lymphedema was 17 +/- 7 months. All patients received 500 mg twice daily of a micronized flavonoid fraction (Daflon 500 mg) for 6 months. At the end of the study, all patients had a clinical improvement of symptoms and limb volume and the mean decrease in volume of the swollen limb reached 6.80%. Functional parameters (half-life, clearance and lymphatic speed of the colloid) assessed with scintigraphy were significantly improved. These preliminary results suggest that this therapy is effective for the treatment of lymphedemas.

  5. The aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive arts: Lifeworld communication among breast cancer survivors living with lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Thomas, Roanne; Ahmed, Shahid; Fichtner, Pam; McMullen, Linda; Block, Janice

    2014-08-01

    The use of popular expressive arts as antidotes to the pathologies of the parallel processes of lifeworld colonization and cultural impoverishment has been under-theorized. This article enters the void with a project in which breast cancer survivors used collages and installations of everyday objects to solicit their authentic expression of the psycho-social impacts of lymphedema. The article enlists Jurgen Habermas' communicative action theory to explore the potential of these expressive arts to expand participants' meaningful engagement with their lifeworlds. The findings point to the unique non-linguistic discursivity of these non-institutional artistic forms as their liberating power to disclose silenced human needs: the images 'spoke' for themselves for group members to recognize shared subjectivities. The authenticity claims inherent in the art forms fostered collective reflexivity and spontaneous, affective responses and compelled the group to create new collective understandings of the experience of living with lymphedema. The article contributes theoretical insights regarding the emancipatory potential of aesthetic-expressive rationality, an under-developed area of Habermasian theory of communicative action, and to the burgeoning literature on arts-based methods in social scientific research. PMID:25197263

  6. The aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive arts: Lifeworld communication among breast cancer survivors living with lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Thomas, Roanne; Ahmed, Shahid; Fichtner, Pam; McMullen, Linda; Block, Janice

    2014-08-01

    The use of popular expressive arts as antidotes to the pathologies of the parallel processes of lifeworld colonization and cultural impoverishment has been under-theorized. This article enters the void with a project in which breast cancer survivors used collages and installations of everyday objects to solicit their authentic expression of the psycho-social impacts of lymphedema. The article enlists Jurgen Habermas' communicative action theory to explore the potential of these expressive arts to expand participants' meaningful engagement with their lifeworlds. The findings point to the unique non-linguistic discursivity of these non-institutional artistic forms as their liberating power to disclose silenced human needs: the images 'spoke' for themselves for group members to recognize shared subjectivities. The authenticity claims inherent in the art forms fostered collective reflexivity and spontaneous, affective responses and compelled the group to create new collective understandings of the experience of living with lymphedema. The article contributes theoretical insights regarding the emancipatory potential of aesthetic-expressive rationality, an under-developed area of Habermasian theory of communicative action, and to the burgeoning literature on arts-based methods in social scientific research.

  7. The aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive arts: Lifeworld communication among breast cancer survivors living with lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Thomas, Roanne; Ahmed, Shahid; Fichtner, Pam; McMullen, Linda; Block, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The use of popular expressive arts as antidotes to the pathologies of the parallel processes of lifeworld colonization and cultural impoverishment has been under-theorized. This article enters the void with a project in which breast cancer survivors used collages and installations of everyday objects to solicit their authentic expression of the psycho-social impacts of lymphedema. The article enlists Jurgen Habermas' communicative action theory to explore the potential of these expressive arts to expand participants' meaningful engagement with their lifeworlds. The findings point to the unique non-linguistic discursivity of these non-institutional artistic forms as their liberating power to disclose silenced human needs: the images ‘spoke' for themselves for group members to recognize shared subjectivities. The authenticity claims inherent in the art forms fostered collective reflexivity and spontaneous, affective responses and compelled the group to create new collective understandings of the experience of living with lymphedema. The article contributes theoretical insights regarding the emancipatory potential of aesthetic-expressive rationality, an under-developed area of Habermasian theory of communicative action, and to the burgeoning literature on arts-based methods in social scientific research. PMID:25197263

  8. Assessment of The Lymphatic System of the Genitalia Using Magnetic Resonance Lymphography Before and After Treatment of Male Genital Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Jiang, Zhaohua; Zhao, Zizhou; Wu, Lianming; Wu, Guangyu; Suo, Shiteng; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-05-01

    Treatment for chronic male genital lymphedema (GL) is limited. No standard treatment or validated instrument to assess GL is available. The aim of this study was to explore whether magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) could be used to assess GL, select proper treatment for patients, and monitor postoperative progress.This is a retrospective analysis of a prospectively acquired cohort of men with GL presenting for MRL over a 7-year period. Thirty-six of 47 eligible men were included. All men were offered preoperative and postoperative MRL and assigned a morphology and function classification. Men with mild, moderate, and severe nodal dysfunction underwent complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP), lymphoveneous microsurgery, and surgical excision, respectively. The volume reductions in the genitalia of patients with mild and moderate nodal dysfunction were recorded and compared using Student t test.The abnormal superficial and deep lymphatic vessels in the lymphedematous genitalia were detected by MRL, and inguinal lymph node dysfunction was classified by MRL. Seven patients with mild dysfunction who underwent CDP showed a more significant mean volume reduction in the genitalia than did 9 patients with moderate dysfunction. Three patients with hyperplasia and moderate dysfunction who underwent microsurgical operations and 17 patients with hypoplasia and moderate or severe nodal dysfunction who underwent surgical excision had excellent cosmetic results with no lymphedema at the 3- to 5-year follow-up.MRL can be used to assess morphological and functional lymphatic abnormalities in GL, preoperatively select appropriate treatment, and postoperatively evaluate treatment outcomes. PMID:27227943

  9. Assessment of The Lymphatic System of the Genitalia Using Magnetic Resonance Lymphography Before and After Treatment of Male Genital Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Jiang, Zhaohua; Zhao, Zizhou; Wu, Lianming; Wu, Guangyu; Suo, Shiteng; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment for chronic male genital lymphedema (GL) is limited. No standard treatment or validated instrument to assess GL is available. The aim of this study was to explore whether magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) could be used to assess GL, select proper treatment for patients, and monitor postoperative progress. This is a retrospective analysis of a prospectively acquired cohort of men with GL presenting for MRL over a 7-year period. Thirty-six of 47 eligible men were included. All men were offered preoperative and postoperative MRL and assigned a morphology and function classification. Men with mild, moderate, and severe nodal dysfunction underwent complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP), lymphoveneous microsurgery, and surgical excision, respectively. The volume reductions in the genitalia of patients with mild and moderate nodal dysfunction were recorded and compared using Student t test. The abnormal superficial and deep lymphatic vessels in the lymphedematous genitalia were detected by MRL, and inguinal lymph node dysfunction was classified by MRL. Seven patients with mild dysfunction who underwent CDP showed a more significant mean volume reduction in the genitalia than did 9 patients with moderate dysfunction. Three patients with hyperplasia and moderate dysfunction who underwent microsurgical operations and 17 patients with hypoplasia and moderate or severe nodal dysfunction who underwent surgical excision had excellent cosmetic results with no lymphedema at the 3- to 5-year follow-up. MRL can be used to assess morphological and functional lymphatic abnormalities in GL, preoperatively select appropriate treatment, and postoperatively evaluate treatment outcomes. PMID:27227943

  10. A randomized clinical trial comparing advanced pneumatic truncal, chest, and arm treatment to arm treatment only in self-care of arm lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Ridner, Sheila H; Murphy, Barbara; Deng, Jie; Kidd, Nancy; Galford, Emily; Bonner, Candace; Bond, Stewart M; Dietrich, Mary S

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of the truncal lymphatics prior to treatment of the lymphedematous arm is an accepted, although not empirically tested, therapeutic intervention delivered during decongestive lymphatic therapy (DLT). Breast cancer survivors with arm lymphedema are encouraged to use these techniques when performing simple lymphatic drainage as part of their life-long lymphedema self-care. Self-massage is at times difficult and pneumatic compression devices are used by many patients to assist with self-care. One such device, the Flexitouch(®) System, replicates the techniques used during DLT; however, the need for application of pneumatic compression in unaffected truncal areas to improve self-care outcomes in arm only lymphedema is not established. The objective of this study was to compare the therapeutic benefit of truncal/chest/arm advanced pneumatic compression therapy (experimental group) verses arm only pneumatic compression (control group) in self-care for arm lymphedema without truncal involvement using the Flexitouch(®) System. Outcomes of interest were self-reported symptoms, function, arm impedance ratios, circumference, volume, and trunk circumference. Forty-two breast cancer survivors, (21 per group), with Stage II lymphedema completed 30 days of home self-care using the Flexitouch(®) System. Findings revealed a statistically significant reduction in both the number of symptoms and overall symptom burden within each group; however, there were no statistically significant differences in these outcomes between the groups. There was no statistically significant overall change or differential pattern of change between the groups in function. A statistically significant reduction in bioelectrical impedance and arm circumference within both of the groups was achieved; however, there was no statistically significant difference in reduction between groups. These findings indicate that both configurations are effective, but that there may be no added benefit to

  11. Improving deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis with mechanical modalities in surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Paula; Jameson, Deborah L; Carroll, Diane L

    2015-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis remains a source of adverse outcomes in surgical patients. Deep vein thrombosis is preventable with prophylactic intervention. The success of noninvasive mechanical modalities for prophylaxis relies on compliance with correct application. The goals of this project were to create a guideline that reflected current evidence and expert thinking about mechanical modalities use, assess compliance with mechanical modalities, and develop strategies to disseminate an evidence-based guideline for deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis.

  12. Tick Bite Prophylaxis: Results From a 2012 Survey of Healthcare Providers.

    PubMed

    Perea, A E; Hinckley, A F; Mead, P S

    2015-08-01

    In a recent national survey, over 30% of healthcare providers (HCPs) reported prescribing tick bite prophylaxis in the previous year. To clarify provider practices, we surveyed HCPs to determine how frequently and for what reasons they prescribed tick bite prophylaxis. We included four questions regarding tick bite prophylaxis in the DocStyles 2012 survey, a computer-administered questionnaire of 2205 US primary care physicians, paediatricians and nurse practitioners. Responses in 14 states with high Lyme disease incidence (high LDI) were compared with responses from other states (low LDI). Overall, 56.4% of 1485 providers reported prescribing tick bite prophylaxis at least once in the previous year, including 73.9% of HCPs in high LDI and 48.2% in low LDI states. The reasons given were 'to prevent Lyme disease' (76.9%), 'patients request it' (40.4%) and 'to prevent other tickborne diseases' (29.4%). Among HCPs who provided prophylaxis, 45.2% did so despite feeling that it was not indicated. Given a hypothetical scenario involving a patient with an attached tick, 38.1% of HCPs from high LDI states and 15.1% from low LDI states would prescribe a single dose of doxycycline; 19.0% from high LDI states and 27.5% from low LDI states would prescribe a full course of doxycycline. HCPs prescribe tick bite prophylaxis frequently in areas where Lyme disease is rare and for tickborne diseases for which it has not been shown effective. HCPs may be unaware of current tick bite prophylaxis guidelines or find them difficult to implement. More information is needed regarding the efficacy of tick bite prophylaxis for diseases other than Lyme disease. PMID:25244410

  13. Atovaquone for Prophylaxis of Toxoplasmosis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mendorf, Alexander; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Langebrake, Claudia; Rohde, Holger; Ayuk, Francis; Regier, Marc; Christopeit, Maximilian; Zabelina, Tatjana; Bacher, Adelbert; Stübig, Thomas; Wolschke, Christine; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and infections by other opportunistic agents such as Pneumocystis jirovecii constitute life-threatening risks for patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been well established for post-transplant toxoplasmosis and pneumocystis prophylaxis, but treatment may be limited due to toxicity. We explored atovaquone as an alternative and compared it with TMP-SMX regarding toxicity and efficacy during the first 100 days after transplantation in 155 consecutive adult stem cell recipients. Eight patients with a prior history of TMP-SMX intolerance received atovaquone as first-line prophylaxis. TMP-SMX was used for 141 patients as first-line strategy, but 13 patients (9.2%) were later switched to atovaquone due to TMP-SMX toxicity or gastrointestinal symptoms. No active toxoplasmosis or active P. jirovecii infection developed under continued prophylaxis with either TMP-SMX or atovaquone. However, for reasons of TMP-SMX and/or atovaquone toxicity, 7 patients were unable to tolerate any efficacious toxoplasmosis prophylaxis and therefore obtained inhalative pentamidine as P. jirovecii prophylaxis but no toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. Importantly, 2 of these patients developed severe toxoplasmosis. In summary, atovaquone appears as a valid alternative for at least some post-transplant patients who cannot tolerate TMP-SMX. This should be further confirmed by multicenter trials. PMID:25968483

  14. Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Survey of Korean Knee Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Jong Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to provide information on the actual status and prevailing trend of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE) following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in South Korea. Materials and Methods The Korean Knee Society (KKS) developed a questionnaire with 6 clinical questions on VTE. The questionnaire was distributed to all members of KKS by both postal and online mail. Participants were asked to supply details on their specialty and to select methods of prophylaxis they employ. Of the total members of KKS, 27.9% participated in the survey. Results The percentage of surgeons who routinely performed prophylaxis for VTE was 60.4%; 19.4% performed prophylaxis depending on the patient's health condition; and the remaining 20.2% never implemented prophylaxis after surgery. The common prophylactic methods among the responders were compression stocking (72.9%), pneumatic leg compression (63.3%), perioral direct factor Xa inhibitor (46.9%), and low-molecular-weight heparin (39.5%). For the respondents who did not perform prophylaxis, the main reason (51.5%) was the low risk of postoperative VTE considering the low incidences in Asians. Conclusions The present study involving members of the KKS will help to comprehend the actual status of VTE prevention in South Korea. The results of this study may be useful to design VTE guidelines appropriate for Koreans in the future. PMID:27595074

  15. Effect of Different Prophylaxis Methods on Microleakage of Microfilled Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Amini, Melina

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of different prophylaxis methods on microleak-age of microfilled composite restorations. Materials and methods In this in vitro study, class V cavities were prepared on buccal surfaces of 84 bovine teeth. The teeth were restored with Tetric N-Bond adhesive and Heliomolar composite resin. Subsequent to a thermocycling procedure and three months of storage in distilled water, the teeth were randomly assigned to four groups (n=21): (1) prophylaxis with a rubber cup and pumice; (2) prophylaxis with a brush and pumice; (3) prophylaxis with air/powder polishing device; and (4) no prophylaxis (the control group). Then the teeth were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin for 24 hours and sectioned for microleakage evaluation under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Signed Rankstests. Statistical significance was defined at p<0.05. Results There were no statistically significant differences in occlusal and gingival microleakage between the groups (p=0.996 and p=0.860, respectively). In all the groups gingival margins exhibited significantly higher microleakage values compared to occlusal margins (p<0.0005). Conclusion Prophylaxis methods had no adverse effect on marginal leakage of microfilled composite resin restorations. PMID:22991639

  16. Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Survey of Korean Knee Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Jong Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to provide information on the actual status and prevailing trend of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE) following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in South Korea. Materials and Methods The Korean Knee Society (KKS) developed a questionnaire with 6 clinical questions on VTE. The questionnaire was distributed to all members of KKS by both postal and online mail. Participants were asked to supply details on their specialty and to select methods of prophylaxis they employ. Of the total members of KKS, 27.9% participated in the survey. Results The percentage of surgeons who routinely performed prophylaxis for VTE was 60.4%; 19.4% performed prophylaxis depending on the patient's health condition; and the remaining 20.2% never implemented prophylaxis after surgery. The common prophylactic methods among the responders were compression stocking (72.9%), pneumatic leg compression (63.3%), perioral direct factor Xa inhibitor (46.9%), and low-molecular-weight heparin (39.5%). For the respondents who did not perform prophylaxis, the main reason (51.5%) was the low risk of postoperative VTE considering the low incidences in Asians. Conclusions The present study involving members of the KKS will help to comprehend the actual status of VTE prevention in South Korea. The results of this study may be useful to design VTE guidelines appropriate for Koreans in the future.

  17. Impact of an individualized prophylaxis approach on young adults with severe hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Susana; Carvalho, Manuela; Lopes, Manuela; Araújo, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    It is now well established that the treatment of choice for children with severe hemophilia is prophylaxis started early in life. Although, there is no consensus among the hemophilia management community to either stop or maintain prophylactic treatment in adulthood, experts, and centers advise individualized prophylaxis according to clinical bleeding pattern, condition of joints, pharmacokinetic profile, physical activity, type of employment, and patients' personal preferences. The aim of this article is to describe the impact of an individualized prophylaxis approach on young adults with severe hemophilia, in the setting of a Portuguese Haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centre. We proposed a tailored prophylaxis approach on a young adult cohort with 10 patients with severe hemophilia (7× type A and 3× type B) on standard prophylactic regimens in childhood, based on clinical outcome. Patients were evaluated and prophylaxis was adjusted (dose and/or frequency) to daily life activity and bleeding pattern. After 12 months of follow-up, one patient returned to the previous regimen due to breakthrough bleeds and the remaining nine patients maintained their new prophylaxis approach, without increasing bleeding episodes. With an individualized approach, in this cohort of nine patients, we observed no negative impact on clinical outcome, with a proposed improvement in quality of life and a reduction of costs.

  18. The cost of outpatient venous thromboembolism prophylaxis following lower limb injuries.

    PubMed

    Menakaya, C U; Pennington, N; Muthukumar, N; Joel, J; Ramirez Jimenez, A J; Shaw, C J; Mohsen, A

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports the cost of outpatient venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis following 388 injuries of the lower limb requiring immobilisation in our institution, from a total of 7408 new patients presenting between May and November 2011. Prophylaxis was by either self-administered subcutaneous dalteparin (n = 128) or oral dabigatran (n = 260). The mean duration of prophylaxis per patient was 46 days (6 to 168). The total cost (pay and non-pay) for prophylaxis with dalteparin was £107.54 and with dabigatran was £143.99. However, five patients in the dalteparin group required nurse administration (£23 per home visit), increasing the cost of dalteparin to £1142.54 per patient. The annual cost of VTE prophylaxis in a busy trauma clinic treating 12 700 new patients (2010/11), would be £92 526.33 in the context of an income for trauma of £1.82 million, which represents 5.3% of the outpatient tariff. Outpatient prophylaxis in a busy trauma clinic is achievable and affordable in the context of the clinical and financial risks involved.

  19. Atovaquone for Prophylaxis of Toxoplasmosis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mendorf, Alexander; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Langebrake, Claudia; Rohde, Holger; Ayuk, Francis; Regier, Marc; Christopeit, Maximilian; Zabelina, Tatjana; Bacher, Adelbert; Stübig, Thomas; Wolschke, Christine; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and infections by other opportunistic agents such as Pneumocystis jirovecii constitute life-threatening risks for patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been well established for post-transplant toxoplasmosis and pneumocystis prophylaxis, but treatment may be limited due to toxicity. We explored atovaquone as an alternative and compared it with TMP-SMX regarding toxicity and efficacy during the first 100 days after transplantation in 155 consecutive adult stem cell recipients. Eight patients with a prior history of TMP-SMX intolerance received atovaquone as first-line prophylaxis. TMP-SMX was used for 141 patients as first-line strategy, but 13 patients (9.2%) were later switched to atovaquone due to TMP-SMX toxicity or gastrointestinal symptoms. No active toxoplasmosis or active P. jirovecii infection developed under continued prophylaxis with either TMP-SMX or atovaquone. However, for reasons of TMP-SMX and/or atovaquone toxicity, 7 patients were unable to tolerate any efficacious toxoplasmosis prophylaxis and therefore obtained inhalative pentamidine as P. jirovecii prophylaxis but no toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. Importantly, 2 of these patients developed severe toxoplasmosis. In summary, atovaquone appears as a valid alternative for at least some post-transplant patients who cannot tolerate TMP-SMX. This should be further confirmed by multicenter trials.

  20. Treatment, prophylaxis and research priorities for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Heymann, D L; Wirima, J J; Perriëns, J H

    1993-01-01

    An estimated two million new adult and pediatric HIV infections occurred worldwide during 1992, more than 50% of them in sub-Saharan Africa, 25% in Asia, and one-eighth in Latin America and the Caribbean. The remaining infections occurred in Europe, North America, and the industrialized countries of the Pacific Rim. Transmission by sexual intercourse and from an infected woman to her fetus/child remain major routes of transmission. The World Health Organization estimates that there will be a cumulative total of 30-40 million people infected with HIV by the year 2000. Over time, increasing numbers of people already infected with HIV and soon to be infected will develop AIDS and require higher levels of care. Obstacles to increasing access to cost-effective drugs for HIV/AIDS in developing countries, however, include weak drug distribution systems, the improper prescribing of available drugs by health workers, and the improper use of these drugs by patients who have not been appropriately educated by prescribing health workers. Currency shortages and lack of political will underlie these obstacles. This paper considers cost-effective prophylaxis and treatment of HIV-related infections including tuberculosis, candidiasis, penicilliosis, combined chemoprophylaxis, pruritus and diarrhea with wasting, and HIV infection. The prevention of HIV transmission is discussed under headings on heterosexual and perinatal transmission, followed by a discussion on increasing access to cost-effective drugs.

  1. [Malaria and children who travel - prophylaxis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Haller, Sabine; Wagner, Noémie; Chappuis, François

    2013-06-01

    Children account for between 15 - 20 % of all imported malaria cases worldwide. Immigrant children visiting their families in the country of origin in sub-Saharan Africa are at highest risk. Prevention of malaria in children who travel to endemic areas is guided by the ABCD principles - Awareness of risk, Bite prevention, Chemoprophylaxis for high risk areas and rapid Diagnosis and treatment when malaria is suspected. The use of anti-malarial medication in small children is hampered by a paucity of dosage, pharmcokinetic and tolerability data. In the pre-travel consultation parents should be provided with practical advice on anti-mosquito measures, exact, (weight-based) dosages of chemoprophylaxis medication and/or stand-by treatment as indicated. A paediatric formulation is available for daily atovaquone-proguanil chemoprophylaxis (children > 11 kg) and mefloquine is a cost-effective, once weekly prophylaxis that is useful for children > 5 kg who travel for longer periods. The bitter taste of mefloquine should be disguised to increase adherence. When a Stand-by Emergency Treatment (SBET) is indicated, artemether-lumefantrine cherry flavoured dispersible tablets are a good choice for small children. Post-travel to endemic areas, malaria should always be suspected if a child becomes ill. Paediatric malaria is an emergency requiring prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  2. Problems concerning the prophylaxis, pathogenesis and therapy of diphtheria

    PubMed Central

    Tasman, A.; Lansberg, H. P.

    1957-01-01

    The first part of this article on the prophylaxis, pathogenesis and therapy of diphtheria is devoted to an epidemiological survey of the results achieved with active immunization against the disease. From these results it can be concluded that active immunization has been largely responsible for the decrease in the morbidity and mortality rates which has taken place in the past half-century. In the second part, the authors deal at length with problems relating to the pathogenesis and therapy of the disease, discussing such subjects as the different types of diphtheria bacteria, the significance of non-virulent strains, the action of bacteriophages, the plurality of diphtheria toxin, the use of antibacterial sera, and the importance of the “avidity” of antitoxic sera. Finally, taking into consideration the data presented in the preceding parts, the authors put forward their views as to the cause of diphtheria, the measures which should be taken to control it, and the most satisfactory form of therapy. PMID:13472439

  3. [Abdominal cavity adhesions. Some issues of pathogenesis, prophylaxis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Tishchenko, V V

    2010-07-01

    The abdominal cavity adhesions (ACA) constitute frequent consequence of various abdominal cavity diseases and traumas and frequent cause of the abdominal adhesive disease and its complications. In spite of the known pathogenesis of ACA, the surgeons had failed throughout the decades of years to find out the measures and methods of its prophylaxis. There are several causes of such a situation and the main of them is that ACA in its origin constitutes a philogenetically developed defense biologic reaction of organism. Because of the fact, that an organism constitutes the self-regulated biological system, any external inputs (including the treatment), directed on qualitative or quantitative signs of these reactions, meet systemic counteraction and become annihilated. The forced overcome of such a counteraction may cause the development of severe systemic disorders in organism. The only prophylactic measures against ACA, which were already tested throughout the time, are the tactical and technical methods, promoting the reduction of severity of morphological changes in peritoneum and abdominal organs, thus causing reduction of natural reaction of organism. When the adhesions formation is inevitable it is necessary to apply surgical methods of governing such a process, and omentoparietopexy may constitutes one of such methods.

