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Sample records for lyngbya majuscula ccap

  1. Genomic insights into the physiology and ecology of the marine filamentous cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula.

    PubMed

    Jones, Adam C; Monroe, Emily A; Podell, Sheila; Hess, Wolfgang R; Klages, Sven; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Niessen, Sherry; Hoover, Heather; Rothmann, Michael; Lasken, Roger S; Yates, John R; Reinhardt, Richard; Kube, Michael; Burkart, Michael D; Allen, Eric E; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gerwick, William H; Gerwick, Lena

    2011-05-24

    Filamentous cyanobacteria of the genus Lyngbya are important contributors to coral reef ecosystems, occasionally forming dominant cover and impacting the health of many other co-occurring organisms. Moreover, they are extraordinarily rich sources of bioactive secondary metabolites, with 35% of all reported cyanobacterial natural products deriving from this single pantropical genus. However, the true natural product potential and life strategies of Lyngbya strains are poorly understood because of phylogenetic ambiguity, lack of genomic information, and their close associations with heterotrophic bacteria and other cyanobacteria. To gauge the natural product potential of Lyngbya and gain insights into potential microbial interactions, we sequenced the genome of Lyngbya majuscula 3L, a Caribbean strain that produces the tubulin polymerization inhibitor curacin A and the molluscicide barbamide, using a combination of Sanger and 454 sequencing approaches. Whereas ∼ 293,000 nucleotides of the draft genome are putatively dedicated to secondary metabolism, this is far too few to encode a large suite of Lyngbya metabolites, suggesting Lyngbya metabolites are strain specific and may be useful in species delineation. Our analysis revealed a complex gene regulatory network, including a large number of sigma factors and other regulatory proteins, indicating an enhanced ability for environmental adaptation or microbial associations. Although Lyngbya species are reported to fix nitrogen, nitrogenase genes were not found in the genome or by PCR of genomic DNA. Subsequent growth experiments confirmed that L. majuscula 3L is unable to fix atmospheric nitrogen. These unanticipated life history characteristics challenge current views of the genus Lyngbya.

  2. Genomic insights into the physiology and ecology of the marine filamentous cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Adam C.; Monroe, Emily A.; Podell, Sheila; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Klages, Sven; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Niessen, Sherry; Hoover, Heather; Rothmann, Michael; Lasken, Roger S.; Yates, John R.; Reinhardt, Richard; Kube, Michael; Burkart, Michael D.; Allen, Eric E.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gerwick, William H.; Gerwick, Lena

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous cyanobacteria of the genus Lyngbya are important contributors to coral reef ecosystems, occasionally forming dominant cover and impacting the health of many other co-occurring organisms. Moreover, they are extraordinarily rich sources of bioactive secondary metabolites, with 35% of all reported cyanobacterial natural products deriving from this single pantropical genus. However, the true natural product potential and life strategies of Lyngbya strains are poorly understood because of phylogenetic ambiguity, lack of genomic information, and their close associations with heterotrophic bacteria and other cyanobacteria. To gauge the natural product potential of Lyngbya and gain insights into potential microbial interactions, we sequenced the genome of Lyngbya majuscula 3L, a Caribbean strain that produces the tubulin polymerization inhibitor curacin A and the molluscicide barbamide, using a combination of Sanger and 454 sequencing approaches. Whereas ∼293,000 nucleotides of the draft genome are putatively dedicated to secondary metabolism, this is far too few to encode a large suite of Lyngbya metabolites, suggesting Lyngbya metabolites are strain specific and may be useful in species delineation. Our analysis revealed a complex gene regulatory network, including a large number of sigma factors and other regulatory proteins, indicating an enhanced ability for environmental adaptation or microbial associations. Although Lyngbya species are reported to fix nitrogen, nitrogenase genes were not found in the genome or by PCR of genomic DNA. Subsequent growth experiments confirmed that L. majuscula 3L is unable to fix atmospheric nitrogen. These unanticipated life history characteristics challenge current views of the genus Lyngbya. PMID:21555588

  3. Pitiprolamide, a proline-rich dolastatin 16 analogue from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula from Guam.

    PubMed

    Montaser, Rana; Abboud, Khalil A; Paul, Valerie J; Luesch, Hendrik

    2011-01-28

    An unusual cyclic depsipeptide, pitiprolamide (1), was isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula collected at Piti Bomb Holes, Guam. The structure was deduced using NMR, MS, X-ray crystallography, and enantioselective HPLC-MS techniques. Remarkably, proline represents half of the residues forming pitiprolamide (1). Other distinctive features include a 4-phenylvaline (dolaphenvaline, Dpv) moiety initially found in dolastatin 16 and the rare 2,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxyhexanoic acid (Dmhha) unit condensed in a unique sequence in one single molecule. Pitiprolamide (1) showed weak cytotoxic activity against HCT116 colon and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines, as well as weak antibacterial activities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Bacillus cereus.

  4. Use of superoxide as an electron shuttle for iron acquisition by the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula.

    PubMed

    Rose, Andrew L; Salmon, Tim P; Lukondeh, Tredwell; Neilan, Brett A; Waite, T David

    2005-05-15

    Reduction of iron from the ferric state to the ferrous state is one strategy employed by microorganisms in nearneutral environments to increase its biological availability. In recent years, the existence of mobile reducing agents produced bymicroorganismsto promote iron reduction, known as electron shuttles, has been demonstrated. Production of electron shuttles has been shown for several organisms, employing a variety of mostly organic molecules as the electron carrier. Here we show that the coastal cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula produces iron-reducing superoxide radicals (02*-) and that this facilitates increased iron uptake. We suggest that superoxide is a useful electron shuttle because it reacts rapidly and almost indiscriminately with Fe(lll)-organic complexes and its precursor, dissolved oxygen, is ubiquitous in the photic zone. We further suggest that, for these reasons, the generation of superoxide by marine oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms and its use in facilitating iron uptake may be a reasonably widespread process.

  5. Pitiprolamide, a Proline-Rich Dolastatin 16 Analogue from the Marine Cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula from Guam

    PubMed Central

    Montaser, Rana; Abboud, Khalil A.; Paul, Valerie J.; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    An unusual cyclic depsipeptide, pitiprolamide (1), was isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula collected at Piti Bomb Holes, Guam. The structure was deduced using NMR, MS, X-ray crystallography and enantioselective HPLC-MS techniques. Remarkably, proline represents half of the residues forming pitiprolamide (1). Other distinctive features include a 4-phenylvaline (dolaphenvaline, Dpv) moiety initially found in dolastatin 16 and the rare 2,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxyhexanoic acid (Dmhha) unit condensed in a unique sequence in one single molecule. Pitiprolamide (1) showed weak cytotoxic activity against HCT116 colon and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines, as well as weak antibacterial activities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Bacillus cereus. PMID:21138309

  6. Pitipeptolides C–F, Antimycobacterial Cyclodepsipeptides from the Marine Cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula from Guam

    PubMed Central

    Montaser, Rana; Paul, Valerie J.; Luesch, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Pitipeptolides A (1) and B (2) are cyclic depsipeptides isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula from Piti Bomb Holes, Guam. Additional analogues have now been isolated by revisiting larger collections of the same cyanobacterium. The four newly identified analogues, pitipeptolides C–F (3–6), are the tetrahydro analogue (3), an analogue with a lower degree of methylation (4) as well as two homologues (5 and 6) of pitipeptolide A. The structures were elucidated using 2D NMR experiments, chiral HPLC analysis and comparison with pitipeptolide A. The newly identified analogues showed weaker cytotoxic activities compared to the two major parent compounds, pitipeptolides A (1) and B (2), against HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma and MCF7 breast cancer cells. On the other hand, pitipeptolide F (6) was the most potent pitipeptolide in a disc diffusion assay against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The latter finding suggests that the structure of pitipeptolides could be optimized for selective antibacterial activity. PMID:21843895

  7. Pitipeptolides C-F, antimycobacterial cyclodepsipeptides from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula from Guam.

    PubMed

    Montaser, Rana; Paul, Valerie J; Luesch, Hendrik

    2011-11-01

    Pitipeptolides A (1) and B (2) are cyclic depsipeptides isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula from Piti Bomb Holes, Guam. Additional analogues have now been isolated by revisiting larger collections of the same cyanobacterium. The four identified analogues, pitipeptolides C-F (3-6), are the tetrahydro analogue (3), an analogue with a lower degree of methylation (4) as well as two homologues (5 and 6) of pitipeptolide A. Their structures were elucidated using 2D NMR experiments, chiral HPLC analysis and comparison with pitipeptolide A. The identified analogues showed weaker cytotoxic activities compared to the two major parent compounds, pitipeptolides A (1) and B (2), against HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma and MCF7 breast cancer cells. On the other hand, pitipeptolide F (6) was the most potent pitipeptolide in a disc diffusion assay against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The latter finding suggests that the structure of pitipeptolides could be optimized for selective antibacterial activity.

  8. Apramides A-G, novel lipopeptides from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula.

    PubMed

    Luesch, H; Yoshida, W Y; Moore, R E; Paul, V J

    2000-08-01

    Six new metabolites have been isolated from a lyngbyastatin 2-producing strain of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula collected at Apra Harbor, Guam, and their structures elucidated. These linear lipopeptides have been assigned the trivial names apramides A-F (1-6). From a more recent collection of this cyanobacterium, a structurally related compound, apramide G (7), has been found instead of apramides A-F (1-6). Structure elucidation of the lipopeptides 1-7 is based on spectroscopic techniques and chiral chromatography of hydrolysis products. The apramides appear as NMR-spectroscopically distinguishable conformers in solution, and this has been ascribed to the presence of a thiazole-containing modified amino acid unit.

  9. Adaptation strategies of the sheathed cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula to ultraviolet-B.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sikha; Rath, Jnanendra; Adhikary, Siba Prasad

    2011-02-01

    Lyngbya majuscula is a dominant organism in the east coast of India forming characteristic mat in dried saline soils simultaneously exposed to solar radiation of the tropics. Studies on the growth response, changes in the spectral properties of the methanolic extract and protein profile of this estuarine sheathed cyanobacterium to UV-B revealed existence of effective adaptation mechanism to withstand prolonged UV-B radiation. Carotenoids along with MAAs of the organism was increased with increase in UV irradiation. Increase in thickness of the mucilaginous sheath layer as well as cellular carbohydrate content was observed upon exposure to prolonged UV-B dose. Induction of 21 and 33 kDa low molecular weight proteins, and a 99 kDa protein together with formation of distinct multilayered sheath embedding trichomes with granulated cells were the adaptive features of the organism to cope with UV-B stress. The organism was considerably revived after incubating the irradiated cells in mineral medium under florescent light and in the dark suggesting existence of photoreactivation and dark repair in this cyanobacterium. However more experiments are needed to establish the existence of photoreactivation and dark repair mechanism in the studied cyanobacterium.

  10. Malyngamide 3 and cocosamides A and B from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula from Cocos Lagoon, Guam.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Sarath P; Owle, Chivas S; Montaser, Rana; Luesch, Hendrik; Paul, Valerie J

    2011-04-25

    Malyngamide 3 (1) and cocosamides A (2) and B (3) were isolated from the lipophilic extract of a collection of Lyngbya majuscula from Cocos Lagoon, Guam. The planar structures of compounds 1-3 were determined by spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by modified Mosher's method, NOESY data, and comparison with lyngbic acid (4). The absolute configurations of 2 and 3 were assigned by enantioselective HPLC analysis and comparison with the closely related compound pitipeptolide A (5). Compounds 1-3 showed weak cytotoxicity against MCF7 breast cancer and HT-29 colon cancer cells.

  11. Malyngamide 3 and Cocosamides A and B from the Marine Cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula from Cocos Lagoon, Guam

    PubMed Central

    Gunasekera, Sarath P.; Owle, Chivas S.; Montaser, Rana; Luesch, Hendrik; Paul, Valerie J.

    2011-01-01

    Malyngamide 3 (1) and cocosamides A (2) and B (3) were isolated from the lipophilic extract of a collection of Lyngbya majuscula from Cocos Lagoon, Guam. The planar structures of compounds 1–3 were determined by spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by modified Mosher’s method, NOESY data and comparison with lyngbic acid (4). The absolute configurations of 2 and 3 were assigned by enantioselective HPLC analysis and comparison with the closely related compound pitipeptolide A (5). Compounds 1–3 showed weak cytotoxicity against MCF7 breast cancer and HT-29 colon cancer cells. PMID:21341718

  12. Isolation and structure of the cytotoxin lyngbyabellin B and absolute configuration of lyngbyapeptin A from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula.

    PubMed

    Luesch, H; Yoshida, W Y; Moore, R E; Paul, V J

    2000-10-01

    An analogue of the potent microfilament-disrupter lyngbyabellin A (1) has been isolated as a minor metabolite from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula collected at Apra Harbor, Guam. It possesses slightly weaker cytotoxicity than 1 and has been named lyngbyabellin B (2). Primarily NMR spectroscopy was used to determine its structure. The absolute configuration of 2 has been ascertained by chiral HPLC analysis of degradation products and by comparison with lyngbyabellin A (1). The known modified tetrapeptide lyngbyapeptin A (3) has also been found in the same extract, and its absolute stereochemistry could be determined for the first time.

  13. Short-term consequences of a benthic cyanobacterial bloom ( Lyngbya majuscula Gomont) for fish and penaeid prawns in Moreton Bay (Queensland, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, S. J.; Pittman, K. M.

    2005-06-01

    This study examined the phenology and ecological consequences of a benthic filamentous cyanobacterial bloom ( Lyngbya majuscula) in Deception Bay (Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia). Bloom initiation occurred in mid December 1999 and expanded to encompass an 8 km 2 area by April 2000. Small fish and penaeid prawns (<25 cm total length) were quantitatively sampled through periods designated as before, during and after the bloom using a combination of pop-netting within mangroves and beam trawling over adjacent seagrass beds. Data on larger-bodied fish were compiled from daily fishing logs provided by local commercial fishers. Changes in dry mass of bloom material caught in nets and changes in water chemistry were also measured. Mean concentrations of ammonia-N in residual water within mangroves were several orders of magnitude higher in the affected area than in the control and dissolved oxygen was markedly lower in affected areas. Across the study area, mean density, live mass and number of species declined during the bloom, with fish assemblages using mangroves showing greater decline than assemblages using seagrasses. Response at the species level was highly variable; generally, epibenthic species showed a more sustained decline than demersals. Mean monthly fish catch was significantly lower in bloom than non-bloom years. This study has also demonstrated that throughout the bloom, the affected area continued to support a highly diverse and abundant fish and prawn assemblage, and probably maintained its function as an important nursery habitat for many species.

  14. Morphological, Chemical, and Genetic Diversity of Tropical Marine Cyanobacteria Lyngbya spp. and Symploca spp. (Oscillatoriales)†

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Robert W.; Paul, Valerie J.

    2004-01-01

    Although diverse natural products have been isolated from the benthic, filamentous cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula, it is unclear whether this chemical variation can be used to establish taxonomic relationships among disparate collections. We compared morphological characteristics, secondary-metabolite compositions, and partial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences among several collections of L. majuscula Gomont, Lyngbya spp., and Symploca spp. from Guam and the Republic of Palau. The morphological characteristics examined were cell length, cell width, and the presence or absence of a calyptra. Secondary metabolites were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Each collection possessed a distinct cellular morphology that readily distinguished Lyngbya spp. from Symploca spp. Each collection yielded a unique chemotype, but common chemical characteristics were shared among four collections of L. majuscula. A phylogeny based on secondary-metabolite composition supported the reciprocal monophyly of Lyngbya and Symploca but yielded a basal polytomy for Lyngbya. Pairwise sequence divergence among species ranged from 10 to 14% across 605 bp of 16S rDNA, while collections of L. majuscula showed 0 to 1.3% divergence. Although the phylogeny of 16S rDNA sequences strongly supported the reciprocal monophyly of Lyngbya and Symploca as well as the monophyly of Lyngbya bouillonii and L. majuscula, genetic divergence was not correlated with chemical and morphological differences. These data suggest that 16S rDNA sequence analyses do not predict chemical variability among Lyngbya species. Other mechanisms, including higher rates of evolution for biosynthetic genes, horizontal gene transfer, and interactions between different genotypes and environmental conditions, may play important roles in generating qualitative and quantitative chemical variation within and among Lyngbya species. PMID:15184125

  15. Isolation and Biological Evaluation of 8-epi-Malyngamide C from the Floridian Marine Cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula†

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jason C.; Teplitski, Max; Gunasekera, Sarath P.; Paul, Valerie J.; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    A new stereoisomer of malyngamide C, 8-epi-malyngamide C (1), and the known compound lyngbic acid [(4E,7S)-7-methoxytetradec-4-enoic acid] were isolated from a sample of Lyngbya majuscula collected near Bush Key, Dry Tortugas, Florida. The structure of 1 was determined by NMR and MS experiments. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by selective Mitsunobu inversion of C-8 to give malyngamide C, as determined by NMR, MS, and comparison of specific rotation. Both 1 and malyngamide C were found to be cytotoxic to HT29 colon cancer cells (IC50 15.4 μM and 5.2 μM, respectively) and to inhibit bacterial quorum sensing in a reporter gene assay. PMID:20166701

  16. A new antitumor arabinopyranoside from Laurencia majuscula induces G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Du, Bin; Zhong, Xueyun; Liao, Xiaojian; Xu, Wenjie; Zhou, Xulong; Xu, Shihai

    2010-10-01

    A new arabinopyranoside was isolated from the alga Laurencia majuscula (Harvey) Lucas, collected from the Xisha Islands in the South China Sea. Its structure was elucidated as hexadecyl-1-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside by spectroscopic analysis. It was found that arabinopyranoside had significant antitumor activity in LOVO and Bel-7402 cell lines. Flow cytometric analysis showed that arabinopyranoside arrested the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. Western blotting demonstrated that the protein expression of CDK1 and cyclin A related to the G2/M phase decreased markedly with arabinopyranoside treatment, with slight changes in cyclin B1 expression. Taken together, the findings identify a potential new antitumor therapeutic arabinopyranoside isolated from red alga Laurencia majuscula.

  17. Attraction of gravid anopheles Pseudopunctipennis females to oviposition substrates by Spirogyra majuscula (Zygnematales: Zygnmataceae) algae under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Torres-Estrada, José L; Meza-Alvarez, Rosa A; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Rodríguez, Mario H; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I

    2007-03-01

    The attraction of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis gravid females to oviposition substrates containing Spirogyra majuscula algae was investigated under laboratory conditions. Gravid females deposited significantly more eggs in cups containing natural algae in water from breeding sites than in cups containing artificial (nylon rope) life-like algae in water from the corresponding natural breeding site, or in cups containing natural algae in distilled water. Bioassays with Spirogyra majuscula organic extracts indicated that these extracts at concentrations of 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% attracted more oviposition, but concentrations of 1%, 10%, and 100% were repellent. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis of algae organic extracts revealed a mixture of ethyl acetate and hydrocarbons compounds. These results suggest that the attraction of gravid An. pseudopunctipennis to natural breeding sites containing filamentous algae is probably mediated by organic compounds released by the algae.

  18. Debromoaplysiatoxin in Lyngbya-dominated mats on manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) in the Florida King's Bay ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Harr, Kendal E; Szabo, Nancy J; Cichra, Mary; Phlips, Edward J

    2008-08-01

    Proliferation of the potentially toxic cyanobacterium, Lyngbya, in Florida lakes and rivers has raised concerns about ecosystem and human health. Debromoaplysiatoxin (DAT) was measured in concentrations up to 6.31 microg/g wet weight lyngbyatoxin A equivalents (WWLAE) in Lyngbya-dominated mats collected from natural substrates. DAT was also detected (up to 1.19 microg/g WWLAE) in Lyngbya-dominated mats collected from manatee dorsa. Ulcerative dermatitis found on manatees is associated with, but has not been proven to be caused by DAT.

  19. Debromoaplysiatoxin in Lyngbya-dominated mats on manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) in the Florida King's Bay ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Harr, Kendal E; Szabo, Nancy J; Cichra, Mary; Phlips, Edward J

    2008-08-01

    Proliferation of the potentially toxic cyanobacterium, Lyngbya, in Florida lakes and rivers has raised concerns about ecosystem and human health. Debromoaplysiatoxin (DAT) was measured in concentrations up to 6.31 microg/g wet weight lyngbyatoxin A equivalents (WWLAE) in Lyngbya-dominated mats collected from natural substrates. DAT was also detected (up to 1.19 microg/g WWLAE) in Lyngbya-dominated mats collected from manatee dorsa. Ulcerative dermatitis found on manatees is associated with, but has not been proven to be caused by DAT. PMID:18585400

  20. Potent antibacterial activity of halogenated metabolites from Malaysian red algae, Laurencia majuscula (Rhodomelaceae, Ceramiales).

    PubMed

    Vairappan, Charles S

    2003-07-01

    Red algae genus Laurencia (Rhodomelaceae, Ceramiales) are known to produce a wide range of chemically interesting secondary halogenated metabolites. This investigation delves upon extraction, isolation, structural elucidation and antibacterial activity of inherently available secondary metabolites of Laurencia majuscula Harvey collected from two locations in waters of Sabah, Malaysia. Two major halogenated compounds, identified as elatol (1) and iso-obtusol (2) were isolated. Structures of these compounds were determined from their spectroscopic data such as IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and optical rotation. Antibacterial bioassay against human pathogenic bacteria was conducted using disc diffusion (Kirby-Bauer) method. Elatol (1) inhibited six species of bacteria, with significant antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus epidermis, Klebsiella pneumonia and Salmonella sp. while iso-obtusol (2) exhibited antibacterial activity against four bacterial species with significant activity against K. pneumonia and Salmonella sp. Elatol (1) showed equal and better antibacterial activity compared with tested commercial antibiotics while iso-obtusol (2) only equaled the potency of commercial antibiotics against K. pneumonia and Salmonella sp. Further tests conducted using dilution method showed both compounds as having bacteriostatic mode of action against the tested bacteria. PMID:12919806

  1. Pleiotropic effects of the neuropeptides CCAP and myosuppressin in the beetle, Tenebrio molitor L.

    PubMed

    Wasielewski, O; Skonieczna, M

    2008-09-01

    Biological activities of crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP; PFCNAFTGCa) and leucomyosuppressin (Lem-MS; pQDVDHVFLRFa) were studied in heterologous bioassays in the larvae and adults of Tenebrio molitor. CCAP exerted a reversible and dose-dependent cardio-stimulatory effect on the semi-isolated heart of the experimental beetles at a concentration of >10(-7) M and induced an effect similar to the endogenic cardio-stimulatory peptide, proctolin. Injections of CCAP (10(-9)-10(-3) M) into 4-day-old adult reproductive females increased the concentration of soluble proteins in hemolymph in comparison to the saline injected controls. Electrophoretic analyses indicated significant increase in the level of two proteins 130 and 170 kDa, and a partial increase of the level of 67-kDa protein. The studies indicated that CCAP increased also free hemolymph sugar concentration in young larvae and adults of the mealworm beetle. The cardio-inhibitory peptide Lem-MS exerted the opposite effect: at concentration 10(-7)-10(-6) M, it significantly decreased the heartbeat frequency. The induced changes were dose-dependent and reversible, but at higher concentrations (>10(-5) M) the stimulatory effect disappeared. Injections of the Lem-MS into young larvae at concentrations 10(-9)-10(-3) M, also increased the free hemolymph sugar level similarly to the CCAP. This work demonstrates the pleiotropic effects of CCAP and Lem-MS in Tenebrio molitor.

  2. A Novel, Poly(Ethyl Ethylene Ether) Inhibitor to Trypsin from Marine Cyanobacteria, Lyngbya confervoides.

    PubMed

    Devi, Ambika; Prasanth, Shankar; Murugesh, Easwaran; Haridas, Karickal R; Sabu, Abdulhameed; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-03-01

    A novel, poly(ethyl ethylene ether) inhibitor to trypsin was purified from marine cyanobacteria, Lyngbya confervoides from the coastal areas of Thalassery, North Kerala. The kinetics and the thermodynamic parameters of its interactions with the enzyme were also studied. It was demonstrated that the substrate binding, catalytic triad of the enzyme could be blocked by the inhibitor, as expressed by molecular simulation studies. The study also showed that the cyanobacterial group could prove to be a potential source of novel enzyme inhibitors for various applications.

  3. Evidence for bacterial chemotaxis to cyanobacteria from a radioassay technique. [Lyngbya birgei; Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; Aeromonas hydrophila

    SciTech Connect

    Kangatharalingam, N.; Wang, Lizhu; Priscu, J.C. )

    1991-08-01

    Lyngbya birgei and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae elicited a significant chemotactic attraction of Aeromonas hydrophila compared with controls lacking cyanobacteria. There was a positive exponential relationship between biomass (chlorophyll a) of L. birgei and A. flos-aquae and chemotactic attraction of A. hydrophila. The assay equipment was simple and reliable and could be used to study bacterial chemotaxis in other species in situ.

  4. Isolation and structure determination of obyanamide, a novel cytotoxic cyclic depsipeptide from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya confervoides.

    PubMed

    Williams, Philip G; Yoshida, Wesley Y; Moore, Richard E; Paul, Valerie J

    2002-01-01

    Obyanamide (1) was isolated from a variety of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya confervoides collected in Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Gross structure elucidation of this novel cyclic depsipeptide relied on extensive application of 2D NMR techniques. The absolute stereochemistry was deduced by chiral chromatography of the hydrolysis products and comparison with authentic and synthetic standards. Obyanamide (1) was cytotoxic against KB cells with an IC(50) of 0.58 microg/mL.

  5. The Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa (CCAP): a biological resource for protistan genomics.

    PubMed

    Gachon, Claire M M; Day, John G; Campbell, Christine N; Pröschold, Thomas; Saxon, Rachel J; Küpper, Frithjof C

    2007-12-30

    CCAP, the largest European protistan culture collection, is based at the Scottish Association for Marine Science near Oban, Scotland (http://www.ccap.ac.uk). The Collection comprises more than 2700 strains in the public domain, of which 1050 are marine algae, 1300 freshwater algae, and 350 protozoa. The primary mission of CCAP is to maintain and distribute defined cultures and their associated information to its customers. It also has a support and advisory function on all aspects of protistan science. In addition, it is involved in the training of students and researchers in algal identification and culture techniques. In light of the increasing number of fully sequenced protists, the CCAP is striving to provide targeted services and support to workers involved in all aspects of genomic research. At present, the Collection holds several hundred strains of genomic model taxa including: Acanthamoeba, Cafeteria, Cercomonas, Chlamydomonas, Chlorella, Cyanophora, Dictyostelium, Dunaliella, Ectocarpus, Emiliania, Euglena, Micromonas, Naegleria, Nephroselmis, Paramecium, Pavlova, Phaeodactylum, Porphyra, Pseudendoclonium, Pylaiella, Rhodomonas, Scenedesmus, Staurastrum, Tetrahymena, Thalassiosira, Volvox and Zygnema. These strains provide a defined representation of natural variation within model organisms, an increasingly useful resource for post-genomics approaches. Our aim over the next 2-5 years is to add value to the Collection by increasing the number of genome model species, and by offering an integrated, up-to-date, easy-to-use resource that would provide curated information on our strain holdings. In collaboration with other major Biological Resource Centres worldwide, we intend to build a hub providing access to both protistan cultures and their associated bioinformatics data.

  6. N- and C-capping preferences for all 20 amino acids in alpha-helical peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Doig, A. J.; Baldwin, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    We have determined the N- and C-capping preferences of all 20 amino acids by substituting residue X in the peptides NH2-XAKAAAAKAAAAKAAGY-CONH2 and in Ac-YGAAKAAAAKAAAAKAX-CO2H. Helix contents were measured by CD spectroscopy to obtain rank orders of capping preferences. The data were further analyzed by our modified Lifson-Roig helix-coil theory, which includes capping parameters (n and c), to find free energies of capping (-RT ln n and -RT ln c), relative to Ala. Results were obtained for charged and uncharged termini and for different charged states of titratable side chains. N-cap preferences varied from Asn (best) to Gln (worst). We find, as expected, that amino acids that can accept hydrogen bonds from otherwise free backbone NH groups, such as Asn, Asp, Ser, Thr, and Cys generally have the highest N-cap preference. Gly and acetyl group are favored, as are negative charges in side chains and at the N-terminus. Our N-cap preference scale agrees well with preferences in proteins. In contrast, we find little variation when changing the identity of the C-cap residue. We find no preference for Gly at the C-cap in contrast to the situation in proteins. Both N-cap and C-cap results for Tyr and Trp are inaccurate because their aromatic groups affect the CD spectrum. The data presented here are of value in rationalizing mutations at capping sites in proteins and in predicting the helix contents of peptides. PMID:7670375

  7. Brain-midgut cross-talk and autocrine metabolastat via the sNPF/CCAP negative feed-back loop in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Mikani, Azam; Watari, Yasuhiko; Takeda, Makio

    2015-12-01

    Immunohistochemical reactivities against short neuropeptide F (sNPF-ir) and crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP-ir) were detected in both the brain-subesophageal ganglion (Br-SOG) and midgut epithelial cells of the male American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Four weeks of starvation increased the number of sNPF-ir cells and decreased the CCAP-ir cells in the Br-SOG, whereas refeeding reversed these effects. The contents of sNPF in the Br-SOG, midgut and hemolymph titer decreased in response to an injection of CCAP into the hemocoel of normally fed male cockroaches, while CCAP titers/contents decreased in response to an injection of sNPF. The results of a double-labeling experiment demonstrated that sNPF-ir co-existed in CCAP-ir cells in the pars intercerebralis (PI), dorsolateral region of protocerebrum (DL), deutocerebrum (De) and SOG. sNPF-ir and CCAP-ir were also colocalized in the midgut. sNPF and CCAP are neuropeptides and midgut factors that interact with each other. Since the two peptides are known to be secreted by identical cells that affect each other, this constitutes autocrine negative feedback regulation for a quick response to food accessibility/inaccessibility. These peptides not only constitute the switch in the digestive mechanism but also couple digestive adaptation with behavior. A CCAP injection suppressed locomotor activity when cockroaches were starved, whereas sNPF activated it when they were fed.

  8. Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, and concentrate sample media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granitto, Matthew; DeWitt, Ed H.; Klein, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    This database was initiated, designed, and populated to collect and integrate geochemical data from central Colorado in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessment, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessment, and medical geology. The Microsoft Access database serves as a geochemical data warehouse in support of the Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses determined by 70 analytical laboratory and field methods for 47,478 rock, sediment, soil, and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed either in the analytical laboratories of the USGS or by contract with commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects. In addition, geochemical data from 7,470 sediment and soil samples collected and analyzed under the Atomic Energy Commission National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program (henceforth called NURE) have been included in this database. In addition to data from 2,377 samples collected and analyzed under CCAP, this dataset includes archived geochemical data originally entered into the in-house Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database (used by the USGS from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s) and the in-house PLUTO database (used by the USGS from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s). All of these data are maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB and from the NURE database were used to generate most of this dataset. In addition, USGS data that have been excluded previously from the NGDB because the data predate earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  9. Comparative genomic analyses of the cyanobacterium, Lyngbya aestuarii BL J, a powerful hydrogen producer

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ankita; Vaughn, Michael; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Lyngbya aestuarii is an important contributor to marine intertidal microbial mats system worldwide. The recent isolate L. aestuarii BL J, is an unusually powerful hydrogen producer. Here we report a morphological, ultrastructural, and genomic characterization of this strain to set the basis for future systems studies and applications of this organism. The filaments contain circa 17 μm wide trichomes, composed of stacked disk-like short cells (2 μm long), encased in a prominent, laminated exopolysaccharide sheath. Cellular division occurs by transversal centripetal growth of cross-walls, where several rounds of division proceed simultaneously. Filament division occurs by cell self-immolation of one or groups of cells (necridial cells) at the breakage point. Short, sheath-less, motile filaments (hormogonia) are also formed. Morphologically and phylogenetically L. aestuarii belongs to a clade of important cyanobacteria that include members of the marine Trichodesmiun and Hydrocoleum genera, as well as terrestrial Microcoleus vaginatus strains, and alkalyphilic strains of Arthrospira. A draft genome of strain BL J was compared to those of other cyanobacteria in order to ascertain some of its ecological constraints and biotechnological potential. The genome had an average GC content of 41.1%. Of the 6.87 Mb sequenced, 6.44 Mb was present as large contigs (>10,000 bp). It contained 6515 putative protein-encoding genes, of which, 43% encode proteins of known functional role, 26% corresponded to proteins with domain or family assignments, 19.6% encode conserved hypothetical proteins, and 11.3% encode apparently unique hypothetical proteins. The strain's genome reveals its adaptations to a life of exposure to intense solar radiation and desiccation. It likely employs the storage compounds, glycogen, and cyanophycin but no polyhydroxyalkanoates, and can produce the osmolytes, trehalose, and glycine betaine. According to its

  10. Evidence for paralytic shellfish poisons in the freshwater cyanobacterium Lyngbya wollei (Farlow ex Gomont) comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, W W; Evans, W R; Yin, Q Q; Bell, P; Moczydlowski, E

    1997-08-01

    Lyngbya wollei (Farlow ex Gomont) comb. nov., a perennial mat-forming filamentous cyanobacterium prevalent in lakes and reservoirs of the southeastern United States, was found to produce a potent, acutely lethal neurotoxin when tested in the mouse bioassay. Signs of poisoning were similar to those of paralytic shellfish poisoning. As part of the Tennessee Valley Authority master plan for Guntersville Reservoir, the mat-forming filamentous cyanobacterium L. wollei, a species that had recently invaded from other areas of the southern United States, was studied to determine if it could produce any of the known cyanotoxins. Of the 91 field samples collected at 10 locations at Guntersville Reservoir, Ala., on the Tennessee River, over a 3-year period, 72.5% were toxic. The minimum 100% lethal doses of the toxic samples ranged from 150 to 1,500 mg kg of lyophilized L. wollei cells-1, with the majority of samples being toxic at 500 mg kg-1. Samples bioassayed for paralytic shellfish toxins by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists method exhibited saxitoxin equivalents ranging from 0 to 58 micrograms g (dry weight)-1. Characteristics of the neurotoxic compound(s), such as the lack of adsorption by C18 solid-phase extraction columns, the short retention times on C18 high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns, the interaction of the neurotoxins with saxiphilin (a soluble saxitoxin-binding protein), and external blockage of voltage-sensitive sodium channels, led to our discovery that this neurotoxin(s) is related to the saxitoxins, the compounds responsible for paralytic shellfish poisonings. The major saxitoxin compounds thus far identified by comparison of HPLC fluorescence retention times are decarbamoyl gonyautoxins 2 and 3. There was no evidence of paralytic shellfish poison C toxins being produced by L. wollei. Fifty field samples were placed in unialgal culture and grown under defined culture conditions. Toxicity and signs of poisoning for these

  11. Clinical Validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62): Further Evaluation and Clinical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleavey, Andrew A.; Nordberg, Samuel S.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Locke, Benjamin D.; Lockard, Allison J.

    2012-01-01

    Self-report instruments of psychological symptoms are increasingly used in counseling centers but rely on rigorous evaluation of their clinical validity. Three studies reported here (total N = 26,886) investigated the validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62; Locke et al., 2011) as an assessment and…

  12. Linking the human cytogenetic map with nucleotide sequence: the CCAP clone set.

    PubMed

    Jang, Wonhee; Yonescu, Raluca; Knutsen, Turid; Brown, Theresa; Reppert, Tricia; Sirotkin, Karl; Schuler, Gregory D; Ried, Thomas; Kirsch, Ilan R

    2006-07-15

    We present the completed dataset and clone repository of the Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), an initiative developed and funded through the intramural program of the U.S. National Cancer Institute, to provide seamless linkage of human cytogenetic markers with the primary nucleotide sequence of the human genome. Spaced at 1-2 Mb intervals across the human genome, 1,339 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones have been localized to chromosomal bands through high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping. Of these clones, 99.8% can be positioned on the primary human genome sequence and 95% are placed at or close to their precise nucleotide starts and stops. This dataset can be studied and manipulated within generally available public Web sites. The clones are available from a commercial repository. The CCAP BAC clone set provides anchors for the interrogation of gene and sequence involvement in oncogenic and developmental disorders when the starting point is the recognition of a structural, numerical, or interstitial chromosomal aberration. This dataset also provides a current view of the quality and coherence of the available genome sequence and insight into the nucleotide and three-dimensional structures that manifest as Giemsa light and dark chromosomal banding patterns.

