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Sample records for lyral quantitative aspects

  1. [Sensitization to Lyral].

    PubMed

    Heras, F; Díaz-Recuero, J L; Cabello, M J; Conde-Salazar, L

    2006-01-01

    Lyral is a fragrance that is present in many cosmetic products. It has turned into an emergent allergen during the last years. In studies carried out in other European countries, the prevalence of sensitization to Lyral has been found to be 1.9-2.7 %, but it is unknown the prevalence in Spain, as well as the need to include it or not in the standard series of the Spanish Group of Contact Dermatitis (GEIDC). We have patch-tested to Lyral all patients with suspicion of contact dermatitis of any origin who attended our Service between April and May-2005. From a total of 170 patients included in our study, 2 of them had a sensitization to Lyral (1.2 %). One of these two patients had an axillae contact dermatitis caused by a deodorant containing Lyral. The other patient was a masseur-woman with a contact dermatitis on both hands, with periods of dissemination to upper extremities and trunk, and who used several cosmetics products for private reasons and during her job. Although the sample of this study is quite small, we think that the results allow to suspect that Lyral is one of the main allergens, or even the most important, in causing allergic contact dermatitis to fragrances in our environment. Therefore, we believe that we must raise the inclusion of Lyral in the standard series of GEIDC, either as independent allergen, or including it in a new mixture of fragrances.

  2. Allergic contact dermatitis from the synthetic fragrances Lyral and acetyl cedrene in separate underarm deodorant preparations.

    PubMed

    Handley, J; Burrows, D

    1994-11-01

    The case is reported of a 28-year-old man who developed allergic contact dermatitis from 2 synthetic fragrance ingredients, Lyral (3- and 4-(4-hydroxy-4-methylpentyl)-3-cyclohexene-1-aldehyde) and acetyl cedrene, in separate underarm deodorant preparations. The implications of the patient's negative patch test reactions to the European standard series (Trolab) and cosmetics and fragrance series (both Chemotechnique Diagnostics) are discussed. The importance is stressed of patch testing with the patient's own preparations when cosmetic dermatitis is suspected, and of identifying and reporting offending fragrance ingredients, with a view possibly to updating the European standard series and commercially available cosmetics and fragrance series.

  3. Quantitative Aspects of Single Molecule Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Raimund J.; Tahmasbi, Amir; Ram, Sripad; Lin, Zhiping; Ward, E. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule microscopy is a relatively new optical microscopy technique that allows the detection of individual molecules such as proteins in a cellular context. This technique has generated significant interest among biologists, biophysicists and biochemists, as it holds the promise to provide novel insights into subcellular processes and structures that otherwise cannot be gained through traditional experimental approaches. Single molecule experiments place stringent demands on experimental and algorithmic tools due to the low signal levels and the presence of significant extraneous noise sources. Consequently, this has necessitated the use of advanced statistical signal and image processing techniques for the design and analysis of single molecule experiments. In this tutorial paper, we provide an overview of single molecule microscopy from early works to current applications and challenges. Specific emphasis will be on the quantitative aspects of this imaging modality, in particular single molecule localization and resolvability, which will be discussed from an information theoretic perspective. We review the stochastic framework for image formation, different types of estimation techniques and expressions for the Fisher information matrix. We also discuss several open problems in the field that demand highly non-trivial signal processing algorithms. PMID:26167102

  4. Practical aspects of quantitative confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, John M

    2013-01-01

    Confocal microscopes are in principle well suited for quantitative imaging. The 3D fluorophore distribution in a specimen is transformed by the microscope optics and detector into the 2D intensity distribution of a digital image by a linear operation, a convolution. If multiple 2D images of the specimen at different focal planes are obtained, then the original 3D distribution in the specimen can be reconstructed. This reconstruction is a low-pass spatially filtered representation of the original, but quantitatively preserves relative fluorophore concentrations, with of course some limitations on accuracy and precision due to aberrations and noise. Given appropriate calibration, absolute fluorophore concentrations are accessible. A few simple guidelines are given for setting up confocal microscopes and checking their performance. With a little care, the images collected should be suitable for most types of quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SOME QUANTITATIVE ASPECTS OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GAVIN, WILLIAM J.; SPITZER, MURRAY

    THE DATA FROM THE SEVERAL STUDIES ANALYZED IN THIS REPORT HAVE BEEN COLLECTED AS PART OF AN ON-GOING EFFORT TO IMPLEMENT THE ABT ASSOCIATES' EDUCATION COST EFFECTIVENESS INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS SUBMODEL, WHICH IS DEVELOPING TECHNIQUES TO EVALUATE THE QUANTITATIVE, CAUSE-AND-EFFECT RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS AND SCHOLASTIC…

  6. Quantitative aspects of fecal Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi in foals.

    PubMed Central

    Takai, S; Ohkura, H; Watanabe, Y; Tsubaki, S

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative aspects of fecal Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi in newborn foals for 12 weeks after birth were investigated on two horse breeding farms. R. equi was found in the feces of foals during week 1 of life. The greatest numbers of R. equi were present in the feces of foals during the first 8 weeks of their lives, which coincides with the age when foals are most liable to be exposed to R. equi. PMID:3700632

  7. Quantitation of Cytomegalovirus: Methodologic Aspects and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Boeckh, Michael; Boivin, Guy

    1998-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an important pathogen in transplant recipients and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Major progress has been made in developing quantitative detection methods for CMV in recent years. Due to their high sensitivity, these assays can detect CMV early, and quantitation may be useful in predicting the patient’s risk for disease and in monitoring the effect of antiviral therapy. This review discusses methodological aspects of currently used quantitative assays for CMV (i.e., viral culture techniques, antigen detection assays, DNA detection assays including PCR, branched-DNA assay, and the DNA hybrid capture assay) and addresses the correlation of systemic and site-specific CMV load and CMV disease in different populations of immunosuppressed patients as well as the response to antiviral treatment. To date, direct antigen detection and molecular techniques have largely replaced traditional culture-based techniques for CMV quantitation. In general, a high systemic CMV load is correlated with CMV disease. This correlation is strong in the HIV-infected population and in solid-organ transplant recipients but less clear in allogeneic marrow transplant recipients. Measuring the viral load at specific anatomic sites may be an alternative way to assess disease activity in situations where the systemic viral load correlates poorly with disease activity. A reduction of the systemic CMV load also correlates with a response to antiviral treatment, but more research is needed to evaluate the role of viral load as a surrogate marker for drug resistance. Due to the widespread use of quantitative CMV detection techniques to direct and monitor antiviral treatment, there is a great need for an assessment of the reproducibility of test results and better standardization of the assays. PMID:9665982

  8. Some quantitative aspects of temporary blinding from high brightness LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, Hans-Dieter

    2007-02-01

    According to the new European Directive on Artificial Optical Radiation (2006/25/EC) the employer has to determine the exposure and the assessment of risks, i.e. workers shall not be exposed above the exposure limit values, which are based on various ICNIRP guidelines. In addition, the employer shall give particular attention, when carrying out the risk assessment, to any indirect effects amongst others such as temporary blinding. Since up to now no quantitative values exist in order to rank or classify artificial optical sources and its associated capability of temporary blinding, we have investigated some aspects of glare and dazzling from a high-brightness LED (HB-LED). With such a single device and an array consisting of 80 HB-LEDs we have found in a previous investigation that the frequency of the blink reflex exceeds the one achieved with laser belonging to class 2 according to the international standard IEC 60825-1, however is less than about 50 %. The size of an after-image as a function of time and the visual acuity after an exposure from a white high-brightness LED has been investigated in detail with 3 test persons. The results have shown that the size of an after-image on the human retina remains nearly constant with a slight decrease over a time duration of about 12 minutes, whereas the initial visual acuity is recovered within 30 up to 60 seconds. Linear and exponential regression descriptions are given for both characteristics.

  9. Quantitative aspects of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulska, Ewa; Wagner, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Accurate determination of elements in various kinds of samples is essential for many areas, including environmental science, medicine, as well as industry. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a powerful tool enabling multi-elemental analysis of numerous matrices with high sensitivity and good precision. Various calibration approaches can be used to perform accurate quantitative measurements by ICP-MS. They include the use of pure standards, matrix-matched standards, or relevant certified reference materials, assuring traceability of the reported results. This review critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of different calibration approaches, which are used in quantitative analyses by ICP-MS. Examples of such analyses are provided. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  10. Quantitative aspects of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bulska, Ewa; Wagner, Barbara

    2016-10-28

    Accurate determination of elements in various kinds of samples is essential for many areas, including environmental science, medicine, as well as industry. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a powerful tool enabling multi-elemental analysis of numerous matrices with high sensitivity and good precision. Various calibration approaches can be used to perform accurate quantitative measurements by ICP-MS. They include the use of pure standards, matrix-matched standards, or relevant certified reference materials, assuring traceability of the reported results. This review critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of different calibration approaches, which are used in quantitative analyses by ICP-MS. Examples of such analyses are provided.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  11. Quantitative aspects of gene regulation by small RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Pankaj

    2007-03-01

    Small, non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) play an important role as genetic regulators in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Many sRNAs act through base-pairing interaction with target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) to regulate transcription, translation, and mRNA stability. sRNAs represent a novel form of genetic regulation distinct from more thoroughly studied protein regulators. This talk addresses quantitative aspectsof sRNA-mediated genetic regulation, focusing on noise, tunability, and feedback. In particular, we compare and contrast sRNA and protein regulators in an attempt to understand the compartive advantages of each form of regulation.

  12. Quantitative aspects of metabolic organization: a discussion of concepts.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, S A

    2001-03-29

    Metabolic organization of individual organisms follows simple quantitative rules that can be understood from basic physical chemical principles. Dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory identifies these rules, which quantify how individuals acquire and use energy and nutrients. The theory provides constraints on the metabolic organization of subcellular processes. Together with rules for interaction between individuals, it also provides a basis to understand population and ecosystem dynamics. The theory, therefore, links various levels of biological organization. It applies to all species of organisms and offers explanations for body-size scaling relationships of natural history parameters that are otherwise difficult to understand. A considerable number of popular empirical models turn out to be special cases of the DEB model, or very close numerical approximations. Strong and weak homeostasis and the partitionability of reserve kinetics are cornerstones of the theory and essential for understanding the evolution of metabolic organization.

  13. Lidar probing of the atmosphere: Some quantitative aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, R. T. H.; Uthe, E. E.

    1972-01-01

    Lidar uses laser energy in radar fashion to observe atmospheric backscattering as a function of range. Because of the short optical and near-optical wavelengths used, very small particles and even the gaseous molecules cause significant scattering. This can complicate the evaluation of the observations by introducing attenuation along the path as a second unknown into the lidar equation. In many cases, however, the observations may be interpreted directly on a qualitative basis and show the distribution of particulate matter in clear air or enable the dimensions of visible cloud to be measured accurately. In other cases, particularly where additional data are available, quantitative solutions can provide useful information on remote targets such as tenuous smoke clouds or haze layers. Examples of such observations are given, illustrating the computational approach to the evaluation of the volume concentration of natural dust and haze layers in the lower atmosphere and the mass concentration of a smoke plume. In both cases lidar data are related to independently obtained data on the particulate concentrations involved.

  14. Lidar probing of the atmosphere: Some quantitative aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, R. T. H.; Uthe, E. E.

    1972-01-01

    Lidar uses laser energy in radar fashion to observe atmospheric backscattering as a function of range. Because of the short optical and near-optical wavelengths used, very small particles and even the gaseous molecules cause significant scattering. This can complicate the evaluation of the observations by introducing attenuation along the path as a second unknown into the lidar equation. In many cases, however, the observations may be interpreted directly on a qualitative basis and show the distribution of particulate matter in clear air or enable the dimensions of visible cloud to be measured accurately. In other cases, particularly where additional data are available, quantitative solutions can provide useful information on remote targets such as tenuous smoke clouds or haze layers. Examples of such observations are given, illustrating the computational approach to the evaluation of the volume concentration of natural dust and haze layers in the lower atmosphere and the mass concentration of a smoke plume. In both cases lidar data are related to independently obtained data on the particulate concentrations involved.

  15. Quantitative aspects of protein fractional synthesis rates in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lescoat, P; Sauvant, D; Danfaer, A

    1997-01-01

    Protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) is a key-factor in the characterisation of ruminant metabolism. Published data from the literature were collected and statistically analysed to isolate the factors influencing FSR. FSR varied largely depending on the tissue considered, over a range from 1 to 20. FSR, with the plasma as the precursor pool for protein synthesis, was halved compared to that of the intracellular pool. The method for supplying the amino acid also significantly affects FSR since the flooding dose technique gave higher FSR estimates than the constant infusion technique. The choice of the labelled amino acid infused influenced FSR. There is a ranking order depending on the tissue or organ. The protein and energy levels of the diets significantly increased FSR, which raises the question of the body nitrogen requirements. Moreover, FSR values were dependent on the physiological status of the animals. To conclude, FSR values should be determined simultaneously with other biological parameters in order to obtain a realistic quantitative estimate of the nitrogen turnover rates during intermediary metabolism.

  16. Cerebral Blood Volume ASPECTS Is the Best Predictor of Clinical Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Retrospective, Combined Semi-Quantitative and Quantitative Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Padroni, Marina; Bernardoni, Andrea; Tamborino, Carmine; Roversi, Gloria; Borrelli, Massimo; Saletti, Andrea; De Vito, Alessandro; Azzini, Cristiano; Borgatti, Luca; Marcello, Onofrio; d’Esterre, Christopher; Ceruti, Stefano; Casetta, Ilaria; Lee, Ting-Yim; Fainardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The capability of CT perfusion (CTP) Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) to predict outcome and identify ischemia severity in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients is still questioned. Methods 62 patients with AIS were imaged within 8 hours of symptom onset by non-contrast CT, CT angiography and CTP scans at admission and 24 hours. CTP ASPECTS was calculated on the affected hemisphere using cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) maps by subtracting 1 point for any abnormalities visually detected or measured within multiple cortical circular regions of interest according to previously established thresholds. MTT-CBV ASPECTS was considered as CTP ASPECTS mismatch. Hemorrhagic transformation (HT), recanalization status and reperfusion grade at 24 hours, final infarct volume at 7 days and modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 3 months after onset were recorded. Results Semi-quantitative and quantitative CTP ASPECTS were highly correlated (p<0.00001). CBF, CBV and MTT ASPECTS were higher in patients with no HT and mRS≤2 and inversely associated with final infarct volume and mRS (p values: from p<0.05 to p<0.00001). CTP ASPECTS mismatch was slightly associated with radiological and clinical outcomes (p values: from p<0.05 to p<0.02) only if evaluated quantitatively. A CBV ASPECTS of 9 was the optimal semi-quantitative value for predicting outcome. Conclusions Our findings suggest that visual inspection of CTP ASPECTS recognizes infarct and ischemic absolute values. Semi-quantitative CBV ASPECTS, but not CTP ASPECTS mismatch, represents a strong prognostic indicator, implying that core extent is the main determinant of outcome, irrespective of penumbra size. PMID:26824672

  17. Morphological and quantitative aspects of nodule formation in hemolymph of the blowfly Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1794).

    PubMed

    Faraldo, A C; Gregório, E A; Lello, E

    2008-03-01

    Insects manifest effective immune responses that include both cellular and humoral components. Morphological and quantitative aspects of cellular and humoral cooperation during nodule formation in Chrysomya megacephala hemolymph against Saccharomyces cerevisae yeast cells were demonstrated for the first time. The analyses were performed in non-injected larvae (NIL), saline-injected larvae (SIL) and yeast-injected larvae (YIL). The hemolymph of injected groups was collected 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 12, 24, 36, or 48-h post-injection. Morphological aspects of YIL nodulation were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Quantitative analyses consisted of total (THC) and differential hemocyte counts (DHC) in all the groups and total yeast count (TYC) in YIL, which were performed in an improved Neubauer chamber. Nodule formation was initiated at approximately 2-h post-injection. Twelve hours after the injection, TEM revealed the presence of an amorphous membrane, at the same time that circulating hemocyte number decreased significantly contrasting the increase of yeast number. Our results showed the ability of C. megacephala hemolymph to perform humoral encapsulation when hemocyte population is insufficient to eliminate the microorganisms, warranting consideration in future investigations on the relative roles played by cellular and humoral elements of innate immunity of this calliphorid.

  18. Quantitative aspects of microchip isotachophoresis for high precision determination of main components in pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hradski, Jasna; Chorváthová, Mária Drusková; Bodor, Róbert; Sabo, Martin; Matejčík, Štefan; Masár, Marián

    2016-12-01

    Although microchip electrophoresis (MCE) is intended to provide reliable quantitative data, so far there is only limited attention paid to these important aspects. This study gives a general overview of key aspects to be followed to reach high-precise determination using isotachophoresis (ITP) on the microchip with conductivity detection. From the application point of view, the procedure for the determination of acetate, a main component in the pharmaceutical preparation buserelin acetate, was developed. Our results document that run-to-run fluctuations in the sample injection volume limit the reproducibility of quantitation based on the external calibration. The use of a suitable internal standard (succinate in this study) improved the repeatability of the precision of acetate determination from six to eight times. The robustness of the procedure was studied in terms of impact of fluctuations in various experimental parameters (driving current, concentration of the leading ions, pH of the leading electrolyte and buffer impurities) on the precision of the ITP determination. The use of computer simulation programs provided means to assess the ITP experiments using well-defined theoretical models. A long-term validity of the calibration curves on two microchips and two MCE equipments was verified. This favors ITP over other microchip electrophoresis techniques, when chip-to-chip or equipment-to-equipment transfer of the analytical method is required. The recovery values in the range of 98-101 % indicate very accurate determination of acetate in buserelin acetate, which is used in the treatment of hormone-dependent tumors. This study showed that microchip ITP is suitable for reliable determination of main components in pharmaceutical preparations.

  19. Quantitative and three-dimensional aspects of the rat parathyroid gland in normo-, hypo-, and hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Wernerson, A; Svensson, O; Reinholt, F P

    1995-10-01

    The ultrastructure of the rat parathyroid has been under study for more than 35 years, but controversies still exist, especially regarding structure-function relationships. The present review focuses on recent morphological parathyroid research on rats under normal conditions and in various states of disturbed calcium metabolism. To facilitate discussions on functional aspects, current biochemical data, particularly those dealing with the regulation of parathyroid hormone synthesis and release, are also considered. Our results from quantitative studies and from investigations employing serial sectioning form the basis for the discussions. A central issue is whether the parathyroid secretory cells undergo secretory cycles. Prompted by results obtained from improved fixation procedures and serial sectioning, we question the basis for the theory of secretory cycles. Since the rat parathyroid secretory cell is polar, a single section is not an appropriate sample for estimating functional activity and for comparing the structure and distribution of intracellular components of adjacent cells. The heterogeneity in ultrastructural appearance of intracellular vesicles calls for the use of specific markers in relating the structure of the vesicular compartment to intracellular processing of hormone. The importance of unbiased quantitative techniques is illustrated in discussions on cell number and size for estimating the response of the parathyroid gland to different functional states or disorders demanding changes in secretion of parathyroid hormone, e.g., hyper- and hypocalcemia.

  20. ASPECT

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Able to deploy within one hour of notification, EPA's Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) is the nation’s only airborne real-time chemical and radiological detection, infrared and photographic imagery platform.

  1. Qualitative and quantitative aspects of the microanatomy of the African elephant cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Busisiwe C; Jacobs, Bob; Spocter, Muhammad A; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Manger, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    The current study provides a number of novel observations on the organization and structure of the cerebellar cortex of the African elephant by using a combination of basic neuroanatomical and immunohistochemical stains with Golgi and stereologic analysis. While the majority of our observations indicate that the cerebellar cortex of the African elephant is comparable to other mammalian species, several features were unique to the elephant. The three-layered organization of the cerebellar cortex, the neuronal types and some aspects of the expression of calcium-binding proteins were common to a broad range of mammalian species. The Lugaro neurons observed in the elephant were greatly enlarged in comparison to those of other large-brained mammals, suggesting a possible alteration in the processing of neural information in the elephant cerebellar cortex. Analysis of Golgi impregnations indicated that the dendritic complexity of the different interneuron types was higher in elephants than other mammals. Expression of parvalbumin in the parallel fibers and calbindin expressed in the stellate and basket cells also suggested changes in the elephant cerebellar neuronal circuitry. The stereologic analysis confirmed and extended previous observations by demonstrating that neuronal density is low in the elephant cerebellar cortex, providing for a larger volume fraction of the neuropil. With previous results indicating that the elephants have the largest relative cerebellar size amongst mammals, and one of the absolutely largest mammalian cerebella, the current observations suggest that the elephants have a greater volume of a potentially more complexly organized cerebellar cortex compared to other mammals. This quantitatively larger and more complex cerebellar cortex likely represents part of the neural machinery required to control the complex motor patterns involved in movement of the trunk and the production of infrasonic vocalizations. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Quantitative aspects of rare earth metal determinations using capillary electrophoresis with indirect absorbance detection

    SciTech Connect

    Colburn, B.A.; Starnes, S.D.; Sepaniak, M.J.

    1995-04-01

    The practical utility of capillary zone electrophoresis with indirect absorbance detection is examined for the separation and quantitation of rare earth metals. Various imidazole derivatives are investigated as to their suitability as running buffer (displaceable) detection ions with {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid functioning as a chelating agent to enhance separations. Parameters important for quantitative analysis, such as limits of detection, relative standard deviation of peak areas, efficiency, resolution, peak shape and linear dynamic range are presented. The influence of sample matrix, method of injection, and background ion identity on these parameters are investigated and discussed.

  3. Quantitative aspects of digital microscopy applied to cellular localization of heparin in smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Richard F.; Hanzel, David K.; Stack, Bob; Brandley, Brian; Castellot, John

    1995-04-01

    High Resolution digital acquisition allows a great deal of flexibility in the types of questions that can be directed to microscopic samples. To eliminate subjective bias and provide quantitative results we have approached microscopy with an automated digital format. This mode can return quantitative data at high resolution over large fields. The digital format makes accessible data including [data segmentation]: multispectral colocalization, seeding and connectivity, particle size and shape distribution and population analysis. We have begun a program to investigate this approach using the confocal microscope. Scanning larger fields-of-view at lower spatial resolutions (e.g., low magnification objective) defines large maps that allow alignment of high spatial resolution (diffraction limited) sampling. The [objective] selection of the field-of-view with low spatial resolution reduces the subjective nature of the selection of a 'typical staining pattern'. High resolution digital scanning in three dimensions contribute both to the 'objective' nature of the analysis and allow for quantitation of characteristics not historically available/accessible. The complex carbohydrate heparin is implicated in tumor growth and wound healing by affecting angiogenesis, cell proliferation and motility. The internal localization of heparin within vascular cells appears to be a good predictor of the sensitivity of those cells to the action of heparin. Cells resistant to the antiproliferative action of heparin are able to sequester the heparin in large vacuoles whereas those cells sensitive to the carbohydrate do not exhibit these structures. We have applied our approach to QUANTITATIVE DIGITAL MICROSCOPY to the analysis of intracellular heparin distribution.

  4. Quantitative Aspects of Single-Word Free Associations to Sentences Varying in Semantic Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Sheldon

    It was anticipated that the single-word free association responses to sentences varying in degree of semantic integration (as indexed by sentence norms) would differ quantitatively. One group of 60 undergraduates was given a list of 16 sentences characterized by high semantic integration (HSI), while another group of 60 undergraduates received a…

  5. Aspects of the quantitative analysis of neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, T S; Pascher, R; Berthold, C H

    1996-12-28

    We address three problems concerning the quantitative analysis of nerve cell distribution in the cerebral cortex: (i) preparatory tissue deformation (shrinkage); (ii) difficulties in differentiating between small neurons and astroglia; and (iii) the bias introduced by the counting method. We found that staining with Richardson's solution led to no shrinkage in Vibratome-cut sections of aldehyde-fixed rat brains, but did result in staining of the neurons and left the glial cells unstained. This was in striking contrast to Nissl staining which introduced a linear shrinkage of 20-30% and stained all kinds of cortical cells indiscriminately. A computer-based unbiased counting method was implemented by taking advantage of the stereological procedure referred to as the 'optical disector' (Gundersen, H.J.G. (1986) Stereology of arbitrary particles, J. Microsc., 143: 3-45).

  6. Quantitative aspects of reversible osmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, S I; Fredericks, W R; Ohno, K; Pettigrew, K D

    1980-05-01

    Retrograde infusion of a hypertonic arabinose solution into the right external carotid artery of rats reversibly increases cerebrovascular permeability to [14C]sucrose in the right cerebral hemisphere. PA ([14C]sucrose permeability x capillary surface area) rises from a control mean of 11 x 10(-6) S-1 to above 200 x 10(-6) S-1. The rise correlates with an increased staining of the brain by intravascular Evans blue, and is followed by a transient, 1-1.5% increase in brain water content. At least 20 s of infusion is required for 1.6 M arabinose solution to effectively open the blood-brain barrier. The increase in cerebrovascular permeability is temporary, however, because PA remains slightly elevated 1-2 h after infusion and is normal 6 h after infusion. It is suggested that osmotic barrier opening is mediated by cerebrovascular dilatation as well as by shrinkage of the vascular endothelium. By quantitatively defining thresholds of infusate concentration and infusion time for osmotic barrier opening, and by characterizing the time course of increased PA, the experiments establish criteria for applying the osmotic method to experimental pharmacology of the central nervous system.

  7. Bohmian-trajectory analysis of high-order-harmonic generation: Ensemble averages, nonlocality, and quantitative aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Augstein, B. B.; Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.

    2013-12-01

    We perform a Bohmian-trajectory analysis of high-order-harmonic generation (HHG), focusing on the fact that typical HHG spectra are best reproduced by the Bohmian trajectory starting at the innermost part of the core [J. Wu, B. B. Augstein, and C. Figueira de Morisson Faria, Phys. Rev. A 88, 023415 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.023415]. Using ensemble averages around this central trajectory, we show that for the high-plateau and cutoff harmonics, small ensembles of Bohmian trajectories are sufficient for a quantitative agreement with the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), while larger ensembles are necessary in the low-plateau region. Furthermore, we relate the Bohmian trajectories to the short and long trajectories encountered in the strong-field approximation (SFA) and show that the time-frequency maps from the central Bohmian trajectory overestimate the contributions of the long SFA trajectory, in comparison to the outcome of the TDSE computations. We also discuss how the time-frequency profile of the central trajectory may be influenced nonlocally by degrading the wave-packet propagation far from the core.

  8. Quantitative aspects of synaptic ribbon formation in the outer plexiform layer of the developing cat retina.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, D H

    1989-07-01

    The development of synaptic ribbons in rod and cone photoreceptor terminals of the cat retina was studied using quantitative electron microscopy. At the region of the area centralis, synaptic ribbon profiles are initially recognized at PCD (postconception day) 59. Synaptic ribbon density increases rapidly, reaching a peak of 0.55 ribbons/micron 3 at PCD 68 (postnatal day 3) and maintains approximately that value for an additional 8 d. Following PCD 76, ribbon density begins to decrease, to 0.37 ribbons/microns 3 at PCD 82 and 0.25 ribbons/microns 3 at PCD 102. Although ribbon density drops by approximately 50% during this 39-d period, the outer plexiform layer (OPL) volume at the area centralis increases by about 20%. Ribbon density continues to decrease gradually over a protracted period to reach a final adult value of 0.11-0.14 ribbons/microns 3. During the period of high ribbon density, rod spherules with two, or even three ribbon profiles, were routinely observed. In contrast, in the adult, spherules with more than one ribbon profile are only rarely encountered. During development, the length of synaptic ribbon profiles increases from a mean of 0.22 microns at PCD 62 to the 0.47 microns mean length found in the adult.

  9. A minimally invasive micro sampler for quantitative sampling with an ultrahigh-aspect-ratio microneedle and a PDMS actuator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Wang, Yan; Yao, Jinyuan; Yang, Cuijun; Ding, Guifu

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a novel micro sampler consisting of an ultrahigh-aspect-ratio microneedle and a PDMS actuator. The microneedle was fabricated by a new method which introduced reshaped photoresist technology to form a flow channel inside. The microneedle includes two parts: shaft and pedestal. In this study, the shaft length is 1500 μm with a 45° taper angle on the tip and pedestal is 1000 μm. Besides, the shaft and pedestal are connected by an arc connection structure with a length of 600 μm. The microneedles have sufficient mechanical strength to insert into skin with a wide safety margin which was proved by mechanics tests. Moreover, a PDMS actuator with a chamber inside was designed and fabricated in this study. The chamber, acting as a reservoir in sampling process as well as providing power, was optimized by finite element analysis (FEA) to decrease dead volume and improve sampling precision. The micro sampler just needs finger press to activate the sampling process as well as used for quantitative micro injection to some extent. And a volume of 31.5 ± 0.8 μl blood was successfully sampled from the ear artery of a rabbit. This micro sampler is suitable for micro sampling for diagnose or therapy in biomedical field.

  10. Generation of domestic waste electrical and electronic equipment on Fernando de Noronha Island: qualitative and quantitative aspects.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Dhiego Raphael Rodrigues; de Oliveira, José Diego; Selva, Vanice Fragoso; Silva, Maisa Mendonça; Santos, Simone Machado

    2017-07-06

    The accelerated growth trajectory of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is a matter of concern for governments worldwide. In developing countries, the problem is more complex because municipal waste management is still a challenge for municipalities. Fernando de Noronha Island, an environmentally protected area, has a transfer station for solid waste before it is sent to the final destination abroad, which is different waste management model to most urban areas. In order to check the specifics of management of WEEE, this study aimed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the generation of this type of waste on the main island of Fernando de Noronha, taking into consideration aspects related to consumption habits and handling of waste. During the in situ research, a questionnaire was applied to a sample of 83 households. The results provide a picture of the generation of WEEE for a period of 1 year, when a production of 1.3 tons of WEEE was estimated. Relationships between education level and monthly income and between education level and number of plasma/LCD TVs and washing machines were confirmed. Another important result is that only two socioeconomic variables (monthly income and education level) are related to two recycling behavior variables. In addition, the population and government treat WEEE as ordinary waste, ignoring its contaminant potential. Despite the existence of relevant legislation concerning the treatment and disposal of WEEE, additional efforts will be required by the government in order to properly manage this type of waste on the island.

  11. Quantitative Aspects about the Interactions of Professors in the Learning Management System during a Final Undergraduate Project Distance Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cechinel, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a quantitative study of the use of a Learning Management System (LMS) by the professors of a distance learning course, focused on the guidance given for the students' Final Undergraduate Project. Data taken from the logs of 34 professors in two distinct virtual rooms were collected. After pre-processing the data, a series of…

  12. Quantitative Aspects about the Interactions of Professors in the Learning Management System during a Final Undergraduate Project Distance Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cechinel, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a quantitative study of the use of a Learning Management System (LMS) by the professors of a distance learning course, focused on the guidance given for the students' Final Undergraduate Project. Data taken from the logs of 34 professors in two distinct virtual rooms were collected. After pre-processing the data, a series of…

  13. Quantitative Content Analysis Procedures to Analyse Students' Reflective Essays: A Methodological Review of Psychometric and Edumetric Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poldner, E.; Simons, P. R. J.; Wijngaards, G.; van der Schaaf, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    Reflective essays are a common way to develop higher education students' reflection ability. Researchers frequently analyse reflective essays based on quantitative content analysis procedures (QCA). However, the quality criteria that should be met in QCA are not straightforward. This article aims to: (1) develop a framework of quality requirements…

  14. A Degree Is Not Enough: A Quantitative Study of Aspects of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Chemistry Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kind, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of chemistry content knowledge held by 265 UK-based pre-service teachers (PSTs) were probed using 28 diagnostic questions in five chemistry concept areas, "Particle theory and changes of state", "Mass conservation" (taught to 11-14-year-olds), and "Chemical bonding", "Mole calculations" and…

  15. A Degree Is Not Enough: A Quantitative Study of Aspects of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Chemistry Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kind, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of chemistry content knowledge held by 265 UK-based pre-service teachers (PSTs) were probed using 28 diagnostic questions in five chemistry concept areas, "Particle theory and changes of state", "Mass conservation" (taught to 11-14-year-olds), and "Chemical bonding", "Mole calculations" and…

  16. Preliminary study of quantitative aspects and the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field treatment on the incorporation of equine cancellous bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Kold, S E; Hickman, J; Meisen, F

    1987-03-01

    The quantitative aspects of equine cancellous bone graft incorporation and the possibility of influencing graft incorporation by daily exposure to a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) was studied in eight yearling ponies. In order to be able to quantify formative aspects of graft remodelling, a double and treble tetracycline intravital labelling technique was used. Intravital radiographs were obtained at regular intervals throughout the trial, but were found to be of little assistance in assessing any differences between stimulated and non-stimulated grafts. The ponies were humanely destroyed at regular intervals between nine and 241 days after installation of the graft. Light microscopy and fluorescent light microscopy were used to evaluate quantitative aspects of graft incorporation and to compare PEMF-stimulated grafts with control grafts. There was a small but statistically significant effect of PEMF-stimulation on cancellous bone graft incorporation. In view of this, these observations can only be considered as indicative of a possible trend, but should encourage further studies using different signal modalities.

  17. The odorous attractant of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana (L.). I. Quantitative aspects of the response to the attractant.

    PubMed

    WHARTON, D R; MILLER, G L; WHARTON, M L

    1954-03-01

    1. Procedures have been developed for studying quantitatively the response of the male American cockroach to the odorous attractant of the female. 2. The percentage of male roaches responding to extracts of the attractant of the female has been found to vary with the log of the concentration of the attractant throughout a wide range. 3. Adaptation to the olfactory stimulus has been demonstrated. 4. A theory of adaptation is offered.

  18. Quantitative and qualitative aspects of the social network in schizophrenic patients living in the community. Relationship to sociodemographic characteristics and clinical factors and subjective quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson-Tops, A; Hansson, L

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative aspects of the social network were investigated in a sample of 120 schizophrenic out-patients. Sociodemographic and clinical factors as well as subjective quality of life were investigated as to their relationship to the social network. The Interview Schedule for Social Integration (ISSI) was used to assess social network and Lancashire Quality of Life Profile was used to assess subjective quality of life. Psychopathology was measured by BPRS and psychosocial functioning by GAF. The patients reported a significantly worse social network compared to a normal sample both regarding quantitative and qualitative aspects of the network. Almost half of the patients wanted access to more social contacts. Relatives and friends turned out to be the patient's main source of supportive contacts. More severe negative and positive symptoms were related to a worse social network. Support was found for an association between characteristics of the social network, such as satisfaction with social contacts, and quality of life. The results give reason to suggest that the care system should consider the informal caregivers' situation and focus on interventions, which enhance the patient's satisfaction with social contacts.

  19. Quantitative Aspects of the Interfacial Catalytic Oxidation of Dithiothreitol by Dissolved Oxygen in the Presence of Carbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Rossi, Michel J

    2016-01-19

    The catalytic nature of particulate matter is often advocated to explain its ability to generate reactive oxygen species, but quantitative data are lacking. We have performed molecular characterization of three different carbonaceous nanoparticles (NP) by 1. identifying and quantifying their surface functional groups based on probe gas-particle titration; 2. studying the kinetics of dissolved oxygen consumption in the presence of suspended NP's and dithiothreitol (DTT). We show that these NP's can reversibly change their oxidation state between oxidized and reduced functional groups present on the NP surface. By comparing the amount of O2 consumed and the number of strongly reducing sites on the NP, its average turnover ranged from 35 to 600 depending on the type of NP. The observed quadratic rate law for O2 disappearance points to a Langmuir-Hinshelwood surface-based reaction mechanism possibly involving semiquinone radical. In the proposed model, the strongly reducing surface site is assumed to be a polycyclic aromatic hydroquinone whose oxidation to the corresponding conjugated quinone is rate-limiting in the catalytic chain reaction. The presence and strength of the reducing surface functional groups are important for explaining the catalytic activity of NP in the presence of oxygen and a reducing agent like DTT.

  20. The osmotic hypersensitivity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strain and growth media dependent: quantitative aspects of the phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, A

    1997-05-01

    Osmotic hypersensitivity is manifested as cellular death at magnitudes of osmotic stress that can support growth. Cellular capacity for survival when plated onto high NaCl media was examined for a number of laboratory and industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. During respiro-fermentative growth in rich medium with glucose as energy and carbon source, the hypersensitivity phenomenon was fairly strain invariant with a threshold value of about 1 M-NaCl; most strains fell within a 300 mM range in LD10 values (lethal dose yielding 10% survival). Furthermore, all but one of the strains displayed similar differential death responses above the threshold value, i.e. ten-fold decreased viability for every 250 mM increase in salinity. Addition of small amounts of salt to the growth medium drastically improved tolerance and shifted the hypersensitivity threshold to higher NaCl concentrations. This salt-instigated tolerance could partly be reversed by washing in water. The washing procedure depleted cells of the glycerol that they had accumulated under saline growth, and the contribution from glycerol to the improved tolerance was about 50% in the two strains examined. Growth on derepressing carbon sources like galactose, ethanol or glycerol gave strain-dependent responses. The laboratory strain X2180-1A drastically improved tolerance while the bakers' yeast strain Y41 did so only marginally. It was concluded that all strains of S. cerevisiae display the osmotic hypersensitivity phenomenon in qualitative terms while the quantitative values differ. It was also proposed that growth rate does not dictate the level of osmotic hypersensitivity of S. cerevisiae.

  1. Novel aspects of quantitation of immunogenic wheat gluten peptides by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sealey-Voyksner, Jennifer A; Khosla, Chaitan; Voyksner, Robert D; Jorgenson, James W

    2010-06-18

    A novel, specific and sensitive non-immunological liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based assay has been developed to detect and quantify trace levels of wheat gluten in food and consumer products. Detection and quantification of dietary gluten is important, because gluten is a principle trigger of a variety of immune diseases including food allergies and intolerances. One such disease, celiac sprue, can cause intestinal inflammation and enteropathy in patients who are exposed to dietary gluten. At present, immunochemistry is the leading analytical method for gluten detection in food. Consequently, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), such as the sandwich or competitive type assays, are the only commercially available methods to ensure that food and consumer products are accurately labeled as gluten-free. The availability of a comprehensive, fast and economic alternative to the immunological ELISA may also facilitate research towards the development of new drugs, therapies and food processing technologies to aid patients with gluten intolerances and for gluten-free labeling and certification purposes. LC-MS is an effective and efficient analytical technique for the study of cereal grain proteins and to quantify trace levels of targeted dietary gluten peptides in complex matrices. Initial efforts in this area afforded the unambiguous identification and structural characterization of six unique physiologically relevant wheat gluten peptides. This paper describes the development and optimization of an LC-MS/MS method that attempts to provide the best possible accuracy and sensitivity for the quantitative detection of trace levels of these six peptides in various food and consumer products. The overall performance of this method was evaluated using native cereal grains. Experimental results demonstrated that this method is capable of detecting and quantifying select target peptides in food over a range from 10pg/mg to 100ng/mg (corresponding to

  2. Quantitative aspects of highly emanating geologic materials and their role in creating high indoor radon. Final report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gundersen, L.C.S.; Schumann, R.R.; Gates, A.E.; Price, P.

    1996-12-31

    Indoor radon hot spots, areas where indoor radon commonly exceeds 20 pCi/L, are often caused by unusually highly emanating soils or rock and their interaction with ambient climatic conditions and a building`s architecture. Highly emanating soils and rocks include glacial deposits; dry fractured clays; black shales; limestone-derived soils; karst and cave areas, fractured or sheared granitic crystalline rocks; mine tailings; uraniferous backfill; and most uranium deposits. The above list probably accounts for 90% of the Nation`s indoor radon over 20 pCi/L. In several of these high indoor radon areas, there appears to be a link between the nature of the radon source in the ground, the architecture of the home, and the relative magnitude and ease of mitigation of the indoor air problem. Quantification of geologic materials in terms of their radon potential with respect to climatic and architectural considerations has never been accomplished. Recent studies have attempted semi-quantitative rankings but rigorous analysis has not been done. In this investigation the authors have attempted to develop the quantitative aspects of geologic materials for prediction of very high indoor radon at several scales of observation from national to census tract.

  3. Immunoreactions involving platelets. III. Quantitative aspects of platelet agglutination, inhibition of clot retraction, and other reactions caused by the antibody of quinidine purpura.