  4. Use of quinocide in treatment and prophylaxis of vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lysenko, A. Y.

    1960-01-01

    The discovery of antimalarial properties of derivatives of 8-aminoquinolines which combine high activity against the tissue stages of the malaria parasite with satisfactory tolerance by man can be said to have marked the final stage in the search for a radical cure of vivax malaria. Since its synthesis in the USSR in 1952, quinocide—an 8-aminoquinoline drug—has been subjected by Soviet workers to intensive research, an outline of which is presented in this paper. The results of their investigations, which ranged from laboratory and clinical studies of tolerance to the drug, through small-scale trials of its parasiticidal activity, to large-scale studies on the effectiveness of its mass administration are very encouraging. Both for anti-relapse treatment and for pre-epidemic prophylaxis, a short (10- or 14-day) course of quinocide proved as effective as a lengthy course of acriquine with plasmocide. Side-effects were infrequent, and most of those that occurred were transient and did not necessitate the suspension of treatment. It is suggested that the mass administration of quinocide would, in certain cases, be a useful adjunct to insecticidal measures in the clearance of malaria foci. PMID:14419205

  5. Social prophylaxis through distant corpse removal in ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Lise; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Detrain, Claire

    2012-10-01

    Living in groups raises important issues concerning waste management and related sanitary risks. Social insects such as ants live at high densities with genetically related individuals within confined and humid nests, all these factors being highly favorable for the spread of pathogens. Therefore, in addition to individual immunity, a social prophylaxis takes place, namely, by the removal of risky items such as corpses and their rejection at a distance from the ant nest. In this study, we investigate how Myrmica rubra workers manage to reduce encounters between potentially hazardous corpses and nestmates. Using both field and laboratory experiments, we describe how the spatial distribution and the removal distance of waste items vary as a function of their associated sanitary risks (inert item vs. corpse). In the field, corpse-carrying ants walked in a rather linear way away from the nest entrance and had an equal probability of choosing any direction. Therefore, they did not aggregate corpses in dedicated areas but scattered them in the environment. In both field and laboratory experiments, ants carrying corpses dropped their load in more remote—and less frequented—areas than workers carrying inert items. However, for equidistant areas, ants did not avoid dropping corpses at a location where they perceived area marking as a cue of high occupancy level by nestmates. Our results suggest that ants use distance to the nest rather than other occupancy cues to limit sanitary risks associated with dead nestmates.

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis--the story so far.

    PubMed

    Simoes, E A F; Groothuis, J R

    2002-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common and highly contagious pathogen that infects nearly all children by the age of 2 years. It is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide among certain high-risk paediatric populations. Therapy is sub-optimal for RSV, thus treatment focuses on ameliorating symptoms. Since discovery of the virus in the 1950s, efforts have been ongoing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. These efforts have met with serious obstacles. Passive immunoprophylaxis presents a viable alternative to active immunization. In 1998, the genetically engineered humanized monoclonal antibody (palivizumab) was granted FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approval for prophylaxis of high-risk children in the United States; EMEA (European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products) approval followed in 1999 for Europe. It is now approved in over 45 countries worldwide. Palivizumab was shown to significantly reduce RSV-related hospitalizations in North America and Europe with few adverse effects. Clinical trial and outcomes data documenting experience with palivizumab to date continue to extend the initial safety and efficacy observations. PMID:11996400

  7. Efficacy of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsin-Hsiao S.; Gbadegesin, Rasheed A.; Foreman, John W.; Nagaraj, Shashi K.; Wigfall, Delbert R.; Wiener, John S.; Routh, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Controversy exists regarding the use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis vs observation in the management of children with vesicoureteral reflux. The reported effectiveness of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis in children with reflux varies widely. We determined whether the aggregated evidence supports use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis in children with vesicoureteral reflux. Materials and Methods We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, clinicaltrials.gov, MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, Google Scholar and recently presented meeting abstracts for reports in any language. Bibliographies of included studies were then hand searched for any missed articles. The study protocol was prospectively registered at PROSPERO (No. CRD42014009639). Reports were assessed and data abstracted in duplicate, with differences resolved by consensus. Risk of bias was assessed using standardized instruments. Results We identified 1,547 studies, of which 8 are included in the metaanalysis. Pooled results demonstrated that continuous antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced the risk of recurrent febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection (pooled OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.96) but, if urinary tract infection occurred, increased the risk of antibiotic resistant organism (pooled OR 8.75, 95% CI 3.52–21.73). A decrease in new renal scarring was not associated with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis use. Adverse events were similar between the 2 groups. Significant heterogeneity existed between studies (I2 50%, p = 0.03), specifically between those trials with significant risk of bias (eg unclear protocol descriptions and/or lack of blinding). Conclusions Compared to no treatment, continuous antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced the risk of febrile and symptomatic urinary tract infections in children with vesicoureteral reflux, although it increased the risk of infection due to antibiotic resistant bacteria. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis did not significantly

  8. The AVAIL ME study: a multinational survey of VTE risk and prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Taher, Ali T; Aoun, Joseph; Salameh, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major public health issue that is frequently underestimated. The primary objective of this multinational survey was to identify patients at risk for VTE, and to define the rate of patients receiving appropriate prophylaxis in the Middle Eastern region. Standardized case report forms were filled by trained individuals on one predefined day in selected hospitals. Data were then entered and analyzed by independent biostatisticians. Risk was categorized according to American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines, 2004. Logistic regressions were carried out to assess factors that determined VTE prophylaxis. 845 (37%) medical and 1421 (63%) surgical patients were eligible for the study. Patients were at low (4.2%), moderate (51.7%), high (9%) and very high risk (35.2%) for VTE. Any VTE prevention was given in 17.9, 41.7, 60.6 and 66.9% of respective risk categories, while ACCP guidelines were applied in 86.3, 41.1, 48.3 and 24.5% of these categories. Surgical patient type, immobility on admission, and contraceptive use were the most important drivers of VTE prophylaxis in those who were eligible to it (OR ≥ 2). Surgical patient type, immobility during hospitalization, existence of a VTE protocol and chronic heart failure were the most important drivers for VTE prophylaxis application in patients who were not eligible for it (OR ≥ 3). A concordance κ value of 0.16 was found between eligibility for VTE prophylaxis on one hand and its application in practice (P < 0.001). Risk factors for VTE and eligibility for VTE prophylaxis are common, but VTE prophylaxis and guidelines application are low.

  9. Prevention of delirium in trauma patients: Are we giving thiamine prophylaxis a fair chance?

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Christopher; Ouellet, Jean-Francois; Niven, Daniel; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Ball, Chad G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Delirium is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in injured patients. Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is delirium linked to malnutrition and chronic alcoholism. It is prevented with administration of thiamine. Our primary goal was to evaluate current blood alcohol level (BAL) testing and thiamine prophylaxis in severely injured patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 1000 consecutive severely injured patients admitted to hospital between Mar. 1, 2009, and Dec. 31, 2009. We used the patients’ medical records and the Alberta Trauma Registry. Results Among 1000 patients (mean age 48 yr, male sex 70%, mean injury severity score 23, mortality 10%), 627 underwent BAL testing at admission; 221 (35%) had a BAL greater than 0 mmol/L, and 189 (30%) had a BAL above the legal limit of 17.4 mmol/L. The mean positive BAL was 41.9 mmol/L. More than 4% had a known history of alcohol abuse. More patients were assaulted (20% v. 9%) or hit by motor vehicles (10% v. 6%) when intoxicated (both p < 0.05). Most injuries occurred after falls (37%) and motor vehicle collisions (33%). Overall, 17% of patients received thiamine prophylaxis. Of the 221 patients with elevated BAL, 44% received thiamine prophylaxis. Of those with a history of alcohol abuse, 77% received thiamine prophylaxis. Conclusion Despite the strong link between alcohol abuse, trauma and WE, more than one-third of patients were not screened for alcohol use. Furthermore, a minority of intoxicated patients received adequate prophylaxis against WE. Given the low risk and cost of BAL testing and thiamine prophylaxis and the high cost of delirium, standard protocols for prophylaxis are essential. PMID:24666443

  10. A survey of current practice patterns in prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism (VTE) and gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration among Canadian burn centers.

    PubMed

    Abedi, Nasim; Papp, Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Prospective data on efficacy of routine thromboprophylaxis in burn population remains limited. We believe that this uncertainty has lead to diverse management practices across Canada. Similarly, despite data supporting effectiveness of early enteral nutrition (EEN) for gastrointestinal (GI) ulcer prophylaxis, we hypothesize that many burn centers continue to use additional medical prophylaxis. A questionnaire was sent to 16 Canadian burn units regarding their practices of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and GI ulcer prophylaxis. We had 50% response rate. Fifty percent of respondents reported routine use of VTE prophylaxis in all their burn patients regardless of risk factors, 75% of these were among the largest burn centers in Canada. Only 1 center reported use of low molecular weight heparin, Enoxaparin, as their only mode of prophylaxis. With regards to GI ulcer prophylaxis, 62.5% of respondents indicated limiting use of ulcer prophylactic medications to ICU patients. Three (37.5%) centers reported practicing EEN for prophylaxis, 1 of which administered it as the sole modality. 7 of 8 centers used additional pharmacologic prophylaxis, most commonly an H2-blocker, ranitidine. There remains lack of consensus among Canadian burn centers in areas of VTE and GI ulcer prophylaxis, reflecting the limited prospective data in these fields. PMID:21767915

  11. Palivizumab prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus disease in 2000-2001: results from The Palivizumab Outcomes Registry.

    PubMed

    Parnes, Curt; Guillermin, Judith; Habersang, Rolf; Nicholes, Peggy; Chawla, Vijay; Kelly, Tammy; Fishbein, Judith; McRae, Patty; Goessler, Mary; Gatti, Antoinette; Calcagno, John A; Eki, Cheryl; Harris, Kristen A; Joyave, Joseph; McFarland, Kathy; Protter, Paul; Sullivan, Mary; Stanford, Allan; Lovett, Nancy; Ortiz, Marisol; Rojas, Sharon; Cyrus, Scott; Cyrus, Janell; Cohen, Stuart; Buchin, Debbie; Riordan, Linda; Zuniga, Monica; Shah, Rupa; Minard, Carmen; Quintin, Arden; Douglas, Glenda; van Houten, John; Freutner, Sharyn; Chartrand, Stephen; Nowatzke, Patsy; Romero, Jose; Rhodes, Torunn; Benoit, Michelle; Walter, Emmanuel; Walker, Leslie; DeBonnett, Laurie; Cross, Mia; Free, Teresa; Martin, Sharman; Shank, Karen; Guedes, Ben; Atkinson, Lee Ann; Halpin, George J; Rouse, Kathy; Hand, Ivan; Geiss, Donna; Marshall, James R; Burleson, Lois; Boland, Jim; Seybold, Kelsey; Hunter, Vicki; Unfer, Susan; Schmucker, Jackie; Gley, Margaret; Marcus, Michael; Thompson, Patricia; Milla, Paulino; Young, Connie; Zanni, Robert; Zinno, Virginia; Fetter-Zarzeka, Alexandra; Busey, Amanda; Sokunbi, Modupe A; Airington, Sherrie; Richard, Nancy; Muraligopal, Vellore; Lewis, Stephanie; Weber, F Thomas; Giordano, Beverly P; Linehan, Denise; Roach, Jane; Davis, Randle; Rzepka, Andrew A; Booth, Teri; Smeltzer, David; Walsh, Jeanne; Arispe, Emilio; Rowley, Rhonda; Bolling, Christopher; Botts, Tanya; Haskett, Kateri; Raby, Deana; Batiz, Evelyn; Gelfand, Andrew; Farrell, Lynn; Butler, Stephen; Colby, Linda; Schochet, Peter; Bentler, Julie; Hirsch, David; Wilkinson, Lisa; Aaronson, Allen; Bennett, Eleanora; Wingate, Julie; Quinn, Dawn; Komendowski, Katherine; Deckard, Marcia; Frogel, Michael; Nerwen, Cliff; Copenhaver, Steven; Prater, Michele; Wolsztein, Jacob; Mackey, Kristine; Benbow, Marshall; Naranjo, Marisela; Hensley, Sandra; Hayes, Cindy; Sadeghi, Hossein; Lawson, Sally May; McCall, Mark; Combs, Karla; Ledbetter, Joel; Sarnosky, Karen; Swafford, Cathy; Speer, Michael; Barton, Wendy J; Mink, J W; Lemm, Dianne; Hudak, Mark; Case, Elizabeth; Rowen, Judith; Fuentes, Sandra; Pane, Carly; Richardson, Leslie; Chavarria, Cesar; Cassino, Deanne; Ghaffari, Kourosh; Carroll, Carol; Lee, Haesoon; Guclu, Lydia; Johnson, Christopher; Blum, Valerie; Boron, Marnie L; Sorrentino, Mark; Hirsch, Robert L; Van Veldhuisen, Paul C; Smith, Carol

    2003-06-01

    The objective of the Registry was to characterize the population of infants receiving prophylaxis for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease by describing the patterns and scope of usage of palivizumab in a cross section of US infants. RSV hospitalization outcomes were also described. The Palivizumab (Synagis, MedImmune, Inc., 25 West Watkins Mill Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878) Outcomes Registry was a prospective multicenter survey conducted at 63 sites. Demographics, injection history, and RSV hospitalization outcomes were collected on 2,116 infants receiving palivizumab. Infants were enrolled in the Registry between September 1, 2000-March 1, 2001, at the time of their first injection. Infants born at less than 32 weeks of gestation accounted for 47% of infants enrolled, and those between 32-35 weeks accounted for 45%; approximately 8% were greater than 35 weeks of gestation. Lower RSV hospitalization rates were observed in infants who had greater adherence to regularly scheduled injections. Nearly one-half of all hospitalizations occurred within the first and second injection intervals, suggesting the importance of early RSV protection. The confirmed RSV hospitalization rate of all infants in the Registry was 2.9%; the rate was 5.8% in infants with chronic lung disease of infancy, and 2.1% in premature infants without chronic lung disease. In conclusion, these data support the continued effectiveness of palivizumab prophylaxis for severe RSV lower respiratory tract disease in a large cohort of high-risk infants from geographically diverse pediatric offices and clinics. The Palivizumab Outcomes Registry provides an opportunity to assess palivizumab utilization and clinical effectiveness in the US. PMID:12746948

  12. A novel SOX18 mutation uncovered in Jordanian patient with hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia syndrome by Whole Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bastaki, Fatma; Mohamed, Madiha; Nair, Pratibha; Saif, Fatima; Tawfiq, Nafisa; Al-Ali, Mahmoud Taleb; Brandau, Oliver; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2016-02-01

    The SOX18 gene encodes a transcription factor that plays a notable role in certain developmental contexts such as lymphangiogenesis, hair follicle development and vasculogenesis. SOX18 mutations are linked to recessive and dominant hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia syndrome (HLTS). In this study we report on a novel heterozygous mutation in SOX18 in a Jordanian patient suffering from HLTS that was revealed by Whole Exome Sequencing. In this case, a frameshift caused by 14-nucleotide duplication in SOX18 appeared de novo resulting in a premature translational stop at the N-terminal region of the central trans-activation domain. Here we present the clinical manifestations of the above mentioned molecular lesion in the light of what is known from published SOX18 mutations.

  13. A novel KIF11 mutation in a Turkish patient with microcephaly, lymphedema, and chorioretinal dysplasia from a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Filiz; Ostergaard, Pia; Ozturk, Taylan; Kantekin, Esin; Atlihan, Fusun; Jeffery, Steve; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2012-07-01

    Microcephaly-lymphedema-chorioretinal dysplasia (MLCRD) syndrome is a rare syndrome that was first described in 1992. Characteristic craniofacial features include severe microcephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, prominent ears, a broad nose, and a long philtrum with a pointed chin. Recently, mutations in KIF11 have been demonstrated to cause dominantly inherited MLCRD syndrome. Herein, we present a patient with MLCRD syndrome whose parents were first cousins. The parents are unaffected, and thus a recessive mode of inheritance for the disorder was considered likely. However, the propositus carries a novel, de novo nonsense mutation in exon 2 of KIF11. The patient also had midline cleft tongue which has not previously been described in this syndrome.

  14. Labview utilities

    2011-09-30

    The software package provides several utilities written in LabView. These utilities don't form independent programs, but rather can be used as a library or controls in other labview programs. The utilities include several new controls (xcontrols), VIs for input and output routines, as well as other 'helper'-functions not provided in the standard LabView environment.

  15. Reducing Cost of Rabies Post Exposure Prophylaxis: Experience of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Salahuddin, Naseem; Gohar, M. Aftab; Baig-Ansari, Naila

    2016-01-01

    Background Rabies is a uniformly fatal disease, but preventable by timely and correct use of post exposure prophylaxis (PEP). Unfortunately, many health care facilities in Pakistan do not carry modern life-saving vaccines and rabies immunoglobulin (RIG), assuming them to be prohibitively expensive and unsafe. Consequently, Emergency Department (ED) health care professionals remain untrained in its application and refer patients out to other hospitals. The conventional Essen regimen requires five vials of cell culture vaccine (CCV) per patient, whereas Thai Red Cross intradermal (TRC-id) regimen requires only one vial per patient, and gives equal seroconversion as compared with Essen regimen. Methodology/Principal Findings This study documents the cost savings in using the Thai Red Cross intradermal regimen with cell culture vaccine instead of the customary 5-dose Essen intramuscular regimen for eligible bite victims. All patients presenting to the Indus Hospital ED between July 2013 to June 2014 with animal bites received WHO recommended PEP. WHO Category 2 bites received intradermal vaccine alone, while Category 3 victims received vaccine plus wound infiltration with Equine RIG. Patients were counseled, and subsequent doses of the vaccine administered on days 3, 7 and 28. Throughput of cases, consumption utilization of vaccine and ERIG and the cost per patient were recorded. Conclusions/Significance Government hospitals in Pakistan are generally underfinanced and cannot afford treatment of the enormous burden of dog bite victims. Hence, patients are either not treated at all, or asked to purchase their own vaccine, which most cannot afford, resulting in neglect and high incidence of rabies deaths. TRC-id regimen reduced the cost of vaccine to 1/5th of Essen regimen and is strongly recommended for institutions with large throughput. Training ED staff would save lives through a safe, effective and affordable technique. PMID:26919606

  16. [Ferro-Folgamma--a drug for treatment and prophylaxis of iron deficiency anemia in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Bozhinova, S; Penkov, V; Bogdanova, A

    2004-01-01

    The problem of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) in pregnant women is not a new one, but the flashback to it is justified because of the fact that its significance is not appreciated properly. The growing foetus has increased needs of different active for blood formation substances such as iron (Fe), folic acid, vit. B12, which are taken away from the mother. If her supplies are not enough, an anaemic syndrome can be promoted. The only suitable way in the presence of iron deficiency is the administration of drugs for equilibration of iron balance. We used Ferro-Folgamma--a new medicine for our pharmaceutical market, for treatment of IDA in 42 pregnant women and we rendered an account of the results of its administration. All pregnant women had starting data of Hb<110 g/l and Hct<0.33 L/L. One capsule of Ferro-Folgamma contains 100 mg iron sulfate siccatum (that corresponds to 37 mg Fe), folic acid - 5 mg, cyancobalamine 10 mg. It is administered a capsule 3 times daily in 1 to 3 courses of treatment and a course has 20 days duration. After a treatment course was carried out the starting data of Hb were increased with 8.73 g/l, and of Hct with 0.02. In 8 pregnant women after the first therapeutic course, a 20-days - treatment was conducted too and Hb rose with 18.14 g/l in comparison with the starting data, and of Hct - with 0.037. The authors recommend the utilization of Ferro-Folgamma for treatment and prophylaxis of IDA in pregnant women, because of its good gastric acceptance, a few side undesired reactions, and the supplement of Folic acid and vit B12 increases the iron resorbtion.

  17. Transgender Women in Clinical Trials of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Grant, Robert M; Sevelius, Jae M; Guanira, Juan V; Aguilar, Jana Villayzan; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-08-15

    Lessons were learned with trans women who participated (as volunteers and investigators) in trials of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Trans women are not men. Compared with men who have sex with men, trans women trial participants were more likely to be involved with transactional sex, had more sexual partners, and were less likely to have PrEP medications detected in blood. Trans women define themselves differently in different cultures. One best practice is to ask at least 2 gender questions: sex assigned at birth and current gender. More information is needed to fully situate PrEP efficacy for trans women, including analysis of drug-drug interactions between PrEP medications and feminizing hormones and PrEP drug penetration into neovaginal tissues. Including trans women in studies is helpful only if their participation is specifically reported, as could occur in a table of baseline characteristics of the enrolled cohort. Gender-affirming care is important to foster appropriate uptake and use of PrEP. Such care includes use of preferred pronouns and names, safety to use the bathroom of choice, and access to gender-affirming hormone therapy and surgery. The consistent finding that PrEP works when taken across diverse populations having diverse practices related to gender, sexual intercourse, and hormone use provides a basis for offering PrEP to people at substantial risk of acquiring HIV although some subgroups may not have been fully represented in trials. Nonetheless, specific PrEP implementation science for trans women (and men) is essential to develop best practices for PrEP delivery and use.