  13. Linking the human cytogenetic map with nucleotide sequence: the CCAP clone set.

    PubMed

    Jang, Wonhee; Yonescu, Raluca; Knutsen, Turid; Brown, Theresa; Reppert, Tricia; Sirotkin, Karl; Schuler, Gregory D; Ried, Thomas; Kirsch, Ilan R

    2006-07-15

    We present the completed dataset and clone repository of the Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), an initiative developed and funded through the intramural program of the U.S. National Cancer Institute, to provide seamless linkage of human cytogenetic markers with the primary nucleotide sequence of the human genome. Spaced at 1-2 Mb intervals across the human genome, 1,339 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones have been localized to chromosomal bands through high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping. Of these clones, 99.8% can be positioned on the primary human genome sequence and 95% are placed at or close to their precise nucleotide starts and stops. This dataset can be studied and manipulated within generally available public Web sites. The clones are available from a commercial repository. The CCAP BAC clone set provides anchors for the interrogation of gene and sequence involvement in oncogenic and developmental disorders when the starting point is the recognition of a structural, numerical, or interstitial chromosomal aberration. This dataset also provides a current view of the quality and coherence of the available genome sequence and insight into the nucleotide and three-dimensional structures that manifest as Giemsa light and dark chromosomal banding patterns. PMID:16843097

  14. Powerful fermentative hydrogen evolution of photosynthate in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya aestuarii BL J mediated by a bidirectional hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ankita; Parameswaran, Prathap; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered good models for biohydrogen production because they are relatively simple organisms with a demonstrable ability to generate H2 under certain physiological conditions. However, most produce only little H2, revert readily to H2 consumption, and suffer from hydrogenase sensitivity to O2. Strains of the cyanobacteria Lyngbya aestuarii and Microcoleus chthonoplastes obtained from marine intertidal cyanobacterial mats were recently found to display much better H2 production potential. Because of their ecological origin in environments that become quickly anoxic in the dark, we hypothesized that this differential ability may have evolved to serve a role in the fermentation of the photosynthate. Here we show that, when forced to ferment internal substrate, these cyanobacteria display desirable characteristics of physiological H2 production. Among them, the strain L. aestuarii BL J had the fastest specific rates and attained the highest H2 concentrations during fermentation of photosynthate, which proceeded via a mixed acid fermentation pathway to yield acetate, ethanol, lactate, H2, CO2, and pyruvate. Contrary to expectations, the H2 yield per mole of glucose was only average compared to that of other cyanobacteria. Thermodynamic analyses point to the use of electron donors more electronegative than NAD(P)H in Lyngbya hydrogenases as the basis for its strong H2 production ability. In any event, the high specific rates and H2 concentrations coupled with the lack of reversibility of the enzyme, at the expense of internal, photosynthetically generated reductants, makes L. aestuarii BL J and/or its enzymes, a potentially feasible platform for large-scale H2 production. PMID:25540642

  15. Daphnia longicephala neuropeptides: morphological description of crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and periviscerokinins in the Ctenodaphnia central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Linda C; Laforsch, Christian; Ioannidou, Ioanna; Herbert, Zsofia; Tollrian, Ralph

    2014-10-01

    The publication of the Daphnia genome has driven research in this ecologically relevant model organism in many directions. However, information on this organism's physiology and the relevant controlling factors is limited. In this regard, especially neuropeptides are important biochemical regulators that control a variety of cellular processes, which in combination influence physiological conditions and allow the adaptation of the internal physiological state to external conditions. Thus, neuropeptides are prime in understanding an organism's physiology. We here aimed to detect and describe the distribution of evolutionary conserved neuropeptides including the crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and peptides of the family periviscerokinins (PVKs) in the central nervous system and the periphery of the Daphnia longicephala head region. We were able to identify a large pair of CCAP immunoreactive cells within central nervous system. In addition, in the periphery we found CCAP immunoreactive cells in the epidermis of the head with processes indicating cuticular secretion. Furthermore, we were able to identify and describe a complex neuronal circuit of PVK neuropeptides in the central nervous system. The data obtained in this study will provide important background information for future investigations aiming to unravel the cellular, neuronal and physiological pathways in a highly adaptive organism such as Daphnia.

  16. Cytotoxic Halogenated Macrolides and Modified Peptides from the Apratoxin-Producing Marine Cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii from Guam

    PubMed Central

    Matthew, Susan; Salvador, Lilibeth A.; Schupp, Peter J.; Paul, Valerie J.; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Collections of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii from shallow patch reefs in Apra Harbor, Guam, afforded three hitherto undescribed analogues of the glycosidic macrolide lyngbyaloside, namely 2-epi-lyngbyaloside (1) and the regioisomeric 18E- and 18Z–lyngbyalosides C (2 and 3). Concurrently we discovered two new analogues of the cytoskeletal actin-disrupting lyngbyabellins, 27-deoxylyngbyabellin A (4) and lyngbyabellin J (5), a novel macrolide of the laingolide family, laingolide B (6), and a linear modified peptide, lyngbyapeptin D (7), along with known lyngbyabellins A and B, lyngbyapeptin A, and lyngbyaloside. The structures of 1–7 were elucidated by a combination of NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analysis. Compounds 1–6 were either brominated (1–3) or chlorinated (4–6), consistent with halogenation being a hallmark of many marine natural products. All extracts derived from these L. bouillonii collections were highly cytotoxic due to the presence of apratoxin A or also apratoxin C. Compounds 1–5 showed weak to moderate cytotoxicity to HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells. PMID:20704304

  17. Cytotoxic halogenated macrolides and modified peptides from the apratoxin-producing marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii from Guam.

    PubMed

    Matthew, Susan; Salvador, Lilibeth A; Schupp, Peter J; Paul, Valerie J; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-09-24

    Collections of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya bouillonii from shallow patch reefs in Apra Harbor, Guam, afforded three hitherto undescribed analogues of the glycosidic macrolide lyngbyaloside, namely, 2-epi-lyngbyaloside (1) and the regioisomeric 18E- and 18Z-lyngbyalosides C (2 and 3). Concurrently we discovered two new analogues of the cytoskeletal actin-disrupting lyngbyabellins, 27-deoxylyngbyabellin A (4) and lyngbyabellin J (5), a novel macrolide of the laingolide family, laingolide B (6), and a linear modified peptide, lyngbyapeptin D (7), along with known lyngbyabellins A and B, lyngbyapeptin A, and lyngbyaloside. The structures of 1-7 were elucidated by a combination of NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analysis. Compounds 1-6 were either brominated (1-3) or chlorinated (4-6), consistent with halogenation being a hallmark of many marine natural products. All extracts derived from these L. bouillonii collections were highly cytotoxic due to the presence of apratoxin A or apratoxin C. Compounds 1-5 showed weak to moderate cytotoxicity to HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

  18. The study of the Bithorax-complex genes in patterning CCAP neurons reveals a temporal control of neuronal differentiation by Abd-B

    PubMed Central

    Moris-Sanz, M.; Estacio-Gómez, A.; Sánchez-Herrero, E.; Díaz-Benjumea, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During development, HOX genes play critical roles in the establishment of segmental differences. In the Drosophila central nervous system, these differences are manifested in the number and type of neurons generated by each neuroblast in each segment. HOX genes can act either in neuroblasts or in postmitotic cells, and either early or late in a lineage. Additionally, they can be continuously required during development or just at a specific stage. Moreover, these features are generally segment-specific. Lately, it has been shown that contrary to what happens in other tissues, where HOX genes define domains of expression, these genes are expressed in individual cells as part of the combinatorial codes involved in cell type specification. In this report we analyse the role of the Bithorax-complex genes – Ultrabithorax, abdominal-A and Abdominal-B – in sculpting the pattern of crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP)-expressing neurons. These neurons are widespread in invertebrates, express CCAP, Bursicon and MIP neuropeptides and play major roles in controlling ecdysis. There are two types of CCAP neuron: interneurons and efferent neurons. Our results indicate that Ultrabithorax and Abdominal-A are not necessary for specification of the CCAP-interneurons, but are absolutely required to prevent the death by apoptosis of the CCAP-efferent neurons. Furthermore, Abdominal-B controls by repression the temporal onset of neuropeptide expression in a subset of CCAP-efferent neurons, and a peak of ecdysone hormone at the end of larval life counteracts this repression. Thus, Bithorax complex genes control the developmental appearance of these neuropeptides both temporally and spatially. PMID:26276099

  19. The influence of photoperiod and light intensity on the growth and photosynthesis of Dunaliella salina (chlorophyta) CCAP 19/30.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanan; Ibrahim, Iskander M; Harvey, Patricia J

    2016-09-01

    The green microalga Dunaliella salina survives in a wide range of salinities via mechanisms involving glycerol synthesis and degradation and is exploited for large amounts of nutraceutical carotenoids produced under stressed conditions. In this study, D. salina CCAP 19/30 was cultured in varying photoperiods and light intensities to study the relationship of light with different growth measurement parameters, with cellular contents of glycerol, starch and carotenoids, and with photosynthesis and respiration. Results show CCAP 19/30 regulated cell volume when growing under light/dark cycles: cell volume increased in the light and decreased in the dark, and these changes corresponded to changes in cellular glycerol content. The decrease in cell volume in the dark was independent of cell division and biological clock and was regulated by the photoperiod of the light/dark cycle. When the light intensity was increased to above 1000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), cells displayed evidence of photodamage. However, these cells also maintained the maximum level of photosynthesis efficiency and respiration possible, and the growth rate increased as light intensity increased. Significantly, the intracellular glycerol content also increased, >2-fold compared to the content in light intensity of 500 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), but there was no commensurate increase in the pool size of carotenoids. These data suggest that in CCAP 19/30 glycerol stabilized the photosynthetic apparatus for maximum performance in high light intensities, a role normally attributed to carotenoids.

  20. The influence of photoperiod and light intensity on the growth and photosynthesis of Dunaliella salina (chlorophyta) CCAP 19/30.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanan; Ibrahim, Iskander M; Harvey, Patricia J

    2016-09-01

    The green microalga Dunaliella salina survives in a wide range of salinities via mechanisms involving glycerol synthesis and degradation and is exploited for large amounts of nutraceutical carotenoids produced under stressed conditions. In this study, D. salina CCAP 19/30 was cultured in varying photoperiods and light intensities to study the relationship of light with different growth measurement parameters, with cellular contents of glycerol, starch and carotenoids, and with photosynthesis and respiration. Results show CCAP 19/30 regulated cell volume when growing under light/dark cycles: cell volume increased in the light and decreased in the dark, and these changes corresponded to changes in cellular glycerol content. The decrease in cell volume in the dark was independent of cell division and biological clock and was regulated by the photoperiod of the light/dark cycle. When the light intensity was increased to above 1000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), cells displayed evidence of photodamage. However, these cells also maintained the maximum level of photosynthesis efficiency and respiration possible, and the growth rate increased as light intensity increased. Significantly, the intracellular glycerol content also increased, >2-fold compared to the content in light intensity of 500 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), but there was no commensurate increase in the pool size of carotenoids. These data suggest that in CCAP 19/30 glycerol stabilized the photosynthetic apparatus for maximum performance in high light intensities, a role normally attributed to carotenoids. PMID:27231875

  1. CCAP and FMRFamide-like peptides accelerate the contraction rate of the antennal accessory pulsatile organs (auxiliary hearts) of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Julia M; Jones, Talitha H; Murphree, Steven C; Hillyer, Julián F

    2016-08-01

    Insects rely on specialized accessory pulsatile organs (APOs), also known as auxiliary hearts, to propel hemolymph into their antennae. In most insects, this is accomplished via the pulsations of a pair of ampulla located in the head, each of which propels hemolymph across an antenna via an antennal vessel. Once at the distal end of the appendage, hemolymph returns to the head via the antennal hemocoel. Although the structure of the antennal hearts has been elucidated in various insect orders, their hormonal modulation has only been studied in cockroaches and other hemimetabolous insects within the superorder Polyneoptera, where proctolin and FMRFamide-like peptides accelerate the contraction rate of these auxiliary hearts. Here, we assessed the hormonal modulation of the antennal APOs of mosquitoes, a group of holometabolous (Endopterygota) insects within the order Diptera. We show that crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), FMRFamide and SALDKNFMRFamide increase the contraction rate of the antennal APOs and the heart of Anopheles gambiae Both antennal hearts are synchronously responsive to these neuropeptides, but their contractions are asynchronous with the contraction of the heart. Furthermore, we show that these neuropeptides increase the velocity and maximum acceleration of hemolymph within the antennal space, suggesting that each contraction is also more forceful. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that hormones of a holometabolous insect modulate the contraction dynamics of an auxiliary heart, and the first report that shows that the hormones of any insect accelerate the velocity of hemolymph in the antennal space.

  2. Effects of PAR and UV Radiation on the Structural and Functional Integrity of Phycocyanin, Phycoerythrin and Allophycocyanin Isolated from the Marine Cyanobacterium Lyngbya sp. A09DM.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Rajesh Prasad; Sonani, Ravi Raghav; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    An in vitro analysis of the effects of photosynthetically active and ultraviolet radiations was executed to assess the photostability of biologically relevant pigments phycocyanin (PC), phycoerythrin (PE) and allophycocyanin (APC) isolated from Lyngbya sp. A09DM. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiances significantly affected the integrity of PC, PE and APC; however, PAR showed least effect. UV radiation affected the bilin chromophores covalently attached to phycobiliproteins (PBPs). Almost complete elimination of the chromophore bands associated with α- and β-subunit of PE and APC occurred after 4 h of UV-B exposure. After 5 h of UV-B exposure, the content of PC, PE and APC decreased by 51.65%, 96.8% and 96.53%, respectively. Contrary to PAR and UV-A radiation, a severe decrease in fluorescence of all PBPs was observed under UV-B irradiation. The fluorescence activity of extracted PBP was gradually inhibited immediately after 15-30 min of UV-B exposure. In comparison to the PC, the fluorescence properties of PE and APC were severely lost under UV-B radiation. Moreover, the present study indicates that UV-B radiation can damage the structural and functional integrity of phycobiliproteins leading to the loss of their ecological and biological functions. PMID:25763657

  3. Affinity and Efficacy of Copper Following an Algicide Exposure: Application of the Critical Burden Concept for Lyngbya wollei Control in Lay Lake, AL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, West M.; Willis, Ben E.; Horton, C. Todd

    2015-04-01

    Accurate predictions of nuisance algae responses to algicide exposures are needed to guide management decisions. Copper sorption and responses of Lyngbya wollei (Farlow ex Gomont) Speziale and Dyck were measured in the laboratory and two areas in Lay Lake (AL, USA) to treatments of Captain® XTR (SePRO Corporation; chelated copper algicide) and a sequential treatment of GreenClean® Liquid (BioSafe Systems, LLC; peroxygen algicide) combined with Hydrothol® 191 (United Phosphorus, Inc.; endothall algicide) followed by Captain XTR. Measured filament viability in laboratory exposures predicted Captain XTR alone could control L. wollei in Lay Lake, with 2 mg Cu/g algae EC75. This produced a targeted field treatment of 9.7 kg Cu/ha which was divided into three applications of 0.3 mg Cu/L as Captain XTR in the treatment areas. Laboratory and field experiments indicated treatments of Captain XTR alone and the combination treatment resulted in comparable copper sorption and responses of L. wollei. Copper adsorbed greater to L. wollei in laboratory experiments than in the treated areas of Lay Lake with comparable exposures (2 mg Cu/g L. wollei). However, responses and infused copper were similar and correlated in laboratory experiments and treated areas of Lay Lake indicating infused copper is critical for governing toxicity. Laboratory exposures as mg Cu/g algae accurately predicted the necessary algicide exposure required to attain the critical burden of infused copper and elicit desired responses of L. wollei in treated areas of Lay Lake.

  4. Affinity and efficacy of copper following an algicide exposure: application of the critical burden concept for Lyngbya wollei control in Lay Lake, AL.

    PubMed

    Bishop, West M; Willis, Ben E; Horton, C Todd

    2015-04-01

    Accurate predictions of nuisance algae responses to algicide exposures are needed to guide management decisions. Copper sorption and responses of Lyngbya wollei (Farlow ex Gomont) Speziale and Dyck were measured in the laboratory and two areas in Lay Lake (AL, USA) to treatments of Captain(®) XTR (SePRO Corporation; chelated copper algicide) and a sequential treatment of GreenClean(®) Liquid (BioSafe Systems, LLC; peroxygen algicide) combined with Hydrothol(®) 191 (United Phosphorus, Inc.; endothall algicide) followed by Captain XTR. Measured filament viability in laboratory exposures predicted Captain XTR alone could control L. wollei in Lay Lake, with 2 mg Cu/g algae EC75. This produced a targeted field treatment of 9.7 kg Cu/ha which was divided into three applications of 0.3 mg Cu/L as Captain XTR in the treatment areas. Laboratory and field experiments indicated treatments of Captain XTR alone and the combination treatment resulted in comparable copper sorption and responses of L. wollei. Copper adsorbed greater to L. wollei in laboratory experiments than in the treated areas of Lay Lake with comparable exposures (2 mg Cu/g L. wollei). However, responses and infused copper were similar and correlated in laboratory experiments and treated areas of Lay Lake indicating infused copper is critical for governing toxicity. Laboratory exposures as mg Cu/g algae accurately predicted the necessary algicide exposure required to attain the critical burden of infused copper and elicit desired responses of L. wollei in treated areas of Lay Lake.

  5. Identification of pheromone components and their binding affinity to the odorant binding protein CcapOBP83a-2 of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, P.; He, X.L.; Woodcock, C.; Pickett, J.A.; Field, L.M.; Birkett, M.A.; Kalinova, B.; Gomulski, L.M.; Scolari, F.; Gasperi, G.; Malacrida, A.R.; Zhou, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly (or medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann; Diptera: Tephritidae), is a serious pest of agriculture worldwide, displaying a very wide larval host range with more than 250 different species of fruit and vegetables. Olfaction plays a key role in the invasive potential of this species. Unfortunately, the pheromone communication system of the medfly is complex and still not well established. In this study, we report the isolation of chemicals emitted by sexually mature individuals during the “calling” period and the electrophysiological responses that these compounds elicit on the antennae of male and female flies. Fifteen compounds with electrophysiological activity were isolated and identified in male emissions by gas chromatography coupled to electroantennography (GC–EAG). Within the group of 15 identified compounds, 11 elicited a response in antennae of both sexes, whilst 4 elicited a response only in female antennae. The binding affinity of these compounds, plus 4 additional compounds known to be behaviourally active from other studies, was measured using C. capitata OBP, CcapOBP83a-2. This OBP has a high homology to Drosophila melanogaster OBPs OS-E and OS-F, which are associated with trichoid sensilla and co-expressed with the well-studied Drosophila pheromone binding protein LUSH. The results provide evidence of involvement of CcapOBP83a-2 in the medfly's odorant perception and its wider specificity for (E,E)-α-farnesene, one of the five major compounds in medfly male pheromone emission. This represents the first step in the clarification of the C. capitata and pheromone reception pathway, and a starting point for further studies aimed towards the creation of new powerful attractants or repellents applicable in the actual control strategies. PMID:24607850

  6. Geospatial Method for Computing Supplemental Multi-Decadal U.S. Coastal Land-Use and Land-Cover Classification Products, Using Landsat Data and C-CAP Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, J. P.; Smoot, James; Ellis, Jean; Hilbert, Kent; Swann, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and implementation of a geospatial data processing method and multi-decadal Landsat time series for computing general coastal U.S. land-use and land-cover (LULC) classifications and change products consisting of seven classes (water, barren, upland herbaceous, non-woody wetland, woody upland, woody wetland, and urban). Use of this approach extends the observational period of the NOAA-generated Coastal Change and Analysis Program (C-CAP) products by almost two decades, assuming the availability of one cloud free Landsat scene from any season for each targeted year. The Mobile Bay region in Alabama was used as a study area to develop, demonstrate, and validate the method that was applied to derive LULC products for nine dates at approximate five year intervals across a 34-year time span, using single dates of data for each classification in which forests were either leaf-on, leaf-off, or mixed senescent conditions. Classifications were computed and refined using decision rules in conjunction with unsupervised classification of Landsat data and C-CAP value-added products. Each classification's overall accuracy was assessed by comparing stratified random locations to available reference data, including higher spatial resolution satellite and aerial imagery, field survey data, and raw Landsat RGBs. Overall classification accuracies ranged from 83 to 91% with overall Kappa statistics ranging from 0.78 to 0.89. The accuracies are comparable to those from similar, generalized LULC products derived from C-CAP data. The Landsat MSS-based LULC product accuracies are similar to those from Landsat TM or ETM+ data. Accurate classifications were computed for all nine dates, yielding effective results regardless of season. This classification method yielded products that were used to compute LULC change products via additive GIS overlay techniques.

  7. Viability of dried filaments, survivability and reproduction under water stress, and survivability following heat and UV exposure in Lyngbya martensiana, Oscillatoria agardhii, Nostoc calcicola, Hormidium fluitans, Spirogyra sp. and Vaucheria geminata.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S C; Singh, V

    2002-01-01

    Dried vegetative filaments of Spirogyra sp., Vaucheria geminata and Nostoc calcicola died within 1/2, 1 and 4 h, respectively; those of Hormidium fluitans, Oscillatoria agardhii and Lyngbya martensiana retained under similar storage conditions viability for 3, 5 and 10 d, respectively. The viability of dried vegetative filaments of L. martensiana, O. agardhii and H. fluitans decreased on storage at 20 degrees C in the dark. L. martensiana and O. agardhii tolerated 0.8 mol/L NaCl. The resistance to desiccation in L. martensiana and O. agardhii exhibited similar dependence as that to frost, to heat and UV light. O. agardhii filaments became slightly broader and their cells developed large number of gas vacuoles when grown in 0.8 mol/L NaCl-containing medium. The water stress imposed on growing algae either on high-agar solid media or in NaCl-containing liquid media reduced hormogonium formation in L. martensiana and O. agardhii, heterocyst and akinete formation in N. calcicola and fragmentation in H. fluitans; it did not induce conjugation in Spirogyra sp. and formation of reproductive organs in V. geminata. In all studied algae the stress reduced at various levels the survival of vegetative parts. Generally, algal body form and composition rather than habitats seem to decide primarily the level of resistance against various stress conditions.

  8. Studies toward the Total Synthesis of Itralamide B and Biological Evaluation of Its Structural Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoji; Lv, Chanshan; Feng, Junmin; Tang, Linjun; Wang, Zhuo; Liu, Yuqing; Meng, Yi; Ye, Tao; Xu, Zhengshuang

    2015-01-01

    Itralamides A and B were isolated from the lipophilic extract of Lyngbya majuscula collected from the eastern Caribbean. Itralamide B (1) showed cytotoxic activity towards human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293, IC50 = 6 μM). Preliminary studies disapproved the proposed stereochemistry of itralamide. In this paper, we will provide a full account of the total synthesis of four stereoisomers of itralamide B and the results derived from biological tests of these structural congeners. PMID:25871289

  9. Cannabinomimetic lipid from a marine cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Pereira, Alban R; Debonsi, Hosana M; Ligresti, Alessia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Gerwick, William H

    2011-10-28

    NMR-guided fractionation of two independent collections of the marine cyanobacteria Lyngbya majuscula obtained from Papua New Guinea and Oscillatoria sp. collected in Panama led to the isolation of the new lipids serinolamide A (3) and propenediester (4). Their structures were determined by NMR and MS data analysis. Serinolamide A (3) exhibited a moderate agonist effect and selectivity for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (Ki=1.3 μM, >5-fold) and represents the newest addition to the known cannabinomimetic natural products of marine origin.

  10. A New Lyngbyatoxin from the Hawaiian Cyanobacterium Moorea producens

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weina; Zhou, Wei; Uchida, Hajime; Kikumori, Masayuki; Irie, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Sakamoto, Bryan; Kamio, Michiya; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Lyngbyatoxin A from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (formerly Lyngbya majuscula) is known as the causative agent of “swimmer’s itch” with its highly inflammatory effect. A new toxic compound was isolated along with lyngbyatoxin A from an ethyl acetate extract of M. producens collected from Hawaii. Analyses of HR-ESI-MS and NMR spectroscopies revealed the isolated compound had the same planar structure with that of lyngbyatoxin A. The results of optical rotation and CD spectra indicated that the compound was a new lyngbyatoxin A derivative, 12-epi-lyngbyatoxin A (1). While 12-epi-lyngbyatoxin A showed comparable toxicities with lyngbyatoxin A in cytotoxicity and crustacean lethality tests, it showed more than 100 times lower affinity for protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) using the PKCδ-C1B peptide when compared to lyngbyatoxin A. PMID:24824022

  11. Clinical Utility of the CCAPS, CAS, and OQ-45

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarlane, Ian M.; Henry, Courtney L.; Nash, Trisha; Kissel, Susan; Bush, David

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a study evaluating the clinical utility of three clinical assessment measures commonly used in university counseling centers: the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45), the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms, and the College Adjustment Scales. Results found subscales assessing depression and anxiety were…

  12. Inhibition of coral recruitment by macroalgae and cyanobacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, I.B.; Walters, L.J.; Becerro, M.A.; Paul, V.J.; Ritson-Williams, R.; Beach, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    Coral recruitment is a key process in the maintenance and recovery of coral reef ecosystems. While intense competition between coral and algae is often assumed on reefs that have undergone phase shifts from coral to algal dominance, data examining the competitive interactions involved, particularly during the larval and immediate post-settlement stage, are scarce. Using a series of field and outdoor seawater table experiments, we tested the hypothesis that common species of macroalgae and cyanobacteria inhibit coral recruitment. We examined the effects of Lyngbya spp., Dictyota spp., Lobophora variegata (J. V. Lamouroux) Womersley, and Chondrophycus poiteaui (J. V. Lamouroux) Nam (formerly Laurencia poiteaui) on the recruitment success of Porites astreoides larvae. All species but C. poiteaui caused either recruitment inhibition or avoidance behavior in P. astreoides larvae, while L. confervoides and D. menstrualis significantly increased mortality rates of P. astreoides recruits. We also tested the effect of some of these macrophytes on larvae of the gorgonian octocoral Briareum asbestinum. Exposure to Lyngbya majuscula reduced survival and recruitment in the octocoral larvae. Our results provide evidence that algae and cyanobacteria use tactics beyond space occupation to inhibit coral recruitment. On reefs experiencing phase shifts or temporary algal blooms, the restocking of adult coral populations may be slowed due to recruitment inhibition, thereby perpetuating reduced coral cover and limiting coral community recovery. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  13. Lipid Extracted Microalgal Biomass Residue as a Fertilizer Substitute for Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Rahulkumar; Chokshi, Kaumeel; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Trivedi, Khanjan; Pancha, Imran; Kubavat, Denish; Mishra, Sandhya; Ghosh, Arup

    2015-01-01

    High volumes of lipid extracted microalgal biomass residues (LMBRs) are expected to be produced upon commencement of biodiesel production on a large scale, thus necessitating its value addition for sustainable development. LMBRs of Chlorella variabilis and Lyngbya majuscula were employed to substitute the nitrogen content of recommended rate of fertilizer (RRF) for Zea mays L. The pot experiment comprised of 10 treatments, i.e., T1 (No fertilizer); T2 (RRF-120 N: 60 P2O5: 40 K2O kg ha(-1)); T3 to T6-100, 75, 50, and 25% N through LMBR of the Chlorella sp., respectively; T7 to T10-100, 75, 50, and 25% N through LMBR of Lyngbya sp., respectively. It was found that all LMBR substitution treatments were at par to RRF with respect to grain yield production. T10 gave the highest grain yield (65.16 g plant(-1)), which was closely followed by that (63.48 g plant(-1)) under T5. T10 also recorded the highest phosphorus and potassium contents in grains. T4 was markedly superior over control in terms of dry matter accumulation (DMA) as well as carbohydrate content, which was ascribed to higher pigment content and photosynthetic activity in leaves. Even though considerably lower DMA was obtained in Lyngbya treatments, which might have been due to the presence of some toxic factors, no reduction in grain yield was apparent. The length of the tassel was significantly higher in either of the LMBRs at any substitution rates over RRF, except T6 and T7. The ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased with decreasing dose of Chlorella LMBR, while all the Lyngbya LMBR treatments recorded lower activity, which were at par with each other. Among the Chlorella treatments, only T5 recorded significantly higher values of glutathione reductase activity over RRF, while the rest were at par. There were significant increases in carbohydrate and crude fat, respectively, only in T4 and T3 over RRF, while no change was observed in crude protein due to LMBR treatments. Apparently, there was no

  14. Lipid Extracted Microalgal Biomass Residue as a Fertilizer Substitute for Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Rahulkumar; Chokshi, Kaumeel; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Trivedi, Khanjan; Pancha, Imran; Kubavat, Denish; Mishra, Sandhya; Ghosh, Arup

    2016-01-01

    High volumes of lipid extracted microalgal biomass residues (LMBRs) are expected to be produced upon commencement of biodiesel production on a large scale, thus necessitating its value addition for sustainable development. LMBRs of Chlorella variabilis and Lyngbya majuscula were employed to substitute the nitrogen content of recommended rate of fertilizer (RRF) for Zea mays L. The pot experiment comprised of 10 treatments, i.e., T1 (No fertilizer); T2 (RRF-120 N: 60 P2O5: 40 K2O kg ha−1); T3 to T6—100, 75, 50, and 25% N through LMBR of the Chlorella sp., respectively; T7 to T10—100, 75, 50, and 25% N through LMBR of Lyngbya sp., respectively. It was found that all LMBR substitution treatments were at par to RRF with respect to grain yield production. T10 gave the highest grain yield (65.16 g plant−1), which was closely followed by that (63.48 g plant−1) under T5. T10 also recorded the highest phosphorus and potassium contents in grains. T4 was markedly superior over control in terms of dry matter accumulation (DMA) as well as carbohydrate content, which was ascribed to higher pigment content and photosynthetic activity in leaves. Even though considerably lower DMA was obtained in Lyngbya treatments, which might have been due to the presence of some toxic factors, no reduction in grain yield was apparent. The length of the tassel was significantly higher in either of the LMBRs at any substitution rates over RRF, except T6 and T7. The ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased with decreasing dose of Chlorella LMBR, while all the Lyngbya LMBR treatments recorded lower activity, which were at par with each other. Among the Chlorella treatments, only T5 recorded significantly higher values of glutathione reductase activity over RRF, while the rest were at par. There were significant increases in carbohydrate and crude fat, respectively, only in T4 and T3 over RRF, while no change was observed in crude protein due to LMBR treatments. Apparently, there was no

  15. Charismatic microfauna alter cyanobacterial production through a trophic cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geange, S. W.; Stier, A. C.

    2010-06-01

    The trophic ecology of cyanobacterial blooms is poorly understood on coral reefs. Blooms of toxic cyanobacteria, Lyngbya majuscula, can quickly form large mats. The herbivorous sea hare, Stylocheilus striatus, and the predatory nudibranch, Gymnodoris ceylonica, often associate with these blooms, forming a linear food chain: nudibranch—sea hare—cyanobacteria. Using laboratory studies, this study quantified (1) the functional response of nudibranchs, (2) the effect of sea hare size on predation rates, and (3) the strength of the indirect effect of sea hare predation on cyanobacteria (i.e., a trophic cascade). Nudibranchs consumed on average 2.4 sea hares d-1, with the consumption of small sea hares 22 times greater than the consumption of large sea hares. Predation of sea hares reduced herbivory. Cyanobacterial biomass was 1.5 times greater when nudibranchs were present relative to when nudibranchs were absent. Although sea hare grazing can substantially reduce cyanobacterial biomass, predation of sea hares may mitigate grazing pressure, and therefore increase the abundance of cyanobacteria.

  16. Evaluation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as a heterologous expression host for the cyanobacterial protein kinase C activator lyngbyatoxin A.

    PubMed

    Jones, Adam C; Ottilie, Sabine; Eustáquio, Alessandra S; Edwards, Daniel J; Gerwick, Lena; Moore, Bradley S; Gerwick, William H

    2012-04-01

    Filamentous marine cyanobacteria are extremely rich sources of bioactive natural products and often employ highly unusual biosynthetic enzymes in their assembly. However, the current lack of techniques for stable DNA transfer into these filamentous organisms, combined with the absence of heterologous expression strategies for nonribosomal cyanobacterial gene clusters, prohibit the creation of mutant strains or the heterologous production of these cyanobacterial compounds in other bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the capability of a derivative of the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) to express enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the protein kinase C activator lyngbyatoxin A from a Hawaiian strain of Moorea producta (previously classified as Lyngbya majuscula). Despite large differences in GC content between these two bacteria and the presence of rare TTA/UUA leucine codons in lyngbyatoxin ORFs we were able to achieve expression of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase LtxB and reverse prenyltransferase LtxC in S. coelicolor M512 and confirmed the in vitro functionality of S. coelicolor overexpressed LtxC. Attempts to express the entire lyngbyatoxin A gene cluster in S. coelicolor M512 were not successful because of transcript termination observed for the ltxA gene, which encodes a large nonribosomal peptide synthetase. However, these attempts did show a detectable level of cyanobacterial promoter recognition in Streptomyces. Successful expression of lyngbyatoxin A proteins in Streptomyces provides a new platform for biochemical investigation of natural product enzymes from Moorea strains.

  17. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J.; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R. W.; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A. S.; Bleyenberg, Tanja E.; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Visser, Petra M.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs.

  18. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse.

    PubMed

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R W; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A S; Bleyenberg, Tanja E; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J A; Visser, Petra M

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs. PMID:27353576

  19. Integrating Bayesian networks and geographic information systems: good practice examples.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sandra; Low-Choy, Sama; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2012-07-01

    Bayesian networks (BNs) are becoming increasingly common in problems with spatial aspects. The degree of spatial involvement may range from spatial mapping of BN outputs based on nodes in the BN that explicitly involve geographic features, to integration of different networks based on geographic information. In these situations, it is useful to consider how geographic information systems (GISs) could be used to enhance the conceptualization, quantification, and prediction of BNs. Here, we discuss some techniques that may be used to integrate GIS and BN models, with reference to some recent literature which illustrate these approaches. We then reflect on 2 case studies based on our own experience. The first involves the integration of GIS and a BN to assess the scientific factors associated with initiation of Lyngbya majuscula, a cyanobacterium that occurs in coastal waterways around the world. The 2nd case study involves the use of GISs as an aid for eliciting spatially informed expert opinion and expressing this information as prior distributions for a Bayesian model and as input into a BN. Elicitator, the prototype software package we developed for achieving this, is also briefly described. Whereas the 1st case study demonstrates a GIS-data driven specification of conditional probability tables for BNs with complete geographical coverage for all the data layers involved, the 2nd illustrates a situation in which we do not have complete coverage and we are forced to extrapolate based on expert judgement.

  20. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse

    PubMed Central

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J.; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R. W.; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A. S.; Bleyenberg, Tanja E.; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Visser, Petra M.

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs. PMID:27353576

  1. Involvement of JNK and Caspase Activation in Hoiamide A-Induced Neurotoxicity in Neocortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Li, Xichun; Zou, Xiaohan; Greenwood, Michael; Gerwick, William H.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    The frequent occurrence of Moorea producens (formerly Lyngbya majuscula) blooms has been associated with adverse effects on human health. Hoiamide A is a structurally unique cyclic depsipeptide isolated from an assemblage of the marine cyanobacteria M. producens and Phormidium gracile. We examined the influence of hoiamide A on neurite outgrowth in neocortical neurons and found that it suppressed neurite outgrowth with an IC50 value of 4.89 nM. Further study demonstrated that hoiamide A stimulated lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) efflux, nuclear condensation and caspase-3 activity with EC50 values of 3.66, 2.55 and 4.33 nM, respectively. These data indicated that hoiamide A triggered a unique neuronal death profile that involves both necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. The similar potencies and similar time-response relationships between LDH efflux and caspase-3 activation/nuclear condensation suggested that both necrosis and apoptosis may derive from interaction with a common molecular target. The broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK completely inhibited hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, hoiamide A stimulated JNK phosphorylation, and a JNK inhibitor attenuated hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Collectively, these data demonstrate that hoiamide A-induced neuronal death requires both JNK and caspase signaling pathways. The potent neurotoxicity and unique neuronal cell death profile of hoiamide A represents a novel neurotoxic chemotype from marine cyanobacteria. PMID:25675001

  2. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Brian; Liu, Yang; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Gerwick, William H.; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula). Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM). Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF) in tumor cells. PMID:25803180

  3. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, T.A.; Macia, V. Mora; Rooks, P.; White, D.A.; Ali, S.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed. PMID:26753128

  4. Lyngbyoic acid, a “tagged” fatty acid from a marine cyanobacterium, disrupts quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa†

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jason Christopher; Meickle, Theresa; Ladwa, Dheran; Teplitski, Max; Paul, Valerie; Luesch, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism of bacterial gene regulation in response to increases in population density. Perhaps most studied are QS pathways mediated by acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) in Gram-negative bacteria. Production of small molecule QS signals, their accumulation within a diffusion-limited environment and their binding to a LuxR-type receptor trigger QS-controlled gene regulatory cascades. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, for example, binding of AHLs to their cognate receptors (LasR, RhlR) controls production of virulence factors, pigments, antibiotics and other behaviors important for its interactions with eukaryotic hosts and other bacteria. We have previously shown that marine cyanobacteria produce QS-inhibitory molecules, including 8-epi-malyngamide C (1), malyngamide C (2) and malyngolide (3). Here we isolated a new small cyclopropane-containing fatty acid, lyngbyoic acid (4), as a major metabolite of the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya cf. majuscula, collected at various sites in Florida. We screened 4 against four reporters based on different AHL receptors (LuxR, AhyR, TraR and LasR) and found that 4 most strongly affected LasR. We also show that 4 reduces pyocyanin and elastase (LasB) both on the protein and transcript level in wild-type P. aeruginosa, and that 4 directly inhibits LasB enzymatic activity. Conversely, dodecanoic acid (9) increased pyocyanin and LasB, demonstrating that the fused cyclopropane “tag” is functionally relevant and potentially confers resistance to β-oxidation. Global transcriptional effects of 4 in some ways replicate the gene expression changes of P. aeruginosa during chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients, with reduced lasR signaling, increased biofilm and expression of the virulence locus HSI-I. Compound 4 may therefore prove to be a useful tool in the study of P. aeruginosa adaption during such chronic infections. PMID:21258753

  5. Terminal Alkene Formation by the Thioesterase of Curacin A Biosynthesis: Structure of a Decarboxylating Thioesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Gehret, Jennifer J.; Gu, Liangcai; Gerwick, William H.; Wipf, Peter; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L.