    PubMed

    SHULMAN, N R

    1958-05-01

    Quantitative aspects of platelet agglutination and inhibition of clot retraction by the antibody of quinidine purpura were described. The reactions appeared to depend on formation of types of antibody-quinidine-platelet complexes which could fix complement but complement was not necessary for these reactions. Complement fixation was at least 10 times more sensitive than platelet agglutination or inhibition of clot retraction for measurement and detection of antibody activity. Although it has been considered that antibodies of drug purpura act as platelet lysins in the presence of complement and that direct lysis of platelets accounts for development of thrombocytopenia in drug purpura, the present study suggests that attachment of antibody produces a change in platelets which is manifested in vitro only by increased susceptibility to non-specific factors which can alter the stability of platelets in the absence of antibody. The attachment of antibody to platelets in vivo may only indirectly affect platelet survival. In contrast to human platelets, dog, rabbit, and guinea pig platelets, and normal or trypsin-treated human red cells did not agglutinate, fix complement, or adsorb antibody; and intact human endothelial cells did not fix complement or adsorb antibody. Rhesus monkey platelets were not agglutinated by the antibody but did adsorb antibody and fix complement although their activity in these reactions differed quantitatively from that of human platelets. Cinchonine could be substituted for quinidine in agglutination and inhibition of clot retraction reactions but quinine and cinchonidine could not. Attempts to cause passive anaphylaxis in guinea pigs with the antibody of quinidine purpura were not successful.

  4. A method for analyzing the qualitative and quantitative aspects of gene expression: a transcriptional profile revealed for HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ryo, A; Kondoh, N; Wakatsuki, T; Hada, A; Yamamoto, N; Yamamoto, M

    1998-01-01

    A number of strategies have been devised by which differentially expressed genes in different cell types or tissues can be identified. We here report an efficient method to analyze the qualitative and quantitative aspects of transcripts and to construct an extensive gene expression profile in any kind of cell or tissue of interest. This method enables us to analyze the composition of mRNA species, reflecting gene activities, by measuring the frequency of appearance of concatamerized 17mer cDNA mini-fragments, which are proportional to the abundance of mRNA. As compared with a related method previously described by others, we can analyze approximately 3-4 bp longer cDNA fragments derived from amounts of total RNA as small as 1 microg. Using this technique we examined 10 100 cDNA mini-fragments from HeLa cells and constructed a gene expression profile consisting of 3665 genes. This method should thus provide an overall indication of gene activities and a rational means for monitoring gene fluctuation in different cells or tissues at different stages of development, in normal and disease states. PMID:9592141

  5. Dynamic Vulnerability of Karst Systems: a Concept to understand qualitative and quantitative Aspects of Karst springs due to Changes in Groundwater Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggenberger, P.; Butscher, C.; Epting, J.; Auckenthaler, A.

    2015-12-01

    Karst groundwater resources represent valuable water resources, which may be affected by different types of pollution and changes of groundwater recharge by climate change. In many parts of Europe, it has been predicted that record-breaking heat waves, such as the one experienced in 2003 and 2015, will become more frequent. At the same time, even as summers become drier, the incidence of severe precipitation events could increase. What is the influence such changes to the quantitative and qualitative aspects of Karst groundwater systems? A factor to be considered in conjunction with groundwater quality is the vulnerability of the resource, which is defined as the sensitivity of a groundwater system to pollution. Intrinsic vulnerability refers to the sensitivity to pollution when considering only natural, geogenic conditions without the effects of human activities such as contaminant release. Intrinsic vulnerability depends on the recharge conditions, which are dependent on the surface and subsurface structure and on precipitation and evaporation patterns. The latter are highly time dependent. Therefore, our groundwater vulnerability concept also includes dynamic aspects of the system, the variations of spatial and temporal components. We present results of combined monitoring and modelling experiments of several types of Karst systems in the Tabular and the Folded Jura of NW Switzerland. The recharge, conduit flow, diffuse flow(RCD) rainfall-discharge model "RCD-seasonal" was used to simulate the discharge and substance concentration of several spring. This lumped parameter model include: the recharge system (soil and epikarst system), the conduit flow system, and the diffuse flow system. The numerically derived Dynamic Vulnerability Index (DVI) can indicate qualitative changes of spring water with sufficient accuracy to be used for drinking water management. In addition, the results obtained from the test sites indicate a decrease in short-lived contaminants in

  6. [Audit of histopathological activities in the laboratories of 7 general hospitals. 1. Types of resources and quantitative aspects of the workload].

    PubMed

    Andrion, A; Feyles, E; Langè, A; Giudici, M; Grasso, G; Amore, M; Bondi, A; Cristofori, E; Pezzotta, M G; Bellomi, A; Anghinoni, E; Barbazza, R; Magnani, C; Ciccone, G

    1996-02-01

    Following a major reorganization of the National Health Service, competition for resources will depend to a great extent on the quality of the service offered, and audit will be of increasing importance. The present investigation deals with the quantitative aspects of the histopathology workload. A retrospective analysis of the biopsy handling of 1,000 consecutive cases was conducted in each histopathology lab of seven general hospitals. The data collected included information on specimen type, diagnosis, block/section/stain details for each specimen, as well as information about human resources, total workload and technical equipment. Among the seven labs, the histopathology workload ranged between 6,600 and 15,600 cases/year. The workload per person/year ranged between 1,400 and 2,600 (mean 1,900) for pathologists, between 800 and 3,000 (mean 1,500) for technicians, and between 2,200 and 8,300 (mean 4,400) for secretarial staff. The prevalence of biopsy fragments (endoscopic, endometrial curettage , etc.), "small" surgery (skin, appendix, gallbladder, etc.) and surgery was, respectively, between 42 and 50%, 34 and 47%, 9 and 21%. In all labs but one, 80% of cases were within 1-3 blocks; the seven labs had a mean of blocks/case ranging from 1.8 to 4.0 (total mean = 2.8). Differences in performing special stains were astonishing: one lab performed special stains in about 40%, and another in only 0.6% of cases (mean of the seven labs = 15%). Finally, the labs performed immunohistochemical stains within a range of 2.7-8% of cases (mean of the seven labs = 4.6%). The data we have collected provided baseline information on the laboratory running, and this is likely to be an integral part of laboratory administration in the near future.

  7. A quantitative in vitro assay for the evaluation of phototoxic potential of topically applied materials.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, S; DiNardo, J; Morris, W E; Wolf, B A; Schnetzinger, R W

    1984-10-01

    A quantitative in vitro method for phototoxic evaluation of chemicals has been developed and validated. The assay uses Saccharomyces cerevisiae, seeded in an agar overlay on top of a plate count agar base. 8-Methoxy psoralen is used as a reference standard against which materials are measured. Activity is quantified by cytotoxicity measured as zones of inhibition. Several known phototoxins (heliotropine, lyral, phantolid, and bergamot oil) and photoallergens (6-methyl coumarin and musk ambrette) are used to validate the assay. An excellent correlation is observed between in vivo studies employing Hartley albino guinea pigs and the in vitro assay for several fragrance raw materials and other chemicals. The in vitro assay exhibits a greater sensitivity from 2-500 fold. For three fragrance oils, the in vitro assay detects low levels of photobiological activity while the in vivo assay is negative. Although the in vitro assay does not discriminate between phototoxins and photoallergens, it can be used for screening of raw materials so that reduction in animal usage can be achieved while maintaining the protection of the consumer.

  8. Quantitative fingerprinting by headspace--two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of solid matrices: some challenging aspects of the exhaustive assessment of food volatiles.

    PubMed

    Nicolotti, Luca; Cordero, Chiara; Cagliero, Cecilia; Liberto, Erica; Sgorbini, Barbara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Bicchi, Carlo

    2013-10-10

    The study proposes an investigation strategy that simultaneously provides detailed profiling and quantitative fingerprinting of food volatiles, through a "comprehensive" analytical platform that includes sample preparation by Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME), separation by two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry detection (GC×GC-MS) and data processing using advanced fingerprinting approaches. Experiments were carried out on roasted hazelnuts and on Gianduja pastes (sugar, vegetable oil, hazelnuts, cocoa, nonfat dried milk, vanilla flavorings) and demonstrated that the information potential of each analysis can better be exploited if suitable quantitation methods are applied. Quantitation approaches through Multiple Headspace Extraction and Standard Addition were compared in terms of performance parameters (linearity, precision, accuracy, Limit of Detection and Limit of Quantitation) under headspace linearity conditions. The results on 19 key analytes, potent odorants, and technological markers, and more than 300 fingerprint components, were used for further processing to obtain information concerning the effect of the matrix on volatile release, and to produce an informative chemical blueprint for use in sensomics and flavoromics. The importance of quantitation approaches in headspace analysis of solid matrices of complex composition, and the advantages of MHE, are also critically discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Descriptive analysis of work and trends in anaesthesiology from 2005 to 2006: quantitative and qualitative aspects of effects and evaluation of anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Majstorović, Branislava M; Simić, Snezana; Milaković, Branko D; Vucović, Dragan S; Aleksić, Valentina V

    2010-01-01

    In anaesthesiology, economic aspects have been insufficiently studied. The aim of this paper was the assessment of rational choice of the anaesthesiological services based on the analysis of the scope, distribution, trend and cost. The costs of anaesthesiological services were counted based on "unit" prices from the Republic Health Insurance Fund. Data were analysed by methods of descriptive statistics and statistical significance was tested by Student's t-test and chi2-test. The number of general anaesthesia was higher and average time of general anaesthesia was shorter, without statistical significance (t-test, p = 0.436) during 2006 compared to the previous year. Local anaesthesia was significantly higher (chi2-test, p = 0.001) in relation to planned operation in emergency surgery. The analysis of total anaesthesiological procedures revealed that a number of procedures significantly increased in ENT and MFH surgery, and ophthalmology, while some reduction was observed in general surgery, orthopaedics and trauma surgery and cardiovascular surgery (chi2-test, p = 0.000). The number of analgesia was higher than other procedures (chi2-test, p = 0.000). The structure of the cost was 24% in neurosurgery, 16% in digestive (general) surgery,14% in gynaecology and obstetrics, 13% in cardiovascular surgery and 9% in emergency room. Anaesthesiological services costs were the highest in neurosurgery, due to the length anaesthesia, and digestive surgery due to the total number of general anaesthesia performed. It is important to implement pharmacoeconomic studies in all departments, and to separate the anaesthesia services for emergency and planned operations. Disproportions between the number of anaesthesia, surgery interventions and the number of patients in surgical departments gives reason to design relation database.

  10. Quantitative Aspects of Cyclosis in Plant Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howells, K. F.; Fell, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an exercise which is currently used in a course in cell physiology at Oxford Polytechnic in England. This exercise can give students some idea of the molecular events involved in bringing about movement of chloroplasts (and other organelles) in plant cells. (HM)

  11. Quantitative Aspects of Cyclosis in Plant Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howells, K. F.; Fell, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an exercise which is currently used in a course in cell physiology at Oxford Polytechnic in England. This exercise can give students some idea of the molecular events involved in bringing about movement of chloroplasts (and other organelles) in plant cells. (HM)

  12. Some Quantitative Aspects of Fatigue of Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-07-01

    189 72 S-N Curves for Inconel X-550 Alloy . ........... & • &90 73 17000F S-N Curves for Inconel 713C at Zero Steady Stress and at Zero...0. . . . . 9 III Heat Resistant Alloys .. . . . . . . . . , , . . . . . . . . . 0 3,1 General . .. 3.2 Discussion of Data’ inable V 0...0 0 . 1 . . . . . .10 IV Alunminum Alloys * . o & v e . 0 0 0 . 0 e 0 . 14 *.. 4.2 Discussion ofiaaianýTiablesoVlto*Xi . . . 14 4.2.1 Aluminum Alloy

  13. Regulatory aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Arthur M.

    1986-07-01

    At this time, there is no US legislation that is specifically aimed at regulating the environmental release of genetically engineered organisms or their modified components, either during the research and development stage or during application. There are some statutes, administered by several federal agencies, whose language is broad enough to allow the extension of intended coverage to include certain aspects of biotechnology. The one possible exception is FIFRA, which has already brought about the registration of several natural microbial pesticides but which also has provision for requiring the registration of “strain improved” microbial pesticides. Nevertheless, there may be gaps in coverage even if all pertinent statutes were to be actively applied to the control of environmental release of genetically modified substances. The decision to regulate biotechnology under TSCA was justified, in part, on the basis of its intended role as a gap-filling piece of environmental legislation. The advantage of regulating biotechnology under TSCA is that this statute, unlike others, is concerned with all media of exposure (air, water, soil, sediment, biota) that may pose health and environmental hazards. Experience may show that extending existing legislation to regulate biotechnology is a poor compromise compared to the promulgation of new legislation specifically designed for this purpose. It appears that many other countries are ultimately going to take the latter course to regulate biotechnology.

  14. Historical aspects of anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Donald F.

    2002-01-01

    “Anxiety” is a key term for behavioral, psychoanalytic, neuroendocrine, and psychopharmacological observations and theories. Commenting on its historical aspects is difficult, since history is properly a study of primary data. Unfortunately, much clinical anecdote does not correspond to factual records of a long time ago. Even reports of objective studies may suffer from allegiance effects. This essay therefore primarily reflects the personal impact of others' work against the background of my experiences, clinical and scientific. These lead me to question the assumption that “anxiety”, as it exists in syndromal disturbances, is simply the quantitative extreme of the normal “anxiety” that occurs during the anticipation of danger. An alternative view that emphasizes dysfunctions of distinct evolved adaptive alarm systems is presented. PMID:22033777

  15. Quantitative autonomic testing.

    PubMed

    Novak, Peter

    2011-07-19

    Disorders associated with dysfunction of autonomic nervous system are quite common yet frequently unrecognized. Quantitative autonomic testing can be invaluable tool for evaluation of these disorders, both in clinic and research. There are number of autonomic tests, however, only few were validated clinically or are quantitative. Here, fully quantitative and clinically validated protocol for testing of autonomic functions is presented. As a bare minimum the clinical autonomic laboratory should have a tilt table, ECG monitor, continuous noninvasive blood pressure monitor, respiratory monitor and a mean for evaluation of sudomotor domain. The software for recording and evaluation of autonomic tests is critical for correct evaluation of data. The presented protocol evaluates 3 major autonomic domains: cardiovagal, adrenergic and sudomotor. The tests include deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, head-up tilt, and quantitative sudomotor axon test (QSART). The severity and distribution of dysautonomia is quantitated using Composite Autonomic Severity Scores (CASS). Detailed protocol is provided highlighting essential aspects of testing with emphasis on proper data acquisition, obtaining the relevant parameters and unbiased evaluation of autonomic signals. The normative data and CASS algorithm for interpretation of results are provided as well.

  16. Quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M; Frey, E C; LaCroix, K J; Lalush, D S; McCartney, W H; King, M A; Gullberg, G T

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the clinical application of attenuation compensation to myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the promise that accurate quantitative images can be obtained to improve clinical diagnoses. The different attenuation compensation methods that are available create confusion and some misconceptions. Also, attenuation-compensated images reveal other image-degrading effects including collimator-detector blurring and scatter that are not apparent in uncompensated images. This article presents basic concepts of the major factors that degrade the quality and quantitative accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT images, and includes a discussion of the various image reconstruction and compensation methods and misconceptions and pitfalls in implementation. The differences between the various compensation methods and their performance are demonstrated. Particular emphasis is directed to an approach that promises to provide quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT images by accurately compensating for the 3-dimensional (3-D) attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter effects. With advances in the computer hardware and optimized implementation techniques, quantitatively accurate and high-quality myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be obtained in clinically acceptable processing time. Examples from simulation, phantom, and patient studies are used to demonstrate the various aspects of the investigation. We conclude that quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT, which holds great promise to improve clinical diagnosis, is an achievable goal in the near future.

  17. Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, John; Jacobsen, Jerrold J.

    1996-12-01

    Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis is a visual library of techniques used in making volumetric measurements. This 40-minute VHS videotape is designed as a resource for introducing students to proper volumetric methods and procedures. The entire tape, or relevant segments of the tape, can also be used to review procedures used in subsequent experiments that rely on the traditional art of quantitative analysis laboratory practice. The techniques included are: Quantitative transfer of a solid with a weighing spoon Quantitative transfer of a solid with a finger held weighing bottle Quantitative transfer of a solid with a paper strap held bottle Quantitative transfer of a solid with a spatula Examples of common quantitative weighing errors Quantitative transfer of a solid from dish to beaker to volumetric flask Quantitative transfer of a solid from dish to volumetric flask Volumetric transfer pipet A complete acid-base titration Hand technique variations The conventional view of contemporary quantitative chemical measurement tends to focus on instrumental systems, computers, and robotics. In this view, the analyst is relegated to placing standards and samples on a tray. A robotic arm delivers a sample to the analysis center, while a computer controls the analysis conditions and records the results. In spite of this, it is rare to find an analysis process that does not rely on some aspect of more traditional quantitative analysis techniques, such as careful dilution to the mark of a volumetric flask. Figure 2. Transfer of a solid with a spatula. Clearly, errors in a classical step will affect the quality of the final analysis. Because of this, it is still important for students to master the key elements of the traditional art of quantitative chemical analysis laboratory practice. Some aspects of chemical analysis, like careful rinsing to insure quantitative transfer, are often an automated part of an instrumental process that must be understood by the

  18. Quantitative research.

    PubMed

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  19. Quantitative Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shock, Everett L.; Holland, Melanie E.

    2007-12-01

    A framework is proposed for a quantitative approach to studying habitability. Considerations of environmental supply and organismal demand of energy lead to the conclusions that power units are most appropriate and that the units for habitability become watts per organism. Extreme and plush environments are revealed to be on a habitability continuum, and extreme environments can be quantified as those where power supply only barely exceeds demand. Strategies for laboratory and field experiments are outlined that would quantify power supplies, power demands, and habitability. An example involving a comparison of various metabolisms pursued by halophiles is shown to be well on the way to a quantitative habitability analysis.

  20. Quantitative Non-canonical Amino Acid Tagging (QuaNCAT) Proteomics Identifies Distinct Patterns of Protein Synthesis Rapidly Induced by Hypertrophic Agents in Cardiomyocytes, Revealing New Aspects of Metabolic Remodeling*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Kenney, Justin W.; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E.; Kamei, Makoto; Woelk, Christopher H.; Xie, Jianling; Schwarzer, Michael; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes undergo growth and remodeling in response to specific pathological or physiological conditions. In the former, myocardial growth is a risk factor for cardiac failure and faster protein synthesis is a major factor driving cardiomyocyte growth. Our goal was to quantify the rapid effects of different pro-hypertrophic stimuli on the synthesis of specific proteins in ARVC and to determine whether such effects are caused by alterations on mRNA abundance or the translation of specific mRNAs. Cardiomyocytes have very low rates of protein synthesis, posing a challenging problem in terms of studying changes in the synthesis of specific proteins, which also applies to other nondividing primary cells. To study the rates of accumulation of specific proteins in these cells, we developed an optimized version of the Quantitative Noncanonical Amino acid Tagging LC/MS proteomic method to label and selectively enrich newly synthesized proteins in these primary cells while eliminating the suppressive effects of pre-existing and highly abundant nonisotope-tagged polypeptides. Our data revealed that a classical pathologic (phenylephrine; PE) and the recently identified insulin stimulus that also contributes to the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy (insulin), both increased the synthesis of proteins involved in, e.g. glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and beta-oxidation, and sarcomeric components. However, insulin increased synthesis of many metabolic enzymes to a greater extent than PE. Using a novel validation method, we confirmed that synthesis of selected candidates is indeed up-regulated by PE and insulin. Synthesis of all proteins studied was up-regulated by signaling through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 without changes in their mRNA levels, showing the key importance of translational control in the rapid effects of hypertrophic stimuli. Expression of PKM2 was up-regulated in rat hearts following TAC. This isoform possesses specific regulatory

  1. QUANTITATIVE MORPHOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: In toxicology, the role of quantitative assessment of brain morphology can be understood in the context of two types of treatment-related alterations. One type of alteration is specifically associated with treatment and is not observed in control animals. Measurement ...

  2. QUANTITATIVE MORPHOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: In toxicology, the role of quantitative assessment of brain morphology can be understood in the context of two types of treatment-related alterations. One type of alteration is specifically associated with treatment and is not observed in control animals. Measurement ...

  3. Quantitative glycomics.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ron

    2010-01-01

    The ability to quantitatively determine changes is an essential component of comparative glycomics. Multiple strategies are available by which this can be accomplished. These include label-free approaches and strategies where an isotopic label is incorporated into the glycans prior to analysis. The focus of this chapter is to describe each of these approaches while providing insight into their strengths and weaknesses, so that glycomic investigators can make an educated choice of the strategy that is best suited for their particular application.

  4. Measuring Aspects of Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziv, Avner

    1976-01-01

    A group test measuring five aspects of morality in children is presented. The aspects are: resistance to temptation, stage of moral judgment, confession after transgression, reaction of fear or guilt, and severity of punishment for transgression. (Editor)

  5. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  6. Quantitative aspects of gain and latency in the cat retina

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, B. G.; Enroth-Cugell, Christina

    1970-01-01

    1. The gain of the central response mechanism and the latency of the pure central response of on-centre ganglion cells were studied by recording from single optic tract fibres the responses evoked by slow square-wave stimuli applied against some steady background. 2. The concept of effective flux was introduced and defined: if any portion of a stimulus extends beyond Ricco's area of complete summation, then that stimulus has an actual flux, equal to the product of its area and luminance, but it also has an effective flux which is that fraction of its actual flux which equals the actual flux of another stimulus which, when it falls entirely within Ricco's area, evokes an isobolic pure central response or has the same adaptive effect upon the central response mechanism as the first stimulus. 3. The most significant finding was that when the cell responded with a pure central response to the incremental flux (the square wave) applied against a steady effective background flux, then the gain and the latency were functions exclusively of the sum of the two fluxes (the total flux), not of the incremental or background flux as such. This shows that the level of field adaptation of the central mechanism is reset within the latent period of the response to an incremental flux. 4. Increment sensitivity curves based on isobolic suprathreshold responses all had the same slope of 0·9, when the log of the incremental flux was plotted against the log of the total flux. A plot of log latency against log total effective flux had a slope of -0·1. 5. The stimulus—response relation derived from (3) and (4) was [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], where R is the response amplitude, Fet the total flux, ΔFe the incremental flux and K1 and K2 are constants. PMID:5498461

  7. III. Quantitative aspects of phosphorus excretion in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Bravo, David; Sauvant, Daniel; Bogaert, Catherine; Meschy, François

    2003-01-01

    Ruminant phosphorus excretion and metabolism were studied through a database. Faecal endogenous phosphorus is the main pathway of phosphorus excretion and averages 0.85 of total faecal phosphorus. The remaining 0.15 is unabsorbed dietary phosphorus. Faecal endogenous phosphorus is mainly unabsorbed phosphorus, with saliva being the major source, and is correlated to factors influencing saliva secretion (DM intake, physical dietary characteristics and dietary phosphorus content). Another source of faecal endogenous phosphorus is rumen microbial phosphorus that escaped solubilisation during post-rumen digestion. All factors stimulating microbial growth would increase phosphorus uptake by the rumen microbes and consequently the faecal endogenous phosphorus. Understanding the determinants of faecal endogenous phosphorus flow will help to precise the determination of net phosphorus requirements for maintenance. The role of plasma phosphorus in urinary phosphorus loss is discussed.

  8. Methods for equine preantral follicles isolation: quantitative aspects.

    PubMed

    Leonel, E C R; Bento-Silva, V; Ambrozio, K S; Luna, H S; Costa e Silva, E V; Zúccari, C E S N

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to test the use of mechanical and mechanical-enzymatic methods, saline solution (SS), and PBS solution for the manipulation and isolation of mare ovarian preantral follicles (PAFs). The ovaries were subjected to mechanical isolation (mixer) alone or in association with enzymatic digestion (collagenase). Incubation times of 10 and 20 min were employed. In the first group, 4.1 ± 4.9 PAFs were harvested with the mechanical-enzymatic method vs 71.1 ± 19.2 with the mechanical procedure, showing a significant difference between methods; using SS and PBS, these numbers were 35.7 ± 34.3 and 39.6 ± 39.6, respectively, with no significant difference between solutions. In the second group, there was significant difference between methods, with 7.1 ± 10.6 follicles harvested with the mechanical-enzymatic method vs 63.2 ± 22.9 with the mechanical procedure; using SS and PBS, means were 35.5 ± 36.4 and 34.9 ± 31.1, respectively. The mechanical method proved more effective than the mechanical-enzymatic approach. Both SS and PBS can be used as a media for equine PAFs preparation.

  9. Aspects of Spanish Deictic Expressions in Barcelona: A Quantitative Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vann, Robert E.

    1998-01-01

    This sociolinguistic investigation analyzes an innovative usage of Spanish motion verbs, demonstratives, and locatives in Barcelona, Spain that involves crosslinguistic pragmatic transfer. Speakers in the two social networks examined (n=58) use these Spanish deictics following pragmatic rules that generally correspond to the rules for their…

  10. Qualitative and quantitative aspects of commitment development in psychology students.

    PubMed

    Kunnen, E Saskia

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the development of study- and work-related commitments in 28 psychology students during their bachelor years. Based on seven measurements of exploration and commitments (over a period of three-and-a-half years) we found the theoretically expected information-oriented, normative and diffuse trajectories. In addition, the longitudinal data allowed us to distinguish between a stable and a fluctuating information-oriented trajectory. We also found a stable moratorium and a regression trajectory. Clear, qualitative differences were found between the commitments in the different types of trajectories. Commitments in the information-oriented trajectories show more differentiation, development and change than those in the normative or diffuse trajectories. The fluctuating trajectory showed more doubt and negative emotions than the gradual and normative trajectories. The commitments in the normative trajectories were characterized by high levels of satisfaction and well-being, and by low levels of differentiation and development. The moratorium trajectories showed the highest levels of doubt and negative emotions, and the diffuse trajectories were average in this respect.

  11. Affinity for Quantitative Tools: Undergraduate Marketing Students Moving beyond Quantitative Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasi, Crina O.; Wilson, J. Holton; Puri, Cheenu; Divine, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Marketing students are known as less likely to have an affinity for the quantitative aspects of the marketing discipline. In this article, we study the reasons why this might be true and develop a parsimonious 20-item scale for measuring quantitative affinity in undergraduate marketing students. The scale was administered to a sample of business…

  12. Affinity for Quantitative Tools: Undergraduate Marketing Students Moving beyond Quantitative Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasi, Crina O.; Wilson, J. Holton; Puri, Cheenu; Divine, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Marketing students are known as less likely to have an affinity for the quantitative aspects of the marketing discipline. In this article, we study the reasons why this might be true and develop a parsimonious 20-item scale for measuring quantitative affinity in undergraduate marketing students. The scale was administered to a sample of business…

  13. Another Curriculum Requirement? Quantitative Reasoning in Economics: Some First Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Patrick B.; Flynn, David T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe first steps toward focusing on quantitative reasoning in an intermediate microeconomic theory course. We find student attitudes toward quantitative aspects of economics improve over the duration of the course (as we would hope). Perhaps more importantly, student attitude toward quantitative reasoning improves, in…

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography: Technical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution, noninvasive, 3D imaging technique with great potential in both clinical and fundamental research applications in many areas. Owing to its exceptionally high spatial resolution and velocity sensitivity, the functional extension of OCT techniques can simultaneously provide tissue structure, blood perfusion, birefringence, and other physiological information and it has great potential for basic biomedical research and clinical medicine. OCT has the far-reaching potential to be a quantitative imaging technique that could impact many, as yet unexplored, areas and should therefore be considered a vital measurement tool. In this chapter, we will first discuss the principle of operation and then the practical aspects of the OCT system; we will also provide detailed discussion on different OCT schemes and its functional extensions.

  15. [Toxic polyneuropathies in shoe factories: preventive aspects].

    PubMed

    Carapella, C

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was carried out concerning 19 shoe factories of Marches province, where 32 cases of polyneuropathy, upon 1264 workmen, have been verified. After examination of qualitative and quantitative risk factors the following conclusions can be deduced. Under the etiological aspect the syndrome can be attributed to poisoning caused by environmental pollutions and thus relating to aliphatic hydrocarbons (exane-cicloexane). Under the quantitative aspect the tecnopatic risk has a multifactorial origin which can be summarised as follows: 1) lack of poor efficiency of environmental purification systems; 2) lack of hygienic-environmental elements; 3) lack of sanitary precautions; 4) poor work organization. A strong preventive therapy is necessary to avoid or at least to reduce the polyneuretic tecnopathy incidence.

  16. Cognitive Aspects of Prejudice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tajfel, Henri

    1969-01-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of a contribution to a symposium on the "Biosocial Aspects of Race," held in London, September, 1968; symposium was published in the "Journal of Biosocial Science," Supplement No. 1, July, 1969. (RJ)

  17. High Aspect Ratio Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Buckling-induced surface undulations are widely found in living creatures, for instance, gut villi and the surface of flower petal cells. These undulations provide unique functionalities with their extremely high aspect ratios. For the synthetic systems, sinusoidal wrinkles that are induced by buckling a thin film attached on a soft substrate have been proposed to many applications. However, the impact of the synthetic wrinkles have been restricted by limited aspect ratios, ranging from 0 to 0.35. Within this range, wrinkle aspect ratio is known to increase with increasing compressive strain until a critical strain is reached, at which point wrinkles transition to localizations, such as folds or period doublings. Inspired by the living creatures, we propose that wrinkles can be stabilized in high aspect ratio by manipulating the strain energy in the substrate. We experimentally demonstrate this idea by forming a secondary crosslinking network in the wrinkled surface and successfully achieve aspect ratio as large as 0.8. This work not only provides insights for the mechanism of high aspect ratio structures seen in living creatures, but also demonstrates significant promise for future wrinkle-based applications.

  18. Quantitative Decision Support Requires Quantitative User Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Is it conceivable that models run on 2007 computer hardware could provide robust and credible probabilistic information for decision support and user guidance at the ZIP code level for sub-daily meteorological events in 2060? In 2090? Retrospectively, how informative would output from today’s models have proven in 2003? or the 1930’s? Consultancies in the United Kingdom, including the Met Office, are offering services to “future-proof” their customers from climate change. How is a US or European based user or policy maker to determine the extent to which exciting new Bayesian methods are relevant here? or when a commercial supplier is vastly overselling the insights of today’s climate science? How are policy makers and academic economists to make the closely related decisions facing them? How can we communicate deep uncertainty in the future at small length-scales without undermining the firm foundation established by climate science regarding global trends? Three distinct aspects of the communication of the uses of climate model output targeting users and policy makers, as well as other specialist adaptation scientists, are discussed. First, a brief scientific evaluation of the length and time scales at which climate model output is likely to become uninformative is provided, including a note on the applicability the latest Bayesian methodology to current state-of-the-art general circulation models output. Second, a critical evaluation of the language often employed in communication of climate model output, a language which accurately states that models are “better”, have “improved” and now “include” and “simulate” relevant meteorological processed, without clearly identifying where the current information is thought to be uninformative and misleads, both for the current climate and as a function of the state of the (each) climate simulation. And thirdly, a general approach for evaluating the relevance of quantitative climate model output

  19. Requirements Engineering and Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yijun; Niu, Nan; González-Baixauli, Bruno; Mylopoulos, John; Easterbrook, Steve; Do Prado Leite, Julio Cesar Sampaio

    A fundamental problem with requirements engineering (RE) is to validate that a design does satisfy stakeholder requirements. Some requirements can be fulfilled locally by designed modules, where others must be accommodated globally by multiple modules together. These global requirements often crosscut with other local requirements and as such lead to scattered concerns. We explore the possibility of borrowing concepts from aspect-oriented programming (AOP) to tackle these problems in early requirements. In order to validate the design against such early aspects, we propose a framework to trace them into coding and testing aspects. We demonstrate the approach using an open-source e-commerce platform. In the conclusion of this work, we reflect on the lessons learnt from the case study on how to fit RE and AOP research together.

  20. Organisational aspects of care.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Jacqueline; Pegram, Anne

    2015-03-04

    Organisational aspects of care, the second essential skills cluster, identifies the need for registered nurses to systematically assess, plan and provide holistic patient care in accordance with individual needs. Safeguarding, supporting and protecting adults and children in vulnerable situations; leading, co-ordinating and managing care; functioning as an effective and confident member of the multidisciplinary team; and managing risk while maintaining a safe environment for patients and colleagues, are vital aspects of this cluster. This article discusses the roles and responsibilities of the newly registered graduate nurse. Throughout their education, nursing students work towards attaining this knowledge and these skills in preparation for their future roles as nurses.

  1. Global aspects of monsoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, T.

    1985-01-01

    Recent developments are studied in three areas of monsoon research: (1) global aspects of the monsoon onset, (2) the orographic influence of the Tibetan Plateau on the summer monsoon circulations, and (3) tropical 40 to 50 day oscillations. Reference was made only to those studies that are primarily based on FGGE Level IIIb data. A brief summary is given.

  2. Medical Aspects of Surfing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renneker, Mark

    1987-01-01

    The medical aspects of surfing include ear and eye injuries and sprains and strains of the lower back and neck, as well as skin cancer from exposure to the sun. Treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of these problems are discussed. Surfing is recommended as part of an exercise program for reasonably healthy people. (Author/MT)

  3. Aspects of Marine Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awkerman, Gary L.

    This publication is designed for use in standard science curricula to develop oceanologic manifestations of certain science topics. Included are teacher guides, student activities, and demonstrations to impart ocean science understanding, specifically, aspects of marine ecology, to high school students. The course objectives include the ability of…

  4. The January Aspect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Glenn F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The January aspect of college administration refers to the Roman god Janus, who was capable of looking forward and backward simultaneously. It is applied to academic deans who must look toward both administrative superiors and subordinates, and the same two-directional interface is imposed on presidents, department chairmen, professors, and…

  5. Sociological Aspects of Deafness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Nine conference papers treat the sociological aspects of deafness. Included are "Individuals Being Deaf and Blind and Living with a Well Hearing Society" by A. Marx (German Federal Republic), "A Deaf Man's Experiences in a Hearing World" by A. B. Simon(U.S.A.), "Problem of Text Books and School Appliances for Vocational…

  6. Medical Aspects of Surfing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renneker, Mark

    1987-01-01

    The medical aspects of surfing include ear and eye injuries and sprains and strains of the lower back and neck, as well as skin cancer from exposure to the sun. Treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of these problems are discussed. Surfing is recommended as part of an exercise program for reasonably healthy people. (Author/MT)

  7. Subduction modelling with ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cédric; Spakman, Wim; Quinquis, Matthieu; Buiter, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion) is a promising new code designed for modelling thermal convection in the mantle (Kronbichler et al. 2012). The code uses state-of-the-art numerical methods, such as high performance solvers and adaptive mesh refinement. It builds on tried-and-well-tested libraries and works with plug-ins allowing easy extension to fine-tune it to the user's specific needs. We make use of the promising features of ASPECT, especially Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), for modelling lithosphere subduction in 2D and 3D geometries. The AMR allows for mesh refinement where needed and mesh coarsening in regions less important to the parameters under investigation. In the context of subduction, this amounts to having very small grid cells at material interfaces and larger cells in more uniform mantle regions. As lithosphere subduction modelling is not standard to ASPECT, we explore the necessary adaptive grid refinement and test ASPECT with widely accepted benchmarks. We showcase examples of mechanical and thermo-mechanical oceanic subduction in which we vary the number of materials making up the overriding and subducting plates as well as the rheology (from linear viscous to more complicated rheologies). Both 2D and 3D geometries are used, as ASPECT easily extends to three dimensions (Kronbichler et al. 2012). Based on these models, we discuss the advection of compositional fields coupled to material properties and the ability of AMR to trace the slab's path through the mantle. Kronbichler, M., T. Heister and W. Bangerth (2012), High Accuracy Mantle Convection Simulation through Modern Numerical Methods, Geophysical Journal International, 191, 12-29.

  8. Modeling the Effect of Polychromatic Light in Quantitative Absorbance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel; Cantrell, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory experiment is conducted to give the students practical experience with the principles of electronic absorbance spectroscopy. This straightforward approach creates a powerful tool for exploring many of the aspects of quantitative absorbance spectroscopy.

  9. Modeling the Effect of Polychromatic Light in Quantitative Absorbance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel; Cantrell, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory experiment is conducted to give the students practical experience with the principles of electronic absorbance spectroscopy. This straightforward approach creates a powerful tool for exploring many of the aspects of quantitative absorbance spectroscopy.

  10. Some "Facts" About CAI: A Quantitative Analysis of the 1976 Index to Computer Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearsley, Greg P.

    1976-01-01

    Descriptive quantitative data on various aspects of CAI are reported, including subject matter, author languages, instructional strategies, level of instruction, sources, and central processors. (Author)

  11. Sensitivity analysis in quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Zwieterin, M H; van Gerwen, S J

    2000-07-15

    The occurrence of foodborne disease remains a widespread problem in both the developing and the developed world. A systematic and quantitative evaluation of food safety is important to control the risk of foodborne diseases. World-wide, many initiatives are being taken to develop quantitative risk analysis. However, the quantitative evaluation of food safety in all its aspects is very complex, especially since in many cases specific parameter values are not available. Often many variables have large statistical variability while the quantitative effect of various phenomena is unknown. Therefore, sensitivity analysis can be a useful tool to determine the main risk-determining phenomena, as well as the aspects that mainly determine the inaccuracy in the risk estimate. This paper presents three stages of sensitivity analysis. First, deterministic analysis selects the most relevant determinants for risk. Overlooking of exceptional, but relevant cases is prevented by a second, worst-case analysis. This analysis finds relevant process steps in worst-case situations, and shows the relevance of variations of factors for risk. The third, stochastic analysis, studies the effects of variations of factors for the variability of risk estimates. Care must be taken that the assumptions made as well as the results are clearly communicated. Stochastic risk estimates are, like deterministic ones, just as good (or bad) as the available data, and the stochastic analysis must not be used to mask lack of information. Sensitivity analysis is a valuable tool in quantitative risk assessment by determining critical aspects and effects of variations.

  12. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS

    PubMed Central

    SIQUEIRA-BATISTA, Rodrigo; SOUZA, Camila Ribeiro; MAIA, Polyana Mendes; SIQUEIRA, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. Objective: To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Method: Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Results: Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. PMID:28076489

  13. Behavioural aspects of terrorism.

    PubMed

    Leistedt, Samuel J

    2013-05-10

    Behavioural and social sciences are useful in collecting and analysing intelligence data, understanding terrorism, and developing strategies to combat terrorism. This article aims to examine the psychopathological concepts of terrorism and discusses the developing roles for behavioural scientists. A systematic review was conducted of studies investigating behavioural aspects of terrorism. These studies were identified by a systematic search of databases, textbooks, and a supplementary manual search of references. Several fundamental concepts were identified that continue to influence the motives and the majority of the behaviours of those who support or engage in this kind of specific violence. Regardless of the psychological aspects and new roles for psychiatrists, the behavioural sciences will continue to be called upon to assist in developing better methods to gather and analyse intelligence, to understand terrorism, and perhaps to stem the radicalisation process.

  14. Aspects of B physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1987-10-14

    Various aspects of weak decays are commented on. Probing of the standard model and of phenomena beyond the standard model are discussed, followed by a theoretical view of B mesons and some experimental observations on B mesons. The point is made that any data on B decay would be interesting in that it would provide powerful new constraints in analyses of the standard model and extensions thereof. (LEW)

  15. [Psychophysiologic aspects of occupational flying].

    PubMed

    Lapa, V V

    1993-01-01

    The paper deals with advanced research on psychophysiology of flying activity to solve a triune task: to humanize the character and means of labour, to maintain a high level of working capacity and to develop professionally important psychophysiological features of flying personnel. The solution of the first task is associated with consecutive realization of the principle of actualization, an increase of psychophysiological capabilities of a man with the use of technical means in designing aeronautical engineering. Assurance of high functional reliability of flying personnel requires the development of the methods to evaluate and predict the state of psychophysiologic reserves during flying activities; the refinement of the norms of flight load on the basis of determining the quantitative interactions between a complexity level of flight assignments and a degree of decrease in reserve capabilities; the search for means and methods of correcting functional state directly in flight and accelerated recovery of performance postflight. The solution of psychophysiologic aspects of the professional reliability of pilot should be the development of a flight capabilities theory and theory-based improvement of estimation methods, development of methods and technical means for their improvements.

  16. Hemodynamic aspects of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Ken; Sato, Mika; Satoh, Yuichi; Watahiki, Yasuhito; Kondoh, Yasushi; Sugawara, Maki; Box, Georgia; Wright, David; Leung, Sumie; Yuya, Hiromichi; Shimosegawa, Eku

    2002-11-01

    Neuroradiological functional imaging techniques demonstrate the patterns of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism that are thought to be useful in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from other dementing disorders. Besides the distribution patterns of perfusion or energy metabolism, vascular transit time (VTT), vascular reactivity (VR), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), which can be measured with positron emission tomography (PET), provide hemodynamic aspects of brain pathophysiology. In order to evaluate the hemodynamic features of AD, PET studies were carried out in 20 patients with probable AD and 20 patients with vascular dementia (VaD). The PET findings were not included in their diagnostic process of AD. Using oxygen-15-labeled compounds, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), OEF, cerebral blood volume, and VTT were measured quantitatively during resting state. To evaluate VR, CBF was also measured during CO(2) inhalation. There was a significant increase in OEF in and around the parietotemporal cortices, but both VTT and VR were well preserved in patients with AD. By contrast, VR was markedly depressed and VTT was mildly prolonged in patients with VaD. Thus, from the hemodynamic point of view, the preservation of vascular reserve may be a distinct difference between AD and VaD. Furthermore, this indicates a hemodynamic integrity of the vasculature in the level of arterioles in AD.