  18. AIDS Vaccines and Preexposure Prophylaxis: Is Synergy Possible?

    PubMed Central

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Rida, Wasima; Priddy, Frances; Gilmour, Jill; McDermott, Adrian B.; Kamali, Anatoli; Anzala, Omu; Mutua, Gaudensia; Sanders, Eduard J.; Koff, Wayne; Berkley, Seth

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While the long-term goal is to develop highly effective AIDS vaccines, first generation vaccines may be only partially effective. Other HIV prevention modalities such as preexposure prophylaxis with antiretrovirals (PrEP) may have limited efficacy as well. The combined administration of vaccine and PrEP (VAXPREP), however, may have a synergistic effect leading to an overall benefit that is greater than the sum of the individual effects. We propose two test-of-concept trial designs for an AIDS vaccine plus oral or topical ARV. In one design, evidence that PrEP reduces the risk of HIV acquisition is assumed to justify offering it to all participants. A two-arm study comparing PrEP alone to VAXPREP is proposed in which 30 to 60 incident infections are observed to assess the additional benefit of vaccination on risk of infection and setpoint viral load. The demonstrated superiority of VAXPREP does not imply vaccine alone is efficacious. Similarly, the lack of superiority does not imply vaccine alone is ineffective, as antagonism could exist between vaccine and PrEP. In the other design, PrEP is assumed not to be in general use. A 2 × 2 factorial design is proposed in which high-risk individuals are randomized to one of four arms: placebo vaccine given with placebo PrEP, placebo vaccine given with PrEP, vaccine given with placebo PrEP, or VAXPREP. Between 60 and 210 infections are required to detect a benefit of vaccination with or without PrEP on risk of HIV acquisition or setpoint viral load, with fewer infections needed when synergy is present. PMID:21043994

  19. Transgender Women in Clinical Trials of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Grant, Robert M; Sevelius, Jae M; Guanira, Juan V; Aguilar, Jana Villayzan; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-08-15

    Lessons were learned with trans women who participated (as volunteers and investigators) in trials of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Trans women are not men. Compared with men who have sex with men, trans women trial participants were more likely to be involved with transactional sex, had more sexual partners, and were less likely to have PrEP medications detected in blood. Trans women define themselves differently in different cultures. One best practice is to ask at least 2 gender questions: sex assigned at birth and current gender. More information is needed to fully situate PrEP efficacy for trans women, including analysis of drug-drug interactions between PrEP medications and feminizing hormones and PrEP drug penetration into neovaginal tissues. Including trans women in studies is helpful only if their participation is specifically reported, as could occur in a table of baseline characteristics of the enrolled cohort. Gender-affirming care is important to foster appropriate uptake and use of PrEP. Such care includes use of preferred pronouns and names, safety to use the bathroom of choice, and access to gender-affirming hormone therapy and surgery. The consistent finding that PrEP works when taken across diverse populations having diverse practices related to gender, sexual intercourse, and hormone use provides a basis for offering PrEP to people at substantial risk of acquiring HIV although some subgroups may not have been fully represented in trials. Nonetheless, specific PrEP implementation science for trans women (and men) is essential to develop best practices for PrEP delivery and use. PMID:27429187

  20. Transgender Women in Clinical Trials of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Sevelius, Jae M.; Guanira, Juan V.; Aguilar, Jana Villayzan; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Deutsch, Madeline B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Lessons were learned with trans women who participated (as volunteers and investigators) in trials of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Trans women are not men. Compared with men who have sex with men, trans women trial participants were more likely to be involved with transactional sex, had more sexual partners, and were less likely to have PrEP medications detected in blood. Trans women define themselves differently in different cultures. One best practice is to ask at least 2 gender questions: sex assigned at birth and current gender. More information is needed to fully situate PrEP efficacy for trans women, including analysis of drug–drug interactions between PrEP medications and feminizing hormones and PrEP drug penetration into neovaginal tissues. Including trans women in studies is helpful only if their participation is specifically reported, as could occur in a table of baseline characteristics of the enrolled cohort. Gender-affirming care is important to foster appropriate uptake and use of PrEP. Such care includes use of preferred pronouns and names, safety to use the bathroom of choice, and access to gender-affirming hormone therapy and surgery. The consistent finding that PrEP works when taken across diverse populations having diverse practices related to gender, sexual intercourse, and hormone use provides a basis for offering PrEP to people at substantial risk of acquiring HIV although some subgroups may not have been fully represented in trials. Nonetheless, specific PrEP implementation science for trans women (and men) is essential to develop best practices for PrEP delivery and use. PMID:27429187

  1. Parsonage-Turner syndrome following post-exposure prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The ‘Parsonage-Turner syndrome’ (PTS) is a rare but distinct disorder with an abrupt onset of shoulder pain, followed by weakness and atrophy of the upper extremity musculature, and a slow recovery requiring months to years. To our best knowledge, this is the first case describing symptoms and signs of PTS following the administration of a post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) regimen against possible human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Case presentation A 25-year-old Caucasian man presented with pain and unilateral scapular winging following PEP against possible HIV and HBV infection. Although atrophy and weakness were observed for the right supraspinatus muscle, a full range of motion was achievable. Neurological examination, plain radiography of the right shoulder and electromyography showed no additional abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with post-vaccination PTS and treated non-operatively. During the following 15 months the scapular winging receded and full muscle strength was regained. Conclusion Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare clinical diagnosis. The precise pathophysiological mechanism of PTS remains unclear, but it seems to involve an interaction between genetic predisposition, mechanical vulnerability and an autoimmune trigger. An immunological event, such as – in this case – a vaccination as part of PEP treatment, can trigger the onset of PTS. The clinical presentation is distinctive with acute severe pain followed by patchy paresis, atrophy and sensory symptoms that persist for months to years. No currently available tests can provide a definite confirmation or exclusion of PTS. Routine blood examination, electromyography (EMG), and computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serve mainly to exclude other disorders. The recovery can be quite lengthy, non-operative treatment is the accepted practice. Supplementary administration of oral prednisolone could shorten the

  2. Malaria at Christmas: risks of prophylaxis versus risks of malaria.

    PubMed

    Reid, A J; Whitty, C J; Ayles, H M; Jennings, R M; Bovill, B A; Felton, J M; Behrens, R H; Bryceson, A D; Mabey, D C

    1998-11-28

    A large increase in the number of falciparum malaria cases imported into the UK was reported to the malaria reference laboratory in the first quarter of 1998. Contributory factors were unusually heavy rains in east Africa and a reduction in the use of the most effective antimalarial drug, mefloquine. There was also an increase in the number of cases of severe malaria in the UK. During December 1997 and January 1998, the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London, treated 5 patients for severe malaria and gave advice on 20 more patients with malaria who had been admitted to intensive care units throughout England. 4 of the severe cases treated at the hospital are reported. In 3 of those 4 cases, incorrect, misleading, or inadequate advice was given by health care professionals. Media coverage of the adverse effects of antimalarial drugs has contributed to confusion about prophylactic regimens among both health care professionals and the public. The incidence of falciparum malaria among travellers who do not take prophylactic drugs is about 0.6% in east Africa and 3.5% in west Africa over a 2-week travel period. Travellers need to take measures to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes and should be taught to promptly seek medical help if they develop a fever while abroad or after they return. Moreover, using any one of the recommended prophylactic regimens is better than not using a potent regimen or no prophylaxis at all. Mefloquine is 90% protective against malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. While the efficacy of proguanil and chloroquine in 1987 was about 70% in west Africa and 50% in east Africa, those levels are now probably lower. The side effects of antimalarial drugs are discussed.

  3. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee arthroplasty: a survey of Canadian orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Michael; Anderson, David R.; Nagpal, Seema; O’Brien, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacologic and physical modalities used by orthopedic surgeons in Canada to prevent venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Design Mail survey sent to all members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association. Setting A nation-wide study. Methods A total of 828 questionnaires, designed to identify the type and frequency of prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism that were used after hip and knee arthroplasty were mailed to orthopedic surgeons. Outcome measures Demographic data and the frequency and type of thromboprophylaxis. Results Of the 828 surveys mailed 445 (54%) were returned, and 397 were included in this analysis. Of the respondents, 97% used prophylaxis routinely for patients who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty. Three of the 397 (0.8%) did not use any method of prophylaxis. Warfarin was the most common agent used (46%), followed by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (36%). Combination therapy with both mechanical and pharmacologic methods were used in 39% of patients. Objective screening tests were not frequently performed before discharge. Extended prophylaxis beyond the duration of hospitalization was used by 36% of physicians. Conclusion Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism with warfarin or LMWH has become standard care after total hip or knee arthroplasty in Canada. PMID:10593248

  4. Effect of pumice prophylaxis on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Lindauer, S J; Browning, H; Shroff, B; Marshall, F; Anderson, R H; Moon, P C

    1997-06-01

    Pumice prophylaxis has long been accepted as a prerequisite for achieving adequate enamel etching during orthodontic bonding procedures. Three methods were used in this study to examine the effects of pumice prophylaxis on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets: (1) shear bond strength of brackets that were bonded to extracted premolars after surface preparation procedures, which either included or did not include prior pumice prophylaxis, was evaluated; (2) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface characteristics of teeth that had been etched with and without prior pumice prophylaxis; and (3) rate of bracket failure in patients who had had brackets bonded with and without prior pumice prophylaxis was recorded during an average treatment time of 18 months. No significant differences were noted in bond strength, general etched enamel surface characteristics, or bracket retention rates. Some specific differences, however, were noted on SEM in localized areas of the etched enamel surfaces, although these did not appear to affect the bond strength or bracket retention rates ultimately attained.

  5. Daily dosing prophylaxis for haemophilia: a randomized crossover pilot study evaluating feasibility and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lindvall, K; Astermark, J; Björkman, S; Ljung, R; Carlsson, K S; Persson, S; Berntorp, E

    2012-11-01

    Regular replacement therapy (prophylaxis) for haemophilia has been shown to prevent development of disabling arthropathy and to provide a better quality of life compared to treatment on demand; however, at a substantially higher cost. Calculations based on pharmacokinetic principles have shown that shortening dose intervals may reduce cost. The aim of this prospective, randomized, crossover pilot study was to address whether daily dosing is feasible, if it reduces concentrate consumption and is as effective in preventing bleeding as the standard prophylactic dosing regimen. In a 12+12 month crossover study, 13 patients were randomized to start either their own previously prescribed standard dose, or daily dosing adjusted to maintain at least the same trough levels as obtained with the standard dose. Ten patients completed the study. A 30% reduction in cost of factor concentrates was achieved with daily prophylaxis. However, the number of bleeding events increased in some patients in the daily dosing arm and patients reported decreased quality of life during daily prophylaxis. Daily treatment had a greater impact on daily life, and the patients found it more stressful.Prophylaxis with daily dosing may be feasible and efficacious in some patients. A substantial reduction of factor consumption and costs can be realized, but larger studies are needed before the introduction of daily prophylaxis into clinical routine can be recommended.

  6. What do women know about breast cancer prophylaxis and a healthy style of life?

    PubMed Central

    Sielska, Jolanta; Matecka, Monika; Dąbrowska, Eliza; Jakubek, Ewa; Urbaniak, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to determine the factors influencing women's knowledge concerning breast cancer prophylaxis and find out the sources of the knowledge. Background In the Greater Poland region, breast cancer has been the most frequently detected tumour for years. The percentage of breast cancer cases has increased by 31% in the last decade. Materials and methods The study encompassed 337 women aged 40–59 who participated in the mammographic examinations. An original research tool was used which assessed the level of knowledge concerning breast cancer prophylaxis, the knowledge of health-oriented behaviour in this regard and the influence of the medical personnel on women's education. Results Age is a factor diversifying the knowledge of the breast self-examination method. Doctors and nurses were rarely indicated as a source of knowledge concerning breast cancer prophylaxis. The subjects presented a high level of knowledge of the factors increasing the risk of developing cancer. Conclusions A correlation between the level of education and the knowledge of one's own breast to a degree which enables a woman to detect even a slight change was observed. Vital findings also concern the sources of knowledge concerning breast cancer prophylaxis. The results of the studies indicated little informative support on the part of the medical personnel; therefore, one should call for supplementing training courses for doctors and nurses focusing on the issues of prophylaxis, including the method of breast self-examination. PMID:26549989

  7. Primary prophylaxis of disseminated histoplasmosis in HIV patients in French Guiana: arguments for cost effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Mathieu; Adenis, Antoine; Basurko, Celia; Vantilcke, Vincent; Blanchet, Denis; Aznar, Christine; Carme, Bernard; Couppié, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Histoplasmosis is the first cause of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related deaths in French Guiana. Cohort data were used to determine whether primary prophylaxis with 100 mg itraconazole for patients with CD4 counts < 150/mm(3) was cost-effective with different scenarios. For a scenario where 12% of patients died, 60% were aware of their human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and adherence was only 50%, primary prophylaxis would prevent 1 death and 9 cases of histoplasmosis for a cost of 36,792 Euros per averted death, 1,533 per life-year saved, 4,415 Euros per averted case, when only counting the costs of itraconazole prophylaxis. Taking into account the total costs of hospitalization showed that primary prophylaxis would allow a savings of 185,178 Euros per year. Even in a scenario of low adherence, primary prophylaxis would be cost-effective in French Guiana, and presumably in the rest of the Guianas and the Amazon.

  8. Intravenous Versus Oral Antibiotic Prophylaxis Efficacy for Elective Laparoscopic Cholecystectomies: a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Karaca, A Serdar; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present prospective randomized controlled trial is to compare the effectiveness of intravenous and oral antibiotic prophylaxis for cost and surgical site infection in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Three hundred twenty patients were split into two groups as to include 160 patients in each, and they were evaluated in a prospective and randomized fashion. While one group was subjected to 1 g cefazolin via intravenous route during anesthesia induction, other group received 1 g cephalexin monohydrate via oral route 1 h prior to the operation. Demographic findings and operation results of the patients were compared by analyses. Our 320 patients (278 females and 42 males) received elective cholecystectomy and were followed up for a period of 6-26 months. Each group had 160 patients. Both groups were similar with regard to demographic characteristics and inclusion criteria. Among all, only five (1.5 %) cases demonstrated postoperative surgical site infection. Surgical site infection at postoperative period was determined in three (1.8 %) cases of intravenous prophylaxis group and two (1.2 %) cases of oral prophylaxis group. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of surgical site infection. Oral antibiotic prophylaxis can be used in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy prophylaxis due to its cost-effective, reliable nature, and low surgical site infection rate. PMID:26730079

  9. Low adherence to secondary prophylaxis among clients diagnosed with rheumatic fever, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sheron Boswell; Brown, Cerese Hepburn; Edwards, Ann Marie; Lindo, Jascinth L M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the level of adherence and possible barriers to secondary prophylaxis among clients with rheumatic fever in Kingston, Jamaica. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 39 clients diagnosed with rheumatic fever, receiving penicillin prophylaxis for more than a year using a 22-item self-administered questionnaire on adherence to secondary prophylaxis and knowledge of rheumatic fever. The patients’ records were reviewed to determine the number of prophylaxis injections the patients received for the year 2010. Results: The majority of participants (74%) were females and 51% were adults. Only 48.7% had a high level of adherence. The majority (72%) had low knowledge levels regarding their illness, while only 5% had a high knowledge level score. Most clients (70%) strongly agreed that nurses and doctors encouraged them to take their prophylaxis. However, over 60% reported that they travelled long distances and or waited long periods to get their injections. One-third reported that they missed appointments because of fear of injections and having to take time off from work or school. Discussion: Clients attending the health centers studied had limited knowledge about rheumatic fever. Barriers to adherence included fear of the injections, long commutes, and long waiting periods at the facilities studied. PMID:25113585

  10. Free lymph node flap transfer and laser-assisted liposuction: a combined technique for the treatment of moderate upper limb lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Fabio; Constantinides, Joannis; Ciudad, Pedro; Sapountzis, Stamatis; Kiranantawat, Kidakorn; Lazzeri, Davide; Lim, Seong Yoon; Nicoli, Marzia; Chen, Pei-Yu; Yeo, Matthew Sze-Wei; Chilgar, Ram M; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2015-05-01

    Upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery is a challenging problem for the surgeon. Lymphatico-venous or lymphatico-lymphatic anastomoses have been used to restore the continuity of the lymphatic system, offering a degree of improvement. Long-term review indicates that lumen obliteration and occlusion at the anastomosis level commonly occurs with time as a result of elevated venous pressure. Lymph node flap transfer is another microsurgical procedure designed to restore lymphatic system physiology but does not provide a complete volume reduction, particularly in the presence of hypertrophied adipose tissue and fibrosis, common in moderate and advanced lymphedema. Laser-assisted liposuction has been shown to effectively reduce fat and fibrotic tissues. We present preliminary results of our practice using a combination of lymph node flap transfer and laser-assisted liposuction. Between October 2012 and May 2013, ten patients (mean 54.6 ± 9.3 years) with moderate (stage II) upper extremity lymphedema underwent groin or supraclavicular lymph node flap transfer combined with laser-assisted liposuction (high-power diode pulsed laser with 1470-nm wavelength, LASEmaR 1500-EUFOTON, Trieste, Italy). A significant decrease of upper limb circumference measurements at all levels was noted postoperatively. Skin tonicity was improved in all patients. Postoperative lymphoscintigraphy revealed reduced lymph stasis. No patient suffered from donor site morbidity. Our results suggest that combining laser liposuction with lymph node flap transfer is a safe and reliable procedure, achieving a reduction of upper limb volume in treated patients suffering from moderate upper extremity lymphedema. PMID:25820369

  11. Free lymph node flap transfer and laser-assisted liposuction: a combined technique for the treatment of moderate upper limb lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Fabio; Constantinides, Joannis; Ciudad, Pedro; Sapountzis, Stamatis; Kiranantawat, Kidakorn; Lazzeri, Davide; Lim, Seong Yoon; Nicoli, Marzia; Chen, Pei-Yu; Yeo, Matthew Sze-Wei; Chilgar, Ram M; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2015-05-01

    Upper limb lymphedema following breast cancer surgery is a challenging problem for the surgeon. Lymphatico-venous or lymphatico-lymphatic anastomoses have been used to restore the continuity of the lymphatic system, offering a degree of improvement. Long-term review indicates that lumen obliteration and occlusion at the anastomosis level commonly occurs with time as a result of elevated venous pressure. Lymph node flap transfer is another microsurgical procedure designed to restore lymphatic system physiology but does not provide a complete volume reduction, particularly in the presence of hypertrophied adipose tissue and fibrosis, common in moderate and advanced lymphedema. Laser-assisted liposuction has been shown to effectively reduce fat and fibrotic tissues. We present preliminary results of our practice using a combination of lymph node flap transfer and laser-assisted liposuction. Between October 2012 and May 2013, ten patients (mean 54.6 ± 9.3 years) with moderate (stage II) upper extremity lymphedema underwent groin or supraclavicular lymph node flap transfer combined with laser-assisted liposuction (high-power diode pulsed laser with 1470-nm wavelength, LASEmaR 1500-EUFOTON, Trieste, Italy). A significant decrease of upper limb circumference measurements at all levels was noted postoperatively. Skin tonicity was improved in all patients. Postoperative lymphoscintigraphy revealed reduced lymph stasis. No patient suffered from donor site morbidity. Our results suggest that combining laser liposuction with lymph node flap transfer is a safe and reliable procedure, achieving a reduction of upper limb volume in treated patients suffering from moderate upper extremity lymphedema.

  12. [The application of the method of kinesio-taping technique for the combined non-pharmacological rehabilitation of the patients presenting with lymphedema of the lower extremities].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, M Yu; Knyazeva, T A; Apkhanova, T V; Kul'Chitskaya, D B

    2015-01-01

    Based on the innovative "kinesio-taping" technique proposed by the Japanese researcher Kenzo Kace, we have designed a new physiotherapeutic complex including the well-known physiotherapeutic methods of lymphatic drainage with intermittent pneumatic compression and underwater massage shower. The objective of our study was to evaluate the efficiency of the application of the "kinesio-taping" technique for the non-pharmacological rehabilitative treatment of the patients presenting with stage I-III lymphedema of the lower sextremities. The secondary objective was to evaluate the possibility of correction of endothelial dysfunction in the patients with lymphedema after the application of the "kinesio-taping" technique. The study included 30 patients with stage I-III lymphedema of the lower extremities randomized into two groups. Group 1 was comprised of 15 patients who were consistently treated by a combination of intermittent pneumatic compression, "akinesio-taping", and underwater massage shower. Group 2 contained 15 patients treated with the use of intermittent pneumatic compression and underwater massage shower. The results of study give evidence of positive changes in microcirculation of the patients comprising group 1 that suggest the improvement of endothelial function, vasodilation of precapillaries, enhancement of the blood flow in the microcirculatory system, and reduction of the influence of the ineffective shunting blood flow. The data obtained confirm the effectiveness of the new non-pharmacological rehabilitation complex that includes the innovative lymph-draining method of kinesio-taping, intermittent pneumatic compression and underwater massage shower for the treatment of patients with lymphedema of the lower extremities. The effectiveness of this complex is due to combined stimulation of the lymphatic and venous drainage systems and coupled to the stimulation of blood flow in the microcirculatory bed and the formation of a positive endothelial response

  13. Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Grafts May Accelerate the Healing of Ulcers on Free Flaps in Patients With Venous Insufficiency and/or Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ulceration of free flaps in patients with venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema is an uncommon but challenging problem. We hypothesized that dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (Epifix) grafts would accelerate healing of these challenging ulcers. Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data identified 8 lower extremity free flaps with ulcerations in the context of venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema. The first 4 were flaps that had been treated with conservative wound care to healing. The second group was treated conservatively initially but then converted to treatment with dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane grafts. The primary endpoint was time to healing. Results: Comparison of Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed a significant difference between the conservatively and dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane–treated flap ulcers, favoring graft treatment (P = .0361). In those ulcers that healed, the average time to healing was 87 days for the conservative treatment group and 33 days for the dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane treatment group (with an average of 1.7 grafts per ulcer). Conclusions: Dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane may accelerate healing of ulcers on lower extremity free flaps in patient with lymphedema and/or venous disease in the treated leg.

  14. Are compression corsets beneficial for the treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema? New opportunities in physiotherapy treatment – a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Hansdorfer-Korzon, Rita; Teodorczyk, Jacek; Gruszecka, Agnieszka; Lass, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of secondary lymphedema still remains an important medical issue. Treatment response is characterized by periodic remission rather than complete recovery. Compression methods currently used as part of complete decongestive therapy vary considerably in efficacy. Manual drainage, bandaging, and compression pumps are ineffective in everyday practice. Positive results have increasingly been reported where compression garments have been used as part of the treatment. This pilot study demonstrates a beneficial effect following the use of compression corsets in the treatment of edema in breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Material A total of 35 women with BCRL were enrolled. Of these, 29 patients completed the study. Methods Ultrasound (B-mode) was used to evaluate lymphedema in the side of the chest after mastectomy. This test was performed three times at a specific site on the operated side and symmetrically on the opposite side. Subsequently, patients were fit with an appropriate compression corset. The data were then statistically analyzed. Conclusion After the surgical treatment of breast cancer, lymphatic fluid reservoirs may form at the side of the chest. The use of carefully selected compression corsets is an effective treatment for BCRL. Corsets are an important item, which we recommend should be included in compression clothing sets. We anticipate this finding will form the foundation for further work on the use of modern compression garments for the treatment of BCRL as well as contribute to the limited number of published reports that exist on the subject. PMID:27103835

  15. Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Grafts May Accelerate the Healing of Ulcers on Free Flaps in Patients With Venous Insufficiency and/or Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ulceration of free flaps in patients with venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema is an uncommon but challenging problem. We hypothesized that dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (Epifix) grafts would accelerate healing of these challenging ulcers. Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data identified 8 lower extremity free flaps with ulcerations in the context of venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema. The first 4 were flaps that had been treated with conservative wound care to healing. The second group was treated conservatively initially but then converted to treatment with dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane grafts. The primary endpoint was time to healing. Results: Comparison of Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed a significant difference between the conservatively and dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane–treated flap ulcers, favoring graft treatment (P = .0361). In those ulcers that healed, the average time to healing was 87 days for the conservative treatment group and 33 days for the dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane treatment group (with an average of 1.7 grafts per ulcer). Conclusions: Dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane may accelerate healing of ulcers on lower extremity free flaps in patient with lymphedema and/or venous disease in the treated leg. PMID:27648116

  16. Comparison of Approaches for Stroke Prophylaxis in Patients with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation: Network Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirav; Hashim, Taimoor; Godara, Hemant; Ather, Sameer; Arora, Garima; Pasala, Tilak; Whitfield, Thomas T.; McGiffin, David C.; Ahmed, Mustafa I.; Lloyd, Steven G.; Limdi, Nita A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple novel oral anticoagulants and left atrial appendage closure devices (WATCHMAN) have been tested against dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonists in randomized controlled trials for stroke prophylaxis in non-valvular atrial fibrillation. No direct comparisons of these strategies are available from randomized controlled trials. We conducted the current analyses by combining efficacy and safety characteristics of all FDA approved stroke prophylaxis treatment strategies for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Materials and Methods We searched SCOPUS from 1945 till October 2015 for randomized controlled trials comparing these strategies and reporting efficacy and safety outcomes. Six randomized controlled trials were identified and included in the final analyses and review. We followed PRISMA guidelines for network meta-analyses while reporting the current analyses. We collected data on ischemic stroke, major bleeding, and the composite primary safety endpoint as defined by various randomized controlled trials. Network meta-analyses were conducted using consistency and inconsistency models for efficacy and safety outcomes. Surface under the cumulative ranking curve were then utilized to cluster rank these treatments for safety and efficacy. Results Six randomized controlled trials with 59,627 patients comparing six treatment strategies were eligible for the analyses. All prophylaxis strategies had comparable rates of ischemic stroke. Apixaban was associated with the least number of primary safety endpoint events as compared with all other treatments. In the cluster analyses assessing safety and efficacy, apixaban, edoxaban and dabigatran ranked best followed by vitamin K antagonists and rivaroxaban, whereas the WATCHMAN left atrial appendage closure device ranked last. Conclusions Dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonists, novel oral anticoagulants, and the WATCHMAN left atrial appendage closure devices are equally efficacious for ischemic stroke

  17. Iodine prophylaxis in pregnant women in Poland - where we are? (update 2015).

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Arkadiusz; Lewinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of the model of iodine prophylaxis based on the consumption of iodized salt in 1997 has eliminated the iodine deficiency in Poland. However, in accordance with the current recommendations, all women who are planning to be pregnant or are pregnant or breastfeeding should receive an additional dose of iodine at 150-200 mcg / day because of the increased body's need for iodine during this period. Studies show that only part of women in Poland conduct a proper iodine prophylaxis and it is often initiated in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. The authors try to analyze the possible causes of this situation, pointing out what could be done to increase the degree of compliance with iodine prophylaxis during pregnancy and physiological lactation in Poland. PMID:26649074

  18. Pneumocystis pneumonia in a non-HIV patient on chronic corticosteroid therapy: a question of prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Plakke, Michael J; Jalota, Leena; Lloyd, Benjamin J

    2013-01-01

    A man in his late 50s with a history of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis presented with fever and mild dyspnoea. He was HIV-negative and had been on corticosteroids as immunosuppression for 6 months prior to tapering them off 1 week before presentation. He was not taking prophylaxis for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After unsuccessful treatment for community-acquired pneumonia, his condition worsened and he required intubation and mechanical ventilation. Full respiratory workup including bronchoscopy revealed P jirovecii as a source for the patient's infection. He was treated successfully with a 21-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole  and eventually weaned off the ventilator. He has had no complications to date. In our review of this case and the existing literature, we believe that proper utilisation of prophylaxis for pneumocystis pneumonia may have prevented our patient's transfer to intensive care unit. In our article, we discuss this issue and explore current evidence for prophylaxis. PMID:23456156

  19. Lack of doxycycline antimalarial prophylaxis impact on Staphylococcus aureus tetracycline resistance.

    PubMed

    Mende, Katrin; Beckius, Miriam L; Zera, Wendy C; Yu, Xin; Li, Ping; Tribble, David R; Murray, Clinton K

    2016-10-01

    There is concern that susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus to tetracyclines may decrease due to use of antimalarial prophylaxis (doxycycline). We examined characteristics related to tetracycline resistance, including doxycycline exposure, in S. aureus isolates collected via admission surveillance swabs and inpatient clinical cultures from United States military personnel injured during deployment (June 2009-January 2012). Tetracycline class resistance was determined using antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The first S. aureus isolate from 168 patients were analyzed, of which 38 (23%) isolates were resistant to tetracyclines (class). Tetracycline-resistant isolates had a higher proportion of resistance to clindamycin (P=0.019) compared to susceptible isolates. There was no significant difference in tetracycline resistance between isolates collected from patients with and without antimalarial prophylaxis; however, significantly more isolates had tet(M) resistance genes in the doxycycline exposure group (P=0.031). Despite 55% of the patients receiving doxycycline as antimalarial prophylaxis, there was no association with resistance to tetracyclines.