    2011-11-07

    Curacin A is a polyketide synthase (PKS)-non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-derived natural product with potent anticancer properties generated by the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula. Type I modular PKS assembly lines typically employ a thioesterase (TE) domain to off-load carboxylic acid or macrolactone products from an adjacent acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In a striking departure from this scheme the curacin A PKS employs tandem sulfotransferase and TE domains to form a terminal alkene moiety. Sulfotransferase sulfonation of {beta}-hydroxy-acyl-ACP is followed by TE hydrolysis, decarboxylation, and sulfate elimination (Gu, L., Wang, B., Kulkarni, A., Gehret, J. J., Lloyd, K. R., Gerwick, L., Gerwick, W. H., Wipf, P., Hakansson, K., Smith, J. L., and Sherman, D. H. (2009) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 16033-16035). With low sequence identity to other PKS TEs (<15%), the curacin TE represents a new thioesterase subfamily. The 1.7-{angstrom} curacin TE crystal structure reveals how the familiar {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase architecture is adapted to specificity for {beta}-sulfated substrates. A Ser-His-Glu catalytic triad is centered in an open active site cleft between the core domain and a lid subdomain. Unlike TEs from other PKSs, the lid is fixed in an open conformation on one side by dimer contacts of a protruding helix and on the other side by an arginine anchor from the lid into the core. Adjacent to the catalytic triad, another arginine residue is positioned to recognize the substrate {beta}-sulfate group. The essential features of the curacin TE are conserved in sequences of five other putative bacterial ACP-ST-TE tridomains. Formation of a sulfate leaving group as a biosynthetic strategy to facilitate acyl chain decarboxylation is of potential value as a route to hydrocarbon biofuels.

  6. A review of acid sulfate soil impacts, actions and policies that impact on water quality in Great Barrier Reef catchments, including a case study on remediation at East Trinity.

    PubMed

    Powell, B; Martens, M

    2005-01-01

    An estimated 666,000 ha of acid sulfate soils (ASS) occur within the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) catchments of Queensland, Australia. Extensive areas have been drained causing acidification, metal contamination, deoxygenation and iron precipitation in reef receiving waters. The close proximity of ASS to reef waters makes them a substantial threat to water quality. Another important issue linked with ASS is their release of soluble iron, which is known to stimulate nuisance marine algal blooms, in particular Lyngbya majuscula. Known blooms of the cyanobacteria in reef waters have been confirmed at Shoalwater Bay, Corio Bay, the Whitsunday area and Hinchinbrook Channel. Acid sulfate soils are intimately related to coastal wetland landscapes. Where landscapes containing ASS have been disturbed (such as for agriculture, aquaculture, marinas, etc.) the biodiversity of adjacent wetlands can be adversely affected. However, there is no clear knowledge of the real extent of the so-called "hotspot" ASS areas that occur within the GBR catchments. Management of ASS in reef catchments has benefited from the implementation of the Queensland Acid Sulfate Soils Management Strategy through policy development, mapping, training programs, an advisory service, research and community participation. However, major gaps remain in mapping the extent and nature of ASS. Areas of significant acidification (i.e. hotspots) need to be identified and policies developed for their remediation. Research has a critical role to play in understanding ASS risk and finding solutions, to prevent the adverse impacts that may be caused by ASS disturbance. A case study is presented of the East Trinity site near Cairns, a failed sugar cane development that episodically discharges large amounts of acid into Trinity Inlet, resulting in periodic fish kills. Details are presented of scientific investigations, and a lime-assisted tidal exchange strategy that are being undertaken to remediate a serious ASS problem

  7. Using the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34 (CCAPS-34) to Predict Premature Termination in a College Counseling Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sean B.

    2012-01-01

    Swift and Greenberg (2012) observed that variables influencing the decision to drop out fluctuate according to the primary presenting problem, the amount of structure in therapy, the length of treatment, and the clinical setting. Due to these reports, researchers may focus on predictors of premature termination (PT) in treatment settings where the…

  8. Integrated Bayesian network framework for modeling complex ecological issues.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sandra; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2012-07-01

    . The benefits of OOBN modeling in the environmental community have not yet been fully realized in environmental management research. The IBNDC approach to BN modeling is described in the context of 2 case studies. The first is the initiation of blooms of Lyngbya majuscula, a blue-green algae, in Deception Bay, Australia where 3 existing models are being integrated, and the second case study is the viability of the free-ranging cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) population in Namibia where an integrated OOBN model is created consisting of 3 independent subnetworks, each describing a particular aspect of free-ranging cheetah population conservation. PMID:21853523

  9. Effect of macro- and micro-nutrient limitation on superoxide dismutase activities and carotenoid levels in microalga Dunaliella salina CCAP 19/18.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sushanta Kumar; Moane, Siobhan; Murray, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of sixteen stress conditions on total carotenoid production and the response of antioxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) in microalga Dunaliella salina. Of the stress conditions tested, high-light illumination (240 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) in combination with nitrogen depletion were the conditions associated with maximum carotenoid production and which induced Fe-SOD and retained the specific Mn-SOD isoform. Removal of the micronutrients manganese (Mn), Zinc (Zn) and Iron (Fe) as well as nitrogen from the medium enhanced carotenoid production on day 5, while the removal of nitrogen and Mn from the growth medium drastically affected carotenoid production at all time-points. The differential response of SODs influences the levels of carotenoid biosynthesis as chronic molecular defence strategies of D. salina.

  10. 25 Ways to Reduce the Cost of College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Richard; Gillen, Andrew; Bennett, Daniel; Denhart, Matthew; Robe, Jonathan; Holbrook, Todd; Neiger, Peter; Coleman, James; Templeton, Jordan; Leirer, Jonathan; Myers, Luke; Brady, Ryan; Malesick, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP) is an independent, nonprofit research center based in Washington, DC that is dedicated to researching public policy and economic issues relating to postsecondary education. CCAP aims to facilitate a broader dialogue that challenges conventional thinking about costs, efficiency and…

  11. Teen Pregnancy Prevention: Grassroots Efforts in Orange County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemenway, Callista Lee

    In 1979, a March of Dimes task force investigation in Orange County, California found a direct correlation between the rising number of low birth weight babies and the rising number of births to teens. Sparked by this investigation, the Coalition Concerned with Adolescent Pregnancy (CCAP), an independent non-profit agency, was formed. CCAP's…

  12. Coincidence of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque, osteoporosis, and periodontal bone loss in dental panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Soroushian, Sheila; Ganguly, Rumpa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to assess the correlation of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque (CCAP), the mandibular cortical index, and periodontal bone loss in panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods One hundred eighty-five panoramic radiographs with CCAP and 234 without this finding were evaluated by 3 observers for the presence of osseous changes related to osteoporosis and periodontal bone loss. Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the two groups for an association of CCAP with the mandibular cortical index and periodontal bone loss, respectively. Results There was a statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and osseous changes related to osteopenia/osteoporosis, with a p-value <0.001. There was no statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and periodontal bone loss. When comparing the 2 groups, "With CCAP" and "Without CCAP", there was a statistically significant association with the mean body mass index (BMI), number of remaining teeth, positive history of diabetes mellitus, and vascular accidents. There was no statistically significant association with gender or a history of smoking. Conclusion This study identified a possible concurrence of CCAP and mandibular cortical changes secondary to osteopenia/osteoporosis in panoramic radiographs. This could demonstrate the important role of dental professionals in screening for these systemic conditions, leading to timely and appropriate referrals resulting in early interventions and thus improving overall health. PMID:24380062

  13. Development and Initial Validation of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Benjamin D.; McAleavey, Andrew A.; Zhao, Yu; Lei, Pui-Wa; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Li, Hongli; Tate, Robin; Lin, Yu-Chu

    2012-01-01

    A short version of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62) was created via three studies. The final short version (CCAPS-34), which contains 34 items and 7 subscales, demonstrated good discrimination power, support for the proposed factor structure, strong initial convergent validity, and adequate test-retest…

  14. Neuropeptide Receptor Transcript Expression Levels and Magnitude of Ionic Current Responses Show Cell Type-Specific Differences in a Small Motor Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Veronica J.; Daur, Nelly; Temporal, Simone; Schulz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the relationship between neuropeptide receptor transcript expression and current responses in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the crab, Cancer borealis. We identified a transcript with high sequence similarity to crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) receptors in insects and mammalian neuropeptide S receptors. This transcript was expressed throughout the nervous system, consistent with the role of CCAP in a range of different behaviors. In the STG, single-cell qPCR showed expression in only a subset of neurons. This subset had previously been shown to respond to CCAP with the activation of a modulator-activated inward current (IMI), with one exception. In the one cell type that showed expression but no IMI responses, we found CCAP modulation of synaptic currents. Expression levels within STG neuron types were fairly variable, but significantly different between some neuron types. We tested the magnitude and concentration dependence of IMI responses to CCAP application in two identified neurons, the lateral pyloric (LP) and the inferior cardiac (IC) neurons. LP had several-fold higher expression and showed larger current responses. It also was more sensitive to low CCAP concentrations and showed saturation at lower concentrations, as sigmoid fits showed smaller EC50 values and steeper slopes. In addition, occlusion experiments with proctolin, a different neuropeptide converging onto IMI, showed that saturating concentrations of CCAP activated all available IMI in LP, but only approximately two-thirds in IC, the neuron with lower receptor transcript expression. The implications of these findings for comodulation are discussed. PMID:25926455

  15. Effects of the surface characteristics of nano-crystalline and micro-particle calcium phosphate/chitosan composite films on the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y-T; Yu, B-Y; Shao, H-J; Chang, C-H; Sun, Y-M; Liu, H-C; Hou, S-M; Young, T-H

    2011-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) compounds, the main inorganic constituent of mammalian bone tissues, are believed to support bone precursor cell growth and osteogenic differentiation. Chitosan, a deacetylated derivative of chitin, is a versatile biopolymer to offer broad possibilities for cell-based tissue engineering. In the present study, different scales of CaP crystals on chitosan membranes were prepared for culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in vitro. A series of aqueous CaP suspensions with different concentrations were mixed with chitosan solution and chitosan/calcium phosphate (C/CaP) films were fabricated by the solvent-casting method. With different weight ratios of CaP in chitosan solution, the various surface characteristics of nano-amorphous (C/CaP 0.1), nano-crystalline (C/CaP 0.5) and micro-particle (C/CaP 2) CaP compounds were examined by scanning electron microscopy and electron dispersion spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction on micro-particles of CaP indicated the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite. The behavior of hMSCs, including proliferation, cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation, was studied on the C/CaP films. In basal culture medium, the incorporation of CaP into chitosan films could promote the proliferation of hMSCs. The C/CaP 0.5 film with connected CaP nano-crystals had better cellular viability. The fluorescence microscope images at 14 days of culture revealed extensive networks of F-actin filaments of hMSCs on chitosan, C/CaP 0.1 and C/CaP 0.5 films. The cellular morphology on C/CaP 2 film with discrete CaP micro-particles was partly restrained. In osteogenic medium, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of hMSCs increased and showed the process of osteogenic differentiation. The ALP levels on C/CaP 2 film were higher than those on C/CaP 0.1 and C/CaP 0.5 films. These results demonstrated that the crystallinity and topography of CaP on chitosan membranes could modulate the behaviors of cultured hMSCs in vitro.

  16. Antioxidant properties in some selected cyanobacteria isolated from fresh water bodies of Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Fuad; Ratnayake, R R; Meerajini, Kirisnashamy; Wasantha Kumara, K L

    2016-09-01

    Phytonutrients and pigments present in cyanobacteria act as antioxidants, which facilitate the formation of body's defense mechanism against free radical damage to cells. The aim of this investigation was to study the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), antioxidant activity, phycobiliproteins (PBPs), and active compounds in four cyanobacterial species, that is, Oscillatoria sp., Lyngbya sp., Microcystis sp., and Spirulina sp. isolated from fresh water bodies of Sri Lanka. In this study, Lyngbya sp., showed highest TPC (5.02 ± 0.20 mg/g), TFC (664.07 ± 19.76 mg/g), and total PBPs (127.01 mg/g) value. The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) was recorded highest in Oscillatoria sp. (39.63 ± 7.02), whereas the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity was also reported the highest in Oscillatoria sp. (465.31 ± 25.76) followed by Lyngbya sp. (248.39 ± 11.97). In FTIR spectroscopy, Lyngbya sp. does not show any N-H stretching band which is ultimately responsible for the inhibition of antioxidant activity. The study revealed that Lyngbya sp. and Oscillatoria sp. can be an excellent source for food, pharmaceutical, and other industrial uses. PMID:27625779

  17. Characteristics of two calcium pectinates prepared from citrus pectin using either calcium chloride or calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiujun; Duan, Hanying; Wang, Chao; Huang, Xuesong

    2014-07-01

    Calcium pectinate (CaP) was prepared from citrus pectin using either calcium chloride (C-CaP) or calcium hydroxide (HO-CaP) as the source of calcium for the reaction. The production yields and the rates of decalcification for the two calcium pectinates were compared and both found to be lower for C-CaP than for HO-CaP. In an attempt to explain these differences, certain chemical and structural characteristics of the two products, including functional groups (-CH3, C═O, COO-), rheological properties, morphology, and egg-box junction zones, were investigated by Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, rheology, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results from FTIR showed that, with an increase in calcium content, the wavenumber values and peak areas of FTIR for -CH3, C═O, and COO- groups all changed dramatically for C-CaP, while they were virtually unchanged for HO-CaP. Rheological analysis of the CaP gel showed that C-CaP had a stronger cross-linked network structure and a greater range of elastic behavior as compared to HO-CaP. SEM images of two CaP gels showed irregular membranes. C-CaP maintained a tight structure and a smooth surface, whereas HO-CaP was loose and rough. The results from XRD revealed a higher degree of crystallinity within C-CaP than within HO-CaP, which indicated that C-CaP possessed compact, ordered, and stable egg-box junction zones while the junction zones in HO-CaP were metastable and loose.

  18. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects.

    PubMed

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R E

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  19. Bursicon and neuropeptide cascades during the ecdysis program of the shore crab, Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Webster, Simon George; Wilcockson, David Charles; Mrinalini; Sharp, Jasmine Heloise

    2013-02-01

    Very little is known regarding the release patterns of neuropeptides involved in ecdysis of crustaceans compared to insects. In particular, the dynamics of release of the insect cuticle hardening hormone bursicon, which has only recently been discovered in crustaceans, is unknown. Bursicon has not previously been identified as a circulating neurohormone in these animals. Since patterns of release were likely to be ephemeral, bursicon, as well as two other neurohormones involved in the ecdysis program in crustaceans, crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone (CHH) were measured in single haemolymph samples in Carcinus maenas. For bursicon, an ultrasensitive time resolved-fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA) was developed, which firstly involved its characterisation by HPLC, bioassay and immunoassay. Simultaneous measurement of three neurohormones was performed at unparalleled levels of resolution, which has not previously been reported in any invertebrate. Additionally, expression patterns and architecture of neurones expressing both bursicon and CCAP were determined in the CNS during the moult cycle. Bursicon and CCAP are released in a massive surge, likely a single global exocytotic event on emergence, just after release of CHH. Despite co-localisation of CCAP and bursicon in neurones of the CNS, observations suggest that differential packaging of CCAP can occur in the pericardial organs in a small population of secretory boutons, thus accounting for observations showing release of some CCAP during the penultimate stages of the ecdysis program. The results obtained vividly illustrate the dynamism of neuropeptide cascades occurring during crustacean ecdysis, and also allow proposal of a hypothesis of its endocrine control. PMID:23247273

  20. Identification and expression of mRNAs encoding bursicon in the plesiomorphic central nervous system of Homarus gammarus.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Jasmine H; Wilcockson, David C; Webster, Simon G

    2010-10-01

    Ecdysis in arthropods is a complex process, regulated by many neurohormones, which must be released in a precisely coordinated manner. In insects, the ultimate hormone involved in this process is the cuticle tanning hormone, bursicon. Recently, this hormone has been identified in crustaceans. To further define the distribution of bursicon in crustacean nervous systems, and to compare hormone structures within the sub-phylum, cDNAs encoding both bursicon subunits were cloned and sequenced from the nervous system of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, and expression patterns including those for CCAP determined using in-situ hybridisation, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Full-length cDNAs encoded bursicon subunits of 121 amino acids (Average M(r): 13365.48) for Burs α, 115 amino acids (Average M(r): 12928.54) for Burs β. Amino acid sequences were most closely related to those of crabs, and for Burs β the sequence was identical to that of the American lobster, Homarus americanus. Complete co-localisation with CCAP in the VNC was seen. Copy numbers burs α, burs β and CCAP mRNAs were between 0.5 and 1.5 × 10(5) for both bursicon subunits, 0.5-6 × 10(5) per cdn neurone for CCAP. The terminal abdominal ganglia (AG 6-8) contained about 52 cdn-type neurons, making it the largest bursicon producing region in the CNS. Double labelling IHC using recombinant Carcinus Burs α and CCAP antisera demonstrated complete co-localisation in the VNC. On the basis of the results obtained, it is proposed that CCAP and bursicon release occur simultaneously during ecdysis in crustaceans. PMID:20691691

  1. Specific Metabolites in a Phaeodactylum tricornutum Strain Isolated from Western Norwegian Fjord Water

    PubMed Central

    Prestegard, Siv Kristin; Erga, Svein Rune; Steinrücken, Pia; Mjøs, Svein Are; Knutsen, Gjert; Rohloff, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We have searched for special characteristics in growth, protein expression, fatty acids and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a local Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin strain (Bergen Marine Biobank), by comparing it with a common accession strain (CCAP). Differences in growth and expressed proteins were detected between the BMB strain and the CCAP strain, and the BMB strain reached the highest cell densities under the given growth conditions. Fatty acid (FA) analyses showed highest relative eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels in the exponential phase (25.73% and 28.31%), and highest levels of palmitoleic acid (16:1 n-7) in the stationary phase (46.36% and 43.66%) in the BMB and CCAP strain, respectively. The most striking finding of the VOCs analyses was the relatively high levels of ectocarpene, 6-((1E)-butenyl)-1,4-cycloheptadiene, hormosirene, and desmarestene and structurally related compounds, which were exclusively detected in the BMB strain. Many of the VOCs detected in the CCAP and, in particular, in the BMB strain have been reported as antimicrobial agents. We suggest that the array of pheromones and antimicrobial substances could be part of an allelopathic strategy of the BMB strain, dominated by oval cells, thus reflecting the benthic life stage of this morphological form. These findings show the potential for bioactive metabolites in the BMB strain. PMID:26729140

  2. Stability of Subsidy Participation and Continuity of Care in the Child Care Assistance Program in Minnesota. Minnesota Child Care Choices Research Brief Series. Publication #2014-55

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elizabeth E.; Krafft, Caroline; Tout, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The Minnesota Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) provides subsidies to help low-income families pay for child care while parents are working, looking for work, or attending school. The program can help make quality child care affordable and is intended both to support employment for low-income families and to support the development and…

  3. Unlocking nature's treasure-chest: screening for oleaginous algae.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Stephen P; Zhang, QianYi; Ross, Michael; Anderson, Avril; Thomas, Naomi J; Lapresa, Ángela; Rad-Menéndez, Cecilia; Campbell, Christine N; Black, Kenneth D; Stanley, Michele S; Day, John G

    2015-01-01

    Micro-algae synthesize high levels of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins photoautotrophically, thus attracting considerable interest for the biotechnological production of fuels, environmental remediation, functional foods and nutraceuticals. Currently, only a few micro-algae species are grown commercially at large-scale, primarily for "health-foods" and pigments. For a range of potential products (fuel to pharma), high lipid productivity strains are required to mitigate the economic costs of mass culture. Here we present a screen concentrating on marine micro-algal strains, which if suitable for scale-up would minimise competition with agriculture for water. Mass-Spectrophotometric analysis (MS) of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) was subsequently validated by measurement of total fatty acids (TFA) by Gas-Chromatography (GC). This identified a rapid and accurate screening strategy based on elemental analysis. The screen identified Nannochloropsis oceanica CCAP 849/10 and a marine isolate of Chlorella vulgaris CCAP 211/21A as the best lipid producers. Analysis of C, N, protein, carbohydrate and Fatty Acid (FA) composition identified a suite of strains for further biotechnological applications e.g. Dunaliella polymorpha CCAP 19/14, significantly the most productive for carbohydrates, and Cyclotella cryptica CCAP 1070/2, with utility for EPA production and N-assimilation. PMID:26202369

  4. Modeling Heterogeneity in Students Seeking College Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordberg, Samuel S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A series of four studies explored the heuristic value of a method of grouping students in counseling by the severity of symptoms across eight domains. Method: Participants were over 50,000 college students in counseling, assessed with the CCAPS-62 and -34 as part of routine clinical care. Latent Profile Analysis was used to group…

  5. An Outcomes Based Assessment of Universities: Using "Who's Who in America"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Richard; Coleman, James; Robe, Jonathan; Ruchti, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This study summarizes recent and continuing research conducted by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP) on the metrics used for measuring college performance. Unlike other rankings, this study does not concentrate on the inputs of college education such as endowment size, number of faculty, or the educational preparation of…

  6. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects

    PubMed Central

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G.; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  7. Insights into the Processing of Carbon by Early Microbial Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, D.; Bebout, B.; Carpenter, S.; Discipulo, S.; Londry, K.; Habicht, K.; Turk, K.

    2003-01-01

    Interactions between Earth and the biosphere that were crucial for early biological evolution also influenced substantially the processes that circulate C between its reservoirs in the atmosphere, ocean, crust and mantle. The C-13 C-12 values of crustal carbonates and organics have recorded changes both in biological discrimination and in the relative rates of burial of organics and carbonates. A full interpretation of these patterns needs further isotopic studies of microbial ecosystems and individual anaerobes. Thus we measured carbon isotope discrimination during autotrophic and heterotrophic growth of pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria and archaea (SRB and SRA). Discrimination during CO2 assimilation is significantly larger than during heterotrophic growth on lactate or acetate. SRB grown lithoautotrophically consumed less than 3% of available CO2 and exhibited substantial discrimination, as follows: Desulfobacterium autotrophicum (alpha 1.0100 to 1.0123), Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus (alpha = 0.0138), and Desulfotomuculum acetoxidans (alpha = 1.0310). Mixotrophic growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans on acetate and CO2 resulted in biomass with delta C-13 composition intermediate to that of the substrates. We have recently extended these experiments to include the thermophilic SRA Archeoglobus spp. Ecological forces also influence isotopic discrimination. Accordingly, we quantified the flow of C and other constituents in modern marine cyanobacterial mats, whose ancestry extends back billions of years. Such ecosystem processes shaped the biosignatures that entered sediments and atmospheres. At Guerrero Negro, BCS, Mexico, we examined mats dominated by Microcoleus (subtidal) and Lyngbya (intertidal to supratidal) cyanobacteria. During 24 hour cycles, we observed the exchange of O2 and dissolved inorganic C (DIC) between mats and the overlying water. Microcoleus mats assimilated near-equal amounts of DIC during the day as they released at night, but

  8. Total Synthesis and Structural Reassignment of Lyngbyaloside C Highlighted by Intermolecular Ketene Esterification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Fu; Stefan, Eric; Taylor, Richard E

    2015-07-20

    Lyngbyaloside C, a classic macrolide, isolated from Lyngbya bouilloni, has shown moderate anticancer activity against several cancer cell lines. Here, we report the first total synthesis and stereochemical configuration reassignment of lyngbyaloside C. The synthesis highlights a one-pot intermolecular ketene esterification reaction to form the crucial tertiary ester and tetrahydropyran. In addition, a novel and concise synthetic pathway towards the 1,3-syn secondary, tertiary diol fragment is described using a regio- and stereospecific electrophilic ether transfer reaction.

  9. Biodiesel production from marine cyanobacteria cultured in plate and tubular photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Selvan, B Karpanai; Revathi, M; Piriya, P Sobana; Vasan, P Thirumalai; Prabhu, D Immuanual Gilwax; Vennison, S John

    2013-03-01

    Carbon (neutral) based renewable liquid biofuels are alternative to petroleum derived transport fuels that contribute to global warming and are of a limited availability. Microalgae based biofuels are considered as promising source of energy. Lyngbya sp. and Synechococcus sp. were studied for the possibility of biodiesel production in different media such as ASNIII, sea water enrichment medium and BG11. The sea water enrichment medium was found superior in enhancing the growth rate of these microalgae. Nitrogen depletion has less effect in total chlorophyll a content, at the same time the lipid content was increased in both Lyngbya sp. and Synechococcus sp. by 1.4 and 1.2 % respectively. Increase in salinity from 0.5-1.0 M also showed an increase in the lipid content to 2.0 and 0.8 % in these strains; but a salinity of 1.5 M has a total inhibitory effect in the growth. The total biomass yield was comparatively higher in tubular LED photobioreactor than the fluorescent flat plated photobioreactor. Lipid extraction was obtained maximum at 60 degrees C in 1:10 sample: solvent ratio. GC-MS analysis of biodiesel showed high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; 4.86 %) than saturated fatty acid (SFA; 4.10 %). Biodiesel production was found maximum in Synechococcus sp. than Lyngbya sp. The viscosity of the biodiesel was closely related to conventional diesel. The results strongly suggest that marine microalgae could be used as a renewable energy source for biodiesel production.

  10. Antioxidant, Anti-Nephrolithe Activities and in Vitro Digestibility Studies of Three Different Cyanobacterial Pigment Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, Chetan; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Bhayani, Khushbu; Maurya, Rahulkumar; Mishra, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Phycobiliprotein-containing water and carotenoid-containing methanolic extracts of three different cyanobacteria, Pseudanabaena sp., Spirulina sp. and Lyngbya sp., were studied for their DPPH scavenging, iso-bolographic studies, and anti-nephrolithe activities. The best EC50 values for DPPH scavenging were in Lyngbya water (LW, 18.78 ± 1.57 mg·mg−1 DPPH) and Lyngbya methanol (LM, 59.56 ± 37.38 mg·mg−1 DPPH) extracts. Iso-bolographic analysis revealed most of the combinations of extracts were antagonistic to each other, although LM—Spirulina methanol (SM) 1:1 had the highest synergistic rate of 86.65%. In vitro digestion studies showed that DPPH scavenging activity was considerably decreased in all extracts except for Pseudanabaena methanol (PM) and LM after the simulated digestion. All of the extracts were effective in reducing the calcium oxalate crystal size by nearly 60%–65% compared to negative control, while PM and Spirulina water (SW) extracts could inhibit both nucleation and aggregation of calcium oxalate by nearly 60%–80%. PMID:26308007

  11. Antioxidant, Anti-Nephrolithe Activities and in Vitro Digestibility Studies of Three Different Cyanobacterial Pigment Extracts.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Chetan; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Bhayani, Khushbu; Maurya, Rahulkumar; Mishra, Sandhya

    2015-08-20

    Phycobiliprotein-containing water and carotenoid-containing methanolic extracts of three different cyanobacteria, Pseudanabaena sp., Spirulina sp. and Lyngbya sp., were studied for their DPPH scavenging, iso-bolographic studies, and anti-nephrolithe activities. The best EC50 values for DPPH scavenging were in Lyngbya water (LW, 18.78 ± 1.57 mg·mg(-1) DPPH) and Lyngbya methanol (LM, 59.56 ± 37.38 mg·mg(-1) DPPH) extracts. Iso-bolographic analysis revealed most of the combinations of extracts were antagonistic to each other, although LM-Spirulina methanol (SM) 1:1 had the highest synergistic rate of 86.65%. In vitro digestion studies showed that DPPH scavenging activity was considerably decreased in all extracts except for Pseudanabaena methanol (PM) and LM after the simulated digestion. All of the extracts were effective in reducing the calcium oxalate crystal size by nearly 60%-65% compared to negative control, while PM and Spirulina water (SW) extracts could inhibit both nucleation and aggregation of calcium oxalate by nearly 60%-80%.

  12. Antioxidant, Anti-Nephrolithe Activities and in Vitro Digestibility Studies of Three Different Cyanobacterial Pigment Extracts.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Chetan; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Bhayani, Khushbu; Maurya, Rahulkumar; Mishra, Sandhya

    2015-08-01

    Phycobiliprotein-containing water and carotenoid-containing methanolic extracts of three different cyanobacteria, Pseudanabaena sp., Spirulina sp. and Lyngbya sp., were studied for their DPPH scavenging, iso-bolographic studies, and anti-nephrolithe activities. The best EC50 values for DPPH scavenging were in Lyngbya water (LW, 18.78 ± 1.57 mg·mg(-1) DPPH) and Lyngbya methanol (LM, 59.56 ± 37.38 mg·mg(-1) DPPH) extracts. Iso-bolographic analysis revealed most of the combinations of extracts were antagonistic to each other, although LM-Spirulina methanol (SM) 1:1 had the highest synergistic rate of 86.65%. In vitro digestion studies showed that DPPH scavenging activity was considerably decreased in all extracts except for Pseudanabaena methanol (PM) and LM after the simulated digestion. All of the extracts were effective in reducing the calcium oxalate crystal size by nearly 60%-65% compared to negative control, while PM and Spirulina water (SW) extracts could inhibit both nucleation and aggregation of calcium oxalate by nearly 60%-80%. PMID:26308007

  13. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S

    2014-01-15

    Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation.

  14. Comparative Plasmodium gene overexpression reveals distinct perturbation of sporozoite transmission by profilin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuko; Hliscs, Marion; Dunst, Josefine; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Montagna, Georgina N.; Matuschewski, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium relies on actin-based motility to migrate from the site of infection and invade target cells. Using a substrate-dependent gliding locomotion, sporozoites are able to move at fast speed (1–3 μm/s). This motility relies on a minimal set of actin regulatory proteins and occurs in the absence of detectable filamentous actin (F-actin). Here we report an overexpression strategy to investigate whether perturbations of F-actin steady-state levels affect gliding locomotion and host invasion. We selected two vital Plasmodium berghei G-actin–binding proteins, C-CAP and profilin, in combination with three stage-specific promoters and mapped the phenotypes afforded by overexpression in all three extracellular motile stages. We show that in merozoites and ookinetes, additional expression does not impair life cycle progression. In marked contrast, overexpression of C-CAP and profilin in sporozoites impairs circular gliding motility and salivary gland invasion. The propensity for productive motility correlates with actin accumulation at the parasite tip, as revealed by combinations of an actin-stabilizing drug and transgenic parasites. Strong expression of profilin, but not C-CAP, resulted in complete life cycle arrest. Comparative overexpression is an alternative experimental genetic strategy to study essential genes and reveals effects of regulatory imbalances that are not uncovered from deletion-mutant phenotyping. PMID:27226484

  15. Discovery of sea urchin NGFFFamide receptor unites a bilaterian neuropeptide family

    PubMed Central

    Semmens, Dean C.; Beets, Isabel; Rowe, Matthew L.; Blowes, Liisa M.; Oliveri, Paola; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides are ancient regulators of physiology and behaviour, but reconstruction of neuropeptide evolution is often difficult owing to lack of sequence conservation. Here, we report that the receptor for the neuropeptide NGFFFamide in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (phylum Echinodermata) is an orthologue of vertebrate neuropeptide-S (NPS) receptors and crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) receptors. Importantly, this has facilitated reconstruction of the evolution of two bilaterian neuropeptide signalling systems. Genes encoding the precursor of a vasopressin/oxytocin-type neuropeptide and its receptor duplicated in a common ancestor of the Bilateria. One copy of the precursor retained ancestral features, as seen in highly conserved vasopressin/oxytocin–neurophysin-type precursors. The other copy diverged, but this took different courses in protostomes and deuterostomes. In protostomes, the occurrence of a disulfide bridge in neuropeptide product(s) of the precursor was retained, as in CCAP, but with loss of the neurophysin domain. In deuterostomes, we see the opposite scenario—the neuropeptides lost the disulfide bridge, and neurophysin was retained (as in the NGFFFamide precursor) but was subsequently lost in vertebrate NPS precursors. Thus, the sea urchin NGFFFamide precursor and receptor are ‘missing links’ in the evolutionary history of neuropeptides that control ecdysis in arthropods (CCAP) and regulate anxiety in humans (NPS). PMID:25904544

  16. Effects of carbon source and light intensity on the growth and total lipid production of three microalgae under different culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Gim, Geun Ho; Ryu, Jaewon; Kim, Moon Jong; Kim, Pyung Il; Kim, Si Wouk

    2016-05-01

    We attempted to enhance the growth and total lipid production of three microalgal species, Isochrysis galbana LB987, Nannochloropsis oculata CCAP849/1, and Dunaliella salina, which are capable of accumulating high content of lipid in cells. Low nitrogen concentration under photoautotrophic conditions stimulated total lipid production, but a decreasing total lipid content and an increasing biomass were observed with increasing nitrogen concentration. Among the different carbon sources tested for heterotrophic cultivation, glucose improved the growth of all three strains. The optimal glucose concentration for growth of I. galbana LB987 and N. oculata CCAP849/1 was 0.02 M, and that of D. salina was 0.05 M. Enhanced growth occurred when they were cultivated under heterotrophic or mixotrophic conditions compared with photoautotrophic conditions. Meanwhile, high total lipid accumulation in cells occurred when they were cultivated under photoautotrophic or mixotrophic conditions. During mixotrophic cultivation, biomass production was not affected significantly by light intensity; however, both chlorophyll concentration and total lipid content increased dramatically with increasing light intensity up to 150 µmol/m(2)/s. The amount and composition ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in cells were different from each other depending on both species and light intensity. The highest accumulation of total fatty acid (C16-C18) among the three strains was found from cells of N. oculata CCAP849/1, which indicates that this species can be used as a source for production of biodiesel. PMID:26856592

  17. Temperature Effect on Exploitation and Interference Competition among Microcystis aeruginosa, Planktothrix agardhii and, Cyclotella meneghiniana

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Andreia Maria da Anunciação; Azevedo, Sandra Maria Feliciano de Oliveira e; Lürling, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of temperature (18 and 30°C) on growth and on the exploitation and interference competition of three species: Microcystis aeruginosa (MIJAC), Planktothrix agardhii (PAT), and Cyclotella meneghiniana (CCAP). Coculturing the organisms in batch systems allowed for the examination of both competitive interactions, while the interference competition was studied in cross-cultures. The experiments were done during 10–12 days, and samples were taken for chlorophyll-a analysis, using PHYTO-PAM. The temperature did not influence exploitation competition between MIJAC and other competitors and it was the best competitor in both temperatures. PAT presented higher growth rates than CCAP in competition at 18 and 30°C. The temperature influenced the interference competition. The growth of MIJAC was favored in strains exudates at 30°C, while CCAP was favored at 18°C, revealing that the optimum growth temperature was important to establish the competitive superiority. Therefore, we can propose two hypotheses: (i) different temperatures may results in production of distinct compounds that influence the competition among phytoplankton species and (ii) the target species may have different vulnerability to these compounds depending on the temperature. At last, we suggest that both the sensitivity and the physiological status of competing species can determine their lasting coexistence. PMID:26380369

  18. Destabilizing an interacting motif strengthens the association of a designed ankyrin repeat protein with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shoeb; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Dreier, Birgit; Hamdane, Djemel; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Plückthun, Andreas; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Affinity maturation by random mutagenesis and selection is an established technique to make binding molecules more suitable for applications in biomedical research, diagnostics and therapy. Here we identified an unexpected novel mechanism of affinity increase upon in vitro evolution of a tubulin-specific designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin). Structural analysis indicated that in the progenitor DARPin the C-terminal capping repeat (C-cap) undergoes a 25° rotation to avoid a clash with tubulin upon binding. Additionally, the C-cap appears to be involved in electrostatic repulsion with tubulin. Biochemical and structural characterizations demonstrated that the evolved mutants achieved a gain in affinity through destabilization of the C-cap, which relieves the need of a DARPin conformational change upon tubulin binding and removes unfavorable interactions in the complex. Therefore, this specific case of an order-to-disorder transition led to a 100-fold tighter complex with a subnanomolar equilibrium dissociation constant, remarkably associated with a 30% decrease of the binding surface. PMID:27380724

  19. Destabilizing an interacting motif strengthens the association of a designed ankyrin repeat protein with tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shoeb; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Dreier, Birgit; Hamdane, Djemel; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Plückthun, Andreas; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Affinity maturation by random mutagenesis and selection is an established technique to make binding molecules more suitable for applications in biomedical research, diagnostics and therapy. Here we identified an unexpected novel mechanism of affinity increase upon in vitro evolution of a tubulin-specific designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin). Structural analysis indicated that in the progenitor DARPin the C-terminal capping repeat (C-cap) undergoes a 25° rotation to avoid a clash with tubulin upon binding. Additionally, the C-cap appears to be involved in electrostatic repulsion with tubulin. Biochemical and structural characterizations demonstrated that the evolved mutants achieved a gain in affinity through destabilization of the C-cap, which relieves the need of a DARPin conformational change upon tubulin binding and removes unfavorable interactions in the complex. Therefore, this specific case of an order-to-disorder transition led to a 100-fold tighter complex with a subnanomolar equilibrium dissociation constant, remarkably associated with a 30% decrease of the binding surface. PMID:27380724

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on cool building materials

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Fishman, B.; Frohnsdorff, G.