  17. Chiral models: Geometrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelomov, A. M.

    1987-02-01

    Two-dimensional classical chiral models of field theory are considered, the main attention being paid on geometrical aspects of such theories. A characteristic feature of these models is that the interaction is inserted not by adding the interaction Lagrangian to the free field Lagrangian, but has a purely geometrical origin and is related to the inner curvature of the manifold. These models are in many respects analogous to non-Abelian gauge theories and as became clear recently, they are also important for the superstring theory which nowadays is the most probable candidate for a truly unified theory of all interactions including gravitation.

  18. Ceramics with decorative aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voica, Cezara

    2009-08-01

    The last decades brought the development of bone china techniques used for producing the decorative articles. These products can be glazed with a transparent and thin glaze layer, even with more special (decorative) ones which gives new aesthetic aspect. The present article presents the results obtained after the studies performed for matte glazes for decorative bone china. As microcrystalization agent were used zinc oxide; the content of this oxide bring some changes of the basic glaze thus the chemical composition must be adjusted as the fluxes would present the desired properties after the heating process.

  19. Metstoich--Teaching Quantitative Metabolism and Energetics in Biochemical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kelvin W. W.; Barford, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Metstoich, a metabolic calculator developed for teaching, can provide a novel way to teach quantitative metabolism to biochemical engineering students. It can also introduce biochemistry/life science students to the quantitative aspects of life science subjects they have studied. Metstoich links traditional biochemistry-based metabolic approaches…

  20. Metstoich--Teaching Quantitative Metabolism and Energetics in Biochemical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kelvin W. W.; Barford, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Metstoich, a metabolic calculator developed for teaching, can provide a novel way to teach quantitative metabolism to biochemical engineering students. It can also introduce biochemistry/life science students to the quantitative aspects of life science subjects they have studied. Metstoich links traditional biochemistry-based metabolic approaches…

  1. Aspects of Gond astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahia, M. N.; Halkare, Ganesh

    2013-03-01

    The Gond community is considered to be one of the most ancient tribes of India with a continuing history of several thousand years. They are also known for their largely isolated history which they have retained through the millennia. Several of their intellectual traditions therefore are a record of parallel aspects of human intellectual growth, and still preserve their original flavour and have not been homogenised by the later traditions of India. In view of this, the Gonds provide a special window to the different currents that constitute contemporary India. In the present study, we summarise their mythology, genetics and script. We then investigate their astronomical traditions and try to understand this community through a survey of 15 Gond villages spread over Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh. We show that they have a distinctly different view of the sky from the conventional astronomical ideas encountered elsewhere in India, which is both interesting and informative. We briefly comment on other aspects of their life as culled from our encounters with different members of the Gond community.

  2. Diabetic patients: Psychological aspects.

    PubMed

    Adili, Fatemeh; Larijani, Bagher; Haghighatpanah, Mohammadreza

    2006-11-01

    This study was undertaken to consider the psychological aspect of diabetes with regard to improving clinical outcomes. The review was limited to literature reports on the causes, solutions, and treatments of some common psychological problems known to complicate diabetes management. A literature search was undertaken using Pub-Med, CINAHL, Proquest, Elsevier, Blackwell Synergy, Ovid, Ebsco, Rose net, and Google websites, including studies published in English journals between 1995 and 2006. Therefore about 88 articles were selected based on the inclusion criteria. In earlier studies, relatively little empirical research was found to substantiate the effect of psychological counseling in complicated diabetes. The greatest deficits were seen in areas of mental health, self-esteem parent impact, and family cohesion. There were some different factors, which influence the psychological aspect of diabetic patients, such as age, gender, place of living, familial and social support, motivation, energy, life satisfaction, and lifestyle. There are various types of solutions for coping with the psychological problems in diabetic clients. The most essential solution lies in educating the patients and healthcare providers on the subject. Before initiating each educational intervention, a thorough assessment would be crucial. Treatment plans may benefit from cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), behavior family therapy, improving family communication, problem-solving skills, and providing motivation for diabetic patients. Moreover, it seems that the close collaboration between diabetologists and psychologists would be fruitful.

  3. Palliative sedation: ethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Miccinesi, Guido; Caraceni, Augusto; Maltoni, Marco

    2017-07-12

    Palliative sedation (PS), the medical act of decreasing a patient's awareness to relieve otherwise intractable suffering, is considered by some commentators to be controversial because of its consequences on residual survival and/or quality of life, and to be inappropriate for treating pure existential suffering. We will argue that PS must be always proportional, i.e. controlling refractory symptoms while keeping the loss of personal values (communication, affective relationships, care relationship) as low as possible, and that imminence of death is necessary too, from an ethical point of view, if a deep and continuous sedation (DCS) is proposed. Moreover, in case of pure existential suffering DCS should only be considered after repeated trials of respite sedation. The use of progressive consent and advance care planning to share the decision with the patient and to involve the family in the decision process as much as the patient desires is another ethical aspect to be pursued. Producing, implementing and sustaining guidelines at the higher scientific and professional level promise to help in improving both clinical and ethical aspects of the practice of PS.

  4. Rigour in quantitative research.

    PubMed

    Claydon, Leica Sarah

    2015-07-22

    This article which forms part of the research series addresses scientific rigour in quantitative research. It explores the basis and use of quantitative research and the nature of scientific rigour. It examines how the reader may determine whether quantitative research results are accurate, the questions that should be asked to determine accuracy and the checklists that may be used in this process. Quantitative research has advantages in nursing, since it can provide numerical data to help answer questions encountered in everyday practice.

  5. Nuclear physics: Macroscopic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    A systematic macroscopic, leptodermous approach to nuclear statics and dynamics is described, based formally on the assumptions {h_bar} {yields} 0 and b/R << 1, where b is the surface diffuseness and R the nuclear radius. The resulting static model of shell-corrected nuclear binding energies and deformabilities is accurate to better than 1 part in a thousand and yields a firm determination of the principal properties of the nuclear fluid. As regards dynamics, the above approach suggests that nuclear shape evolutions will often be dominated by dissipation, but quantitative comparisons with experimental data are more difficult than in the case of statics. In its simplest liquid drop version the model exhibits interesting formal connections to the classic astronomical problem of rotating gravitating masses.

  6. Aspects, Wrappers and Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on Object Infrastructure Framework (OIF), an Aspect-Oriented Programming (AOP) system. The presentation begins with an introduction to the difficulties and requirements of distributed computing, including functional and non-functional requirements (ilities). The architecture of Distributed Object Technology includes stubs, proxies for implementation objects, and skeletons, proxies for client applications. The key OIF ideas (injecting behavior, annotated communications, thread contexts, and pragma) are discussed. OIF is an AOP mechanism; AOP is centered on: 1) Separate expression of crosscutting concerns; 2) Mechanisms to weave the separate expressions into a unified system. AOP is software engineering technology for separately expressing systematic properties while nevertheless producing running systems that embody these properties.

  7. Geometrical aspects of entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Leinaas, Jon Magne; Myrheim, Jan; Ovrum, Eirik

    2006-07-15

    We study geometrical aspects of entanglement, with the Hilbert-Schmidt norm defining the metric on the set of density matrices. We focus first on the simplest case of two two-level systems and show that a 'relativistic' formulation leads to a complete analysis of the question of separability. Our approach is based on Schmidt decomposition of density matrices for a composite system and nonunitary transformations to a standard form. The positivity of the density matrices is crucial for the method to work. A similar approach works to some extent in higher dimensions, but is a less powerful tool. We further present a numerical method for examining separability and illustrate the method by a numerical study of bound entanglement in a composite system of two three-level systems.

  8. Aspects of Plant Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    TREWAVAS, ANTHONY

    2003-01-01

    Intelligence is not a term commonly used when plants are discussed. However, I believe that this is an omission based not on a true assessment of the ability of plants to compute complex aspects of their environment, but solely a reflection of a sessile lifestyle. This article, which is admittedly controversial, attempts to raise many issues that surround this area. To commence use of the term intelligence with regard to plant behaviour will lead to a better understanding of the complexity of plant signal transduction and the discrimination and sensitivity with which plants construct images of their environment, and raises critical questions concerning how plants compute responses at the whole‐plant level. Approaches to investigating learning and memory in plants will also be considered. PMID:12740212

  9. Psychiatric Aspects of Dementia.

    PubMed

    Onyike, Chiadi U

    2016-04-01

    The psychiatric aspects of dementia are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to distress, disability, and care burden, and, thus, are of increasing interest to practicing neurologists. This article examines how psychiatric disorders are entwined with dementia and describes the predictive, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications of the psychiatric symptoms of dementia. Psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and schizophrenia, are associated with higher risk for late-life dementia. Psychiatric phenomena also define phenotypes such as frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, cause distress, and amplify dementia-related disabilities. Management requires a multidisciplinary team, a problem-solving stance, programs of care, and pharmacologic management. Recent innovations include model programs that provide structured problem-solving interventions and tailored in-home care. There is new appreciation of the complexity of the relationship between psychiatric disorders and dementia as well as the significance of this relationship for treatment, community services, and research.

  10. Psychiatric Aspects of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Onyike, Chiadi U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review: The psychiatric aspects of dementia are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to distress, disability, and care burden, and, thus, are of increasing interest to practicing neurologists. This article examines how psychiatric disorders are entwined with dementia and describes the predictive, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications of the psychiatric symptoms of dementia. Recent Findings: Psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and schizophrenia, are associated with higher risk for late-life dementia. Psychiatric phenomena also define phenotypes such as frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, cause distress, and amplify dementia-related disabilities. Management requires a multidisciplinary team, a problem-solving stance, programs of care, and pharmacologic management. Recent innovations include model programs that provide structured problem-solving interventions and tailored in-home care. Summary: There is new appreciation of the complexity of the relationship between psychiatric disorders and dementia as well as the significance of this relationship for treatment, community services, and research. PMID:27042910

  11. Aspects, Wrappers and Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on Object Infrastructure Framework (OIF), an Aspect-Oriented Programming (AOP) system. The presentation begins with an introduction to the difficulties and requirements of distributed computing, including functional and non-functional requirements (ilities). The architecture of Distributed Object Technology includes stubs, proxies for implementation objects, and skeletons, proxies for client applications. The key OIF ideas (injecting behavior, annotated communications, thread contexts, and pragma) are discussed. OIF is an AOP mechanism; AOP is centered on: 1) Separate expression of crosscutting concerns; 2) Mechanisms to weave the separate expressions into a unified system. AOP is software engineering technology for separately expressing systematic properties while nevertheless producing running systems that embody these properties.

  12. Sprirtual aspects of psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prasinos, S

    1992-03-01

    This article addresses the relevance of spirituality to psychology and psychotherapy. It argues that spiritual experience is phenomenologically legitimate and worthy of study, especially by students of mental health. It utilizes Fox's (1985) definition of spirituality as "unitive experience" to show that spiritual experience is often present, overtly or covertly, within the ritual of psychotherapy. The paper argues that the therapist's adoption of an empathic posture is essentially a spiritual position. This position consists of a sense of peace, eternity, forgiveness, faith, love, truth, and God. These aspects are part of an integrated spiritual gestalt which is, though generally unacknowledged, fundamental to the communal healing process of psychotherapy. The paper concludes by asserting that greater involvement with the unitive (as opposed to the disunitive) represents a positive paradigmatic shift for psychology and humanity.

  13. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS.

    PubMed

    Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Souza, Camila Ribeiro; Maia, Polyana Mendes; Siqueira, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. A utilização de robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos tem sido cada vez mais frequente na atualidade, o que permite a emergência de inúmeras questões bioéticas nesse âmbito. Apresentar revisão sobre os aspectos éticos dos usos de robôs em cirurgia. Realizou-se revisão nas bases de dados Pubmed, SciELO e Lilacs cruzando-se os descritores "bioética", "cirurgia", "ética", "laparoscopia" e "robótica". Do total de citações obtidas, selecionou-se 17 artigos, os quais foram utilizados para a elaboração do artigo. Ele contém breve apresentação sobre a robótica, sua inserção na saúde e os aspectos bioéticos da utilização dos robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos. A cirurgia robótica é uma realidade, hoje, em muitas unidades hospitalares, o que torna essencial a reflexão bioética sobre as relações entre profissionais da saúde, autômatos e pacientes.

  14. Environmental aspects of wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunil; Choudhary, Mahendra Pratap

    2007-07-01

    The population is increasing rapidly and the demand for water by cities, industries and agriculture has tended to grow even faster than the population. Wastewater reclamation consists of a combination of conventional and advanced treatment processes employed to return a wastewater to nearly original quality, reclaiming the water. The environmental health aspects associated with reclamation of wastewater include quality aspects and public health aspects. An attempt has been made in the present paper to describe these aspects and to suggest appropriate solutions.

  15. Recent advances in quantitative neuroproteomics.

    PubMed

    Craft, George E; Chen, Anshu; Nairn, Angus C

    2013-06-15

    The field of proteomics is undergoing rapid development in a number of different areas including improvements in mass spectrometric platforms, peptide identification algorithms and bioinformatics. In particular, new and/or improved approaches have established robust methods that not only allow for in-depth and accurate peptide and protein identification and modification, but also allow for sensitive measurement of relative or absolute quantitation. These methods are beginning to be applied to the area of neuroproteomics, but the central nervous system poses many specific challenges in terms of quantitative proteomics, given the large number of different neuronal cell types that are intermixed and that exhibit distinct patterns of gene and protein expression. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in quantitative neuroproteomics, with a focus on work published over the last five years that applies emerging methods to normal brain function as well as to various neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and drug addiction as well as of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. While older methods such as two-dimensional polyacrylamide electrophoresis continued to be used, a variety of more in-depth MS-based approaches including both label (ICAT, iTRAQ, TMT, SILAC, SILAM), label-free (label-free, MRM, SWATH) and absolute quantification methods, are rapidly being applied to neurobiological investigations of normal and diseased brain tissue as well as of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). While the biological implications of many of these studies remain to be clearly established, that there is a clear need for standardization of experimental design and data analysis, and that the analysis of protein changes in specific neuronal cell types in the central nervous system remains a serious challenge, it appears that the quality and depth of the more recent quantitative proteomics studies is beginning to shed

  16. Quantitative ADF STEM: acquisition, analysis and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative annular dark-field in the scanning transmission electron microscope (ADF STEM), where image intensities are used to provide composition and thickness measurements, has enjoyed a renaissance during the last decade. Now in a post aberration-correction era many aspects of the technique are being revisited. Here the recent progress and emerging best-practice for such aberration corrected quantitative ADF STEM is discussed including issues relating to proper acquisition of experimental data and its calibration, approaches for data analysis, the utility of such data, its interpretation and limitations.

  17. Aspects of quantum cosmology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, D. N.

    Quantum mechanics may be formulated as Sensible Quantum Mechanics (SQM) so that it contains nothing probabilistic, except, in a certain frequency sense, conscious perceptions. Sets of these perceptions can be deterministically realized with measures given by expectation values of positive-operator-valued awareness operators in a quantum state of the universe which never jumps or collapses. Ratios of the measures for these sets of perceptions can be interpreted as frequency-type probabilities for many actually existing sets rather than as propensities for potentialities to be actualized, so there is nothing indeterministic in SQM. These frequency-type probabilities generally cannot be given by the ordinary quantum "probabilities" for a single set of alternatives. Probabilism, or ascribing probabilities to unconscious aspects of the world, may be seen to be an aethemamorphic myth. No fundamental correlation or equivalence is postulated between different perceptions, so SQM, a variant of Everett's "many-worlds" framework, is a "many-perceptions" framework but not a "many-minds" framework. Different detailed SQM theories may be tested against experienced perceptions by the typicalities (defined herein) they predict for these perceptions. One may adopt the Conditional Aesthemic Principle: among the set of all conscious perceptions, our perceptions are likely to be typical.

  18. Strategic Aspects of Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Edward; Hammerstein, Peter; Hess, Nicole

    Rarely do human behavioral scientists and scholars study language, music, and other forms of communication as strategies—a means to some end. Some even deny that communication is the primary function of these phenomena. Here we draw upon selections of our earlier work to briefly define the strategy concept and sketch how decision theory, developed to explain the behavior of rational actors, is applied to evolved agents. Communication can then be interpreted as a strategy that advances the "fitness interests" of such agents. When this perspective is applied to agents with conflicts of interest, deception emerges as an important aspect of communication. We briefly review costly signaling, one solution to the problem of honest communication among agents with conflicts of interest. We also explore the subversion of cooperative signals by parasites and by plants defending themselves against herbivores, and we touch on biases in human gossip. Experiments with artificial embodied and communicating agents confirm that when there are conflicts of interest among agents, deception readily evolves. Finally, we consider signaling among super-organisms and the possible implications for understanding human music and language.

  19. [Liver transplantation. Experimental aspects].

    PubMed

    Duca, S

    1981-01-01

    Following an overview of the data published in the specialized literature in connection with liver transplantation the author presents original experimental studies in this field. One of the first aspects considered is the stage of obtaining the graft of liver tissue. The selective perfusion was used, in situ, of the dog liver, and conditions were achieved which were similar to those obtained in other methods of graft preparation. Two washing solutions were used: a simple one, currently used in the practice, and another one which was enriched with various substrates. Biochemical parameters of tissue sampled by bioptic puncture have demonstrated that the first solution induces a lowering of the glycogen contents of hepatocytes, and this alters the biological qualities or the graft. The fact is stressed that the obtention of the hepatic tissue for grafting should be considered in fact as an in situ conservation. With regard to the liver transplantation proper it is shown that the author has performed the sector heterotopic procedure in the rat. Vascular anastomoses have been made with histoacryl-N-blau by the method of prosthesis with lost tubing. Problems raised by the vascular re-connection of the auxilliary hepatic tissue, and those related to the space where this tissue should be placed are also discussed in detail. The survival time was not longer than 30 hours.

  20. Electrical aspects of rainout

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenkilde, C.E.

    1981-11-23

    Rainout commonly denotes the aggregate of phenomena associated with precipitation scavenging of radioactivity from a cloud of nuclear debris that is within a natural rain cloud. (In contrast, the term, washout, is applicable when the nuclear cloud is below the rain cloud and the term, fallout, commonly denotes the direct gravitational settling of contaminated solid material from a nuclear cloud.) Nuclear debris aerosols may be scavenged within natural clouds by a variety of different physical processes which may involve diffusion, convection, impaction, nucleation, phoresis, turbulence, and/or electricity among others. Processes which involve electrical aspects are scrutinized for their susceptibility to the intimate presence of the radioactive-cloud environment. This particular choice of electrical processes is not accidental. Nearly all of the listed processes were examined earlier by Williams. His rough estimates suggested that electrical effects, and to a lesser extent turbulence, could enhance the scavenging of those submicron aerosols which reside in the size-range that bridges the minimum in the scavenging rate coefficient which is commonly called the Greenfield gap. This minimum in the scavenging-rate coefficient is created by the simultaneous reduction of scavenging via diffusion and the reduction of scavenging via inertial impaction. However, Williams omitted the specific influence of a radioactive environment. This report aims to remedy this omission.

  1. Theoretical Aspect of Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Václav, Štefan; Jurko, Jozef; Božek, Pavol; Lecký, Šimon

    2016-09-01

    Assembly plays a decisive role in global production in terms of its share in the total costs of the products assembled and in terms of the number of people working in the field. The author of (1) indicates that the percentage of the workers in assembly out of the total number of the workers in manufacturing in the U.S.A. ranged from 26.3% (bicycles) to 45.6% (automobiles), while the cost of the product assembly represented typically more than 50% of the total costs. Despite the above-mentioned importance of assembly in the industry, the discontinuous production processes have not been paid adequate attention until recently. It was sufficient to manufacture parts and then an operative reasonably and inexpensively assembled each product manually. The authors of this paper would like to emphasise "the method of a systemic approach" which focuses upon identifying the key activities to meet the objective. Harmonious interrelations of the activities are often a source of greater profit than in a system where some activities are of the top level while the others are neglected (2). The aim of this paper is to describe theoretical aspects of all the typical activities of the assembly system.

  2. Gastric cancer: basic aspects.

    PubMed

    Resende, Carlos; Thiel, Alexandra; Machado, José C; Ristimäki, Ari

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a world health burden, ranging as the second cause of cancer death worldwide. Etiologically, GC arises not only from the combined effects of environmental factors and susceptible genetic variants but also from the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. In the last years, molecular oncobiology studies brought to light a number of genes that are implicated in gastric carcinogenesis. This review is intended to focus on the recently described basic aspects that play key roles in the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants of the genes IL-10, IL-17, MUC1, MUC6, DNMT3B, SMAD4, and SERPINE1 have been reported to modify the risk of developing GC. Several genes have been newly associated with gastric carcinogenesis, both through oncogenic activation (GSK3β, CD133, DSC2, P-Cadherin, CDH17, CD168, CD44, metalloproteinases MMP7 and MMP11, and a subset of miRNAs) and through tumor suppressor gene inactivation mechanisms (TFF1, PDX1, BCL2L10, XRCC, psiTPTE-HERV, HAI-2, GRIK2, and RUNX3). It also addressed the role of the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its importance as a potential molecular target for therapy.

  3. Cultural aspects of suicide.

    PubMed

    Maharajh, Hari D; Abdool, Petal S

    2005-09-08

    Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  4. [Psychosomatic aspects of obesity].

    PubMed

    Herpertz, S; Saller, B

    2001-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are widespread in industrial countries and are considered to be serious health problems in these countries. Population-based studies in Germany have shown that between 12 and 18 % of the adult population is obese. Overweight and obesity are accompanied by a large spectrum of health disorders and extreme psychosocial burdens. Besides the hereditary disposition, the life style including both intra- and inter-individual aspects determines the complex etiology of obesity. Within the collective sample of the obese, one sub-sample is the "psychogenic obese" i. e. in which psychiatric disorders lead to a change in both eating and exercise behavior, the result then being a continuous positive energy reserve in the form of overweight and obesity. The paper describes the psychosocial problems of obese persons; especially the controverse question with regard to psychiatric morbidity in general and eating disorders in particular are emphasized. The results of past, mainly behavioral oriented treatment concepts are presented and various concepts beyond single school orientation are discussed. Finally, the problems with psychiatric psychological diagnostics in those obese patients with the request for surgical weight reduction within the context of insurance coverage and the surgeons are presented.

  5. Psychosocial aspects of abortion

    PubMed Central

    Illsley, Raymond; Hall, Marion H.

    1976-01-01

    The literature on psychosocial aspects of abortion is confusing. Individual publications must be interpreted in the context of cultural, religious, and legal constraints obtaining in a particular society at a given time, with due attention to the status and availability of alternatives to abortion that might be chosen by a woman with an “unwanted” pregnancy. A review of the literature shows that, where careful pre- and post-abortion assessments are made, the evidence is that psychological benefit commonly results, and serious adverse emotional sequelae are rare. The outcome of refused abortion seems less satisfactory, with regrets and distress frequently occurring. Research on the administration of abortion services suggests that counselling is often of value, that distress is frequently caused by delays in deciding upon and in carrying out abortions, and by unsympathetic attitudes of service providers. The phenomenon of repeated abortion seeking should be seen in the context of the availability and cost of contraception and sterilization. The place of sterilization with abortion requires careful study. A recommendation is made for observational descriptive research on populations of women with potentially unwanted pregnancies in different cultures, with comparisons of management systems and an evaluation of their impact on service users. PMID:1085671

  6. Aspects of cosmological relativity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, M.

    1999-07-01

    The author reviews cosmological relativity, a new special theory of relativity that was recently developed for cosmology, and discusses in detail some of its aspects. He recalls that in this theory it is assumed that gravitation is negligible. Under this assumption, the receding velocities of galaxies and the distances between them in the Hubble expansion are united into a four-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean manifold, similarly to space and time in ordinary special relativity. The Hubble law is assumed and is written in an invariant way that enables one to derive a four-dimensional transformation which is similar to the Lorentz transformation. The parameter in the new transformation is the ratio between the cosmic time to the Hubble time. Accordingly, the new transformation relates physical quantities at different cosmic times in the limit of weak or negligible gravitation. The transformation is then applied to the problem of the expansion of the universe at the very early stage when gravity was negligible and thus the transformation is applicable. New applications of the theory are presented. The author shows that there is no need to assume the existence of galaxy dark matter; the Tully-Fisher law is derived from the theory. A completely new picture of the expanding universe is thus obtained and compared to the FRW one.

  7. Immunological aspects of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Kevin J

    2013-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in several countries. The underlying process is atherosclerosis, a slowly progressing chronic disorder that can lead to intravascular thrombosis. There is overwhelming evidence for the underlying importance of our immune system in atherosclerosis. Monocytes, which comprise part of the innate immune system, can be recruited to inflamed endothelium and this recruitment has been shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerotic disease. Monocytes undergo migration into the vasculature, they differentiate into macrophage phenotypes, which are highly phagocytic and can scavenge modified lipids, leading to foam cell formation and development of the lipid-rich atheroma core. This increased influx leads to a highly inflammatory environment and along with other immune cells can increase the risk in the development of the unstable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype. The present review provides an overview and description of the immunological aspect of innate and adaptive immune cell subsets in atherosclerosis, by defining their interaction with the vascular environment, modified lipids and other cellular exchanges. There is a particular focus on monocytes and macrophages, but shorter descriptions of dendritic cells, lymphocyte populations, neutrophils, mast cells and platelets are also included.

  8. [Ptosis surgery. Current aspects].

    PubMed

    Hintschich, C

    2012-05-01

    Ptosis can be congenital but is more commonly an acquired condition occurring in particular as involutional forms. In addition to the aesthetic aspects ptosis mostly also leads to functional problems. Congenital ptosis in particular carries a high risk of amblyopia in childhood, therefore competent and close-knit pediatric ophthalmological treatment is important. Correction of ptosis is surgical and direct or indirect procedures are available depending on the conditions. Transcutaneous levator surgery has proven to be the universally applicable method for ptosis of all degrees of severity and can be combined with other corrective measures, such as temporal canthopexy or blepharoplasty, particularly for eyelids of elderly patients. In cases of severely impaired levator function and poor Bell phenomenon the indirect frontalis suspension method can be used. Congenital ptosis in childhood should be surgically treated at an early stage because of a substantial risk of amblyopia even if the central visual axis is still clear. The results of ptosis surgery are generally good and serious complications are rare.

  9. Quantitative tritium imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youle, Ian Stuart

    1999-12-01

    Tritium Imaging electrostatically focuses secondary electrons produced at a surface by beta-particles from tritium in the material form an image of the tritiated areas. It has hitherto been essentially a qualitative technique. The research described here examines quantitative aspects of the process. Of particular importance is the effect of depth of tritium on image intensity. For imaging purposes, tritium must obviously be nearer the surface than the maximum range of a beta particle, (about 2.6mum in graphite, and less in heavier materials). Numerical simulation, however, indicates that sensitivity falls off very rapidly with depth, dropping by 50% within the first 100nm. Simulations also indicate that for all but the shallowest tritium, imaging sensitivity drops exponentially with depth. This is experimentally investigated by implanting specimens with tritium ions of a known energy to give a calculated depth distribution. The surfaces of the specimens are sputtered to change the depth distribution, and the sample is imaged at various stages in the process. The evolution of the image intensity of the sputtered region is compared to the predictions of the numerical model. This technique was partially successful in graphite, but not in aluminum, due to the mobility of tritium in aluminum, and the modification of the aluminum surface by oxidation. Imaging was used to explore the nature of these modifications. In other experiments, tritiated graphite specimens were coated with aluminum, and the image intensity was measured as a function of coating thickness. As the tritium was fixed in atomic traps in the graphite, and the aluminum coatings could be assumed to be unoxidized at the time of deposition, problems previously encountered in aluminum were avoided. In these experiments, image intensity decreased exponentially with coating thickness, as predicted by the mathematical models, although slightly less rapidly than expected. It is also demonstrated that for many

  10. Computational Aspects of Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannakakis, Mihalis

    Equilibria play a central role in game theory and economics. They characterize the possible outcomes in the interaction of rational, optimizing agents: In a game between rational players that want to optimize their payoffs, the only solutions in which no player has any incentive to switch his strategy are the Nash equilibria. Price equilibria in markets give the prices that allow the market to clear (demand matches supply) while the traders optimize their preferences (utilities). Fundamental theorems of Nash [34] and Arrow-Debreu [2] established the existence of the respective equilibria (under suitable conditions in the market case). The proofs in both cases use a fixed point theorem (relying ultimately on a compactness argument), and are non-constructive, i.e., do not yield an algorithm for constructing an equilibrium. We would clearly like to compute these predicted outcomes. This has led to extensive research since the 60’s in the game theory and mathematical economics literature, with the development of several methods for computation of equilibria, and more generally fixed points. More recently, equilibria problems have been studied intensively in the computer science community, from the point of view of modern computation theory. While we still do not know definitely whether equilibria can be computed in general efficiently or not, these investigations have led to a better understanding of the computational complexity of equilibria, the various issues involved, and the relationship with other open problems in computation. In this talk we will discuss some of these aspects and our current understanding of the relevant problems. We outline below the main points and explain some of the related issues.

  11. Proportionality and quantitative relationships in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, R.

    1986-11-01

    Considers some aspects of quantitative relationships involved in learning physics. These are proportionality, various kinds of equality and the need for generality. The distinctions may seem to some extent artificial, for the physics curriculum is very much a seamless robe. However, some distinguishing is necessary if the physics curriculum is to be examined with regard to pupil outcomes. Knowledge relevant to proportionality and other aspects of quantitative relationships (which is often perhaps implicitly assumed) should be subsumed by the successful learning of physics: as such it need not feature in summative assessment and does not seem to do so in practice. If, however, some children fail to learn much physics theory, for whatever reason, they could be far more aware of the difficulties involved that are either their teachers or their more successful colleagues. It could be the case that some children become confused or demotivated by some of the various aspects of quantitative relationships and so remain confused or ignorant as regard the intended outcomes of the curriculum. The literature indicates that many children do indeed remain confused and/or ignorant (e.g. see Gilbert and Watts 1983).

  12. Aspects of flux compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao

    In this thesis, we study three main aspects of flux compactifications: (1) classify supergravity solutions from flux compactification; (2) construct flux-deformed geometry and 4D low-energy theory to describe these flux vacua; and (3) study 4D particle phenomenology and cosmology of flux vacua. In the first part, we review G-structure, the basic tool to study supersymmetric flux solutions, and some typical solutions obtained in heterotic, type IIA and type IIB string theories. Then we present a comprehensive classification of supersymmetric vacua of M-theory compactification on 7D manifolds with general four-form fluxes. We analyze the cases where the resulting four-dimensional vacua have N = 1, 2, 3, 4 supersymmetry and the internal space allows for SU(2)-, SU(3)- or G 2-structures. In particular, we find for N = 2 supersymmetry, that the external space-time is Minkowski and the base manifold of the internal space is conformally Kahler for SU(2) structures, while for SU(3) structures the internal space has to be Einstein-Sasaki and no internal fluxes are allowed. Moreover, we provide a new vacuum with N = 1 supersymmetry and SU(3) structure, where all fluxes are non-zero and the first order differential equations are solved. In the second part, we simply review the methods used to construct one subclass of fluxed-deformed geometry or the so-called "twisted manifold", and the associated 4D effective theory describing these flux vacua. Then by employing (generalized) Scherk-Schwarz reduction, we construct the geometric twisting for Calabi-Yau manifolds of Voisin-Borcea type (K 3 x T2)/ Z2 and study the superpotential in a type IIA orientifold based on this geometry. The twists modify the direct product by fibering the K 3 over T2 while preserving the Z2 involution. As an important application, the Voisin-Borcea class contains T6/( Z2 x Z2 ), the usual setting for intersecting D6 brane model building. Past work in this context considered only those twists inherited

  13. [Benzodiazepines and forensic aspects].

    PubMed

    Michel, L; Lang, J-P

    2003-01-01

    Adverse effects of benzodiazepines are well known since the first one was used in 1958 (chlordiazepoxide). The literature collects study-cases or rarely controlled studies concerning side effects or paradoxical reactions to benzodiazepines. They mostly described drowsiness and behavioral disinhibition, including increased well-being feeling but also hostility, rage access with feeling of invulnerability, serious crimes and sometimes homicides. Delusional, manic, confusional or depressive states are also pointed out. Rate for aggressive behaviour is 0.3 to 0.7% but distinction should be done between accidental or "idiosyncratic" reaction and voluntary sought disinhibition, clearly more frequent. No benzodiazepine has any specificity for these adverse effects but pharmacology, doses, associated drugs (or alcohol) and psychopathology interact to produce hazardous psychic states. Pharmacology: GABA induces a decrease in serotonin compound and vigilance. Pharmacokinetic: first dose effect or over-dose effect, short half-life, lipophily, affinity, digestive absorption, active metabolites interact. Psychopathology: age, alcohol association, psychological status (high initial level of hostility, impulsivity, frustration, personality disorder and depressive status). External conditions: chronic illness, affective and professional frustrations, physical or psychic exhaustion contribute also. Some benzodiazepines (flunitrazepam, diazepam, clorazepate, triazolam, alprazolam, lorazepam, for example) are more often concerned for pharmacokinetics characteristics but also prescription habits. Forensic aspects should be considered in case of homicide. Especially, reality of benzodiazepines consumption and awareness of the potential paradoxical reaction should be precisely evaluated. Special focus on voluntary induced disinhibition has to be done for forensic considerations. Relationship but also crime facilitations are sometimes consciously sought. Some benzodiazepines have already

  14. Quantitative plant proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Cramer, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    Quantitation is an inherent requirement in comparative proteomics and there is no exception to this for plant proteomics. Quantitative proteomics has high demands on the experimental workflow, requiring a thorough design and often a complex multi-step structure. It has to include sufficient numbers of biological and technical replicates and methods that are able to facilitate a quantitative signal read-out. Quantitative plant proteomics in particular poses many additional challenges but because of the nature of plants it also offers some potential advantages. In general, analysis of plants has been less prominent in proteomics. Low protein concentration, difficulties in protein extraction, genome multiploidy, high Rubisco abundance in green tissue, and an absence of well-annotated and completed genome sequences are some of the main challenges in plant proteomics. However, the latter is now changing with several genomes emerging for model plants and crops such as potato, tomato, soybean, rice, maize and barley. This review discusses the current status in quantitative plant proteomics (MS-based and non-MS-based) and its challenges and potentials. Both relative and absolute quantitation methods in plant proteomics from DIGE to MS-based analysis after isotope labeling and label-free quantitation are described and illustrated by published studies. In particular, we describe plant-specific quantitative methods such as metabolic labeling methods that can take full advantage of plant metabolism and culture practices, and discuss other potential advantages and challenges that may arise from the unique properties of plants.

  15. Quantitative nuclear hepatology

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, S.A.; Brown, P.H.; Krishnamurthy, G.T.

    1987-03-01

    This is the first in a series of four Continuing Education articles on quantitative imaging techniques. After studying this article, the reader should be able to: 1) compare the radiopharmaceuticals available for hepatobiliary imaging; 2) discuss quantitation of hepatobiliary studies; and 3) discuss the clinical applications of these techniques.

  16. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis on Privacy Leak Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  17. Comprehensive quantitative analysis on privacy leak behavior.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects.

  18. The quantitative modelling of human spatial habitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A model for the quantitative assessment of human spatial habitability is presented in the space station context. The visual aspect assesses how interior spaces appear to the inhabitants. This aspect concerns criteria such as sensed spaciousness and the affective (emotional) connotations of settings' appearances. The kinesthetic aspect evaluates the available space in terms of its suitability to accommodate human movement patterns, as well as the postural and anthrometric changes due to microgravity. Finally, social logic concerns how the volume and geometry of available space either affirms or contravenes established social and organizational expectations for spatial arrangements. Here, the criteria include privacy, status, social power, and proxemics (the uses of space as a medium of social communication).

  19. Robots in Space -Psychological Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, Walter E.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the psychological aspects of developing robots to perform routine operations associated with monitoring, inspection, maintenance and repair in space is shown. The topics include: 1) Purpose; 2) Vision; 3) Current Robots in Space; 4) Ground Based Robots; 5) AERCam; 6) Rotating Bladder Robot (ROBLR); 7) DART; 8) Robonaut; 9) Full Immersion Telepresence Testbed; 10) ERA; and 11) Psychological Aspects

  20. Quantitative film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-02-26

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects.

  1. On Quantitative Rorschach Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Ernest A.

    1978-01-01

    Two types of quantitative Rorschach scales are discussed: first, those based on the response categories of content, location, and the determinants, and second, global scales based on the subject's responses to all ten stimulus cards. (Author/JKS)

  2. Recapturing Quantitative Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pernezny, Ken; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity on estimating animal populations. Uses shoe boxes and candies to emphasize the importance of mathematics in biology while introducing the methods of quantitative ecology. (JRH)

  3. Quantitative receptor autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Boast, C.A.; Snowhill, E.W.; Altar, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography addresses the topic of technical and scientific advances in the sphere of quantitative autoradiography. The volume opens with a overview of the field from a historical and critical perspective. Following is a detailed discussion of in vitro data obtained from a variety of neurotransmitter systems. The next section explores applications of autoradiography, and the final two chapters consider experimental models. Methodological considerations are emphasized, including the use of computers for image analysis.

  4. Multivariate Quantitative Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinchen, David G.; Capezza, Mary

    1995-01-01

    Technique of multivariate quantitative chemical analysis devised for use in determining relative proportions of two components mixed and sprayed together onto object to form thermally insulating foam. Potentially adaptable to other materials, especially in process-monitoring applications in which necessary to know and control critical properties of products via quantitative chemical analyses of products. In addition to chemical composition, also used to determine such physical properties as densities and strengths.

  5. RECENT ADVANCES IN QUANTITATIVE NEUROPROTEOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Craft, George E; Chen, Anshu; Nairn, Angus C

    2014-01-01

    The field of proteomics is undergoing rapid development in a number of different areas including improvements in mass spectrometric platforms, peptide identification algorithms and bioinformatics. In particular, new and/or improved approaches have established robust methods that not only allow for in-depth and accurate peptide and protein identification and modification, but also allow for sensitive measurement of relative or absolute quantitation. These methods are beginning to be applied to the area of neuroproteomics, but the central nervous system poses many specific challenges in terms of quantitative proteomics, given the large number of different neuronal cell types that are intermixed and that exhibit distinct patterns of gene and protein expression. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in quantitative neuroproteomics, with a focus on work published over the last five years that applies emerging methods to normal brain function as well as to various neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and drug addiction as well as of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. While older methods such as two-dimensional polyacrylamide electrophoresis continued to be used, a variety of more in-depth MS-based approaches including both label (ICAT, iTRAQ, TMT, SILAC, SILAM), label-free (label-free, MRM, SWATH) and absolute quantification methods, are rapidly being applied to neurobiological investigations of normal and diseased brain tissue as well as of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). While the biological implications of many of these studies remain to be clearly established, that there is a clear need for standardization of experimental design and data analysis, and that the analysis of protein changes in specific neuronal cell types in the central nervous system remains a serious challenge, it appears that the quality and depth of the more recent quantitative proteomics studies is beginning to

  6. Elastocapillary bundling of high aspect-ratio metallic glass nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhonglue; Uzun, Ceren; Dong, Ziye; Li, Wei; Bernussi, Ayrton A.; Kumar, Golden

    2017-07-01

    Collapsing and bundling of wet nanostructures can be a desirable or an unwanted phenomenon depending on the target application. We study the effect of the aspect-ratio and solvent surface tension on bundling of Pt-based metallic glass nanowires prepared by thermoplastic molding. The results show that the bundling can be quantitatively described by the competition between the Laplacian capillary force and the elastic restoring force. Supercritical CO2 drying can prevent bundling to form vertically aligned metallic glass nanowires with high aspect-ratios (>15). Optical measurements and simulations reveal that the diffuse reflectance of metallic glass nanowires strongly depends on their profile (vertical or bundled).

  7. Aspect-Oriented Design with Reusable Aspect Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienzle, Jörg; Al Abed, Wisam; Fleurey, Franck; Jézéquel, Jean-Marc; Klein, Jacques

    The idea behind Aspect-Oriented Modeling (AOM) is to apply aspect-oriented techniques to (software) models with the aim of modularizing crosscutting concerns. This can be done within different modeling notations, at different levels of abstraction, and at different moments during the software development process. This paper demonstrates the applicability of AOM during the software design phase by presenting parts of an aspect-oriented design of a crisis management system. The design solution proposed in this paper is based on the Reusable Aspect Models (RAM) approach, which allows a modeler to express the structure and behavior of a complex system using class, state and sequence diagrams encapsulated in several aspect models. The paper describes how the model of the "create mission" functionality of the server backend can be decomposed into 23 inter-dependent aspect models. The presentation of the design is followed by a discussion on the lessons learned from the case study. Next, RAM is compared to 8 other AOM approaches according to 6 criteria: language, concern composition, asymmetric and symmetric composition, maturity, and tool support. To conclude the paper, a discussion section points out the features of RAM that specifically support reuse.