  20. Heterotopic ossification: Pathophysiology, clinical features, and the role of radiotherapy for prophylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Tracy A.; Gobezie, Reuben; Mamon, Harvey J. . E-mail: hmamon@partners.org

    2006-08-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a benign condition of abnormal formation of bone in soft tissue. HO is frequently asymptomatic, though when it is more severe it typically manifests as decreased range of motion at a nearby joint. HO has been recognized to occur in three distinct contexts-trauma, neurologic injury, and genetic abnormalities. The etiology of HO is incompletely understood. A posited theory is that HO results from the presence of osteoprogenitor cells pathologically induced by an imbalance in local or systemic factors. Individuals at high risk for HO development frequently undergo prophylaxis to prevent HO formation. The two most commonly employed modalities for prophylaxis are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and radiation therapy. This review discusses HO pathophysiology, clinical features, and the role of radiotherapy for prophylaxis.

  1. Antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial infections in afebrile neutropenic patients following chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Fraser, Abigail; Paul, Mical; Vidal, Liat; Lawrie, Theresa A; van de Wetering, Marianne D; Kremer, Leontien CM; Leibovici, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who are neutropenic following chemotherapy for malignancy. Trials have shown the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing the incidence of bacterial infections but not in reducing mortality rates. Our systematic review from 2006 also showed a reduction in mortality. Objectives This updated review aimed to evaluate whether there is still a benefit of reduction in mortality when compared to placebo or no intervention. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cancer Network Register of Trials (2011), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2011), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2011), EMBASE (1980 to March 2011), abstracts of conference proceedings and the references of identified studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing different types of antibiotic prophylaxis with placebo or no intervention, or another antibiotic, to prevent bacterial infections in afebrile neutropenic patients. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently appraised the quality of each trial and extracted data from the included trials. Analyses were performed using RevMan 5.1 software. Main results One-hundred and nine trials (involving 13,579 patients) that were conducted between the years 1973 to 2010 met the inclusion criteria. When compared with placebo or no intervention, antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced the risk of death from all causes (46 trials, 5635 participants; risk ratio (RR) 0.66, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.79) and the risk of infection-related death (43 trials, 5777 participants; RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.77). The estimated number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one death was 34 (all-cause mortality) and 48 (infection-related mortality). Prophylaxis also significantly reduced the occurrence of fever (54 trials, 6658 participants; RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.87), clinically documented infection

  2. Editorial Commentary: The Efficacy of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs for Prophylaxis of Heterotopic Ossification in Hip Arthroscopy--Do We Treat Patients or X-rays?

    PubMed

    Miller, G Klaud

    2016-03-01

    A systematic review of 5 series comparing the incidence of heterotopic ossification after hip arthroscopy with and without nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug prophylaxis showed a statistically significant improvement with the use of prophylaxis.

  3. Thrombo-prophylaxis in acutely ill medical and critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Saurabh; Sharma, Jai Prakash; Joshi, Rajnish; Singh, Dinesh Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Thrombo-prophylaxis has been shown to reduce the incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and mortality in surgical patients. The purpose of this review is to find out the evidence-based clinical practice criteria of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis in acutely ill medical and critically ill patients. English-language randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis were included if they provided clinical outcomes and evaluated therapy with low-dose heparin or related agents compared with placebo, no treatment, or other active prophylaxis in the critically ill and medically ill population. For the same, we searched MEDLINE, PUBMED, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. In acutely ill medical patients on the basis of meta-analysis by Lederle et al. (40 trials) and LIFENOX study, heparin prophylaxis had no significant effect on mortality. The prophylaxis may have reduced PE in acutely ill medical patients, but led to more bleeding events, thus resulting in no net benefit. In critically ill patients, results of meta-analysis by Alhazzani et al. and PROTECT Trial indicate that any heparin prophylaxis compared with placebo reduces the rate of DVT and PE, but not symptomatic DVT. Major bleeding risk and mortality rates were similar. On the basis of MAGELLAN trial and EINSTEIN program, rivaroxaban offers a single-drug approach to the short-term and continued treatment of venous thrombosis. Aspirin has been used as antiplatelet agent, but when the data from two trials the ASPIRE and WARFASA study were pooled, there was a 32% reduction in the rate of recurrence of venous thrombo-embolism and a 34% reduction in the rate of major vascular events.

  4. Feasibility, efficacy, and adverse effects of outpatient antibacterial prophylaxis in children with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Gaur, Aditya H; Cao, Xueyuan; Flynn, Patricia M; Pounds, Stanley B; Avutu, Viswatej; Marszal, Lindsay N; Howard, Scott C; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C; Hayden, Randall T; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intensive chemotherapy for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) incurs the risk of infectious complications, but the benefits of antibiotic prophylaxis remain unclear. METHODS In 103 children treated on the AML02 protocol between October 2002 and October 2008 at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, we retrospectively assessed the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the frequency of febrile neutropenia, clinically or microbiologically confirmed infections (including bacteremia), and antibiotic resistance, and on the results of nasal and rectal surveillance cultures. Initially, patients received no prophylaxis or oral cephalosporin (Group A). Then the protocol was amended to give intravenous cefepime alone or intravenous vancomycin plus either oral cephalosporin, oral ciprofloxacin, or intravenous cefepime (Group B). RESULTS There were 334 infectious episodes. Group A had a significantly greater frequency of documented infections and bacteremia (both P < .0001) (including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteremia, P = .0003 and .001, respectively) than Group B, especially viridans streptococcal bacteremia (P = .001). The incidence of febrile neutropenia without documented infection was not different between the two groups. Five cases of bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) occurred in group B (vs. none in Group A), without related mortality. Two of these cases were preceded by positive VRE rectal surveillance cultures. CONCLUSIONS Outpatient intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis is feasible in children with AML and reduces the frequency of documented infection but not of febrile neutropenia. Despite emergence of VRE bacteremia, the benefits favor antibiotic prophylaxis. Creative approaches to shorten the duration of prophylaxis and thereby minimize resistance should be explored. PMID:24677028

  5. Use of Provider-Level Dashboards and Pay-for-Performance in Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis*

    PubMed Central

    Michtalik, Henry J.; Carolan, Howard T.; Haut, Elliott R.; Lau, Brandyn D.; Streiff, Michael B.; Finkelstein, Joseph; Pronovost, Peter J.; Durkin, Nowella; Brotman, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite safe and cost-effective venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention measures, VTE prophylaxis rates are often suboptimal. Healthcare reform efforts emphasize transparency through programs to report performance, and payment incentives through programs to pay-for-performance. Objective To sequentially examine an individualized physician dashboard and pay-for-performance program to improve VTE prophylaxis rates amongst hospitalists. Design Retrospective analysis of 3144 inpatient admissions. After a baseline observation period, VTE prophylaxis compliance was compared during both interventions. Setting 1060-bed tertiary care medical center. Participants 38 part- and full-time academic hospitalists. Interventions A Web-based hospitalist dashboard provided VTE prophylaxis feedback. After 6 months of feedback only, a pay-for-performance program was incorporated, with graduated payouts for compliance rates of 80-100%. Measurements Prescription of American College of Chest Physicians guideline-compliant VTE prophylaxis and subsequent pay-for-performance payments. Results Monthly VTE prophylaxis compliance rates were 86% (95% CI: 85, 88), 90% (95% CI: 88, 93), and 94% (95% CI: 93, 96) during the baseline, dashboard, and combined dashboard/pay-for-performance periods, respectively. Compliance significantly improved with the use of the dashboard (p=0.01) and addition of the pay-for-performance program (p=0.01). The highest rate of improvement occurred with the dashboard (1.58%/month; p=0.01). Annual individual physician performance payments ranged from $53 to $1244 (mean $633; SD ±350). Conclusions Direct feedback using dashboards was associated with significantly improved compliance, with further improvement after incorporating an individual physician pay-for-performance program. Real-time dashboards and physician-level incentives may assist hospitals in achieving higher safety and quality benchmarks. PMID:25545690

  6. [Preparatory training of primary health care nurses for handling health education regarding prophylaxis of circulatory disorders].

    PubMed

    Mojsa, Wieslawa; Owłasiuk, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Circulatory disorders (CD) exhibit high incidence rate. At the same time the increasing number of data indicate that most of these disorders can be prevented. Prophylaxis is one of the professional functions of nurses. The preventive tasks included in this function are of special importance in achieving the goals of the National Health Programme and international CINDI WHO Programme--a model programme for the prophylaxis of chronic diseases and health promotion. The necessity exists to enhance the preventive actions, of which health education is an integral part. Therefore, it seems essential to prepare the nurses to conduct health education in the field of circulatory disorders. The aim of the study was to answer the following questions: 1. Do the primary health care nurses think that they are sufficiently prepared to conduct health education among their patients on the prophylaxis of circulatory disorders? 2. What sources do they use to obtain the knowledge about the prophylaxis of circulatory disorders? 3. Do they understand the need of getting and additional training in the prophylaxis of circulatory disorders and to what extent? The research problem was to determine whether there is a difference in responses between two groups: 1. nurses with secondary education and specialization and 2. nurses without specialization. The study involved all the nurses employed in the primary health care centres in Białystok. Questionnaire was the research tool. 172 questionnaire forms were distributed, of which 146 were properly filled in. The study shows that the nurses with secondary education and specialization declared preparation to conduct education concerning the prophylaxis of circulatory disorders significantly more often than the nurses with secondary education without specialization. Worth noting is the fact, that the nurses with secondary education without specialization uttered a smaller need of additional training than those with secondary education and

  7. Intracameral cefuroxime and moxifloxacin used as endophthalmitis prophylaxis after cataract surgery: systematic review of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Linertová, Renata; Abreu-González, Rodrigo; García-Pérez, Lidia; Alonso-Plasencia, Marta; Cordovés-Dorta, Luis Mateo; Abreu-Reyes, José Augusto; Serrano-Aguilar, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative endophthalmitis is one of the most serious potential complications of ocular lens surgery. Its incidence can be reduced by means of antibiotic prophylaxis. Although the prophylactic use of intracameral cefuroxime has been extended, other drugs, such as moxifloxacin, have arisen as alternatives. We performed a systematic literature review on the effectiveness and efficiency of intracameral cefuroxime and moxifloxacin for the prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Several bibliographic databases were searched up to October 2010 and were updated up to January 2013. Outcomes were the onset of endophthalmitis after surgery and the cost-effectiveness ratio of using both antibiotic prophylaxis alternatives. The following were included: a clinical trial reported in two papers, six observational studies, and an economic evaluation. All studies assessed cefuroxime compared with another antibiotic prophylaxis or no prophylaxis. The only randomized controlled trial performed by the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery found that intracameral cefuroxime is significantly more effective than not using prophylaxis or the use of a topical antibiotic. The observational studies support these results. The economic evaluation compared different prophylaxis regimens and concluded that intracameral cefuroxime showed the best cost-effectiveness ratio. Both the observational studies and the economic evaluation have methodological limits that reduce their validity. This review confirmed that cefuroxime can prevent endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Further randomized controlled trials, with large sample sizes, are required to compare different antibiotic prophylaxis regimens.

  8. 75 FR 32490 - Issues in the Development of Medical Products for the Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute Antibody Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients; Public... prophylaxis and/or treatment of acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) in kidney transplant recipients. This public workshop is intended to provide information for and gain perspective from health care...

  9. [An increase of infective endocarditis cases in England seen with concomitant reduction in antibiotic prophylaxis since the implementation of NICE guidelines in 2008: possible explanations].

    PubMed

    Tiberi, Simon; Pink, Frederick; Jayakumar, Angelina; Arioli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Dayer and colleagues recently reported in The Lancet an increased incidence of infective endocarditis in England since 2008, year of NICE guideline on the restriction of antibiotic prophylaxis. They observed a concomitant decrease in the use of antibiotic prophylaxis. The temporal link between reduction of prophylaxis prescribing and increase of infective endocarditis raises the question of whether there is a causal association. In view of this observation, should we rethink antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infective endocarditis?

  10. Vitamin K prophylaxis for prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, M J; Chandrasekaran, A; Kumar, P; Thukral, A; Agarwal, R; Paul, V K

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the burden of late vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) and the effect of vitamin K prophylaxis on the incidence of VKDB. We searched MEDLINE and other electronic databases, and included all observational studies including population surveys as well as randomized controlled trials (RCT). The median (interquartile range) burden of late VKDB was 35 (10.5 to 80) per 100 000 live births in infants who had not received prophylaxis at birth; the burden was much higher in low- and middle-income countries as compared with high-income countries-80 (72 to 80) vs 8.8 (5.8 to 17.8) per 100 000 live births. Two randomized trials evaluated the effect of intramuscular (IM) prophylaxis on the risk of classical VKDB. Although one trial reported a significant reduction in the incidence of any bleeding (relative risk (RR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56 to 0.96) and moderate to severe bleeding (RR 0.19, 0.08 to 0.46; number needed to treat (NNT) 74, 47 to 177), the other trial demonstrated a significant reduction in the risk of secondary bleeding after circumcision in male neonates (RR 0.18, CI 0.08 to 0.42; NNT 9, 6 to 15). No RCTs evaluated the effect of vitamin K prophylaxis on late VKDB. Data from four surveillance studies indicate that the use of IM/subcutaneous vitamin K prophylaxis could significantly reduce the risk of late VKDB when compared with no prophylaxis (pooled RR 0.02; 95% CI 0.00 to 0.10). When compared with IM prophylaxis, a single oral dose of vitamin K increased the risk of VKDB (RR 24.5; 95% CI 7.4 to 81.0) but multiple oral doses did not (RR 3.64; CI 0.82 to 16.3). There is low-quality evidence from observational studies that routine IM administration of 1 mg of vitamin K at birth reduces the incidence of late VKDB during infancy. Given the high risk of mortality and morbidity in infants with late VKDB, it seems appropriate to administer IM vitamin K prophylaxis to all neonates at birth. Future studies

  11. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis and antibiotic nonsusceptibility in invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Soeters, Heidi M; von Gottberg, Anne; Cohen, Cheryl; Quan, Vanessa; Klugman, Keith P

    2012-03-01

    Among 5,043 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) isolates identified through South African national surveillance from 2003 to 2007, we estimated the effect of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) prophylaxis on antimicrobial resistance. Patients on TMP-SMX prophylaxis were more likely to have a pneumococcal isolate nonsusceptible to TMP-SMX, penicillin, and rifampin. TMP-SMX nonsusceptibility was associated with nonsusceptibility to penicillin, erythromycin, and rifampin and multidrug resistance. This study informs empirical treatment of suspected IPD in patients with a history of TMP-SMX use. PMID:22232291

  12. Rabies encephalitis in a child: a failure of rabies post exposure prophylaxis?

    PubMed

    Tinsa, Faten; Borgi, Aida; Jahouat, Imen; Boussetta, Khadija

    2015-01-01

    Rabies remains a serious public health problem in many developing countries. The diagnosis is easy when a non-immunised patient presents with hydrophobia and hypersalivation after a bite by a known rabid animal but more difficult when a patient presents atypical symptoms after having received rabies postexposure prophylaxis. Rabies postexposure prophylaxis failure is rare. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented febrile seizure with agitation and cerebellar signs, without hydrophobia or hypersalivation, 17 days after a dog bite. Despite four doses of rabies vaccine and immunoglobulin, he died. Diagnostic confirmation of rabies encephalitis was made in post mortem on brain biopsies by fluorescent antibody technique.

  13. Vitamin K prophylaxis for prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sankar, M J; Chandrasekaran, A; Kumar, P; Thukral, A; Agarwal, R; Paul, V K

    2016-05-01

    We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the burden of late vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) and the effect of vitamin K prophylaxis on the incidence of VKDB. We searched MEDLINE and other electronic databases, and included all observational studies including population surveys as well as randomized controlled trials (RCT). The median (interquartile range) burden of late VKDB was 35 (10.5 to 80) per 100 000 live births in infants who had not received prophylaxis at birth; the burden was much higher in low- and middle-income countries as compared with high-income countries-80 (72 to 80) vs 8.8 (5.8 to 17.8) per 100 000 live births. Two randomized trials evaluated the effect of intramuscular (IM) prophylaxis on the risk of classical VKDB. Although one trial reported a significant reduction in the incidence of any bleeding (relative risk (RR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56 to 0.96) and moderate to severe bleeding (RR 0.19, 0.08 to 0.46; number needed to treat (NNT) 74, 47 to 177), the other trial demonstrated a significant reduction in the risk of secondary bleeding after circumcision in male neonates (RR 0.18, CI 0.08 to 0.42; NNT 9, 6 to 15). No RCTs evaluated the effect of vitamin K prophylaxis on late VKDB. Data from four surveillance studies indicate that the use of IM/subcutaneous vitamin K prophylaxis could significantly reduce the risk of late VKDB when compared with no prophylaxis (pooled RR 0.02; 95% CI 0.00 to 0.10). When compared with IM prophylaxis, a single oral dose of vitamin K increased the risk of VKDB (RR 24.5; 95% CI 7.4 to 81.0) but multiple oral doses did not (RR 3.64; CI 0.82 to 16.3). There is low-quality evidence from observational studies that routine IM administration of 1 mg of vitamin K at birth reduces the incidence of late VKDB during infancy. Given the high risk of mortality and morbidity in infants with late VKDB, it seems appropriate to administer IM vitamin K prophylaxis to all neonates at birth. Future studies

  14. Prophylaxis and post-exposure treatment of intoxications caused by nerve agents and organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Kuca, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Musilek, Kamil; Pohanka, Miroslav; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Soukup, Ondrej

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of intoxications caused by nerve agents and organophosphorus pesticides consists of different approaches. The first approach is called prophylaxis or pre-exposure administration of antidotes such as cholinesterase reactivators or bioscavengers. The second, post-exposure treatment consists of anticholinergic drugs, acetylcholinesterase reactivators and anticonvulsants. This article is aimed at both mentioned approaches, especially focused on cholinesterase reactivators, which are a broad group of structurally different compounds that can be used in prophylaxis (separately or in combination with butyrylcholinesterase) and also as post-exposure treatment.

  15. Malaria prophylaxis: survey of the response of British travellers to prophylactic advice.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Howard, P A; Blaze, M; Hurn, M; Bradley, D J

    1986-01-01

    A cohort study was conducted to determine the compliance of travellers with chemoprophylactic advice given over the telephone by the malaria reference advisory service. Travellers who visited their general practitioner first for advice about malaria prophylaxis were often advised to consult a specialist service themselves. Compliance fell in travellers who were given complicated information and those who received conflicting advice when they contacted other advisory services. After returning to Britain 48% of the travellers reported that they were fully compliant with prophylactic advice; over a third of the travellers studied did not maintain prophylaxis on their return. PMID:3094721

  16. Continuous sulfa prophylaxis for urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Peters, C; Peterson, P; Marabella, P; Simmons, R L; Najarian, J S

    1983-11-01

    During a 12 to 25 month follow-up period, 252 renal transplant recipients maintained with continuous sulfa prophylaxis were observed for evidence of bacteriuria. Although symptoms were rare, positive cultures were obtained in 6 percent of the patients who responded to conventional antibiotic outpatient therapy. Compared with sulfisoxazole, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole led to slightly fewer infections, especially with gram-negative organisms. Toxicity from sulfa was minimal and occasional leukopenia reversed by temporarily withholding azathioprine. Continuous sulfa prophylaxis in renal transplant patients is therefore safe and effective in minimizing the incidence of urinary tract infection, as well as other opportunistic infections known to be treatable by sulfa agents.

  17. Cost effectiveness of danaparoid compared with enoxaparin as deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis after hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Wade, W E

    1999-04-01

    Guidelines for prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) after hip replacement surgery suggest the use of twice-daily low-molecular-weight heparin as one treatment option. Danaparoid, a low-molecular-weight heparinoid, and once-daily enoxaparin are recently released dosage forms that have been evaluated as pharmacoprophylaxis for DVT after hip replacement surgery. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio calculations using published efficacy and safety data suggest that enoxaparin (40 mg) daily is the more cost effective of these two agents as routine prophylaxis after hip replacement surgery. PMID:10220094

  18. Incidence and prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis in outpatients with injury of the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Kujath, P; Spannagel, U; Habscheid, W

    1993-03-01

    253 outpatients were included in a prospective randomized study. All patients had incidence of injuries of the lower limb immobilized by a plaster cast. 126 patients (group I) received a subcutaneous injection of Fraxiparin daily, and 127 patients (group II) received no thromboprophylaxis. Without prophylaxis 21 (16.5%) cases developed a thrombosis, and with prophylaxis a thrombosis could be proven in 6 (4.8%) patients only (p < 0.01). Thus, for all patients with an injury of the lower limb being immobilized by a plaster cast, a thromboprophylaxis with a low-molecular-weight heparin is recommended.

  19. Should we definitively abandon prophylaxis for patent ductus arteriosus in preterm new-borns?

    PubMed Central

    Fanos, Vassilios; Pusceddu, Michele; Dessì, Angelica; Marcialis, Maria Antonietta

    2011-01-01

    Although the prophylactic administration of indomethacin in extremely low-birth weight infants reduces the frequency of patent ductus arteriosus and severe intraventricular hemorrhage, it does not appear to provide any long-term benefit in terms of survival without neurosensory and cognitive outcomes. Considering the increased drug-induced reduction in renal, intestinal, and cerebral blood flow, the use of prophylaxis cannot be routinely recommended in preterm neonates. However, a better understanding of the genetic background of each infant may allow for individualized prophylaxis using NSAIDs and metabolomics. PMID:22189742

  20. [Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury].

    PubMed

    Silva, Vinícius Trindade Gomes da; Iglesio, Ricardo; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Siqueira, Mario Gilberto; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: O risco de trombose venosa profunda encontra-se aumentado em doentes vítimas de traumatismo cranioencefálico, mas a profilaxia da trombose venosa profunda se confronta com o possível risco de piora de lesões hemorrágicas relacionados ao traumatismo cranioencefálico. Neste artigo apresentamos uma revisão crítica do tema e propomos um protocolo de profilaxia para estes doentes.Material e Métodos: Foi realizada uma pesquisa na base de dados Medline/PubMed, Cochrane, e Scielo de janeiro de 1998 a janeiro de 2014 com a expressão de busca âÄúdeep venous thrombosis and prophylaxis and traumatic brain injuryâÄù. Foram encontrados 44 artigos usando os termos MeSH definidos. Destes foram selecionados 23 artigos, usando como critérios: publicação em inglês ou português, fase aguda do traumatismo cranioencefálico moderado e grave, profilaxia mecânica não invasiva ou química.Resultados: O traumatismo cranioencefálico é um fator de risco para trombose venosa profunda e tromboembolismo pulmonar. A chance de trombose venosa profunda é 2,59 vezes maior em doentes com traumatismo cranioencefálico. A prevalência de trombose venosa profunda e embolia pulmonar em doentes que sofreram traumatismo cranioencefálico é de 20%, podendo atingir 30% dos doentes em alguns estudos.Discussão e Conclusão: As diversas formas de traumatismo de forma isolada constituem fator de risco para trombose venosa profunda e tromboembolismo pulmonar. Ensaios clínicos são necessários para estabelecer a eficácia da profilaxia e o melhor momento de iniciar medicação para trombose venosa profunda em doentes com traumatismo craniencefálico.