    1994-04-01

    The Option 9, Cool Communities, of the Clinton-Gore Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) calls for mobilizing community and corporate resources to strategically plant trees and lighten the surfaces of buildings and roads in order to reduce cooling energy use of the buildings. It is estimated that Cool Communities Project will potentially save over 100 billion kilowatt-hour of energy per year corresponding to 27 million tons of carbon per year by the year 2015. To pursue the CCAP`s objectives, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on behalf of the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency, in cooperation with the Building and Fire Research Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), organized a one-day meeting to (1) explore the need for developing a national plan to assess the technical feasibility and commercial potential of high-albedo (``cool``) building materials, and if appropriate, to (2) outline a course of action for developing the plan. The meeting took place on February 28, 1994, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The proceedings of the conference, Cool Building Materials, includes the minutes of the conference and copies of presentation materials distributed by the conference participants.

  1. Impacts of microcystins on the feeding behaviour and energy balance of zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha: a bioenergetics approach.

    PubMed

    Juhel, G; Davenport, J; O'Halloran, J; Culloty, S C; O'Riordan, R M; James, K F; Furey, A; Allis, O

    2006-10-12

    Microcystins are produced by bloom-forming cyanobacteria and pose significant health and ecological problems. To investigate the impacts of these biotoxins on the physiology of the zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, a series of short-term feeding experiments were conducted in the laboratory. We used five microalgal diets consisting of single-cell suspensions of the green algae, Chlorella vulgaris, the diatom, Asterionella formosa, the cryptophyte, Cryptomonas sp. and two strains of the toxic cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa (strains CCAP 1450/06 and CCAP 1450/10). A sixth diet was a mixture of the diatom and the CCAP 1450/10 cyanobacterial strain. The low-toxicity strain CCAP 1450/06 contained 7.4 microg l(-1) of the MC-LR variant while the very toxic strain CCAP 1450/10 contained 23.8 microg l(-1) of MC-LR and 82.9 microg l(-1) of MC-LF. A flow-through system was designed to measure the following feeding parameters: clearance, filtration, ingestion and absorption rates. Ultimately the scope for growth (SFG) was determined as a net energy balance. We observed that mussels cleared the cyanobacterial species containing MC-LF (mean+/-95% confidence interval) at a significant lower rate (498+/-82 ml h(-1) g(-1) for the single cell suspension and 663+/-100 ml h(-1) g(-1) for the mixture diet) than all of the non-toxic species and the cyanobacterium containing MC-LR (all above 1l h(-1) g(-1)). The same pattern was observed with all the feeding parameters, particularly absorption rates. Furthermore, MC-LF caused an acute irritant response manifested by the production of 'pseudodiarrhoea', unusually fluid pseudofaeces, rich in mucus and MC-LF-producing Microcystis cells, ejected through the pedal gape of the mussels. This overall response therefore demonstrates selective rejection of MC-LF-producing cyanobacteria by zebra mussels, enhancing the presence of the very toxic MC-LF-producing M. aeruginosa in mixed cyanobacterial blooms and in the benthos. Finally, we

  2. Impacts of microcystins on the feeding behaviour and energy balance of zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha: a bioenergetics approach.

    PubMed

    Juhel, G; Davenport, J; O'Halloran, J; Culloty, S C; O'Riordan, R M; James, K F; Furey, A; Allis, O

    2006-10-12

    Microcystins are produced by bloom-forming cyanobacteria and pose significant health and ecological problems. To investigate the impacts of these biotoxins on the physiology of the zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, a series of short-term feeding experiments were conducted in the laboratory. We used five microalgal diets consisting of single-cell suspensions of the green algae, Chlorella vulgaris, the diatom, Asterionella formosa, the cryptophyte, Cryptomonas sp. and two strains of the toxic cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa (strains CCAP 1450/06 and CCAP 1450/10). A sixth diet was a mixture of the diatom and the CCAP 1450/10 cyanobacterial strain. The low-toxicity strain CCAP 1450/06 contained 7.4 microg l(-1) of the MC-LR variant while the very toxic strain CCAP 1450/10 contained 23.8 microg l(-1) of MC-LR and 82.9 microg l(-1) of MC-LF. A flow-through system was designed to measure the following feeding parameters: clearance, filtration, ingestion and absorption rates. Ultimately the scope for growth (SFG) was determined as a net energy balance. We observed that mussels cleared the cyanobacterial species containing MC-LF (mean+/-95% confidence interval) at a significant lower rate (498+/-82 ml h(-1) g(-1) for the single cell suspension and 663+/-100 ml h(-1) g(-1) for the mixture diet) than all of the non-toxic species and the cyanobacterium containing MC-LR (all above 1l h(-1) g(-1)). The same pattern was observed with all the feeding parameters, particularly absorption rates. Furthermore, MC-LF caused an acute irritant response manifested by the production of 'pseudodiarrhoea', unusually fluid pseudofaeces, rich in mucus and MC-LF-producing Microcystis cells, ejected through the pedal gape of the mussels. This overall response therefore demonstrates selective rejection of MC-LF-producing cyanobacteria by zebra mussels, enhancing the presence of the very toxic MC-LF-producing M. aeruginosa in mixed cyanobacterial blooms and in the benthos. Finally, we

  3. Revisiting N2 fixation in Guerrero Negro intertidal microbial mats with a functional single-cell approach

    PubMed Central

    Woebken, Dagmar; Burow, Luke C; Behnam, Faris; Mayali, Xavier; Schintlmeister, Arno; Fleming, Erich D; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Singer, Steven W; Cortés, Alejandro López; Hoehler, Tori M; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Spormann, Alfred M; Wagner, Michael; Weber, Peter K; Bebout, Brad M

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are complex, stratified ecosystems in which high rates of primary production create a demand for nitrogen, met partially by N2 fixation. Dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes and transcripts from Cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria (for example, Deltaproteobacteria) were detected in these mats, yet their contribution to N2 fixation is poorly understood. We used a combined approach of manipulation experiments with inhibitors, nifH sequencing and single-cell isotope analysis to investigate the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats at Laguna Ojo de Liebre near Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Acetylene reduction assays with specific metabolic inhibitors suggested that both sulfate reducers and members of the Cyanobacteria contributed to N2 fixation, whereas 15N2 tracer experiments at the bulk level only supported a contribution of Cyanobacteria. Cyanobacterial and nifH Cluster III (including deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers) sequences dominated the nifH gene pool, whereas the nifH transcript pool was dominated by sequences related to Lyngbya spp. Single-cell isotope analysis of 15N2-incubated mat samples via high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) revealed that Cyanobacteria were enriched in 15N, with the highest enrichment being detected in Lyngbya spp. filaments (on average 4.4 at% 15N), whereas the Deltaproteobacteria (identified by CARD-FISH) were not significantly enriched. We investigated the potential dilution effect from CARD-FISH on the isotopic composition and concluded that the dilution bias was not substantial enough to influence our conclusions. Our combined data provide evidence that members of the Cyanobacteria, especially Lyngbya spp., actively contributed to N2 fixation in the intertidal mats, whereas support for significant N2 fixation activity of the targeted deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers could not be found. PMID:25303712

  4. Revisiting N2 fixation in Guerrero Negro intertidal microbial mats with a functional single-cell approach

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woebken, Dagmar; Burow, Luke C.; Behnam, Faris; Mayali, Xavier; Schintlmeister, Arno; Fleming, Erich D.; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Singer, Steven W.; Cortes, Alehandro Lopez; Hoehler, Tori M.; et al

    2014-10-10

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are complex, stratified ecosystems in which high rates of primary production create a demand for nitrogen, met partially by N2 fixation. Dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes and transcripts from Cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria (for example, Deltaproteobacteria) were detected in these mats, yet their contribution to N2 fixation is poorly understood. We used a combined approach of manipulation experiments with inhibitors, nifH sequencing and single-cell isotope analysis to investigate the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats at Laguna Ojo de Liebre near Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Acetylene reduction assays with specific metabolic inhibitors suggested that both sulfate reducers andmore » members of the Cyanobacteria contributed to N2 fixation, whereas 15N2 tracer experiments at the bulk level only supported a contribution of Cyanobacteria. Cyanobacterial and nifH Cluster III (including deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers) sequences dominated the nifH gene pool, whereas the nifH transcript pool was dominated by sequences related to Lyngbya spp. Single-cell isotope analysis of 15N2-incubated mat samples via high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) revealed that Cyanobacteria were enriched in 15N, with the highest enrichment being detected in Lyngbya spp. filaments (on average 4.4 at% 15N), whereas the Deltaproteobacteria (identified by CARD-FISH) were not significantly enriched. We investigated the potential dilution effect from CARD-FISH on the isotopic composition and concluded that the dilution bias was not substantial enough to influence our conclusions. As a result, our combined data provide evidence that members of the Cyanobacteria, especially Lyngbya spp., actively contributed to N2 fixation in the intertidal mats, whereas support for significant N2 fixation activity of the targeted deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers could not be found.« less

  5. Identification of a molecular target of kurahyne, an apoptosis-inducing lipopeptide from marine cyanobacterial assemblages.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Arihiro; Ohno, Osamu; Katsuyama, Shun; Morita, Maho; Sasazawa, Yukiko; Dan, Shingo; Simizu, Siro; Yamori, Takao; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2015-11-15

    In 2014, we isolated kurahyne, an acetylene-containing lipopeptide, from a marine cyanobacterial assemblage of Lyngbya sp. Kurahyne exhibited growth-inhibitory activity against human cancer cells, and induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. However, its mode of action is not yet clear. To elucidate its mode of action, we carried out several cell-based assays, and identified the intracellular target molecule of kurahyne as sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA). In addition, we found that kurahyne inhibited the differentiation of macrophages into osteoclasts. PMID:26428873

  6. Morphology and phylogeny of Vannella croatica n. sp. (Amoebozoa, Discosea, Vannellida).

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Alexey V; Bondarenko, Natalya; Glotova, Anna; Nassonova, Elena

    2016-02-01

    We isolated and described a new species of freshwater vannellid amoeba from Krka natural reserve in Croatia--Vannella croatica n. sp. This species has certain morphological differences from all known vannellids and differs at the level of SSU sequence. It resembles in size and morphology Vannella lata; to facilitate direct comparison we publish images of V. lata CCAP 1589/12 strain (type strain, which is now lost) taken in 1999. Vannela croatica feeds on bacteria and can be easily grown in large amount in relatively pure culture and thus is suitable for molecular and biochemical studies requiring large amounts of material. PMID:26774817

  7. The Urban Leaders Adaptation Initiative: Climate Resilient Local Governments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. G.

    2008-12-01

    Local governments, the first responders to public health, safety and environmental hazards, must act now to lessen vulnerabilities to climate change. They must plan for and invest in "adapting" to inevitable impacts such as flood, fire, and draught that will occur notwithstanding best efforts to mitigate climate change. CCAP's Urban Leaders Adaptation Initiative is developing a framework for informed decision making on climate adaptation. Looking ahead to projected climate impacts and 'back casting' can identify what is needed now to both reduce greenhouse gas emissions and build local resiliency to climate change. CCAP's partnership with King County (WA), Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami-Dade County (FL), Milwaukee, Nassau County (NY), Phoenix, San Francisco, and Toronto is advancing policy discussions to ensure that state and local governments consider climate change when making decisions about infrastructure, transportation, land use, and resource management. Through the Initiative, local leaders will incorporate climate change into daily urban management and planning activities, proactively engage city and county managers and the public in developing solutions, and build community resilience. One goal is to change both institutional and public attitudes and behaviors. Determining appropriate adaptation strategies for each jurisdiction requires Asking the Climate Question: "How does what we are doing increase our resilience to climate change?" Over the next three years, the Initiative will design and implement specific adaptation plans, policies and 'catalytic' projects, collect and disseminate "best practices," and participate in framing national climate policy discussions. In the coming years, policy-makers will have to consider climate change in major infrastructure development decisions. If they are to be successful and have the resources they need, national climate change policy and emerging legislation will have to support these communities. The Urban Leaders

  8. Diversity of Heterotrophic Nitrogen Fixation Genes in a Marine Cyanobacterial Mat

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J. P.; Mellon, M.; Braun, S.; Litaker, W.; Steppe, T.; Paerl, H. W.

    1995-01-01

    The diversity of nitrogenase genes in a marine cyanobacterial mat was investigated through amplification of a fragment of nifH, which encodes the Fe protein of the nitrogenase complex. The amplified nifH products were characterized by DNA sequencing and were compared with the sequences of nitrogenase genes from cultivated organisms. Phylogenetic analysis showed that similar organisms clustered together, with the exception that anaerobic bacteria clustered together, even though they represented firmicutes, (delta)-proteobacteria, and (gamma)-proteobacteria. Mat nifH sequences were most closely related to those of the anaerobes, with a few being most closely related to the cluster of (gamma)-proteobacteria containing Klebsiella and Azotobacter species. No cyanobacterial nifH sequences were found from the mat collected in November when Microcoleus chthonoplastes was the dominant cyanobacterium, but sequences closely related to the cyanobacterium Lyngbya lagerheimeii were found during summer, when a Lyngbya strain was dominant. The results indicate that there is a high diversity of heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing organisms in marine cyanobacterial mats. PMID:16535068

  9. Effects of copper on composition species of periphyton in a Sierra Nevada, California, stream.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.; Carter, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    An oligotrophic stream was continuously dosed for 1 yr at 2.5, 5 and 10 mu g l-1 CuT; c12, 25 and 50 ng l-1 Cu2+. The numerically most abundant taxa were Bacillariophyceae (Achnanthes minutissima, Cocconeis placentula, Cymbella microcephala, C. sinuata, Fragilaria construens, F. crotonensis, Navicula spp., Synedra acus and S. rumpens), and the Cyanophyta Lyngbya spp., a co-dominant during spring and summer. Population densities of Lyngbya spp. were markedly reduced at all Cu concentrations. Population densities of the principal Chlorophyta (Spirogyra spp., Cladophora spp.) and the diatom Amphipleura pellucida were reduced at 5 mu g l-1 CuT. Of the 22 most abundant taxa, 16 were reduced in abundance by continuous exposure to 10 mu g l-1 CuT. There was no commensurate reduction in standing crop. Achnanthes minutissima was the primary replacement species. Other taxa more abundant at 5 mu g l-1 CuT than in the control were Ceratoneis arcus, Cocconeis placentula, Navicula spp. and Synedra rumpens. Only A. minutissima and Calothrix spp. were more abundant at 10 mu g l-1 than in the control. Three resemblance measures (Canberra metric, Bray-Curtis and Dice) and diversity (Brillouin's) were evaluated for detecting differences in species composition among stream sections. The Canberra metric, an index sensitive to proportional rather than absolute differences, was the most informative. -from Authors

  10. The effect of light:dark cycles of medium frequency on photosynthesis by Chlorella vulgaris and the implications for waste stabilisation pond design and performance.

    PubMed

    Ratchford, I A J; Fallowfield, H J

    2003-01-01

    The effect of light/dark (L:D) cycle times on the recovery from photoinhibition of green micro-alga Chlorella vulgaris (CCAP211/11c) and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus (CCAP1479/5) was investigated using an irradiated, temperature controlled oxygen electrode. The onset of photoinhibition in both organisms occurred at irradiances > 300 micromol m(-2)s(-1) at temperatures >15 degrees C. Light/dark cycle times were controlled independently using a relay timer and shutter placed between the quartz iodide light source and the oxygen electrode chamber. Oxygen evolution decreased rapidly when cells were continuously irradiated at 300, 500 and 750 micromol m(-2)s(-1). However, Chlorella cells irradiated at 300, 500 and 750 micromol m(-2)s(-1)on a L:D cycle of 60s:20s, 30s:60s and 60s: 120s respectively, maintained a constant rate of oxygen evolution over a 24 h incubation period. Exposure time to a given incident irradiance rather than the total light dose received appeared to determine the effect of light/dark cycle times on photosynthesis. A relationship was established between L:D ratio required to maintain constant oxygen production and incident photon flux density. The results suggest that the adverse effects of high irradiances on algae near the surface of a stratified waste stabilisation pond might be ameliorated by controlled mixing of algal cells through the depth of the pond.

  11. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-12-08

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD{sup +} utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5{prime},3{prime}-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5{prime}-AMP, 3{prime}-AMP, and 2{prime}-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5{prime}-nucleotides and 3{prime}-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5{prime} substrates in an anti conformation and 3{prime} substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  12. Recognition of nucleoside monophosphate substrates by Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2010-12-10

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD(+) utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5',3'-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 2'-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5'-nucleotides and 3'-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5' substrates in an anti conformation and 3' substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition. PMID:20934434

  13. National technology needs assessment for the preparation and implementation of climate change action plans

    SciTech Connect

    Berkel, C.W.M. van; Blonk, T.J.; Westra, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    In the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) it is recognised that developed countries have a responsibility in assisting developing countries and countries in economic transition in building a national capacity for the development, acquisition and transfer of Climate-related Technologies (CTs). Such assistance is most likely to be successful once it is tailored to the results of a sound assessment of the country`s development needs and once the results of this assessment have been endorsed by the most important stakeholders in the country. Recent insight in the opportunities and constraints for National (technology) Needs Assessments (NNAs) as planning tool for both capacity building and technology transfer regarding Environmentally Sound Technologies (ESTs) is applied here to propose a participatory Climate Change Action Planning (CCAP) process. This participatory planning process is thought to serve the dual objective of defining a national Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) while at the same time contributing to the creation of a broad supportive basis for its acceptance and implementation among stakeholders in the developing country.

  14. Modeling and mapping regional land use/land cover change in South Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranatunga, T.; Messen, D.

    2014-12-01

    Houston-Galveston Area Council (H-GAC) conducted a land use/land cover (LULC) change detection study to generate information about the LULC changes in a 15-county area of South Central Texas. Such information is essential in regional planning, natural resource management, monitoring and modeling of environmental characteristics. The objectives of this study are (1) Identification of regional spatial patterns of each LULC conversion, (2) Estimation of the area coverage of each LULC conversion, and (3) Estimation of the net gain and losses of each LULC classes. To achieve these objectives, ArcGIS Spatial analysis functions and data management tools were employed in python environment. Change detection was estimated from 1992 to 2011 using datasets from NLCD (National Land Cover Database) 1992, NLCD 2001 and NOAA C-CAP (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Coastal Change Analysis Program) 2011. Through visual analysis and comparisons with aerial imagery, we established that NLCD 1992 and 2001 datasets contained more classification inaccuracies than the NOAA 2011 dataset. The misclassified cells in the 1992 and 2001 NLCD datasets were corrected to be consistent with the 2011 C-CAP dataset. The NLCD 2001 dataset was first corrected using a logical evaluation with 2011 classes in each pixel. Then the NLCD 1992 dataset was corrected using the correct 2001 dataset. After correcting 1992 dataset, a cell by cell comparison was conducted with the NOAA 2011 dataset, and individual changes were recorded.

  15. Capping motifs stabilize the leucine-rich repeat protein PP32 and rigidify adjacent repeats.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thuy P; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2014-06-01

    Capping motifs are found to flank most β-strand-containing repeat proteins. To better understand the roles of these capping motifs in organizing structure and stability, we carried out folding and solution NMR studies on the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of PP32, which is composed of five tandem LRR, capped by α-helical and β-hairpin motifs on the N- and C-termini. We were able to purify PP32 constructs lacking either cap and containing destabilizing substitutions. Removing the C-cap results in complete unfolding of PP32. Removing the N-cap has a much less severe effect, decreasing stability but retaining much of its secondary structure. In contrast, the dynamics and tertiary structure of the first two repeats are significantly perturbed, based on (1)H-(15)N relaxation studies, chemical shift perturbations, and residual dipolar couplings. However, more distal repeats (3 to C-cap) retain their native tertiary structure. In this regard, the N-cap drives the folding of adjacent repeats from what appears to be a molten-globule-like state. This interpretation is supported by extensive analysis using core packing substitutions in the full-length and N-cap-truncated PP32. This work highlights the importance of caps to the stability and structural integrity of β-strand-containing LRR proteins, and emphasizes the different contributions of the N- and C-terminal caps. PMID:24659532

  16. Revisiting N2 fixation in Guerrero Negro intertidal microbial mats with a functional single-cell approach

    SciTech Connect

    Woebken, Dagmar; Burow, Luke C.; Behnam, Faris; Mayali, Xavier; Schintlmeister, Arno; Fleming, Erich D.; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Singer, Steven W.; Cortes, Alehandro Lopez; Hoehler, Tori M.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Spormann, Alfed M.; Wagner, Michael; Weber, Peter K.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2014-10-10

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are complex, stratified ecosystems in which high rates of primary production create a demand for nitrogen, met partially by N2 fixation. Dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes and transcripts from Cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria (for example, Deltaproteobacteria) were detected in these mats, yet their contribution to N2 fixation is poorly understood. We used a combined approach of manipulation experiments with inhibitors, nifH sequencing and single-cell isotope analysis to investigate the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats at Laguna Ojo de Liebre near Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Acetylene reduction assays with specific metabolic inhibitors suggested that both sulfate reducers and members of the Cyanobacteria contributed to N2 fixation, whereas 15N2 tracer experiments at the bulk level only supported a contribution of Cyanobacteria. Cyanobacterial and nifH Cluster III (including deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers) sequences dominated the nifH gene pool, whereas the nifH transcript pool was dominated by sequences related to Lyngbya spp. Single-cell isotope analysis of 15N2-incubated mat samples via high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) revealed that Cyanobacteria were enriched in 15N, with the highest enrichment being detected in Lyngbya spp. filaments (on average 4.4 at% 15N), whereas the Deltaproteobacteria (identified by CARD-FISH) were not significantly enriched. We investigated the potential dilution effect from CARD-FISH on the isotopic composition and concluded that the dilution bias was not substantial enough to influence our conclusions. As a result, our combined data provide evidence that members of the Cyanobacteria, especially Lyngbya spp., actively contributed to N2

  17. Microbial ecology summer research program, June 20-August 26, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The personnel, lecture topics, and summaries of research reports generated are presented. Research topics include: mutants of Escherichia coli affected in inducer exclusion; anaerobic chitin degradation; feeding relationships of harpacticoid copepods and microbial flora; degradation of ortho phenyl phenol by streptomycetes; biodegradation of dieldrin and aromatic compounds; the effect of neurotoxins on chemotaxis is Spirochaeta aurantia; chemotaxis and algal attachment of caulobacter; pigment formation in Lyngbya aestuari; diel movements of bacteria in a salt marsh; chemotaxis in S. Aurantia; isolation of marine toluate-oxidizing bacteria; growth inhibition of enteric bacteria by methyl-..cap alpha..-D-glucoside; studies of magnetic bacteria in brackish waters; and mechanisms of interaction between two microbial populations in activated sludge. (ACR)

  18. Preliminary Assessment of Cyanobacteria Diversity and Toxic Potential in Ten Freshwater Lakes in Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinang, Som Cit; Poh, Keong Bun; Shamsudin, Syakirah; Sinden, Ann

    2015-10-01

    Toxic cyanobacteria blooms are increasing in magnitude and frequency worldwide. However, this issue has not been adequately addressed in Malaysia. Therefore, this study aims to better understand eutrophication levels, cyanobacteria diversity, and microcystin concentrations in ten Malaysian freshwater lakes. The results revealed that most lakes were eutrophic, with total phosphorus and total chlorophyll-a concentrations ranging from 15 to 4270 µg L(-1) and 1.1 to 903.1 µg L(-1), respectively. Cyanobacteria were detected in all lakes, and identified as Microcystis spp., Planktothrix spp., Phormidium spp., Oscillatoria spp., and Lyngbya spp. Microcystis spp. was the most commonly observed and most abundant cyanobacteria recorded. Semi-quantitative microcystin analysis indicated the presence of microcystin in all lakes. These findings illustrate the potential health risk of cyanobacteria in Malaysia freshwater lakes, thus magnifying the importance of cyanobacteria monitoring and management in Malaysian waterways.

  19. Subsurface Intertidal Microbes: A Cryptic Source Of Organic Carbon For Beach Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Giver, Lorraine J.; Alvarez, Teresa (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Some freshwater, marine or hotspring beaches have no visible source of primary production, yet beneath the surface is an interstitial photosynthetic microbial community. To assess the significance of this source of organic carbon, we measured in situ carbon fixation rates in an intertidal marine beach through a diurnal cycle. Gross fixation for a transect (99 x 1 m) perpendicular to the shore was approx. 4041 mg C fixed/ day, or approx. 41 mg C fixed/ sq m day. In contrast, an adjacent well-established cyanobacterial (Lyngbya) mat was approx. 12 x as productive (approx. 490 mg C fixed/sq m day). Thus, subsurface sand mats may be an overlooked, yet important, endogenous source of organic carbon for intertidal ecosystems, as well as a sink in the global carbon cycle.

  20. Occurrence of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis among filamentous and unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Garlick, S; Oren, A; Padan, E

    1977-01-01

    Eleven of 21 cyanobacteria strains examined are capable of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis, as shown by their ability to photoassimilate CO2 in the presence of Na2S, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 703-nm light. These include different cyanobacterial types (filamentous and unicellular) of different growth histories (aerobic, anaerobic, and marine and freshwater). Oscillatoria limnetica, Aphanothece halophytica (7418), and Lyngbya (7104) have different optimal concentrations of Na2S permitting CO2 photoassimilation, above which the rate decreases: 3.5, 0.7, and 0.1 mM, respectively. In A. halophytica, for each CO2 molecule photoassimilated two sulfide molecules are oxidized to elemental sulfur, which is excreted from the cells.The ecological and evolutionary significance of anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacteria is discussed. PMID:402355

  1. Bloom of the cyanobacterium Moorea bouillonii on the gorgonian coral Annella reticulata in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Hideyuki; Isomura, Naoko; Sakai, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Coral populations are in decline due to environmental changes and biological attacks by predators and infectious diseases. Here, we report a localized bloom of the benthic filamentous cyanobacterium Moorea bouillonii (formerly Lyngbya bouillonii) observed exclusively on the gorgonian (sea fan) coral Annella reticulata at around 20 m depth in Japan. The degree of infection has reached 26% among different sizes of Annella colonies. Thick and continuous growth of Moorea may be sustained partly by symbiotic alpheid shrimp, which affix Moorea filaments to gorgonian corals for use as food and shelter. Most filaments get entangled on the coral colony, some penetrate into the stem of the coral with a swollen end like a root hair, which appears to function as an anchor in Annella. In addition to the cyanobacterium–shrimp interaction, the new trait of anchoring by the cyanobacterium into gorgonian coral may contribute to persistence of this bloom. PMID:25112498

  2. FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopic analysis of pretreated biosorbent to observe the effect on Cr (VI) remediation.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Bala; Rani, Nisha; Kaushik, Anubha

    2016-11-01

    Various chemical and physical treatments have been applied to indigenously isolated cyanobacterial strain, Lyngbya putealis HH-15, to observe the effect on chromium removal capacity. Pretreatment with hydrochloric acid (99.1%) and nitric acid (98.5%) resulted in enhanced chromium removal as compared to untreated control biosorbent (98.1%). Pretreatment with acetic acid (97.9%), methanol (97.0%), calcium chloride (96.0%), hot water (95.2%), and sodium hydroxide (93.9%) did not improve the chromium removal capacity of biosorbent. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis identified changes in biomass functionality and availability after physical and chemical modification-the results of which were in agreement with metal removal studies. In conclusion, this acid-treated biosorbent represents a suitable candidate to replace conventional removal technologies for metal-bearing wastewaters. PMID:27185214

  3. Occurrence of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis among filamentous and unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Garlick, S; Oren, A; Padan, E

    1977-02-01

    Eleven of 21 cyanobacteria strains examined are capable of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis, as shown by their ability to photoassimilate CO2 in the presence of Na2S, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 703-nm light. These include different cyanobacterial types (filamentous and unicellular) of different growth histories (aerobic, anaerobic, and marine and freshwater). Oscillatoria limnetica, Aphanothece halophytica (7418), and Lyngbya (7104) have different optimal concentrations of Na2S permitting CO2 photoassimilation, above which the rate decreases: 3.5, 0.7, and 0.1 mM, respectively. In A. halophytica, for each CO2 molecule photoassimilated two sulfide molecules are oxidized to elemental sulfur, which is excreted from the cells. The ecological and evolutionary significance of anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacteria is discussed. PMID:402355

  4. The biosynthesis of cyanobacterial sunscreen scytonemin in intertidal microbial mat communities

    PubMed Central

    Balskus, Emily P.; Case, Rebecca J.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2011-01-01

    We have examined the biosynthesis and accumulation of cyanobacterial sunscreening pigment scytonemin within intertidal microbial mat communities using a combination of chemical, molecular, and phylogenetic approaches. Both laminated (layered) and non-laminated mats contained scytonemin, with morphologically distinct mats having different cyanobacterial community compositions. Within laminated microbial mats, regions with and without scytonemin had different dominant oxygenic phototrophs, with scytonemin-producing areas consisting primarily of Lyngbya aestuarii and scytonemin-deficient areas dominated by a eukaryotic alga. The non-laminated mat was populated by a diverse group of cyanobacteria and did not contain algae. The amplification and phylogenetic assignment of scytonemin biosynthetic gene scyC from laminated mat samples confirmed that the dominant cyanobacterium in these areas, L. aestuarii, is likely responsible for sunscreen production. This study is the first to utilize an understanding of the molecular basis of scytonemin assembly to explore its synthesis and function within natural microbial communities. PMID:21501195

  5. Distribution and diagenesis of microfossils from the lower Proterozoic Duck Creek Dolomite, Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.; Strother, P. K.; Rossi, S.

    1988-01-01

    Two distinct generations of microfossils occur in silicified carbonates from a previously undescribed locality of the Lower Proterozoic Duck Creek Dolomite, Western Australia. The earlier generation occurs in discrete organic-rich clasts and clots characterized by microquartz anhedra; it contains a variety of filamentous and coccoidal fossils in varying states of preservation. Second generation microfossils consist almost exclusively of well-preserved Gunflintia minuta filaments that drape clasts or appear to float in clear chalcedony. These filaments appear to represent an ecologically distinct assemblage that colonized a substrate containing the partially degraded remains of the first generation community. The two assemblages differ significantly in taxonomic frequency distribution from previously described Duck Creek florules. Taken together, Duck Creek microfossils exhibit a range of assemblage variability comparable to that found in other Lower Proterozoic iron formations and ferruginous carbonates. With increasing severity of post-mortem alteration, Duck Creek microfossils appear to converge morphologically on assemblages of simple microstructures described from early Archean cherts. Two new species are described: Oscillatoriopsis majuscula and O. cuboides; the former is among the largest septate filamentous fossils described from any Proterozoic formation.

  6. Late stages of massive star evolution and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of massive stars in the mass range of 8 to 25 M solar mass is reviewed. The effect of electron degeneracy on the gravothermal nature of stars is discussed. Depending on the stellar mass, the stars form three types of cores, namely, non-degenerate, semi-degenerate, and strongly degenerate cores. The evolution for these cases is quite distinct from each other and leads to the three different types of final fate. It is suggested that our helium star model, which is equivalent to a 25 M solar mass star, will form a relatively small mass iron core despite the faster /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O reaction. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  7. Current Neural and Behavioral Dimensional Constructs across Mood Disorders.

    PubMed

    Langenecker, Scott A; Jacobs, Rachel H; Passarotti, Alessandra M

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of the underlying neurobiology for mood disorders is still limited. We present an integrated model for conceptualizing and understanding mood disorders drawing upon a broad literature pertinent to mood disorders. The integrated model of emotion processing and regulation incorporates the linguistic constructs of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative. In particular, we focus on the Positive Valence domain/circuit (PVC), highlighting recent reward research and the Negative Valence domain/circuit (NVC), highlighting rumination. Furthermore, we also illustrate the Cognitive Control and Problem Solving (CCaPS) circuit, which is heavily involved in emotion regulation, as well as the default mode network (DMN) and interactions between circuits. We conclude by proposing methods for addressing challenges in the developmental study of mood disorders including using high-risk design that incorporates risk for many disorders.

  8. Theoretical models for Type I and Type II supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in understanding the origin and nature of Type I and Type II supernovae is discussed. New Type II presupernova models characterized by a variety of iron core masses at the time of collapse are presented and the sensitivity to the reaction rate /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O explained. Stars heavier than about 20 M/sub solar/ must explode by a ''delayed'' mechanism not directly related to the hydrodynamical core bounce and a subset is likely to leave black hole remnants. The isotopic nucleosynthesis expected from these massive stellar explosions is in striking agreement with the sun. Type I supernovae result when an accreting white dwarf undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. The critical role of the velocity of the deflagration front in determining the light curve, spectrum, and, especially, isotopic nucleosynthesis in these models is explored. 76 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Tucson Electric`s diversified approach to greenhouse gas management

    SciTech Connect

    Dayal, P.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of development efforts by Tucson Electric Power Company (TEP) for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases (GHS) from it`s diversified carbon management projects. These efforts in part pursue the company`s proactive and innovative stewardship for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to 1990 levels. These GHS levels were the primary goals of the Clinton Administration`s Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) developed in October 1993. TEP corporate environmental commitments to reach these goals include partnership with the Department of Energy in the Climate Challenge Program, and the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding in 1996 with the US Environmental Protection Agency in the Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP). TEP`s diversified program for greenhouse gas management demonstrates the company`s performance using cost-effective opportunities that enhance it`s environmental programs.

  10. Selected Field Parameters from Streams and Analytical Data from Water and Macroinvertebrate Samples, Central Colorado Assessment Project, Environmental Assessment Task, 2004 and 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fey, David L.; Church, Stanley E.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Wanty, Richard B.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Adams, Monique; Anthony, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) began in October 2003 and is planned to last through September 2008. One major goal of this project is to compare the relationships between surface-water chemistry and aquatic fauna in mined and unmined areas. To accomplish this goal, we are conducting a State-scale reconnaissance sampling program, in which we are collecting water and macroinvertebrate samples. Selected results from the first two years of project analyses are reported here. We plan to develop statistical models and use geographic information system (GIS) technology to quantify the relationships between ecological indicators of metal contamination in Rocky Mountain streams and water quality, landscape and land-use characteristics (for example, mine density, geology, geomorphology, vegetation, topography). Our research will test the hypothesis that physicochemical variables and ecological responses to metal concentrations in stream water in Rocky Mountain streams are ultimately determined largely by historical land uses.