  8. Spatial aspects in the SMAD signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Claus, J; Friedmann, E; Klingmüller, U; Rannacher, R; Szekeres, T

    2013-11-01

    Among other approaches, differential equations are used for a deterministic quantitative description of time-dependent biological processes. For intracellular systems, such as signaling pathways, most existing models are based on ordinary differential equations. These models describe temporal processes, while they neglect spatial aspects. We present a model for the SMAD signaling pathway, which gives a temporal and spatial description on the basis of reaction diffusion equations to answer the question whether cell geometry plays a role in signaling. In this article we simulate the ordinary differential equations as well as partial differential equations of parabolic type with suile numerical methods, the latter on different cell geometries. In addition to manual construction of idealized cells, we also construct meshes from microscopy images of real cells. The main focus of the paper is to compare the results of the model without and with spatial aspects to answer the addressed question. The results show that diffusion in the model can lead to significant intracellular gradients of signaling molecules and changes the level of response to the signal transduced by the signaling pathway. In particular, the extent of these observations depends on the geometry of the cell.

  9. Neuro magnetic stimulation: Engineering aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mutawaly, Nafia

    Magnetic nerve stimulation has proven to be an effective, non-invasive technique to excite peripheral and central nervous systems. In this technique, the excitement of the neural tissue depends on exposure to a transient magnetic field generated by passing a high pulse of current through a coil. By positioning the coil in a specific orientation over the targeted tissue, the transient magnetic field will induce an electric field in the conductive milieu of the body. If this field reaches a certain threshold within a specific time period, neural depolarization is then evident. The primary objective of this thesis is the development and testing of new coil designs that can focus the magnetic field more effectively. Two such coils have been built. The first coil has an air core, while the other has a magnetic core. The magnetic fields of these coils, applied to the human upper limb, have been determined theoretically, and the results compared to the field generated by the most common commercial coil, the Figure-8 coil. To design these coils and to test them experimentally, a current pulse generator has been designed and built. Further, a novel measurement system using surface mount inductances and a computer based data acquisition system has been designed and built. The experimental results confirm the theoretical findings, that the air core coil is slightly better than the Figure-8, as far as field strength and focality are concerned. In addition, the experimental results, prove that the coil with the ferromagnetic core, is superior. The second objective is to investigate the effect of stimulus waveforms theoretically, experimentally, and through in vivo study. The goals of the study are to establish a quantitative relationship among various waveforms and to investigate the effect of these waveforms in determining the site of stimulation. Accordingly, a multi subject trial was conducted: a Figure-8 coil was applied to the median nerve of ten subjects at the upper limb

  10. Topological Aspects of Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egghe, Leo; Rousseau, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Discusses topological aspects of theoretical information retrieval, including retrieval topology; similarity topology; pseudo-metric topology; document spaces as topological spaces; Boolean information retrieval as a subsystem of any topological system; and proofs of theorems. (LRW)

  11. Sexual Aspects of Multilateral Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantine, Joan M.; Constantine, Larry L.

    1971-01-01

    This study involved a variety of data gathering techniques focusing on almost every aspect of multilateral marriages. Specific topics covered included sex as motivation, group sex, sleeping arrangements, cohesion, sexual problems, jealousy, roles and sex differences. (Author/CG)

  12. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  13. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  14. A Digital Solar Aspect Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albus, James S.

    1961-01-01

    The solar aspect sensor described herein performs the analog-to-digital conversion of data optically. To accomplish this, it uses a binary "Gray code" light mask to produce a digital indication, in vehicle-fixed coordinates, of the elevation and azimuth angles of incident light from the sun. This digital solar aspect sensor system, in Explorer X, provided measurements of both elevation and azimuth angles to +/- 2 degrees at a distance of over 140,000 statute miles.

  15. The Quantitative Preparation of Future Geoscience Graduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, C. A.; Hancock, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geoscience is a highly quantitative science. In February, a small group of faculty and graduate students from across the country met to discuss the quantitative preparation of geoscience majors for graduate school. The group included ten faculty supervising graduate students in quantitative areas spanning the earth, atmosphere, and ocean sciences; five current graduate students in these areas; and five faculty teaching undergraduate students in the spectrum of institutions preparing students for graduate work. Discussion focused in four key ares: Are incoming graduate students adequately prepared for the quantitative aspects of graduate geoscience programs? What are the essential quantitative skills are that are required for success in graduate school? What are perceived as the important courses to prepare students for the quantitative aspects of graduate school? What programs/resources would be valuable in helping faculty/departments improve the quantitative preparation of students? The participants concluded that strengthening the quantitative preparation of undergraduate geoscience majors would increase their opportunities in graduate school. While specifics differed amongst disciplines, a special importance was placed on developing the ability to use quantitative skills to solve geoscience problems. This requires the ability to pose problems so they can be addressed quantitatively, understand the relationship between quantitative concepts and physical representations, visualize mathematics, test the reasonableness of quantitative results, creatively move forward from existing models/techniques/approaches, and move between quantitative and verbal descriptions. A list of important quantitative competencies desirable in incoming graduate students includes mechanical skills in basic mathematics, functions, multi-variate analysis, statistics and calculus, as well as skills in logical analysis and the ability to learn independently in quantitative ways

  16. Recent Developments in Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Christopher H.; Bern, Marshall

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics is the study of proteins on a large scale, encompassing the many interests scientists and physicians have in their expression and physical properties. Proteomics continues to be a rapidly expanding field, with a wealth of reports regularly appearing on technology enhancements and scientific studies using these new tools. This review focuses primarily on the quantitative aspect of protein expression and the associated computational machinery for making large-scale identifications of proteins and their post-translational modifications. The primary emphasis is on the combination of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods and associated tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Tandem mass spectrometry, or MS/MS, involves a second analysis within the instrument after a molecular dissociative event in order to obtain structural information including but not limited to sequence information. This review further focuses primarily on the study of in vitro digested proteins known as bottom-up or shotgun proteomics. A brief discussion of recent instrumental improvements precedes a discussion on affinity enrichment and depletion of proteins, followed by a review of the major approaches (label-free and isotope-labeling) to making protein expression measurements quantitative, especially in the context of profiling large numbers of proteins. Then a discussion follows on the various computational techniques used to identify peptides and proteins from LC-MS/MS data. This review article then includes a short discussion of LC-MS approaches to three-dimensional structure determination and concludes with a section on statistics and data mining for proteomics, including comments on properly powering clinical studies and avoiding over-fitting with large data sets. PMID:20620221

  17. Recent developments in quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christopher H; Bern, Marshall

    2011-06-17

    Proteomics is the study of proteins on a large scale, encompassing the many interests scientists and physicians have in their expression and physical properties. Proteomics continues to be a rapidly expanding field, with a wealth of reports regularly appearing on technology enhancements and scientific studies using these new tools. This review focuses primarily on the quantitative aspect of protein expression and the associated computational machinery for making large-scale identifications of proteins and their post-translational modifications. The primary emphasis is on the combination of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods and associated tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Tandem mass spectrometry, or MS/MS, involves a second analysis within the instrument after a molecular dissociative event in order to obtain structural information including but not limited to sequence information. This review further focuses primarily on the study of in vitro digested proteins known as bottom-up or shotgun proteomics. A brief discussion of recent instrumental improvements precedes a discussion on affinity enrichment and depletion of proteins, followed by a review of the major approaches (label-free and isotope-labeling) to making protein expression measurements quantitative, especially in the context of profiling large numbers of proteins. Then a discussion follows on the various computational techniques used to identify peptides and proteins from LC-MS/MS data. This review article then includes a short discussion of LC-MS approaches to three-dimensional structure determination and concludes with a section on statistics and data mining for proteomics, including comments on properly powering clinical studies and avoiding over-fitting with large data sets. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative glycomics strategies.

    PubMed

    Mechref, Yehia; Hu, Yunli; Desantos-Garcia, Janie L; Hussein, Ahmed; Tang, Haixu

    2013-04-01

    The correlations between protein glycosylation and many biological processes and diseases are increasing the demand for quantitative glycomics strategies enabling sensitive monitoring of changes in the abundance and structure of glycans. This is currently attained through multiple strategies employing several analytical techniques such as capillary electrophoresis, liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry. The detection and quantification of glycans often involve labeling with ionic and/or hydrophobic reagents. This step is needed in order to enhance detection in spectroscopic and mass spectrometric measurements. Recently, labeling with stable isotopic reagents has also been presented as a very viable strategy enabling relative quantitation. The different strategies available for reliable and sensitive quantitative glycomics are herein described and discussed.

  19. Studying learning in the healthcare setting: the potential of quantitative diary methods.

    PubMed

    Ciere, Yvette; Jaarsma, Debbie; Visser, Annemieke; Sanderman, Robbert; Snippe, Evelien; Fleer, Joke

    2015-08-01

    Quantitative diary methods are longitudinal approaches that involve the repeated measurement of aspects of peoples' experience of daily life. In this article, we outline the main characteristics and applications of quantitative diary methods and discuss how their use may further research in the field of medical education. Quantitative diary methods offer several methodological advantages, such as measuring aspects of learning with great detail, accuracy and authenticity. Moreover, they enable researchers to study how and under which conditions learning in the health care setting occurs and in which way learning can be promoted. Hence, quantitative diary methods may contribute to theory development and the optimization of teaching methods in medical education.

  20. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  1. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, several algorithms that allow for quantitative photoacoustic reconstruction of tissue optical, acoustic and physiological properties are described in a finite-element method based framework. These quantitative reconstruction algorithms are compared, and the merits and limitations associated with these methods are discussed. In addition, a multispectral approach is presented for concurrent reconstructions of multiple parameters including deoxyhaemoglobin, oxyhaemoglobin and water concentrations as well as acoustic speed. Simulation and in vivo experiments are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the reconstruction algorithms presented. PMID:19581254

  2. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  3. What Are We Doing When We Translate from Quantitative Models?

    PubMed Central

    Critchfield, Thomas S; Reed, Derek D

    2009-01-01

    Although quantitative analysis (in which behavior principles are defined in terms of equations) has become common in basic behavior analysis, translational efforts often examine everyday events through the lens of narrative versions of laboratory-derived principles. This approach to translation, although useful, is incomplete because equations may convey concepts that are difficult to capture in words. To support this point, we provide a nontechnical introduction to selected aspects of quantitative analysis; consider some issues that translational investigators (and, potentially, practitioners) confront when attempting to translate from quantitative models; and discuss examples of relevant translational studies. We conclude that, where behavior-science translation is concerned, the quantitative features of quantitative models cannot be ignored without sacrificing conceptual precision, scientific and practical insights, and the capacity of the basic and applied wings of behavior analysis to communicate effectively. PMID:22478533

  4. What are we doing when we translate from quantitative models?

    PubMed

    Critchfield, Thomas S; Reed, Derek D

    2009-01-01

    Although quantitative analysis (in which behavior principles are defined in terms of equations) has become common in basic behavior analysis, translational efforts often examine everyday events through the lens of narrative versions of laboratory-derived principles. This approach to translation, although useful, is incomplete because equations may convey concepts that are difficult to capture in words. To support this point, we provide a nontechnical introduction to selected aspects of quantitative analysis; consider some issues that translational investigators (and, potentially, practitioners) confront when attempting to translate from quantitative models; and discuss examples of relevant translational studies. We conclude that, where behavior-science translation is concerned, the quantitative features of quantitative models cannot be ignored without sacrificing conceptual precision, scientific and practical insights, and the capacity of the basic and applied wings of behavior analysis to communicate effectively.

  5. Quantitative Simulation Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černý, Pavol; Henzinger, Thomas A.; Radhakrishna, Arjun

    While a boolean notion of correctness is given by a preorder on systems and properties, a quantitative notion of correctness is defined by a distance function on systems and properties, where the distance between a system and a property provides a measure of "fit" or "desirability." In this article, we explore several ways how the simulation preorder can be generalized to a distance function. This is done by equipping the classical simulation game between a system and a property with quantitative objectives. In particular, for systems that satisfy a property, a quantitative simulation game can measure the "robustness" of the satisfaction, that is, how much the system can deviate from its nominal behavior while still satisfying the property. For systems that violate a property, a quantitative simulation game can measure the "seriousness" of the violation, that is, how much the property has to be modified so that it is satisfied by the system. These distances can be computed in polynomial time, since the computation reduces to the value problem in limit average games with constant weights. Finally, we demonstrate how the robustness distance can be used to measure how many transmission errors are tolerated by error correcting codes.

  6. Quantitative Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Grover H.

    The use of quantitative decision making tools provides the decision maker with a range of alternatives among which to decide, permits acceptance and use of the optimal solution, and decreases risk. Training line administrators in the use of these tools can help school business officials obtain reliable information upon which to base district…

  7. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  8. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  9. Dynamic aspects of musical imagery.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Andrea R

    2012-04-01

    Auditory imagery can represent many aspects of music, such as the starting pitches of a tune or the instrument that typically plays it. In this paper, I concentrate on more dynamic, or time-sensitive aspects of musical imagery, as demonstrated in two recently published studies. The first was a behavioral study that examined the ability to make emotional judgments about both heard and imagined music in real time. The second was a neuroimaging study on the neural correlates of anticipating an upcoming tune, after hearing a cue tune. That study found activation of several sequence-learning brain areas, some of which varied with the vividness of the anticipated musical memory. Both studies speak to the ways in which musical imagery allows us to judge temporally changing aspects of the represented musical experience. These judgments can be quite precise, despite the complexity of generating the rich internal representations of imagery. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. On the quantitative inventory of the riverscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; O'Brien Marchand, Maura

    1968-01-01

    In the vicinity of Berkeley, California, 24 minor valleys were described in terms of factors chosen to represent aspects of the river landscape. A total of 28 factors were evaluated at each site. Some were directly measurable, others were estimated, but each observation was assigned to one of five categories for that factor. Each factor for each site was then expressed as a uniqueness ratio, which depended on the number of sites being in the same category. The uniqueness ratio is believed to represent one way the scarcity of a given riverscape can be ranked quantitatively without bias based on notions of good or bad, and without assigning monetary value.

  11. Supersymmetric chiral models: Geometrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelomov, A. M.

    1989-03-01

    We consider classical supersymmetric chiral models of field theory and focus our attention on the geometrical aspects of such theories. A characteristic feature of such models is that the interaction is not introduced by adding the interaction Lagrangian to the free field Lagrangian, but has a purely geometrical origin and is related to the inner curvature of the target manifold. In many aspects these models are analogous to gauge theories and, as became clear recently, they are also important for superstring theory, which nowadays is the most probable candidate for a truly unified theory of all interactions including gravitation.

  12. Ethical aspects of clinical chemistry.

    PubMed Central

    BenGershôm, E

    1983-01-01

    The work performed by the clinical chemist may deeply affect the decisions of the doctor and the well-being of the patient. Yet in contrast to the doctor and to the nurse the clinical chemist usually has no personal relationship with the patient. Being encumbered by much technology and anonymity is itself a reason for scrutinising his involvement in issues of health care ethics. This is an attempt at clarifying some major aspects: the relationship of his professional ethics to medical ethics as a whole, his ethical obligations to the patient and to society, and other aspects. PMID:6199500

  13. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF ATOMIC DISASTER

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Edward C.

    1954-01-01

    Increasing attention to the psychological aspects of atomic disaster will help improve the ability of the citizens of this country to withstand attack and survive as a free people. Since an enemy may be expected to exploit any internal weaknesses it can find, preparation must be made against the onslaught. The ability to deal effectively with any situation, even the most awesome, depends on knowledge of what to expect, and there is no reason to believe that facts about atomic disaster are an exception to this time proven truth. The psychological aspects need to be considered from two points of view, namely, the effect on masses of people and on individuals. PMID:13182616

  14. Teaching Quantitative Research Methods: A Quasi-Experimental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, George S.; Gillmore, Gerald M.; Pershing, Jana L.; Bates, Kristin A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to introduce aspects of quantitative reasoning to a large, substantively-focused class in the social sciences. Reveals that participating students' abilities to interpret and manipulate empirical data increased significantly, independent of baseline SAT verbal and mathematics scores. Discusses implications for…

  15. [Scientometric aspects of medical eponyms].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2014-09-07

    Eponyms, scientific concepts named after persons, have a long tradition in medical sciences. Their emergence and use are rather instructive from the aspects of scientometrics, as well. Using a medical sample it is shown that although references to publications giving origin to the eponyms inevitably get obliterated, their citation rate is still many times higher than that of other publications of the same age.

  16. Behavioral Aspects of Marijuana Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, Patricia

    This paper examines the behavioral aspects of marijuana use. The focus of the study was to investigate the attitudes and practices toward drugs by users and non-users and the relationship of these attitudes and practices to selected psychosocial factors. A survey instrument in the form of an anonymous questionnaire was developed and administered…

  17. Legal Aspects of the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrull, Alexandre Lopez; Oppenheim, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to legal aspects of the Web: copyright; domain names and trademarks; linking, framing, caching, and spamdexing; patents; pornography and censorship on the Internet; defamation; liability; conflict of laws and jurisdiction; legal deposit; and spam, i.e., unsolicited mails.…

  18. LEGAL ASPECTS OF STUDENT TEACHING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SWALLS, FRED

    THE LEGAL POSITION OF STUDENT TEACHERS WAS STUDIED. A SURVEY OF STATUTES, ATTORNEY GENERALS' OPINIONS, AND CASE LAWS IN 10 STATES WAS CONDUCTED. THE LEGAL ASPECTS OF STUDENT TEACHING SURVEYED WERE (1) THE LIABILITY FOR PUPIL INJURY, (2) THE AUTHORITY TO REGULATE PUPIL CONDUCT, AND (3) THE LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY OF PUBLIC SCHOOL CORPORATIONS AND OF…

  19. Aspects of Spirituality in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussing, Arndt; Foller-Mancini, Axel; Gidley, Jennifer; Heusser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses which aspects of spirituality are valued by adolescents, and how they are interconnected with youths' life satisfaction and "self-centeredness". The participants were 254 adolescents (11th grade) of four different high schools from west Germany. After re-validation of the 6-factorial student's version of the ASP…

  20. Mathematical Aspects of Electoral Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinov, M. M.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we consider some mathematical aspects of electoral systems. Sometimes the results from elections seem paradoxical although they are mathematically correct. These cases are known as electoral paradoxes. A number of paradoxes of proportional and majoritarian electoral systems are considered.

  1. Aspects and the Overlap Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Marilyn M.; Levine, Leonard P.

    1984-01-01

    Presents system for automatic handling of ordered sets, states based on these sets, and differing points of view regarding Universe of Discourse. Aspects are represented by new logical "overlap" function with examples taken from Ranganathan's horse and carriage parable and several books involving four main concepts (history, geography,…

  2. Psychosocial Aspects of Heart Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suszycki, Lee H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents an overview of medical and psychosocial aspects of heart transplantation, with a focus on the program at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Describes social workers' interventions which help patients and families to achieve optimal psychosocial functioning before and after transplantation. (Author/ABL)

  3. Additional aspects of elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    An up-to-date review of the varying aspects of elastohydrodynamic lubrication is presented.. Some recent work on elastohydrodynamic lubrication of materials of low elastic modulus as well as on hydrodynamic lubrication is included. Both these topics are applicable for contacts with any ellipticity parameter (ranging from a circular contact to a line contact).

  4. Gender Aspects of Human Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moussa, Ghada

    2008-01-01

    The chapter deals with the gender dimensions in human security through focusing on the relationship between gender and human security, first manifested in international declarations and conventions, and subsequently evolving in world women conferences. It aims at analysing the various gender aspects in its relation to different human security…

  5. Legal Aspects of the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrull, Alexandre Lopez; Oppenheim, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to legal aspects of the Web: copyright; domain names and trademarks; linking, framing, caching, and spamdexing; patents; pornography and censorship on the Internet; defamation; liability; conflict of laws and jurisdiction; legal deposit; and spam, i.e., unsolicited mails.…

  6. Aspects of preheating after inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Patrick Bradley

    2002-12-01

    We review several aspects of preheating after inflation. Topics covered include the structure of bosonic parametric resonance in conformal theories, the parametric excitation of fermions both with and without expansion of the universe, and tachyonic preheating at the end of supersymmetric hybrid inflation.

  7. Gender Aspects of Human Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moussa, Ghada

    2008-01-01

    The chapter deals with the gender dimensions in human security through focusing on the relationship between gender and human security, first manifested in international declarations and conventions, and subsequently evolving in world women conferences. It aims at analysing the various gender aspects in its relation to different human security…

  8. Neurologic aspects of drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Goforth, Harold W; Murtaugh, Reed; Fernandez, Francisco

    2010-02-01

    Neurologic aspects of drug abuse vary. This article explains the general nature of drug abuse, identifies the physiologic effects of certain drugs, and briefly describes the neurobiology of addiction. This article also reviews available treatment options for those addicted to substances of abuse, and clarifies common misconceptions, including the differences between tolerance, abuse, and addiction.

  9. Aspects of Spirituality in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussing, Arndt; Foller-Mancini, Axel; Gidley, Jennifer; Heusser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses which aspects of spirituality are valued by adolescents, and how they are interconnected with youths' life satisfaction and "self-centeredness". The participants were 254 adolescents (11th grade) of four different high schools from west Germany. After re-validation of the 6-factorial student's version of the ASP…

  10. TWO ASPECT MARKERS IN MANDARIN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WANG, WILLIAM S-Y.

    TWO ASPECT MARKERS IN MANDARIN CHINESE ARE STUDIED WITHIN THE GENERAL FRAMEWORK OF A TRANSFORMATIONAL GRAMMAR. THEY ARE COMMONLY REPRESENTED AS "-LE," INDICATING COMPLETION OF ACTION, AND "-GUO," INDICATING THAT AN ACTION HAS TAKEN PLACE AT LEAST ONCE. THE PROBLEM INVOLVES SEVERAL SEEMING IRREGULARITIES IN THE FORMATION OF…

  11. Psychosocial Aspects of Heart Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suszycki, Lee H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents an overview of medical and psychosocial aspects of heart transplantation, with a focus on the program at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Describes social workers' interventions which help patients and families to achieve optimal psychosocial functioning before and after transplantation. (Author/ABL)

  12. Pragmatic Aspects of Scalar Modifiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawada, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the pragmatic aspects of scalar modifiers from the standpoint of the interface between semantics and pragmatics, focusing on (i) the (non) parallelism between the truth-conditional scalar modifiers and the non-truth-conditional scalar modifiers, (ii) the compositionality and dimensionality of non-truth-conditional…

  13. Theoretical Aspects of Speech Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Kenneth N.

    1992-01-01

    This paper on speech production in children and youth with hearing impairments summarizes theoretical aspects, including the speech production process, sound sources in the vocal tract, vowel production, and consonant production. Examples of spectra for several classes of vowel and consonant sounds in simple syllables are given. (DB)

  14. Energy & Climate: Getting Quantitative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, Richard

    2011-11-01

    A noted environmentalist claims that buying an SUV instead of a regular car is energetically equivalent to leaving your refrigerator door open for seven years. A fossil-fuel apologist argues that solar energy is a pie-in-the-sky dream promulgated by na"ive environmentalists, because there's nowhere near enough solar energy to meet humankind's energy demand. A group advocating shutdown of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant claims that 70% of its electrical energy is lost in transmission lines. Around the world, thousands agitate for climate action, under the numerical banner ``350.'' Neither the environmentalist, the fossil-fuel apologist, the antinuclear activists, nor most of those marching under the ``350'' banner can back up their assertions with quantitative arguments. Yet questions about energy and its environmental impacts almost always require quantitative answers. Physics can help! This poster gives some cogent examples, based on the newly published 2^nd edition of the author's textbook Energy, Environment, and Climate.

  15. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  16. Quantitative Risk - Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-29

    Cook,  2000,  Bar-­‐ Yam ,  2003).     The  term  “complexity”  has  several  definitions  and  various  related  aspects...Final  Report,  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology.     Bar-­‐ Yam  Y.  2003.  When  systems  engineering  fails

  17. Quantitative traits and diversification.

    PubMed

    FitzJohn, Richard G

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative traits have long been hypothesized to affect speciation and extinction rates. For example, smaller body size or increased specialization may be associated with increased rates of diversification. Here, I present a phylogenetic likelihood-based method (quantitative state speciation and extinction [QuaSSE]) that can be used to test such hypotheses using extant character distributions. This approach assumes that diversification follows a birth-death process where speciation and extinction rates may vary with one or more traits that evolve under a diffusion model. Speciation and extinction rates may be arbitrary functions of the character state, allowing much flexibility in testing models of trait-dependent diversification. I test the approach using simulated phylogenies and show that a known relationship between speciation and a quantitative character could be recovered in up to 80% of the cases on large trees (500 species). Consistent with other approaches, detecting shifts in diversification due to differences in extinction rates was harder than when due to differences in speciation rates. Finally, I demonstrate the application of QuaSSE to investigate the correlation between body size and diversification in primates, concluding that clade-specific differences in diversification may be more important than size-dependent diversification in shaping the patterns of diversity within this group.

  18. Quantitation of signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Krauss, S; Brand, M D

    2000-12-01

    Conventional qualitative approaches to signal transduction provide powerful ways to explore the architecture and function of signaling pathways. However, at the level of the complete system, they do not fully depict the interactions between signaling and metabolic pathways and fail to give a manageable overview of the complexity that is often a feature of cellular signal transduction. Here, we introduce a quantitative experimental approach to signal transduction that helps to overcome these difficulties. We present a quantitative analysis of signal transduction during early mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes, with steady-state respiration rate as a convenient marker of metabolic stimulation. First, by inhibiting various key signaling pathways, we measure their relative importance in regulating respiration. About 80% of the input signal is conveyed via identifiable routes: 50% through pathways sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and MAP kinase and 30% through pathways sensitive to an inhibitor of calcineurin. Second, we quantify how each of these pathways differentially stimulates functional units of reactions that produce and consume a key intermediate in respiration: the mitochondrial membrane potential. Both the PKC and calcineurin routes stimulate consumption more strongly than production, whereas the unidentified signaling routes stimulate production more than consumption, leading to no change in membrane potential despite increased respiration rate. The approach allows a quantitative description of the relative importance of signal transduction pathways and the routes by which they activate a specific cellular process. It should be widely applicable.

  19. Quantitation of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Topilsky, Yan; Grigioni, Francesco; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most frequent valve disease. Nevertheless, evaluation of MR severity is difficult because standard color flow imaging is plagued by considerable pitfalls. Modern surgical indications in asymptomatic patients require precise assessment of MR severity. MR severity assessment is always comprehensive, utilizing all views and methods. Determining trivial/mild MR is usually easy, based on small jet and flow convergence. Specific signs of severe MR (pulmonary venous flow systolic reversal or severe mitral lesion) are useful but insensitive. Quantitative methods, quantitative Doppler (measuring stroke volumes) and flow convergence (aka PISA method), measure the lesion severity as effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) and volume overload as regurgitant volume (RVol). Interpretation of these numbers should be performed in context of specific MR type. In organic MR (intrinsic valve lesions) ERO ≥ 0.40 cm(2) and RVol ≥ 60 mL are associated with poor outcome, while in functional MR ERO ≥ 0.20 cm(2) and RVol ≥ 30 mL mark reduced survival. While MR assessment should always be comprehensive, quantitative assessment of MR provides measures that are strongly predictive of outcome and should be the preferred approach. The ERO and RVol measured by these methods require interpretation in causal context to best predict outcome and determine MR management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Using quantitative phase petrology to understand metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative phase petrology has become one of the mainstay methods for interpreting metamorphic rocks and processes. Its increased utility has been driven by improvements to end-member thermodynamics, activity-composition relationships and computer programs to undertake calculations. Such improvements now allow us to undertake calculations in increasingly complex chemical systems that more closely reflect those of rocks. Recent progress in activity-composition (a-x) relationships is aimed at developing suites of a-x relationships in large chemical systems that are calibrated together, which will allow a more direct application of the method to metamorphic rocks. In addition, considerable progress has been made in how quantitative phase diagrams can be used to understand features, including chemical potential diagrams for reaction textures, methods for fractionating bulk compositions and methods for modelling open system processes. One feature of calculated phase diagrams is that they present us with a great amount of information, such as mineral assemblages, mineral proportions, phase compositions, volume or density etc. An important aspect to using this information is to understand the potential uncertainties associated with these, which are significant. These uncertainties require that calculated phase diagrams be used with caution to interpret observed features in rocks. Features such as mineral zoning and reaction textures should still be interpreted in a semi-quantitative way, even if based on a fully quantitative diagram. Exercises such as the interpretation of reaction overstepping based on relating phase diagrams to observed mineral core compositions are likely to give spurious results given the infelicities in existing a-x models. Despite these limitations, quantitative phase petrology remains the most useful approach to interpreting the metamorphic history of rocks in that it provides a theoretical framework in which to interpret observed features rather

  1. The psychological aspects of rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Tasman, Abel-Jan

    2010-08-01

    Literature on the psychological aspects of rhinoplasty is sparse compared with publications on methods and instrumentation. Understanding the psychological aspects of rhinoplasty and, more importantly, recognizing the patient who may have an unfavorable postoperative course regardless of the objective outcome is of fundamental importance to the surgeon. Several profiles of patients with a high risk of postoperative dissatisfaction have been described and the important role of body dysmorphic disorder and its treatment has been stressed. Still, these criteria can be insufficient when facing the individual patient, as reliable screening instruments for clinical practice have not been developed and the question when not to operate is subject to controversy. The role of computer imaging as a safeguard in preoperative counseling has been highlighted. The surgeon must rely on instinct and experience to avoid overlooking any signs of psychological imbalance in the patient that may herald adversity. Archetypes described in the literature should be recognized and computer imaging should be used during the preoperative consultation.

  2. Liposarcome dorsal: aspect clinique rare

    PubMed Central

    Agbessi, Odry; Arrob, Adil; Fiqhi, Kamal; Khalfi, Lahcen; Nassih, Mohammed; El Khatib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Décrit la première fois par Virchow en 1860, le liposarcome est une tumeur mésenchymateuse rare. Cette rareté est relative car les liposarcomes représentent quand même 14 à 18% de l'ensemble des tumeurs malignes des parties molles et ils constituent le plus fréquent des sarcomes des parties molles. Pour la majorité des auteurs, il ne se développerait jamais sur un lipome ou une lipomatose préexistant. Nous rapportons un cas de volumineux liposarcome de la face dorsale du tronc. L'histoire de la maladie, l'aspect clinique inhabituel « de tumeur dans tumeur », l'aspect de la pièce opératoire nous fait évoquer la possibilité de la transformation maligne d'un lipome bénin préexistant. PMID:26113914

  3. Environmental aspects of congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Yu, Xin; Shen, Jianxiong

    2015-04-01

    Growing evidence has proved that many aspects of our lifestyle and the environment contribute to the development of congenital disease. Congenital spinal deformities are due to anomalous development of the vertebrae including failure of formation and segmentation during embryogenesis. The causes of congenital scoliosis have not been fully identified. A variety of factors are implicated in the development of vertebral abnormalities. Previous studies have demonstrated that both genetics and environmental factors are implicated in the development of vertebral abnormalities. However, no specific cause for congenital scoliosis has been identified. In our review, we focus on the environmental factors for the development of congenital scoliosis. Various maternal exposures during pregnancy including hypoxia, alcohol use, vitamin deficiency, valproic acid, boric acid, and hyperthermia have been observed to be associated with the occurrence of congenital scoliosis. This review describes the major environmental contributors of congenital scoliosis with an emphasis on treatment aspects associated with environmental disposition in congenital scoliosis.

  4. Aspects of Tactical Biological Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-03

    immunoprophylaxes (vaccines), and chemoprophylaxes (antibiotics, e,g. ciprofloxacin used in Operation Desert Storm for protection against anthrax). The...spectrophotometry may be used to identify biochemicals in two ways: (1) through LW light adsorption spectra, or (2) through fluorescence of UV...irradiated molecules. UV adsorption profiles for proteins and nucleic acids have been used for years in laboratories for the detection and quantitation of

  5. Thermodynamic aspects of therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Vanlandingham, Sean C; Kurz, Michael C; Wang, Henry E

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is an important treatment for post-cardiac arrest syndrome. Despite its widespread practice, only limited data describe the thermodynamic aspects of heat transfer during TH. This paper reviews the principles of human body heat balance and provides a conceptual model for characterizing heat exchange during TH. The model may provide a framework for computer simulation for improving training in or clinical methods of TH.

  6. Legal aspects of satellite teleconferencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The application of satellite communications for teleconferencing purposes is discussed. The legal framework within which such a system or series of systems could be developed is considered. The analysis is based on: (1) satellite teleconferencing regulation, (2) the options available for such a system, (3) regulatory alternatives, and (4) ownership and management aspects. The system is designed to provide a capability for professional education, remote medical diagnosis, business conferences, and computer techniques.

  7. [Economic aspects of health telematics].

    PubMed

    Lux, A

    2005-06-01

    The economic aspects of the health telematics must be considered from two points of view. The administrative applications are suitable as start-applications, because their data structures and processes are well known, and the calculation of the individual monetary effects have a solid empirical basis. However, only the medical applications will exhaust the real potential of health telematics and only these applications will justify the political and financial effort involved.

  8. Aspects of future CIM solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Werner

    Due to the complexity of the data quality and quantity used in CAD/CAM systems, integrated CIM (computer-integrated manufacturing) with suitable data banks is required. Suggestions and studies in progress on modern interfaces and hardware satisfying these requirements are discussed, including user aspects such as 'open' CAD/CAM systems, localized-centralized workstations, and data management. The state of the art with regard to internationally cooperative aircraft construction is considered along with trends and future developments.

  9. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE ANALYSES OF EXOGENOUS AND ENDOGENOUS CHILDREN IN SOME READING PROCESSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAPOBIANCO, RUDOLPH J.; MILLER, DONALD Y.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE PRESENT STUDY WAS TO INVESTIGATE THESE ASPECTS OF THE READING PROCESS--(1) SILENT AND ORAL READING ACHIEVEMENT, (2) PATTERN OF READING ERRORS, (3) AND AUDITORY AND VISUAL PERCEPTION TECHNIQUES. THE FACT THAT COMPARISONS BETWEEN THE EXOGENOUS AND ENDOGENOUS GROUPS ON THE QUANTITATIVE AND MOST OF THE QUALITATIVE ASPECTS OF TEST…

  10. Designing quantitative telemedicine research.

    PubMed

    Wade, Victoria; Barnett, Adrian G; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Russell, Trevor

    2016-10-27

    When designing quantitative trials and evaluation of telehealth interventions, researchers should think ahead to the intended way that the intervention could be implemented in routine care and consider how trial participants with similar characteristics to the target population can be included. The telehealth intervention and the context in which it is placed should be clearly described, and consideration given to conducting pragmatic trials in order to show the effect of telehealth in complex environments with rapidly changing technology. Types of research designs, comparators and outcome measures are discussed and common statistical issues are introduced. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. The use of quantitative medical sociology.

    PubMed

    Blane, David

    2003-01-01

    The present article reviews, in relation to quantitative work on the social structure, papers published in Sociology of Health and Illness during its first 25 years. Each issue published during the years 1979-2002 has been examined; and quantitative papers, relating to various aspects of the social structure, have been identified. Such papers are found to have formed a minor but substantively significant theme within the Journal. These contributions situate the journal between sociology and social epidemiology. Articles in the Journal, for example, have been part of sociological debates about the measurement of social class, and of social epidemiological debates about the relationship between income distribution and population health. The contribution of Sociology of Health and Illness to a number of such debates is reviewed. The article concludes that the present situation, in particular the intellectual crisis in social epidemiology and social science investment in large data sets, gives the Journal the chance to build on this distinguished tradition by encouraging, through its publication policy, the further development of quantitative medical sociology.

  12. Quantitative resilience analysis through control design.

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderland, Daniel; Vugrin, Eric D.; Camphouse, Russell Chris

    2009-09-01

    Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. Few quantitative resilience methods exist, and those existing approaches tend to be rather simplistic and, hence, not capable of sufficiently assessing all aspects of critical infrastructure resilience. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the development of quantitative resilience through application of control design methods. Specifically, we conducted a survey of infrastructure models to assess what types of control design might be applicable for critical infrastructure resilience assessment. As a result of this survey, we developed a decision process that directs the resilience analyst to the control method that is most likely applicable to the system under consideration. Furthermore, we developed optimal control strategies for two sets of representative infrastructure systems to demonstrate how control methods could be used to assess the resilience of the systems to catastrophic disruptions. We present recommendations for future work to continue the development of quantitative resilience analysis methods.

  13. Quantitative Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marvin E; Aalderink, Bernard J; Padoan, Roberto; De Bruin, Gerrit; Steemers, Ted A G

    2008-09-11

    Hyperspectral imaging is a non-destructive optical analysis technique that can for instance be used to obtain information from cultural heritage objects unavailable with conventional colour or multi-spectral photography. This technique can be used to distinguish and recognize materials, to enhance the visibility of faint or obscured features, to detect signs of degradation and study the effect of environmental conditions on the object. We describe the basic concept, working principles, construction and performance of a laboratory instrument specifically developed for the analysis of historical documents. The instrument measures calibrated spectral reflectance images at 70 wavelengths ranging from 365 to 1100 nm (near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared). By using a wavelength tunable narrow-bandwidth light-source, the light energy used to illuminate the measured object is minimal, so that any light-induced degradation can be excluded. Basic analysis of the hyperspectral data includes a qualitative comparison of the spectral images and the extraction of quantitative data such as mean spectral reflectance curves and statistical information from user-defined regions-of-interest. More sophisticated mathematical feature extraction and classification techniques can be used to map areas on the document, where different types of ink had been applied or where one ink shows various degrees of degradation. The developed quantitative hyperspectral imager is currently in use by the Nationaal Archief (National Archives of The Netherlands) to study degradation effects of artificial samples and original documents, exposed in their permanent exhibition area or stored in their deposit rooms.

  14. Is quantitative electromyography reliable?

    PubMed

    Cecere, F; Ruf, S; Pancherz, H

    1996-01-01

    The reliability of quantitative electromyography (EMG) of the masticatory muscles was investigated in 14 subjects without any signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. Integrated EMG activity from the anterior temporalis and masseter muscles was recorded bilaterally by means of bipolar surface electrodes during chewing and biting activities. In the first experiment, the influence of electrode relocation was investigated. No influence of electrode relocation on the recorded EMG signal could be detected. In a second experiment, three sessions of EMG recordings during five different chewing and biting activities were performed in the morning (I); 1 hour later without intermediate removal of the electrodes (II); and in the afternoon, using new electrodes (III). The method errors for different time intervals (I-II and I-III errors) for each muscle and each function were calculated. Depending on the time interval between the EMG recordings, the muscles considered, and the function performed, the individual errors ranged from 5% to 63%. The method error increased significantly (P < .05 to P < .01) with the time interval between recordings. The error for the masseter (mean 27.2%) was higher than for the temporalis (mean 20.0%). The largest function error was found during maximal biting in intercuspal position (mean 23.1%). Based on the findings, quantitative electromyography of the masticatory muscles seems to have a limited value in diagnostics and in the evaluation of individual treatment results.

  15. Aspects of spirituality concerning illness.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, René; Tiesinga, Lucas J; Jochemsen, Henk; Jochemasen, Henk; Post, Doeke

    2007-12-01

    The spiritual dimension of illness, health and care may be seen as a unique aspect in addition to the physical, mental and social dimension. This contribution describes experiences of patients, nurses and hospital chaplains in relation to the spiritual aspects of being ill. Qualitative research was performed with the design of a focus group study, consisting of 13 focus groups with a total of 67 participants. A purposive sample was used comprising patients, nurses and hospital chaplains working in oncology, cardiology and neurology in different institutions and regions in the Netherlands. The qualitative analysis consisted of open coding and the determining of topics, followed by the subsequent attachment of substantial dimensions and characteristic fragments. Data were analysed by using the computer program KWALITAN. Spirituality play various roles in patients lives during their illness. There is a wide range of topics that may have an individual effect on patients. Despite differences in emphasis, the topics play a role in different patient categories. Although the spiritual topics seem to manifest themselves more clearly in long-term care relationships, they may also play a role during brief admittance periods (such as treatment decisions). The spiritual topics that arise from this study offer caregivers a framework for signalling the spiritual needs of patients. The question is not whether spirituality is a relevant focus area in care, but how and to what degree it plays a role with individual patients. Follow up research should aim at further exploration of spiritual aspects in care, the relationship between spirituality and health and at effective training of caregivers.