  1. Echinocandin resistance, susceptibility testing and prophylaxis: implications for patient management.

    PubMed

    Perlin, David S

    2014-09-01

    become drug tolerant and can form stable drug resistant FKS mutations with continued drug exposure. A major concern for resistance detection is that classical broth microdilution techniques show significant variability among clinical microbiology laboratories for certain echinocandin drugs and Candida species. The consequence is that susceptible strains are misclassified according to established clinical breakpoints, and this has led to confusion in the field. Clinical factors that appear to promote echinocandin resistance include the expanding use of antifungal agents for empiric therapy and prophylaxis. Furthermore, host reservoirs such as biofilms in the gastrointestinal tract or intra-abdominal infections can seed development of resistant organisms during therapy. A fundamental understanding of the primary molecular resistance mechanism, along with cellular and clinical factors that promote resistance emergence, is critical to develop better diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies to overcome and prevent echinocandin resistance.

  2. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in patients with colorectal lesions undergoing endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi-Sheng; Han, Bing; Xu, Jian-Hua; Gao, Peng; Shen, Yu-Cui

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of prophylaxis with antibiotics on clinical adverse events in patients who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) or endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for colorectal lesions. METHODS: From June 2011 to December 2013, a total of 428 patients were enrolled into the study, of which 214 patients admitted to hospital underwent EMR or ESD procedures. These patients were randomized to an antibiotic group, in which patients were given cefuroxime 1.5 g iv half an hour before and 6 h after surgery respectively, and a control group, in which patients were not given any antibiotic. A further 214 outpatients with small polyps treated by polypectomy were compared with controls that were matched by age and gender, and operations were performed as outpatient surgery. Recorded patient parameters were demographics, characteristics of lesions and treatment modality, and the size of the wound area. The primary outcome measures were clinical adverse events, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, hemotachezia, and fever. Secondary outcome measures were white blood cell count, C-reactive protein and blood culture. Additionlly, the relationship between the size of the wound area and clinical adverse events was analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 409 patients were enrolled in this study, with 107 patients in the control group, 107 patients in the antibiotic group, and another 195 cases in the follow-up outpatient group. The patients’ demographic characteristics, including age, gender, characteristics of lesions, treatment modality, and the size of the wound area were similar between the 2 groups. The rates of adverse events in the antibiotic group were significantly lower than in the control group: abdominal pain (2.8% vs 14.9%, P < 0.01), diarrhea (2.0% vs 9.3%, P < 0.05), and fever (0.9% vs 8.4%, P < 0.05) respectively. The levels of inflammatory markers also decreased significantly in the antibiotic group compared with the control group: leukocytosis

  3. Postexposure prophylaxis, preexposure prophylaxis or universal test and treat: the strategic use of antiretroviral drugs to prevent HIV acquisition and transmission.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jonathan; Tatoud, Roger; Fidler, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    This review considers the use of antiretroviral drugs specifically to prevent HIV transmission. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can be implemented for the protection of uninfected individuals both before (preexposure prophylaxis) and after (postexposure prophylaxis) exposure to HIV infection. Preexposure prophylaxis may be used coitally dependently when individuals are intermittently exposed or by continuous daily dosing for those constantly exposed; postexposure prophylaxis is used in 28-day courses. Alternatively, ART can be used strategically to reduce the viral load and consequent infectiousness of an HIV-infected individual, thereby limiting the risk of onward viral transmission. A policy of universal HIV testing to enhance the identification of all HIV-positive individuals followed by immediate treatment of all HIV-positive individuals, irrespective of their CD4 cell counts (universal test and treat), has been postulated as a potential tool capable of reducing HIV incidence at a population level. This concept represents a paradigm shift in the use of ART, targeting infectious individuals for prevention rather than protecting uninfected exposed populations. This strategy could have the advantage of preventing transmission and reducing HIV incidence at a population level, as well as delivering universal access to therapy for all people living with HIV and AIDS, potentially eliminating mother-to-child HIV transmission and limiting concomitant diseases such as tuberculosis. This review critically examines the scientific basis of ART for HIV prevention, summarizing the risks and opportunities of the potential expansion of ART for prevention. Specifically, we consider the evidences for and against targeting HIV-uninfected individuals compared with enhanced HIV testing and treatment of HIV-infected individuals in terms of impact on viral transmission.

  4. Is selective prenatal iron prophylaxis better than routine prophylaxis: final results of a trial (PROFEG) in Maputo, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Elina; Nwaru, Bright I; Salomé, Graca; Parkkali, Saara; Abacassamo, Fatima; Augusto, Orvalho; Cliff, Julie; Regushevskaya, Elena; Dgedge, Martinho; Sousa, Cesar; Chilundo, Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare routine versus selective (ie, screening and treatment for anaemia) prenatal iron prophylaxis in a malaria-endemic and HIV-prevalent setting, an extended analysis including previously missing data. Design A pragmatic randomised controlled clinical trial. Setting 2 health centres in Maputo, Mozambique. Participants Pregnant women (≥18 years old; non-high-risk pregnancy) were randomly allocated to routine iron (n=2184) and selective iron (n=2142) groups. Interventions In the routine group, women received 60 mg ferrous sulfate plus 400 μg folic acid daily. In the selective group, women received 1 mg of folic acid daily and haemoglobin (Hb) screening at each visit; with low Hb (cut-off 9 g/dL) treatment (120 mg+800 μg of folic acid daily) for a month. Outcome measures Primary outcomes: preterm birth, low birth weight; secondary outcomes: self-reported malaria, labour complications, caesarean section, perinatal death, woman's death. Nurses collected pregnancy data. Birth data were abstracted from hospital records for 52% of women and traced using various methods and linked with probabilistic matching for 24%. Women's deaths were collected from death registers. Results Birth data were available for 3301 (76%) of the women. Outcomes were similar in the two groups: preterm births (27.1% in the selective vs 25.3% in the routine group), low birthweight infants (11.0% vs 11.7%), perinatal deaths (2.4% vs 2.4%) and caesarean sections (4.0% vs 4.5%). Women's deaths during pregnancy or <42 days postpartum were more common in the selective group (0.8% among the two best matched women) than in the routine group (0.4%). Extra deaths could not be explained by the cause of death, Hb level or HIV status at recruitment. Conclusions Birth outcomes were similar in the two iron groups. There might have been more women's deaths in the selective iron group, but it is unclear whether this was due to the intervention, other factors or chance finding

  5. National study on the utilization of prophylactic antibiotics in surgery, Belgium, 1986

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, R.; Verbist, L.; Gordts, B.; Lauwers, S.; Potvliege, C.; Reybrouck, G.; Verschraegen, G.; Wauters, G.; Berghmans, L.; Dondeyne, F.; Stroobant, A.

    1989-01-01

    During the last week of May 1986, a 1-week prospective study on antibiotic utilization in surgical patients was held in 104 (42%) of the 247 Belgian acute care hospitals. All surgical patients with a post-operative stay of at least 3 days were studied, involving 3112 patients. Each patient was observed for 7 days, starting from the day before surgery. Antibiotics were administered to 71·9% of all patients; 21·9% received therapeutic antibiotics and 52·9% prophylactic antibiotics; 2·9% received both. Of the 1285 patients undergoing a surgical procedure with no indication for antimicrobial prophylaxis, 50·7% nevertheless received prophylaxis; 92·8% of patients with a generally recognized indication for prophylaxis received antibiotic prophylaxis. Less than one fifth (17·1%) of all prophylactic courses were stopped on the day of the intervention whilst 26·3% were continued up to the fifth post-operative day or beyond. The most frequently prescribed drugs for this indication included first and second generation cephalosporins and nitroimidazoles. The number of different generic drugs utilized per hospital ranged from 1 to 18 (mean: 7·7). PMID:2680549

  6. Clinical Feasibility of Noninvasive Visualization of Lymphatic Flow using Principles of Spin Labeling MRI: Implications for Lymphedema Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Swati; Donahue, Paula M. C.; Towse, Ted; Ridner, Sheila; Chappell, Michael; Jordi, John; Gore, John; Donahue, Manus J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To extend a commonly employed, noninvasive arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI method for measuring blood flow to evaluate lymphatic flow. Materials and Methods All volunteers (n=12) provided informed consent in accordance with IRB and HIPAA regulations. Quantitative relaxation time (T1 and T2) measurements were made in extracted human lymphatic fluid at 3.0T. Guided by these parameters, an ASL MRI approach was adapted to measure lymphatic flow (flow-alternating-inversion-recovery lymphatic water labeling; 3×3×5 mm3) in healthy subjects (n=6; 30±1 yrs; recruitment duration=2 months). Lymphatic flow velocity was quantified by performing spin labeling measurements as a function of post-labeling delay time and measuring the time-to-peak of signal in axillary lymph nodes. Clinical feasibility was evaluated in Stage II lymphedema patients (n=3; 60yr/F, 43yr/F, 64yr/F) and control subjects with unilateral cuff-induced lymphatic stenosis (n=3; 31yr/M, 31yr/M, 35yr/F). Results T1 and T2 of lymphatic fluid at 3.0T were 3100±160 ms (range=2930-3210 ms; median=3200 ms) and 610±12 ms (range=598-618 ms; median=610 ms), respectively. Healthy lymphatic flow (afferent vessel to axillary node) velocity was found to be 0.61±0.13 cm/min (n=6). A reduction (P<0.005) in lymphatic flow velocity in the affected arms of patients and the affected arms of healthy subjects with manipulated cuff-induced flow reduction was observed. The ratio of unaffected to affected axilla lymphatic velocity (1.24±0.18) was significantly (P<0.005) higher than the Left/Right ratio in healthy subjects (0.91±0.18). Conclusion This work provides a foundation for clinical investigations whereby lymphedema etiogenesis and therapies may be interrogated without exogenous agents and with clinically available imaging equipment. PMID:23864103

  7. [Prophylaxis of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation: new oral anticoagulants and left atrial appendage closure].

    PubMed

    Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Bode, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Thrombo-embolic prophylaxis is a key element within the therapy of atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter. Besides new oral anticoagulants the concept of left atrial appendage occlusion has approved to be a good alternative option, especially in patients with increased risk of bleeding. PMID:26261929

  8. Effects of different forms of central nervous system prophylaxis on neuropsychologic function in childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, J.H.; Glidewell, O.J.; Sibley, R.F.; Holland, J.C.; Tull, R.; Berman, A.; Brecher, M.L.; Harris, M.; Glicksman, A.S.; Forman, E.

    1984-12-01

    A comparison of the late effects on intellectual and neuropsychologic function of three different CNS prophylaxis regimens was conducted in 104 patients treated for childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Of the children studied, 33 were randomized to treatment with intrathecal (IT) methotrexate alone, 36 to IT methotrexate plus 2,400 rad cranial irradiation, and 35 to IT methotrexate plus intravenous intermediate dose methotrexate. All patients were in their first (complete) continuous remission, were a minimum of one year post-CNS prophylaxis and had no evidence of CNS disease at the time of evaluation. In contrast to the other two treatment groups, children whose CNS prophylaxis included cranial irradiation attained significantly lower mean Full Scale IQs, performed more poorly on the Wide Range Achievement Test, a measure of school abilities, and exhibited a greater number of difficulties on a variety of other neuropsychologic measures. The poorer performance of the irradiated group was independent of sex of the patient, time since treatment and age at diagnosis. These data suggest that the addition of 2,400 rad cranial irradiation to CNS prophylaxis in ALL puts these children at greater risk for mild global loss in intellectual and neuropsychologic ability.

  9. Assessing safety and immunogenicity of post-exposure prophylaxis following interchangeability of rabies vaccines in humans.

    PubMed

    Ravish, Hardanahalli S; Sudarshan, Mysore K; Madhusudana, Shampur N; Annadani, Rachana R; Narayana, Doddabele H Ashwath; Belludi, Ashwin Y; Anandaiah, Gangaboraiah; Vijayashankar, Veena

    2014-01-01

    Rabies post exposure prophylaxis with cell culture vaccines by either intramuscular route or intradermal route spans over a period of one month. World Health Organization recommends completing post exposure prophylaxis against rabies with the same cell culture or embryonated egg rabies vaccine and with same route of administration and any deviation from this shall be an exception. In the present study, the safety and immunogenicity of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis was studied prospectively in 90 animal bite cases that had interchangeability of rabies vaccines either by route of administration or brand/type and such changes had occurred due to logistical/financial problems. Among them, 47 had change in route of administration from intramuscular to intradermal or vice versa and 43 had change in the brand/type of cell culture rabies vaccine. All of them had category III rabies exposure and received equine rabies immunoglobulin along with the rabies vaccine. None of the study subjects had any adverse reactions. The rabies virus neutralizing antibody titers was assessed by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test and all the vaccinees had titers ≥0.5 IU per mL on day 14 which is considered as adequate for protection against rabies. Thus, the present study showed that, rabies post-exposure prophylaxis was safe and immunogenic despite changes in the route of administration and brand/type of rabies vaccine.

  10. Failures of endocarditis prophylaxis: selective review of the literature and a case report.

    PubMed

    van der Bijl, P; Maresky, L S

    1991-01-01

    Patients at risk for developing infective endocarditis require antibiotic prophylaxis before bloody dental procedures. However, despite prophylactic measures, some patients still develop the infection. A selective review of the literature is given and a case report of prophylactic failure in a high risk patient is presented.

  11. Risk-assessment algorithm and recommendations for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in medical patients

    PubMed Central

    T Rocha, Ana; F Paiva, Edison; Lichtenstein, Arnaldo; Milani, Rodolfo; Cavalheiro-Filho, Cyrillo; H Maffei, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in medical patients is high, but risk assessment is rarely performed because there is not yet a good method to identify candidates for prophylaxis. Purpose To perform a systematic review about VTE risk factors (RFs) in hospitalized medical patients and generate recommendations (RECs) for prophylaxis that can be implemented into practice. Data sources A multidisciplinary group of experts from 12 Brazilian Medical Societies searched MEDLINE, Cochrane, and LILACS. Study selection Two experts independently classified the evidence for each RF by its scientific quality in a standardized manner. A risk-assessment algorithm was created based on the results of the review. Data synthesis Several VTE RFs have enough evidence to support RECs for prophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients (eg, increasing age, heart failure, and stroke). Other factors are considered adjuncts of risk (eg, varices, obesity, and infections). According to the algorithm, hospitalized medical patients ≥40 years-old with decreased mobility, and ≥1 RFs should receive chemoprophylaxis with heparin, provided they don’t have contraindications. High prophylactic doses of unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight-heparin must be administered and maintained for 6–14 days. Conclusions A multidisciplinary group generated evidence-based RECs and an easy-to-use algorithm to facilitate VTE prophylaxis in medical patients. PMID:17969384

  12. Prophylaxis for acute gout flares after initiation of urate-lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Latourte, Augustin; Bardin, Thomas; Richette, Pascal

    2014-11-01

    This review summarizes evidence relating to prophylaxis for gout flares after the initiation of urate-lowering therapy (ULT). We searched MEDLINE via PubMed for articles published in English from 1963 to 2013 using MEsH terms covering all aspects of prophylaxis for flares. Dispersion of monosodium urate crystals during the initial phase of deposit dissolution with ULT exposes the patient to an increased rate of acute flares that could contribute to poor treatment adherence. Slow titration of ULT might decrease the risk of flares. According to the most recent international recommendation, the two first-line options for prophylaxis are low-dose colchicine (0.5 mg once or twice a day) or low-dose NSAIDs such as naproxen 250 mg orally twice a day. They can be given for up to 6 months. If these drugs are contraindicated, not tolerated or ineffective, low-dose corticosteroids (prednisone or prednisolone) might be used. Recently, reports for four trials described the efficacy of canakinumab and rilonacept, two IL-1 inhibitors, for preventing flares during the initiation of allopurinol therapy. Prophylaxis for flares induced by ULT is an important consideration in gout management. Low-dose colchicine and low-dose NSAIDs are the recommended first-line therapies. Although no IL-1 blockers are approved as prophylactic treatment, this class of drug could become an interesting option for patients with gout with intolerance or contraindication to colchicine, NSAIDs or corticosteroids.

  13. Pneumocystis carinii mutations are associated with duration of sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis exposure in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Kazanjian, P; Armstrong, W; Hossler, P A; Burman, W; Richardson, J; Lee, C H; Crane, L; Katz, J; Meshnick, S R

    2000-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether Pneumocystis carinii dyhydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene mutations in AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia (PCP) are affected by duration of sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis and influence response to sulfa or sulfone therapy. The P. carinii DHPS genes from 97 AIDS patients with PCP between 1991 and 1999 from 4 medical centers were amplified, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequenced. Mutations were observed in 76% of isolates from patients exposed to sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis compared with 23% of isolates from patients not exposed (P=.001). Duration of prophylaxis increased the risk of mutations (relative risk [RR] for each exposure month, 1.06; P=.02). Twenty-eight percent of patients with mutations failed sulfa or sulfone treatment; mutations increased the risk of sulfa or sulfone treatment failure (RR, 2.1; P=0.01). Thus, an increased duration of sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis increases the chance of developing a P. carinii mutation. The majority of patients with mutations respond to sulfa or sulfone therapy.

  14. Antibiotic surgical prophylaxis increases nasal carriage of antibiotic-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Claire L; Hardy, Katherine J; Verlander, Neville Q; Hawkey, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococci are a significant cause of hospital-acquired infection. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is an important risk factor for infection in surgical patients and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a major cause of prosthetic joint infections. The impact that antibiotic surgical prophylaxis has on the nasal carriage of staphylococci has not been studied. Daily nasal swabs were taken from 63 patients who received antibiotic surgical prophylaxis and 16 patients who received no antibiotics. Total aerobic bacterial count, S. aureus and CNS were enumerated by culture from nasal swabs. Representative isolates were typed by staphylococcal interspersed repeat units (SIRU) typing and PFGE, and MICs to nine antibiotics were determined. After antibiotic administration, there was a reduction in S. aureus counts (median - 2.3 log(10)c.f.u. ml(- 1)) in 64.0 % of S. aureus carriers, compared with only a 0.89 log(10)c.f.u. ml(- 1) reduction in 75.0 % of S. aureus carriers who did not receive antibiotics. A greater increase in the nasal carriage rate of meticillin-resistant CNS was observed after antibiotic surgical prophylaxis compared with hospitalization alone, with increases of 16.4 and 4.6 %, respectively. Antibiotic-resistant S. epidermidis carriage rate increased by 16.6 % after antibiotic administration compared with 7.5 % with hospitalization alone. Antibiotic surgical prophylaxis impacts the nasal carriage of both S. aureus and CNS.

  15. Survey of Intraocular Antibiotics Prophylaxis Practice after Open Globe Injury in China

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Junlian; Yang, Yao; Yuan, Zhaohui; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the Chinese practice of intraocular antibiotics administration for prophylaxis after open globe injury. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed online by scanning a Quickmark (QR) code with smartphones at the 20th Chinese National Conference of Ocular Trauma in November 2014. Results A total of 153 (30.6%) of all participators at the conference responded. Of the respondents, 20.9% were routinely administered with prophylactic intraocular injection of antibiotics at the conclusion of the primary eye repair, and 56.9% were used only in cases with high risk of endophthalmitis development. The intraocular route of delivery was mainly included with intracameral injection (47.9%) and intravitreal injection (42.0%). Cephalosporins (53.8%) and vancomycin (42.0%) were the main choices of antibiotic agents, followed by fluoroquinolones (24.3%), and aminoglycosides (13.4%). Only 21.9% preferred a combination of two or more two drugs routinely. In addition, significantly more respondents from the referral eye hospital (92.7%) replied using intraocular antibiotics injection for prophylaxis compared to those respondents from the primary hospital (69.4%) (p = 0.001, Fisher’s exact test). Conclusions Intraocular antibiotics injection for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis is widely used in China. However, the choice of antibiotic agents and the intraocular route of delivery vary. A well-designed clinical trial is needed to establish a standardized protocol of intraocular antibiotics administration for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis. PMID:27275777

  16. Risk factors for RhD immunisation despite antenatal and postnatal anti-D prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Koelewijn, JM; de Haas, M; Vrijkotte, TGM; van der Schoot, CE; Bonsel, GJ

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for Rhesus D (RhD) immunisation in pregnancy, despite adequate antenatal and postnatal anti-D prophylaxis in the previous pregnancy. To generate evidence for improved primary prevention by extra administration of anti-D Ig in the presence of a risk factor. Design Case–control study. Setting Nation-wide evaluation of the Dutch antenatal anti-D-prophylaxis programme. Population Cases: 42 RhD-immunised parae-1, recognised by first-trimester routine red cell antibody screening in their current pregnancy, who received antenatal and postnatal anti-D Ig prophylaxis (gifts of 1000 iu) in their first pregnancy. Controls: 339 parae-1 without red cell antibodies. Methods Data were collected via obstetric care workers and/or personal interviews with women. Main outcome measure Significant risk factors for RhD immunisation in multivariate analysis. Results Independent risk factors were non-spontaneous delivery (assisted vaginal delivery or caesarean section) (OR 2.23; 95% CI:1.04–4.74), postmaturity (≥42 weeks of completed gestation: OR 3.07; 95% CI:1.02–9.02), pregnancy-related red blood cell transfusion (OR 3.51; 95% CI:0.97–12.7 and age (OR 0.89/year; 95% CI:0.80–0.98). In 43% of cases, none of the categorical risk factors was present. Conclusions In at least half of the failures of anti-D Ig prophylaxis, a condition related to increased fetomaternal haemorrhage (FMH) and/or insufficient anti-D Ig levels was observed. Hence, RhD immunisation may be further reduced by strict compliance to guidelines concerning determination of FMH and accordingly adjusted anti-D Ig prophylaxis, or by routine administration of extra anti-D Ig after a non-spontaneous delivery and/or a complicated or prolonged third stage of labour. PMID:19538414

  17. Changing practice: implementation of a venous thromboembolism prophylaxis protocol at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Pannucci, Christopher J.; Jaber, Reda M.; Zumsteg, Justin M.; Golgotiu, Vlad; Spratke, Lisa M.; Wilkins, Edwin G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine has identified a “quality chasm” between existing evidence and actual clinical practice. The Venous Thromboembolism Prevention Study (VTEPS) has shown that enoxaparin prophylaxis is a safe and effective way to prevent post-operative venous thromboembolism (VTE). Here, we present a “how-to” guide for implementation of a VTE prophylaxis protocol. Methods The VTEPS prophylaxis protocol included provision of post-operative, prophylactic dose enoxaparin for the duration of inpatient stay. “Compliance” was considered at the individual patient level, and was defined as appropriate provision of protocol-appropriate enoxaparin prophylaxis. Multiple simultaneous interventions to improve protocol compliance were undertaken. Both physician and physician assistant “champions” were identified. Interventions included staff and surgeon educational sessions, discussion of VTE-themed articles at journal club, and monthly email reminders specific to the protocol, among others. Compliance rates over time were compared using the chi-squared test. Results We reviewed medical records from 945 consecutive admissions to the plastic surgery service who met VTEPS eligibility criteria over a 30-month period. Initial education sessions significantly increased compliance over baseline (55% vs. 10%, p<0.001). After formal protocol adoption, compliance increased steadily over the first nine months and peaked by one year. In the absence of any direct intervention, compliance remained stable at 90% for the final 12 months of the study. This was significantly increased when compared to the period of time immediately following protocol adoption (90% vs. 77%, p<0.001). Conclusions This manuscript provides readers with a practical approach for implementation of a VTE prophylaxis protocol at their hospital. PMID:21738084

  18. Prophylaxis on gout flares after the initiation of urate-lowering therapy: a retrospective research

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xin; Li, Yao; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety associated with treatment available to prevent an acute attack of gout when initiating a urate-lowering therapy (ULT). We retrospectively reviewed patients who were diagnosed with gout and treated with ULT during the period from January 2000 to January 2014. They were divided into three groups, 75 patients without prophylaxis treatment, 103 patients treated with etoricoxib, and 129 patients with colchicine treatment. Both demographic and clinical characteristics associated with gout were analyzed. At baseline, demographic and clinical characteristics were generally similar in three groups. SU target level was achieved in 49.3% of the patients without prophylaxis treatment, 66.4% in the etoricoxib group and 65.1% in colchicine group, respectively. During the first 16 weeks, patients without prophylaxis treatment exhibited higher flare rates than patients in other two groups. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between patients in etoricoxib group and colchicine group. In the 16-24 weeks, the proportion of patients who reported flares were all decreased similarly in three groups. The mean number of acute gout flares per patient and gout flare days per patient was significantly higher in patients without prophylaxis treatment than patients in other groups. The mean number of acute gout flares was lower (4.2±2.3 vs 3.2±1.8) in patients with etoricoxib treatment than that in patients with colchicine treatment. Gout flare days per patient were significantly higher in patients without prophylaxis treatment. Compared to colchicine group, gout flare days per patient in etoricoxib were lower (1.2±0.5 vs 2.6±0.6). In term of AEs, patients receiving colchicine had higher rates of gastrointestinal AEs than those who received etoricoxib. In summary, our survey revealed that etoricoxib was more effective and safe than colchicine in preventing acute attack during ULT. PMID:26885092

  19. B-cell surface marker analysis for improvement of rituximab prophylaxis in ABO-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Hiroto; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Haga, Hironori; Tsuji, Hiroaki; Yurugi, Kimiko; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Oike, Fumitaka; Fukuda, Akinari; Yoshizawa, Jun; Takada, Yasutsugu; Tanaka, Koichi; Maekawa, Taira; Ozawa, Kazue; Uemoto, Shinji

    2007-04-01

    Although the effectiveness of rituximab has been reported in ABO blood group (ABO)-incompatible (ABO-I) organ transplantation, the protocol is not yet established. We studied the impact of the timing of rituximab prophylaxis and the humoral immune response of patients undergoing ABO-I living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), focusing on clinicopathological findings and the B-cell subset. From July 2003 to December 2005, 30 adult patients were treated with hepatic artery infusion (HAI) protocol without splenectomy for ABO-I LDLT. A total of 17 patients were treated only with HAI (no prophylaxis), and the other 13 were treated with rituximab prophylaxis at various times prior to transplantation. For B-cell study of the spleen, another 4 patients undergoing ABO-I LDLT both with HAI after prophylaxis and eventual splenectomy, and 3 patients with ABO-compatible LDLT with splenectomy were enrolled. The mortality of the 30 patients with HAI, without splenectomy, and with/without rituximab prophylaxis was 33% and the main cause of death was sepsis. Peripheral blood B cells were completely depleted, anti-donor blood-type antibody titer was lower, and clinical and pathological antibody-mediated rejection was not observed in patients with prophylaxis earlier than 7 days before transplantation (early prophylaxis). Early rituximab prophylaxis significantly depleted B cells and memory B cells in the spleen but not in lymph nodes. On the other hand, B cells and memory B cells increased and memory B cells became dominant during antibody-mediated rejection. In conclusion, early prophylaxis with rituximab depletes B cells, including memory B cells, in the spleen and is associated with a trend toward lower humoral rejection rates and lower peak immunoglobulin (Ig)G titers in ABO-I LDLT patients.