  11. Structure, stability and folding of the alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Doig, A J; Andrew, C D; Cochran, D A; Hughes, E; Penel, S; Sun, J K; Stapley, B J; Clarke, D T; Jones, G R

    2001-01-01

    Pauling first described the alpha-helix nearly 50 years ago, yet new features of its structure continue to be discovered, using peptide model systems, site-directed mutagenesis, advances in theory, the expansion of the Protein Data Bank and new experimental techniques. Helical peptides in solution form a vast number of structures, including fully helical, fully coiled and partly helical. To interpret peptide results quantitatively it is essential to use a helix/coil model that includes the stabilities of all these conformations. Our models now include terms for helix interiors, capping, side-chain interactions, N-termini and 3(10)-helices. The first three amino acids in a helix (N1, N2 and N3) and the preceding N-cap are unique, as their amide NH groups do not participate in backbone hydrogen bonding. We surveyed their structures in proteins and measured their amino acid preferences. The results are predominantly rationalized by hydrogen bonding to the free NH groups. Stabilizing side-chain-side-chain energies, including hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding and polar/non-polar interactions, were measured accurately in helical peptides. Helices in proteins show a preference for having approximately an integral number of turns so that their N- and C-caps lie on the same side. There are also strong periodic trends in the likelihood of terminating a helix with a Schellman or alpha L C-cap motif. The kinetics of alpha-helix folding have been studied with stopped-flow deep ultraviolet circular dichroism using synchrotron radiation as the light source; this gives a far superior signal-to-noise ratio than a conventional instrument. We find that poly(Glu), poly(Lys) and alanine-based peptides fold in milliseconds, with longer peptides showing a transient overshoot in helix content.

  12. Development and utilization strategies for recovery and utilization of coal mine methane

    SciTech Connect

    Byrer, C.W.; Layne, A.W.; Guthrie, H.D.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), at its Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has been involved in natural gas research since the 1970`s. DOE has assessed the potential of gas in coals throughout the U.S. and promoted research and development for recovery and use of methane found in minable and unminable coalbeds. DOE efforts have focused on the use of coal mine methane for regional economic gas self-sufficiency, energy parks, self-help initiatives, and small-power generation. This paper focuses on DOE`s past and present efforts to more effectively and efficiently recover and use this valuable domestic energy source. The Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) (1) lists a series of 50 voluntary initiatives designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, such as methane from mining operations, to their 1990 levels. Action No. 36 of the CCAP expands the DOE research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) efforts to broaden the range of cost-effective technologies and practices for recovering methane associated with coal mining operations. The major thrust of Action No. 36 is to reduce methane emissions associated with coal mining operations from target year 2000 levels by 1.5 MMT of carbon equivalent. Crosscutting activities in the DOE Natural Gas Program supply the utilization sectors will address RD&D to reduce methane emissions released from various mining operations, focusing on recovery and end use technology systems to effectively drain, capture, and utilize the emitted gas. Pilot projects with industry partners will develop and test the most effective methods and technology systems for economic recovery and utilization of coal mine gas emissions in regions where industry considers efforts to be presently non-economic. These existing RD&D programs focus on near-term gas recovery and gathering systems, gas upgrading, and power generation.

  13. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein is Required for Programmed Cell Death and Clearance of Developmentally-Transient Peptidergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Cheryl L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene function, is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. The FMR1 product (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein best established to function in activity-dependent modulation of synaptic connections. In the Drosophila FXS disease model, loss of functionally-conserved dFMRP causes synaptic overgrowth and overelaboration in pigment dispersing factor (PDF) peptidergic neurons in the adult brain. Here, we identify a very different component of PDF neuron misregulation in dfmr1 mutants: the aberrant retention of normally developmentally-transient PDF tritocerebral (PDF-TRI) neurons. In wild-type animals, PDF-TRI neurons in the central brain undergo programmed cell death and complete, processive clearance within days of eclosion. In the absence of dFMRP, a defective apoptotic program leads to constitutive maintenance of these peptidergic neurons. We tested whether this apoptotic defect is circuit-specific by examining crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and bursicon circuits, which are similarly developmentally-transient and normally eliminated immediately post-eclosion. In dfmr1 null mutants, CCAP/bursicon neurons also exhibit significantly delayed clearance dynamics, but are subsequently eliminated from the nervous system, in contrast to the fully persistent PDF-TRI neurons. Thus, the requirement of dFMRP for the retention of transitory peptidergic neurons shows evident circuit specificity. The novel defect of impaired apoptosis and aberrant neuron persistence in the Drosophila FXS model suggests an entirely new level of “pruning” dysfunction may contribute to the FXS disease state. PMID:21596027

  14. Molecular Ecological and Stable Isotopic Studies of Nitrogen Fixation in Modern Microbial Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, B. M.; Crumbliss, L. L.; DesMarais, D. J.; Hogan, M. E.; Omoregie, E.; Turk, K. A.; Zehr, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen is usually the element limiting biological productivity in the marine environment. Microbial mats, laminated microbial communities analogous to some of the oldest forms of life on Earth, are often the sites of high rates of N fixation (the energetically expensive conversion of atmospheric dinitrogen into a biologically useful form). The N fixing enzyme nitrogenase is generally considered to be of ancient origin, and is widely distributed throughout the Bacterial and Archaeal domains of life, indicating an important role for this process over evolutionary time. The stable isotopic signature of N fixation is purportedly recognizable in organic matter (ancient kerogens as well as present-day microbial mats) as a delta (15)N(sub organic) near zero. We studied two microbial mats exhibiting different rates of N fixation in order to better understand the impact of N fixation on the delta (15)N (sub organic) of the mats, as well as what organisms are important in this process. Mats dominated by the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes grow in permanently submerged hypersaline salterns, and exhibit low rates of N fixation, whereas mats dominated by the cyanobacterium Lyngbya spp grow in an intertidal area, and exhibit rates of N fixation an order of magnitude higher. To examine successional stages in mat growth, both developing and established mats at each location were sampled. PCR and RT-PCR based approaches were used to identify, respectively, the organisms containing nifH (one of the genes that encode nitrogenase) as well as those expressing nifH in these mats. Both mats exhibited a distinct diel cycle of N fixation, with highest rates occurring at night. The delta (15)N(sub organic) of the subtidal Microcoleus mats is near zero whereas the delta (15)N(sub organic) is slightly more positive (+ 2-3%), in the intertidal Lyngbya mats, an interesting difference in view of the fact that overall rates of activity in the intertidal mats are much higher that those

  15. A Landsat-Based Assessment of Mobile Bay Land Use and Land Cover Change from 1974 to 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph; Ellis, Jean; Smoot, James; Swann, Roberta; Graham, William

    2009-01-01

    The Mobile Bay region has experienced noteworthy land use and land cover (LULC) change in the latter half of the 20th century. Accompanying this change has been urban expansion and a reduction of rural land uses. Much of this LULC change has reportedly occurred since the landfall of Hurricane Frederic in 1979. The Mobile Bay region provides great economic and ecologic benefits to the Nation, including important coastal habitat for a broad diversity of fisheries and wildlife. Regional urbanization threatens the estuary s water quality and aquatic-habitat dependent biota, including commercial fisheries and avian wildlife. Coastal conservation and urban land use planners require additional information on historical LULC change to support coastal habitat restoration and resiliency management efforts. This presentation discusses results of a Gulf of Mexico Application Pilot project that was conducted in 2008 to quantify and assess LULC change from 1974 to 2008. This project was led by NASA Stennis Space Center and involved multiple Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) partners, including the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program (NEP), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration s (NOAA s) National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC), and the NOAA Coastal Services Center. Nine Landsat images were employed to compute LULC products because of their availability and suitability for the application. The project also used Landsat-based national LULC products, including coastal LULC products from NOAA s Coastal Change & Analysis Program (C-CAP), available at 5-year intervals since 1995. Our study was initiated in part because C-CAP LULC products were not available to assess the region s urbanization prior to 1995 and subsequent to post Hurricane Katrina in 2006. This project assessed LULC change across the 34-year time frame and at decadal and middecadal scales. The study area included the majority of Mobile and Baldwin counties that

  16. Rock Geochemistry and Mineralogy from Fault Zones and Polymetallic Fault Veins of the Central Front Range, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caine, Jonathan Saul; Bove, Dana J.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2004 to 2008 field seasons, approximately 200 hand samples of fault and polymetallic vein-related rocks were collected for geochemical and mineralogical analyses. The samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the Evolution of Brittle Structures Task under the Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) of the Mineral Resources Program (http://minerals.cr.usgs.gov/projects/colorado_assessment/index.html). The purpose of this work has been to characterize the relation between epithermal, polymetallic mineral deposits, paleostress, and the geological structures that hosted fluid flow and localization of the deposits. The data in this report will be used to document and better understand the processes that control epithermal mineral-deposit formation by attempting to relate the geochemistry of the primary structures that hosted hydrothermal fluid flow to their heat and fluid sources. This includes processes from the scale of the structures themselves to the far field scale, inclusive of the intrusive bodies that have been thought to be the sources for the hydrothermal fluid flow. The data presented in this report are part of a larger assessment effort on public lands. The larger study area spans the region of the southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado from the Wyoming to New Mexico borders and from the eastern boundary of the Front Range to approximately the longitude of Vail and Leadville, Colorado. Although the study area has had an extensive history of geological mapping, the mapping has resulted in a number of hypotheses that are still in their infancy of being tested. For example, the proximity of polymetallic veins to intrusive bodies has been thought to reflect a genetic relation between the two features; however, this idea has not been well tested with geochemical indicators. Recent knowledge regarding the coupled nature of stress, strain, fluid flow, and geochemistry warrant new investigations and approaches to test a variety of

  17. High-resolution mapping of combustion processes and implications for CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Tao, S.; Ciais, P.; Shen, H. Z.; Huang, Y.; Chen, H.; Shen, G. F.; Wang, B.; Li, W.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Lu, Y.; Zhu, D.; Chen, Y. C.; Liu, X. P.; Wang, W. T.; Wang, X. L.; Liu, W. X.; Li, B. G.; Piao, S. L.

    2013-05-01

    High-resolution mapping of fuel combustion and CO2 emission provides valuable information for modeling pollutant transport, developing mitigation policy, and for inverse modeling of CO2 fluxes. Previous global emission maps included only few fuel types, and emissions were estimated on a grid by distributing national fuel data on an equal per capita basis, using population density maps. This process distorts the geographical distribution of emissions within countries. In this study, a sub-national disaggregation method (SDM) of fuel data is applied to establish a global 0.1° × 0.1° geo-referenced inventory of fuel combustion (PKU-FUEL) and corresponding CO2 emissions (PKU-CO2) based upon 64 fuel sub-types for the year 2007. Uncertainties of the emission maps are evaluated using a Monte Carlo method. It is estimated that CO2 emission from combustion sources including fossil fuel, biomass, and solid wastes in 2007 was 11.2 Pg C yr-1 (9.1 Pg C yr-1 and 13.3 Pg C yr-1 as 5th and 95th percentiles). Of this, emission from fossil fuel combustion is 7.83 Pg C yr-1, which is very close to the estimate of the International Energy Agency (7.87 Pg C yr-1). By replacing national data disaggregation with sub-national data in this study, the average 95th minus 5th percentile ranges of CO2 emission for all grid points can be reduced from 417 to 68.2 Mg km-2 yr-1. The spread is reduced because the uneven distribution of per capita fuel consumptions within countries is better taken into account by using sub-national fuel consumption data directly. Significant difference in per capita CO2 emissions between urban and rural areas was found in developing countries (2.08 vs. 0.598 Mg C/(cap. × yr)), but not in developed countries (3.55 vs. 3.41 Mg C/(cap. × yr)). This implies that rapid urbanization of developing countries is very likely to drive up their emissions in the future.

  18. Microalgae mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sudha, S S; Rajamanickam, Karthic; Rengaramanujam, J

    2013-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles is known to have antimicrobial affects. Cyanobacteria isolates from muthupet mangrove includes Aphanothece sp, Oscillatoria sp, Microcoleus sp, Aphanocapsa sp, Phormidium sp, Lyngbya sp, Gleocapsa sp, Synechococcus sp, Spirulina sp with were set in compliance with their cellular mechanism of nano silver creation, and were investigated by UV-VIS spectrophotometer, Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Silver nanoparticles were spherical shaped well distributed without aggregation in solution with an average size of about 40- 80 nm. Synthesised nano silver had antibacterial production on various organisms that provoked various diseases in humans. The cellular metabolites of Microcoleus sp. only created nano silver and it enhanced the antibacterial activity against test pathogenic bacteria from MTCC (Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholera, Streptococcus sp., Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli.) The antimicrobial assay was performed using 0.001 M concentration of nano silver in well diffusion method with positive control of appropriate standard antibiotic discs Cephotaxime, Ampicillin, Tetracyclin, Cephalexin etc. Synthesised silver nanoparticles acted as an effective antimicrobial agent and proved as an alternative for the development of new antimicrobial agents to combat the problem of resistance. PMID:23821828

  19. Phosphorus Recycling from an Unexplored Source by Polyphosphate Accumulating Microalgae and Cyanobacteria-A Step to Phosphorus Security in Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Chandan; Chowdhury, Rajojit; Ray, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P), an essential element required for crop growth has no substitute. The global food security depends on phosphorus availability in soil for crop production. World phosphorus reserves are fast depleting and with an annual increase of 2.3% in phosphorus demand, the current reserves will be exhausted in coming 50-100 years. India and other Western countries are forced to import phosphorus fertilizers at high costs to meet their agricultural demands due to uneven distribution of phosphate rocks on earth. The present study from India, aims to draw attention to an unnoticed source of phosphorus being wasted as parboiled rice mill effluent and subsequent bio-recovery of the valuable element from this unconventional source. The research was conducted in West Bengal, India, a state with the highest number of parboiled rice mills where its effluent carries on an average ~40 mg/L of soluble phosphorus. Technology to recover and recycle this wastewater P in India in a simple, inexpensive mode is yet to be optimized. Our strategy to use microalgae, Chlorella sp. and cyanobacteria, Cyanobacterium sp., Lyngbya sp., and Anabaena sp. to sequester the excess phosphorus from the effluent as polyphosphate inclusions and its subsequent recycling as slow and moderate release phosphorus biofertilizers to aid plant growth, preventing phosphorus loss and pollution, is a contemporary venture to meet the need of the hour. These polyphosphate accumulating microorganisms play a dual role of remediation and recovery of phosphorus, preliminarily validated in laboratory scale. PMID:26733966

  20. Moorea producens gen. nov., sp. nov. and Moorea bouillonii comb. nov., tropical marine cyanobacteria rich in bioactive secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Engene, Niclas; Rottacker, Erin C; Kaštovský, Jan; Byrum, Tara; Choi, Hyukjae; Ellisman, Mark H; Komárek, Jiří; Gerwick, William H

    2012-05-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterial genus Moorea gen. nov., described here under the provisions of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, is a cosmopolitan pan-tropical group abundant in the marine benthos. Members of the genus Moorea are photosynthetic (containing phycocyanin, phycoerythrin, allophycocyanin and chlorophyll a), but non-diazotrophic (lack heterocysts and nitrogenase reductase genes). The cells (discoid and 25-80 µm wide) are arranged in long filaments (<10 cm in length) and often form extensive mats or blooms in shallow water. The cells are surrounded by thick polysaccharide sheaths covered by a rich diversity of heterotrophic micro-organisms. A distinctive character of this genus is its extraordinarily rich production of bioactive secondary metabolites. This is matched by genomes rich in polyketide synthase and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase biosynthetic genes which are dedicated to secondary metabolism. The encoded natural products are sometimes responsible for harmful algae blooms and, due to morphological resemblance to the genus Lyngbya, this group has often been incorrectly cited in the literature. We here describe two species of the genus Moorea: Moorea producens sp. nov. (type species of the genus) with 3L(T) as the nomenclature type, and Moorea bouillonii comb. nov. with PNG5-198(R) as the nomenclature type.

  1. Single cell genome amplification accelerates identification of the apratoxin biosynthetic pathway from a complex microbial assemblage.

    PubMed

    Grindberg, Rashel V; Ishoey, Thomas; Brinza, Dumitru; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Coates, R Cameron; Liu, Wei-ting; Gerwick, Lena; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Pevzner, Pavel; Lasken, Roger; Gerwick, William H

    2011-04-12

    Filamentous marine cyanobacteria are extraordinarily rich sources of structurally novel, biomedically relevant natural products. To understand their biosynthetic origins as well as produce increased supplies and analog molecules, access to the clustered biosynthetic genes that encode for the assembly enzymes is necessary. Complicating these efforts is the universal presence of heterotrophic bacteria in the cell wall and sheath material of cyanobacteria obtained from the environment and those grown in uni-cyanobacterial culture. Moreover, the high similarity in genetic elements across disparate secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways renders imprecise current gene cluster targeting strategies and contributes sequence complexity resulting in partial genome coverage. Thus, it was necessary to use a dual-method approach of single-cell genomic sequencing based on multiple displacement amplification (MDA) and metagenomic library screening. Here, we report the identification of the putative apratoxin. A biosynthetic gene cluster, a potent cancer cell cytotoxin with promise for medicinal applications. The roughly 58 kb biosynthetic gene cluster is composed of 12 open reading frames and has a type I modular mixed polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS) organization and features loading and off-loading domain architecture never previously described. Moreover, this work represents the first successful isolation of a complete biosynthetic gene cluster from Lyngbya bouillonii, a tropical marine cyanobacterium renowned for its production of diverse bioactive secondary metabolites.

  2. Temporal dynamics of natural product biosynthesis in marine cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Esquenazi, Eduardo; Jones, Adam C; Byrum, Tara; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gerwick, William H

    2011-03-29

    Sessile marine organisms are prolific sources of biologically active natural products. However, these compounds are often found in highly variable amounts, with the abiotic and biotic factors governing their production remaining poorly understood. We present an approach that permits monitoring of in vivo natural product production and turnover using mass spectrometry and stable isotope ((15)N) feeding with small cultures of various marine strains of the natural product-rich cyanobacterial genus Lyngbya. This temporal comparison of the amount of in vivo (15)N labeling of nitrogen-containing metabolites represents a direct way to discover and evaluate factors influencing natural product biosynthesis, as well as the timing of specific steps in metabolite assembly, and is a strong complement to more traditional in vitro studies. Relative quantification of (15)N labeling allowed the concurrent measurement of turnover rates of multiple natural products from small amounts of biomass. This technique also afforded the production of the neurotoxic jamaicamides to be more carefully studied, including an assessment of how jamaicamide turnover compares with filament growth rate and primary metabolism and provided new insights into the biosynthetic timing of jamaicamide A bromination. This approach should be valuable in determining how environmental factors affect secondary metabolite production, ultimately yielding insight into the energetic balance among growth, primary production, and secondary metabolism, and thus aid in the development of methods to improve compound yields for biomedical or biotechnological applications.

  3. Benthic cyanobacterial diversity of Iles Eparses (Scattered Islands) in the Mozambique Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubia, Mayalen; Turquet, Jean; Golubic, Stjepko

    2016-04-01

    The marine benthic cyanobacteria of the Iles Eparses, Mozambique Channel, were surveyed for the first time. A total of 39 species are reported: 29 from Europa, 17 from Glorioso and 23 from Juan de Nova Islands. The higher biodiversity in Europa is explained by greater habitat diversity on this Island with unique ecosystems (mangroves, fossil reefs, pools). Average species richness varied between the geomorphological habitat types with higher diversity in shallow environments (fossil reef pools, mangroves, reef flats), which are characterized by high temperatures and high irradiances. The most common species observed on the three islands were Hydrocoleum coccineum, Hydrocoleum glutinosum, Hydrocoleum lyngbyaceum, Phormidium laysanense, Lyngbya sordida, and Symploca hydnoides; which are also the dominant species observed in the Southwest Indian Ocean region. The most frequent species was Phormidium laysanense with extensive cover observed in the northwest of Juan de Nova Island. Our study provided a comparison between the cyanobacterial flora of Iles Eparses and the recorded surveys in the Southwest Indian Ocean region. The low similarity observed between these species lists could be explained by differences in sampling strategies and efforts, as well as by different taxonomic approaches employed in past regional studies.

  4. Distribution of phototrophic populations and primary production in a microbial mat from the Ebro Delta, Spain.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Mir, Joan; Caumette, Pierre; Gaju, Núria; Guerrero, Ricardo; Esteve, Isabel

    2004-03-01

    Microbial mats arising in the sand flats of the Ebro Delta (Tarragona, Spain) were investigated during the summer season, when the community was highly developed. These mats are composed of three pigmented layers of phototrophic organisms, an upper brown layer mainly composed of Lyngbya aestuarii and diatoms, an intermediate green layer of the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes, and an underlying pink layer of a so-far unidentified purple sulfur bacterium. In the photic zone, oxygenic phototrophs constitute about 58% of total photosynthetic biomass, measured as biovolume, and anoxygenic phototrophs represent 42%. Diatoms constitute 11.8% of the oxygenic biomass, M. chthonoplastes 61.2%, and L. aestuarii and coccoid cyanobacteria 20.6 and 6.4%, respectively. In this laminated community, organic matter has an autochthonous origin, and photosynthesis is the most important source of organic carbon. Oxygen production reaches up to 27.2 mmol O(2) m(-2) h(-1), measured at 1000 microE m(-2) s(-1) light intensity, whereas oxidation of sulfide in the light has been calculated to be 18.6 mmol S m(-2) h(-1). This amount represents 26% of the total photosynthetic production in terms of photoassimilated carbon, demonstrating the important role of anoxygenic phototrophs as primary producers in the pink layer of Ebro Delta microbial mats.

  5. Elevated CO2: Impact on diurnal patterns of photosynthesis in natural microbial ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    Algae, including blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), are the major source of fixed carbon in many aquatic ecosystems. Previous work has shown that photosynthetic carbon fixation is often enhanced in the presence of additional carbon dioxide (CO2). This study was undertaken to determine if this CO2 fertilization effect extended to microbial mats, and, if so, at what times during the day might the addition of CO2 affect carbon fixation. Four microbial mats from diverse environments were selected, including mats from a hypersaline pond (area 5, Exportadora de Sal, Mexico), the marine intertidal (Lyngbya, Laguna Ojo de Liebre, Mexico), an acidic hotspring (Cyanidium, Nymph Creek, Yellowstone National Park), and an acidic stream at ambient temperature (Zygogonium, Yellowstone National Park). Carbon fixation in the absence of additional CO2 essentially followed the rising and falling sunlight levels, except that during the middle of the day there was a short dip in carbon fixation rates. The addition of CO2 profoundly enhanced carbon fixation rates during the daylight hours, including during the midday dip. Therefore, it is unlikely that the midday dip was due to photoinhibition. Surprisingly, enhancement of carbon fixation was often greatest in the early morning or late afternoon, times when carbon fixation would be most likely to be light limited.

  6. Paleobiology of the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic transition: the Sukhaya Tunguska Formation, Turukhansk Uplift, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergeev, V. N.; Knoll, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    Silicified carbonates of the latest Mesoproterozoic Sukhaya Tunguska Formation, northwestern Siberia, contain abundant and diverse permineralized microfossils. Peritidal environments are dominated by microbial mats built by filamentous cyanobacteria comparable to modern species of Lyngbya and Phormidium. In subtidal to lower intertidal settings, mat-dwelling microbenthos and possible coastal microplankton are abundant. In contrast, densely woven mat populations with few associated taxa characterize more restricted parts of tidal flats; the preservation of vertically oriented sheath bundles and primary fenestrae indicates that in these mats carbonate cementation was commonly penecontemporaneous with mat growth. Eoentophysalis mats are limited to restricted environments where microlaminated carbonate precipitates formed on or just beneath the sediment surface. Most microbenthic populations are cyanobacterial, although eukaryotic microfossils may occur among the simple spheroidal cells interpreted as coastal plankton. Protists are more securely represented by large (up to 320 micrometers in diameter) but poorly preserved acritarchs in basinal facies. The Sukhaya Tunguska assemblage contains 27 species in 18 genera. By virtue of their stratigraphic longevity and their close and predictable association with specific paleoenvironmental conditions, including substrates, Proterozoic cyanobacteria support a model of bacterial evolution in which populations adapt rapidly to novel environments and, thereafter, resist competitive replacement. The resulting evolutionary pattern is one of accumulation and stasis rather than the turnover and replacement characteristic of Phanerozoic plants and animals.

  7. Development of a universal microarray based on the ligation detection reaction and 16S rrna gene polymorphism to target diversity of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Bianca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Frosini, Andrea; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rajaniemi, Pirjo; Rantala, Anne; Mugnai, Maria Angela; Ventura, Stefano; Wilmotte, Annick; Boutte, Christophe; Grubisic, Stana; Balthasart, Pierre; Consolandi, Clarissa; Bordoni, Roberta; Mezzelani, Alessandra; Battaglia, Cristina; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2004-12-01

    The cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes of significant ecological and biotechnological interest, since they strongly contribute to primary production and are a rich source of bioactive compounds. In eutrophic fresh and brackish waters, their mass occurrences (water blooms) are often toxic and constitute a high potential risk for human health. Therefore, rapid and reliable identification of cyanobacterial species in complex environmental samples is important. Here we describe the development and validation of a microarray for the identification of cyanobacteria in aquatic environments. Our approach is based on the use of a ligation detection reaction coupled to a universal array. Probes were designed for detecting 19 cyanobacterial groups including Anabaena/Aphanizomenon, Calothrix, Cylindrospermopsis, Cylindrospermum, Gloeothece, halotolerants, Leptolyngbya, Palau Lyngbya, Microcystis, Nodularia, Nostoc, Planktothrix, Antarctic Phormidium, Prochlorococcus, Spirulina, Synechococcus, Synechocystis, Trichodesmium, and Woronichinia. These groups were identified based on an alignment of over 300 cyanobacterial 16S rRNA sequences. For validation of the microarrays, 95 samples (24 axenic strains from culture collections, 27 isolated strains, and 44 cloned fragments recovered from environmental samples) were tested. The results demonstrated a high discriminative power and sensitivity to 1 fmol of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene. Accurate identification of target strains was also achieved with unbalanced mixes of PCR amplicons from different cyanobacteria and an environmental sample. Our universal array method shows great potential for rapid and reliable identification of cyanobacteria. It can be easily adapted to future development and could thus be applied both in research and environmental monitoring. PMID:15574913

  8. Selective inhibition of cancer cells' proliferation by compounds included in extracts from Baltic Sea cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Pawlik, Anna; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Toruńska-Sitarz, Anna; Narajczyk, Magdalena; Richert, Malwina; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna

    2015-12-15

    Cyanobacteria are a rich source of biologically active compounds used in pharmacology and biotechnology. Due to their high capacity of adaptation, which is reflected in the production of diverse metabolites, including toxins, these microorganisms are able to inhabit very different environments. In this work, water and ethanol extracts from 11 cyanobacterial strains derived from the Baltic Sea (Microcystis, Synechocystis, Leptolyngbya, Pseudanabaena, Lyngbya, Phormidium, Nodularia and Anabaena genera) were screened for anticancer activity. MCF-7 human breast cancer and HeLa cervical cancer cell lines, as well as HDFa normal human fibroblasts, were used. Three extracts derived from Pseudanabaena sp., Pseudanabaena cf. galeata and Microcystis aeruginosa revealed potent and selective antiproliferative activities against cancer cells. The mechanism of the anticancer activity was explored in MCF-7 cells, and was found to rely on the inhibition of the pro-survival Akt kinase and induction of cell death. The peptide profiles of selected cyanobacterial extracts were determined using LC-MS/MS, and classes of bioactive compounds that might be potentially responsible for the observed anticancer activities are presented.

  9. Caldora penicillata gen. nov., comb. nov. (cyanobacteria), a pantropical marine species with biomedical relevance.

    PubMed

    Engene, Niclas; Tronholm, Ana; Salvador-Reyes, Lilibeth A; Luesch, Hendrik; Paul, Valerie J

    2015-08-01

    Many tropical marine cyanobacteria are prolific producers of bioactive secondary metabolites with ecological relevance and promising pharmaceutical applications. One species of chemically rich, tropical marine cyanobacteria that was previously identified as Symploca hydnoides or Symploca sp. corresponds to the traditional taxonomic definition of Phormidium penicillatum. In this study, we clarified the taxonomy of this biomedically and ecologically important cyanobacterium by comparing recently collected specimens with the original type material and the taxonomic description of P. penicillatum. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer regions showed that P. penicillatum formed an independent clade sister to the genus Symploca, and distantly related to Phormidium and Lyngbya. We propose the new genus Caldora for this clade, with Caldora penicillata comb. nov. as the type species and designate as the epitype the recently collected strain FK13-1. Furthermore, the production of bioactive secondary metabolites among various geographically dispersed collections of C. penicillata showed that this species consistently produced the metabolite dolastatin 10 and/or the related compound symplostatin 1, which appear to be robust autapomorphic characters and chemotaxonomic markers for this taxon. PMID:26327714

  10. Photodynamic action of C-phycocyanins obtained from marine and fresh water cyanobacterial cultures: a comparative study using EPR spin trapping technique.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bibbin Tom; Patel, Anamika; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam; Mishra, Sandhya; Ghosh, Pushpita Kumar; Murugesan, Ramachandran

    2006-08-01

    C-phycocyanins, major biliproteins of blue green algae (cyanobacteria), widely used as colourants in food and cosmetics are known for their antioxidant as well as therapeutic potential. Recent claims indicating phycobiliproteins exert stronger photodynamic action on tumor cells than clinically approved hematoporphyrin derivatives motivate us to investigate the photodynamic action of two newly isolated C-phycocyanins from Phormidium [PHR] and Lyngbya [LY] spp, respectively in comparison with known C-phycocyanin from Spirulina sp. [SPI]. Photolysis of air saturated solutions of PHR, LY and SPI in the presence of 2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl piperidinol (TEMPL) generated three line EPR spectrum characteristic of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxyl (TEMPOL). The increase in intensity of the EPR spectrum with time of irradiation and decrease in intensity, in the presence of 1O2 quencher DABCO confirm the formation of 1O2. Photoirradiation in the presence of spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) generated EPR signal characteristic of O2(-) adduct. Efficiency of 1O2 generation is of the order LY > PHR> SPI. The yield of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is found to be 1O2>O2(-) indicating type II mechanism to be the prominent pathway for photosensitation by phycocyanins.

  11. Application of Multispectral and Hyperspectral Remote Sensing For Detection of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudela, R. M.; Accorsi, E.; Austerberry, D.; Palacios, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater Cyanobacterial Harmful algal blooms (CHABs) represent a pressing and apparently increasing threat to both human and environmental health. In California, toxin producing blooms of several species, including Aphanizomenon, Microcystis, Lyngbya, and Anabaena are common; toxins from these blooms have been linked to impaired drinking water, domestic and wild animal deaths, and increasing evidence for toxin transfer to coastal marine environments, including the death of several California sea otters, a threatened marine species. California scientists and managers are under increasing pressure to identify and mitigate these potentially toxic blooms, but point-source measurements and grab samples have been less than effective. There is increasing awareness that these toxic events are both spatially widespread and ephememeral, leading to the need for better monitoring methods applicable to large spatial and temporal scales. Based on monitoring in several California water bodies, it appears that Aphanizomenon blooms frequently precede dangerous levels of toxins from Microcystis. We are exploring new detection methods for identifying CHABs and potentially distinguishing between blooms of the harmful cyanobacteria Aphanizomenon and Microcystis using remote sensing reflectance from a variety of airborne and satellite sensors. We suggest that Aphanizomenon blooms could potentially be used as an early warning of more highly toxic subsequent blooms, and that these methods, combined with better toxin monitoring, can lead to improved understanding and prediction of CHABs by pinpointing problematic watersheds.

  12. Response of benthic algae to environmental gradients in an agriculturally dominated landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, M.D.; Black, R.W.; Gruber, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Benthic algal communities were assessed in an agriculturally dominated landscape in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington, to determine which environmental variables best explained species distributions, and whether algae species optima models were useful in predicting specific water-quality parameters. Land uses in the study area included forest, range, urban, and agriculture. Most of the streams in this region can be characterized as open-channel systems influenced by intensive dryland (nonirrigated) and irrigated agriculture. Algal communities in forested streams were dominated by blue-green algae, with communities in urban and range streams dominated by diatoms. The predominance of either blue-greens or diatoms in agricultural streams varied greatly depending on the specific site. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated a strong gradient effect of several key environmental variables on benthic algal community composition. Conductivity and % agriculture were the dominant explanatory variables when all sites (n = 24) were included in the CCA; water velocity replaced conductivity when the CCA included only agricultural and urban sites. Other significant explanatory variables included dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), orthophosphate (OP), discharge, and precipitation. Regression and calibration models accurately predicted conductivity based on benthic algal communities, with OP having slightly lower predictability. The model for DIN was poor, and therefore may be less useful in this system. Thirty-four algal taxa were identified as potential indicators of conductivity and nutrient conditions, with most indicators being diatoms except for the blue-greens Anabaenasp. and Lyngbya sp.

  13. The Relationship between Phytoplankton Evenness and Copepod Abundance in Lake Nansihu, China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wang; Zhang, Huayong; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Xiang; Huang, Hai

    2016-08-31

    The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is a central issue in ecology. Previous studies have shown that producer diversity can impact the consumer community via predator-prey interactions. However, direct observations of this relationship remain rare, in particular for aquatic ecosystems. In this research, the relationship between phytoplankton diversity (species richness and evenness) and the abundance of copepods was analyzed in Lake Nansihu, a meso-eutrophic lake in China. The results showed that copepods abundance was significantly decreased with increasing phytoplankton evenness throughout the year. However, both species richness and phytoplankton biomass showed no significant relationship with the abundance of copepods. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that phytoplankton evenness was negatively correlated with Thermocyclops kawamurai, Cyclops vicinus, Eucyclops serrulatus, Mesocyclops leuckarti, Sinocalanus tenellus, Sinocalanus dorrii, Copepods nauplius, but positively correlated with many Cyanophyta species (Chroococcus minutus, Dactylococcopsis acicularis, Microcystis incerta, Merismopedia tenuissima, Merismopedia sinica and Lyngbya limnetica). Based on our results, phytoplankton evenness was a better predictor of copepods abundance in meso-eutrophic lakes. These results provide new insights into the relationship between diversity and ecosystem functioning in aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Neutral monosaccharides from a hypersaline tropical environment: Applications to the characterization of modern and ancient ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Moers, M.E.C.; Larter, S.R. )

    1993-07-01

    Surficial and buried sediment samples from a hypersaline lagoon-sabkha system (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) were analyzed for carbohydrates (as neutral monosaccharides) to distinguish and characterize various types of recent and ancient tropical ecosystems on a molecular level. The samples consisted of surficial and buried microbial mats, lagoonal sediments containing seagrass (Halodule uninervis), and mangrove (Avicennia marine) paleosoils and handpicked mangrove leaves, ranging in age from contemporary to ca. 6000 yr BP. Analysis of quantitative neutral monosaccharide data by multivariate techniques shows that various groups can be distinguished: intact vascular plant material (mangrove leaf) contains high amounts of arabinose and glucose and hardly any partially methylated monosaccharides, whereas microbial mats in general and lagoonal seagrass sediments show high contributions of fucose, ribose, mannose, galactose, and partially methylated monosaccharides. Moreover, surficial microbial mats consisting of filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes, Lyngbya aestuarii) can be distinguished from other mats and sediments containing coccoid cyanobacteria (Entophysalis major) and/or fermenting, sulphate reducing, and methanogenic bacteria on the basis of high contributions of specific groups of partially methylated monosaccharides and other [open quotes]minor[close quotes] saccharides. The neutral monosaccharides present in mangrove paleosoils are for a substantial part derived from microorganisms. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Neutral monosaccharides from a hypersaline tropical environment: Applications to the characterization of modern and ancient ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moers, M. E. C.; Larter, S. R.

    1993-07-01

    Surficial and buried sediment samples from a hypersaline lagoon-sabkha system (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) were analysed for carbohydrates (as neutral monosaccharides) to distinguish and characterise various types of recent and ancient tropical ecosystems on a molecular level. The samples consisted of surficial and buried microbial mats, lagoonal sediments containing seagrass ( Halodule uninervis), and mangrove ( Avicennia marina) paleosoils and handpicked mangrove leaves, ranging in age from contemporary to ca. 6000 yr Bp. Analysis of quantitative neutral monosaccharide data by multivariate techniques shows that various groups can be distinguished: intact vascular plant material (mangrove leaf) contains high amounts of arabinose and glucose and hardly any partially methylated monosaccharides, whereas microbial mats in general and lagoonal seagrass sediments show high contributions of fucose, ribose, mannose, galactose and partially methylated monosaccharides. Moreover, surficial microbial mats consisting of filamentous cyanobacteria ( Microcoleus chtonoplastes, Lyngbya aestuarii) can be distinguished from other mats and sediments containing coccoid cyanobacteria ( Entophysalis major) and/or fermenting, sulphate reducing, and methanogenic bacteria on the basis of high contributions of specific groups of partially methylated monosaccharides and other "minor" saccharides. The neutral monosaccharides present in mangrove paleosoils are for a substantial part derived from microorganisms.