  16. Practical Aspects of Nonlinear Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-19

    14. E. Levitan and B . Polyak, "Constrained Minimization Methods", USSR Comp. Math. and Math. Physics 6, 1, (1966). 15. J. May, "Solving Nonlinear...AD-AIO 858 MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH LEXINGTON LINCOLN LAB F/G 12/1 PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF NONLINEAR OPTIMIZATION.U) JUN 81 R B HOLMES, J W TOLLESON...dj, l<j< m , (2) with the understanding the Q so defined has a non-empty interior (is "solid"). No qualitative assumptions on the objective - i

  17. Nutritional aspects related to endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Gabriela; Schor, Eduardo; Kopelman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This literature review analyzed the evidence on nutritional aspects related to the pathogenesis and progression of endometriosis. Diets deficient in nutrients result in changes in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and promote epigenetic abnormalities, that may be involved in the genesis and progression of the disease. Foods rich in omega 3 with anti-inflammatory effects, supplementation with N-acetylcysteine, vitamin D and resveratrol, in addition to the increased consumption of fruits, vegetables (preferably organic) and whole grains exert a protective effect, reducing the risk of development and possible regression of disease. Dietary re-education seems to be a promising tool in the prevention and treatment of endometriosis.

  18. Mechanical engineering aspects of TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Citrolo, J.C.

    1983-04-01

    This paper briefly presents the principles which characterize a tokamak and discusses the mechanical aspects of TFTR, particularly the toroidal field coils and the vacuum chamber, in the context of being key components common to all tokamaks. The mechanical loads on these items as well as other design requirements are considered and the solutions to these requirements as executed in TFTR are presented. Future technological developments beyond the scope of TFTR, which are necessary to bring the tokamak concept to a full fusion-power system, are also presented. Additional methods of plasma heating, current drive, and first wall designs are examples of items in this category.

  19. Systemic aspects of biological evolution.

    PubMed

    Arber, Werner

    2009-11-01

    In recent years molecular mechanisms and natural strategies have been explored that spontaneously generate genetic variations at low rates without seriously affecting genetic stability at the level of populations. Thereby acquired knowledge suggests systemic aspects of evolutionary interdependences both in the past and in future evolutionary developments. The natural strategy of DNA acquisition by horizontal gene transfer interconnects different branches of the tree of evolution at random times. This makes in principle the entire global gene pool of the biosphere available to any kinds of living beings for their further evolutionary development. The relevance of this knowledge for risk assessments of genetically engineered organisms is discussed.

  20. Immunological aspects of cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the innate and adaptive immune systems make a crucial contribution to the antitumour effects of conventional chemotherapy-based and radiotherapy-based cancer treatments. Moreover, the molecular and cellular bases of the immunogenicity of cell death that is induced by cytotoxic agents are being progressively unravelled, challenging the guidelines that currently govern the development of anticancer drugs. Here, we review the immunological aspects of conventional cancer treatments and propose that future successes in the fight against cancer will rely on the development and clinical application of combined chemo- and immunotherapies.

  1. Technical aspects of abdominal stomas.

    PubMed

    Link, Brian A; Kropp, Bradley; Frimberger, Dominic

    2007-01-01

    Continent urinary diversion has gained increasing popularity in the pediatric population during the last few decades. In adults, continent diversions are usually needed to replace a bladder after cystectomy for invasive carcinoma. Subsequently, the creation of functional and cosmetically hidden urinary and cecal abdominal stomas has become an integral part of many urinary reconstructive procedures. These techniques, originally developed for pediatric urinary reconstruction have gained increasing popularity for adult patients in need of a continence procedure. In the current manuscript, we review the technical aspects of site selection, mucocutaneous anastomosis, cosmetic appearance, and management of associated complications.

  2. Aspect ratio effect on shock-accelerated elliptic gas cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liyong; Liao, Shenfei; Liu, Cangli; Wang, Yanping; Zhai, Zhigang

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of an elliptic heavy-gas (SF6) cylinder accelerated by a planar weak shock wave is investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry (PIV) diagnostics, and the emphasis is on the aspect ratio effect on shock-elliptic cylinder interaction. Experiments are conducted at five different aspect ratios (the ratio of length in streamwise and spanwise directions) varied from 0.25 to 4.0. PIV raw images and quantitative flow field data are obtained at t = 0.6 ms after the shock impact. As the aspect ratio increases, the interface morphology develops faster owing to more vorticity produced along the interface and smaller vortex spacing between the two vortex cores. For each case in this study, the maximal fluctuating velocity locates at the middle point of the two counter-vortices. The histograms of fluctuating velocity reveal that a distinct double-peak structure appears in the largest aspect ratio case in comparison with a single-peak structure in the smallest aspect ratio case. The vortex velocities predicted by the theoretical model [G. Rudinger and L. M. Somers, "Behaviour of small regions of different gases carried in accelerated gas flows," J. Fluid Mech. 7, 161-176 (1960)] agree well with the experimental ones. With the increase of aspect ratio, the maximal value of vorticity increases as well as the circulation, and more low-magnitude quantities are generated, which indicates the formation of multi-scale flow structure in the late mixing process. It is found that the experimental circulation of the vortex motion is reasonably estimated by the ideal point vortex-pair model.

  3. Quantitative Geophysics and Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Clark R.

    Most college instructors of geophysics are on the lookout for new textbooks. This is especially the case for instructors of survey courses at the upper division or graduate level, where choices are limited and opinions differ as to what ought be included and the level of detail. As one of those instructors, I was eager to review Quantitative Geophysics and Geology. Its title seemed to fit several courses taught at my institution. But upon reading the book, I found it was not useful for most of our courses.The variety of geophysical topics is so vast that an orderly exposition simply is not possible for all. The book's strong point is that a number of chapters provide succinct and readable reviews of traditional topics, which makes it well suited for an introduction or review at the graduate level.

  4. Quantitative analysis in megageomorphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, L.

    1985-01-01

    Megageomorphology is the study of regional topographic features and their relations to independent geomorphic variables that operate at the regional scale. These independent variables can be classified as either tectonic or climatic in nature. Quantitative megageomorphology stresses the causal relations between plate tectonic factors and landscape features or correlations between climatic factors and geomorphic processes. In addition, the cumulative effects of tectonics and climate on landscape evolution that simultaneously operate in a complex system of energy transfer is of interst. Regional topographic differentiation, say between continents and ocean floors, is largely the result of the different densities and density contrasts within the oceanic and continental lithosphere and their isostatic consequences. Regional tectonic processes that alter these lithospheric characteristics include rifting, collision, subduction, transpression and transtension.

  5. [Some basic aspects in statistical analysis of visual acuity data].

    PubMed

    Ren, Ze-Qin

    2007-06-01

    All visual acuity charts used currently have their own shortcomings. Therefore, it is difficult for ophthalmologists to evaluate visual acuity data. Many problems present in the use of statistical methods for handling visual acuity data in clinical research. The quantitative relationship between visual acuity and visual angle varied in different visual acuity charts. The type of visual acuity and visual angle are different from each other. Therefore, different statistical methods should be used for different data sources. A correct understanding and analysis of visual acuity data could be obtained only after the elucidation of these aspects.

  6. Liability aspects of home energy-rating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1983-10-01

    Liability aspects of home energy rating systems are discussed. An introduction to the rating system concept, including types of rating systems, implementation efforts to date, and possible groups to conduct ratings, is also included. The home energy rating system concept involves the periodic rating of the energy efficiency of residential buildings. The rating can provide a relative indication of a home's energy efficiency and also a quantitative estimate of consumption, fuel cost, or both. Primary attention is given to liability issues associated with developing and performing ratings. Secondary attention is given to possible liability associated with misuse of a rating once it has been performed.

  7. Quantitative immunoglobulins in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Howard C; Quinn, James M

    2009-01-01

    Although age-related changes in serum immunoglobulins are well described in childhood, alterations in immunoglobulins in the elderly are less well described and published. This study was designed to better define expected immunoglobulin ranges and differences in adults of differing decades of life. Sera from 404 patients, aged 20-89 years old were analyzed for quantitative immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and immunoglobulin A (IgA). The patients with diagnoses or medications known to affect immunoglobulin levels were identified while blinded to their immunoglobulin levels. A two-factor ANOVA was performed using decade of life and gender on both the entire sample population as well as the subset without any disease or medication expected to alter immunoglobulin levels. A literature review was also performed on all English language articles evaluating quantitative immunoglobulin levels in adults >60 years old. For the entire population, IgM was found to be higher in women when compared with men (p < 0.001) and lower in the oldest sample population compared with the youngest population (p < 0.001). For the population without diseases known to affect immunoglobulin levels, the differences in IgM with gender and age were maintained (p < or = 0.001) and IgA levels were generally higher in the older population when compared with the younger population (p = 0.009). Elderly patients without disease known to affect immunoglobulin levels have higher serum IgA levels and lower serum IgM levels. Women have higher IgM levels than men throughout life. IgG levels are not significantly altered in an older population.

  8. Quantitative Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marvin E.; Aalderink, Bernard J.; Padoan, Roberto; de Bruin, Gerrit; Steemers, Ted A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a non-destructive optical analysis technique that can for instance be used to obtain information from cultural heritage objects unavailable with conventional colour or multi-spectral photography. This technique can be used to distinguish and recognize materials, to enhance the visibility of faint or obscured features, to detect signs of degradation and study the effect of environmental conditions on the object. We describe the basic concept, working principles, construction and performance of a laboratory instrument specifically developed for the analysis of historical documents. The instrument measures calibrated spectral reflectance images at 70 wavelengths ranging from 365 to 1100 nm (near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared). By using a wavelength tunable narrow-bandwidth light-source, the light energy used to illuminate the measured object is minimal, so that any light-induced degradation can be excluded. Basic analysis of the hyperspectral data includes a qualitative comparison of the spectral images and the extraction of quantitative data such as mean spectral reflectance curves and statistical information from user-defined regions-of-interest. More sophisticated mathematical feature extraction and classification techniques can be used to map areas on the document, where different types of ink had been applied or where one ink shows various degrees of degradation. The developed quantitative hyperspectral imager is currently in use by the Nationaal Archief (National Archives of The Netherlands) to study degradation effects of artificial samples and original documents, exposed in their permanent exhibition area or stored in their deposit rooms. PMID:27873831

  9. Quantitative evolutionary design

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jared

    2002-01-01

    The field of quantitative evolutionary design uses evolutionary reasoning (in terms of natural selection and ultimate causation) to understand the magnitudes of biological reserve capacities, i.e. excesses of capacities over natural loads. Ratios of capacities to loads, defined as safety factors, fall in the range 1.2-10 for most engineered and biological components, even though engineered safety factors are specified intentionally by humans while biological safety factors arise through natural selection. Familiar examples of engineered safety factors include those of buildings, bridges and elevators (lifts), while biological examples include factors of bones and other structural elements, of enzymes and transporters, and of organ metabolic performances. Safety factors serve to minimize the overlap zone (resulting in performance failure) between the low tail of capacity distributions and the high tail of load distributions. Safety factors increase with coefficients of variation of load and capacity, with capacity deterioration with time, and with cost of failure, and decrease with costs of initial construction, maintenance, operation, and opportunity. Adaptive regulation of many biological systems involves capacity increases with increasing load; several quantitative examples suggest sublinear increases, such that safety factors decrease towards 1.0. Unsolved questions include safety factors of series systems, parallel or branched pathways, elements with multiple functions, enzyme reaction chains, and equilibrium enzymes. The modest sizes of safety factors imply the existence of costs that penalize excess capacities. Those costs are likely to involve wasted energy or space for large or expensive components, but opportunity costs of wasted space at the molecular level for minor components. PMID:12122135

  10. Genetic aspects of dental disorders.

    PubMed

    Townsend, G C; Aldred, M J; Bartold, P M

    1998-08-01

    This paper reviews past and present applications of quantitative and molecular genetics to dental disorders. Examples are given relating to craniofacial development (including malocclusion), oral supporting tissues (including periodontal diseases) and dental hard tissues (including defects of enamel and dentine as well as dental caries). Future developments and applications to clinical dentistry are discussed. Early investigations confirmed genetic bases to dental caries, periodontal diseases and malocclusion, but research findings have had little impact on clinical practice. The complex multifactorial aetiologies of these conditions, together with methodological problems, have limited progress until recently. Present studies are clarifying previously unrecognized genetic and phenotypic heterogeneities and attempting to unravel the complex interactions between genes and environment by applying new statistical modelling approaches to twin and family data. Linkage studies using highly polymorphic DNA markers are providing a means of locating candidate genes, including quantitative trait loci (QTL). In future, as knowledge increases; it should be possible to implement preventive strategies for those genetically-predisposed individuals who are identified to be at risk.

  11. 1, 2, 3, 4: Infusing Quantitative Literacy into Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Momsen, Jennifer L.; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A.; Ebert-May, Diane; Long, Tammy M.; Wyse, Sara; Linton, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Biology of the twenty-first century is an increasingly quantitative science. Undergraduate biology education therefore needs to provide opportunities for students to develop fluency in the tools and language of quantitative disciplines. Quantitative literacy (QL) is important for future scientists as well as for citizens, who need to interpret numeric information and data-based claims regarding nearly every aspect of daily life. To address the need for QL in biology education, we incorporated quantitative concepts throughout a semester-long introductory biology course at a large research university. Early in the course, we assessed the quantitative skills that students bring to the introductory biology classroom and found that students had difficulties in performing simple calculations, representing data graphically, and articulating data-driven arguments. In response to students' learning needs, we infused the course with quantitative concepts aligned with the existing course content and learning objectives. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by significant improvement in the quality of students' graphical representations of biological data. Infusing QL in introductory biology presents challenges. Our study, however, supports the conclusion that it is feasible in the context of an existing course, consistent with the goals of college biology education, and promotes students' development of important quantitative skills. PMID:20810965

  12. 1, 2, 3, 4: infusing quantitative literacy into introductory biology.

    PubMed

    Speth, Elena Bray; Momsen, Jennifer L; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A; Ebert-May, Diane; Long, Tammy M; Wyse, Sara; Linton, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Biology of the twenty-first century is an increasingly quantitative science. Undergraduate biology education therefore needs to provide opportunities for students to develop fluency in the tools and language of quantitative disciplines. Quantitative literacy (QL) is important for future scientists as well as for citizens, who need to interpret numeric information and data-based claims regarding nearly every aspect of daily life. To address the need for QL in biology education, we incorporated quantitative concepts throughout a semester-long introductory biology course at a large research university. Early in the course, we assessed the quantitative skills that students bring to the introductory biology classroom and found that students had difficulties in performing simple calculations, representing data graphically, and articulating data-driven arguments. In response to students' learning needs, we infused the course with quantitative concepts aligned with the existing course content and learning objectives. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by significant improvement in the quality of students' graphical representations of biological data. Infusing QL in introductory biology presents challenges. Our study, however, supports the conclusion that it is feasible in the context of an existing course, consistent with the goals of college biology education, and promotes students' development of important quantitative skills.

  13. Nutritional Aspects of Dysphagia Management.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, C; Brito-de la Fuente, E; Clavé, P; Costa, A; Assegehegn, G

    This chapter describes the nutritional aspects of dysphagia management by starting with the definition of these two conditions (dysphagia and malnutrition) that share three main clinical characteristics: (a) their prevalence is very high, (b) they can lead to severe complications, and (c) they are frequently underrecognized and neglected conditions. From an anatomical standpoint, dysphagia can result from oropharyngeal and/or esophageal causes; from a pathophysiological perspective, dysphagia can be caused by organic or structural diseases (either benign or malignant) or diseases causing impaired physiology (mainly motility and/or perception disorders). This chapter gathers up-to-date information on the screening and diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia, the consequences of dysphagia (aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and dehydration), and on the nutritional management of dysphagic patients. Concerning this last topic, this chapter reviews the rheological aspects of swallowing and dysphagia (including shear and elongational flows) and its influence on the characteristics of the enteral nutrition for dysphagia management (solid/semisolid foods and thickened liquids; ready-to-use oral nutritional supplements and thickening powders), with special focus on the real characteristics of the bolus after mixing with human saliva. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ethical aspects on rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Luis A; Galindo, Gilberto Cely

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss several of the most relevant subjects related to ethics on Rare Diseases. Some general aspects are discussed such as the socio-psychological problems that confront the patients and their families that finally lead to marginalization and exclusion of patients affected by these diseases from the health programs, even in wealthy countries. Then we address problems related to diagnosis and some ethical aspects of newborn screening, prenatal, pre-implantation diagnosis and reference centers, as well as some conditions that should be met by the persons and institutions performing such tasks. Alternatives of solutions for the most critical situations are proposed. Subsequently the orphan drugs subject is discussed not only from the availability point of view, prizes, industrial practices, and purchasing power in developed and developing societies. The research related to rare disease in children and other especially vulnerable conditions, the need for informed consent, review boards or ethics comities, confidentiality of the information, biobanks and pharmacogenetics are discussed.

  15. Mechanical aspects of CO₂ angiography.

    PubMed

    Corazza, Ivan; Rossi, Pier Luca; Feliciani, Giacomo; Pisani, Luca; Zannoli, Sebastiano; Zannoli, Romano

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to clarify some physical-mechanical aspects involved in the carbon dioxide angiography procedure (CO₂ angiography), with a particular attention to a possible damage of the vascular wall. CO₂ angiography is widely used on patients with iodine intolerance. The injection of a gaseous element, in most cases manually performed, requires a long training period. Automatic systems allow better control of the injection and the study of the mechanical behaviour of the gas. CO₂ injections have been studied by using manual and automatic systems. Pressures, flows and jet shapes have been monitored by using a cardiovascular mock. Photographic images of liquid and gaseous jet have been recorded in different conditions, and the vascular pressure rises during injection have been monitored. The shape of the liquid jet during the catheter washing phase is straight in the catheter direction and there is no jet during gas injection. Gas bubbles are suddenly formed at the catheter's hole and move upwards: buoyancy is the only governing phenomenon and no bubbles fragmentation is detected. The pressure rise in the vessel depends on the injection pressure and volume and in some cases of manual injection it may double the basal vascular pressure values. CO₂ angiography is a powerful and safe procedure which diffusion will certainly increase, although some aspects related to gas injection and chamber filling are not jet well known. The use of an automatic system permits better results, shorter training period and limitation of vascular wall damage risk.

  16. Terminological aspects of data elements

    SciTech Connect

    Strehlow, R.A. ); Kenworthey, W.H. Jr. ); Schuldt, R.E. )

    1991-01-01

    The creation and display of data comprise a process that involves a sequence of steps requiring both semantic and systems analysis. An essential early step in this process is the choice, definition, and naming of data element concepts and is followed by the specification of other needed data element concept attributes. The attributes and the values of data element concept remain associated with them from their birth as a concept to a generic data element that serves as a template for final application. Terminology is, therefore, centrally important to the entire data creation process. Smooth mapping from natural language to a database is a critical aspect of database, and consequently, it requires terminology standardization from the outset of database work. In this paper the semantic aspects of data elements are analyzed and discussed. Seven kinds of data element concept information are considered and those that require terminological development and standardization are identified. The four terminological components of a data element are the hierarchical type of a concept, functional dependencies, schematas showing conceptual structures, and definition statements. These constitute the conventional role of terminology in database design. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Tularaemia: clinical aspects in Europe.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Max; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2016-01-01

    Tularaemia is a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium. Typically, human and animal infections are caused by F tularensis subspecies tularensis (type A) strains mainly in Canada and USA, and F tularensis subspecies holarctica (type B) strains throughout the northern hemisphere, including Europe. In the past, the epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic aspects of tularaemia reported in the English medical literature were mainly those that had been reported in the USA, where the disease was first described. Tularaemia has markedly changed in the past decade, and a large number of studies have provided novel data for the disease characteristics in Europe. In this Review we aim to emphasise the specific and variable aspects of tularaemia in different European countries. In particular, two natural lifecycles of F tularensis have been described in this continent, although not fully characterised, which are associated with different modes of transmission, clinical features, and public health burdens of tularaemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigating legal aspects of cyberbullying.

    PubMed

    Paul, Simone; Smith, Peter K; Blumberg, Herbert H

    2012-11-01

    In the UK schools are required by law to protect students from bullying; the responsibility of teachers to govern such behaviour has been extended outside the school setting to include cyberbullying. In this investigation, cyberbullying in secondary education is explored from the student perspective using a qualitative method of enquiry. Reported awareness and understanding about the legal aspects of cyberbullying are investigated; consideration is given to legislation, cybercrime, children's rights, school sanctions and safeguarding responsibilities. A total of 197 male and female students aged between 11 and 14 years old participated. Despite the availability of information on guidelines and legislation at national, local, and school level, this does not appear to have reached ground level of the individual student. There is a considerable gap between what students should know and what they report to be aware of with regard to legal aspects of cyberbullying. To address concerns of keeping up with the pace of change in cyberbullying, a collaborative approach is required with young people and adults sharing expertise.

  19. Theoretical foundations for a quantitative approach to paleogenetics. I, II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that by neglecting the phenomena of multiple hits, back mutation, and chance coincidence errors larger than 100% can be introduced in the calculated value of the average number of nucleotide base differences to be expected between two homologous polynucleotides. Mathematical formulas are derived to correct quantitatively for these effects. It is pointed out that the effects change materially the quantitative aspects of phylogenics, such as the length of the legs of the trees. A number of problems are solved without approximation.-

  20. Practical aspects in surface biopotential electrode placement for smart clothing: A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyadi, Indra H.; Haueisen, Jens; Supriyanto, Eko

    2017-02-01

    In addition to physiological aspects, placement of surface biopotential electrodes for smart clothing should consider practical aspects due to their dynamic application environment. This study is aimed at finding the best places to put the electrode on areas where the measurement is practically reliable. Calculation was performed by using three practical aspects: 1) skin-shirt gap; 2) shirt movement, and 4) regional sweat rate. We employed 3DS Max software to simulate shirt behavior. The simulation result showed that generally practical satisfaction degrees are higher in the posterior. The quantitative approach may help smart clothing designers to choose the locations to place electrodes.

  1. Biophysical Aspects of Spindle Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadifar, Reza; Baer, Charlie; Needleman, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    The continual propagation of genetic material from one generation to the next is one of the most basic characteristics of all organisms. In eukaryotes, DNA is segregated into the two daughter cells by a highly dynamic, self-organizing structure called the mitotic spindle. Mitotic spindles can show remarkable variability between tissues and organisms, but there is currently little understanding of the biophysical and evolutionary basis of this diversity. We are studying how spontaneous mutations modify cell division during nematode development. By comparing the mutational variation - the raw material of evolution - with the variation present in nature, we are investigating how the mitotic spindle is shaped over the course of evolution. This combination of quantitative genetics and cellular biophysics gives insight into how the structure and dynamics of the spindle is formed through selection, drift, and biophysical constraints.

  2. Scaling Aspects of Lymphocyte Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Perelson, Alan S.; Wiegel, Frederik W.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the long lived pool of B and T cells that recirculate through blood, tissues and the lymphatic system of an animal with body mass M. We derive scaling rules (allometric relations) for: (1) the rate of production of mature lymphocytes; (2) the accumulation of lymphocytes in the tissues; (3) the flux of lymphocytes through the lymphatic system; (4) the number of lymph nodes, (5) the number of lymphocytes per clone within a lymph node, and (6) the total number of lymphocytes within a lymph node. Mass-dependent aspects of immune learning and of the immunological self are shown to be not very significant. Our treatment is somewhat heuristic and aims at a combination of immunological data with recent progress in biological scaling. PMID:19084024

  3. Biomedical aspects of artificial gravity.

    PubMed

    Vil-Viliams, I F; Kotovskaya, A R; Shipov, A A

    1997-07-01

    Artificial gravity (AG) is the basic challenge for space biology and medicine. The importance of this problem is associated with the fact that duration of the space missions will become progressively longer, but the presently available countermeasures do not provide reason enough to predict the human health safety during space missions of any duration. The creation of AG could be an efficient method for removing the negative effects of microgravity. Two principle methods of generating AG, rotation of space system (SS) and building of short arm centrifuge (SAC), have been proposed. The purpose of the present work is to review the biomedical aspects of AG in the context of its use in long-term space missions.

  4. Ethical aspects of personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Bendelow, Gillian

    2010-11-01

    To review recent literature around the controversial diagnosis of personality disorder, and to assess the ethical aspects of its status as a medical disorder. The diagnostic currency of personality disorder as a psychiatric/medical disorder has a longstanding history of ethical and social challenges through critiques of the medicalization of deviance. More recently controversies by reflexive physicians around the inclusion of the category in the forthcoming revisions of International Classification of Diseases and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders classifications reflect the problems of value-laden criteria, with the diagnostic category being severely challenged from within psychiatry as well as from without. The clinical diagnostic criteria for extremely value-laden psychiatric conditions such as personality disorder need to be analyzed through the lens of values-based medicine, as well as through clinical evidence, as the propensity for political and sociolegal appropriation of the categories can render their clinical and diagnostic value meaningless.

  5. Sensory aspects of movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia, Tourette’s syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed. PMID:24331796

  6. [Clinical aspects of witchcraft delusions].

    PubMed

    Pashkovskiĭ, V E

    2005-01-01

    To distinguish clinical variants and to specify nosologic entity of witchcraft delusions, 69 patients (10 males, aged 15-72 years) have been examined. It was found that witchcraft delusions exist in passive and active forms. In a passive form, the patient is sure that unknown (mystic) power damaged him/her; in an active form the patient, possessing a gift for unusual abilities, can influence the others (bewitches, heals, etc). Five clinical syndromes, in the structure of which the above delusions were found, namely, paranoiac-hypochondriac, hallucination-paranoid, depressive-paranoid, paraphrenic and delirious, were identified. Psychoses of schizophrenia spectrum were diagnosed in 52 patients, organic--in 8, alcoholic--in 7 and recurrent depressive disorder--in 2. Clinical significance of witchcraft delusions is closely related to its social aspect. Being combined with ideas of persecution, poisoning and damage, it results in the brutal forms of delusions defense and may be considered as an unfavorable prognostic trait.

  7. Social aspects in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Fasouliotis, S J; Schenker, J G

    1999-01-01

    In-vitro fertilization (IVF) and assisted reproductive techniques have become common practice in many countries today, regulated by established legislation, regulations or by committee-set ethical standards. The rapid evolution and progress of these techniques have revealed certain social issues that have to be addressed. The traditional heterosexual couple, nowadays, is not considered by many as the only 'IVF appropriate patient' since deviations from this pattern (single mother, lesbians) have also gained access to these treatments. Genetic material donation, age limitation, selective embryo reduction, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, surrogacy and cloning are interpreted differently in the various countries, as their definition and application are influenced by social factors, religion and law. Financial and emotional stresses are also often described in infertile couples. Information as deduced from the world literature regarding IVF regulation, as well as about the existing religious, cultural and social behaviours towards these new technologies, is presented in this article in relation to the social aspects of assisted reproduction.

  8. Sensory aspects of movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, Tourette's syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed.

  9. Psychiatric Aspects of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, G.; Desousa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical transplantation of human organs from deceased as well as living donors to sick and dying patients began after the Second World War. Over the past 50 years the transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells has become a worldwide practice which has extended, and greatly enhanced the quality of hundreds of thousands of lives. The field of transplantation medicine provides an important chance for liaison between psychiatric professionals and other transplant physicians and surgeons. The discrepancy between the ever-increasing demand for organs but the decreasing supply makes it important to evaluate and prioritize individuals who are in dire need of the organ. However, this also gives rise to certain ethical questions. The following paper discusses various psychiatric aspects of organ transplantation in general. PMID:25013589

  10. Physico - chemical aspects of electrocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S.U.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this article various important physico-chemical aspects of electrocatalysis and photo-electrocatalysis are discussed. The adiabaticity and nonadiabaticity calculations in terms of transmission coefficient have been correlated to the extent of electrocatalytic effect of various electrode materials. Chemisorption model of one electron approximation is utilized for understanding the mechanism of electrocatalysis. Electrocatalysis of oxygen evolution reaction on pervoskite is explained in terms of d -character of transition metals. Modified Anderson model of resonance tunneling has been utilized to explain the electrocatalytic effect of modified electrode. A model of electrocatalysis using the concept of multiple sites is given. A model of electrocatalysis in the presence of metal adsorbate on semiconducting electrodes are given in terms of both catalytic absorption and Schottky barrier concepts.

  11. Evolutionary Aspects of Enzyme Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Klinman, Judith P.; Kohen, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    The role of evolutionary pressure on the chemical step catalyzed by enzymes is somewhat enigmatic, in part because chemistry is not rate-limiting for many optimized systems. Herein, we present studies that examine various aspects of the evolutionary relationship between protein dynamics and the chemical step in two paradigmatic enzyme families, dihydrofolate reductases and alcohol dehydrogenases. Molecular details of both convergent and divergent evolution are beginning to emerge. The findings suggest that protein dynamics across an entire enzyme can play a role in adaptation to differing physiological conditions. The growing tool kit of kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, molecular biology, biophysics, and bioinformatics provides means to link evolutionary changes in structure-dynamics function to the vibrational and conformational states of each protein. PMID:25210031

  12. Discriminatory aspects of medical screening.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, M A

    1986-10-01

    Presently, there are few legal restrictions on the use of medical screening of workers. The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act) requires that certain medical tests be performed when workers will be exposed to specific toxic substances. The OSH Act does not, however, prohibit the use of any medical screening measure nor does it indicate what actions an employer may or may not take as a result of such information. (A notable exception is the medical removal provision of the Lead Standard). This paper discusses that protection afforded under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. This paper will demonstrate that the law has, in general, failed to take into account the discriminatory aspects of medical screening.

  13. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Brazdova, Andrea; Senechal, Helene; Peltre, Gabriel; Poncet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility. PMID:27123194

  14. Mental health aspects of disasters.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Disaster preparations and responses are incomplete without addressing the mental health aspects of disasters. Unpleasant mental states can be a natural and even adaptive human response following a disaster; however, disasters also can contribute to the development of mental illnesses and substance use disorders or exacerbate existing disorders for disaster survivors, response personnel, and even families and close contacts of survivors and responders. Disaster-related psychopathology can mimic or negatively affect other disaster-related illnesses and can impair health professionals and others who must respond to catastrophic events; however, disasters also can encourage tremendous human coping, perseverance, and resilience and can even enhance personal and collective feelings of purpose, connection, and meaning. Integrating mental health promotion and care into disaster planning and response has the potential to mitigate psychiatric and medical consequences of a disaster and may preserve the mission readiness of disaster response personnel and promote healing among communities traumatized by disaster.

  15. [New aspects of tuberculosis therapy].

    PubMed

    Haegi, V

    1975-02-22

    The introduction of ethambutol and rifampicin has modified the therapy of tuberculosis. Therapy in hospitals or sanatoria can be shortened, and intermittent regimens (once or twice weekly under supervision) are possible. Better knowledge of the side effects of particular drugs, particularly rifampicin, (such as allergic reactions in intermittent administration and reduced effect of oral contraceptives) has been gained. Instead of mere supervision, preventive chemotherapy is given in many cases such as in recently discovered fibrotic lesions and in high risk cases (silicosis, treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents)minadequate treatment may lead to functional impairment such as fibrosis and cor pulmonale. These aspects are discussed and the resultant guidelines for the treatment of tuberculosis are presented.

  16. Ergonomical aspects of anaesthetic practice

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendra Rao, RS

    2016-01-01

    Anaesthesiologist's service begins as a general physician, goes on as an investigator cum data analyser leading to the architectural planning of a forthcoming surgical event, but only after articulately convincing the subject along with his kith and kin. In the era of rapid developments in the field of medicine which includes relevant developments in anaesthetic care, an adequate work environment has to be provided to the anaesthesia team so that all anaesthetic procedures can be carried out safely and efficiently and an optimal workflow can be established in the operating room environment. Such ecological state demands an updated knowledge and ergonomics to aid him. Unfortunately, ergonomics is an area of anaesthesia that has received little attention and should be addressed through more education and training for workplace well-ness. Hence, an attempt is made to discuss few aspects on ergonomics for the interface between anaesthesiologist-machine-patient systems regarded as human-machine-system. PMID:27212716

  17. Epidemiological aspects of heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Tao, Ziqi; Wei, Peng; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the main cause of mortality in heart patients following stroke, rheumatic heart disease and myocardial infarctions. Approximately 80% of individuals succumb to CVDs, due to poor living conditions in low and middle income families and malnutrition. Infectious diseases, human immunodeficiency, tuberculosis, malaria, high blood pressure or hypertension, obesity and overweight, and nutritional disorders including smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, high salt and sugar intake, as well as other factors are responsible for CVDs and CHDs in young as well as elderly individuals. The focus of the present review are recent epidemiological aspects of CVD and CHD as well as the usefulness of a Mediterranean diet for heart patients and the prevention of heart diseases. PMID:27602082

  18. Technical aspects of fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Groenier, W.S.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief description of fuel reprocessing and some present developments which show the reliability of nuclear energy as a long-term supply. The following topics are discussed: technical reasons for reprocessing; economic reasons for reprocessing; past experience; justification for advanced reprocessing R and D; technical aspects of current reprocessing development. The present developments are mainly directed at the reprocessing of breeder reactor fuels but there are also many applications to light-water reactor fuel reprocessing. These new developments involve totally remote operation, and maintenance. To demonstrate this advanced reprocessing concept, pilot-scale demonstration facilities are planned with commercial application occurring sometime after the year 2000. (ATT)

  19. Quantitative aspects of inorganic nutrient fluxes in the Gazi Bay (Kenya): implications for coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mwashote, Benjamin M; Jumba, Isaac O

    2002-11-01

    Fluxes of dissolved inorganic nutrients: NH4+, NO2-, NO3-, PO4(3-) and Si(OH)4 from nearshore sediments of Gazi Bay were measured in situ within mangrove, seagrass and coral reef biotopes using benthic flux bell-jar chambers of cross-sectional area 0.066 m2 and volume 0.0132 m3. The objectives were: (1) to determine the influence of benthic fluxes, fluvial discharge and seasonal variations on the nutrient budget in the Bay waters; (2) to determine the effect of tidal and spatial variations on nutrient loads in the water column and (3) to establish the relative importance of the nutrient sources with regard to total community production of the Bay. The directly measured fluxes ranged from -270 to +148 micromol NH4+-N/m2/h; -60 to +63 micromol NO2(-)-N/m2/h; -79 to +41 micromol NO3(-)-N/m2/h; -79 to +75 micromol PO4(3-)-P/m2/h and +30 to +350 micromol Si(OH)4-Si/m2/h for and respectively. It was established that benthic fluxes are the major sources of dissolved inorganic NH4+, NO2- and Si(OH)4 while fluvial sources are important for NO3- and PO4(3-) into Gazi Bay waters. Seasonal variations had an appreciable effect on the PO4(3-) fluxes, N:Si ratio, river nutrient discharge, plankton productivity and important environmental factors such as salinity and temperature. Tidal and spatial variations had no significant effect on nutrient concentrations and net fluxes within the water column. The results imply that benthic fluxes are largely responsible for the nutrient dynamics of the nearshore coastal ecosystems especially where direct terrestrial inputs do not contribute significantly to the nutrient budget.

  20. Quantitative Aspects of Space Weathering: Implications for Regolith Breccia Meteorites and Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.; Keller, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Space weathering is defined as the physical and optical changes incurred by material exposed to the space environment. Through studies of lunar soils, these changes are becoming well understood. However, the effects of space weathering are dependent on the physical environment to which the host materials are exposed, and thus, the effects will likely vary from body to body. The optical effects of space weathering result from nanophase iron (npFe(sup 0)) created during micrometeorite bombardment and solar wind sputtering. In the asteroid belt, bodies are farther from the sun than our Moon, and are widely known to incur less solar wind implantation and sputtering. The velocity of impacts is smaller resulting in less melting and vaporization, and therefore fewer space weathering products. The impact rate in the asteroid belt is greater, which will result in more comminution, further diluting any weathering products. Ergo, asteroidal regoliths should contain fewer space weathering products than lunar soils. However, even very small degrees of space weathering can have dramatic consequences for the optical properties of soils. A discussion on the optical effects of space weathering is presented.

  1. Fundamental aspects in quantitative ultrasonic determination of fracture toughness: The scattering of a single ellipsoidal inhomogeneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S. W.

    1982-01-01

    The scattering of a single ellipsoidal inhomogeneity is studied via an eigenstrain approach. The displacement field is given in terms of volume integrals that involve eigenstrains that are related to mismatch in mass density and that in elastic moduli. The governing equations for these unknown eigenstrains are derived. Agreement with other approaches for the scattering problem is shown. The formulation is general and both the inhomogeneity and the host medium can be anisotrophic. The axisymmetric scattering of an ellipsoidal inhomogeneity in a linear elastic isotropic medium is given as an example. The angular and frequency dependence of the scattered displacement field, the differential and total cross sections are formally given in series expansions for the case of uniformly distributed eigenstrains.

  2. Valence Photoisomerization of 1-Ethoxycarbonyl-1H-Azepine and Its Thermal Reversion. Quantitative Aspects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-15

    addition of triplet quenchers. Sensitization v/ith fluorenone, benzophenone , or valerophenone does not affect valence isomerization. Azepine 3^acts...benzene C0T C (0.11) 0.014 0.10 benzene diene (l (0.02 - 0.08) 0.012 0.10 benzene fluorenone 6 (0.9) ɘ.0P3 9 0.09 benzene benzophenone (1.0) ɘ.003 g... benzophenone (in fact very little if any sensitization by azepine was observed). For de- -22- tails concerninn narallel irradiation and nmr amlysis for

  3. Quantitative aspects of evaluating the consequences of pollution for parasite populations and communities.

    PubMed

    Lotz, J M

    1997-09-01

    The utility of parasites as indicators of environmental health depends upon scientists' ability to understand how environmental stress may cause changes in parasite populations and communities. Predicting the changes due to pollution calls for dynamic models and experimentally determined knowledge of the consequences of pollution on the parameters of the model. Through an interplay of modeling, laboratory experiments, and field comparisons scientists can develop a theory of pollution and parasites and perhaps use it to assess the impact of pollution. To develop a theoretical framework for the effects of pollution on host-parasite relationships will require an identification of the appropriate scale and a determination of whether the host and parasite populations should be treated as open and recruitment-driven or closed and reproduction-driven. A theory can then be developed using epidemiology models. Those models are divided into prevalence models that track the prevalence of infection and abundance models that track the number of parasites per host. Whether a deterministic model or a stochastic counterpart should be used depends upon the scale but generally a stochastic model will give a more realistic picture. Mimicking the variability inherent in natural systems is the goal of stochastic models. The models emphasize that field tests of their predictions can only be made by studies designed with extensive replication of samples from reference and stressed sites.

  4. Quantitative aspects of informed consent: considering the dose response curve when estimating quantity of information.

    PubMed

    Lynöe, N; Hoeyer, K

    2005-12-01

    Information is usually supposed to be a prerequisite for people making decisions on whether or not to participate in a clinical trial. Previously conducted studies and research ethics scandals indicate that participants have sometimes lacked important pieces of information. Over the past few decades the quantity of information believed to be adequate has increased significantly, and in some instances a new maxim seems to be in place: the more information, the better the ethics in terms of respecting a participant's autonomy. The authors hypothesise that the dose-response curve from pharmacology or toxicology serves as a model to illustrate that a large amount of written information does not equal optimality. Using the curve as a pedagogical analogy when teaching ethics to students in clinical sciences, and also in engaging in dialogue with research institutions, may promote reflection on how to adjust information in relation to the preferences of individual participants, thereby transgressing the maxim that more information means better ethics.

  5. Comparative quantitative aspects of putative neurotransmitters in the central nervous system of spiders (Arachnida: Araneida).

    PubMed

    Meyer, W; Schlesinger, C; Poehling, H M; Ruge, W

    1984-01-01

    The amounts of eight putative neurotransmitters or modulators (acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, GABA, taurine, glutamic acid, glycine) were determined from the CNS of 12 species of five different spider families (Theraphosidae, Agelenidae, Araneidae, Lycosidae, Salticidae). Comparatively high contents of acetylcholine and noradrenaline could be found in the CNS of hunting spiders, higher contents of GABA and taurine were visible in the web-building spider families, while extraordinarily high amounts of glutamic acid were confined to the Theraphosidae. The results obtained are compared with findings from other arthropod groups and the role of putative transmitters or modulators in the spider CNS is discussed in relation to behavioural differences within the families investigated.

  6. Fundamental aspects in the quantitative ultrasonic determination of fracture toughness: General equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of establishing a theoretical groundwork for experimentally-found correlations between ultrasonic and fracture toughness factors in polycrystalline metals is discussed. It is noted that the link between these material properties and ultrasonic factors are the microstructural parameters that interact with stress wave propagation during deformation and fracture. The dynamic response of material inhomogeneities and the strains and displacements they undergo under incident stress waves are considered. Dynamic strains and displacements inside and outside scatterers are treated. The underlying approach, the formulation and governing equations for the eigenstrains, and the determination of the energy due to the presence of inhomogeneities are presented. The stress wave interaction problem is presented in terms of the dynamic eigenstrain concept.