  20. Experiences of a Community-Based Lymphedema Management Program for Lymphatic Filariasis in Odisha State, India: An Analysis of Focus Group Discussions with Patients, Families, Community Members and Program Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Tali; Worrell, Caitlin M.; Little, Kristen; Prakash, Aishya; Patra, Inakhi; Rout, Jonathan; Fox, LeAnne M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Globally 68 million people are infected with lymphatic filariasis (LF), 17 million of whom have lymphedema. This study explores the effects of a lymphedema management program in Odisha State, India on morbidity and psychosocial effects associated with lymphedema. Methodology/Principal Findings Focus groups were held with patients (eight groups, separated by gender), their family members (eight groups), community members (four groups) and program volunteers (four groups) who had participated in a lymphedema management program for the past three years. Significant social, physical, and economic difficulties were described by patients and family members, including marriageability, social stigma, and lost workdays. However, the positive impact of the lymphedema management program was also emphasized, and many family and community members indicated that community members were accepting of patients and had some improved understanding of the etiology of the disease. Program volunteers and community members stressed the role that the program had played in educating people, though interestingly, local explanations and treatments appear to coexist with knowledge of biomedical treatments and the mosquito vector. Conclusions/Significance Local and biomedical understandings of disease can co-exist and do not preclude individuals from participating in biomedical interventions, specifically lymphedema management for those with lymphatic filariasis. There is a continued need for gender-specific psychosocial support groups to address issues particular to men and women as well as a continued need for improved economic opportunities for LF-affected patients. There is an urgent need to scale up LF-related morbidity management programs to reduce the suffering of people affected by LF. PMID:26849126

  1. [How to implement a guideline from theory to practice: the example of the venous thromboembolism prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Paiva, Edison F; Rocha, Ana T C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to discuss the existing barriers for the dissemination of medical guidelines, and to present strategies that facilitate the adaptation of the recommendations into clinical practice. The literature shows that it usually takes several years until new scientific evidence is adopted in current practice, even when there is obvious impact in patients' morbidity and mortality. There are some examples where more than thirty years have elapsed since the first case reports about the use of a effective therapy were published until its utilization became routine. That is the case of fibrinolysis for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Some of the main barriers for the implementation of new recommendations are: the lack of knowledge of a new guideline, personal resistance to changes, uncertainty about the efficacy of the proposed recommendation, fear of potential side-effects, difficulties in remembering the recommendations, inexistence of institutional policies reinforcing the recommendation and even economical restrains. In order to overcome these barriers a strategy that involves a program with multiple tools is always the best. That must include the implementation of easy-to-use algorithms, continuous medical education materials and lectures, electronic or paper alerts, tools to facilitate evaluation and prescription, and periodic audits to show results to the practitioners involved in the process. It is also fundamental that the medical societies involved with the specific medical issue support the program for its scientific and ethical soundness. The creation of multidisciplinary committees in each institution and the inclusion of opinion leaders that have pro-active and lasting attitudes are the key-points for the program's success. In this manuscript we use as an example the implementation of a guideline for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, but the concepts described here can be easily applied to any other guideline

  2. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Measures of Breast Cancer–Related Lymphedema: Area Under the Curve

    PubMed Central

    Smoot, Betty J.; Wong, Josephine F.; Dodd, Marylin J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare diagnostic accuracy of measures of breast cancer–related lymphedema (BCRL). Design Cross-sectional design comparing clinical measures with the criterion standard of previous diagnosis of BCRL. Setting University of California San Francisco Translational Science Clinical Research Center. Participants Women older than 18 years and more than 6 months posttreatment for breast cancer (n=141; 70 with BCRL, 71 without BCRL). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Sensitivity, specificity, receiver operator characteristic curve, and area under the curve (AUC) were used to evaluate accuracy. Results A total of 141 women were categorized as having (n=70) or not having (n=71) BCRL based on past diagnosis by a health care provider, which was used as the reference standard. Analyses of ROC curves for the continuous outcomes yielded AUC of .68 to .88 (P<.001); of the physical measures bioimpedance spectroscopy yielded the highest accuracy with an AUC of .88 (95% confidence interval, .80–.96) for women whose dominant arm was the affected arm. The lowest accuracy was found using the 2-cm diagnostic cutoff score to identify previously diagnosed BCRL (AUC, .54–.65). Conclusions Our findings support the use of bioimpedance spectroscopy in the assessment of existing BCRL. Refining diagnostic cutoff values may improve accuracy of diagnosis and warrant further investigation. PMID:21440706

  3. Illustrating the (in)visible: Understanding the impact of loss in adults living with secondary lymphedema after cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Roanne; Hamilton, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Life with a disability is often riddled with paradoxes, one of which is being visibly marked, while personal experiences, losses, and challenges remain hidden. Our article draws attention to this paradox among people who live with secondary lymphedema after cancer (SLC). SLC is a relatively unfamiliar chronic condition within medical and lay discourses of cancer, which proves challenging for the many cancer survivors who are in search of information and understanding. Thirteen men and women with SLC were recruited from two research sites (Fredericton, NB, and Ottawa, ON, Canada) to participate in semi-structured interviews about the physical and psychosocial aspects of SLC. Using a methodology of interpretive description, our analysis of participant interviews reveals the complex ways in which men and women felt both visible and invisible within various contexts. We discuss three majors themes: (in)visibility and appearance related to material losses; (in)visibility and action connected to visible losses in function, as well as invisible struggles to care for oneself; and the loss of present and future well-being, as SLC renders some limitations visible while potentially obscuring a hopeful future indefinitely. Our research indicates that timely diagnosis of SLC would be an immediate first step in recognizing the physical and emotional dimensions of the condition. To accomplish this, increased awareness is needed. To enhance quality of life for those living with SLC, the development of new resources and psychosocial supports is also required. PMID:25148936

  4. Effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation D2 flexion and breathing exercises on lymphedema without a short stretch compression bandage.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Woon Taek; Chung, Sin Ho; Chung, Min Sung; Lee, Kyu Hoon; Kim, Taikon

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) D2 flexion and breathing exercises in a patient with lymphedema (LE). [Subject] This report describes a 57-year-old woman with LE in whom a short-stretch compression bandage (SSCB) could not be used for treatment because of skin itching and redness. [Methods] The patient received complex decongestive therapy without a SSCB. Next, PNF D2 flexion and breathing exercises were conducted three times per week for 14 weeks (36 times). [Results] As a result, the circumference of the armpit was reduced by 0.5 cm; that of 10 cm above the elbow, by 1 cm; that of the elbow, by 0.5 cm; that of 10 cm below the elbow, by 1 cm; and that of the back of the hand, by 0.5 cm. A total of 100 mL (9.4%) of body water was eliminated from the right upper extremity, and moisture ratio was reduced by 0.005%. Finally, range of motion was improved to 20° flexion, 60° abduction, 40° external rotation, and 10° internal rotation. [Conclusion] This study showed that PNF D2 flexion and breathing exercises were effective in reducing LE and improving range of motion. PMID:26644706

  5. Illustrating the (in)visible: understanding the impact of loss in adults living with secondary lymphedema after cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roanne; Hamilton, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Life with a disability is often riddled with paradoxes, one of which is being visibly marked, while personal experiences, losses, and challenges remain hidden. Our article draws attention to this paradox among people who live with secondary lymphedema after cancer (SLC). SLC is a relatively unfamiliar chronic condition within medical and lay discourses of cancer, which proves challenging for the many cancer survivors who are in search of information and understanding. Thirteen men and women with SLC were recruited from two research sites (Fredericton, NB, and Ottawa, ON, Canada) to participate in semi-structured interviews about the physical and psychosocial aspects of SLC. Using a methodology of interpretive description, our analysis of participant interviews reveals the complex ways in which men and women felt both visible and invisible within various contexts. We discuss three majors themes: (in)visibility and appearance related to material losses; (in)visibility and action connected to visible losses in function, as well as invisible struggles to care for oneself; and the loss of present and future well-being, as SLC renders some limitations visible while potentially obscuring a hopeful future indefinitely. Our research indicates that timely diagnosis of SLC would be an immediate first step in recognizing the physical and emotional dimensions of the condition. To accomplish this, increased awareness is needed. To enhance quality of life for those living with SLC, the development of new resources and psychosocial supports is also required.

  6. Changes in Antibody Levels during and following an Episode of Acute Adenolymphangitis (ADL) among Lymphedema Patients in Léogâne, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Mues, Katherine E.; Lammie, Patrick J.; Klein, Mitchel; Kleinbaum, David G.; Addiss, David; Fox, LeAnne M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Episodes of acute adenolymphangitis (ADL) are often the first clinical sign of lymphatic filariasis (LF). They are often accompanied by swelling of the affected limb, inflammation, fever, and general malaise and lead to the progression of lymphedema. Although ADL episodes have been studied for a century or more, questions still remain as to their etiology. We quantified antibody levels to pathogens that potentially contribute to ADL episodes during and after an episode among lymphedema patients in Léogâne, Haiti. We estimated the proportion of ADL episodes hypothesized to be attributed to specific pathogens. Methods We measured antibody levels to specific pathogens during and following an ADL episode among 41 lymphedema patients enrolled in a cohort study in Léogâne, Haiti. We calculated the absolute and relative changes in antibody levels between the ADL and convalescent time points. We calculated the proportion of episodes that demonstrated a two-fold increase in antibody level for several bacterial, fungal, and filarial pathogens. Results Our results showed the greatest proportion of two-fold changes in antibody levels for the carbohydrate antigen Streptococcus group A, followed by IgG2 responses to a soluble filarial antigen (BpG2), Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxin B, and an antigen for the fungal pathogen Candida. When comparing the median antibody level during the ADL episode to the median antibody level at the convalescent time point, only the antigens for Pseudomonas species (P-value = 0.0351) and Streptolysin O (P-value = 0.0074) showed a significant result. Conclusion Although our results are limited by the lack of a control group and few antibody responses, they provide some evidence for infection with Streptococcus A as a potential contributing factor to ADL episodes. Our results add to the current evidence and illustrate the importance of determining the causal role of bacterial and fungal pathogens and immunological antifilarial

  7. Lighting Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with lighting utilization. Its objective is for the student to be able to outline the development of lighting use and conservation and identify major types and operating characteristics of lamps used in electric lighting. Some topics…

  8. Spondylodiscitis after lumbar microdiscectomy: effectiveness of two protocols of intraoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in 1167 cases.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, Luciano; Rychlicki, Franco; Tatta, Carlo; Morabito, Letterio; Agrillo, Umberto; Ducati, Alessandro

    2005-10-01

    The role of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing postoperative lumbar spondylodiscitis is still controversial in medical, ethical, economic, and legal terms. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of two intraoperative antibiotic prophylaxis protocols in a large series of lumbar microdiscectomies performed in two different neurosurgical centres. We reviewed the outcome of 1167 patients operated on for a lumbar disc herniation with microsurgical technique, in order to detect the incidence of postoperative spondylodiscitis. Group A included 450 patients operated on in a 3-year period in the Neurosurgical Division of the University Hospital of Ancona; group P consisted of 717 patients operated on in a 4-year period in the Neurosurgical Division of the Sandro Pertini Hospital of Rome. In both groups intraoperative antibiotics for prophylaxis were administered, whereas postoperative prophylaxis was not performed. Protocol of group A: single intravenous dose of cefazoline 1 g at induction of general anesthesia and generous washing with saline solution and irrigation with a solution containing rifamicin at the end of microsurgical procedure. Protocol of group P: single-dose of intravenous ampicillin 1000 mg and sulbactam 500 mg at induction of anesthesia and generous irrigation with saline solution at the end of microsurgical procedure. A diagnosis of postoperative spondylodiscitis was made in three out of 450 patients in group A (0.67%) and in 5 out of 717 patients in group P (0.69%). In all cases, treatment consisted of rigid thoraco-lumbar orthesis and 4- to 6-week administration of amoxicillin/clavulanate compound (500/125 mg). The low incidence of postoperative spondylodiscitis obtained with both our protocols seems to confirm that intraoperative antibiotic prophylaxis is associated with the same rate of discitis of prolonged prophylaxis usually still adopted in many centres, but is more advantageous both in terms of welfare and comfort for

  9. Bacteriological studies of blood, tissue fluid, lymph and lymph nodes in patients with acute dermatolymphangioadenitis (DLA) in course of 'filarial' lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, W L; Jamal, S; Manokaran, G; Pani, S; Kumaraswami, V; Kubicka, U; Lukomska, B; Tripathi, F M; Swoboda, E; Meisel-Mikolajczyk, F; Stelmach, E; Zaleska, M

    1999-10-15

    Filarial lymphedema is complicated by frequent episodes of dermatolymphangioadenitis (DLA). Severe systemic symptoms during attacks of DLA resemble those of septicemia. The question we asked was whether bacterial isolates can be found in the peripheral blood of patients during the episodes of DLA. Out of 100 patients referred to us with 'filarial' lymphedema 14 displayed acute and five subacute symptoms of DLA. All were on admission blood microfilariae negative but had a positive test in the past. Blood bacterial isolates were found in nine cases, four acute (21%) and five subacute (26%). In 10 acute cases blood cultures were found negative. Six blood isolates belonged to Bacilli, four to Cocci and one was Sarcina. To identify the sites of origin of bacterial dissemination, swabs taken from the calf skin biopsy wounds and tissue fluid, lymph and lymph node specimens were cultured. Swabs from the calf skin biopsy wound contained isolates in nine (47%) cases. They were Bacilli in nine, Cocci in three, Acinetobacter and Erwinia in two cases. Tissue fluid was collected from 10 patients and contained Bacilli in four (40%) and Staphylococci in three (30%). Lymph was drained in four patients and contained isolates in all samples (100%). They were Staphylococcus epidermis, xylosus and aureus, Acinetobacter, Bacillus subtilis and Sarcina. Three lymph nodes were biopsied and contained Staphylococcus chromogenes, xylosus, Enterococcus and Bacillus cereus. In six cases the same phenotypically defined species of bacteria were found in blood and limb tissues or fluids. In the 'control' group of patients with lymphedema without acute or subacute changes all blood cultures were negative. Interestingly, swabs from biopsy wound of these patients contained isolates in 80%, tissue fluid in 68%, lymph in 70% and lymph nodes in 58% of cases. In healthy controls, tissue fluid did not contain bacteria, and lymph isolates were found only in 12% of cases. This study demonstrates that

  10. GATA-2 anomaly and clinical phenotype of a sporadic case of lymphedema, dendritic cell, monocyte, B- and NK-cell (DCML) deficiency, and myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Imai, Kosuke; Honma, Kenichi; Tamura, Shin-Ichi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Ito, Masafumi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki

    2012-08-01

    A Japanese patient presented with lymphedema, severe Varicella zoster, and Salmonella infection, recurrent respiratory infections, panniculitis, monocytopenia, B- and NK-cell lymphopenia, and myelodysplasia. The phenotype was a mixture of the monocytopenia and mycobacterial infection (MonoMAC) and Emberger syndromes. Sequencing of the GATA-2 cDNA revealed the heterozygous missense mutation 1187 G > A. This mutation resulted in the amino acid mutation Arg396Gln in the zinc fingers-2 domain, which is predicted to cause significant structural change and prevent a critical interaction with DNA. Functional analysis of the patient's GATA-2 mutation is required to understand the relationship between these distinctive syndromes. PMID:22430350

  11. Clinical consequences and cost of limiting use of vancomycin for perioperative prophylaxis: example of coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, G.; Goldie, S. J.; Platt, R.

    2001-01-01

    Routine us of vancomycin for perioperative prophylaxis is discouraged, principally to minimize microbial resistance to it. However, outcomes and costs of this recommendation have not been assessed. We used decision-analytic models to compare clinical results and cost-effectiveness of no prophylaxis, cefazolin, and vancomycin, in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. In the base case, vancomycin resulted in 7% fewer surgical site infections and 1% lower all-cause mortality and saved $117 per procedure, compared with cefazolin. Cefazolin, in turn, resulted in substantially fewer infections and deaths and lower costs than no prophylaxis. We conclude that perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis with vancomycin is usually more effective and less expensive than cefazolin. Data on vancomycin's impact on resistance are needed to quantify the trade-off between individual patients' improved clinical outcomes and lower costs and the future long-term consequences to society. PMID:11747694

  12. Correlation of antibiotic prophylaxis and difficulty of extraction with postoperative inflammatory complications in the lower third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Do, H S; Lim, J H; Jang, H S; Rim, J S; Kwon, J J; Lee, E S

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the correlation among antibiotic prophylaxis, difficulty of extraction, and postoperative complications in the removal of lower 3rd molars. A total of 1222 such extractions in 890 patients between January 2010 and January 2012 were analysed retrospectively. The difficulty of extraction measured by Pederson's index, antibiotic prophylaxis with cefditoren, and postoperative complications were recorded. The difficulty of extraction was significantly associated with postoperative complications (p=0.03). There were no significant associations between antibiotic prophylaxis and postoperative complications in groups of equal difficulty ("easy" group (class I) p=1.00; "moderate" group (class II) p=1.00; and "difficult" group (class III) p=0.65). There was a small but insignificant increase in the number of dry sockets and infections in class III cases. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative inflammatory complications is unnecessary for extraction of 3rd molars. PMID:24029441

  13. Central nervous system prophylaxis in patients with aggressive diffuse large B cell lymphoma: an analysis of 3,258 patients in a single center.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Jesús Nambo, M; Neri, Natividad

    2013-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse continues to be a frequent and usually fatal complication in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Multiple factors identify the possibility of relapse and justify neurological prophylaxis; however, most of these have not been confirmed. Thus, the use of prophylaxis has not been defined. From 1988 to 2008, 3,258 patients with DLBCL with higher clinical risks and multiple extranodal involvement that have been treated with standard anthracycline-based chemotherapy: CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) or CHOP-R (CHOP plus rituximab) and that achieve complete response were retrospectively analyzed to assess the efficacy of CNS prophylaxis. One thousand five patients received different schedules for CNS prophylaxis, and 2,253 patients did not receive CNS prophylaxis. CNS relapse was similar in patients who receive prophylaxis (6 %) compared to patients who did not receive prophylaxis (5.9 %). Overall survival of patients who either receive or did not receive prophylaxis was not statistically significant: 49 % versus 53 % (p = 0.802). Thus, it seems that CNS prophylaxis did not improve outcome in this special setting of patients, and no prognostic factors to predict the presence of CNS relapse were identified. It is evident that multicentric studies are necessary to define the role of prophylaxis in order to prevent CNS relapse and that the therapeutic procedure will be carefully revised. PMID:23456620

  14. Uptake and Repeat Use of Postexposure Prophylaxis in a Community-Based Clinic in Los Angeles, California

    PubMed Central

    Bolan, Robert K.; Flynn, Risa P.; Kerrone, Dustin R.; Pieribone, David L.; Kulkarni, Sonali P.; Stitt, Jackelyn C.; Mejia, Everardo; Landovitz, Raphael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) has become an important tool for HIV prevention in the men who have sex with men (MSM) communities within Los Angeles County. However, it is unclear as to whether the most sexually at-risk MSM populations are accessing PEP services. Furthermore, it is unclear what behavioral risk factors differentiate individuals who utilize PEP once (single PEP) versus those who utilize it multiple times (re-PEP). Data were collected between May 2011 and December 2012 on all clients enrolled in the Los Angeles LGBT Center's (the Center) PEP-LA program as well as on all sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening clients visiting the Center. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze results. PEP clients had greater odds of having a history of gonorrhea in the past year when compared to high-risk, non-PEP clients (OR: 1.71; CI: 1.25–2.35). Furthermore, they had greater odds of using methamphetamines (OR: 1.71; CI: 1.30–2.24) and inhaled nitrates (OR: 1.62; CI: 1.30–2.01) in the past 12 months when compared to high-risk, non-PEP clients. Re-PEP clients had greater odds of methamphetamine use than single PEP clients (OR: 2.80; CI: 1.65–4.75). There were no significant differences by race/ethnicity between high-risk, non-PEP clients and PEP clients in either the entire cohort or MSM only sample. However, African Americans made up 8.5% of persons accessing PEP services but 16.7% of persons who tested HIV positive. Similar proportions of PEP use by race/ethnicity are problematic considering the disproportionate burden of HIV infections in the African American community. Although uptake among the highest risk populations has been brisk (n=649), inequities based upon race/ethnicity suggest the need for increased outreach. PMID:24970113

  15. Uptake and repeat use of postexposure prophylaxis in a community-based clinic in Los Angeles, California.

    PubMed

    Beymer, Matthew R; Bolan, Robert K; Flynn, Risa P; Kerrone, Dustin R; Pieribone, David L; Kulkarni, Sonali P; Stitt, Jackelyn C; Mejia, Everardo; Landovitz, Raphael J

    2014-09-01

    Postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) has become an important tool for HIV prevention in the men who have sex with men (MSM) communities within Los Angeles County. However, it is unclear as to whether the most sexually at-risk MSM populations are accessing PEP services. Furthermore, it is unclear what behavioral risk factors differentiate individuals who utilize PEP once (single PEP) versus those who utilize it multiple times (re-PEP). Data were collected between May 2011 and December 2012 on all clients enrolled in the Los Angeles LGBT Center's (the Center) PEP-LA program as well as on all sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening clients visiting the Center. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze results. PEP clients had greater odds of having a history of gonorrhea in the past year when compared to high-risk, non-PEP clients (OR: 1.71; CI: 1.25-2.35). Furthermore, they had greater odds of using methamphetamines (OR: 1.71; CI: 1.30-2.24) and inhaled nitrates (OR: 1.62; CI: 1.30-2.01) in the past 12 months when compared to high-risk, non-PEP clients. Re-PEP clients had greater odds of methamphetamine use than single PEP clients (OR: 2.80; CI: 1.65-4.75). There were no significant differences by race/ethnicity between high-risk, non-PEP clients and PEP clients in either the entire cohort or MSM only sample. However, African Americans made up 8.5% of persons accessing PEP services but 16.7% of persons who tested HIV positive. Similar proportions of PEP use by race/ethnicity are problematic considering the disproportionate burden of HIV infections in the African American community. Although uptake among the highest risk populations has been brisk (n=649), inequities based upon race/ethnicity suggest the need for increased outreach.

  16. Workshop on treatment of and postexposure prophylaxis for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei Infection, 2010.