  16. Preferential soft-tissue preservation in the Hot Creek carbonate spring deposit, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainey, Dustin K.; Jones, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The relict Holocene Hot Creek carbonate spring deposit in southeast British Columbia is characterized by excellent preservation of soft-tissue organisms (e.g. cyanobacteria), but poor preservation of organisms with hard-tissue (e.g. wood, diatoms). The deposit is formed mainly of calcified cyanobacteria, with fewer mineralized macrophytes (plants), bryophytes (mosses), wood, and diatoms. Cyanobacteria grew as solitary filaments ( Lyngbya) and as radiating hemispherical colonies ( Rivularia). Both were preserved by encrustation and encapsulation while alive, and as casts after filament death and decay. Sheath impregnation was rare to absent. Filament encrustation, whereby calcite crystals nucleated on, and grew away from the sheath exterior, produced moulds that replicated external filament morphology, but hastened filament decay. Filament encapsulation, whereby calcite nucleated in the vicinity of, and grew towards the encapsulated filament, promoted sheath preservation even after trichome decay. Subsequent calcite precipitation inside the hollow sheath generated sheath casts. The inability of mineralizing spring water to penetrate durable cell walls meant that bryophytes, macrophytes, and most wood was preserved by encrustation. Some wood resisted complete decay for several thousand years, and its lignified cell walls allowed rare permineralizations. Diatoms were not preserved in the relict deposit because the frustules were dissolved by the basic spring water. Amorphous calcium carbonate produced by photosynthetic CO 2 removal may have acted as nucleation sites for physicochemically precipitated calcite. Thus, metabolic activities of floral organisms probably initiated biotic mineralization, but continuous inorganic calcite precipitation on and in flora ensured that soft tissues were preserved.

  17. Elevated CO2: impact on diurnal patterns of photosynthesis in natural microbial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, L J

    1994-01-01

    Algae, including blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), are the major source of fixed carbon in many aquatic ecosystems. Previous work has shown that photosynthetic carbon fixation is often enhanced in the presence of additional carbon dioxide (CO2). This study was undertaken to determine if this CO2 fertilization effect extended to microbial mats, and, if so, at what times during the day might the addition of CO2 affect carbon fixation. Four microbial mats from diverse environments were selected, including mats from a hypersaline pond (area 5, Exportadora de Sal, Mexico), the marine intertidal (Lyngbya, Laguna Ojo de Liebre, Mexico), an acidic hotspring (Cyanidium, Nymph Creek, Yellowstone National Park), and an acidic stream at ambient temperature (Zygogonium, Yellowstone National Park). Carbon fixation in the absence of additional CO2 essentially followed the rising and falling sunlight levels, except that during the middle of the day there was a short dip in carbon fixation rates. The addition of CO2 profoundly enhanced carbon fixation rates during the daylight hours, including during the midday dip. Therefore, it is unlikely that the midday dip was due to photoinhibition. Surprisingly, enhancement of carbon fixation was often greatest in the early morning or late afternoon, times when carbon fixation would be most likely to be light limited.

  18. The effects of UV radiation A and B on diurnal variation in photosynthesis in three taxonomically and ecologically diverse microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S; Rothschild, L J

    1999-02-01

    Photosynthetic primary production, the basis of most global food chains, is inhibited by UV radiation. Evaluating UV inhibition is therefore important for assessing the role of natural levels of UV radiation in regulating ecosystem behavior as well as the potential impact of stratospheric ozone depletion on global ecosystems. As both photosynthesis and UV fluxes are subject to diurnal variations, we examined the diurnal variability of the effect of UV radiation on photosynthesis in three diverse algal mats. In one of the mats (Cyanidium caldarium) a small mean decrease in primary productivity over the whole day occurred when both UVA and UVB were screened out. In two of the mats (Lyngbya aestuarii and Zygogonium sp.) we found a mean increase in the total primary productivity over the day when UVB alone was screened and a further increase when UVA and UVB were both screened out. Variations in the effects of UV radiation were found at different times of the day. This diurnal variability may be because even under the same solar radiation flux, there are different factors that may control photosynthetic rate, including nutritional status and other physiological processes in the cell. The results show the importance of assessing the complete diurnal productivity. For some of the time points the increase in the mean was still within the standard deviations in primary productivity, illustrating the difficulty in dissecting UV effects from other natural variations.

  19. Paleobiology of the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic transition: the Sukhaya Tunguska Formation, Turukhansk Uplift, Siberia.

    PubMed

    Sergeev, V N; Knoll, A H; Petrov PYu

    1997-12-01

    Silicified carbonates of the latest Mesoproterozoic Sukhaya Tunguska Formation, northwestern Siberia, contain abundant and diverse permineralized microfossils. Peritidal environments are dominated by microbial mats built by filamentous cyanobacteria comparable to modern species of Lyngbya and Phormidium. In subtidal to lower intertidal settings, mat-dwelling microbenthos and possible coastal microplankton are abundant. In contrast, densely woven mat populations with few associated taxa characterize more restricted parts of tidal flats; the preservation of vertically oriented sheath bundles and primary fenestrae indicates that in these mats carbonate cementation was commonly penecontemporaneous with mat growth. Eoentophysalis mats are limited to restricted environments where microlaminated carbonate precipitates formed on or just beneath the sediment surface. Most microbenthic populations are cyanobacterial, although eukaryotic microfossils may occur among the simple spheroidal cells interpreted as coastal plankton. Protists are more securely represented by large (up to 320 micrometers in diameter) but poorly preserved acritarchs in basinal facies. The Sukhaya Tunguska assemblage contains 27 species in 18 genera. By virtue of their stratigraphic longevity and their close and predictable association with specific paleoenvironmental conditions, including substrates, Proterozoic cyanobacteria support a model of bacterial evolution in which populations adapt rapidly to novel environments and, thereafter, resist competitive replacement. The resulting evolutionary pattern is one of accumulation and stasis rather than the turnover and replacement characteristic of Phanerozoic plants and animals.

  20. Caldora penicillata gen. nov., comb. nov. (Cyanobacteria), a pantropical marine species with biomedical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Engene, Niclas; Tronholm, Ana; Salvador-Reyes, Lilibeth A.; Luesch, Hendrik; Paul, Valerie J.

    2015-01-01

    Many tropical marine cyanobacteria are prolific producers of bioactive secondary metabolites with ecological relevance and promising pharmaceutical applications. One species of chemically rich, tropical marine cyanobacteria that was previously identified as Symploca hydnoides or Symploca sp. corresponds to the traditional taxonomic definition of Phormidium penicillatum. In this study, we clarified the taxonomy of this biomedically and ecologically important cyanobacterium by comparing recently collected specimens with the original type material and the taxonomic description of P. penicillatum. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S ITS regions showed that P. penicillatum formed an independent clade sister to the genus Symploca, and distantly related to Phormidium and Lyngbya. We propose the new genus Caldora for this clade, with Caldora penicillata comb. nov. as the type species and designate as the epitype the recently collected strain FK13-1. Furthermore, the production of bioactive secondary metabolites among various geographically dispersed collections of C. penicillata showed that this species consistently produced the metabolite dolastatin 10 and/or the related compound symplostatin 1, which appear to be robust autapomorphic characters and chemotaxonomic markers for this taxon. PMID:26327714

  1. Inhibition of denitrification by ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, R L; White, M R

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown that UV-A (lambda=320-400 nm) and UV-B (lambda=280-320 nm) inhibit photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and nitrification. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects, if any, on denitrification in a microbial community inhabiting the intertidal. The community studied is the microbial mat consisting primarily of Lyngbya that inhabits the Pacific marine intertidal, Baja California, Mexico. Rates of denitrification were determined using the acetylene blockage technique. Pseudomonas fluorescens (ATCC #17400) was used as a control organism, and treated similarly to the mat samples. Samples were incubated either beneath a PAR transparent, UV opaque screen (OP3), or a mylar screen to block UV-B, or a UV transparent screen (UVT) for 2 to 3 hours. Sets of samples were also treated with nitrapyrin to inhibit nitrification, or DCMU to inhibit photosynthesis and treated similarly. Denitrification rates were greater in the UV protected samples than in the UV exposed samples the mat samples as well as for the Ps fluorescens cultures. Killed controls exhibited no activity. In the DCMU and nitrapyrin treated samples denitrification rates were the same as in the untreated samples. These data indicate that denitrification is directly inhibited by UV radiation.

  2. Lipid biomarkers, pigments and cyanobacterial diversity of microbial mats across intertidal flats of the arid coast of the Arabian Gulf (Abu Dhabi, UAE).

    PubMed

    Abed, Raeid M M; Kohls, Katharina; Schoon, Raphaela; Scherf, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Marion; Palinska, Katarzyna A; Al-Hassani, Huda; Hamza, Waleed; Rullkötter, Jürgen; Golubic, Stjepko

    2008-09-01

    Variations in morphology, fatty acids, pigments and cyanobacterial community composition were studied in microbial mats across intertidal flats of the arid Arabian Gulf coast. These mats experience combined extreme conditions of salinity, temperature, UV radiation and desiccation depending on their tidal position. Different mat forms were observed depending on the topology of the coast and location. The mats contained 63 fatty acids in different proportions. The increased amounts of unsaturated fatty acids (12-39%) and the trans/cis ratio (0.6-1.6%) of the cyanobacterial fatty acid n-18:1omega9 in the higher tidal mats suggested an adaptation of the mat microorganisms to environmental stress. Chlorophyll a concentrations suggested lower cyanobacterial abundance in the higher than in the lower intertidal mats. Scytonemin concentrations were dependent on the increase in solar irradiation, salinity and desiccation. The mats showed richness in cyanobacterial species, with Microcoleus chthonoplastes and Lyngbya aestuarii morphotypes as the dominant cyanobacteria. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis patterns suggested shifts in the cyanobacterial community dependent on drainage efficiency and salinity from lower to higher tidal zones. We conclude that the topology of the coast and the variable extreme environmental conditions across the tidal flat determine the distribution of microbial mats as well as the presence or absence of different microorganisms.

  3. Inhibition of denitrification by ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; White, M. R.

    It has been shown that UV-A (λ = 320- 400 nm) and UV-B (λ = 280 - 320 nm) inhibit photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and nitrification. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects, if any, on denitrification in a microbial community inhabiting the intertidal. The community studied is the microbial mat consisting primarily of Lyngbya that inhabits the Pacific marine intertidal, Baja California, Mexico. Rates of denitrification were determined using the acetylene blockage technique. Pseudomonas fluorescens (ATCC # 17400) was used as a control organism, and treated similarly to the mat samples. Samples were incubated either beneath a PAR transparent, UV opaque screen (OP3), or a mylar screen to block UV-B, or a UV transparent screen (UVT) for 2 to 3 hours. Sets of samples were also treated with nitrapyrin to inhibit nitrification, or DCMU to inhibit photosynthesis and treated similarly. Denitrification rates were greater in the UV protected samples than in the UV exposed samples the mat samples as well as for the Ps. fluorescens cultures. Killed controls exhibited no activity. In the DCMU and nitrapyrin treated samples denitrification rates were the same as in the untreated samples. These data indicate that denitrification is directly inhibited by UV radiation.

  4. Cyanobacteria associated with Anopheles albimanus (Diptera: Culicidae) larval habitats in southern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Martínez, M Guadalupe; Rodríguez, Mario H; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I; Méndez-Sanchez, José D; Bond-Compeán, J Guillermo; Cold-Morgan, Michelle

    2002-11-01

    Cyanobacteria associated with Anopheles albimanus Wiedemann larval habitats from southern Chiapas, Mexico, were isolated and identified from water samples and larval midguts using selective medium BG-11. Larval breeding sites were classified according to their hydrology and dominant vegetation. Cyanobacteria isolated in water samples were recorded and analyzed according to hydrological and vegetation habitat breeding types, and mosquito larval abundance. In total, 19 cyanobacteria species were isolated from water samples. Overall, the most frequently isolated cyanobacterial taxa were Phormidium sp., Oscillatoria sp., Aphanocapsa cf. littoralis, Lyngbya lutea, P. animalis, and Anabaena cf. spiroides. Cyanobacteria were especially abundant in estuaries, irrigation canals, river margins and mangrove lagoons, and more cyanobacteria were isolated from Brachiaria mutica, Ceratophyllum demersum, and Hymenachne amplexicaulis habitats. Cyanobacteria were found in habitats with low to high An. albimanus larval abundance, but Aphanocapsa cf. littoralis was associated with habitats of low larval abundance. No correlation was found between water chemistry parameters and the presence of cyanobacteria, however, water temperature (29.2-29.4 degrees C) and phosphate concentration (79.8-136.5 ppb) were associated with medium and high mosquito larvae abundance. In An. albimanus larval midguts, only six species of cyanobacteria were isolated, the majority being from the most abundant cyanobacteria in water samples.

  5. Phosphorus Recycling from an Unexplored Source by Polyphosphate Accumulating Microalgae and Cyanobacteria—A Step to Phosphorus Security in Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Chandan; Chowdhury, Rajojit; Ray, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P), an essential element required for crop growth has no substitute. The global food security depends on phosphorus availability in soil for crop production. World phosphorus reserves are fast depleting and with an annual increase of 2.3% in phosphorus demand, the current reserves will be exhausted in coming 50–100 years. India and other Western countries are forced to import phosphorus fertilizers at high costs to meet their agricultural demands due to uneven distribution of phosphate rocks on earth. The present study from India, aims to draw attention to an unnoticed source of phosphorus being wasted as parboiled rice mill effluent and subsequent bio-recovery of the valuable element from this unconventional source. The research was conducted in West Bengal, India, a state with the highest number of parboiled rice mills where its effluent carries on an average ~40 mg/L of soluble phosphorus. Technology to recover and recycle this wastewater P in India in a simple, inexpensive mode is yet to be optimized. Our strategy to use microalgae, Chlorella sp. and cyanobacteria, Cyanobacterium sp., Lyngbya sp., and Anabaena sp. to sequester the excess phosphorus from the effluent as polyphosphate inclusions and its subsequent recycling as slow and moderate release phosphorus biofertilizers to aid plant growth, preventing phosphorus loss and pollution, is a contemporary venture to meet the need of the hour. These polyphosphate accumulating microorganisms play a dual role of remediation and recovery of phosphorus, preliminarily validated in laboratory scale. PMID:26733966

  6. Inhibition of denitrification by ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, R L; White, M R

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown that UV-A (lambda=320-400 nm) and UV-B (lambda=280-320 nm) inhibit photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and nitrification. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects, if any, on denitrification in a microbial community inhabiting the intertidal. The community studied is the microbial mat consisting primarily of Lyngbya that inhabits the Pacific marine intertidal, Baja California, Mexico. Rates of denitrification were determined using the acetylene blockage technique. Pseudomonas fluorescens (ATCC #17400) was used as a control organism, and treated similarly to the mat samples. Samples were incubated either beneath a PAR transparent, UV opaque screen (OP3), or a mylar screen to block UV-B, or a UV transparent screen (UVT) for 2 to 3 hours. Sets of samples were also treated with nitrapyrin to inhibit nitrification, or DCMU to inhibit photosynthesis and treated similarly. Denitrification rates were greater in the UV protected samples than in the UV exposed samples the mat samples as well as for the Ps fluorescens cultures. Killed controls exhibited no activity. In the DCMU and nitrapyrin treated samples denitrification rates were the same as in the untreated samples. These data indicate that denitrification is directly inhibited by UV radiation. PMID:12038490

  7. The effects of UV radiation A and B on diurnal variation in photosynthesis in three taxonomically and ecologically diverse microbial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, C. S.; Rothschild, L. J.

    1999-01-01

    Photosynthetic primary production, the basis of most global food chains, is inhibited by UV radiation. Evaluating UV inhibition is therefore important for assessing the role of natural levels of UV radiation in regulating ecosystem behavior as well as the potential impact of stratospheric ozone depletion on global ecosystems. As both photosynthesis and UV fluxes are subject to diurnal variations, we examined the diurnal variability of the effect of UV radiation on photosynthesis in three diverse algal mats. In one of the mats (Cyanidium caldarium) a small mean decrease in primary productivity over the whole day occurred when both UVA and UVB were screened out. In two of the mats (Lyngbya aestuarii and Zygogonium sp.) we found a mean increase in the total primary productivity over the day when UVB alone was screened and a further increase when UVA and UVB were both screened out. Variations in the effects of UV radiation were found at different times of the day. This diurnal variability may be because even under the same solar radiation flux, there are different factors that may control photosynthetic rate, including nutritional status and other physiological processes in the cell. The results show the importance of assessing the complete diurnal productivity. For some of the time points the increase in the mean was still within the standard deviations in primary productivity, illustrating the difficulty in dissecting UV effects from other natural variations.

  8. The Relationship between Phytoplankton Evenness and Copepod Abundance in Lake Nansihu, China

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wang; Zhang, Huayong; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Xiang; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is a central issue in ecology. Previous studies have shown that producer diversity can impact the consumer community via predator-prey interactions. However, direct observations of this relationship remain rare, in particular for aquatic ecosystems. In this research, the relationship between phytoplankton diversity (species richness and evenness) and the abundance of copepods was analyzed in Lake Nansihu, a meso-eutrophic lake in China. The results showed that copepods abundance was significantly decreased with increasing phytoplankton evenness throughout the year. However, both species richness and phytoplankton biomass showed no significant relationship with the abundance of copepods. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that phytoplankton evenness was negatively correlated with Thermocyclops kawamurai, Cyclops vicinus, Eucyclops serrulatus, Mesocyclops leuckarti, Sinocalanus tenellus, Sinocalanus dorrii, Copepods nauplius, but positively correlated with many Cyanophyta species (Chroococcus minutus, Dactylococcopsis acicularis, Microcystis incerta, Merismopedia tenuissima, Merismopedia sinica and Lyngbya limnetica). Based on our results, phytoplankton evenness was a better predictor of copepods abundance in meso-eutrophic lakes. These results provide new insights into the relationship between diversity and ecosystem functioning in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27589782

  9. Elevated CO2: impact on diurnal patterns of photosynthesis in natural microbial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, L J

    1994-01-01

    Algae, including blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), are the major source of fixed carbon in many aquatic ecosystems. Previous work has shown that photosynthetic carbon fixation is often enhanced in the presence of additional carbon dioxide (CO2). This study was undertaken to determine if this CO2 fertilization effect extended to microbial mats, and, if so, at what times during the day might the addition of CO2 affect carbon fixation. Four microbial mats from diverse environments were selected, including mats from a hypersaline pond (area 5, Exportadora de Sal, Mexico), the marine intertidal (Lyngbya, Laguna Ojo de Liebre, Mexico), an acidic hotspring (Cyanidium, Nymph Creek, Yellowstone National Park), and an acidic stream at ambient temperature (Zygogonium, Yellowstone National Park). Carbon fixation in the absence of additional CO2 essentially followed the rising and falling sunlight levels, except that during the middle of the day there was a short dip in carbon fixation rates. The addition of CO2 profoundly enhanced carbon fixation rates during the daylight hours, including during the midday dip. Therefore, it is unlikely that the midday dip was due to photoinhibition. Surprisingly, enhancement of carbon fixation was often greatest in the early morning or late afternoon, times when carbon fixation would be most likely to be light limited. PMID:11538022

  10. The Relationship between Phytoplankton Evenness and Copepod Abundance in Lake Nansihu, China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wang; Zhang, Huayong; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Xiang; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is a central issue in ecology. Previous studies have shown that producer diversity can impact the consumer community via predator-prey interactions. However, direct observations of this relationship remain rare, in particular for aquatic ecosystems. In this research, the relationship between phytoplankton diversity (species richness and evenness) and the abundance of copepods was analyzed in Lake Nansihu, a meso-eutrophic lake in China. The results showed that copepods abundance was significantly decreased with increasing phytoplankton evenness throughout the year. However, both species richness and phytoplankton biomass showed no significant relationship with the abundance of copepods. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that phytoplankton evenness was negatively correlated with Thermocyclops kawamurai, Cyclops vicinus, Eucyclops serrulatus, Mesocyclops leuckarti, Sinocalanus tenellus, Sinocalanus dorrii, Copepods nauplius, but positively correlated with many Cyanophyta species (Chroococcus minutus, Dactylococcopsis acicularis, Microcystis incerta, Merismopedia tenuissima, Merismopedia sinica and Lyngbya limnetica). Based on our results, phytoplankton evenness was a better predictor of copepods abundance in meso-eutrophic lakes. These results provide new insights into the relationship between diversity and ecosystem functioning in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27589782

  11. Consortium of the 'bichlorophyllous' cyanobacterium Prochlorothrix hollandica and chemoheterotrophic partner bacteria: culture and metagenome-based description.

    PubMed

    Velichko, Natalia; Chernyaeva, Ekaterina; Averina, Svetlana; Gavrilova, Olga; Lapidus, Alla; Pinevich, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    'Bacterial consortium' sensu lato applies to mutualism or syntrophy-based systems consisting of unrelated bacteria. Consortia of cyanobacteria have been preferentially studied on Anabaena epibioses; non-photosynthetic satellites of other filamentous or unicellular cyanobacteria were also considered although structure-functional data are few. At the same time, information about consortia of cyanobacteria which have light-harvesting antennae distinct from standard phycobilisome was missing. In this study, we characterized first, via a polyphasic approach, the cultivable consortium of Prochlorothrix hollandica CCAP 1490/1 (filamentous cyanobacterium which contains chlorophylls a, b/carotenoid/protein complex in the absence of phycobilisome) and non-photosynthetic heterotrophic bacteria. The strains of most abundant satellites were isolated and identified. Consortium metagenome reconstructed via 454-pyro and Illumina sequencing was shown to include, except for P. hollandica, several phylotypes of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The ratio of consortium members was essentially stable irrespective of culture age, and restored after artificially imposed imbalance. The consortium had a complex spatial arrangement as demonstrated by FISH and SEM images of the association, epibiosis, and biofilm type. Preliminary data of metagenome annotation agreed with the hypothesis that satellite bacteria contribute to P. hollandica protection from reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:25990300

  12. In silico characterization of thermostable lipases.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Debamitra; Parameswaran, Saravanan; Dubey, Vikash Kumar; Patra, Sanjukta

    2011-01-01

    Thermostable lipases are of high priority for industrial applications as they are endowed with the capability of carrying out diversified reactions at elevated temperatures. Extremophiles are their potential source. Sequence and structure annotation of thermostable lipases can elucidate evolution of lipases from their mesophilic counterparts with enhanced thermostability hence better industrial potential. Sequence analysis highlighted the conserved residues in bacterial and fungal thermostable lipases. Higher frequency of AXXXA motif and poly Ala residues in lid domain of thermostable Bacillus lipases were distinguishing characteristics. Comparison of amino acid composition among thermostable and mesostable lipases brought into light the role of neutral, charged and aromatic amino acid residues in enhancement of thermostability. Structural annotation of thermostable lipases with that of mesostable lipases revealed some striking features which are increment of gamma turns in thermostable lipases; being first time reported in our paper, longer beta strands, lesser beta-branched residues in helices, increase in charged-neutral hydrogen bonding pair, hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact and differences in the N-cap and C-cap residues of the α helices. Conclusively, it can be stated that subtle changes in the arrangement of amino acid residues in the tertiary structure of lipases contributes to enhanced thermostability.

  13. Coprophilic amoebae and flagellates, including Guttulinopsis, Rosculus and Helkesimastix, characterise a divergent and diverse rhizarian radiation and contribute to a large diversity of faecal-associated protists.

    PubMed

    Bass, David; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Brown, Matthew W; Pearce, Rebecca A; Tice, Alexander K; Jousset, Alexandre; Geisen, Stefan; Hartikainen, Hanna

    2016-05-01

    A wide diversity of organisms utilize faecal habitats as a rich nutrient source or a mechanism to traverse through animal hosts. We sequenced the 18S rRNA genes of the coprophilic, fruiting body-forming amoeba Guttulinopsis vulgaris and its non-fruiting relatives Rosculus 'ithacus' CCAP 1571/3, R. terrestris n. sp. and R. elongata n. sp. and demonstrate that they are related to the coprophilic flagellate Helkesimastix in a strongly supported, but highly divergent 18S sister clade. PCR primers specific to both clades were used to generate 18S amplicons from a range of environmental and faecal DNA samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the cloned sequences demonstrated a high diversity of uncharacterised sequence types within this clade, likely representing previously described members of the genera Guttulinopsis, Rosculus and Helkesimastix, as well as so-far unobserved organisms. Further, an Illumina MiSeq sequenced set of 18S V4-region amplicons generated from faecal DNAs using universal eukaryote primers showed that core-cercozoan assemblages in faecal samples are as diverse as those found in more conventionally examined habitats. These results reveal many novel lineages, some of which appear to occur preferentially in faecal material, in particular cercomonads and glissomonads. More broadly, we show that faecal habitats are likely untapped reservoirs of microbial eukaryotic diversity. PMID:26914587

  14. Characterization of the transport of. cap alpha. -methylaminoisobutyric acid by a human intestinal cell line (HT-29)

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, L.; Dantzig, A.H.

    1986-03-01

    Under certain growth conditions, the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29 exhibits intestinal enterocyte-like properties. The differentiated cells possess a brush border with the enzyme markers (aminopeptidase and sucrase) normally associated with the intestine. To aid in the characterization of the transport properties of these cells, the uptake of a non-metabolizable amino acid analog, /sup 14/C-..cap alpha..-methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB) as examined in the HT-29-Al subclone which possesses a brush border. The cells exhibited a time-dependent uptake of MeAIB which was concentrative and sodium-dependent. The pH optimum for uptake was about 7.8. Uptake was inhibited by low temperature, 1 mM ouabain, or 0.5 mM dinitrophenol. A 1 hr-preincubation of the cells in an isotonic KCl solution resulted in a decreased uptake rate, suggesting that a negative membrane potential is important for MeAIB uptake. The rate of 0.5 mM MeABIB uptake was inhibited by 40 to 90% by 5 mM of certain small neutral amino acids such as Ala, Ser, Pro, Gly, met but not by acidic or basic amino acids such as Asp, Glu, Arg or Lys. The uptake of MeAIB appears to be mediated by an amino acid transport carrier similar to the A-system described previously for Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  15. HILIC- and SCX-based quantitative proteomics of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during nitrogen starvation induced lipid and carbohydrate accumulation.

    PubMed

    Longworth, Joseph; Noirel, Josselin; Pandhal, Jagroop; Wright, Phillip C; Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen starvation induced changes in carbohydrate and lipid content is described in several algal species. Although these phenotypic changes are desirable, such manipulations also significantly deteriorate culture health, ultimately halting growth. To optimize biofuel production from algae, it is desirable to induce lipid accumulation without compromising cell growth and survival. In this study, we utilized an 8-plex iTRAQ-based proteomic approach to assess the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CCAP 11/32CW15+ under nitrogen starvation. First-dimension fractionation was conducted using HILIC and SCX. A total of 587 proteins were identified (≥3 peptides) of which 71 and 311 were differentially expressed at significant levels (p<0.05), during nitrogen stress induced carbohydrate and lipid production, respectively. Forty-seven percent more changes with significance were observed with HILIC compared to SCX. Several trends were observed including increase in energy metabolism, decrease in translation machinery, increase in cell wall production and a change of balance between photosystems I and II. These findings point to a severely compromised system where lipid is accumulated at the expense of normal functioning of the organism, suggesting that a more informed and controlled method of lipid induction than gross nutrient manipulation would be needed for development of sustainable processes.

  16. Reproductive neuropeptides that stimulate spawning in the Sydney Rock Oyster (Saccostrea glomerata).

    PubMed

    In, Vu Van; Ntalamagka, Nikoleta; O'Connor, Wayne; Wang, Tianfang; Powell, Daniel; Cummins, Scott F; Elizur, Abigail

    2016-08-01

    The Sydney Rock Oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, is a socioeconomically important species in Australia, yet little is known about the molecular mechanism that regulates its reproduction. To address this gap, we have performed a combination of high throughput transcriptomic and peptidomic analysis, to identify genes and neuropeptides that are expressed in the key regulatory tissues of S. glomerata; the visceral ganglia and gonads. Neuropeptides are known to encompass a diverse class of peptide messengers that play functional roles in many aspects of an animal's life, including reproduction. Approximately 28 neuropeptide genes were identified, primarily within the visceral ganglia transcriptome, that encode precursor proteins containing numerous neuropeptides; some were confirmed through mass spectral peptidomics analysis of the visceral ganglia. Of those, 28 bioactive neuropeptides were synthesized, and then tested for their capacity to induce gonad development and spawning in S. glomerata. Egg laying hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, APGWamide, buccalin, CCAP and LFRFamide were neuropeptides found to trigger spawning in ripe animals. Additional testing of APGWa and buccalin demonstrated their capacity to advance conditioning and gonadal maturation. In summary, our analysis of S. glomerata has identified neuropeptides that can influence the reproductive cycle of this species, specifically by accelerating gonadal maturation and triggering spawning. Other molluscan neuropeptides identified in this study will enable further research into understanding the neuroendocrinology of oysters, which may benefit their cultivation. PMID:27328253

  17. Chalicogloea cavernicola gen. nov., sp. nov. (Chroococcales, Cyanobacteria), from low-light aerophytic environments: combined molecular, phenotypic and ecological criteria.

    PubMed

    Roldán, M; Ramírez, M; del Campo, J; Hernández-Mariné, M; Komárek, J

    2013-06-01

    This work characterizes a unicellular cyanobacterium with nearly spherical cells and thin-outlined sheaths that divide irregularly, forming small packets immersed in a diffluent mucilaginous layer. It was isolated growing on calcite speleothems and walls in a show cave in Collbató (Barcelona, Spain). Spectral confocal laser and transmission electron microscopy were used to describe the morphology, fine structure and thylakoid arrangement. The pigments identified were phycoerythrin, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and chlorophyll a. Three-dimensional reconstructions, generated from natural fluorescence z-stacks, revealed a large surface area of nearly flat, arm-like thylakoidal membranes connected to each other and forming a unified structure in a way that, to our knowledge, has never been described before. Phylogenetic analyses using the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed 95% similarity to strain Chroococcus sp. JJCM (GenBank accession no. AM710384). The diacritical phenotypic features do not correspond to any species currently described, and the genetic traits support the strain being classified as the first member of an independent genus in the order Chroococcales and the family Chroococcaceae. Hence, we propose the name Chalicogloea cavernicola gen. nov., sp. nov. under the provisions of the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants. The type strain of Chalicogloea cavernicola is COLL 3(T) (=CCALA 975(T) =CCAP 1424/1(T)).

  18. Subunit structure of the dihydrolipoyl transacylase component of branched-chain. cap alpha. -keto acid dehydrogenase complex from bovine liver: mapping of the lipoyl-bearing domain by limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-05

    To characterize the lipoyl-bearing domain of the dihydrolipoyl transacylase (E/sub 2/) component, purified branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase complex from bovine liver was reductively acylated with (U-/sup 14/C)..cap alpha..-ketoisovalerate in the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate and N-ethylmaleimide. Digestion of the modified complex with increasing concentrations of trypsin sequentially cleaved the E/sub 2/ polypeptide chain (M/sub r/ = 52,000) into five radiolabeled lipoyl-containing fragments, L/sub 1/-L/sub 5/. In addition, a lipoate-free inner E/sub 2/ core consisting of fragment A and fragment B was produced. Fragment A contains the active site for transacylation reaction and fragment B is the subunit-binding domain. Fragment L/sub 5/ and fragment B were stable and resistant to further tryptic digestion. Mouse antiserium against E/sub 2/ reacted only with fragments L/sub 1/, L/sub 2/, and L/sub 3/, and did not bind fragments L/sub 4/, L/sub 5/, A, and B as judged by immunoblotting analysis. The anti-E/sub 2/ serum-strongly inhibited the overall reaction catalyzed by the complex, but was without effect on the transacylation activity of E/sub 2/. Measurement of incorporation of (1-/sup 14/C)isobutyryl groups into the E/sub 2/ subunit indicated the presence of 1 lipoyl residue/E/sub 2/ chain.

  19. Reproductive neuropeptides that stimulate spawning in the Sydney Rock Oyster (Saccostrea glomerata).

    PubMed

    In, Vu Van; Ntalamagka, Nikoleta; O'Connor, Wayne; Wang, Tianfang; Powell, Daniel; Cummins, Scott F; Elizur, Abigail

    2016-08-01

    The Sydney Rock Oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, is a socioeconomically important species in Australia, yet little is known about the molecular mechanism that regulates its reproduction. To address this gap, we have performed a combination of high throughput transcriptomic and peptidomic analysis, to identify genes and neuropeptides that are expressed in the key regulatory tissues of S. glomerata; the visceral ganglia and gonads. Neuropeptides are known to encompass a diverse class of peptide messengers that play functional roles in many aspects of an animal's life, including reproduction. Approximately 28 neuropeptide genes were identified, primarily within the visceral ganglia transcriptome, that encode precursor proteins containing numerous neuropeptides; some were confirmed through mass spectral peptidomics analysis of the visceral ganglia. Of those, 28 bioactive neuropeptides were synthesized, and then tested for their capacity to induce gonad development and spawning in S. glomerata. Egg laying hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, APGWamide, buccalin, CCAP and LFRFamide were neuropeptides found to trigger spawning in ripe animals. Additional testing of APGWa and buccalin demonstrated their capacity to advance conditioning and gonadal maturation. In summary, our analysis of S. glomerata has identified neuropeptides that can influence the reproductive cycle of this species, specifically by accelerating gonadal maturation and triggering spawning. Other molluscan neuropeptides identified in this study will enable further research into understanding the neuroendocrinology of oysters, which may benefit their cultivation.

  20. An innovative partnership for national environmental assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, D.M.; Field, D.W.; Holm, T.M.; Jennings, M.D.; Sturdevant, J.A.; Thelin, G.P.; Worthy, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    Four federal environmental programs: EMAP (USEPA), GAP (USFWS), C-CAP (NOAA), NAWQA (USGS) have formed a partnership with EROS Data Center (USGS) to facilitate the development of baseline land characteristics information for the conterminous U.S. Each of the respective programs brings to the group unique experience and expertise. Despite emphasis on different environmental issues, together we have identified common requirements for source satellite data, preprocessing, spectral clustering, ancillary data, data management and distribution. We are also developing a research agenda to support this initiative and future efforts of this partnership. The short-term goal of out effort is the joint acquisition and preprocessing of recent Landsat TM images for the conterminous U.S. To date, images have been identified for acquisition, and preliminary plans have been made for preprocessing. The long-term goal for this group is collaborative research and development of a flexible and functional land characteristics database for use by our programs and others. This partnership demonstrates that national environmental programs within multiple government agencies can work effectively together to achieve common goals and reduce overall cost.

  1. The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium: 20 years of development and integration of USA national land cover data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickham, James D.; Homer, Collin G.; Vogelmann, James E.; McKerrow, Alexa; Mueller, Rick; Herold, Nate; Coluston, John

    2014-01-01

    The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium demonstrates the national benefits of USA Federal collaboration. Starting in the mid-1990s as a small group with the straightforward goal of compiling a comprehensive national Landsat dataset that could be used to meet agencies’ needs, MRLC has grown into a group of 10 USA Federal Agencies that coordinate the production of five different products, including the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP), the Cropland Data Layer (CDL), the Gap Analysis Program (GAP), and the Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE). As a set, the products include almost every aspect of land cover from impervious surface to detailed crop and vegetation types to fire fuel classes. Some products can be used for land cover change assessments because they cover multiple time periods. The MRLC Consortium has become a collaborative forum, where members share research, methodological approaches, and data to produce products using established protocols, and we believe it is a model for the production of integrated land cover products at national to continental scales. We provide a brief overview of each of the main products produced by MRLC and examples of how each product has been used. We follow that with a discussion of the impact of the MRLC program and a brief overview of future plans.

  2. Correct identification of species makes the amoebozoan rRNA tree congruent with morphology for the order Leptomyxida Page 1987; with description of Acramoeba dendroida n. g., n. sp., originally misidentified as 'Gephyramoeba sp.'.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Alexey V; Nassonova, Elena S; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Morphological identification of protists remains an expert task, especially for little known and poorly described species. Culture collections normally accept organisms under the name provided by depositors and are not responsible for identification. Uncritical acceptance of these names by molecular phylogeneticists may result in serious errors of interpretation of phylogenetic trees based on DNA sequences, making them appear more incongruent with morphology than they really are. Several cases of misidentification in a major culture collection have recently been reported. Here we provide evidence for misidentifications of two more gymnamoebae. The first concerns "Gephyramoeba sp." ATCC 50654; it is not Gephyramoeba, a leptomyxid with lobose pseudopods, but a hitherto undescribed branching amoeba with fine, filamentous subpseudopods named here Acramoeba dendroida gen. et sp. nov. We also sequenced 18S rRNA of Page's strain of Rhizamoeba saxonica (CCAP 1570/2) and show that it is the most deeply branching leptomyxid and is not phylogenetically close to 'Rhizamoeba saxonica' ATCC 50742, which was misidentified. Correcting these misidentifications improves the congruence between morphological diversity of Amoebozoa and their rRNA-based phylogenies, both for Leptomyxida and for the Acramoeba part of the tree. On morphological grounds we transfer Gephyramoebidae from Varipodida back to Leptomyxida and remove Flamella from Leptomyxida; sequences are needed to confirm these two revisions.