  7. Vocabulary Development in Italian Children: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Odorico, Laura; Carubbi, Stefania; Salerni, Nicoletta; Calvo, Vicenzo

    2001-01-01

    Vocabulary development of a sample of 42 Italian children was evaluated through monthly administration of the Italian version of the CDI. Data collection started at age one for 32 children and a few moths later for the remaining subjects and continued until children's vocabulary reached 200 words. At fixed stages of vocabulary size, individual…

  8. Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects of L1 (Swedish) and L2 (English) Idiom Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Monica

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, 15 first term university students were faced with 80 context-based idioms in English (L2) and Swedish (L1) respectively, 30 of which were in the source domain of animals, commonly used in both languages, and asked to explain their meaning. The idioms were of varying frequency and transparency. Three main research…

  9. Some qualitative and quantitative aspects of the fast-rotating clinostat as a research tool.

    PubMed

    Briegleb, W

    1992-10-01

    In 1958 the geneticist H.J. Muller proposed an extension of the principle of the (slow) plant clinostat which --to a certain extent--abolishes g effects on plant growth (geotropism). Muller predicted that a feeling of weightlessness would be experienced by a human being attached to a clinostat platform, the rotation speed of which is enhanced compared to that of the plant clinostat. This method (called fast-rotating or fast clinostat) was developed by the author in the mid 1960s to investigate the effects of weightlessness on small living objects. This chapter describes the method qualitatively on the basis of a macroscopic functional model and of empirical results obtained using a fast-rotating clinostat microscope. Some practical hints in using the slow and fast clinostat principles are given.

  10. Quantitative aspects of contact allergy to chromium and exposure to chrome-tanned leather.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Malene Barré; Rydin, Stefan; Menné, Torkil; Duus Johansen, Jeanne

    2002-09-01

    The potential of trivalent and hexavalent chromium to induce and elicit allergic contact dermatitis and the degree of chromium exposure from leather products are reviewed. Chromium dermatitis is often due to exposure in the occupational environment, with cement being one of the most common chromium sources. However, consumer products such as chromium(III)-tanned leather products are also an important source of chromium exposure. Apart from Cr(III), which is used for tanning, leather often also contains trace amounts of Cr(VI), which is formed by oxidation of Cr(III) during the tanning process. In a recent study of the Cr(VI) content of leather products bought on the Danish market, 35% of such articles had a Cr(VI) content above the detection limit of 3 p.p.m., ranging from 3.6 p.p.m. to 14.7 p.p.m. Leachable Cr(III) was detected at levels of 430-980 p.p.m. An examination of available dose-response studies showed that exposure to occluded patch test concentrations of 7-45 p.p.m. Cr(VI) elicits a reaction in 10% of the chromium-sensitive patients. When reviewing repeated open exposure studies, it is seen that either exposure to 5 p.p.m. Cr(VI) in the presence of 1% sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or exposure to 10 p.p.m. Cr(VI) alone both elicit eczema in chromium-sensitive patients. The eliciting capacity of Cr(III) has not been systematically investigated but, compared to Cr(VI), much higher concentrations are needed to elicit eczema.

  11. Vocabulary Development in Italian Children: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Odorico, Laura; Carubbi, Stefania; Salerni, Nicoletta; Calvo, Vicenzo

    2001-01-01

    Vocabulary development of a sample of 42 Italian children was evaluated through monthly administration of the Italian version of the CDI. Data collection started at age one for 32 children and a few moths later for the remaining subjects and continued until children's vocabulary reached 200 words. At fixed stages of vocabulary size, individual…

  12. Some quantitative aspects of the labelling of proteins with 125I by the iodine monochloride method

    PubMed Central

    Ceska, M.; Sjödin, A. V.; Grossmüller, F.

    1971-01-01

    The labelling of proteins by the iodine monochloride method was studied by using a mathematical model. The equations used were primarily derived from the mass law equation of the isotopic exchange reaction between [125I]iodide and iodine monochloride. For convenient application, all equations were programmed into a computing desk-top calculator. To support the validity of the theoretical model, a series of iodinations of insulin were performed under various labelling conditions. The results of these experiments compare well with the theoretically derived values. Deviations from the theoretical values occurring at molar ratios of [125I]iodide to iodine monochloride < 0.1 and > 4.0 are explained and suggestions made about how to prevent them. The mathematical model was used to simulate the isotopic exchange, and the iodination reaction under various conditions, to study (a) the influence of the amount of [125I]iodide on the amount of [125I]iodine monochloride formed, (b) the influence of the specific radioactivity of [125I]iodide on the amount of [125I]iodine monochloride formed, and (c) the influence of the specific radioactivity of [125I]iodide on the number of millicuries needed for labelling to a desired extent. PMID:5116527

  13. Quantitative and morphological aspects of Unicryl versus Lowicryl K4M embedding in immunoelectron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Bogers, J J; Nibbeling, H A; Deelder, A M; van Marck, E A

    1996-01-01

    In this study we compared the recently commercialized electron microscopy embedding resin Unicryl with the well-known resin Lowicryl K4M with regard to morphological and immunohistochemical preservation properties. The standard embedding procedure recommended by the manufacturer for the use of Unicryl resulted in considerable morphological alterations of the tissue, with the appearance of large gaps in and between the cells of the examined tissue. Morphometric analysis pointed to a swelling of the extracellular matrix as the main cause of these morphological artifacts. A slight modification in the protocol to correct this artifact is proposed and tested. Immunohistochemically, tissue embedded in Unicryl resulted in a significantly stronger immunogold labeling than identical tissue embedded in Lowicryl K4M. From the results of this technical study, it can be concluded that Unicryl embedding is a valuable new tool to supplement the available techniques for immunoelectron microscopic studies.

  14. Psychosocial aspects of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    De Niet, J E; Naiman, D I

    2011-12-01

    Rates of childhood obesity are increasing at alarming rates worldwide. This is especially alarming as obesity is associated with many physical and psychological consequences. A great number of studies indicate that obese children have an impaired psychological well-being (e.g., depression, self-esteem, and quality of life) compared to their non-overweight peers. There has been an overwhelming amount of research conducted in this area over the past few decades, and as such, this paper provides a summarized overview of the vast trove of available information on the psychosocial aspects of childhood obesity. In this paper we provide a summarized overview of: 1) psychosocial aspects that contribute to the onset of childhood obesity; 2) psychosocial consequences of childhood obesity; and 3) familial-based lifestyle behavior modification interventions for treating childhood obesity and its treatment success. Although it seems obvious that obese children and adolescents would likely be at higher risk for psychological problems, the mediating factors in the relationship between psychological problems and obesity are still not well established. Obesity is a complex disorder with an equally complex etiology, and is thus associated with complex behaviors and outcomes that make it difficult to study in children. It has been indicated that family-based lifestyle interventions can improve psychological well-being in obese children; however, not all children profit from these interventions. Interventions aimed at improving treatment results need further investigation. For example, interventions targeted specifically at groups that tend to be less successful in weight-loss programs and interventions providing long-term support to these individuals are recommended.

  15. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  16. Quantitative environmental risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klovning, J.; Nilsen, E.F.

    1995-12-31

    According to regulations relating to implementation and rise of risk analysis in the petroleum activities issued by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, it is mandatory for an operator on the Norwegian Continental Shelf to establish acceptance criteria for environmental risk in the activities and carry out environmental risk analysis. This paper presents a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} method for environmental risk analysis developed by the company. The objective has been to assist the company to meet rules and regulations and to assess and describe the environmental risk in a systematic manner. In the environmental risk analysis the most sensitive biological resource in the affected area is used to assess the environmental damage. The analytical method is based on the methodology for quantitative risk analysis related to loss of life. In addition it incorporates the effect of seasonal fluctuations in the environmental risk evaluations. The paper is describing the function of the main analytical sequences exemplified through an analysis of environmental risk related to exploration drilling in an environmental sensitive area on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

  17. Programmable Quantitative DNA Nanothermometers.

    PubMed

    Gareau, David; Desrosiers, Arnaud; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2016-07-13

    Developing molecules, switches, probes or nanomaterials that are able to respond to specific temperature changes should prove of utility for several applications in nanotechnology. Here, we describe bioinspired strategies to design DNA thermoswitches with programmable linear response ranges that can provide either a precise ultrasensitive response over a desired, small temperature interval (±0.05 °C) or an extended linear response over a wide temperature range (e.g., from 25 to 90 °C). Using structural modifications or inexpensive DNA stabilizers, we show that we can tune the transition midpoints of DNA thermometers from 30 to 85 °C. Using multimeric switch architectures, we are able to create ultrasensitive thermometers that display large quantitative fluorescence gains within small temperature variation (e.g., > 700% over 10 °C). Using a combination of thermoswitches of different stabilities or a mix of stabilizers of various strengths, we can create extended thermometers that respond linearly up to 50 °C in temperature range. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility, robustness, and efficiency of these programmable DNA thermometers by monitoring temperature change inside individual wells during polymerase chain reactions. We discuss the potential applications of these programmable DNA thermoswitches in various nanotechnology fields including cell imaging, nanofluidics, nanomedecine, nanoelectronics, nanomaterial, and synthetic biology.

  18. Quantitative Electron Nanodiffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, John

    2015-01-30

    This Final report summarizes progress under this award for the final reporting period 2002 - 2013 in our development of quantitive electron nanodiffraction to materials problems, especially devoted to atomistic processes in semiconductors and electronic oxides such as the new artificial oxide multilayers, where our microdiffraction is complemented with energy-loss spectroscopy (ELNES) and aberration-corrected STEM imaging (9). The method has also been used to map out the chemical bonds in the important GaN semiconductor (1) used for solid state lighting, and to understand the effects of stacking sequence variations and interfaces in digital oxide superlattices (8). Other projects include the development of a laser-beam Zernike phase plate for cryo-electron microscopy (5) (based on the Kapitza-Dirac effect), work on reconstruction of molecular images using the scattering from many identical molecules lying in random orientations (4), a review article on space-group determination for the International Tables on Crystallography (10), the observation of energy-loss spectra with millivolt energy resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution from individual point defects in an alkali halide, a review article for the Centenary of X-ray Diffration (17) and the development of a new method of electron-beam lithography (12). We briefly summarize here the work on GaN, on oxide superlattice ELNES, and on lithography by STEM.

  19. Quantitative Rheological Model Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan; Ewoldt, Randy

    2014-11-01

    The more parameters in a rheological the better it will reproduce available data, though this does not mean that it is necessarily a better justified model. Good fits are only part of model selection. We employ a Bayesian inference approach that quantifies model suitability by balancing closeness to data against both the number of model parameters and their a priori uncertainty. The penalty depends upon prior-to-calibration expectation of the viable range of values that model parameters might take, which we discuss as an essential aspect of the selection criterion. Models that are physically grounded are usually accompanied by tighter physical constraints on their respective parameters. The analysis reflects a basic principle: models grounded in physics can be expected to enjoy greater generality and perform better away from where they are calibrated. In contrast, purely empirical models can provide comparable fits, but the model selection framework penalizes their a priori uncertainty. We demonstrate the approach by selecting the best-justified number of modes in a Multi-mode Maxwell description of PVA-Borax. We also quantify relative merits of the Maxwell model relative to powerlaw fits and purely empirical fits for PVA-Borax, a viscoelastic liquid, and gluten.

  20. Self-Consciousness and Aspects of Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Jonathan M.; Briggs, Stephen R.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between public and private self-consciousness and social and personal aspects of identity. Public self-consciousness correlated more strongly with social than with personal aspects of identity, and private self-consciousness correlated more strongly with personal than with social aspects. Discusses implications for…

  1. Is Judgement of Biotechnological Ethical Aspects Related to High School Students' Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crne-Hladnik, Helena; Hladnik, Ales; Javornik, Branka; Kosmelj, Katarina; Peklaj, Cirila

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative studies of various aspects of the perception of biotechnology were conducted among 469 Slovenian high school students of average age 17 years. Our research aimed to explore relationships among students' pre-knowledge of molecular and human genetics, and their attitudes to four specific biotechnological applications.…

  2. Is Judgement of Biotechnological Ethical Aspects Related to High School Students' Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crne-Hladnik, Helena; Hladnik, Ales; Javornik, Branka; Kosmelj, Katarina; Peklaj, Cirila

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative studies of various aspects of the perception of biotechnology were conducted among 469 Slovenian high school students of average age 17 years. Our research aimed to explore relationships among students' pre-knowledge of molecular and human genetics, and their attitudes to four specific biotechnological applications.…

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Selected Mechanical Aspects of the Ice Skating Stride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, G. Wayne

    This study quantitatively analyzes selected aspects of the skating strides of above-average and below-average ability skaters. Subproblems were to determine how stride length and stride rate are affected by changes in skating velocity, to ascertain whether the basic assumption that stride length accurately approximates horizontal movement of the…

  4. Which Aspects of the English Language Do Distance Learners Find Difficult?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teoh, George Boon Sai; Lin, Agnes Liau Wei; Belaja, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the findings of a research carried out on distance learners at the School of Distance Education (SDE), University Sains Malaysia (USM). The study was explorative in nature with the purpose identifying the aspects of the English language which distance learners found difficult to learn. A quantitative survey questionnaire design…

  5. Quantitative Literacy: Geosciences and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.; McCallum, W. G.

    2002-12-01

    Quantitative literacy seems like such a natural for the geosciences, right? The field has gone from its origin as a largely descriptive discipline to one where it is hard to imagine failing to bring a full range of mathematical tools to the solution of geological problems. Although there are many definitions of quantitative literacy, we have proposed one that is analogous to the UNESCO definition of conventional literacy: "A quantitatively literate person is one who, with understanding, can both read and represent quantitative information arising in his or her everyday life." Central to this definition is the concept that a curriculum for quantitative literacy must go beyond the basic ability to "read and write" mathematics and develop conceptual understanding. It is also critical that a curriculum for quantitative literacy be engaged with a context, be it everyday life, humanities, geoscience or other sciences, business, engineering, or technology. Thus, our definition works both within and outside the sciences. What role do geoscience faculty have in helping students become quantitatively literate? Is it our role, or that of the mathematicians? How does quantitative literacy vary between different scientific and engineering fields? Or between science and nonscience fields? We will argue that successful quantitative literacy curricula must be an across-the-curriculum responsibility. We will share examples of how quantitative literacy can be developed within a geoscience curriculum, beginning with introductory classes for nonmajors (using the Mauna Loa CO2 data set) through graduate courses in inverse theory (using singular value decomposition). We will highlight six approaches to across-the curriculum efforts from national models: collaboration between mathematics and other faculty; gateway testing; intensive instructional support; workshops for nonmathematics faculty; quantitative reasoning requirement; and individual initiative by nonmathematics faculty.

  6. Quantitative Spectroscopy of Deneb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Florian; Przybilla, N.

    We use the visually brightest A-type supergiant Deneb (A2 Ia) as benchmark for testing a spectro- scopic analysis technique developed for quantitative studies of BA-type supergiants. Our NLTE spectrum synthesis technique allows us to derive stellar parameters and elemental abundances with unprecedented accuracy. The study is based on a high-resolution and high-S/N spectrum obtained with the Echelle spectrograph FOCES on the Calar Alto 2.2 m telescope. Practically all inconsistencies reported in earlier studies are resolved. A self-consistent view of Deneb is thus obtained, allowing us to discuss its evolutionary state in detail by comparison with the most recent generation of evolution models for massive stars. The basic atmospheric parameters Teff = 8525 ± 75 K and log g = 1.10 ± 0.05 dex (cgs) and the distance imply the following fundamental parameters for Deneb: M spec = 17 ± 3 M⊙ , L = 1.77 ± 0.29 · 105 L⊙ and R = 192 ± 16 R⊙ . The derived He and CNO abundances indicate mixing with nuclear processed matter. The high N/C ratio of 4.64 ± 1.39 and a N/O ratio of 0.88 ± 0.07 (mass fractions) could in principle be explained by evolutionary models with initially very rapid rotation. A mass of ˜ 22 M⊙ is implied for the progenitor on the zero-age main se- quence, i.e. it was a late O-type star. Significant mass-loss has occurred, probably enhanced by pronounced centrifugal forces. The observational constraints favour a scenario for the evolu- tion of Deneb where the effects of rotational mixing may be amplified by an interaction with a magnetic field. Analogous analyses of such highly luminous BA-type supergiants will allow for precision studies of different galaxies in the Local Group and beyond.

  7. Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.; Fecht, B.A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of the MEASUREMENT OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  8. Quantitative Redox Imaging Software.

    PubMed

    Fricker, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    A wealth of fluorescent reporters and imaging systems are now available to characterize dynamic physiological processes in living cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. The most reliable probes for quantitative measurements show shifts in their excitation or emission spectrum, rather than just a change in intensity, as spectral shifts are independent of optical path length, illumination intensity, probe concentration, and photobleaching, and they can be easily determined by ratiometric measurements at two wavelengths. A number of ratiometric fluorescent reporters, such as reduction-oxidation-sensitive green fluorescent protein (roGFP), have been developed that respond to the glutathione redox potential and allow redox imaging in vivo. roGFP and its derivatives can be expressed in the cytoplasm or targeted to different organelles, giving fine control of measurements from sub-cellular compartments. Furthermore, roGFP can be imaged with probes for other physiological parameters, such as reactive oxygen species or mitochondrial membrane potential, to give multi-channel, multi-dimensional 4D (x,y,z,t) images. Live cell imaging approaches are needed to capture transient or highly spatially localized physiological behavior from intact, living specimens, which are often not accessible by other biochemical or genetic means. The next challenge is to be able to extract useful data rapidly from such large (GByte) images with due care given to the assumptions used during image processing. This article describes a suite of software programs, available for download, that provide intuitive user interfaces to conduct multi-channel ratio imaging, or alternative analysis methods such as pixel-population statistics or image segmentation and object-based ratio analysis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 752-762.

  9. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishko, C. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Fecht, B. A.

    The goal of the Measurement of Chemiluminescence project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  10. [Immunogenetic aspects of autism. Review].

    PubMed

    Pardo-Govea, Tatiana; Solís-Añez, Ernesto

    2009-09-01

    Autism is a generalized or pervasive developmental disorder that affects about five in ten thousand children worldwide (5/10.000). In Maracaibo the incidence is 1.1/1000, with a ratio of male/female, 4:1. The autistic disorder is defined entirely based on the impairment in three areas: 1) Impairment of social interaction, 2) Impairment in communication and 3) Stereotyped and repetitive behavior. Autism is a disorder with a large genetic component and a oligogenic inheritance model has been proposed. Quantitative and qualitative disturbances of certain components of the immune system in patients with autism have been used as endophenotype, one of the strategies used to identify candidate genes for susceptibility to autism. On the other hand the hypersensitivity to specific groups of foods such as casein and gluten has become clear, which has led to the postulation of immunogenetics theories in autism, which mainly involve genes of the histocompatibility major complex. Although it has not been confirmed that immunogenetics factors could be involved in the etiopathogenesis of autism, several studies have shown the influence of the complex Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) HLA DR4, DR13, DR11, A2 and others genes in the clinical status, risk and therapeutic response of some psychiatric disorders. The lack of literature demands a greater number of studies related to different ethnic groups and the participation of HLA, as well as the importance of this complex in the pathogenesis of psychiatric illness.

  11. Plant Physiological Aspects of Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, E.; Fan, T.W-M.; Higashi, R.M.; Silk, W.K.

    2002-07-10

    The element silicon, Si, represents an anomaly in plant physiology (Epstein, 1994, 1999b). Plants contain the element in amounts comparable to those of such macronutrient elements as phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, viz. at tissue concentrations (dry weight basis) of about 0.1-10%, although both lower and higher values may be encountered. In some plants, such as rice and sugarcane, Si may be the mineral element present in largest amount. In much of plant physiological research, however, Si is considered a nonentity. Thus, not a single formulation of the widely used nutrient solutions includes Si. Experimental plants grown in these solutions are therefore abnormally low in their content of the element, being able to obtain only what Si is present as an unavoidable contaminant of the nutrient salts used, and from the experimental environment and their own seeds. The reason for the astonishing discrepancy between the prominence of Si in plants and its neglect in much of the enterprise of plant physiological research is that Si does not qualify as an ''essential'' element. Ever since the introduction of the solution culture method in the middle of the last century (Epstein, 1999a, b) it has been found that higher plants can grow in nutrient solutions in the formulation of which Si is not included. The only exceptions are the Equisitaceae (horsetails or scouring rushes), for which Si is a quantitatively major essential element.

  12. Understanding quantitative research: part 2.

    PubMed

    Hoare, Zoë; Hoe, Juanita

    This article, which is the second in a two-part series, provides an introduction to understanding quantitative research, basic statistics and terminology used in research articles. Understanding statistical analysis will ensure that nurses can assess the credibility and significance of the evidence reported. This article focuses on explaining common statistical terms and the presentation of statistical data in quantitative research.

  13. Workshop on quantitative dynamic stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.

    1988-04-01

    This document discusses the development of quantitative simulation models for the investigation of geologic systems. The selection of variables, model verification, evaluation, and future directions in quantitative dynamic stratigraphy (QDS) models are detailed. Interdisciplinary applications, integration, implementation, and transfer of QDS are also discussed. (FI)

  14. Neuroendocrine aspects of catamenial epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Samba Reddy, Doodipala

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the neuroendocrinological aspects of catamenial epilepsy, a menstrual cycle-related seizure disorder in women with epilepsy. Catamenial epilepsy is a multifaceted neuroendocrine condition in which seizures are clustered around specific points in the menstrual cycle, most often around perimenstrual or periovulatory period. Three types of catamenial seizures (perimenstrual, periovulatory and inadequate luteal) have been identified. The molecular pathophysiology of catamenial epilepsy remains unclear. Cyclical changes in the circulating levels of estrogens and progesterone (P) play a central role in the development of catamenial epilepsy. Endogenous neurosteroids such as allopregnanolone (AP) and allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) that modulate seizure susceptibility could play a critical role in catamenial epilepsy. In addition, plasticity in GABA-A receptor subunits could play a role in the enhanced seizure susceptibility in catamenial epilepsy. P-derived neurosteroids such as AP and THDOC potentiate synaptic GABA-A receptor function and also activate extrasynaptic GABA-A receptors in the hippocampus and thus may represent endogenous regulators of catamenial seizure susceptibility. Experimental studies have shown that neurosteroids confer greater seizure protection in animal models of catamenial epilepsy, especially without evident tolerance to their actions during chronic therapy. In the recently completed NIH-sponsored, placebo controlled Phase 3 clinical trial, P therapy proved to be beneficial only in women with perimenstrual catamenial epilepsy but not in non-catamenial subjects. Neurosteroid analogs with favorable profile may be useful in the treatment of catamenial epilepsy. PMID:22579656

  15. Theoretical aspects of pollutant stress.

    PubMed

    Ballach, H J

    1998-01-01

    Symptoms of tree damage observed in Europe and overseas are often described as premature senescence. However, our own experiments with fumigated poplars have shown that the term premature senescence is misleading if undue emphasis is placed on features common to both normal and premature senescence. Consequently, the term should be replaced by a concrete description of the stress symptom noted, e.g. premature leaf loss or premature starch degradation. Such stress symptoms are usually unspecific - just like the mechanisms of stress avoidance or stress tolerance themselves. A stress model taking account of ecological, physiological and evolutionary aspects is presented; it is shown that the different stress phases are influenced by various factors, e.g. the photosynthetic capacity of the leaves. The stress reactions displayed by fumigated poplars serve as illustrations for this model. Different species of the genus Populus can be classified as more or less pure C-strategists. It is postulated that this group of plants, in particular, is disturbed by various stress parameters, such as air pollutants, if shoot growth or metabolite transport is impaired.

  16. [Multiple sclerosis: current immunological aspects].

    PubMed

    Cuevas-García, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common inflammatory, chronic and degenerative condition of the central nervous system, and represents the first cause of disability in young adults. In Mexico, 11 to 20 out of every 100 000 people suffer from this disease. The causes of multiple sclerosis remain unknown, but several theories have been proposed: the interaction of environmental factors, viral infectious factors and genetic and immune susceptibility of each individual patient, which induce an autoimmune response and promote neuronal/axonal degeneration. In this review, the immune reaction main components and neurodegeneration present in multiple sclerosis are analyzed, as well as the inflammatory cascade associated with demyelination. Available treatments' main purpose is to modulate aspects related to the adaptive immune response (B and T cells). The therapeutic challenge will be antigen-specific immune-tolerance induction, for example, with the use of tolerance protocols with peptides or DNA or nanoparticles vaccines. Future therapies should aim to control innate components (microglia, macrophages, astrocytes) and to promote remyelination. To optimize the treatment, a combined therapeutic approach targeting the control of inflammatory and neurodegenerative components of the disease and monitoring of biomarkers will be necessary.

  17. Key aspects of coronal heating

    PubMed Central

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We highlight 10 key aspects of coronal heating that must be understood before we can consider the problem to be solved. (1) All coronal heating is impulsive. (2) The details of coronal heating matter. (3) The corona is filled with elemental magnetic stands. (4) The corona is densely populated with current sheets. (5) The strands must reconnect to prevent an infinite build-up of stress. (6) Nanoflares repeat with different frequencies. (7) What is the characteristic magnitude of energy release? (8) What causes the collective behaviour responsible for loops? (9) What are the onset conditions for energy release? (10) Chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of coronal plasma. Significant progress in solving the coronal heating problem will require coordination of approaches: observational studies, field-aligned hydrodynamic simulations, large-scale and localized three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and possibly also kinetic simulations. There is a unique value to each of these approaches, and the community must strive to coordinate better. PMID:25897094

  18. Cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Andrea De; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-08-24

    We investigate cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis driven by a scalar field, and present general constraints that are independent of the particle physics model. The relevant constraints are obtained by studying the backreaction of the produced baryons on the scalar field, the cosmological expansion history after baryogenesis, and the baryon isocurvature perturbations. We show that cosmological considerations alone provide powerful constraints, especially for the minimal scenario with a quadratic scalar potential. Intriguingly, we find that for a given inflation scale, the other parameters including the reheat temperature, decoupling temperature of the baryon violating interactions, and the mass and decay constant of the scalar are restricted to lie within ranges of at most a few orders of magnitude. We also discuss possible extensions to the minimal setup, and propose two ideas for evading constraints on isocurvature perturbations: one is to suppress the baryon isocurvature with nonquadratic scalar potentials, another is to compensate the baryon isocurvature with cold dark matter isocurvature by making the scalar survive until the present.

  19. [RATIONAL ASPECTS OF BACTERIOPHAGES USE].

    PubMed

    Vakarina, A A; Kataeva, L V; Karpukhina, N F

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of existing aspects of bacteriophage use and study features of their lytic activity by using various techniques. Effect of monophages and associated bacteriophages (staphylococci, piopolyvalent and piocombined, intestiphage, pneumonia klebsiella and polyvalent klebsiella produced by "Microgen") was studied with 380 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 279 cultures of Klebsiella pneumoniae in liquid and solid nutrient media. From patients with intestinal disorder, sensitivity was analyzed to 184 strains of Salmonella genus bacteria 18 serological variants to salmonella bacteriophages, 137 strains of Escherichia coli (lactose-negative, hemolytic), as well as some members of OKA groups (21 serovars) to coli-proteic and piopolyvalent bacteriophages. Lytic ability of the piobacteriophage against Klebsiella and Proteus genus bacteria was determined. Staphylococcus aureus was sensitive to staphylococcus bacteriophage in 71.6% of cases and to piobacteriophage--in 86.15% of cases. A 100% lytic ability of salmonella bacteriophage against Salmonella spp. was established. Sensitivity of E. coli of various serogroups to coli-proteic and piobacteriophage was 66 - 100%. Klebsiella, Proteus genus bacteria were sensitive to piobacteriophage in only 35% and 43.15% of cases, respectively. A more rational use of bacteriophages is necessary: development of a technique, evaluation of sensitivity of bacteria to bacteriophage, introduction of corrections into their production (expansion of bacteriophage spectra, determination and indication of their concentration in accompanying documents).

  20. Theoretical aspects of heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Santen, R. A.

    Quantum chemical aspects of chemical bonding to metal surfaces are discussed. It is demonstrated that a Frontier Orbital Theory of chemisorption can be developed in which the group orbital local density of states at the Fermi level replaces the HOMO and LUMO interactions familiar in organic or organo-metallic chemistry. This appears to be a useful tool to describe elementary reactions at metal surfaces. Dissociation of the H2 molecule and hydrogen atom recombination is analysed in detail. Symmetry considerations can be applied. It is shown that the interaction with antisymmetric group orbitais lowers the activation energies. Such orbitais are also available at s-valence electron metal surfaces as long as the molecule interacts in bridging coordination sites. One finds that the interaction with metal d-valence electrons stabilizes coordination in the atop position. The relative contribution to bonding of metal s and d-valence electrons differs significantly for the transition metals. It is not only a function of metal-electron occupation, number, but also of the row in the periodic system in which the metal is placed. This information is used to explain the different hydrogenolysis behaviour of Ni and Pt.

  1. Aspects of Malpractice in Prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2017-06-09

    Crowns, fixed partial dentures, and removable dentures are the popular prosthetic dental restorations in current dental practice. Prosthodontic rehabilitation of the mouth, particularly in advanced and complex cases, requires careful planning, adequate clinical skills, and exacting technical standards. While a successful outcome is the ultimate goal for any prosthodontic treatment, complications, injuries, dissatisfaction, and/or failure may occur. When such events develop as a result of negligence or violation of standards of care, they are considered under the term of malpractice and may incur ethical and medico-legal implications. This paper reviews and highlights some aspects of malpractice in prosthodontics. The current state of prosthodontic malpractice on a global level will also be evaluated. Standards of prosthodontic care, current literature of prosthodontic malpractice, where and how prosthodontic malpractice occurs, and recommendations for the future are presented. A thorough understanding of what is quality prosthodontic care and what disrupts this care can be a useful guard against professional litigation and may protect patients from poor quality of dental prosthetic care. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Psychological aspects of peacekeeping operations

    PubMed Central

    Raju, M. S. V. K.

    2014-01-01

    Peacekeeping operations are but one aspect of the systems of peace that have evolved over the past seven decades in a world that is riven with violence of all kinds. With the end of cold war in the late eighties of the last century we have come to see much intrastate violence, in addition to usual interstate hostilities and war, arising out of religious, political, ethnic and economic differences between people. In the changed scenario peacekeeping operations have become complex politico-military-humanitarian efforts. A soldier, trained for conventional military operations, is obliged to participate in the unconventional operations of waging peace in alien lands often in volatile and violent situations and in the process he stands to get exposed to widely variable demands for adjustment that have the potential to bring to the fore many maladaptive responses. Peacekeeping operations also have the potential to offer opportunities for growth and resilience. India is a major player in peacekeeping activities for well over sixty years all over the world. It is necessary for the commanders and mental health professionals to understand the multifarious factors that impinge on the peacekeeping soldier's mind and the emerging patterns of responses thereof for effective management trained manpower and fulfillment of mission objectives PMID:25788805

  3. Geometrical aspects of quantum spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Pei -Ming

    1996-05-11

    Various geometrical aspects of quantum spaces are presented showing the possibility of building physics on quantum spaces. In the first chapter the authors give the motivations for studying noncommutative geometry and also review the definition of a Hopf algebra and some general features of the differential geometry on quantum groups and quantum planes. In Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 the noncommutative version of differential calculus, integration and complex structure are established for the quantum sphere S12 and the quantum complex projective space CP{sub q}(N), on which there are quantum group symmetries that are represented nonlinearly, and are respected by all the aforementioned structures. The braiding of Sq2 and CPq(N) is also described. In Chapter 4 the quantum projective geometry over the quantum projective space CPq(N) is developed. Collinearity conditions, coplanarity conditions, intersections and anharmonic ratios is described. In Chapter 5 an algebraic formulation of Reimannian geometry on quantum spaces is presented where Riemannian metric, distance, Laplacian, connection, and curvature have their quantum counterparts. This attempt is also extended to complex manifolds. Examples include the quantum sphere, the complex quantum projective space and the two-sheeted space. The quantum group of general coordinate transformations on some quantum spaces is also given.

  4. [Legal aspects of ritual circumcision].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, M; Schott, G E; Rascher, W; Bender, A W

    2009-12-01

    Female circumcision (genital mutilation) is a criminal violation of human rights under German law. Even with consent of the person to be circumcised and/or her legal representative this procedure must not be carried out since a consent to female circumcision is unethical and therefore void. As much consent as there is on female circumcision the legal situation with ritual male circumcision is very unclear. In practice and unnoticed by the public male circumcision is carried out - be it for medical or ritual reasons - without deeper-going reflexions on the clearness of the medical indication or the legal situation with ritual circumcision. From the medical aspect there are big differences between female and male circumcision but also certain parallels. Various reasons, partly founded in prejudice and misinformation, make people refrain from regarding circumcision of boys also as illegal. Contrary to the prevailing opinion male circumcision also represents a bodily harm which a doctor can only carry out after a preoperative interview and with the consent of the affected person. Since ritual male circumcision does not serve the wellbeing of a child it is not possible for the parents to give their consent to the circumcision in lieu of the child. Male circumcision is only permitted if the child has given his consent and is thus only legally permitted if the child has reached an age at which he is mature enough to understand the meaning and extent of such an action which is hardly the case before he has completed his 16 (th) year.

  5. Juvenile onset spondyloarthropathies: therapeutic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Vargas, R

    2002-01-01

    Juvenile onset spondyloarthropathy (SpA) is a term that refers to a group of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 associated inflammatory disorders affecting children under the age of 16 years, producing a continuum of clinical symptoms through adulthood. This disease is characterised by enthesopathy and arthropathy affecting the joints of the lower extremities and seronegativity for IgM rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies. Children usually present with undifferentiated SpA and progress to differentiated forms over time. Except for the prevalence of some clinical features at onset, the pathogenic and clinical aspects of juvenile onset SpAs resemble those of the adult disease. Thus application of the same or similar therapeutic measures for both juvenile and adult onset SpAs seems logical. Current treatments for juvenile onset SpA provide symptomatic improvement, but do not alter disease progression. The increased expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) in synovial tissue of patients with adult and juvenile onset SpA and its correlation with infiltration of inflammatory mediators into the synovia suggest a significant pathogenic role of this cytokine. Clinical trials of anti-TNFα antibody (infliximab) therapy in patients with adult onset SpA have demonstrated significant clinical improvement in inflammatory pain, function, disease activity, and quality of life in correlation with histological and immunohistochemical evidence of modulation of synovial inflammatory processes. These promising findings suggest that anti-TNFα therapy may confer similar benefits in patients with juvenile onset SpA. PMID:12381509

  6. Fibromyalgia: clinical and occupational aspects.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein Jr, Milton; Goldenfum, Marco Aurélio; Siena, César Augusto Fávaro

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a clinical syndrome commonly observed in daily medical practice and its etiopathogenesis is still unclear. As it is characterized by chronic musculoskeletal pain associated with several symptoms, FM may be confused with several other rheumatic and nonrheumatic diseases when they course with pictures of diffuse pain and chronic fatigue. FM treatment should be multidisciplinary, individualized, count on active participation of the patient, and based on combined pharmacological and nonpharmacological modalities. It is found both in work and non-work settings, and there is no scientific evidence in the literature showing that FM might be caused by occupation. FM seldom leads to incapacity to work. In cases where pain or fatigue do not respond to appropriate treatment, reaching significant levels, a short period away from work can be considered. As FM is a relevant subject, this review article was based on exploratory, qualitative, and bibliographic investigation, aiming to study the main clinical and occupational aspects of FM, emphasizing the theoretical-conceptual background and the experience of specialists.

  7. [Clinical aspects of corneal burns].

    PubMed

    Borderie, V

    2004-12-01

    Clinical aspects and prognosis of corneal burns mainly depend on the agent responsible for the trauma. The most severe burns are caustic burns, which should be classified as burns caused by basic agents, associated with deep and prolonged injuries, and burns caused by acidic agents, associated with more superficial injuries. At the acute stage, caustic burns induce epithelial defects, corneal edema, and ischemic necrosis of the limbus, conjunctiva, iris and ciliary body. At the early stage, reepithelialization occurs and is often associated with corneal vascularization and stromal infiltrates, followed by corneal scar formation. At the chronic stage, the following complications are possible: corneal scars, limbal stem cell insufficiency, lachrymal insufficiency, irregular astigmatism, ocular surface fibrosis, cataract, glaucoma, decreased intraocular pressure, and ocular atrophy. The Ropper-Hall classification is based on the extent of limbal ischemia. Thermal burns induce epithelial defects at the acute stage, with the more severe forms giving the same complications as caustic burns. Radiation-related burns can be caused by ultraviolet radiations (acute epithelial keratitis, pterygium, droplet-like keratitis), microwaves, infrared radiations, ionizing radiations or, laser radiations. Electrical burns are often a result of torture and give corneal stroma opacification.

  8. Some Aspects of PDC Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poláčik, Ján; Pospíšil, Jiří

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, aspects of pulsed direct current (PDC) water splitting are described. Electrolysis is a simple and well-known method to produce hydrogen. The efficiency is relatively low in normal conditions using conventional DC. PDC in electrolysis brings about many advantages. It increases efficiency of hydrogen production, and performance of the electrolyser may be smoothly controlled without compromising efficiency of the process. In our approach, ultra-short pulses are applied. This method enhances efficiency of electrical energy in the process of decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen. Efficiency depends on frequency, shape and width of the electrical pulses. Experiments proved that efficiency was increased by 2 to 8 per cent. One of the prospects of PDC electrolysis producing hydrogen is in increase of efficiency of energy storage efficiency in the hydrogen. There are strong efforts to make the electrical grid more efficient and balanced in terms of production by installing electricity storage units. Using hydrogen as a fuel decreases air pollution and amount of carbon dioxide emissions in the air. In addition to energy storage, hydrogen is also important in transportation and chemical industry.

  9. Breast Cancer 2012 - New Aspects.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, H-C; Lüftner, D; Lux, M P; Maass, N; Schütz, F; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Janni, W; Kümmel, S

    2012-07-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, however potentially promising combinations do not always achieve a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also inherited genetic properties of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Also health-economic aspects are more frequently being taken into consideration so that health-economic considerations may also play a part. This review is based on information from the recent annual congresses. The latest of these are the 34th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2011 and the ASCO Annual Meeting 2012. Among their highlights are the clinically significant results from the CLEOPATRA, BOLERO-2, EMILIA and SWOG S0226 trials on the therapy for metastatic breast cancer as well as further state-of-the-art data on the adjuvant use of bisphosphonates within the framework of the ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, NSABP-B34 and GAIN trials.

  10. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Prax, Marcel; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopolog profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds. PMID:25374846

  11. Acne vulgaris--psychosomatic aspects.

    PubMed

    Niemeier, Volker; Kupfer, Jörg; Gieler, Uwe

    2006-12-01

    More than a cosmetic nuisance, acne can produce anxiety, depression, and other psychological problems that affect patients' lives in ways comparable to life-threatening or disabling diseases. Emotional problems due to the disease should be taken seriously and included in the treatment plan. A purely dermatological therapy by itself may not achieve its purpose. Even mild to moderate disease can be associated with significant depression and suicidal ideation, and psychologic change does not necessarily correlate with disease severity. Acne patients suffer particularly under social limitations and reduced quality of life. Psychological comorbidities in acne are probably greater than generally assumed. Attention should be paid to psychosomatic aspects especially if depressive-anxious disorders are suspected, particularly with evidence of suicidal tendencies, body dysmorphic disorders, or also in disrupted compliance.Therefore, patients who report particularly high emotional distress or dysmorphic tendencies due to the disease should be treated, if possible, by interdisciplinary therapy. The dermatologist should have some knowledge of the basics of psychotherapy and psychopharmacology, which sometimes must be combined with systemic and topical treatment of acne in conjunction with basic psychosomatic treatment.

  12. Biological aspects of gender disorders.

    PubMed

    Corsello, S M; Di Donna, V; Senes, P; Luotto, V; Ricciato, M P; Paragliola, R M; Pontecorvi, A

    2011-12-01

    The scientific community is very interested in the biological aspects of gender disorders and sexual orientation. There are different levels to define an individual's sex: chromosomal, gonadic, and phenotypic sex. Concerning the psychological sex, men and women are different by virtue of their own gender identity, which means they recognize themselves as belonging to a determinate sex. They are different also as a result of their own role identity, a set of behaviors, tendencies, and cognitive and emotional attitudes, commonly defined as "male" and "female". Transsexuality is a disorder characterized by the development of a gender identity opposed to phenotypic sex, whereas homosexuality is not a disturbance of gender identity but only of sexual attraction, expressing sexual orientation towards people of the same sex. We started from a critical review of literature on genetic and hormonal mechanisms involved in sexual differentiation. We re-examined the neuro-anatomic and functional differences between men and women, with special reference to their role in psychosexual differentiation and to their possible implication in the genesis of homosexuality and identity gender disorders. Homosexuality and transsexuality are conditions without a well defined etiology. Although the influence of educational and environmental factors in humans is undeniable, it seems that organic neurohormonal prenatal and postnatal factors might contribute in a determinant way in the development of these two conditions. This "organicistic neurohormal theory" might find support in the study of particular situations in which the human fetus is exposed to an abnormal hormonal environment in utero.