    PubMed

    Lipsitz, Rebecca; Garges, Susan; Aurigemma, Rosemarie; Baccam, Prasith; Blaney, David D; Cheng, Allen C; Currie, Bart J; Dance, David; Gee, Jay E; Larsen, Joseph; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Morrow, Meredith G; Norton, Robert; O'Mara, Elizabeth; Peacock, Sharon J; Pesik, Nicki; Rogers, L Paige; Schweizer, Herbert P; Steinmetz, Ivo; Tan, Gladys; Tan, Patrick; Wiersinga, W Joost; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Smith, Theresa L

    2012-12-01

    The US Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise convened subject matter experts at the 2010 HHS Burkholderia Workshop to develop consensus recommendations for postexposure prophylaxis against and treatment for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei infections, which cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Drugs recommended by consensus of the participants are ceftazidime or meropenem for initial intensive therapy, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for eradication therapy. For postexposure prophylaxis, recommended drugs are trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or co-amoxiclav. To improve the timely diagnosis of melioidosis and glanders, further development and wide distribution of rapid diagnostic assays were also recommended. Standardized animal models and B. pseudomallei strains are needed for further development of therapeutic options. Training for laboratory technicians and physicians would facilitate better diagnosis and treatment options.

  17. Methemoglobinemia in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Receiving Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Timothy G.; Carroll, Megan G.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 6-month Final Diagnosis: Methemoglobinemia Symptoms: — Medication: Sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim Clinical Procedure: Methylene blue administration Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Methemoglobinemia due to the administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim has been documented in a series of case reports. However, all of these reports are on adult patients, and all patients received at least daily administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim for the treatment of active or suspected infection. Case Report: Herein we report the development of methemoglobinemia in a pediatric patient receiving sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim three times weekly for the prophylaxis of opportunistic infections. Conclusions: The clinician should always consider sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, even when administered for opportunistic infection prophylaxis at reduced doses and intervals, as a possible cause of methemoglobinemia. PMID:27424851

  18. [Potential endovascular prophylaxis for pulmonary thromboembolism in the combined treatment of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Bocharov, A V; Cherenkov, V G; Ukhanov, A P; Chentsov, V I

    2011-01-01

    Our study was concerned with the role of ultrasound examination of the lower extremity veins to detect deep venous thrombosis and to evaluate complex prophylaxis of thromboembolism of pulmonary arteries (TEPA). The procedure involved vena cava filter placement in patients with neoplasia and high risk of TEPA as compared with controls receiving conservative therapy alone. A positive correlation was established between surgery and/or polychemotherapy, on the one hand, and higher stage and high risk of TEPA, on the other. Patients with deep venous thrombosis and neoplasia were referred to groups of extremely high risk of that pathology. Angiological history, physical examination and ultrasound check-ups of the lower vein must be carried out in cancer patients. Vena cava filter placement proved to be an effective and safe measure of TEPA prophylaxis. It lowered the risk of lethal outcome in 24 during surgery and polychemotherapy. Lethality rate among controls was 43.5 +/- 0.51%. PMID:22191245

  19. [The use of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental procedures for the prevention of prosthetic joint infection].

    PubMed

    Volfin, G; Yarom, N; Elad, S; Volpin, G

    2011-04-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a severe illness which may cause pain and discomfort, may damage the quality of life and may even be life-threatening. A variety of studies have demonstrated the presence of bacteria in a small but potentially dangerous number of prosthetic joint infections that may have originated in the oral cavity. Some dental treatments such as calculus removal, extractions, dental implants placements etc. and daily oral hygiene routines such as tooth brushing may cause bacteremia. Recently the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) published updated guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent prosthetic joint infections. These guidelines suggest a direct and established connection between dental treatments and prosthetic joint infections, and expand the criteria to prescribe antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental procedures associated with bacteremia. The purpose of this review is to introduce these new guidelines, and to review the literature regarding the relationship between dental care and prosthetic joint infections.

  20. Cost-effective prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism after total joint arthroplasty: warfarin versus aspirin.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi Tabatabaee, Reza; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-02-01

    Although recent guidelines suggest aspirin for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in low risk patients following total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there are no cost-effectiveness studies comparing aspirin and warfarin. In a Markov cohort cost-effectiveness analysis, we found that aspirin cost less and saved more quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) than warfarin in all age groups. Cost per QALY gained by aspirin was $24,506.20 at age of 55 and $47,148.10 at the age of 85 following THA and $15,117.20 and $24,458.10 after TKA, which were greater than warfarin. In patients undergoing THA/TKA without prior VTE, aspirin is more cost-effective prophylactic agent than warfarin. Warfarin might be a better prophylaxis in TKA patients with high probability of VTE and very low probability of bleeding. PMID:25534862

  1. Direct Costs of Aspirin versus Warfarin for Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis after Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Christina J; Zmistowski, Benjamin M; Lonner, Jess H; Purtill, James J; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-09-01

    Interest in aspirin as an alternative strategy for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after arthroplasty has grown, as studies have suggested improved clinical efficacy and lower complication rates with aspirin compared to warfarin. The goal of this study was to compare the direct costs of an episode of arthroplasty care, when using aspirin instead of warfarin. The charts of patients who either received aspirin or warfarin after arthroplasty from January 2008 to March 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Charges were recorded for their index admission, and for subsequent admissions related to either VTE or complications of prophylaxis. Multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was an independent predictor of decreased cost of index hospitalization, and total episode of care charges, achieved largely through a shorter length of hospitalization. PMID:26073347

  2. A double blind controlled study of propranolol and cyproheptadine in migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Rao, B S; Das, D G; Taraknath, V R; Sarma, Y

    2000-09-01

    Role of propranolol and cyproheptadine in the prophylaxis of migraine was studied in a controlled double blind trial. Two hundred fifty-nine patients were divided into four groups. Each group was either given a placebo, cyproheptadine, propranolol or a combination of the latter two drugs. The patients were followed for a period of three months. Significant relief in frequency, duration and severity from migranous attacks was seen in all drug treated groups over placebo. Significant correlation in response was seen in frequency, duration and severity in all the groups which received drugs. Statistically more significant relief was seen in cyproheptadine and propranolol treated group as compared to individual drug treated groups. In cyproheptadine and propranolol treated groups, the dropout rate was lower and associated symptoms were better relieved than in other groups. The study shows efficacy of combination of cyproheptadine and propranolol in migraine prophylaxis.

  3. Trophallaxis and prophylaxis: social immunity in the carpenter ant Camponotus pennsylvanicus.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Casey; Lejeune, Brian T; Rosengaus, Rebeca B

    2011-02-23

    In social insects, group behaviour can increase disease resistance among nest-mates and generate social prophylaxis. Stomodeal trophallaxis, or mutual feeding through regurgitation, may boost colony-level immunocompetence. We provide evidence for increased trophallactic behaviour among immunized workers of the carpenter ant Camponotus pennsylvanicus, which, together with increased antimicrobial activity of the regurgitate droplet, help explain the improved survival of droplet recipient ants relative to controls following an immune challenge. We have identified a protein related to cathepsin D, a lysosomal protease, as a potential contributor to the antimicrobial activity. The combined behavioural and immunological responses to infection in these ants probably represent an effective mechanism underlying the social facilitation of disease resistance, which could potentially produce socially mediated colony-wide prophylaxis. The externalization and sharing of an individual's immune responses via trophallaxis could be an important component of social immunity, allowing insect colonies to thrive under high pathogenic pressures.

  4. Trophallaxis and prophylaxis: social immunity in the carpenter ant Camponotus pennsylvanicus.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Casey; Lejeune, Brian T; Rosengaus, Rebeca B

    2011-02-23

    In social insects, group behaviour can increase disease resistance among nest-mates and generate social prophylaxis. Stomodeal trophallaxis, or mutual feeding through regurgitation, may boost colony-level immunocompetence. We provide evidence for increased trophallactic behaviour among immunized workers of the carpenter ant Camponotus pennsylvanicus, which, together with increased antimicrobial activity of the regurgitate droplet, help explain the improved survival of droplet recipient ants relative to controls following an immune challenge. We have identified a protein related to cathepsin D, a lysosomal protease, as a potential contributor to the antimicrobial activity. The combined behavioural and immunological responses to infection in these ants probably represent an effective mechanism underlying the social facilitation of disease resistance, which could potentially produce socially mediated colony-wide prophylaxis. The externalization and sharing of an individual's immune responses via trophallaxis could be an important component of social immunity, allowing insect colonies to thrive under high pathogenic pressures. PMID:20591850

  5. Transdermal clonidine in the prophylaxis of episodic cluster headache: an open study.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Attanasio, A; Grazzi, L; Libro, G; D'Amico, D; Moschiano, F; Bussone, G

    1997-10-01

    Transdermal clonidine has recently been reported to be efficacious in the prophylaxis of cluster headache. A 2-week course of transdermal clonidine (5 mg the first week, 7.5 mg the second week) preceded by a 5-day run-in period, was administered to 16 patients with episodic cluster headache in an active cluster period. In 5 patients, the painful attacks disappeared after the seventh day of treatment. For the group as a whole, no significant variations in headache frequency, pain intensity, or attack duration were observed between the run-in period and the first and second weeks of treatment (ANOVA). Further studies are necessary to clarify the effectiveness of transdermal clonidine in the prophylaxis of episodic cluster headache. PMID:9385753

  6. Malaria prophylaxis with doxycycline in soldiers deployed to the Thai-Kampuchean border.

    PubMed

    Watanasook, C; Singharaj, P; Suriyamongkol, V; Karwacki, J J; Shanks, D; Phintuyothin, P; Pilungkasa, S; Wasuwat, P

    1989-03-01

    A battalion of Royal Thai Marine militia was assigned to take either 50 mg or 100 mg of doxycycline daily or pyrimethamine/dapsone weekly for malaria prophylaxis on the Thai-Kampuchean border for a 17 week period. Attack rates for the groups expressed as cases/100 men were 34 for 50 mg doxycycline, 18 for 100 mg doxycycline, and 52 for pyrimethamine/dapsone. The relative efficacy of the two doxycycline regimens compared to Maloprim were 1.6 and 1.4. Compliance with the daily drug nearly equalled that of the weekly regimen. This suggests that 100 mg of doxycycline daily can be effectively used for malaria prophylaxis by soldiers under operational conditions on the Thai-Kampuchean border.

  7. Transdermal clonidine in the prophylaxis of episodic cluster headache: an open study.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Attanasio, A; Grazzi, L; Libro, G; D'Amico, D; Moschiano, F; Bussone, G

    1997-10-01

    Transdermal clonidine has recently been reported to be efficacious in the prophylaxis of cluster headache. A 2-week course of transdermal clonidine (5 mg the first week, 7.5 mg the second week) preceded by a 5-day run-in period, was administered to 16 patients with episodic cluster headache in an active cluster period. In 5 patients, the painful attacks disappeared after the seventh day of treatment. For the group as a whole, no significant variations in headache frequency, pain intensity, or attack duration were observed between the run-in period and the first and second weeks of treatment (ANOVA). Further studies are necessary to clarify the effectiveness of transdermal clonidine in the prophylaxis of episodic cluster headache.

  8. [CONTEMPORARY TENDENCIES IN CONSTRUCTING RECOMBINANT VACCINES FOR SPECIFIC PROPHYLAXIS OF PLAGUE].

    PubMed

    Mikshis, N I; Kudryavtseva, O M; Kutyrev, V V

    2015-01-01

    An importance place in the system of prophylaxis measures against plague is allotted to vaccination of population contingents, that belong to risk groups for infection. The whole arsenal of accumulated knowledge on structure, properties, molecular nature, genetic determination, synthesis pathways, regulation and mechanisms of interaction with macroorganism of pathogenicity factors and immunogenicity of the infectious disease causative agent is used in the creation of new generation of vaccines. Contemporary technologies--genomics, proteomics, reverse vaccinology facilitate detection of protective antigens and help determine rational design of the vaccines. Main tendencies in development of recombinant live and chemical vaccines for specific prophylaxis of plague are presented in the review. Constructive approaches, that allow to produce highly effective and safe preparations are isolated.

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis: different practice patterns within and outside the United States

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    Endophthalmitis remains a rare but important cause of visual loss. Prophylaxis strategies are important to reduce rates of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery, intravitreal injection, and other procedures. There is substantial variability between the US and the rest of the world. During cataract surgery, intracameral antibiotics are commonly used in many nations, especially in Europe, but are less commonly used in the US. A randomized clinical trial from the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons reported an approximately fivefold reduction in endophthalmitis rates associated with intracameral cefuroxime but these results are controversial. There are no randomized clinical trials regarding endophthalmitis associated with intravitreal injection. Topical antibiotics are commonly used in many nations, but are less commonly used in the US. At this time, there is no global consensus and it appears unlikely that additional major clinical trials will conclusively define the optimal endophthalmitis prophylaxis techniques. PMID:26869761

  10. A review of nanotechnological approaches for the prophylaxis of HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Date, Abhijit A.; Destache, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Successful treatment and control of HIV/AIDS is one of the biggest challenges of 21st century. More than 33 million individuals are infected with HIV worldwide and more than 2 million new cases of HIV infection have been reported. The situation demands development of effective prevention strategies to control the pandemic of AIDS. Due to lack of availability of an effective HIV vaccine, antiretroviral drugs and nucleic acid therapeutics like siRNA have been explored for HIV prophylaxis. Clinical trials shave shown that antiretroviral drugs, tenofovir and emtricitabine can offer some degree of HIV prevention. However, complete prevention of HIV infection has not been achieved yet. Nanotechnology has brought a paradigm shift in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of many diseases. The current review discusses potential of various nanocarriers such as dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, lipid nanocarriers, drug nanocrystals, inorganic nanocarriers and nanofibers in improving efficacy of various modalities available for HIV prophylaxis. PMID:23726227

  11. Direct Costs of Aspirin versus Warfarin for Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis after Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Christina J; Zmistowski, Benjamin M; Lonner, Jess H; Purtill, James J; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-09-01

    Interest in aspirin as an alternative strategy for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after arthroplasty has grown, as studies have suggested improved clinical efficacy and lower complication rates with aspirin compared to warfarin. The goal of this study was to compare the direct costs of an episode of arthroplasty care, when using aspirin instead of warfarin. The charts of patients who either received aspirin or warfarin after arthroplasty from January 2008 to March 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Charges were recorded for their index admission, and for subsequent admissions related to either VTE or complications of prophylaxis. Multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was an independent predictor of decreased cost of index hospitalization, and total episode of care charges, achieved largely through a shorter length of hospitalization.

  12. [The role of the vaccine prophylaxis of cervical cancer among female military personnel].

    PubMed

    Shmidt, A A; Alieva, M T; Ivanova, L V; Molchanov, O V

    2015-06-01

    The authors presented results of the study concerning human papillomavirus infecting of military students of higher military educational institutions of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. In the Center for Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the Kirov Military-Medical Academy was performed a dynamic examination of 478 female cadets aged 17-25. The high level of high-risk HPV viruses was revealed during the examination what proves the necessity of prophylaxis enhancing with the aim to prevent gynecological diseases and reproductive health promotion. The main ways of cervical cancer prophylaxis are health education, in-depth medical examination of women with the aim to reveal and treat gynecological diseases (this medical examination should be carried out twice a year), primary prevention of cervical cancer by vaccination.

  13. Venous Thromboembolism Risk and Adequacy of Prophylaxis in High Risk Pregnancy in the Arabian Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Alsayegh, Faisal; Al-Jassar, Waleed; Wani, Salima; Tahlak, Muna; Al-Bahar, Awatef; Al-Kharusi, Lamya; Al-Tamimi, Halima; El-Taher, Faten; Mahmood, Naeema; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk factors in pregnancy and the proportion of pregnancies at risk of VTE that received the recommended prophylaxis according to the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) 2012 published guidelines in antenatal clinics in the Arabian Gulf. Methods: The evaluation of venous thromboembolism (EVE)-Risk project was a non-interventional, cross-sectional, multi-centre, multi-national study of all eligible pregnant women (≥17 years) screened during antenatal clinics from 7 centres in the Arabian Gulf countries (United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar and Oman). Pregnant women were recruited during a 3-month period between September and December 2012. Results: Of 4,131 screened pregnant women, 32% (n=1,337) had ≥1 risk factors for VTE. Common VTE risk factors included obesity (76%), multiparity (33%), recurrent miscarriages (9.1%), varicose veins (6.9%), thrombophilia (2.6%), immobilization (2.0%), sickle cell disease (2.8%) and previous VTE (1.6%). Only 8.3% (n=111) of the high risk patients were on the recommended VTE prophylaxis. Enoxaparin was used in 80% (n=89) of the cases followed by tinzaparin (4%; n=4). Antiplatelet agents were prescribed in 11% (n=149) of pregnant women. Of those on anticoagulants (n=111), 59% (n=66) were also co-prescribed antiplatelet agents. Side effects (mainly local bruising at the injection site) were reported in 12% (n=13) of the cases. Conclusion: A large proportion of pregnant women in the Arabian Gulf countries have ≥1 VTE risk factor with even a smaller fraction on prophylaxis. VTE risk assessment must be adopted to identify those at risk who would need VTE prophylaxis.

  14. [The use of exogenous nitrogen monoxide for the prophylaxis of postoperative wound infection].

    PubMed

    Larichev, A B; Shishlo, V K; Lisovskiĭ, A V; Chistiakov, A L

    2011-01-01

    The study covers treatment results of 220 patients operated on ventral hernia and in vivo experimental treatment of 36 rats proved the nitrogen monoxide (NO) to be the effective means of wound infection prophylaxis. NO potentiates antiseptic effects, minimizing intraoperative wound contamination. It, besides, stimulates endothelial and basal cells of epidermis proliferation. Wound infection was observed only in 9,8% of patients, treated with NO intraoperatively. All cases of infective complications were serous and infiltrative, but not purulent.

  15. Platelet transfusion prophylaxis for patients with haematological malignancies: where to now?

    PubMed

    Stanworth, S J; Hyde, C; Brunskill, S; Murphy, M F

    2005-12-01

    National guidelines for platelet transfusion in many countries recommend that the general platelet transfusion trigger for prophylaxis is 10x10(9)/l. This annotation reviews the evidence for this threshold level and discusses other current unresolved issues relevant to platelet transfusion practice such as the optimal dose and the clinical benefit of a strategy for the prophylactic use of platelet transfusions when the platelet count falls below a given threshold. PMID:16351634

  16. Pre-exposure prophylaxis for human immunodeficiency virus: the past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Castel, Amanda D; Magnus, Manya; Greenberg, Alan E

    2014-12-01

    This article presents an overview of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention. The authors describe the past animal and human research that has been conducted that informs our current understanding of PrEP; summarize ongoing research in the area, including describing new regimens and delivery mechanisms being studied for PrEP; and highlight key issues that must be addressed in order to implement and optimize the use of this HIV prevention tool.

  17. Reviewing current and emerging antiemetics for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Natale, James J

    2015-01-01

    This review provides background information on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) classification and pathophysiology and reviews various antiemetic agents for CINV prophylaxis, including corticosteroids, serotonin receptor antagonists (5-HT3 RAs), tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists (NK1 RAs), and olanzapine. Other less commonly used agents are briefly discussed. Practical considerations are reviewed as well, including emetogenicity of chemotherapeutic regimens, patient-specific risk factors for CINV, principles of CINV management, health economics outcome research, and quality of life. Available data on the newly FDA-approved antiemetic combination netupitant/palonosetron (NEPA) is also reviewed. Prevention of CINV is an important goal in managing patients with cancer and is especially difficult with respect to nausea and delayed CINV. Corticosteroids are a mainstay of CINV prophylaxis and are usually given in combination with other therapies. The 5-HT3 RA palonosetron has shown increased efficacy over other agents in the same class for prevention of delayed emesis with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy and NK1 RAs improve emesis prevention in combination with 5-HT3 RAs and dexamethasone. Olanzapine has shown efficacy for CINV prophylaxis and the treatment of breakthrough CINV. The new combination therapy, NEPA, has been shown to be efficacious for the prevention of acute, delayed, and overall CINV. Risk factors that have been identified for CINV include gender, age, and alcohol intake. It is important to assess the emetogenicity of chemotherapy regimens as well as the potential impact of patient risk factors in order to provide adequate prophylaxis. Acute and delayed CINV are severe, burdensome side effects of chemotherapy; however, new data on prevention and the discovery of new agents can further improve CINV control.

  18. Lower respiratory tract illness and RSV prophylaxis in very premature infants

    PubMed Central

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, T; Truffert, P; Pinquier, D; Daoud, P; Goldfarb, G; Vicaut, E; Fauroux, B

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To determine the frequency of and the risk factors for readmissions for any lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) and for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) documented LRTI in children born very prematurely who had or had not received RSV prophylaxis. Methods: Multicentre prospective longitudinal cohort study of 2813 infants, born between April 2000 and December 2000 at less than 33 weeks of gestational age, and followed until the end of the epidemic season. Results: Among the 2256 children who had no bronchopulmonary dysplasia at 36 weeks of postmenstrual age and were not submitted to RSV prophylaxis, 27.4% were readmitted at least once for any reason during the epidemic season; 15.1% and 7.2% were readmitted at least once for any LRTI and RSV related LRTI, respectively. Children born at less than 31 weeks' gestation, having an intrauterine growth restriction, or living in a single mother family were at a significantly higher risk of readmission for LRTI in general as well as for RSV related LRTI. Of the 376 children submitted to prophylaxis, 28.2% were readmitted at least once for any LRTI and 6.1% for RSV related LRTI. Conclusion: One out of four children who had received no prophylaxis, was born very prematurely, and was without bronchopulmonary dysplasia at 36 weeks of postmenstrual age, was readmitted at least once for any reason. Roughly 50% and 20% of these readmissions were related to a LRTI and an RSV infection, respectively. Further epidemiological studies are warranted to assess the aetiology and impact of other respiratory pathogens on post-discharge readmission and respiratory morbidity in this population. PMID:15155404

  19. Acute management and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding: A western Canadian survey

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Justin; Wong, Winnie; Zandieh, Iman; Leung, Yvette; Lee, Samuel S; Ramji, Alnoor; Yoshida, Eric M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis. Guidelines have been published in 1997; however, variability in the acute management and prevention of EVB rebleeding may occur. METHODS: Gastroenterologists in the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan were sent a self-reporting questionnaire. RESULTS: The response rate was 70.4% (86 of 122). Intravenous octreotide was recommended by 93% for EVB patients but the duration was variable. The preferred timing for endoscopy in suspected acute EVB was within 12 h in 75.6% of respondents and within 24 h in 24.6% of respondents. Most (52.3%) gastroenterologists do not routinely use antibiotic prophylaxis in acute EVB patients. The preferred duration of antibiotic therapy was less than three days (35.7%), three to seven days (44.6%), seven to 10 days (10.7%) and throughout hospitalization (8.9%). Methods of secondary prophylaxis included repeat endoscopic therapy (93%) and beta-blocker therapy (84.9%). Most gastroenterologists (80.2%) routinely attempted to titrate beta-blockers to a heart rate of 55 beats/min or a 25% reduction from baseline. The most common form of secondary prophylaxis was a combination of endoscopic and pharmacological therapy (70.9%). CONCLUSIONS: Variability exists in some areas of EVB treatment, especially in areas for which evidence was lacking at the time of the last guideline publication. Gastroenterologists varied in the use of prophylactic antibiotics for acute EVB. More gastroenterologists used combination secondary prophylaxis in the form of band ligation eradication and beta-blocker therapy rather than either treatment alone. Future guidelines may be needed to address these practice differences. PMID:16955150

  20. [The PROMET study: Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolic disease in at-risk patients hospitalized in Algeria].

    PubMed

    Guermaz, R; Belhamidi, S; Amarni, A

    2015-07-01

    PROMET is an observational study aimed to assess the management of patients at venous thromboembolism risk in the Algerian hospitals and to evaluate the proportion of at-risk patients treated with an adequate prophylaxis. Following the ENDORSE study achieved five years before with a similar protocol, PROMET included 435hospitalized patients (229 in medical units and 206 in surgical units). Compared to the ENDORSE results, the PROMET data reflect progress in the management of venous thromboembolism: 73.3% of at-risk patients received prophylaxis (57.6% of medical patients and 90.8% of surgical patients). In 93.1% of cases, this prophylaxis was provided by a low molecular weight heparin, mainly at the dose of one injection per day. In medical population, the prescription was triggered by long-term immobilization (P=0.01; OR=5.8 95%CI [1.5-23.0]), associated risk factors (P=0.025; OR=4.13 [1.2-14.2]) and the cause of hospitalization (P=0.056). In surgical departments, the therapeutic decision depended on the nature of the surgical intervention and was influenced by the presence of a contraindication for prophylaxis (P<0.001; OR=0.02 [0.00-0.14]) or a high hemorrhagic risk (P<0.001; OR=0.02). The assessment and management of thromboembolic risk were in accordance with ACCP recommendations for surgical patients. However efforts are needed for medical patients for whom the risk is underestimated and insufficiently supported. Unlike surgery where procedures are well established, there are real difficulties in medicine to define the at-risk patients who will benefit from thromboprophylaxis. The process of preventive treatment (particularly the optimal duration) needs to be clarified.