  3. Coprophilic amoebae and flagellates, including Guttulinopsis, Rosculus and Helkesimastix, characterise a divergent and diverse rhizarian radiation and contribute to a large diversity of faecal-associated protists.

    PubMed

    Bass, David; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Brown, Matthew W; Pearce, Rebecca A; Tice, Alexander K; Jousset, Alexandre; Geisen, Stefan; Hartikainen, Hanna

    2016-05-01

    A wide diversity of organisms utilize faecal habitats as a rich nutrient source or a mechanism to traverse through animal hosts. We sequenced the 18S rRNA genes of the coprophilic, fruiting body-forming amoeba Guttulinopsis vulgaris and its non-fruiting relatives Rosculus 'ithacus' CCAP 1571/3, R. terrestris n. sp. and R. elongata n. sp. and demonstrate that they are related to the coprophilic flagellate Helkesimastix in a strongly supported, but highly divergent 18S sister clade. PCR primers specific to both clades were used to generate 18S amplicons from a range of environmental and faecal DNA samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the cloned sequences demonstrated a high diversity of uncharacterised sequence types within this clade, likely representing previously described members of the genera Guttulinopsis, Rosculus and Helkesimastix, as well as so-far unobserved organisms. Further, an Illumina MiSeq sequenced set of 18S V4-region amplicons generated from faecal DNAs using universal eukaryote primers showed that core-cercozoan assemblages in faecal samples are as diverse as those found in more conventionally examined habitats. These results reveal many novel lineages, some of which appear to occur preferentially in faecal material, in particular cercomonads and glissomonads. More broadly, we show that faecal habitats are likely untapped reservoirs of microbial eukaryotic diversity.

  4. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information: update

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David L.; Church, Deanna M.; Edgar, Ron; Federhen, Scott; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Madden, Thomas L.; Pontius, Joan U.; Schuler, Gregory D.; Schriml, Lynn M.; Sequeira, Edwin; Suzek, Tugba O.; Tatusova, Tatiana A.; Wagner, Lukas

    2004-01-01

    In addition to maintaining the GenBank(R) nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides data analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through NCBI’s website. NCBI resources include Entrez, PubMed, PubMed Central, LocusLink, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) database, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, SARS Coronavirus Resource, SAGEmap, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD) and the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART). Augmenting many of the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of the resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:14681353

  5. Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David L.; Church, Deanna M.; Federhen, Scott; Lash, Alex E.; Madden, Thomas L.; Pontius, Joan U.; Schuler, Gregory D.; Schriml, Lynn M.; Sequeira, Edwin; Tatusova, Tatiana A.; Wagner, Lukas

    2003-01-01

    In addition to maintaining the GenBank(R) nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides data analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through NCBI's Web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, PubMed, PubMed Central (PMC), LocusLink, the NCBITaxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Electronic PCR (e-PCR), Open Reading Frame (ORF) Finder, References Sequence (RefSeq), UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, Database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (dbSNP), Human/Mouse Homology Map, Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker (MM), Evidence Viewer (EV), Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) database, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, SAGEmap, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), and the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART). Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of the resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:12519941

  6. Spontaneous self-assembly of engineered armadillo repeat protein fragments into a folded structure.

    PubMed

    Watson, Randall P; Christen, Martin T; Ewald, Christina; Bumbak, Fabian; Reichen, Christian; Mihajlovic, Maja; Schmidt, Elena; Güntert, Peter; Caflisch, Amedeo; Plückthun, Andreas; Zerbe, Oliver

    2014-07-01

    Repeat proteins are built of modules, each of which constitutes a structural motif. We have investigated whether fragments of a designed consensus armadillo repeat protein (ArmRP) recognize each other. We examined a split ArmRP consisting of an N-capping repeat (denoted Y), three internal repeats (M), and a C-capping repeat (A). We demonstrate that the C-terminal MA fragment adopts a fold similar to the corresponding part of the entire protein. In contrast, the N-terminal YM2 fragment constitutes a molten globule. The two fragments form a 1:1 YM2:MA complex with a nanomolar dissociation constant essentially identical to the crystal structure of the continuous YM3A protein. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the complex is structurally stable over a 1 μs timescale and reveal the importance of hydrophobic contacts across the interface. We propose that the existence of a stable complex recapitulates possible intermediates in the early evolution of these repeat proteins. PMID:24931467

  7. Total synthesis of the marine cyanobacterial cyclodepsipeptide apratoxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiehao; Forsyth, Craig J.

    2004-01-01

    A total synthesis of apratoxin A was developed. Apratoxin A, isolated from Lyngbya spp. cyanobacteria, is representative of a growing class of marine cyanobacterial cyclodepsipeptides wherein discrete polypeptide and polyketide domains are merged by ester and amide or amide-derived linkages. In the apratoxins, the N terminus of the peptide domain [(Pro)-(N-Me-Ile)-(N-Me-ala)-(O-Me-Tyr)-(moCys)] is a modified vinylogous cysteine that is joined to a novel ketide [3,7-dihydroxy-2,5,8,8-tetramethylnonanoic acid (Dtna)] by an acid-sensitive thiazoline. The C-terminal proline is esterified to a hindered hydroxyl vicinal to the ketide's tert-butyl terminus. Major synthetic challenges included assembly and maintenance the thiazoline-containing moiety and macrolide formation involving acylation of the C39 hydroxyl. The Dtna domain was assembled in the biogenetic direction beginning with a Brown allylation of trimethylacetaldehyde to establish the C39 alcohol configuration. Diastereofacial selective addition of a higher-order dimethylcuprate upon a ring-closing metathesis-derived α,β-unsaturated valerolactone installed the C37 methyl-bearing center. A Paterson anti-aldol process was used to incorporate the remaining two ketide stereogenic centers at C34 and C35. Although attempts to incorporate the thiazoline moiety by condensations of thiol esters bearing α-amino carbamate derivatives failed, an intramolecular Staudinger reduction–aza-Wittig process using α-azido thiol esters was uniquely successful. Late-stage macrocycle closure proceeded well by lactam formation between Pro and N-Me-Ile residues, but attempted lactonizations of the Pro carboxylate with the C39 hydroxyl failed. Optimization of C35 hydroxyl group protection-deprotection completed the effort, which culminated in the first total synthesis of apratoxin A and will enable analog generation toward improving differential cytotoxicity. PMID:15231999

  8. On the origin of 3-methylglutaconic acid in disorders of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA)-uria occurs in numerous inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) associated with compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism. This organic acid arises from thioester cleavage of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA (3MG CoA), an intermediate in leucine catabolism. In individuals harboring mutations in 3MG CoA hydratase (i.e., primary 3MGA-uria), dietary leucine is the source of 3MGA. In secondary 3MGA-uria, however, no leucine metabolism defects have been reported. While others have suggested 3MGA arises from aberrant isoprenoid shunting from cytosol to mitochondria, an alternative route posits that 3MG CoA arises in three steps from mitochondrial acetyl CoA. Support for this biosynthetic route in IEMs is seen by its regulated occurrence in microorganisms. The fungus, Ustilago maydis, the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus and the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscule, generate 3MG CoA (or acyl carrier protein derivative) in the biosynthesis of iron chelating siderophores, iso-odd chain fatty acids and polyketide/nonribosomal peptide products, respectively. The existence of this biosynthetic machinery in these organisms supports a model wherein, under conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of acetyl CoA in the inner mitochondrial space as a result of inefficient fuel utilization drives de novo synthesis of 3MG CoA. Since humans lack the downstream biosynthetic capability of the organisms mentioned above, as 3MG CoA levels rise, thioester hydrolysis yields 3MGA, which is excreted in urine as unspent fuel. Understanding the metabolic origins of 3MGA may increase its utility as a biomarker.

  9. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jackson Z; Burow, Luke C; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R Craig; Kubo, Mike D; Spormann, Alfred M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M; Hoehler, Tori M

    2014-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico-permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)-were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with (13)C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi.

  10. Morphology and Elemental Composition of Recent and Fossil Cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintAmand, Ann; Hoover, Richard B.; Jerman, Gregory; Rozanov, Alexei Yu.

    2005-01-01

    genera Calothnx, Leptolyngbya, Lyngbya, Planktolyngbya and Oscillatoria.

  11. Effects of acid stress on Scenedesmus quadricauda (chlorophyta) and Anabaena sp. (cyanophyta)

    SciTech Connect

    Hadden-Carter, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of pH in conjunction with light and temperature on growth of Scenedesmus quadricauda (Chlorophyta) and Anabaena sp. (Cyanophyta) were examined in culture. Decreasing pH from 7 to 3 inhibited growth, more so in the blue-green alga. Effects were greatly influenced by light and temperature. Above a critical level (pH4 with the blue-green, pH 3 with the green) both algae recovered when acid stress was removed; post-acidification growth rates varied inversely with pH for the green alga and directly for the blue-green. Two sheathed blue-green algae (Lyngbya and Gleocapsa) grew below pH 6, while two unsheathed blue-green algae (Anabaena and Oscillatoria) did not. Cell dimensions of both S. quadricaude and Anabaena sp. generally increased as pH declined; the green alga was the more plastic of the two. Acid stress significantly decreased photosynthetic rate in S. quadricauda but did not for Anabaena sp. Respiratory rates were not significantly related to pH for either alga. Chlorophyll a per cell was higher than controls (pH 7) at pH 5 and 6 in Anabaena sp. and at pH 4 through 6 for S. quadricauda. Both cell division and total culture biomass declined with pH. When grown in mixed culture, the green alga usually predominated at pH 4 and often at pH 5; the blue-green was favored at lower light intensities and higher temperatures. In no instance did one alga stimulate growth of the other, although mutual inhibition occurred in several instances.

  12. Microbial biofilms on the sandstone monuments of the Angkor Wat Complex, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Gaylarde, Christine C; Rodríguez, César Hernández; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Ortega-Morales, B Otto

    2012-02-01

    Discoloring biofilms from Cambodian temples Angkor Wat, Preah Khan, and the Bayon and West Prasat in Angkor Thom contained a microbial community dominated by coccoid cyanobacteria. Molecular analysis identified Chroococcidiopsis as major colonizer, but low similarity values (<95%) suggested a similar genus or species not present in the databases. In only two of the six sites sampled were filamentous cyanobacteria, Microcoleus, Leptolyngbya, and Scytonema, found; the first two detected by sequencing of 16S rRNA gene library clones from samples of a moist green biofilm on internal walls in Preah Khan, where Lyngbya (possibly synonymous with Microcoleus) was seen by direct microscopy as major colonizer. Scytonema was detected also by microscopy on an internal wall in the Bayon. This suggests that filamentous cyanobacteria are more prevalent in internal (high moisture) areas. Heterotrophic bacteria were found in all samples. DNA sequencing of bands from DGGE gels identified Proteobacteria (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Methylobacterium radiotolerans) and Firmicutes (Bacillus sp., Bacillus niacini, Bacillus sporothermodurans, Lysinibacillus fusiformis, Paenibacillus sp., Paenibacillus panacisoli, and Paenibacillus zanthoxyli). Some of these bacteria produce organic acids, potentially degrading stone. Actinobacteria, mainly streptomycetes, were present in most samples; algae and fungi were rare. A dark-pigmented filamentous fungus was detected in internal and external Preah Khan samples, while the alga Trentepohlia was found only in samples taken from external, pink-stained stone at Preah Khan. Results show that these microbial biofilms are mature communities whose major constituents are resistant to dehydration and high levels of irradiation and can be involved in deterioration of sandstone. Such analyses are important prerequisites to the application of control strategies. PMID:22006074

  13. Biological Soil Crusts from Coastal Dunes at the Baltic Sea: Cyanobacterial and Algal Biodiversity and Related Soil Properties.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Karoline; Mikhailyuk, Tatiana; Dreßler, Mirko; Leinweber, Peter; Karsten, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are known as "ecosystem-engineers" that have important, multifunctional ecological roles in primary production, in nutrient and hydrological cycles, and in stabilization of soils. These communities, however, are almost unstudied in coastal dunes of the temperate zone. Hence, for the first time, the biodiversity of cyanobacterial and algal dominated BSCs collected in five dunes from the southern Baltic Sea coast on the islands Rügen and Usedom (Germany) was investigated in connection with physicochemical soil parameters. The species composition of cyanobacteria and algae was identified with direct determination of crust subsamples, cultural methods, and diatom slides. To investigate the influence of soil properties on species composition, the texture, pH, electrical conductivity, carbonate content, total contents of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and the bioavailable phosphorus-fraction (PO4 (3-)) were analyzed in adjacent BSC-free surface soils at each study site. The data indicate that BSCs in coastal dunes of the southern Baltic Sea represent an ecologically important vegetation form with a surprisingly high site-specific diversity of 19 cyanobacteria, 51 non-diatom algae, and 55 diatoms. All dominant species of the genera Coleofasciculus, Lyngbya, Microcoleus, Nostoc, Hydrocoryne, Leptolyngbya, Klebsormidium, and Lobochlamys are typical aero-terrestrial cyanobacteria and algae, respectively. This first study of coastal sand dunes in the Baltic region provides compelling evidence that here the BSCs were dominated by cyanobacteria, algae, or a mixture of both. Among the physicochemical soil properties, the total phosphorus content of the BSC-free sand was the only factor that significantly influenced the cyanobacterial and algal community structure of BSCs in coastal dunes.

  14. On the origin of 3-methylglutaconic acid in disorders of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA)-uria occurs in numerous inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) associated with compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism. This organic acid arises from thioester cleavage of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA (3MG CoA), an intermediate in leucine catabolism. In individuals harboring mutations in 3MG CoA hydratase (i.e., primary 3MGA-uria), dietary leucine is the source of 3MGA. In secondary 3MGA-uria, however, no leucine metabolism defects have been reported. While others have suggested 3MGA arises from aberrant isoprenoid shunting from cytosol to mitochondria, an alternative route posits that 3MG CoA arises in three steps from mitochondrial acetyl CoA. Support for this biosynthetic route in IEMs is seen by its regulated occurrence in microorganisms. The fungus, Ustilago maydis, the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus and the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscule, generate 3MG CoA (or acyl carrier protein derivative) in the biosynthesis of iron chelating siderophores, iso-odd chain fatty acids and polyketide/nonribosomal peptide products, respectively. The existence of this biosynthetic machinery in these organisms supports a model wherein, under conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of acetyl CoA in the inner mitochondrial space as a result of inefficient fuel utilization drives de novo synthesis of 3MG CoA. Since humans lack the downstream biosynthetic capability of the organisms mentioned above, as 3MG CoA levels rise, thioester hydrolysis yields 3MGA, which is excreted in urine as unspent fuel. Understanding the metabolic origins of 3MGA may increase its utility as a biomarker. PMID:27091556

  15. Effect of oxidant exposure on the release of intracellular microcystin, MIB, and geosmin from three cyanobacteria species.

    PubMed

    Wert, Eric C; Korak, Julie A; Trenholm, Rebecca A; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2014-04-01

    The release of intracellular microcystin-LR (MC-LR), 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), and geosmin was investigated after the oxidation of three cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa (MA), Oscillatoria sp. (OSC), and Lyngbya sp. (LYN)). During the oxidation of 200,000 cells/mL of MA, release of intracellular MC-LR exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline of 1 μg/L during the lowest oxidant exposures (CT) tested: ozone (0 mg-min/L, below the ozone demand), chlorine (<40 mg-min/L), chlorine dioxide (<560 mg-min/L), and chloramine (<640 mg-min/L). As the CT increased, ozone, chlorine, and chlorine dioxide were able to oxidize the released MC-LR. During the oxidation of OSC (2800 cells/mL) and LYN (1600 cells/mL), release of intracellular MIB and geosmin exceeded reported threshold odor values after exposure to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine, which have low reactivity with these taste and odor compounds. Ozone oxidation of OSC yielded an increase in MIB concentration at lower exposures (≤2.9 mg-min/L), likely due to insufficient oxidation by hydroxyl radicals. The release of intracellular organic matter (IOM) was also measured to determine the potential of bulk measurements to act as a surrogate for cyanotoxins and metabolite release. In all cases, the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release was less than 0.25 mgC/L, which lacked the sensitivity to indicate the release of MC-LR, MIB, or geosmin. The fluorescence index proved to be a more sensitive indicator of intracellular organic matter release than DOC for MA. These results illustrate that toxic or odorous compounds may be released from cyanobacteria cells during oxidation processes with minimal changes in the DOC concentration.

  16. Grazer Effects on Stream Primary Production and Nitrate Utilization: Estimating Feedbacks Under Reduced Nitrate Levels at High-Temporal Resolutions from the Patch to Reach-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijo, C. J.; Cohen, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    While nutrient enrichment is often identified as the leading cause for changes in stream gross primary production (GPP) and shifts in vegetative communities, other factors such as grazers influence overall stream structure and function. Evidence shows that grazers are a top-down control on algae in streams; however, the specific feedbacks between overall stream metabolism, grazer effects, and nutrient cycling have been variable and little is known about these interactions at nutrient levels below ambient. To further our understanding of these linkages, a nutrient depletion chamber was created and paired with high-resolution in situ sensors to estimate stream metabolism and characterize nitrate uptake (UNO3) pathways (i.e. plant uptake and denitrification). The Plexiglas chamber blocks flow and nutrient supply, inserts into upper sediments, allows light in and sediment-water-air interactions to occur. At Gum Slough Springs, FL, nitrate was reduced from ambient levels (1.40 mg N/L) to below regulatory thresholds (ca. 0.20 mg N/L) within one week. Paired chambers with and without the presence of snails (Elimia floridensis) were deployed across submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV; Vallisneria americana) and algae (Lyngbya) substrates. Results show that GPP and UNO3 were higher under SAV (70 g O2/m2/d and 300 mg NO3/m2/d, respectively) and a general lack of nutrient limitation even at low [NO3]. Grazer effects differed by vegetation type as it alleviated the reduction of NO3 levels and GPP under SAV but enhanced the decrease of algal GPP and NO3 levels over time. Continued work includes estimating grazer effects on denitrification, quantifying snail nutrient excretion contributions, and scaling up all estimates from the patch to reach level. Overall, this study will further our understanding of grazer-production-nutrient interactions within stream systems, making it possible to predict changes in feedbacks when one part of the biotic or abiotic ecosystem is altered.

  17. Allelochemicals produced by Caribbean macroalgae and cyanobacteria have species-specific effects on reef coral microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, K. M.; Paul, V. J.; Liles, M. R.; Chadwick, N. E.

    2011-06-01

    Coral populations have precipitously declined on Caribbean reefs while algal abundance has increased, leading to enhanced competitive damage to corals, which likely is mediated by the potent allelochemicals produced by both macroalgae and benthic cyanobacteria. Allelochemicals may affect the composition and abundance of coral-associated microorganisms that control host responses and adaptations to environmental change, including susceptibility to bacterial diseases. Here, we demonstrate that extracts of six Caribbean macroalgae and two benthic cyanobacteria have both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on bacterial taxa cultured from the surfaces of Caribbean corals, macroalgae, and corals exposed to macroalgal extracts. The growth of 54 bacterial isolates was monitored in the presence of lipophilic and hydrophilic crude extracts derived from Caribbean macroalgae and cyanobacteria using 96-well plate bioassays. All 54 bacterial cultures were identified by ribotyping. Lipophilic extracts from two species of Dictyota brown algae inhibited >50% of the reef coral bacteria assayed, and hydrophilic compounds from Dictyota menstrualis particularly inhibited Vibrio bacteria, a genus associated with several coral diseases. In contrast, both lipo- and hydrophilic extracts from 2 species of Lyngbya cyanobacteria strongly stimulated bacterial growth. The brown alga Lobophora variegata produced hydrophilic compounds with broad-spectrum antibacterial effects, which inhibited 93% of the bacterial cultures. Furthermore, bacteria cultured from different locations (corals vs. macroalgae vs. coral surfaces exposed to macroalgal extracts) responded differently to algal extracts. These results reveal that extracts from macroalgae and cyanobacteria have species-specific effects on the composition of coral-microbial assemblages, which in turn may increase coral host susceptibility to disease and result in coral mortality.

  18. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jackson Z; Burow, Luke C; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R Craig; Kubo, Mike D; Spormann, Alfred M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M; Hoehler, Tori M

    2014-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico-permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)-were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with (13)C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi. PMID:24616716

  19. Microbial biofilms on the sandstone monuments of the Angkor Wat Complex, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Gaylarde, Christine C; Rodríguez, César Hernández; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Ortega-Morales, B Otto

    2012-02-01

    Discoloring biofilms from Cambodian temples Angkor Wat, Preah Khan, and the Bayon and West Prasat in Angkor Thom contained a microbial community dominated by coccoid cyanobacteria. Molecular analysis identified Chroococcidiopsis as major colonizer, but low similarity values (<95%) suggested a similar genus or species not present in the databases. In only two of the six sites sampled were filamentous cyanobacteria, Microcoleus, Leptolyngbya, and Scytonema, found; the first two detected by sequencing of 16S rRNA gene library clones from samples of a moist green biofilm on internal walls in Preah Khan, where Lyngbya (possibly synonymous with Microcoleus) was seen by direct microscopy as major colonizer. Scytonema was detected also by microscopy on an internal wall in the Bayon. This suggests that filamentous cyanobacteria are more prevalent in internal (high moisture) areas. Heterotrophic bacteria were found in all samples. DNA sequencing of bands from DGGE gels identified Proteobacteria (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Methylobacterium radiotolerans) and Firmicutes (Bacillus sp., Bacillus niacini, Bacillus sporothermodurans, Lysinibacillus fusiformis, Paenibacillus sp., Paenibacillus panacisoli, and Paenibacillus zanthoxyli). Some of these bacteria produce organic acids, potentially degrading stone. Actinobacteria, mainly streptomycetes, were present in most samples; algae and fungi were rare. A dark-pigmented filamentous fungus was detected in internal and external Preah Khan samples, while the alga Trentepohlia was found only in samples taken from external, pink-stained stone at Preah Khan. Results show that these microbial biofilms are mature communities whose major constituents are resistant to dehydration and high levels of irradiation and can be involved in deterioration of sandstone. Such analyses are important prerequisites to the application of control strategies.

  20. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R. Craig; Kubo, Mike D.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.

    2013-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico—permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)—were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi. PMID:24616716

  1. Isotopic patterns in caps and stipes in sporocarps reveal patterns of organic nitrogen use by ectomycorrhizal fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, Erik; Ouimette, Andrew; Chen, Janet

    2016-04-01

    were explained best by exploration type (45% of explained variance), the interaction of exploration type and %Ncap-stipe (20%), the interaction of exploration type and %Ncap/stipe (22%), %Ccap-stipe (8%), and %Ncap-stipe (5%). δ15N differences between caps and stipes in a multiple regression model had an adjusted r2 of 0.486 (p < 0.0001), and were explained best by exploration type (47% of explained variance), the interaction of exploration type and %Ncap-stipe (26%), the interaction of exploration type and %Ncap/stipe (14%), %Ncap/stipe (11%),and %Ccap-stipe (2%). We argue that these differences in the 13C and 15N enrichment of caps relative to stipes reflect not only shifts in the proportions of protein and carbohydrates, but also differences in the extent of fluxes and the δ13C and δ15N signatures of soil- and litter-derived organic nitrogen taken up by these fungi. We also propose equations to quantify this uptake. Organic nitrogen from litter (lower δ13C and δ15N) may be incorporated by medium-distance mat, short-distance, and contact exploration types of ectomycorrhizal fungi, whereas long-distance and medium-distance fringe exploration types appeared to incorporate deeper soil organic nitrogen.

  2. Proceedings of the 2004 High Spatial Resolution Commercial Imagery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Topics covered include: NASA Applied Sciences Program; USGS Land Remote Sensing: Overview; QuickBird System Status and Product Overview; ORBIMAGE Overview; IKONOS 2004 Calibration and Validation Status; OrbView-3 Spatial Characterization; On-Orbit Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) Measurement of QuickBird; Spatial Resolution Characterization for QuickBird Image Products 2003-2004 Season; Image Quality Evaluation of QuickBird Super Resolution and Revisit of IKONOS: Civil and Commercial Application Project (CCAP); On-Orbit System MTF Measurement; QuickBird Post Launch Geopositional Characterization Update; OrbView-3 Geometric Calibration and Geopositional Accuracy; Geopositional Statistical Methods; QuickBird and OrbView-3 Geopositional Accuracy Assessment; Initial On-Orbit Spatial Resolution Characterization of OrbView-3 Panchromatic Images; Laboratory Measurement of Bidirectional Reflectance of Radiometric Tarps; Stennis Space Center Verification and Validation Capabilities; Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) Team; Adjacency Effects in High Resolution Imagery; Effect of Pulse Width vs. GSD on MTF Estimation; Camera and Sensor Calibration at the USGS; QuickBird Geometric Verification; Comparison of MODTRAN to Heritage-based Results in Vicarious Calibration at University of Arizona; Using Remotely Sensed Imagery to Determine Impervious Surface in Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Estimating Sub-Pixel Proportions of Sagebrush with a Regression Tree; How Do YOU Use the National Land Cover Dataset?; The National Map Hazards Data Distribution System; Recording a Troubled World; What Does This-Have to Do with This?; When Can a Picture Save a Thousand Homes?; InSAR Studies of Alaska Volcanoes; Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Data Products; Improving Access to the USGS Aerial Film Collections: High Resolution Scanners; Improving Access to the USGS Aerial Film Collections: Phoenix Digitizing System Product Distribution; System and Product Characterization: Issues Approach

  3. Cultivation and Complete Genome Sequencing of Gloeobacter kilaueensis sp. nov., from a Lava Cave in Kīlauea Caldera, Hawai'i

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Jimmy H. W.; Schatz, Michael; Brown, Mark V.; Kunkel, Dennis D.; Foster, Jamie S.; Shick, Harry; Christensen, Stephanie; Hou, Shaobin; Wan, Xuehua; Donachie, Stuart P.

    2013-01-01

    The ancestor of Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421T is believed to have diverged from that of all known cyanobacteria before the evolution of thylakoid membranes and plant plastids. The long and largely independent evolutionary history of G. violaceus presents an organism retaining ancestral features of early oxygenic photoautotrophs, and in whom cyanobacteria evolution can be investigated. No other Gloeobacter species has been described since the genus was established in 1974 (Rippka et al., Arch Microbiol 100:435). Gloeobacter affiliated ribosomal gene sequences have been reported in environmental DNA libraries, but only the type strain's genome has been sequenced. However, we report here the cultivation of a new Gloeobacter species, G. kilaueensis JS1T, from an epilithic biofilm in a lava cave in Kīlauea Caldera, Hawai'i. The strain's genome was sequenced from an enriched culture resembling a low-complexity metagenomic sample, using 9 kb paired-end 454 pyrosequences and 400 bp paired-end Illumina reads. The JS1T and G. violaceus PCC 7421T genomes have little gene synteny despite sharing 2842 orthologous genes; comparing the genomes shows they do not belong to the same species. Our results support establishing a new species to accommodate JS1T, for which we propose the name Gloeobacter kilaueensis sp. nov. Strain JS1T has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (BAA-2537), the Scottish Marine Institute's Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa (CCAP 1431/1), and the Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms (ULC0316). The G. kilaueensis holotype has been deposited in the Algal Collection of the US National Herbarium (US# 217948). The JS1T genome sequence has been deposited in GenBank under accession number CP003587. The G+C content of the genome is 60.54 mol%. The complete genome sequence of G. kilaueensis JS1T may further understanding of cyanobacteria evolution, and the shift from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis. PMID:24194836

  4. Design of lanthanide fingers: compact lanthanide-binding metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    am Ende, Christopher W; Meng, Hai Yun; Ye, Mao; Pandey, Anil K; Zondlo, Neal J

    2010-08-16

    Lanthanides have interesting chemical properties; these include luminescent, magnetic, and catalytic functions. Toward the development of proteins incorporating novel functions, we have designed a new lanthanide-binding motif, lanthanide fingers. These were designed based on the Zif268 zinc finger, which exhibits a beta beta alpha structural motif. Lanthanide fingers utilize an Asp(2)Glu(2) metal-coordination environment to bind lanthanides through a tetracarboxylate peptide ligand. The iterative design of a general lanthanide-binding peptide incorporated the following key elements: 1) residues with high alpha-helix and beta-sheet propensities in the respective secondary structures; 2) an optimized big box alpha-helix N-cap; 3) a Schellman alpha-helix C-cap motif; and 4) an optional D-Pro-Ser type II' beta-turn in the beta-hairpin. The peptides were characterized for lanthanide binding by circular dichroism (CD), NMR, and fluorescence spectroscopy. In all instances, stabilization of the peptide secondary structures resulted in an increase in metal affinity. The optimized protein design was a 25-residue peptide that was a general lanthanide-binding motif; this binds all lanthanides examined in a competitive aqueous environment, with a dissociation constant of 9.3 microM for binding Er(3+). CD spectra of the peptide-lanthanide complexes are similar to those of zinc fingers and other beta beta alpha proteins. Metal binding involves residues from the N-terminal beta-hairpin and the C terminal alpha-helical segments of the peptide. NMR data indicated that metal binding induced a global change in the peptide structure. The D-Pro-Ser type II' beta-turn motif could be replaced by Thr-Ile to generate genetically encodable lanthanide fingers. Replacement of the central Phe with Trp generated genetically encodable lanthanide fingers that exhibited terbium luminescence greater than that of an EF-hand peptide.

  5. Toxicity of microcystin-LR, isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa, against various insect species.

    PubMed

    Delaney, J M; Wilkins, R M

    1995-06-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR), isolated from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Kuetzing emend. Elenkin strain CCAP 1450/4 was tested for biological activity against four species of insect and the invertebrate Artemia salina. The efficacy of pesticidal activity was compared with various insecticides. The 24 hr LD50 value for third instar diamond-backed moth, Plutella xylostella, on ingestion from a treated leaf surface was 1.0 micrograms cm2, compared with a 72 hr LD50 value for rotenone of 2.0 micrograms cm-2. The 24 hr LD50 values of MC-LR and malathion on intrathoracic injection into adult house flies (Musca domestica) were 0.5 and 3.7 mg kg-1, respectively. MC-LR had no effect on M. domestica when applied topically at dosages up to 32 mg kg-1. MC-LR and malathion gave 24 hr LD50 values of 4.7 and 13.1 mg kg-1, respectively when injected into third instar cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). In fourth instar cabbage white butterfly larvae (Pieris brassicae) MC-LR injected gave 24 and 48 hr LD50 values of 3.9 and 1.9 mg kg-1, respectively, whilst the 24 and 48 hr LD50 values for carbofuran were 0.4 and 0.3 mg kg-1, respectively. An immersion bioassay with 1-day-old brine shrimp larvae (Artemia salina) gave 24 hr LD50 values of 3.8 micrograms ml-1 for MC-LR and 1.8 micrograms ml-1 for carbofuran. MC-LR has appreciable insect toxicity, comparable to the three insecticides tested. The toxin look 24-48 hr to exert its full lethal effect in insects, much longer than the 1-3 hr it takes in mammals. The potential use of MC-LR as an insecticide is discussed. PMID:7676468

  6. Structural dynamics of soluble chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 examined by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stoychev, Stoyan H; Nathaniel, Christos; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Brock, Melissa; Li, Sheng; Asmus, Kyle; Woods, Virgil L; Dirr, Heini W

    2009-09-01

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) functions as an anion channel in plasma and nuclear membranes when its soluble monomeric form converts to an integral-membrane form. The transmembrane region of CLIC1 is located in its thioredoxin-like domain 1, but the mechanism whereby the protein converts to its membrane conformation has yet to be determined. Since channel formation in membranes is enhanced at low pH (5 to 5.5), a condition that is found at the surface of membranes, the structural dynamics of soluble CLIC1 was studied at pH 7 and at pH 5.5 in the absence of membranes by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS). Rapid hydrogen exchange data indicate that CLIC1 displays a similar core structure at these pH values. Domain 1 is less stable than the all-helical domain 2, and, while the structure of domain 1 remains intact, its conformational flexibility is further increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.5). In the absence of membrane, an acidic environment appears to prime the solution structure of CLIC1 by destabilizing domain 1 in order to lower the activation energy barrier for its conversion to the membrane-insertion conformation. The significantly enhanced H/D-exchange rates at pH 5.5 displayed by two segments (peptides 11-31 and 68-82) could be due to the protonation of acidic residues in salt bridges. One of these segments (peptide 11-31) includes part of the transmembrane region which, in the solution structure, consists of helix alpha1. This helix is intrinsically stable and is most likely retained in the membrane conformation. Strand beta2, another element of the transmembrane region, displays a propensity to form a helical structure and has putative N- and C-capping motifs, suggesting that it too most likely forms a helix in a lipid bilayer.

  7. Diverse in- and output polarities and high complexity of local synaptic and non-synaptic signaling within a chemically defined class of peptidergic Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    Karsai, Gergely; Pollák, Edit; Wacker, Matthias; Vömel, Matthias; Selcho, Mareike; Berta, Gergely; Nachman, Ronald J.; Isaac, R. Elwyn; Molnár, László; Wegener, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Peptidergic neurons are not easily integrated into current connectomics concepts, since their peptide messages can be distributed via non-synaptic paracrine signaling or volume transmission. Moreover, the polarity of peptidergic interneurons in terms of in- and out-put sites can be hard to predict and is very little explored. We describe in detail the morphology and the subcellular distribution of fluorescent vesicle/dendrite markers in CCAP neurons (NCCAP), a well defined set of peptidergic neurons in the Drosophila larva. NCCAP can be divided into five morphologically distinct subsets. In contrast to other subsets, serial homologous interneurons in the ventral ganglion show a mixed localization of in- and output markers along ventral neurites that defy a classification as dendritic or axonal compartments. Ultrastructurally, these neurites contain both pre- and postsynaptic sites preferably at varicosities. A significant portion of the synaptic events are due to reciprocal synapses. Peptides are mostly non-synaptically or parasynaptically released, and dense-core vesicles and synaptic vesicle pools are typically well separated. The responsiveness of the NCCAP to ecdysis-triggering hormone may be at least partly dependent on a tonic synaptic inhibition, and is independent of ecdysteroids. Our results reveal a remarkable variety and complexity of local synaptic circuitry within a chemically defined set of peptidergic neurons. Synaptic transmitter signaling as well as peptidergic paracrine signaling and volume transmission from varicosities can be main signaling modes of peptidergic interneurons depending on the subcellular region. The possibility of region-specific variable signaling modes should be taken into account in connectomic studies that aim to dissect the circuitry underlying insect behavior and physiology, in which peptidergic neurons act as important regulators. PMID:23914156

  8. Cultivation and complete genome sequencing of Gloeobacter kilaueensis sp. nov., from a lava cave in Kīlauea Caldera, Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Saw, Jimmy H W; Schatz, Michael; Brown, Mark V; Kunkel, Dennis D; Foster, Jamie S; Shick, Harry; Christensen, Stephanie; Hou, Shaobin; Wan, Xuehua; Donachie, Stuart P

    2013-01-01

    The ancestor of Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421(T) is believed to have diverged from that of all known cyanobacteria before the evolution of thylakoid membranes and plant plastids. The long and largely independent evolutionary history of G. violaceus presents an organism retaining ancestral features of early oxygenic photoautotrophs, and in whom cyanobacteria evolution can be investigated. No other Gloeobacter species has been described since the genus was established in 1974 (Rippka et al., Arch Microbiol 100:435). Gloeobacter affiliated ribosomal gene sequences have been reported in environmental DNA libraries, but only the type strain's genome has been sequenced. However, we report here the cultivation of a new Gloeobacter species, G. kilaueensis JS1(T), from an epilithic biofilm in a lava cave in Kīlauea Caldera, Hawai'i. The strain's genome was sequenced from an enriched culture resembling a low-complexity metagenomic sample, using 9 kb paired-end 454 pyrosequences and 400 bp paired-end Illumina reads. The JS1(T) and G. violaceus PCC 7421(T) genomes have little gene synteny despite sharing 2842 orthologous genes; comparing the genomes shows they do not belong to the same species. Our results support establishing a new species to accommodate JS1(T), for which we propose the name Gloeobacter kilaueensis sp. nov. Strain JS1(T) has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (BAA-2537), the Scottish Marine Institute's Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa (CCAP 1431/1), and the Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms (ULC0316). The G. kilaueensis holotype has been deposited in the Algal Collection of the US National Herbarium (US# 217948). The JS1(T) genome sequence has been deposited in GenBank under accession number CP003587. The G+C content of the genome is 60.54 mol%. The complete genome sequence of G. kilaueensis JS1(T) may further understanding of cyanobacteria evolution, and the shift from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis.