  13. Aspects in grinding of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.J.; Huh, Y.H.; Yoon, K.J. . Materials Evaluation Center); Ogawa, Tomeyoshi . Machining Group)

    1994-09-01

    Aspects in the grinding of ceramics have been investigated. Si[sub 3]N[sub 4], ZrO[sub 2], SiC, and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] were ground with resin-bonded diamond wheels of grit numbers ranging from 80 to 800. Microstructural observations of ground surfaces show that grinding occurs predominantly by flow mode in Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] and ZrO[sub 2], and by fracture and grain pullout in SiC and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The measurement of grinding force shows that grinding resistances in Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] and ZrO[sub 2] are significantly larger than those in SiC and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. As the grit number of the grinding wheel increases, maximum surface roughness significantly decreases in Si[sub 3]N[sub 4], ZrO[sub 2], and SiC, but it apparently does not change in Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. This unexpected result in Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] is discussed in terms of the observed grinding mode and microstructure.

  14. Emerging therapeutic aspects in oncology

    PubMed Central

    MacEwan, David J

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a peculiarly stubborn disease to treat. Some forms of cancer have seen tremendous advances in the effectiveness of their treatments, whereas other forms have remained resistant to pharmacological control. This lack of hope for success is in part due to the types of drugs that are used in the clinic, and the targeted biological system being based purely on cellular growth rates. However, recent drugs designed to affect specific signalling pathways or proteins have been showing much success. Thanks to the ingenuity of pharmacologists in understanding and targeting these processes, there have been real improvements in treatment. Here we are presented with some of the research into such critical systems that have to be understood, so that they can be conquered. We will also look at the challenges facing cancer pharmacologists and what the field may present to us all in the future. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Emerging Therapeutic Aspects in Oncology. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-8 PMID:23889318

  15. Global Aspects of Radiation Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winicour, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    The gravitational radiation memory effect produces a net displacement of test particles. The proposed sources lead to E mode memory, as characterized by an even parity polarization pattern. Although odd parity, or B mode, radiation memory is mathematically possible, no physically realistic source has been identified. There is an electromagnetic counterpart to radiation memory which produces a net momentum ``kick'' of charged test particles. A global null cone treatment shows that electromagnetic E mode memory requires unbounded charges and no physically realistic source produces B mode memory. A compelling theoretical aspect of E mode gravitational radiation memory is related to the supertranslations in the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) asymptotic symmetry group. For a stationary system, supertranslations can be eliminated and the BMS group reduced to the Poincare group, for which angular momentum is well-defined. However, for a stationary to stationary transition, the two Poincare groups obtained at early and late times differ by a supertranslation if the gravitational radiation has nonzero E mode memory. This suggests a distinctly general relativistic mechanism for angular momentum loss and presents a ripe problem for the numerical simulation of high spin black hole binaries. Supported by NSF grant PHY-1201276 to the University of Pittsburgh.

  16. Flower senescence: some molecular aspects.

    PubMed

    Shahri, Waseem; Tahir, Inayatullah

    2014-02-01

    Some molecular aspects of flower senescence have been reviewed. The isolation, identification and characterization of different genes from various flowers (mainly from petals) associated with senescence have been discussed. The isolated genes were divided into different groups. A large proportion of genes have been found to be upregulated during flower senescence while some genes were also found to be downregulated indicating that there exists a complex interplay between the expression patterns of various genes. The genes involved in petal expansion are found to be upregulated during normal flower development from anthesis to open flower stage, but XTH (Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase hydrolase) is found to be involved in petal expansion as well as abscission. Cysteine proteases or the genes encoding cysteine proteases (assigned a central role in protein degradation) have been identified from various flower systems, but no cysteine protease has been identified from senescing Mirabilis jalapa flowers. In addition to proteases, the genes encoding ubiquitin (exhibiting proteasomal degradation by 26S proteasomes) have also been identified suggesting the two alternate pathways for protein degradation. Genes encoding specific nucleases have also been identified, but they displayed an early increase in transcript abundance before the senescence symptoms become evident and characterize the involvement of PCD during flower senescence. A range of transcription factors are described and their possible role in flower senescence has been discussed. A detailed description of genes involved in ethylene synthesis and the components involved in ethylene signaling have been presented.

  17. Psychosocial aspects of induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Stotland, N L

    1997-09-01

    US anti-abortion groups have used misinformation on the long-term psychological impact of induced abortion to advance their position. This article reviews the available research evidence on the definition, history, cultural context, and emotional and psychiatric sequelae of induced abortion. Notable has been a confusion of normative, transient reactions to unintended pregnancy and abortion (e.g., guilt, depression, anxiety) with serious mental disorders. Studies of the psychiatric aspects of abortion have been limited by methodological problems such as the impossibility of randomly assigning women to study and control groups, resistance to follow-up, and confounding variables. Among the factors that may impact on an unintended pregnancy and the decision to abort are ongoing or past psychiatric illness, poverty, social chaos, youth and immaturity, abandonment issues, ongoing domestic responsibilities, rape and incest, domestic violence, religion, and contraceptive failure. Among the risk factors for postabortion psychosocial difficulties are previous or concurrent psychiatric illness, coercion to abort, genetic or medical indications, lack of social supports, ambivalence, and increasing length of gestation. Overall, the literature indicates that serious psychiatric illness is at least 8 times more common among postpartum than among postabortion women. Abortion center staff should acknowledge that the termination of a pregnancy may be experienced as a loss even when it is a voluntary choice. Referrals should be offered to women who show great emotional distress, have had several previous abortions, or request psychiatric consultation.

  18. Clinical aspects of phage therapy.

    PubMed

    Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Borysowski, Jan; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Pawełczyk, Zdzisław; Rogóż, Paweł; Kłak, Marlena; Wojtasik, Elżbieta; Górski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Phage therapy (PT) is a unique method of treatment of bacterial infections using bacteriophages (phages)-viruses that specifically kill bacteria, including their antibiotic-resistant strains. Over the last decade a marked increase in interest in the therapeutic use of phages has been observed, which has resulted from a substantial rise in the prevalence of antibiotic resistance of bacteria, coupled with an inadequate number of new antibiotics. The first, and so far the only, center of PT in the European Union is the Phage Therapy Unit (PTU) established at the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Wrocław, Poland in 2005. This center continues the rich tradition of PT in Poland, which dates from the early 1920s. The main objective of this chapter is to present a detailed retrospective analysis of the results of PT of 153 patients with a wide range of infections resistant to antibiotic therapy admitted for treatment at the PTU between January 2008 and December 2010. Analysis includes the evaluation of both the efficacy and the safety of PT. In general, data suggest that PT can provide good clinical results in a significant cohort of patients with otherwise untreatable chronic bacterial infections and is essentially well tolerated. In addition, the whole complex procedure employed to obtain and characterize therapeutic phage preparations, as well as ethical aspects of PT, is discussed.

  19. Statistical genetics and evolution of quantitative traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neher, Richard A.; Shraiman, Boris I.

    2011-10-01

    The distribution and heritability of many traits depends on numerous loci in the genome. In general, the astronomical number of possible genotypes makes the system with large numbers of loci difficult to describe. Multilocus evolution, however, greatly simplifies in the limit of weak selection and frequent recombination. In this limit, populations rapidly reach quasilinkage equilibrium (QLE) in which the dynamics of the full genotype distribution, including correlations between alleles at different loci, can be parametrized by the allele frequencies. This review provides a simplified exposition of the concept and mathematics of QLE which is central to the statistical description of genotypes in sexual populations. Key results of quantitative genetics such as the generalized Fisher’s “fundamental theorem,” along with Wright’s adaptive landscape, are shown to emerge within QLE from the dynamics of the genotype distribution. This is followed by a discussion under what circumstances QLE is applicable, and what the breakdown of QLE implies for the population structure and the dynamics of selection. Understanding the fundamental aspects of multilocus evolution obtained through simplified models may be helpful in providing conceptual and computational tools to address the challenges arising in the studies of complex quantitative phenotypes of practical interest.

  20. Quantitative Pathway Logic for Computational Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggi, Michele; Ballis, Demis; Falaschi, Moreno

    This paper presents an extension of Pathway Logic, called Quantitative Pathway Logic (QPL), which allows one to reason about quantitative aspects of biological processes, such as element concentrations and reactions kinetics. Besides, it supports the modeling of inhibitors, that is, chemicals which may block a given reaction whenever their concentration exceeds a certain threshold. QPL models can be specified and directly simulated using rewriting logic or can be translated into Discrete Functional Petri Nets (DFPN) which are a subclass of Hybrid Functional Petri Nets in which only discrete transitions are allowed. Under some constraints over the anonymous variables appearing in the QPL models, the transformation between the two computational models is shown to preserve computations. By using the DFPN representation our models can be graphically visualized and simulated by means of well known tools (e.g. Cell Illustrator); moreover standard Petri net analyses (e.g. topological analysis, forward/backward reachability, etc.) may be performed on the net model. An executable framework for QPL and for the translation of QPL models into DFPNs has been implemented using the rewriting-based language Maude. We have tested this system on several examples.

  1. Good practices for quantitative bias analysis.

    PubMed

    Lash, Timothy L; Fox, Matthew P; MacLehose, Richard F; Maldonado, George; McCandless, Lawrence C; Greenland, Sander

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative bias analysis serves several objectives in epidemiological research. First, it provides a quantitative estimate of the direction, magnitude and uncertainty arising from systematic errors. Second, the acts of identifying sources of systematic error, writing down models to quantify them, assigning values to the bias parameters and interpreting the results combat the human tendency towards overconfidence in research results, syntheses and critiques and the inferences that rest upon them. Finally, by suggesting aspects that dominate uncertainty in a particular research result or topic area, bias analysis can guide efficient allocation of sparse research resources. The fundamental methods of bias analyses have been known for decades, and there have been calls for more widespread use for nearly as long. There was a time when some believed that bias analyses were rarely undertaken because the methods were not widely known and because automated computing tools were not readily available to implement the methods. These shortcomings have been largely resolved. We must, therefore, contemplate other barriers to implementation. One possibility is that practitioners avoid the analyses because they lack confidence in the practice of bias analysis. The purpose of this paper is therefore to describe what we view as good practices for applying quantitative bias analysis to epidemiological data, directed towards those familiar with the methods. We focus on answering questions often posed to those of us who advocate incorporation of bias analysis methods into teaching and research. These include the following. When is bias analysis practical and productive? How does one select the biases that ought to be addressed? How does one select a method to model biases? How does one assign values to the parameters of a bias model? How does one present and interpret a bias analysis?. We hope that our guide to good practices for conducting and presenting bias analyses will encourage

  2. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    This dissertation examines the use of electric fields as one mechanism for controlling combustion as flames are partially extinguished when impinging on nearby surfaces. Electrical aspects of flames, specifically, the production of chemi-ions in hydrocarbon flames and the use of convective flows driven by these ions, have been investigated in a wide range of applications in prior work but despite this fairly comprehensive effort to study electrical aspects of combustion, relatively little research has focused on electrical phenomena near flame extinguishment, nor for flames near impingement surfaces. Electrical impinging flames have complex properties under global influences of ion-driven winds and flow field disturbances from the impingement surface. Challenges of measurements when an electric field is applied in the system have limited an understanding of changes to the flame behavior and species concentrations caused by the field. This research initially characterizes the ability of high voltage power supplies to respond on sufficiently short time scales to permit real time electrical flame actuation. The study then characterizes the influence of an electric field on the impinging flame shape, ion current and flow field of the thermal plume associated with the flame. The more significant further examinations can be separated into two parts: 1) the potential for using electric fields to control the release of carbon monoxide (CO) from surface-impinging flames, and 2) an investigation of controlling electrically the heat transfer to a plate on which the flame impinges. Carbon monoxide (CO) results from the incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels and, while CO can be desirable in some syngas processes, it is usually a dangerous emission from forest fires, gas heaters, gas stoves, or furnaces where insufficient oxygen in the core reaction does not fully oxidize the fuel to carbon dioxide and water. Determining how carbon monoxide is released and how heat transfer

  3. Glare Design Aspects and Philosophies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeeren, C. A. J. R.; Beumler, Th.; de Kanter, J. L. C. G.; van der Jagt, O. C.; Out, B. C. L.

    2003-07-01

    The very nature of Glare is its crack bridging mechanism, which provides superior damage tolerance properties. Depending on the property, Glare shows either monolithic metal or composite behaviour, which challenges the definition of strength justification and certification procedures. Airworthiness regulations have to be interpreted for Glare in order to guarantee the same level of safety as obtained for aircraft structures made of other materials and to take at the same time benefit of its particular properties. Cut-outs are highly fatigue sensitive due to the stress concentrations they cause. In aircraft fuselages these cut-outs are quite large in the case of the windows and doors. The stress level may be increased through the application of Glare in the doubler packages, due to the improved fatigue behaviour compared to conventional aluminium. Glare also presents the possibility of tailoring the material to the load, i.e. fibres aligned with the load, e.g., a 45 degree orientation. FE analysis defined the total doubler package and a test programme was run to confirm the behaviour of the material and to predict the crack behaviour of the Glare door corner. Some aspects of the detailed design of aircraft structures in Glare, the design of splices and riveted joints are discussed. In order to apply Glare in very large fuselage panels, a splice concept was developed, which allows a number of longitudinal splices to be cured in the same curing cycle as the basic material. Through the introduction of this splicing concept, the width of a panel is no longer limited to the maximum width of the aluminium sheet. Internal local reinforcements (doublers) can be integrated into the panel during lay-up. A discussion on the design of riveted joints in Glare is held.

  4. Regulatory aspects of clinical xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Henk-Jan

    2015-11-01

    Xenotransplantation attracted interest from regulatory authorities, particularly after the demonstration of pig-to-human transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (1996). This added to the risk of a product, resulting in a Guidance of the US Food and Drug Administration (2003). This addresses the full flow chart in product manufacturing, starting with the designated pathogen-free status of the source animal; and special aspects regarding the recipient like informed consent and monitoring for infectious pathogens. Also archiving of records from the donor and recipient, as well as storage of samples is described. The European Medicines Agency issued a Guideline on xenogeneic cell therapy products (2009). Cell-based medicinal products are subject to specific regulations and directives, which apply also to xenogeneic products: the xenotransplant guidances/guidelines are an addition to these regulations. Noteworthy, acellular products like heart valves and decellularized cornea are not considered a cell therapy product, but rather a medical device with its own regulation. WHO issued relevant documents, especially about safety, and the International Xenotransplantation Association published consensus documents, a.o., addressing preclinical efficacy requirements before entering clinical trials. This manuscript presents an overview of the regulatory framework, with special focus on cell therapy products necause these are expected to reach the market first (i.e., pancreatic islets, hepatocytes and cellularized cornea); major illustrations are from the European situation. Albeit being complex, the regulation of xenotransplant products does not form a block in product development, but rather supports the introduction of efficacious and safe products to meet the medical need. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Somaiya, Mansi; Kumar, Santhosh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the “tip of the iceberg” of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control), sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation) and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD. PMID:25552854

  6. Aspects of topological string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Paul L. H.

    Two aspects of the topological string and its applications are considered in this thesis. Firstly, non-perturbative contributions to the OSV conjecture relating four-dimensional extremal black holes and the closed topological string partition function are studied. A new technique is formulated for encapsulating these contributions for the case of a Calabi-Yau manifold constructed by fibering two line bundle over a torus, with the unexpected property that the resulting non-perturbative completion of the topological string partition function is such that the black hole partition function is equal to a product of a chiral and an anti-chiral function. This new approach is considered both in the context of the requirement of background independence for the topological string, and for more general Calabi-Yau manifolds. Secondly, this thesis provides a microscopic derivation of the open topological string holomorphic anomaly equations proposed by Walcher in arXiv:0705.4098 under the assumption that open string moduli do not contribute. In doing so, however, new anomalies are found for compact Calabi-Yau manifolds when the disk one-point functions (string to boundary amplitudes) are non-zero. These new anomalies introduce coupling to wrong moduli (complex structure moduli in A-model and Kahler moduli in B-model), and spoil the recursive structure of the holomorphic anomaly equations. For vanishing disk one-point functions, the open string holomorphic anomaly equations can be integrated to solve for amplitudes recursively, using a Feynman diagram approach, for which a proof is presented.

  7. Quantitative analysis of PET studies.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wolfgang A

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative analysis can be included relatively easily in clinical PET-imaging protocols, but in order to obtain meaningful quantitative results one needs to follow a standardized protocol for image acquisition and data analysis. Important factors to consider are the calibration of the PET scanner, the radiotracer uptake time and the approach for definition of regions of interests. Using such standardized acquisition protocols quantitative parameters of tumor metabolism or receptor status can be derived from tracer kinetic analysis and simplified approaches such as calculation of standardized uptake values (SUVs).

  8. Understanding quantitative research: part 1.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Juanita; Hoare, Zoë

    This article, which is the first in a two-part series, provides an introduction to understanding quantitative research, basic statistics and terminology used in research articles. Critical appraisal of research articles is essential to ensure that nurses remain up to date with evidence-based practice to provide consistent and high-quality nursing care. This article focuses on developing critical appraisal skills and understanding the use and implications of different quantitative approaches to research. Part two of this article will focus on explaining common statistical terms and the presentation of statistical data in quantitative research.

  9. A Primer on Quantitative Modeling.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Iulia; Levine, Erel

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is particularly suitable for obtaining quantitative data about behavior, neuronal activity, gene expression, ecological interactions, quantitative traits, and much more. To exploit the full potential of these data one seeks to interpret them within quantitative models. Using two examples from the C. elegans literature we briefly explore several types of modeling approaches relevant to worm biology, and show how they might be used to interpret data, formulate testable hypotheses, and suggest new experiments. We emphasize that the choice of modeling approach is strongly dependent on the questions of interest and the type of available knowledge.

  10. [Biochemical aspects of fetal hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Biringer, K; Danko, J; Dókus, K; Mat'asová, K; Zibolen, M; Pullmann, R

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate validity of biochemical diagnostic methods of fetal hypoxia. A case-control study. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Martin, Slovak Republic. We included 67 patients, and they were retrospectively divided into group of controls (n=36), and studied group (n=31) according to pH in umbilical artery (UA) <7.15. Acid-base parameters were assessed with Rapidlab 248, Bayer Healthcare LLC, East Walpole, USA. We determined criterion for metabolic acidosis (MAC) as pH UA <7.15, resp. base deficit (BD) UA >12 mmol/l. Postpartal lactate concentration in umbilical vein (UV) and UA was determined with lactatemeter Accutrend Lactate, Roche Diagnostics, Switzerland. Quantitative assessment of fetal human protein S100B was provided with ELISA (Sangtec 100 ELISA, DiaSorin Inc., Stillwater, Minnesota, USA). Fetal erythropoietin concentration in UV was examined with immunoenzymatic assessment Access EPO (Beckman Coulter, Inc., Fullerton, CA, USA). histograms, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Mann-Whitney test, Spearman's rho; statistical significance: p<0.05, Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, Area Under the Curve. The best correlation was between fetal acid-base parameters and lactate in UA (p<0.0005). Significant correlation was between EPO in UV, and protein S100B in UV (p<0.05). EPO in UV significantly correlated with lactate in UA (p<0.05). Correlation between EPO in UV and protein S100B was not significant. According to ROC curves in prediction of fetal hypoxia, we found an excellent accuracy (AUC>0.9) for lactate in UA, good accuracy (AUC>0.7) had EPO in UV. Results for protein S100B were not significant. The highest sensitivity had EPO in UV, while the highest specificity has had lactate in UA. An indisputable evidence of labor management quality is the fetal metabolic status. On the basis of our results, the suitable clinical markers are lactate and EPO, in addition to acid-base parameters.

  11. Pharmacotherapeutic Aspects of Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi

    2004-01-01

    produced by any drug depend upon rates of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of the drug; space flight-induced changes in blood flow and the function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, liver, or kidneys may alter these processes. Another important aspect of clinical efficacy of medications in space is the stability of pharmaceuticals. As the U.S. space program is moving toward extended Space Shuttle flights and beyond, to space station missions and planetary explorations, understanding how space flight affects organ systems and clinical pharmacology is necessary to optimize pharmacotherapeutics in space and ensure adequate safety and health of crewmembers.

  12. Learning to Relate Qualitative and Quantitative Problem Representations in a Model-Based Setting for Collaborative Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploetzner, Rolf; Fehse, Eric; Kneser, Cornelia; Spada, Hans

    1999-01-01

    Investigates how 10th-grade students acquire, extend, and successively relate knowledge about qualitative and quantitative aspects of classical mechanics. Analysis of the multicomponent tests revealed that qualitative, as well as quantitative, knowledge can be taught successfully using concept maps. (Author/CCM)

  13. Learning to Relate Qualitative and Quantitative Problem Representations in a Model-Based Setting for Collaborative Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploetzner, Rolf; Fehse, Eric; Kneser, Cornelia; Spada, Hans

    1999-01-01

    Investigates how 10th-grade students acquire, extend, and successively relate knowledge about qualitative and quantitative aspects of classical mechanics. Analysis of the multicomponent tests revealed that qualitative, as well as quantitative, knowledge can be taught successfully using concept maps. (Author/CCM)

  14. Flying High: The Aeromedical Aspects of Marihuana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A summary of the discussions from the Civil Aeromedical Institute Symposium on aeromedical aspects of marihuana is presented. The invited panel...discussed the legal aspects of marihuana use and aviation, the experiences of military aviation, and the acute and chronic effects of the drug. For civil...aviation, the panel proposed a 12-16 hour period between marihuana use and work in aviation, no radical changes in FAA policy towards marihuana use, and additional research on aeromedical aspects of marihuana .

  15. Geomorphic aspects of groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFleur, Robert G.

    The many roles that groundwater plays in landscape evolution are becoming more widely appreciated. In this overview, three major categories of groundwater processes and resulting landforms are considered: (1) Dissolution creates various karst geometries, mainly in carbonate rocks, in response to conditions of recharge, geologic setting, lithology, and groundwater circulation. Denudation and cave formation rates can be estimated from kinetic and hydraulic parameters. (2) Groundwater weathering generates regoliths of residual alteration products at weathering fronts, and subsequent exhumation exposes corestones, flared slopes, balanced rocks, domed inselbergs, and etchplains of regional importance. Groundwater relocation of dissolved salts creates duricrusts of various compositions, which become landforms. (3) Soil and rock erosion by groundwater processes include piping, seepage erosion, and sapping, important agents in slope retreat and headward gully migration. Thresholds and limits are important in many chemical and mechanical groundwater actions. A quantitative, morphometric approach to groundwater landforms and processes is exemplified by selected studies in carbonate and clastic terrains of ancient and recent origins. Résumé Les rôles variés joués par les eaux souterraines dans l'évolution des paysages deviennent nettement mieux connus. La revue faite ici prend en considération trois grandes catégories de processus liés aux eaux souterraines et les formes associées: (1) La dissolution crée des formes karstiques variées, surtout dans les roches carbonatées, en fonction des conditions d'alimentation, du cadre géologique, de la lithologie et de la circulation des eaux souterraines. Les taux d'érosion et de formation des grottes peuvent être estimés à partir de paramètres cinétiques et hydrauliques. (2) L'érosion par les eaux souterraines donne naissance à des régolites, résidus d'altération sur des fronts d'altération, et l'exhumation r

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE.

  17. Effect of particle aspect ratio in magnetorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, Jose R.; Carreón-González, Elizabeth; de Vicente, Juan

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles in magnetorheology. Two systems are studied: conventional magnetorheological fluids prepared by dispersion of nickel nanowires, and inverse ferrofluids prepared by dispersion of glass fibers in a ferrofluid. In both cases the apparent yield stress is found to increase with aspect ratio in contradiction to available models in the literature. Experimental observations demonstrate that the particle volume fraction within the aggregates initially increases with increasing the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles. When the aspect ratio is further raised, a gel-like percolating structure forms inhibiting the formation of elongated clusters in the field direction.

  18. Understanding How Grammatical Aspect Influences Legal Judgment

    PubMed Central

    Sherrill, Andrew M.; Eerland, Anita; Zwaan, Rolf A.; Magliano, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that grammatical aspect can bias how individuals perceive criminal intentionality during discourse comprehension. Given that criminal intentionality is a common criterion for legal definitions (e.g., first-degree murder), the present study explored whether grammatical aspect may also impact legal judgments. In a series of four experiments participants were provided with a legal definition and a description of a crime in which the grammatical aspect of provocation and murder events were manipulated. Participants were asked to make a decision (first- vs. second-degree murder) and then indicate factors that impacted their decision. Findings suggest that legal judgments can be affected by grammatical aspect but the most robust effects were limited to temporal dynamics (i.e., imperfective aspect results in more murder actions than perfective aspect), which may in turn influence other representational systems (i.e., number of murder actions positively predicts perceived intentionality). In addition, findings demonstrate that the influence of grammatical aspect on situation model construction and evaluation is dependent upon the larger linguistic and semantic context. Together, the results suggest grammatical aspect has indirect influences on legal judgments to the extent that variability in aspect changes the features of the situation model that align with criteria for making legal judgments. PMID:26496364

  19. Food irradiation facilities: Requirements and technical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittendorfer, Josef

    2016-12-01

    This survey presents some aspects and requirement for food irradiation facilities. Topics like radiation source, dose ranges and dose rate are discussed, together with logistics and operational considerations

  20. Bence-Jones protein - quantitative

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003597.htm Quantitative Bence-Jones protein test To use the sharing ... Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare ...

  1. The Quantitative Theory of Interest.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    whose interest rate is at least sigma. The author calls this the qualitative theorem. In the paper, it is desired to further interpret the size of...the interest rate by relating it to borrowing and lending rates which are defined without respect to prices. An economic model is used similar to the...maximum (respectively minimum) interest rate . The author calls this the quantitative theorem. The quantitative theorem is used to prove a slightly

  2. Legal aspects of abortion practice.

    PubMed

    Goldman, E B

    1986-03-01

    Focusing on the legal aspects of abortion, this chapter considers the development of constitutional law on the right to abortion, rights for adults and minors, conscience clauses, and abortion and malpractice issues. In 1973 the US Supreme Court in the cases of Roe v. Wade held that the right of privacy grounded in the concept of personal liberty guaranteed by the 9th and 14th amendment to the US Constitution included a woman's right to decide whether or not to have an abortion. The cases held unconstitutional any statute that prohibited abortion and statutes that imposed such stringent requirements on abortion as to make abortion unavailable. The Court recognized the state's interest in protecting maternal health and preserving the life of the fetus but said that a woman's right to privacy was a paramount fundamental right and could be interfered with only if the state could show a compelling interest. The Court analyzed the right to abortion based on different stages of pregnancy. During the 1st trimester, a woman has a virtually unfettered right to have an abortion free from interference by state or federal government; the decision is between the woman and her physician. Due to the fact that abortions during the 2nd trimester are more dangerous to the health of the mother, the state can regulate the abortion procedure so long as the regulations are limited to preservation and protection of maternal health. Thus, the state can establish licensing requirements for facilities in which the procedure is to be performed as well as requirements concerning reporting and record keeping. During the 3rd trimester, the viability of the fetus allows the state's compelling interest in the protection of fetal life to be dominant over the mother's right to privacy. During this trimester, the state may, but is not required to, proscribe abortion except where necessary to preserve the life or health of the mother. During the 1973-83 period, numerous attempts were made to chip

  3. Precocious quantitative cognition in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Stephen; Hughes, Kelly D; Cantlon, Jessica F

    2016-02-01

    Basic quantitative abilities are thought to have an innate basis in humans partly because the ability to discriminate quantities emerges early in child development. If humans and nonhuman primates share this developmentally primitive foundation of quantitative reasoning, then this ability should be present early in development across species and should emerge earlier in monkeys than in humans because monkeys mature faster than humans. We report that monkeys spontaneously make accurate quantity choices by 1 year of age in a task that human children begin to perform only at 2.5 to 3 years of age. Additionally, we report that the quantitative sensitivity of infant monkeys is equal to that of the adult animals in their group and that rates of learning do not differ between infant and adult animals. This novel evidence of precocious quantitative reasoning in infant monkeys suggests that human quantitative reasoning shares its early developing foundation with other primates. The data further suggest that early developing components of primate quantitative reasoning are constrained by maturational factors related to genetic development as opposed to learning experience alone.

  4. The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Balk, Lisanne J; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Saidha, Shiv; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Lagreze, Wolf A; Schuman, Joel S; Villoslada, Pablo; Calabresi, Peter; Balcer, Laura; Petzold, Axel; Green, Ari J; Paul, Friedemann; Brandt, Alexander U; Albrecht, Philipp

    2016-06-14

    To develop consensus recommendations for reporting of quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) study results. A panel of experienced OCT researchers (including 11 neurologists, 2 ophthalmologists, and 2 neuroscientists) discussed requirements for performing and reporting quantitative analyses of retinal morphology and developed a list of initial recommendations based on experience and previous studies. The list of recommendations was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group. We provide a 9-point checklist encompassing aspects deemed relevant when reporting quantitative OCT studies. The areas covered are study protocol, acquisition device, acquisition settings, scanning protocol, funduscopic imaging, postacquisition data selection, postacquisition data analysis, recommended nomenclature, and statistical analysis. The Advised Protocol for OCT Study Terminology and Elements recommendations include core items to standardize and improve quality of reporting in quantitative OCT studies. The recommendations will make reporting of quantitative OCT studies more consistent and in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. The recommendations originated from expert consensus and thus represent Class IV evidence. They will need to be regularly adjusted according to new insights and practices. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Balk, Lisanne J.; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Saidha, Shiv; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H.; Lagreze, Wolf A.; Schuman, Joel S.; Villoslada, Pablo; Calabresi, Peter; Balcer, Laura; Petzold, Axel; Green, Ari J.; Paul, Friedemann; Brandt, Alexander U.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop consensus recommendations for reporting of quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) study results. Methods: A panel of experienced OCT researchers (including 11 neurologists, 2 ophthalmologists, and 2 neuroscientists) discussed requirements for performing and reporting quantitative analyses of retinal morphology and developed a list of initial recommendations based on experience and previous studies. The list of recommendations was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group. Results: We provide a 9-point checklist encompassing aspects deemed relevant when reporting quantitative OCT studies. The areas covered are study protocol, acquisition device, acquisition settings, scanning protocol, funduscopic imaging, postacquisition data selection, postacquisition data analysis, recommended nomenclature, and statistical analysis. Conclusions: The Advised Protocol for OCT Study Terminology and Elements recommendations include core items to standardize and improve quality of reporting in quantitative OCT studies. The recommendations will make reporting of quantitative OCT studies more consistent and in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. The recommendations originated from expert consensus and thus represent Class IV evidence. They will need to be regularly adjusted according to new insights and practices. PMID:27225223

  6. [Bibliometric analysis of bacterial quantitative proteomics in English literatures].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; She, Danyang; Liu, Youning; Wang, Rui; Di, Xiuzhen; Liang, Beibei; Wang, Yue

    2014-07-01

    To analyze the worldwide advances on bacterial quantitative proteomics over the past fifteen years with bibliometric approach. Literature retrieval was conducted throughout the databases of Pubmed, Embase and Science citation index (SCI), using "bacterium" and "quantitative proteomics" as the key words. The deadline is July 2013. We sorted and analyzed these articles with Endnote X6 from the aspects of published year, the first author, name of journal, published institution, cited frequency and publication type. 932 English articles were included in our research after deleting the duplicates. The first article on bacterial quantitative proteomics was reported in 1999. The maximal publications were 163 related articles in 2012. Up till July 2013, authors from more than 23 countries and regions have published articles in this field. China ranks the fourth. The main publication type is original articles. The most frequently cited article is entitled with "Absolute quantification of proteins by LCMSE: a virtue of parallel MS acquisition" by Silva JC, Gorenstein MV, Li GZ, et al in Mol Cell Proteomics 2006. The most productive author is Smith RD from Biological Sciences Division, Pac. Northwest National Laboratory. The top journal publishing bacterial quantitative proteomics is Proteomics. More and more researchers pay attention to quantitative proteomics which will be widely used in bacteriology.

  7. Developing Geoscience Students' Quantitative Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, C. A.; Hancock, G. S.

    2005-12-01

    Sophisticated quantitative skills are an essential tool for the professional geoscientist. While students learn many of these sophisticated skills in graduate school, it is increasingly important that they have a strong grounding in quantitative geoscience as undergraduates. Faculty have developed many strong approaches to teaching these skills in a wide variety of geoscience courses. A workshop in June 2005 brought together eight faculty teaching surface processes and climate change to discuss and refine activities they use and to publish them on the Teaching Quantitative Skills in the Geosciences website (serc.Carleton.edu/quantskills) for broader use. Workshop participants in consultation with two mathematics faculty who have expertise in math education developed six review criteria to guide discussion: 1) Are the quantitative and geologic goals central and important? (e.g. problem solving, mastery of important skill, modeling, relating theory to observation); 2) Does the activity lead to better problem solving? 3) Are the quantitative skills integrated with geoscience concepts in a way that makes sense for the learning environment and supports learning both quantitative skills and geoscience? 4) Does the methodology support learning? (e.g. motivate and engage students; use multiple representations, incorporate reflection, discussion and synthesis) 5) Are the materials complete and helpful to students? 6) How well has the activity worked when used? Workshop participants found that reviewing each others activities was very productive because they thought about new ways to teach and the experience of reviewing helped them think about their own activity from a different point of view. The review criteria focused their thinking about the activity and would be equally helpful in the design of a new activity. We invite a broad international discussion of the criteria(serc.Carleton.edu/quantskills/workshop05/review.html).The Teaching activities can be found on the

  8. Some medical aspects of radionuclide intakes

    SciTech Connect

    Poda, G A

    1983-01-01

    In the field of medicine, particularly industrial medicine, the radiation aspect of the practice probably takes about 1/10 of 1% of our time. All the health physicist's tools of principles of internal dosimetry, lung models, mathematics, chemistry, etc. have little meaning until applied to an individual who has had an intake. This article discusses some of the medical aspects of internal dosimetry.

  9. Preliminary Aspects of Language Course Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohrabi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Program and/or course evaluation is a process in which different types of data are collected systematically in order to study the virtues and weaknesses of a language instruction program. Program evaluation is, in fact, one of the essential aspects of any curriculum. It is a kind of quality control in which various aspects of an instructional…

  10. Preliminary Aspects of Language Course Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohrabi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Program and /or course evaluation is a process in which different types of data are collected systematically in order to study the virtues and weaknesses of a language instruction program. Program evaluation is, in fact, one of the essential aspects of any curriculum. It is a kind of quality control in which various aspects of an instructional…

  11. Preliminary Aspects of Language Course Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohrabi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Program and /or course evaluation is a process in which different types of data are collected systematically in order to study the virtues and weaknesses of a language instruction program. Program evaluation is, in fact, one of the essential aspects of any curriculum. It is a kind of quality control in which various aspects of an instructional…

  12. [Legal aspects of psychiatry in Soviet legislation].

    PubMed

    Babayan, E A

    1977-01-01

    The Author examines and describes in detail the normative and organizational aspects of forensic-psychiatric services in the URSS. Both criminal expert opinions and civil aspects are described. The problem of civil rights of mentally ill persons are discussed together with education and training of the experts employed in institutions and by the courts.

  13. Synthesis of monodisperse, rodlike silica colloids with tunable aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Kuijk, Anke; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2011-03-02

    Although the experimental study of spherical colloids has been extensive, similar studies on rodlike particles are rare because suitable model systems are scarcely available. To fulfill this need, we present the synthesis of monodisperse rodlike silica colloids with tunable dimensions. Rods were produced with diameters of 200 nm and greater and lengths up to 10 μm, resulting in aspect ratios from 1 to ∼25. The growth mechanism of these rods involves emulsion droplets inside which silica condensation takes place. Due to an anisotropic supply of reactants, the nucleus grows to one side only, resulting in rod formation. In concentrated dispersions, these rods self-assemble in liquid crystal phases, which can be studied quantitatively on the single particle level in three-dimensional real-space using confocal microscopy. Isotropic, paranematic, and smectic phases were observed for this system.

  14. Salvia divinorum: toxicological aspects and analysis in human biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Margalho, Cláudia; Corte-Real, Francisco; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Gallardo, Eugenia

    2016-07-01

    The identification and quantitation of the main psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum (salvinorin A) in biological specimens are crucial in forensic and clinical toxicology. Despite all the efforts made, its uncontrolled abuse has increased quickly, exposing its users' health to serious risks both in the short and long term. The use of alternative biological matrices in toxicological analyzes can be advantageous as complementary postmortem samples, or in situations when neither blood nor urine can be collected; they may be useful tools in those determinations, providing important information about prior exposure. The aim of this article is to present a brief summary of legal aspects of Salvia divinorum and salvinorin A, including the methods used for the determination of the latter in biological matrices.

  15. Automated quantitative image analysis of nanoparticle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Chaitanya R.; Gao, Bo; Tao, Andrea R.; Arya, Gaurav

    2015-05-01

    The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated manner. The software outputs averages and distributions in the size, radius of gyration, fractal dimension, backbone length, end-to-end distance, anisotropic ratio, and aspect ratio of NP clusters as a function of time along with bootstrapped error bounds for all calculated properties. The polydispersity in the NP building blocks and biases in the sampling of NP clusters are accounted for through the use of probabilistic weights. This software, named Particle Image Characterization Tool (PICT), has been made publicly available and could be an invaluable resource for researchers studying NP assembly. To demonstrate its practical utility, we used PICT to analyze scanning electron microscopy images taken during the assembly of surface-functionalized metal NPs of differing shapes and sizes within a polymer matrix. PICT is used to characterize and analyze the morphology of NP clusters, providing quantitative information that can be used to elucidate the physical mechanisms governing NP assembly.The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated

  16. Quantitative imaging methods in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Oei, Ling; Koromani, Fjorda; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Zillikens, M Carola; Oei, Edwin H G

    2016-12-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by a decreased bone mass and quality resulting in an increased fracture risk. Quantitative imaging methods are critical in the diagnosis and follow-up of treatment effects in osteoporosis. Prior radiographic vertebral fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) as a quantitative parameter derived from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are among the strongest known predictors of future osteoporotic fractures. Therefore, current clinical decision making relies heavily on accurate assessment of these imaging features. Further, novel quantitative techniques are being developed to appraise additional characteristics of osteoporosis including three-dimensional bone architecture with quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Dedicated high-resolution (HR) CT equipment is available to enhance image quality. At the other end of the spectrum, by utilizing post-processing techniques such as the trabecular bone score (TBS) information on three-dimensional architecture can be derived from DXA images. Further developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seem promising to not only capture bone micro-architecture but also characterize processes at the molecular level. This review provides an overview of various quantitative imaging techniques based on different radiological modalities utilized in clinical osteoporosis care and research.

  17. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry—especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644965

  18. Quantitative imaging methods in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Oei, Ling; Koromani, Fjorda; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Zillikens, M. Carola

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by a decreased bone mass and quality resulting in an increased fracture risk. Quantitative imaging methods are critical in the diagnosis and follow-up of treatment effects in osteoporosis. Prior radiographic vertebral fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) as a quantitative parameter derived from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are among the strongest known predictors of future osteoporotic fractures. Therefore, current clinical decision making relies heavily on accurate assessment of these imaging features. Further, novel quantitative techniques are being developed to appraise additional characteristics of osteoporosis including three-dimensional bone architecture with quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Dedicated high-resolution (HR) CT equipment is available to enhance image quality. At the other end of the spectrum, by utilizing post-processing techniques such as the trabecular bone score (TBS) information on three-dimensional architecture can be derived from DXA images. Further developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seem promising to not only capture bone micro-architecture but also characterize processes at the molecular level. This review provides an overview of various quantitative imaging techniques based on different radiological modalities utilized in clinical osteoporosis care and research. PMID:28090446

  19. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Pawel L.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry-especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  20. Environmental Aspects, Objectives and Targets Identification Process

    SciTech Connect

    R. Green

    2002-07-29

    The purpose of this report is to document the environmental aspects and associated environmental impacts of the Bechtel SAIC Company (BSC) scope of work, evaluate the significance of those environmental aspects based on established criteria, and establish environmental objectives and targets for specific environmental aspects. This report is intended to be used by environmental staff in the evaluation of BSC work packages during the annual risk-based planning process. This report shall be fully reviewed and revised annually during the annual work planning process to reflect changes in BSC operations, facilities, and scope of work. Planned BSC work will be evaluated to determine if the work is covered by a previously defined activity, product or service (see Table 2); if work activities require redefinition or addition of a new activity; and if the significant evaluation for each environment aspect is still valid based on scope of planned work. New workscope initiated during the fiscal year through the Baseline Change Proposal process (i.e., not as part of the annual work plan) also will be reviewed for new environmental aspects and determination of whether the new workscope would change the significance rating of any environmental aspect. If a new environmental aspect is identified in a new work activity, product, or service but the aspect is not determined to be significant (see Section 4), then this report can be changed through an interim change notice (ICN). This report can be changed five times through an ICN before a full revision is required. However, if new workscope causes an environmental aspect to be graded as significant using the evaluation process in Section 4, this report shall be revised though a full review and revision.