  1. An objective method for assessing adherence to prophylaxis in adults with severe haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ho, S; Gue, D; McIntosh, K; Bucevska, M; Yang, M; Jackson, S

    2014-01-01

    Severe haemophilia is often managed by prophylactic factor infusions in developed countries. The benefits of secondary prophylaxis in adults are currently being studied and adherence to the prescribed prophylactic factor regimen is vital to decreasing bleeding episodes. The aim of this study was to measure discrepancy between the physicians' prescription for prophylactic factor usage, and the actual factor usage obtained through infusion logs. During this method subjects with severe haemophilia A or B (FVIII or FIX ≤2%), from a single haemophilia clinic with complete medical and infusion records from July 01, 2009 to June 30, 2011, were evaluated. Continuous prophylaxis ≥4 weeks were included in the analysis. A scoring system for adherence to prescribed dosing and frequency was developed. A global scale of adherence was performed by two independent nurses using visual analogue scale. Thirty-one subjects, all with haemophilia A, with a median age of 26 years (range 18-56) were included. Results showed that the median (IQR) adherence rate to prescribed frequency and dosage, respectively, was 76% (67;85) and 93% (73;97). In multivariate analysis, only the length of time on prophylaxis during the study period showed a positive correlation with adherence whereas age, number of co-infections, number of bleeds and number of joints with chronic arthropathy did not. Global nursing assessments were in general agreement with the score. In conclusion, we observed a moderately good level of adherence based on score and by the nurse global assessment. Better adherence was found in subjects with longer exposure to prophylaxis.

  2. Postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean-contaminated head and neck oncologic surgery: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Busch, C-J; Knecht, R; Münscher, A; Matern, J; Dalchow, C; Lörincz, B B

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is commonly used in head and neck oncologic surgery, due to the clean-contaminated nature of these procedures. There is a wide variety in the use of prophylactic antibiotics regarding the duration of application and the choice of agent. The purpose of this study was to determine whether short-term or long-term antibiotic prophylaxis has an impact on the development of head and neck surgical wound infection (SWI). Retrospective chart review was carried out in 418 clean-contaminated head and neck surgical oncology cases at our department. More than 50 variables including tumour type and stage, type of surgical treatment, co-morbidities, duration and choice of antibiotic prophylaxis, and the incidence of SWI were analysed. Following descriptive data analysis, Chi square test by Pearson and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical evaluation. Fifty-eight of the 418 patients (13.9 %) developed SWI. Patients with advanced disease and tracheotomy showed a significantly higher rate of SWI than those with early stage disease and without tracheotomy (p = 0.012 and p = 0.00017, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between the SWI rates in the short term and long term treatment groups (14.6 and 13.2 %, respectively; p = 0.689). Diabetes and body weight were not found to be risk factors for SWI. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis was not associated with a decrease in SWI in the entire cohort of patients undergoing clean-contaminated major head and neck oncologic surgery. Our data confirmed the extent of surgery and tracheotomy as being risk factors for postoperative SWI.

  3. [Using safocid for antibiotic prophylaxis in minimally-invasive endoscopic operations and manipulations].

    PubMed

    Proskurin, A A; Asfandiiarov, F R; Kalashnikov, E S; Miroshnikov, V M

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy of safocid (1 g of seknidasol, 1 g of azitromycin, 150 mg of fluconasol) was studied in antibiotic prophylaxis before conduction of urological endoscopic operations: diagnostic cystoscopy, renal stenting, ureteroscopy with contact lithotripsy. A total of 128 patients of the urological department received a single safocid dose 90 min before surgical intervention. Safocid efficacy in prevention of infectious complications reached 96.2%. PMID:21427992

  4. Pelvic inflammatory disease following induced first-trimester abortion. Risk groups, prophylaxis and sequelae.

    PubMed

    Heisterberg, L

    1988-02-01

    An analysis of published studies of the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis associated with vacuum aspiration abortion includes an examination of risk factors for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), cervical and vaginal flora present in early pregnancy and in PID, the effect of surgical scrub and of prophylaxis on flora, principles of antibiotic prophylaxis, and economic costs of PID. From several prospective studies, it is clear that nulliparas, women with a history of PID, those bearing Chlamydia trachomatis are at risk of post-abortion infection. No risk was associated with pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, social class, insertion of an IUD, or timing of resumption of coitus. After an extensive enumeration of microbes found in nonpregnant, pregnant, and PID female genital tracts, it was concluded that only C. trachomatis and N. gonorrheae are clearly associated with PID, while the importance of several other microbes is unclear. Quantitative counts of organisms in any condition are lacking. PID is polymicrobial; different organisms probably account for noniatrogenic PID and post-surgical PID. There is evidence that surgical cleansing of the vagina has no bearing on incidence of post-abortal PID, since the responsible organisms come from the endocervix. 5 controlled clinical trials demonstrated that antibiotic prophylaxis is warranted; that penicillin/ampicillin selectively reduced PID in women with PID history; that imidazoles preferentially reduce PID in the general population without PID history. No lasting side effects or emergence of resistant organisms was reported. The treatment was cost effective, cutting health costs and labor losses 5-8%, and reducing the incidence of spontaneous abortion, secondary infertility, and chronic pain. PMID:3277798

  5. Antibiotic surgical prophylaxis increases nasal carriage of antibiotic-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Claire L; Hardy, Katherine J; Verlander, Neville Q; Hawkey, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococci are a significant cause of hospital-acquired infection. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is an important risk factor for infection in surgical patients and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a major cause of prosthetic joint infections. The impact that antibiotic surgical prophylaxis has on the nasal carriage of staphylococci has not been studied. Daily nasal swabs were taken from 63 patients who received antibiotic surgical prophylaxis and 16 patients who received no antibiotics. Total aerobic bacterial count, S. aureus and CNS were enumerated by culture from nasal swabs. Representative isolates were typed by staphylococcal interspersed repeat units (SIRU) typing and PFGE, and MICs to nine antibiotics were determined. After antibiotic administration, there was a reduction in S. aureus counts (median - 2.3 log(10)c.f.u. ml(- 1)) in 64.0 % of S. aureus carriers, compared with only a 0.89 log(10)c.f.u. ml(- 1) reduction in 75.0 % of S. aureus carriers who did not receive antibiotics. A greater increase in the nasal carriage rate of meticillin-resistant CNS was observed after antibiotic surgical prophylaxis compared with hospitalization alone, with increases of 16.4 and 4.6 %, respectively. Antibiotic-resistant S. epidermidis carriage rate increased by 16.6 % after antibiotic administration compared with 7.5 % with hospitalization alone. Antibiotic surgical prophylaxis impacts the nasal carriage of both S. aureus and CNS. PMID:26445858

  6. Oral preexposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection: clinical and public health implications.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jonathan; OʼHara, Kevin Michael

    2014-12-01

    This article reviews the use of combination emtricitabine (FTC)/tenofovir as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-negative patients at high risk of acquiring HIV, including heterosexual men and women, men who have sex with men, and IV drug users. When used with classic prevention strategies such as condoms, PrEP has been found effective in reducing the risk of HIV transmission. PMID:25390822

  7. [Sexual exposure to HIV, sexual behaviour and use of pharmacological post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP)].

    PubMed

    Franco, Alfredo; Starace, Fabrizio; Aprea, Lucia; Faella, Francesco Saverio; Giordano, Antonio; Maiorino, Cosimo; Manzillo, Elio; Marocco, Alessandro; Martucci, Fiorella; Pizzella, Teresa; Simioli, Francesco; Izzo, Crescenzo Maria

    2009-06-01

    In this study we examined the characteristics of 60 subjects (49 M and 11 F, average age 32.3) out of 195 post-exposure pharmacological prophylaxis (PEP) to HIV, taken in our hospital from 2001 to 2008. The above-mentioned subjects are sexually exposed (or presumably exposed) to HIV. We considered both their sexual intercourse behaviour and protective measures, and sought to infer some trends in sexual behaviour in Italy. All the subjects were monitored until 180 days after exposure, as established by the national guidelines. Only one of the 60 people presented a seroconversion (he dropped out after a 15-day follow-up and after an inadequate 19-day prophylaxis). Another subject, a homosexual male, never previously tested, resulted positive at time 0 both for HIV-Ab and syphilis tests (due to previous risk-sexual exposure), which caused the suspension of the prophylaxis. No HBV, HCV or syphilis seroconversion occurred. Two other homosexual males showed a previously latent positivity to syphilis tests at time 0. PMID:19602921

  8. Current rabies vaccines and prophylaxis schedules: preventing rabies before and after exposure.

    PubMed

    Warrell, M J

    2012-01-01

    Travellers are probably the largest group in the general population to receive rabies pre-exposure prophylaxis. The dangerous consequences of the unavailability of rabies immune globulin in many countries could be ameliorated if pre-exposure rabies vaccination were practised more widely, especially in children, living in dog rabies enzootic countries. The WHO has recommended several different regimens for post-exposure prophylaxis, while individual countries decide on protocols for local use. Intramuscular regimens are expensive and waste vaccine. Although failure to receive vaccine is usually the due to the cost, the economical potential of intradermal vaccination has still not been realised 19 years after its introduction. The currently recommended 2-site intradermal post-exposure regimen is not economical for use in rural areas where 80% of Indian rabies deaths occur. Most countries using it demand higher potency vaccine, indicating that they do not have complete confidence in the method. This intradermal regimen has only been used where immunoglobulin is likely to be available for severely bitten patients. Increased intradermal doses are sometimes used for selected patients. Provision of economical rabies prophylaxis can be improved. Decisions to change recommendations should take account of the immunological, financial, practical and logistical aspects of dog bite treatment in remote areas. PMID:22342356

  9. Erythromycin prophylaxis for Legionnaire's disease in immunosuppressed patients in a contaminated hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Vereerstraeten, P; Stolear, J C; Schoutens-Serruys, E; Maes, N; Thys, J P; Liesnard, C; Rost, F; Kinnaert, P; Toussaint, C

    1986-01-01

    Between January 1 and June 30, 1983, immunosuppressive drugs were administered in 20 renal transplant recipients undergoing 23 rejection episodes and in 3 patients with renal failure secondary to systemic disease. Legionella pneumophila, serogroup 1, pneumonia was diagnosed on 12/26 (47%) occasions. In an attempt to decrease this high rate, a program of erythromycin prophylaxis was instituted for every new patient who received immunosuppressive chemotherapy until eradication of the organism from the water supply could be realized. From July 1, 1983 to April 30, 1984, erythromycin prophylaxis (1.5-3 g/day by mouth) was administered during 39 episodes of high-dose immunosuppression (20 kidney graft recipients and 4 patients with systemic diseases); no cases of Legionnaire's disease were recorded. During the same period, erythromycin prophylaxis was withheld from 9 other high-dose immunosuppression episodes (7 kidney graft recipients and one patient with sarcoidosis); 5 cases of Legionnaire's disease occurred (56%) in this group. We conclude that erythromycin effectively protects immunocompromised patients in an environment contaminated with L pneumophila.

  10. Anuric Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Acute Mountain Sickness Prophylaxis With Acetazolamide

    PubMed Central

    Castle Alvarez-Maza, James; Novak, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Acetazolamide (ACZ) is a sulfonamide derivative that inhibits carbonic anhydrase and is the mainstay for prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Acute kidney injury (AKI) is not well recognized as a complication of ACZ ingestion, especially when low doses are used for short periods of time. We report a case of a healthy, middle-aged man who developed severe AKI after the ingestion of ACZ for AMS prophylaxis. The patient presented with bilateral flank pain and anuric AKI without radiographic signs of obstructive uropathy. All blood and urine testing to determine the cause of AKI were negative or normal. The patient required 2 sessions of hemodialysis due to worsening metabolic derangements, which included severe anion gap metabolic acidosis and hyperphosphatemia. Renal function returned to baseline after 96 hours of supportive care. The pathogenesis of AKI in our patient was attributed to ACZ-induced sulfonamide crystalluria causing intratubular obstruction and retrograde urine flow, but not intraureteric precipitation or obstructive uropathy. This classic presentation of anuric AKI and renal colic has been previously described with higher doses of ACZ for prolonged periods of time but never with low doses for AMS prophylaxis such as in our patient (total dose of 1250 mg within 48 hours). Our case highlights the risk of adverse renal outcomes following ACZ ingestion, even in previously healthy individuals, and suggests that increased fluid intake may be advisable for travelers taking ACZ prophylaxis. PMID:25264540

  11. Comparison of Levetiracetam and sodium Valproate in migraine prophylaxis: A randomized placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghian, Homa; Motiei-Langroudi, Rouzbeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a chronic and disabling disorder. Treatment of migraine often comprises of symptomatic (abortive) and preventive (prophylactic) treatment. The current drugs used in migraine prophylaxis include antidepressant drugs (Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Tricyclic antidepressants), and anti-epileptic drugs (valproate, gabapentin, etc). Objective: The objective of our study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of levetiracetam in adult migraine prophylaxis, compared to valproate and placebo. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study. A total of 85 patients were randomized to receive levetiracetam 500 mg/d (n = 27), valproate 500 mg/d (n = 32) or placebo (n = 26). The patients were evaluated for treatment efficacy after 6 months. Efficacy was assessed as a more than 50% decrease in headache frequency. Results: In levetiracetam group, 17 (63.0%) patients experienced a more than 50% decrease in headache frequency, while this efficacy number was 21 (65.6%) for valproate group and 4 (15.4%) for placebo group. The difference was not statistically significant between levetiracetam and valproate, while it was significant when comparing either levetiracetam or valproate to placebo. Conclusion: Compared to placebo, levetiracetam offers improvement in headache frequency in patients with migraine. The efficacy of levetiracetam in migraine prophylaxis is comparable to currently used drugs such as valproate. PMID:25745310

  12. Malaria prophylaxis amongst British residents of Lilongwe and Kasungu districts, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Forshaw, C J; Friend, H M

    1988-01-01

    Questionnaires on various aspects of malaria prophylaxis were distributed to all British residents (adults and children) of Lilongwe and Kasungu districts, Malawi, and were completed and returned by 293 (response rate 89%). Almost all residents used some measures to reduce mosquito contact, and 96% used chemoprophylaxis. Eight different chemoprophylactic regimens were used. Proguanil, alone or with chloroquine, was the most popular agent despite being associated with mouth ulcers in 25% of residents. Residents on this regimen had in general obtained their advice from a British source, and 75% considered they were adequately informed on the subject. This regimen was the most effective in preventing malaria attacks in the previous 12 months, even though over half those on proguanil alone were taking an inadequate dose. Residents on other chemoprophylactic regimens in general obtained their advice elsewhere, considered they were inadequately informed, and had a higher incidence of malaria. Whatever the regimen, 27% of adult residents would discontinue prophylaxis prematurely on return to the United Kingdom. Results suggest that more needs to be done to provide regular, precise and up-to-date information on malaria prophylaxis to British residents in malaria endemic areas.

  13. Nebulised amphotericin B-polymethacrylic acid nanoparticle prophylaxis prevents invasive aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirkhani, Khojasteh; Teo, Ian; Armstrong-James, Darius; Shaunak, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus species are the major life threatening fungal pathogens in transplant patients. Germination of inhaled fungal spores initiates infection, causes severe pneumonia, and has a mortality of > 50%. This is leading to the consideration of pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent infection. We made a very low MWt amphotericin B-polymethacrylic acid nanoparticle. It was not toxic to lung epithelial cells or monocyte-derived-macrophages in-vitro, or in an in-vivo transplant immuno-suppression mouse model of life threatening invasive aspergillosis. Three days of nebuliser based prophylaxis delivered the nanoparticle effectively to lung and prevented both fungal growth and lung inflammation. Protection from disease was associated with > 99% killing of the Aspergillus and a 90% reduction in lung TNF-α; the primary driver of tissue destructive immuno-pathology. This study provides in-vivo proof-of-principle that very small and cost-effective nanoparticles can be made simply, and delivered safely and effectively to lung by the aerosol route to prevent fungal infections. From the Clinical Editor Aspergillus is an opportunistic pathogen, which affects immunocompromised patients. One novel way to help fight against this infection is pre-exposure prophylaxis. The authors here made PMA based anionic hydrogels carrying amphotericin B, with mucoadhesive behavior. They showed that aerosol route of the drug was very effective in protecting against the disease in an in-vivo model and should provide a stepping-stone towards clinical trials in the future. PMID:25791815

  14. Implementation of vertical clinical pharmacist service on venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Celina Setsuko; Mancio, Cassio Massashi; Pioner, Micheline da Costa; Alves, Fabricia Aparecida de Lima; Lira, Andreia Ramos; da Silva, João Severino; Ferracini, Fábio Teixeira; Borges, Wladimir Mendes; Guerra, João Carlos de Campos; Laselva, Claudia Regina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the vertical clinical pharmacist service's interventions in prevention of venous thromboembolism. Methods: This prospective study was done at a private hospital. From January to May 2012, the clinical pharmacist evaluated medical patients without prophylaxis for thromboembolism. If the patient fulfilled criteria for thromboembolism and did not have contraindications, the clinical pharmacist suggested inclusion of pharmacologic agents and/or mechanical methods for venous thromboembolism prevention. In addition, the appropriate dose, route of administration, duplicity and replacement of the drug were suggested. Results: We evaluated 9,000 hospitalized medical patients and carried out 77 pharmaceutical interventions. A total of 71 cases (92.21%) adhered to treatment so that non-adherence occurred in 6 cases (7.79%). In 25 cases pharmacologic agents were included and in 20 cases mechanical prophylaxis. Dose adjustments, route, frequency, duplicity and replacement made up 32 cases. Conclusion: The vertical clinical pharmacist service included the prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism and promotion of appropriate use of medicines in the hospital. PMID:24728242

  15. In search for better pharmacological prophylaxis for acute mountain sickness: looking in other directions.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Wang, R; Xiong, J; Xie, H; Kayser, B; Jia, Z P

    2015-05-01

    Despite decades of research, the exact pathogenic mechanisms underlying acute mountain sickness (AMS) are still poorly understood. This fact frustrates the search for novel pharmacological prophylaxis for AMS. The prevailing view is that AMS results from an insufficient physiological response to hypoxia and that prophylaxis should aim at stimulating the response. Starting off from the opposite hypothesis that AMS may be caused by an initial excessive response to hypoxia, we suggest that directly or indirectly blunting-specific parts of the response might provide promising research alternatives. This reasoning is based on the observations that (i) humans, once acclimatized, can climb Mt Everest experiencing arterial partial oxygen pressures (PaO2) as low as 25 mmHg without AMS symptoms; (ii) paradoxically, AMS usually develops at much higher PaO2 levels; and (iii) several biomarkers, suggesting initial activation of specific pathways at such PaO2, are correlated with AMS. Apart from looking for substances that stimulate certain hypoxia triggered effects, such as the ventilatory response to hypoxia, we suggest to also investigate pharmacological means aiming at blunting certain other specific hypoxia-activated pathways, or stimulating their agonists, in the quest for better pharmacological prophylaxis for AMS. PMID:25778288

  16. Measurement Issues in Anthropometric Measures of Limb Volume Change in Persons at Risk for and Living with Lymphedema: A Reliability Study.

    PubMed

    Tidhar, Dorit; Armer, Jane M; Deutscher, Daniel; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Azuri, Josef; Madsen, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Understanding whether a true change has occurred during the process of care is of utmost importance in lymphedema management secondary to cancer treatments. Decisions about when to order a garment, start an exercise program, and begin or end therapy are based primarily on measurements of limb volume, based on circumferences taken by physiotherapists using a flexible tape. This study aimed to assess intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of measurements taken by physiotherapists of legs and arms with and without lymphedema and to evaluate whether there is a difference in reliability when measuring a healthy versus a lymphedematous limb. The intra-rater reliability of arm and leg measurements by trained physiotherapist is very high (scaled standard error of measurements (SEMs) for an arm and a leg volume were 0.82% and 0.64%, respectively) and a cut-point of 1% scaled SEM may be recommended as a threshold for acceptable reliability. Physiotherapists can rely on the same error when assessing lymphedematous or healthy limbs. For those who work in teams and share patients, practice is needed in synchronizing the measurements and regularly monitoring their inter-rater reliability. PMID:26437431

  17. Measurement Issues in Anthropometric Measures of Limb Volume Change in Persons at Risk for and Living with Lymphedema: A Reliability Study

    PubMed Central

    Tidhar, Dorit; Armer, Jane M.; Deutscher, Daniel; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Azuri, Josef; Madsen, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Understanding whether a true change has occurred during the process of care is of utmost importance in lymphedema management secondary to cancer treatments. Decisions about when to order a garment, start an exercise program, and begin or end therapy are based primarily on measurements of limb volume, based on circumferences taken by physiotherapists using a flexible tape. This study aimed to assess intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of measurements taken by physiotherapists of legs and arms with and without lymphedema and to evaluate whether there is a difference in reliability when measuring a healthy versus a lymphedematous limb. The intra-rater reliability of arm and leg measurements by trained physiotherapist were very high (scaled standard error of measurements (SEMs) for an arm and a leg volume were 0.82% and 0.64%, respectively) and a cut-point of 1% scaled SEM may be recommended as a threshold for acceptable reliability. Physiotherapists can rely on the same error when assessing lymphedematous or healthy limbs. For those who work in teams and share patients, practice is needed in synchronizing the measurements and regularly monitoring their inter-rater reliability. PMID:26437431

  18. Interleukin 1 (IL-1)- and IL-23-Mediated Expansion of Filarial Antigen-Specific Th17 and Th22 Cells in Filarial Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, R.; George, P. Jovvian; Chandrasekaran, V.; Kumaran, P. Paul; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic filarial disease is known to be associated with elevated Th1 responses and normal or diminished Th2 responses to parasite-specific antigens. The roles of Th17 cells and the recently described Th22 cells have not been examined in detail in either filarial infection itself or in filarial disease (e.g., lymphedema and elephantiasis). To explore the roles of Th17 and Th22 cells and their subsets, we examined the frequencies of these cells in individuals with filarial lymphedema (chronic pathology [CP]), in clinically asymptomatic infected (INF) individuals, and in uninfected (UN) individuals ex vivo and in response to parasite and nonparasite antigens. Those with disease (CP) had significantly expanded frequencies of Th17 and Th22 cells, compared with either INF or UN individuals, at baseline (ex vivo) and in response to parasite antigens. This antigen-driven expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was dependent on interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-23, and, to lesser extent, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), as blockade of any of these cytokines resulted in significantly diminished frequencies of Th17 and Th22 cells. Our findings, therefore, suggest that filarial parasite-driven expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells is associated with the pathogenesis of filarial infections and disease. PMID:24807054

  19. HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis: Mucosal Tissue Drug Distribution of RT Inhibitor Tenofovir and Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc in a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Veselinovic, Milena; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; LeCureux, Jonathan; Sykes, Craig; Remling-Mulder, Leila; Kashuba, Angela DM; Akkina, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) strategies utilizing anti-retroviral drugs show considerable promise for HIV prevention. However there is insufficient pharmacokinetic (PK) data on drug concentrations required for protection at the relevant mucosal tissues where the infection is initiated. Here we evaluated the utility of a humanized mouse model to derive PK data on two leading drugs, the RT inhibitor tenofovir (TFV) and CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc (MVC). Following oral dosing, both the drugs and the intracellular active TFV-diphosphate could be detected in vaginal, rectal and intestinal tissues. The drug exposures (AUC24hr) were found to be higher in vaginal tissue compared to plasma with even higher levels detected in rectal and intestinal tissues. The overall trends of drug concentrations seen in humanized mice reflect those seen in the human thus establishing the utility of this model complementing the present non-human primate (NHP) models for future pre-clinical evaluations of promising HIV PrEP drug candidates. PMID:25105490

  20. Ciprofloxacin versus colistin prophylaxis during neutropenia in acute myeloid leukemia: two parallel patient cohorts treated in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Pohlen, Michele; Marx, Julia; Mellmann, Alexander; Becker, Karsten; Mesters, Rolf M.; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Schliemann, Christoph; Lenz, Georg; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Büchner, Thomas; Krug, Utz; Stelljes, Matthias; Karch, Helge; Peters, Georg; Gerth, Hans U.; Görlich, Dennis; Berdel, Wolfgang E.

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia are at high risk for bacterial infections during therapy-related neut