  9. Mychonastes afer HSO-3-1 as a potential new source of biodiesel

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biodiesel is considered to be a promising future substitute for fossil fuels, and microalgae are one source of biodiesel. The ratios of lipid, carbohydrates and proteins are different in different microalgal species, and finding a good strain for oil production remains a difficult prospect. Strains producing valuable co-products would improve the viability of biofuel production. Results In this study, we performed sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of an algal strain designated HSO-3-1, and found that it was closely related to the Mychonastes afer strain CCAP 260/6. Morphology and cellular structure observation also supported the identification of strain HSO-3-1 as M. afer. We also investigated the effects of nitrogen on the growth and lipid accumulation of the naturally occurring M. afer HSO-3-1, and its potential for biodiesel production. In total, 17 fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were identified in M. afer HSO-3-1, using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The total lipid content of M. afer HSO-3-1 was 53.9% of the dry cell weight, and we also detected nervonic acid (C24:1), which has biomedical applications, making up 3.8% of total fatty acids. The highest biomass and lipid yields achieved were 3.29 g/l and 1.62 g/l, respectively, under optimized conditions. Conclusion The presence of octadecenoic and hexadecanoic acids as major components, with the presence of a high-value component, nervonic acid, renders M. afer HSO-3-1 biomass an economic feedstock for biodiesel production. PMID:22040677

  10. Transcriptome and Peptidome Characterisation of the Main Neuropeptides and Peptidic Hormones of a Euphausiid: The Ice Krill, Euphausia crystallorophias

    PubMed Central

    Toullec, Jean-Yves; Corre, Erwan; Bernay, Benoît; Thorne, Michael A. S.; Cascella, Kévin; Ollivaux, Céline; Henry, Joël; Clark, Melody S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Ice krill, Euphausia crystallorophias is one of the species at the base of the Southern Ocean food chain. Given their significant contribution to the biomass of the Southern Ocean, it is vitally important to gain a better understanding of their physiology and, in particular, anticipate their responses to climate change effects in the warming seas around Antarctica. Methodology/Principal Findings Illumina sequencing was used to produce a transcriptome of the ice krill. Analysis of the assembled contigs via two different methods, produced 36 new pre-pro-peptides, coding for 61 neuropeptides or peptide hormones belonging to the following families: Allatostatins (A, B et C), Bursicon (α and β), Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormones (CHH and MIH/VIHs), Crustacean Cardioactive Peptide (CCAP), Corazonin, Diuretic Hormones (DH), the Eclosion Hormone (EH), Neuroparsin, Neuropeptide F (NPF), small Neuropeptide F (sNPF), Pigment Dispersing Hormone (PDH), Red Pigment Concentrating Hormone (RPCH) and finally Tachykinin. LC/MS/MS proteomics was also carried out on eyestalk extracts, which are the major site of neuropeptide synthesis in decapod crustaceans. Results confirmed the presence of six neuropeptides and six precursor-related peptides previously identified in the transcriptome analyses. Conclusions This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of neuropeptide hormones in a Eucarida non-decapod Malacostraca, several of which are described for the first time in a non-decapod crustacean. Additionally, there is a potential expansion of PDH and Neuropeptide F family members, which may reflect certain life history traits such as circadian rhythms associated with diurnal migrations and also the confirmation via mass spectrometry of several novel pre-pro-peptides, of unknown function. Knowledge of these essential hormones provides a vital framework for understanding the physiological response of this key Southern Ocean species to climate change and provides

  11. Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., an aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium found associated with laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Green, David H; Nichols, Peter D; Whitman, William B; Semple, Kirk T; Aitken, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    A strictly aerobic, halotolerant, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain TG408, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum (CCAP1077/1C) by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed this organism within the order Xanthomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Its closest relatives included representatives of the Hydrocarboniphaga-Nevskia-Sinobacter clade (<92% sequence similarity) in the family Sinobacteraceae. The strain exhibited a narrow nutritional spectrum, preferring to utilize aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds and small organic acids. Notably, it displayed versatility in degrading two- and three-ring PAHs. Moreover, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was detected in lysates, indicating that this strain utilizes the meta-cleavage pathway for aromatic compound degradation. Cells produced surface blebs and contained a single polar flagellum. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain TG408 was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C(16:0), C(16:1) ω7c, and C(18:1) ω7c. The G+C content of the isolate's DNA was 64.3 mol% ± 0.34 mol%. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain TG408 represents a novel genus and species in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which the name Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain were developed and used to show that this organism is found associated with other species of marine phytoplankton. Phytoplankton may be a natural biotope in the ocean where new species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria await discovery and which contribute significantly to natural remediation processes. PMID:23087039

  12. Expanding the Crustacean Neuropeptidome using a Multi-Faceted Mass Spectrometric Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Mingming; Wang, Junhua; Chen, Ruibing; Li, Lingjun

    2009-01-01

    Jonah crab Cancer borealis is an excellent model organism long served for many areas of physiology, including the study of endocrinology and neurobiology. Characterizing the neuropeptides present in its nervous system provides the first critical step toward understanding the physiological roles of these complex molecules. Multiple mass spectral techniques were used to comprehensively characterize the neuropeptidome in C. borealis, including matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI FTMS), MALDI time of flight (TOF)/TOF MS and nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time of flight tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC ESI Q TOF MS/MS). In order to enhance the detection signals and expand the dynamic range, direct tissue analysis, tissue extraction, capillary electrophoresis (CE) and off-line HPLC separation have also been employed. In total, 142 peptides were identified, including 85 previously known C. borealis peptides, 22 peptides characterized previously from other decapods, but new to this species, and 35 new peptides de novo sequenced for the first time in this study. Seventeen neuropeptide families were revealed including RFamide, allatostatin (A and B type), RYamide, orcokinin, orcomyotropin, proctolin, crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), crustacean hyperglycemic hormone precursor-related peptide (CPRP), crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH), corazonin, pigment-dispersing hormone (PDH), tachykinin, pyrokinin, SIFamide, red pigment concentrating hormone (RPCH) and HISGLYRamide. Collectively, our results greatly increase the number and expand the coverage of known C. borealis neuropeptides, and thus provide a stronger framework for future studies on the physiological roles played by these molecules in this important model organism. PMID:19222238

  13. A helix-turn motif in the C-terminal domain of histone H1.

    PubMed Central

    Vila, R.; Ponte, I.; Jiménez, M. A.; Rico, M.; Suau, P.

    2000-01-01

    The structural study of peptides belonging to the terminal domains of histone H1 can be considered as a step toward the understanding of the function of H1 in chromatin. The conformational properties of the peptide Ac-EPKRSVAFKKTKKEVKKVATPKK (CH-1), which belongs to the C-terminal domain of histone H1(o) (residues 99-121) and is adjacent to the central globular domain of the protein, were examined by means of 1H-NMR and circular dichroism. In aqueous solution, CH-1 behaved as a mainly unstructured peptide, although turn-like conformations in rapid equilibrium with the unfolded state could be present. Addition of trifluoroethanol resulted in a substantial increase of the helical content. The helical limits, as indicated by (i,i + 3) nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) cross correlations and significant up-field conformational shifts of the C(alpha) protons, span from Pro100 to Val116, with Glu99 and Ala117 as N- and C-caps. A structure calculation performed on the basis of distance constraints derived from NOE cross peaks in 90% trifluoroethanol confirmed the helical structure of this region. The helical region has a marked amphipathic character, due to the location of all positively charged residues on one face of the helix and all the hydrophobic residues on the opposite face. The peptide has a TPKK motif at the C-terminus, following the alpha-helical region. The observed NOE connectivities suggest that the TPKK sequence adopts a type (I) beta-turn conformation, a sigma-turn conformation or a combination of both, in fast equilibrium with unfolded states. Sequences of the kind (S/T)P(K/R)(K/R) have been proposed as DNA binding motifs. The CH-1 peptide, thus, combines a positively charged amphipathic helix and a turn as potential DNA-binding motifs. PMID:10794405

  14. Change in Land Cover along the Lower Columbia River Estuary as Determined from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Garono, Ralph; Anderson, Becci; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01

    The Lower Columbia River Estuary Management Plan (Jerrick, 1991) recognizes the positive relationship between the conservation of fish and wildlife habitat, and sustaining their populations. An important component of fish and wildlife conservation and management is the identification of habitats, trends in habitat change, and delineation of habitat for preservation, restoration or enhancement. Alterations to the environment, such as hydropower generation, dredging, forestry, agriculture, channel alteration, diking, bank stabilization and floodplain development, have dramatically altered both the type and distribution of habitats along the Columbia River Estuary (CRE) and its floodplain. Along the Columbia River, tidally influenced habitats occur from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam, a distance of 230 km. If we are to effectively manage the natural resources of the Columbia River ecosystem, there is a need to understand how habitats have changed because fish and wildlife populations are known to respond to changes in habitat quality and distribution. The goal of this study was to measure the amount and type of change of CRE land cover from 1992 to 2000. We performed a change analysis on two spatial data sets describing land cover along the lower portion of the estuary (Fig. 1). The 1992 data set was created by the NOAA Coastal Remote Sensing, Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) in cooperation with Columbia River Estuary Study Task Force (CREST), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Point Adams Field Station, and State of Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The 2000 data set was produced by Earth Design Consultants, Inc. (EDC) and the Wetland Ecosystem Team (WET: University of Washington) as part of a larger Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) habitat mapping study. Although the image classification methodologies used to create the data sets differed, both data sets were produced by classifying Landsat

  15. Attenuation of Storm Surge Flooding By Wetlands in the Chesapeake Bay: An Integrated Geospatial Framework Evaluating Impacts to Critical Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, A.; Haddad, J.; Lawler, S.; Ferreira, C.

    2014-12-01

    Areas along the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries are extremely vulnerable to hurricane flooding, as evidenced by the costly effects and severe impacts of recent storms along the Virginia coast, such as Hurricane Isabel in 2003 and Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Coastal wetlands, in addition to their ecological importance, are expected to mitigate the impact of storm surge by acting as a natural protection against hurricane flooding. Quantifying such interactions helps to provide a sound scientific basis to support planning and decision making. Using storm surge flooding from various historical hurricanes, simulated using a coupled hydrodynamic wave model (ADCIRC-SWAN), we propose an integrated framework yielding a geospatial identification of the capacity of Chesapeake Bay wetlands to protect critical infrastructure. Spatial identification of Chesapeake Bay wetlands is derived from the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI), National Land Cover Database (NLCD), and the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP). Inventories of population and critical infrastructure are extracted from US Census block data and FEMA's HAZUS-Multi Hazard geodatabase. Geospatial and statistical analyses are carried out to develop a relationship between wetland land cover, hurricane flooding, population and infrastructure vulnerability. These analyses result in the identification and quantification of populations and infrastructure in flooded areas that lie within a reasonable buffer surrounding the identified wetlands. Our analysis thus produces a spatial perspective on the potential for wetlands to attenuate hurricane flood impacts in critical areas. Statistical analysis will support hypothesis testing to evaluate the benefits of wetlands from a flooding and storm-surge attenuation perspective. Results from geospatial analysis are used to identify where interactions with critical infrastructure are relevant in the Chesapeake Bay.

  16. Mineralized Remains of Morphotypes of Filamentous Cyanobacteria in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    ) investigations of freshly fractured interior surfaces of carbonaceous meteorites, terrestrial rocks, and recent microbial extremophiles and filamentous cyanobacteria. These studies have resulted in the detection in a several carbonaceous meteorites of the mineralized remains of a wide variety of complex filamentous trichomic microorganisms. These embedded forms are consistent in size and microstructure with well-preserved morphotypes of mat- forming filamentous trichomic cyanobacteria and the degraded remains of microfibrils of cyanobacterial sheaths. We present the results of comparative imaging studies and EDAX elemental analyses of recent cyanobacteria (e.g. Calothrix, Oscillatoria, and Lyngbya) that are similar in size, morphology and microstructure to morphotypes found embedded in meteorites. EDAX elemental studies reveal that forms found in carbonaceous meteorites often have highly carbonized sheaths in close association with permineralized filaments, trichomes and microbial cells. Ratios of critical bioelements (C:O, C:N, C:P, and C:S) reveal dramatic differences between microfossils in Earth rocks and meteorites and in filaments, trichomes, hormogonia, and cells of recent cyanobacteria.

  17. Dynamics of Molecular Hydrogen in Hypersaline Microbial Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Bebout, Brad M.; Visscher, Pieter T.; DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Early Earth microbial communities that centered around the anaerobic decomposition of organic molecular hydrogen as a carrier of electrons, regulator of energy metabolism, and facilitator of syntroph'c microbial interactions. The advent of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms added a highly dynamic and potentially dominant term to the hydrogen economy of these communities. We have examined the daily variations of hydrogen concentrations in cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mats from hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur, Mexico. These mats bring together phototrophic and anaerobic bacteria (along with virtually all other trophic groups) in a spatially ordered and chemically dynamic matrix that provides a good analog for early Earth microbial ecosystems. Hydrogen concentrations in the photic zone of the mat can be three orders of magnitude or more higher than in the photic zone, which are, in turn, an order of magnitude higher than in the unconsolidated sediments underlying the mat community. Within the photic zone, hydrogen concentrations can fluctuate dramatically during the diel (24 hour day-night) cycle, ranging from less than 0.001% during the day to nearly 10% at night. The resultant nighttime flux of hydrogen from the mat to the environment was up to 17% of the daytime oxygen flux. The daily pattern observed is highly dependent on cyanobacterial species composition within the mat, with Lyngbya-dominated systems having a much greater dynamic range than those dominated by Microcoleus; this may relate largely to differing degrees of nitrogen-fixing and fermentative activity in the two mats. The greatest H2 concentrations and fluxes were observed in the absence of oxygen, suggesting an important potential feedback control in the context of the evolution of atmospheric composition. The impact of adding this highly dynamic photosynthetic term to the hydrogen economy of early microbial ecosystems must have been substantial. From an evolutionary standpoint, the H2

  18. Biologically induced mineralization of dypingite by cyanobacteria from an alkaline wetland near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Power, Ian M; Wilson, Siobhan A; Thom, James M; Dipple, Gregory M; Southam, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Background This study provides experimental evidence for biologically induced precipitation of magnesium carbonates, specifically dypingite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·5H2O), by cyanobacteria from an alkaline wetland near Atlin, British Columbia. This wetland is part of a larger hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O) playa. Abiotic and biotic processes for magnesium carbonate precipitation in this environment are compared. Results Field observations show that evaporation of wetland water produces carbonate films of nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) on the water surface and crusts on exposed surfaces. In contrast, benthic microbial mats possessing filamentous cyanobacteria (Lyngbya sp.) contain platy dypingite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·5H2O) and aragonite. Bulk carbonates in the benthic mats (δ13C avg. = 6.7‰, δ18O avg. = 17.2‰) were isotopically distinguishable from abiotically formed nesquehonite (δ13C avg. = 9.3‰, δ18O avg. = 24.9‰). Field and laboratory experiments, which emulated natural conditions, were conducted to provide insight into the processes for magnesium carbonate precipitation in this environment. Field microcosm experiments included an abiotic control and two microbial systems, one containing ambient wetland water and one amended with nutrients to simulate eutrophic conditions. The abiotic control developed an extensive crust of nesquehonite on its bottom surface during which [Mg2+] decreased by 16.7% relative to the starting concentration. In the microbial systems, precipitation occurred within the mats and was not simply due to the capturing of mineral grains settling out of the water column. Magnesium concentrations decreased by 22.2% and 38.7% in the microbial systems, respectively. Laboratory experiments using natural waters from the Atlin site produced rosettes and flakey globular aggregates of dypingite precipitated in association with filamentous cyanobacteria dominated biofilms cultured from the site, whereas the abiotic control again precipitated

  19. Modern lacustrine stromatolites, Walker Lake, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Robert H.; Licari, Gerald R.; Link, Martin H.

    1982-05-01

    The Walker River drainage basin occupies about 10,000 km 2 in western Nevada and parts of California and is essentially a closed hydrologic system which drains from the crest of the Sierra Nevada in California and terminates in Walker Lake, Nevada. Walker Lake trends north and is about 27.4 km long and 8 km wide with water depths exceeding 30.5 m. The lake is situated in an asymmetric basin with steep alluvial fans flanking the western shoreline (Wassuk Range) and more gentle but areally more extensive alluvial fans flanking the eastern shoreline (Gillis Range). Exposed lake terraces and the present shoreline of Walker Lake record a sequence of Pleistocene and Holocene stromatolitic and tufaceous carbonate deposits. Small generalized and columnar stromatolites, frequently encrusted on exposed coarse-grained clasts or bedrock, are present along parts of the nearshore margin of Walker Lake and at elevated lake stands. Columnar stromatolites as much as 4 cm high are subcylindrical to club shaped discrete, and laterally linked at the base with local branching. These digitate stromatolites start as wavy, generalized stromatolites which are vertically transitional to small, laterally linked cabbage heads with laminae which thicken over the crests. Although algal structures are not well preserved in the older stromatolites, recent precipitation of low magnesium calcite occurs as smooth encrustations and as tiny mounds which are consistently associated with a diverse, seasonally variable, green and blue-green algal community including Cladophora glomerata, Ulothrix (cf. aequalis), Gongrosira, Schizothrix, Amphithrix janthina, Calothrix, Homeothrix, Spirulina, Anabaena, Lyngbya, and Entophysalis. Cladophora glomerata and a species of Ulothrix, which are the two most abundant algae within the Walker Lake stromatolite community, are known to condition semi-alkaline lake water by the removal of CO 2 from bicarbonate during photosynthesis. Such conditioning results in the

  20. Hyperspectral remote sensing for water quality applications in Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Cordova, A. I.; Christopher, S. A.; Irwin, D.

    2013-12-01

    Water quality measurements are relevant to control and prevent the pollution of surface water essential for human use. Previous studies have used standard methods of water sampling to estimate water quality parameters. Nevertheless those methods are extremely expensive and time-consuming and do not provide information for an entire water body. Hence it is important to implement techniques that allow for the monitoring of water quality parameters in a timely and cost-effective manner, and remote sensing represents a feasible alternative. This study focuses on the largest algal bloom affecting Lake Atitlan, located in Guatemala, by using the hyperspectral sensor Hyperion on board the EO-1 satellite. This algal bloom had a life span that extended for a little more than a month and had a maximum coverage of approximately 40% of the lake's 137 square kilometer surface. This algal bloom occurred at the end of the year 2009, with November being the most critical month. Different satellite sensors were used to monitor the extent of the algal bloom, including Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and the Advanced Land Imager (ALI). However, Hyperion images were used to distinguish the characteristics of the vegetation populating the algal bloom. Hyperion satellite images provided a more complete spectral profile of the algal bloom affecting the lake due to its high spectral resolution characteristics. This enabled the identification of unique peaks of reflectance and absorption features of the spectral signature obtained from the algal bloom. The algal bloom was formed mainly by the cyanobacteria Lyngbya robusta. Hyperion satellite images were used to characterize the algal bloom and the unique pigments of cyanobacteria such as phycocyanin. Atmospheric correction was critical to obtain the pure reflectance of the algal bloom and differentiate the spectral features unique to the cyanobacteria

  1. Image applications for coastal resource planning: Elkhorn Slough Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvitek, Rikk G.; Sharp, Gary D.; VanCoops, Jonathan; Fitzgerald, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to evaluate the utility of digital spectral imagery at two levels of resolution for large scale, accurate, auto-classification of land cover along the Central California Coast. Although remote sensing technology offers obvious advantages over on-the-ground mapping, there are substantial trade-offs that must be made between resolving power and costs. Higher resolution images can theoretically be used to identify smaller habitat patches, but they usually require more scenes to cover a given area and processing these images is computationally intense requiring much more computer time and memory. Lower resolution images can cover much larger areas, are less costly to store, process, and manipulate, but due to their larger pixel size can lack the resolving power of the denser images. This lack of resolving power can be critical in regions such as the Central California Coast where important habitat change often occurs on a scale of 10 meters. Our approach has been to compare vegetation and habitat classification results from two aircraft-based spectral scenes covering the same study area but at different levels of resolution with a previously produced ground-truthed land cover base map of the area. Both of the spectral images used for this project were of significantly higher resolution than the satellite-based LandSat scenes used in the C-CAP program. The lower reaches of the Elkhorn Slough watershed was chosen as an ideal study site because it encompasses a suite of important vegetation types and habitat loss processes characteristic of the central coast region. Dramatic habitat alterations have and are occurring within the Elkhorn Slough drainage area, including erosion and sedimentation, land use conversion, wetland loss, and incremental loss due to development and encroachnnent by agriculture. Additonally, much attention has already been focused on the Elkhorn Slough due to its status as a National Marine Education and Research

  2. Using NEXRAD Radar Rainfall to Calibrate a Development Impact Model in a Coastal Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, A.; Bedient, P.

    2012-12-01

    Low slopes and shallow, impermeable soils are characteristic of the Upper Texas Gulf Coast. These, coupled with large rainfall events, contribute to wide floodplains and ponding. Rapid, high intensity development has further exacerbated flooding in this coastal region. The Clear Creek Watershed is located in southeast Houston and empties into Galveston Bay. During the past decade, the watershed has been impacted by significant historical coastal storms and rainfall events such as Tropical Storm Allison (2001), Hurricane Ike (2008), and the April 2009 Event. In this study, we employ a calibrated, distributed hydrologic model and pre- and LID-development models to analyze how development characteristics have contributed to costly flooding in coastal watersheds. In 2012, Brody et al. used FEMA floodclaims collected over the 11-year period between 1999 and 2009 to examine the pattern of flood loss across the Clear Creek watershed. The results showed that the 100-year floodplain did not adequately represent overall or event-specific loss. Using a spatial cluster analysis, the Turkey Creek sub-area of the Clear Creek watershed was pin-pointed as an area of statistically significant flood loss, an area where there were a considerable number of high-value flood claims. This area is characterized by high-density, poorly constructed development and frequent flooding. In parallel with Brody's study of flood-risk indicators, our study aims to examine the behavior of the flood-wave in the coastal watershed and how it is affected by different development patterns. A distributed hydrologic VfloTM model was built for Turkey Creek using 2008 CCAP land cover data and calibrated using NEXRAD radar rainfall for the Hurricane Ike (2008) and April 2009 events. Once the model was calibrated, both pre- and LID-development models were built using historical land cover data. These models were used to identify how development patterns have influence the flood hydrograph. Early results

  3. Structural Dynamics of Soluble Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein CLIC1 Examined by Amide Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS)†

    PubMed Central

    Stoychev, Stoyan H.; Nathaniel, Christos; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Brock, Melissa; Li, Sheng; Asmus, Kyle; Woods, Virgil L.; Dirr, Heini W.

    2009-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) functions as an anion channel in plasma and nuclear membranes when its soluble monomeric form converts to an integral-membrane form. The transmembrane region of CLIC1 is located in its thioredoxin-like domain 1 but the mechanism whereby the protein converts to its membrane conformation has yet to be determined. Since channel formation in membranes is enhanced at low pH (5 to 5.5), a condition that is found at the surface of membranes, the structural dynamics of soluble CLIC1 was studied at pH 7 and at pH 5.5 in the absence of membranes by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS). Rapid hydrogen exchange data indicate that CLIC1 displays a similar core structure at these pH values. Domain 1 is less stable than the all-helical domain 2 and, while the structure of domain 1 remains intact, its conformational flexibility is further increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.5). In the absence of membrane, an acidic environment appears to prime the solution structure of CLIC1 by destabilising domain 1 in order to lower the activation energy barrier for its conversion to the membrane-insertion conformation. The significantly enhanced H/D-exchange rates at pH 5.5 displayed by two segments (peptides 11-31 and 68-82) could be due to the protonation of acidic residues in salt bridges. One of these segments (peptide 11-31) includes part of the transmembrane region which, in the solution structure, consists of helix α1. This helix is intrinsically stable and is most likely retained in the membrane conformation. Strand β2, another element of the transmembrane region, displays a propensity to form a helical structure and has putative N- and C-capping motifs, suggesting that it too most likely forms a helix in a lipid bilayer. PMID:19650640

  4. Nutrient and other environmental controls of harmful cyanobacterial blooms along the freshwater-marine continuum.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Nutrient and hydrologic conditions strongly influence harmful planktonic and benthic cyanobacterial bloom (CHAB) dynamics in aquatic ecosystems ranging from streams and lakes to coastal ecosystems. Urbanization, agricultural and industrial development have led to increased nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) discharge, which affect CHAB potentials of receiving waters. The amounts, proportions and chemical composition of N and P sources can influence the composition, magnitude and duration of blooms. This, in turn, has ramifications for food web dynamics (toxic or inedible CHABs), nutrient and oxygen cycling and nutrient budgets. Some CHABs are capable of N2 fixation, a process that can influence N availability and budgets. Certain invasive N2 fixing taxa (e.g., Cylindrospermopsis, Lyngbya) also effectively compete for fixed N during spring, N-enriched runoff periods, while they use N2 fixation to supplant their N needs during N-deplete summer months. Control of these taxa is strongly dependent on P supply. However, additional factors, such as molar N:P supply ratios, organic matter availability, light attenuation, freshwater discharge, flushing rates (residence time) and water column stability play interactive roles in determining CHAB composition (i.e. N2 fixing vs. non-N2 fixing taxa) and biomass. Bloom potentials of nutrient-impacted waters are sensitive to water residence (or flushing) time, temperatures (preference for > 15 degrees C), vertical mixing and turbidity. These physical forcing features can control absolute growth rates of bloom taxa. Human activities may affect "bottom up" physical-chemical modulators either directly, by controlling hydrologic, nutrient, sediment and toxic discharges, or indirectly, by influencing climate. Control and management of cyanobacterial and other phytoplankton blooms invariably includes nutrient input constraints, most often focused on N and/or P. While single nutrient input constraints may be effective in some water bodies

  5. Characterization of the hydrology, water chemistry, and aquatic communities of selected springs in the St. Johns River Water Management District, Florida, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Gerwig, Robert M.; Tate, William B.

    2006-01-01

    from the Silver Springs group and in both boils at Gemini Springs. No pesticides were detected in water samples from De Leon Spring and Green Spring. Evidence of denitrification was indicated by the presence of excess nitrogen gas in water samples from most of the springs. Aquatic communities varied among the springs. Large floating mats of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), identified as Lyngbya wollei, were observed in De Leon Spring during all sampling events in 2004. At Gemini Springs, the dominant periphyton was Rhizoclonium sp. Of the three springs sampled for benthic invertebrates, De Leon Spring had the highest overall species richness and most disturbance intolerant species (Florida Index = 4). Green Spring had the lowest species richness of the springs sampled. Based on qualitative comparisons, overall macroinvertebrate species richness seemed to be negatively related to magnesium, potassium, sodium, and specific conductance. Invertebrate abundance was greatest when dissolved oxygen and nitrate were high but phosphorus and potassium concentrations were low. Dipteran abundance seemed to be positively associated with specific conductance and total organic carbon but negatively associated with nitrate-N. Amphipods were the numerically dominant group collected in most (six of nine) collections. Shifts in amphipod abundance of the two species collected (Gammarus sp. and Hyalella azteca) varied by season among the three springs, but there were no trends evident in the variation. Fish populations were relatively species-rich at the Silver Springs group, De Leon Spring, and Gemini Springs, but not at Green Spring. Nonindigenous fish species were observed at all springs except Green Spring.

  6. Mineralized remains of morphotypes of filamentous cyanobacteria in carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-09-01

    rocks, living, cryopreserved and fossilized extremophiles and cyanobacteria. These studies have resulted in the detection of mineralized remains of morphotypes of filamentous cyanobacteria, mats and consortia in many carbonaceous meteorites. These well-preserved and embedded microfossils are consistent with the size, morphology and ultra-microstructure of filamentous trichomic prokaryotes and degraded remains of microfibrils of cyanobacterial sheaths. EDAX elemental studies reveal that the forms in the meteorites often have highly carbonized sheaths in close association with permineralized filaments, trichomes, and microbial cells. The eextensive protocols and methodologies that have been developed to protect the samples from contamination and to distinguish recent contaminants from indigenous microfossils are described recent bio-contaminants. Ratios of critical bioelements (C:O, C:N, C:P, and C:S) reveal dramatic differences between microfossils in Earth rocks and meteorites and in the cells, filaments, trichomes, and hormogonia of recently living cyanobacteria. The results of comparative optical, ESEM and FESEM studies and EDAX elemental analyses of recent cyanobacteria (e.g. Calothrix, Oscillatoria, and Lyngbya) of similar size, morphology and microstructure to microfossils found embedded in the Murchison CM2 and the Orgueil CI1 carbonaceous meteorites are presented

  7. U.S. Energy Flow -- 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H; Mui, N; Pasternak, A

    1997-12-01

    under construction in the United States came on line in 1995. The Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Watts Bar-l received a low-power operating license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The construction permit was granted in 1972. Also, TVA canceled plans to complete construction of three other nuclear plants. In 1995, federal and state governments took steps to deregulate and restructure the electric power industry. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) unanimously approved a proposal to require utilities to open their electric transmission system to competition from wholesale electricity suppliers. California has been at the forefront in the restructuring of the electric utility industry. Plans authorized by the California Public Utility Commission prepare for a free market in electricity to be established by 1998. In 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began reporting statistics on renewable energy consumption. The types and amounts of renewable energy consumed vary by end-use sector, electric utilities and the industrial sector being the primary consumers since 1990. Renewable energy provided 6.83 quads (7.6I) of the total energy consumed in the United States in 1995, compared to 7.1% in 1994. Increasing concern over the emission of greenhouse gases has resulted in exhaustive analysis of U.S. carbon emissions from energy use. Emissions in the early 1990s have already exceeded those projected by the Clinton Administration's Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) released in 1994 that was developed to stabilize U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by the year 2000.

  8. Impact of Sea Level Rise on the Attenuation of Hurricane Storm Surge by Wetlands in Corpus Christi, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, C.; Irish, J. L.; Olivera, F.

    2011-12-01

    Celso Ferreira1, Jennifer L. Irish2, Francisco Olivera3 1 Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, email: celsoferreira@tamu.edu. 2 Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, email: jirish@vt.edu 3 Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, email: folivera@civil.tamu.edu. Texas has historically faced severe hurricanes with Ike being the most recent major storm example. It is believed that coastal wetlands might reduce the impact of the storm surge on coastal areas, acting as a natural protection against hurricane flooding, especially for small hurricanes and tropical storms. Considering the expected rise in the mean sea level, wetland composition and spatial distribution are also expected to change as the environmental conditions change along the coast. We analyzed a range of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projections for sea level rise (SLR) to simulate wetland alterations and evaluate their impact on hurricane storm surge. The analyses was conducted for Corpus Christi Bay using a pre-validated, physically based, hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC) and a wind and pressure field model (PBL) representing the physical properties of historical hurricane Bret. The calculations were performed using an unstructured numerical grid with 3.3 million nodes covering part of the Atlantic Ocean and the entire Gulf of Mexico (resolution from 2000 km to 50 meters at the coast). Wetlands are represented in the numerical model through their influence on the frictional resistance proprieties and bathymetric changes. To characterize the wetland types and their spatial distribution along the coast, we used six different land use databases from the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) (1992, 2001), the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) (1993) and the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP

  9. Biological soil crusts are the main contributor to winter soil respiration in a temperate desert ecosystem of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M. Z.

    2012-04-01

    distribute with cover about 1% of the entire study area. Prior to revegetation, straw-checkerboards approximately 1×1 m2 in area were constructed using wheat or rice straw to stabilize the dune surface and allow time for the planted xerophytic shrubs to adapt to the new environment. In 1956, the following 2-year-old xerophytic shrub seedlings were planted within the checkerboard at a density of 16 individuals per 100 m2 and grown without irrigation: Artemisia ordosica Krasch, H. scoparium Fisch, Calligonum mongolicum Turc'z, Caragana microphylla Lam., Caragana korshinskii Kom, Salix gordejevii and Atraphaxis bracteata A.Los. The stabilized area was then expanded to parallel areas in 1964 and 1982 using the same method and species. As a result, the initial stages of change that have occurred at these sites were similar. After more than fifties years succession, the predominant plants are semi-shrubs, shrubs, forbs, and grasses at present and BSCs formed. The common BSCs in the region may be dominated by cyanobacteria, algae, lichens and mosses, or any combination of these organisms. Cyanobacteria species include Microcolous vaginatus Gom., Hydrocoleus violacens Gom., Lyngbya crytoraginatus Schk., Phormidium amblgum Gom., P. autumnale (Ag.) Gom., P. foveolarum (Mont.) Gom. and Phormidium luridum (Kutz) Gom. etc; algal species mainly include Anabaena azotica Ley, Euglena sp., Hantzschia amphioxys var capitata Grum, Oscillatoria obscura Gom., O. pseudogeminate G. Schm. And Scytonema javanicum (Kutz) Bornet Flash etc; lichen species include Collema tenax (Sw.) Ach., Endocarpon pusillum Hedw.; and moss species are dominated by Bryum argenteum Hedw., Didymodon constrictus (Mitt.) Saito., Tortula bidentata Bai Xue Liang and T. desertorum Broth.. Experimental Design and Rs measurements On October 2010, We selected the moss-dominated BSCs at four revegetation sites and natural vegetation sites, in which 3 replicated plots were selected randomly. In each plot, olyvinyl chloride (PVC

  10. Land-Use and Land-Cover Change around Mobile Bay, Alabama from 1974-2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Jean; Spruce, Joseph P.; Swann, Roberta; Smooth, James C.

    2009-01-01

    ), which is critical nursing ground for many Gulf fish species. A survey of Mobile Bay SAV showed widespread decreases since the 1940s. Prior to our project, coastal environmental managers in Baldwin and Mobile counties needed more understanding of the historical LULC for properly assessing the impacts of urbanization. In particular, more information on the location and extent of changing urbanization LULC patterns was needed to aid LULC planning and to assess predictions of future LULC patterns. Our products will assist the coastal environmental managers and land-use planners in making better community growth planning decisions. Our project also will help to establish a historical baseline of LULC distributions, which is a fundamental need in any stewardship plan. The primary research objective of our project was to produce historic and current geospatial LULC change products across a 34-year time frame. A multi-decadal coastal LULC change product was the major project deliverable. The geographic extent and nature of change was quantified and assessed for the upland herbaceous, barren, open water, urban, upland forest, woody wetland, and non-woody wetlanddominated land cover types. We focused on regional analyses of decadal-scale urban expansion and watershed-scaled analyses of LULC change for multiple areas of concern to the Mobile Bay NEP (Figure A). We used the following dates to derive LULC classification products from Landsat data: 1974, 1979, 1984, 1988, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2005, and 2008. We assessed the accuracy of our products using randomly sampled locations and digital geospatial reference data including field survey data, high resolution orthorectified aerial photography, high resolution multispectral and panchromatic satellite data displays (from QuickBird and Corona sensors), digital elevation model data, and National Wetlands Inventory wetland cover type data. NOAA s Coastal Change Assessment Program s (C-CAP) and National Land Cover Database (NLCD) procts

  11. Biological soil crusts are the main contributor to winter soil respiration in a temperate desert ecosystem of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M. Z.

    2012-04-01

    distribute with cover about 1% of the entire study area. Prior to revegetation, straw-checkerboards approximately 1×1 m2 in area were constructed using wheat or rice straw to stabilize the dune surface and allow time for the planted xerophytic shrubs to adapt to the new environment. In 1956, the following 2-year-old xerophytic shrub seedlings were planted within the checkerboard at a density of 16 individuals per 100 m2 and grown without irrigation: Artemisia ordosica Krasch, H. scoparium Fisch, Calligonum mongolicum Turc'z, Caragana microphylla Lam., Caragana korshinskii Kom, Salix gordejevii and Atraphaxis bracteata A.Los. The stabilized area was then expanded to parallel areas in 1964 and 1982 using the same method and species. As a result, the initial stages of change that have occurred at these sites were similar. After more than fifties years succession, the predominant plants are semi-shrubs, shrubs, forbs, and grasses at present and BSCs formed. The common BSCs in the region may be dominated by cyanobacteria, algae, lichens and mosses, or any combination of these organisms. Cyanobacteria species include Microcolous vaginatus Gom., Hydrocoleus violacens Gom., Lyngbya crytoraginatus Schk., Phormidium amblgum Gom., P. autumnale (Ag.) Gom., P. foveolarum (Mont.) Gom. and Phormidium luridum (Kutz) Gom. etc; algal species mainly include Anabaena azotica Ley, Euglena sp., Hantzschia amphioxys var capitata Grum, Oscillatoria obscura Gom., O. pseudogeminate G. Schm. And Scytonema javanicum (Kutz) Bornet Flash etc; lichen species include Collema tenax (Sw.) Ach., Endocarpon pusillum Hedw.; and moss species are dominated by Bryum argenteum Hedw., Didymodon constrictus (Mitt.) Saito., Tortula bidentata Bai Xue Liang and T. desertorum Broth.. Experimental Design and Rs measurements On October 2010, We selected the moss-dominated BSCs at four revegetation sites and natural vegetation sites, in which 3 replicated plots were selected randomly. In each plot, olyvinyl chloride (PVC