  1. Energy Aspects of Green Buildings - International Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauskale, L.; Geipele, I.; Zeltins, N.; Lecis, I.

    2016-12-01

    At present, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is one of the main environmental priorities globally, and implementation of sustainability aspects in the construction industry, including energy aspects, is of major importance for long-term environmental development, as buildings have a long life cycle and require many resources both for construction and operation periods. The aim of the research is to analyse energy aspects of green buildings. The results of research show that the construction of green buildings can significantly result in energy savings and has other benefits for different market participants. Future research directions have been identified as well.

  2. Quantitative descriptions of generalized arousal, an elementary function of the vertebrate brain

    PubMed Central

    Quinkert, Amy Wells; Vimal, Vivek; Weil, Zachary M.; Reeke, George N.; Schiff, Nicholas D.; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2011-01-01

    We review a concept of the most primitive, fundamental function of the vertebrate CNS, generalized arousal (GA). Three independent lines of evidence indicate the existence of GA: statistical, genetic, and mechanistic. Here we ask, is this concept amenable to quantitative analysis? Answering in the affirmative, four quantitative approaches have proven useful: (i) factor analysis, (ii) information theory, (iii) deterministic chaos, and (iv) application of a Gaussian equation. It strikes us that, to date, not just one but at least four different quantitative approaches seem necessary for describing different aspects of scientific work on GA. PMID:21555568

  3. Software for quantitative trait analysis.

    PubMed

    Almasy, Laura; Warren, Diane M

    2005-09-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of software currently available for the genetic analysis of quantitative traits in humans. Programs that implement variance components, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), Haseman-Elston (H-E) and penetrance model-based linkage analyses are discussed, as are programs for measured genotype association analyses and quantitative trait transmission disequilibrium tests. The software compared includes LINKAGE, FASTLINK, PAP, SOLAR, SEGPATH, ACT, Mx, MERLIN, GENEHUNTER, Loki, Mendel, SAGE, QTDT and FBAT. Where possible, the paper provides URLs for acquiring these programs through the internet, details of the platforms for which the software is available and the types of analyses performed.

  4. Software for quantitative trait analysis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of software currently available for the genetic analysis of quantitative traits in humans. Programs that implement variance components, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), Haseman-Elston (H-E) and penetrance model-based linkage analyses are discussed, as are programs for measured genotype association analyses and quantitative trait transmission disequilibrium tests. The software compared includes LINKAGE, FASTLINK, PAP, SOLAR, SEGPATH, ACT, Mx, MERLIN, GENEHUNTER, Loki, Mendel, SAGE, QTDT and FBAT. Where possible, the paper provides URLs for acquiring these programs through the internet, details of the platforms for which the software is available and the types of analyses performed. PMID:16197737

  5. Developmental Aspects of Sexuality and Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Donald; Valdez, Hilary

    1973-01-01

    Personality traits (aspects of aggression and sexuality) were measured for 70 Anglo-American and 70 Mexican-American children. Discussion concerns differences between the groups and developmental patterns. (DP)

  6. Some Legal Aspects of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Casimir J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    This article explores some legal aspects of public and private education, as well as several Amendments to the Constitution and their relationships to higher education: the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments. (Author)

  7. [Communication in health care - legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Mina, András

    2016-04-24

    This paper is focusing on the legal aspects of communication in health care, especially on doctor-patient relationship, responsibility for information, communication of adverse events, and legal declarations.

  8. Aspects of prehistoric astronomy in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. Kameswara

    2005-12-01

    Some archeoastronomical aspects regarding the development of observational astronomy in India during prehistoric times are described. A plea is made for the preservation of megalithic monuments of possible astronomical significance.

  9. Some Legal Aspects of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Casimir J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    This article explores some legal aspects of public and private education, as well as several Amendments to the Constitution and their relationships to higher education: the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments. (Author)

  10. Multiple sclerosis: Experimental and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, L.; Raine, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the experimental and clinical aspects of multiple sclerosis. Specifically discussed are - Association of Epstein Barr Virus with pathology of central nervous system; immunology of viruses; and immunosuppression.

  11. Critiquing the ethical aspects of a study.

    PubMed

    Pat, F

    1995-09-01

    The task of critiquing the ethical aspects of a study is complicated by convention. Research reports are written in a standardised way that may lead to ethical issues being ignored or mentioned only in passing ( 1 ). This can leave room for author and reader to make vastly different assumptions. The reader of a research paper must leant to recognise aspects of the research process which may be in conflict with accepted research ethics.

  12. Technical aspects of ileoanal pouch surgery.

    PubMed

    Carne, Peter W G; Pemberton, John H

    2004-02-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis has become the surgical procedure of choice for chronic ulcerative colitis. Since the initial description of the technique, various modifications have facilitated its evolution into a safe operation with excellent long-term outcomes. However, some aspects of the operation remain contentious. Our aim is to describe the technical aspects of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis and review the current literature in the areas of controversy.

  13. Approaches to high aspect ratio triangulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, M.-A.

    1993-01-01

    In aerospace computational fluid dynamics calculations, high aspect ratio, or stretched, triangulations are necessary to adequately resolve the features of a viscous flow around bodies. In this paper, we explore alternatives to the Delaunay triangulation which can be used to generate high aspect ratio triangulations of point sets. The method is based on a variation of the lifting map concept which derives Delaunay triangulations from convex hull calculations.

  14. Financial and Cost Aspects of Other Transactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-24

    0ort 0 ..... ... s.. FINANCIAL AND COST ASPECTS OF OTHER TRANSACTIONS Report Number 98-191 August 24, 1998 Office of the Inspector General...Audit Report on Financial and Cost Aspects of Other Transactions (Report No. 98-191) We are providing this final report for review and comment. This... transactions ." The second audit report will discuss the review of costs charged to the agreements by the "other transaction " participant(s). "Other

  15. Quantitative reactive modeling and verification.

    PubMed

    Henzinger, Thomas A

    Formal verification aims to improve the quality of software by detecting errors before they do harm. At the basis of formal verification is the logical notion of correctness, which purports to capture whether or not a program behaves as desired. We suggest that the boolean partition of software into correct and incorrect programs falls short of the practical need to assess the behavior of software in a more nuanced fashion against multiple criteria. We therefore propose to introduce quantitative fitness measures for programs, specifically for measuring the function, performance, and robustness of reactive programs such as concurrent processes. This article describes the goals of the ERC Advanced Investigator Project QUAREM. The project aims to build and evaluate a theory of quantitative fitness measures for reactive models. Such a theory must strive to obtain quantitative generalizations of the paradigms that have been success stories in qualitative reactive modeling, such as compositionality, property-preserving abstraction and abstraction refinement, model checking, and synthesis. The theory will be evaluated not only in the context of software and hardware engineering, but also in the context of systems biology. In particular, we will use the quantitative reactive models and fitness measures developed in this project for testing hypotheses about the mechanisms behind data from biological experiments.

  16. Quantitative Research in Written Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebhard, Ann O.

    Offered as an introductory guide to teachers interested in approaching written English as a "second dialect" that students must master, this review covers quantitative investigations of written language. The first section deals with developmental studies, describing how a variety of researchers have related written structure to writer maturity.…

  17. Quantitative Research in Written Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebhard, Ann O.

    Offered as an introductory guide to teachers interested in approaching written English as a "second dialect" that students must master, this review covers quantitative investigations of written language. The first section deals with developmental studies, describing how a variety of researchers have related written structure to writer maturity.…

  18. A Quantitative Infrared Spectroscopy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahling, Mark D.; Eliason, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Although infrared spectroscopy is used primarily for qualitative identifications, it is possible to use it as a quantitative tool as well. The use of a standard curve to determine percent methanol in a 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol sample is described. Background information, experimental procedures, and results obtained are provided. (JN)

  19. Quantitative assessment of scientific quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzl, Harald; Bloching, Philipp

    2012-09-01

    Scientific publications, authors, and journals are commonly evaluated with quantitative bibliometric measures. Frequently-used measures will be reviewed and their strengths and weaknesses will be highlighted. Reflections about conditions for a new, research paper-specific measure will be presented.

  20. A Quantitative Infrared Spectroscopy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahling, Mark D.; Eliason, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Although infrared spectroscopy is used primarily for qualitative identifications, it is possible to use it as a quantitative tool as well. The use of a standard curve to determine percent methanol in a 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol sample is described. Background information, experimental procedures, and results obtained are provided. (JN)

  1. Quantitative Reasoning in Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramful, Ajay; Ho, Siew Yin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Ajay Ramful and Siew Yin Ho explain the meaning of quantitative reasoning, describing how it is used in the to solve mathematical problems. They also describe a diagrammatic approach to represent relationships among quantities and provide examples of problems and their solutions.

  2. Towards quantitative assessment of calciphylaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deserno, Thomas M.; Sárándi, István.; Jose, Abin; Haak, Daniel; Jonas, Stephan; Specht, Paula; Brandenburg, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    Calciphylaxis is a rare disease that has devastating conditions associated with high morbidity and mortality. Calciphylaxis is characterized by systemic medial calcification of the arteries yielding necrotic skin ulcerations. In this paper, we aim at supporting the installation of multi-center registries for calciphylaxis, which includes a photographic documentation of skin necrosis. However, photographs acquired in different centers under different conditions using different equipment and photographers cannot be compared quantitatively. For normalization, we use a simple color pad that is placed into the field of view, segmented from the image, and its color fields are analyzed. In total, 24 colors are printed on that scale. A least-squares approach is used to determine the affine color transform. Furthermore, the card allows scale normalization. We provide a case study for qualitative assessment. In addition, the method is evaluated quantitatively using 10 images of two sets of different captures of the same necrosis. The variability of quantitative measurements based on free hand photography is assessed regarding geometric and color distortions before and after our simple calibration procedure. Using automated image processing, the standard deviation of measurements is significantly reduced. The coefficients of variations yield 5-20% and 2-10% for geometry and color, respectively. Hence, quantitative assessment of calciphylaxis becomes practicable and will impact a better understanding of this rare but fatal disease.

  3. e-ASPECTS software is non-inferior to neuroradiologists in applying the ASPECT score to computed tomography scans of acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Simon; Sinha, Devesh; Day, Diana; Reith, Wolfgang; Chapot, René; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Warburton, Elizabeth A; Guyler, Paul; Tysoe, Sharon; Fassbender, Klaus; Walter, Silke; Essig, Marco; Heidenrich, Jens; Konstas, Angelos A; Harrison, Michael; Papadakis, Michalis; Greveson, Eric; Joly, Olivier; Gerry, Stephen; Maguire, Holly; Roffe, Christine; Hampton-Till, James; Buchan, Alastair M; Grunwald, Iris Q

    2017-08-01

    Background The Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score (ASPECTS) is an established 10-point quantitative topographic computed tomography scan score to assess early ischemic changes. We performed a non-inferiority trial between the e-ASPECTS software and neuroradiologists in scoring ASPECTS on non-contrast enhanced computed tomography images of acute ischemic stroke patients. Methods In this multicenter study, e-ASPECTS and three independent neuroradiologists retrospectively and blindly assessed baseline non-contrast enhanced computed tomography images of 132 patients with acute anterior circulation ischemic stroke. Follow-up scans served as ground truth to determine the definite area of infarction. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for region- and score-based analysis, receiver-operating characteristic curves, Bland-Altman plots and Matthews correlation coefficients relative to the ground truth were calculated and comparisons were made between neuroradiologists and different pre-specified e-ASPECTS operating points. The non-inferiority margin was set to 10% for both sensitivity and specificity on region-based analysis. Results In total 2640 (132 patients × 20 regions per patient) ASPECTS regions were scored. Mean time from onset to baseline computed tomography was 146 ± 124 min and median NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was 11 (6-17, interquartile range). Median ASPECTS for ground truth on follow-up imaging was 8 (6.5-9, interquartile range). In the region-based analysis, two e-ASPECTS operating points (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 44%, 93%, 87% and 44%, 91%, 85%) were statistically non-inferior to all three neuroradiologists (all p-values <0.003). Both Matthews correlation coefficients for e-ASPECTS were higher (0.36 and 0.34) than those of all neuroradiologists (0.32, 0.31, and 0.3). Conclusions e-ASPECTS was non-inferior to three neuroradiologists in scoring ASPECTS on non-contrast enhanced computed tomography images of

  4. Quantitative infrared spectra of vapor phase chemical agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, Pamela M.; Kleimeyer, James; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White cell of 5.6 m optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer's law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at the Dugway Proving Ground (DPG).

  5. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies.

  6. Toward a Quantitative Theory of Electrically Forced Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael; Hohman, Moses; Rutledge, Gregory; Shin, Michael

    1999-11-01

    We describe our ongoing research aimed at developing quantitative comparisons between theory and experiment for electrically forced jets. This problem has technological importance in two different physical limits: for high viscosity fluids, it corresponds to electrospinning-i.e. the production of very thin fibers, and for low viscosity fluids it corresponds to electrosprays--the production of a spray of fine drops. An analysis of the shape and stability of electrically forced jets is presented, based on a simple model systematically derived from the full equations in the limit that the jet has small aspect ratio. The model includes all relevant effects (viscosity, surface tension, inertia, gravity, surface charge advection, bulk conductivity, electric tangential stress, etc.), and its simplicity enables elucidation of the underlying physics. We present quantitative comparisons between theory and experiment for the shape and stability of the jets, and the implications for the mechanisms of both electrospray production and electrospinning are discussed.

  7. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  8. Quantitative profiling of initiating ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangwei; Wan, Ji; Liu, Botao; Ma, Ming; Shen, Ben; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2015-02-01

    Cells have evolved exquisite mechanisms to fine-tune the rate of protein synthesis in response to stress. Systemic mapping of start-codon positions and precise measurement of the corresponding initiation rate would transform our understanding of translational control. Here we present quantitative translation initiation sequencing (QTI-seq), with which the initiating ribosomes can be profiled in real time at single-nucleotide resolution. Resultant initiation maps not only delineated variations of start-codon selection but also highlighted a dynamic range of initiation rates in response to nutrient starvation. The integrated data set provided unique insights into principles of alternative translation and mechanisms controlling different aspects of translation initiation. With RiboTag mice, QTI-seq permitted tissue-specific profiling of initiating ribosomes in vivo. Liver cell-specific ribosome profiling uncovered a robust translational reprogramming of the proteasome system in fasted mice. Our findings illuminated the prevalence and dynamic nature of translational regulation pivotal to physiological adaptation in vivo.

  9. Quantitative structural health monitoring using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Paul D.; Lee, Chee Kin; Scholey, Jonathan J.; Friswell, Michael I.; Wisnom, Michael R.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2006-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is potentially a highly suitable technique for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications due to its ability to achieve high sensitivity from a sparse array of sensors. For AE to be deployed as part of an SHM system it is essential that its capability is understood. This is the motivation for developing a forward model, referred to as QAE-Forward, of the complete AE process in real structures which is described in the first part of this paper. QAE-Forward is based around a modular and expandable architecture of frequency domain transfer functions to describe various aspects of the AE process, such as AE signal generation, wave propagation and signal detection. The intention is to build additional functionality into QAE-Forward as further data becomes available, whether this is through new analytic tools, numerical models or experimental measurements. QAE-Forward currently contains functions that implement (1) the excitation of multimodal guided waves by arbitrarily orientated point sources, (2) multi-modal wave propagation through generally anisotropic multi-layered media, and (3) the detection of waves by circular transducers of finite size. Results from the current implementation of QAE-Forward are compared to experimental data obtained from Hsu-Neilson tests on aluminum plate and good agreement is obtained. The paper then describes an experimental technique and a finite element modeling technique to obtain quantitative AE data from fatigue crack growth that will feed into QAE-Forward.

  10. Quantitative nanoscale vortex imaging using a cryogenic quantum magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Thiel, L; Rohner, D; Ganzhorn, M; Appel, P; Neu, E; Müller, B; Kleiner, R; Koelle, D; Maletinsky, P

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic studies of superconductors and their vortices play a pivotal role in understanding the mechanisms underlying superconductivity. Local measurements of penetration depths or magnetic stray fields enable access to fundamental aspects such as nanoscale variations in superfluid densities or the order parameter symmetry of superconductors. However, experimental tools that offer quantitative, nanoscale magnetometry and operate over large ranges of temperature and magnetic fields are still lacking. Here, we demonstrate the first operation of a cryogenic scanning quantum sensor in the form of a single nitrogen-vacancy electronic spin in diamond, which is capable of overcoming these existing limitations. To demonstrate the power of our approach, we perform quantitative, nanoscale magnetic imaging of Pearl vortices in the cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ. With a sensor-to-sample distance of ∼10 nm, we observe striking deviations from the prevalent monopole approximation in our vortex stray-field images, and find excellent quantitative agreement with Pearl's analytic model. Our experiments provide a non-invasive and unambiguous determination of the system's local penetration depth and are readily extended to higher temperatures and magnetic fields. These results demonstrate the potential of quantitative quantum sensors in benchmarking microscopic models of complex electronic systems and open the door for further exploration of strongly correlated electron physics using scanning nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry.

  11. Quantitative nanoscale vortex imaging using a cryogenic quantum magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, L.; Rohner, D.; Ganzhorn, M.; Appel, P.; Neu, E.; Müller, B.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Maletinsky, P.

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic studies of superconductors and their vortices play a pivotal role in understanding the mechanisms underlying superconductivity. Local measurements of penetration depths or magnetic stray fields enable access to fundamental aspects such as nanoscale variations in superfluid densities or the order parameter symmetry of superconductors. However, experimental tools that offer quantitative, nanoscale magnetometry and operate over large ranges of temperature and magnetic fields are still lacking. Here, we demonstrate the first operation of a cryogenic scanning quantum sensor in the form of a single nitrogen-vacancy electronic spin in diamond, which is capable of overcoming these existing limitations. To demonstrate the power of our approach, we perform quantitative, nanoscale magnetic imaging of Pearl vortices in the cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ. With a sensor-to-sample distance of ˜10 nm, we observe striking deviations from the prevalent monopole approximation in our vortex stray-field images, and find excellent quantitative agreement with Pearl's analytic model. Our experiments provide a non-invasive and unambiguous determination of the system's local penetration depth and are readily extended to higher temperatures and magnetic fields. These results demonstrate the potential of quantitative quantum sensors in benchmarking microscopic models of complex electronic systems and open the door for further exploration of strongly correlated electron physics using scanning nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry.

  12. Quantitative proteomic analysis by accurate mass retention time pairs.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jeffrey C; Denny, Richard; Dorschel, Craig A; Gorenstein, Marc; Kass, Ignatius J; Li, Guo-Zhong; McKenna, Therese; Nold, Michael J; Richardson, Keith; Young, Phillip; Geromanos, Scott

    2005-04-01

    Current methodologies for protein quantitation include 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis techniques, metabolic labeling, and stable isotope labeling methods to name only a few. The current literature illustrates both pros and cons for each of the previously mentioned methodologies. Keeping with the teachings of William of Ockham, "with all things being equal the simplest solution tends to be correct", a simple LC/MS based methodology is presented that allows relative changes in abundance of proteins in highly complex mixtures to be determined. Utilizing a reproducible chromatographic separations system along with the high mass resolution and mass accuracy of an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer, the quantitative comparison of tens of thousands of ions emanating from identically prepared control and experimental samples can be made. Using this configuration, we can determine the change in relative abundance of a small number of ions between the two conditions solely by accurate mass and retention time. Employing standard operating procedures for both sample preparation and ESI-mass spectrometry, one typically obtains under 5 ppm mass precision and quantitative variations between 10 and 15%. The principal focus of this paper will demonstrate the quantitative aspects of the methodology and continue with a discussion of the associated, complementary qualitative capabilities.

  13. Quantitative three-dimensional low-speed wake surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical and practical aspects of conducting three-dimensional wake measurements in large wind tunnels are reviewed with emphasis on applications in low-speed aerodynamics. Such quantitative wake surveys furnish separate values for the components of drag, such as profile drag and induced drag, but also measure lift without the use of a balance. In addition to global data, details of the wake flowfield as well as spanwise distributions of lift and drag are obtained. The paper demonstrates the value of this measurement technique using data from wake measurements conducted by Boeing on a variety of low-speed configurations including the complex high-lift system of a transport aircraft.

  14. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Fusion contains 13 informative papers that were initially presented at the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety held in Vienna, Austria, 10-13 July 2006. Following recommendation from the International Fusion Research Council, the IAEA organizes Technical Meetings on Fusion Safety with the aim to bring together experts to discuss the ongoing work, share new ideas and outline general guidance and recommendations on different issues related to safety and environmental (S&E) aspects of fusion research and power facilities. Previous meetings in this series were held in Vienna, Austria (1980), Ispra, Italy (1983), Culham, UK (1986), Jackson Hole, USA (1989), Toronto, Canada (1993), Naka, Japan (1996) and Cannes, France (2000). The recognized progress in fusion research and technology over the last quarter of a century has boosted the awareness of the potential of fusion to be a practically inexhaustible and clean source of energy. The decision to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents a landmark in the path to fusion power engineering. Ongoing activities to license ITER in France look for an adequate balance between technological and scientific deliverables and complying with safety requirements. Actually, this is the first instance of licensing a representative fusion machine, and it will very likely shape the way in which a more common basis for establishing safety standards and policies for licensing future fusion power plants will be developed. Now that ITER licensing activities are underway, it is becoming clear that the international fusion community should strengthen its efforts in the area of designing the next generations of fusion power plants—demonstrational and commercial. Therefore, the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Safety focused on the safety aspects of power facilities. Some ITER-related safety issues were reported and discussed owing to their potential

  15. Quantitative Neuroimaging: What You can Say and What You can Believe About the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desco, M.

    For many years, medical images have been simple pictures examined by a doctor at the lightbox. With the introduction of modern image modalities (X-Ray Computed Tomography, Positron Emission Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging), imaging has turned into a measuring instrument able to provide quantitative information about many aspects of biological systems, including brain function.

  16. Kinetic Analysis of Amylase Using Quantitative Benedict's and Iodine Starch Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Beverly; Lunday, Deborah; Miskevich, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of carbohydrates is a fundamental analytical tool used in many aspects of biology and chemistry. We have adapted a technique developed by Mathews et al. using an inexpensive scanner and open-source image analysis software to quantify amylase activity using both the breakdown of starch and the appearance of glucose. Breakdown…

  17. Kinetic Analysis of Amylase Using Quantitative Benedict's and Iodine Starch Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Beverly; Lunday, Deborah; Miskevich, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of carbohydrates is a fundamental analytical tool used in many aspects of biology and chemistry. We have adapted a technique developed by Mathews et al. using an inexpensive scanner and open-source image analysis software to quantify amylase activity using both the breakdown of starch and the appearance of glucose. Breakdown…

  18. Quantitative disease resistance and quantitative resistance Loci in breeding.

    PubMed

    St Clair, Dina A

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative disease resistance (QDR) has been observed within many crop plants but is not as well understood as qualitative (monogenic) disease resistance and has not been used as extensively in breeding. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is a powerful tool for genetic dissection of QDR. DNA markers tightly linked to quantitative resistance loci (QRLs) controlling QDR can be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) to incorporate these valuable traits. QDR confers a reduction, rather than lack, of disease and has diverse biological and molecular bases as revealed by cloning of QRLs and identification of the candidate gene(s) underlying QRLs. Increasing our biological knowledge of QDR and QRLs will enhance understanding of how QDR differs from qualitative resistance and provide the necessary information to better deploy these resources in breeding. Application of MAS for QRLs in breeding for QDR to diverse pathogens is illustrated by examples from wheat, barley, common bean, tomato, and pepper. Strategies for optimum deployment of QRLs require research to understand effects of QDR on pathogen populations over time.

  19. Who Is Solidary? A Study of Swedish Students' Attitudes towards Solidarity as an Aspect of Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbjörnsson, Tomas; Molin, Lena

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore students' attitudes towards solidarity, as an aspect of sustainable development (SD), and analyse how students can be described as solidary. Our motive is to obtain better knowledge regarding important preconditions for education for SD. We conducted a quantitative study with 782 responding upper secondary students from…

  20. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy.

  1. Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers of NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Kinner, Sonja; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional imaging modalities, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR), play an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by allowing noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic steatosis. However, conventional imaging modalities are limited as biomarkers of NAFLD for various reasons. Multi-parametric quantitative MRI techniques overcome many of the shortcomings of conventional imaging and allow comprehensive and objective evaluation of NAFLD. MRI can provide unconfounded biomarkers of hepatic fat, iron, and fibrosis in a single examination—a virtual biopsy has become a clinical reality. In this article, we will review the utility and limitation of conventional US, CT, and MR imaging for the diagnosis NAFLD. Recent advances in imaging biomarkers of NAFLD are also discussed with an emphasis in multi-parametric quantitative MRI. PMID:26848588

  2. Bioimaging for quantitative phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Xia, Xian; Huang, Yi; Chen, Xingwei; Han, Jing-Dong J

    2016-06-01

    With the development of bio-imaging techniques, an increasing number of studies apply these techniques to generate a myriad of image data. Its applications range from quantification of cellular, tissue, organismal and behavioral phenotypes of model organisms, to human facial phenotypes. The bio-imaging approaches to automatically detect, quantify, and profile phenotypic changes related to specific biological questions open new doors to studying phenotype-genotype associations and to precisely evaluating molecular changes associated with quantitative phenotypes. Here, we review major applications of bioimage-based quantitative phenotype analysis. Specifically, we describe the biological questions and experimental needs addressable by these analyses, computational techniques and tools that are available in these contexts, and the new perspectives on phenotype-genotype association uncovered by such analyses.

  3. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy. PMID:26334858

  4. Quantitative wave-particle duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Tabish

    2016-07-01

    The complementary wave and particle character of quantum objects (or quantons) was pointed out by Niels Bohr. This wave-particle duality, in the context of the two-slit experiment, is here described not just as two extreme cases of wave and particle characteristics, but in terms of quantitative measures of these characteristics, known to follow a duality relation. A very simple and intuitive derivation of a closely related duality relation is presented, which should be understandable to the introductory student.

  5. Quantitative analysis of glycoprotein glycans.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The ability to quantitatively determine changes in the N- and O-linked glycans is an essential component of comparative glycomics. Multiple strategies are available to by which this can be accomplished, including; both label free approaches and isotopic labeling strategies. The focus of this chapter is to describe each of these approaches while providing insight into their strengths and weaknesses, so that glycomic investigators can make an educated choice of the strategy that is best suited for their particular application.

  6. Quantitative imaging of MPD flowfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, K.; Kuriki, K.; Nakayama, T.

    Quantitative imaging of MPD flowfields was carried out by disturbance-free measurements such as magnetic sensitive film for current, CCD images with interference filters for electron temperature, and far infrared Mach-Zehnder interferometry for plasma density. A distinct cathode jet accompanying a current concentrated at the cathode-tip was observed in molecular propellant and hydrogen. Such wall-detaching plasma confinement inside the self-induced magnetic field led to thruster performance improvements.

  7. Quantitative Relaxometry of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Deoni, Sean C.L.

    2011-01-01

    The exquisite soft tissue contrast provided by magnetic resonance imaging arises principally from differences in the intrinsic relaxation properties, T1 and T2. Though the intricate relationships that link tissue microstructure and the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times remain to be firmly established, quantitative measurement of these parameters, also referred to as quantitative relaxometry, can be informative of disease-related tissue change, developmental plasticity, and other biological processes. Further, relaxometry studies potentially offer a more detailed characterization of tissue, compared with conventional qualitative or weighted imaging approaches. The purpose of this review is to briefly review the biophysical basis of relaxation, focusing specifically on the T1, T2 and T2* relaxation times, and to detail some of the more widely used and clinically feasible techniques for their in vivo measurement. We will focus on neuroimaging applications, though the methods described are equally well suited to cardiac, abdominal and musculoskeletal imaging. Potential sources of error, and methods for their correction, are also touched on. Finally, the combination of relaxation time data with other complementary quantitative imaging data, including diffusion tensor imaging, is discussed, with the aim of more thoroughly characterizing brain tissue. PMID:21613875

  8. Quantitative measures for redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Ché S; Eagling, Beatrice D; Driscoll, Scott R E; Rohwer, Johann M

    2016-07-01

    Redox signaling is now recognized as an important regulatory mechanism for a number of cellular processes including the antioxidant response, phosphokinase signal transduction and redox metabolism. While there has been considerable progress in identifying the cellular machinery involved in redox signaling, quantitative measures of redox signals have been lacking, limiting efforts aimed at understanding and comparing redox signaling under normoxic and pathogenic conditions. Here we have outlined some of the accepted principles for redox signaling, including the description of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule and the role of kinetics in conferring specificity to these signaling events. Based on these principles, we then develop a working definition for redox signaling and review a number of quantitative methods that have been employed to describe signaling in other systems. Using computational modeling and published data, we show how time- and concentration- dependent analyses, in particular, could be used to quantitatively describe redox signaling and therefore provide important insights into the functional organization of redox networks. Finally, we consider some of the key challenges with implementing these methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative characterisation of sedimentary grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunwal, Mohit; Mulchrone, Kieran F.; Meere, Patrick A.

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of sedimentary texture helps in determining the formation, transportation and deposition processes of sedimentary rocks. Grain size analysis is traditionally quantitative, whereas grain shape analysis is largely qualitative. A semi-automated approach to quantitatively analyse shape and size of sand sized sedimentary grains is presented. Grain boundaries are manually traced from thin section microphotographs in the case of lithified samples and are automatically identified in the case of loose sediments. Shape and size paramters can then be estimated using a software package written on the Mathematica platform. While automated methodology already exists for loose sediment analysis, the available techniques for the case of lithified samples are limited to cases of high definition thin section microphotographs showing clear contrast between framework grains and matrix. Along with the size of grain, shape parameters such as roundness, angularity, circularity, irregularity and fractal dimension are measured. A new grain shape parameter developed using Fourier descriptors has also been developed. To test this new approach theoretical examples were analysed and produce high quality results supporting the accuracy of the algorithm. Furthermore sandstone samples from known aeolian and fluvial environments from the Dingle Basin, County Kerry, Ireland were collected and analysed. Modern loose sediments from glacial till from County Cork, Ireland and aeolian sediments from Rajasthan, India have also been collected and analysed. A graphical summary of the data is presented and allows for quantitative distinction between samples extracted from different sedimentary environments.

  10. Quantitative analysis of glycated proteins.

    PubMed

    Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Ramírez-Boo, María; Finamore, Francesco; Gluck, Florent; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2014-02-07

    The proposed protocol presents a comprehensive approach for large-scale qualitative and quantitative analysis of glycated proteins (GP) in complex biological samples including biological fluids and cell lysates such as plasma and red blood cells. The method, named glycation isotopic labeling (GIL), is based on the differential labeling of proteins with isotopic [(13)C6]-glucose, which supports quantitation of the resulting glycated peptides after enzymatic digestion with endoproteinase Glu-C. The key principle of the GIL approach is the detection of doublet signals for each glycated peptide in MS precursor scanning (glycated peptide with in vivo [(12)C6]- and in vitro [(13)C6]-glucose). The mass shift of the doublet signals is +6, +3 or +2 Da depending on the peptide charge state and the number of glycation sites. The intensity ratio between doublet signals generates quantitative information of glycated proteins that can be related to the glycemic state of the studied samples. Tandem mass spectrometry with high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD-MS2) and data-dependent methods with collision-induced dissociation (CID-MS3 neutral loss scan) are used for qualitative analysis.

  11. Quantitative studies of immunofluorescent staining*

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Ernst H.; Sepulveda, Marion R.; Barnett, Eugene V.

    1968-01-01

    Reproducible titres of indirect immunofluorescent (IF) staining with antinuclear factor (ANF)-containing sera could be obtained with different antihuman IgG conjugates by quantitative adjustments of their characteristics. Conversely, one ANF yielded a broad range of ANF titre (80-640) upon appropriate adjustments of the conjugate characteristics. The same and related characteristics of the conjugates also afforded a basis for quantitatively defining the conditions under which non-specific staining (NSS) appeared. The salient characteristics of the anti-IgG conjugates include: (1) their strength of antiglobulin (expressed as units/ml of precipitating antibody or μg antibody N/ml); (2) their apparent fluorescein concentration (in μg F/ml); (3) their protein concentration (in mg/ml). Optical and immunologic sensitivity ratios are calculated from these conjugate characteristics. Optical sensitivity (expressed as fluorescein concentration to protein concentration (F/P) ratios), immunological sensitivities (expressed as units/1% protein) and the dilution employed serve to characterize quantitatively anti-IgG conjugates adequately to define their specific and non-specific staining properties. PMID:4179321

  12. GCS plan for software aspects of certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shagnea, Anita M.; Lowman, Douglas S.; Withers, B. Edward

    1990-01-01

    As part of the Guidance and Control Software (GCS) research project being sponsored by NASA to evaluate the failure processes of software, standard industry software development procedures are being employed. To ensure that these procedures are authentic, the guidelines outlined in the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA/DO-178A document entitled, software considerations in airborne systems and equipment certification, were adopted. A major aspect of these guidelines is proper documentation. As such, this report, the plan for software aspects of certification, was produced in accordance with DO-178A. An overview is given of the GCS research project, including the goals of the project, project organization, and project schedules. It also specifies the plans for all aspects of the project which relate to the certification of the GCS implementations developed under a NASA contract. These plans include decisions made regarding the software specification, accuracy requirements, configuration management, implementation development and verification, and the development of the GCS simulator.

  13. Nutritional Aspects of Treatment in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    SOLTANI, Danesh; GHAFFAR POUR, Majid; TAFAKHORI, Abbas; SARRAF, Payam; BITARAFAN, Sama

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by interruption of normal neuronal functions that is manifested by behavioral disorders, changing of awareness level, and presence of some sensory, autonomic and motor symptoms or signs. It is resulted from many different causes. Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are considered to manage epileptic attacks. Some of them change metabolism and absorption of many nutrients. Therefore, epileptic patients may be in higher risk of nutrient deficiency and its unwelcome effects. In the present paper, we intend to review the relationship between nutrition and epilepsy in two aspects. In one aspect we discuss the nutritional status in epileptic patients, the causes of nutritional deficiencies and the way of compensation of the nutrient deficiencies. It will guide these patients to have a healthy life. In another aspect we explain the role of some nutrients and specific diets in management of epileptic attacks. It can help to better control of epileptic attacks in these patients. PMID:27375750

  14. Nutritional Aspects of Treatment in Epileptic Patients.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Danesh; Ghaffar Pour, Majid; Tafakhori, Abbas; Sarraf, Payam; Bitarafan, Sama

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by interruption of normal neuronal functions that is manifested by behavioral disorders, changing of awareness level, and presence of some sensory, autonomic and motor symptoms or signs. It is resulted from many different causes. Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are considered to manage epileptic attacks. Some of them change metabolism and absorption of many nutrients. Therefore, epileptic patients may be in higher risk of nutrient deficiency and its unwelcome effects. In the present paper, we intend to review the relationship between nutrition and epilepsy in two aspects. In one aspect we discuss the nutritional status in epileptic patients, the causes of nutritional deficiencies and the way of compensation of the nutrient deficiencies. It will guide these patients to have a healthy life. In another aspect we explain the role of some nutrients and specific diets in management of epileptic attacks. It can help to better control of epileptic attacks in these patients.

  15. Algorithms for high aspect ratio oriented triangulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, Mary-Anne K.

    1995-01-01

    Grid generation plays an integral part in the solution of computational fluid dynamics problems for aerodynamics applications. A major difficulty with standard structured grid generation, which produces quadrilateral (or hexahedral) elements with implicit connectivity, has been the requirement for a great deal of human intervention in developing grids around complex configurations. This has led to investigations into unstructured grids with explicit connectivities, which are primarily composed of triangular (or tetrahedral) elements, although other subdivisions of convex cells may be used. The existence of large gradients in the solution of aerodynamic problems may be exploited to reduce the computational effort by using high aspect ratio elements in high gradient regions. However, the heuristic approaches currently in use do not adequately address this need for high aspect ratio unstructured grids. High aspect ratio triangulations very often produce the large angles that are to be avoided. Point generation techniques based on contour or front generation are judged to be the most promising in terms of being able to handle complicated multiple body objects, with this technique lending itself well to adaptivity. The eventual goal encompasses several phases: first, a partitioning phase, in which the Voronoi diagram of a set of points and line segments (the input set) will be generated to partition the input domain; second, a contour generation phase in which body-conforming contours are used to subdivide the partition further as well as introduce the foundation for aspect ratio control, and; third, a Steiner triangulation phase in which points are added to the partition to enable triangulation while controlling angle bounds and aspect ratio. This provides a combination of the advancing front/contour techniques and refinement. By using a front, aspect ratio can be better controlled. By using refinement, bounds on angles can be maintained, while attempting to minimize

  16. [Genetically modified organisms (GMO): toxicological aspects].

    PubMed

    Ludwicki, J K

    1998-01-01

    The genetically modified organisms (GMO) are one of the major public concerns partially due to the activity of the non-governmental organizations which believe that public opinion must be duly informed on what leaves the laboratories and enters the environment or is proposed as food. This article discusses some major toxicological and nutritional aspects of GMO designed as food for humans. The range of current use of GMOs, potential hazards for humans, safety assessment, allergenic concerns, and some aspects of the use of marker genes are discussed in regard to human safety. The need for relevant regulations is stressed.

  17. Laboratory Modeling of Aspects of Large Fires,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-30

    7 -7 g~L AD-A153 152 DNA-TR- 84-18 LABORATORY MODELING OF ASPECTS OF LARGE FIRES G.F. Carrier "URARY F.E. Fendell b DVSO R.D. Fleeter N. Got L.M...I1I TITLE (include Socurty Olassihicarion) LABORATORY MODELING OF ASPECTS OF LARGE FIRES 12. PERSONAL AUrHoR(S G.F. Carrier F.E. Fendell R.D. Fleeter N...Motorbuch Verlag.___ Caidin, M. (1960). A Torch to the Enemy: the Fire Raid on Tokyo. New York, NY: Ballantine. Carrier, G. F., Fendell , F. E., and

  18. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile constituents from latrines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianming; Aoll, Jackline; Niclass, Yvan; Velazco, Maria Inés; Wünsche, Laurent; Pika, Jana; Starkenmann, Christian

    2013-07-16

    More than 2.5 billion people defecate in the open. The increased commitment of private and public organizations to improving this situation is driving the research and development of new technologies for toilets and latrines. Although key technical aspects are considered by researchers when designing new technologies for developing countries, the basic aspect of offending malodors from human waste is often neglected. With the objective of contributing to technical solutions that are acceptable to global consumers, we investigated the chemical composition of latrine malodors sampled in Africa and India. Field latrines in four countries were evaluated olfactively and the odors qualitatively and quantitatively characterized with three analytical techniques. Sulfur compounds including H2S, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl-mono-(di;tri) sulfide are important in sewage-like odors of pit latrines under anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic conditions, in Nairobi for example, paracresol and indole reached concentrations of 89 and 65 μg/g, respectively, which, along with short chain fatty acids such as butyric acid (13 mg/g) explained the strong rancid, manure and farm yard odor. This work represents the first qualitative and quantitative study of volatile compounds sampled from seven pit latrines in a variety of geographic, technical, and economic contexts in addition to three single stools from India and a pit latrine model system.

  19. Learning Quantitative Sequence-Function Relationships from Massively Parallel Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwal, Gurinder S.; Kinney, Justin B.

    2016-03-01

    A fundamental aspect of biological information processing is the ubiquity of sequence-function relationships—functions that map the sequence of DNA, RNA, or protein to a biochemically relevant activity. Most sequence-function relationships in biology are quantitative, but only recently have experimental techniques for effectively measuring these relationships been developed. The advent of such "massively parallel" experiments presents an exciting opportunity for the concepts and methods of statistical physics to inform the study of biological systems. After reviewing these recent experimental advances, we focus on the problem of how to infer parametric models of sequence-function relationships from the data produced by these experiments. Specifically, we retrace and extend recent theoretical work showing that inference based on mutual information, not the standard likelihood-based approach, is often necessary for accurately learning the parameters of these models. Closely connected with this result is the emergence of "diffeomorphic modes"—directions in parameter space that are far less constrained by data than likelihood-based inference would suggest. Analogous to Goldstone modes in physics, diffeomorphic modes arise from an arbitrarily broken symmetry of the inference problem. An analytically tractable model of a massively parallel experiment is then described, providing an explicit demonstration of these fundamental aspects of statistical inference. This paper concludes with an outlook on the theoretical and computational challenges currently facing studies of quantitative sequence-function relationships.

  20. New Quantitative Tectonic Models for Southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, H. J.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2002-12-01

    Crustal deformation studies using GPS have made important contributions to our knowledge of the tectonics of Alaska. Since 1995, we have determined precise GPS velocities for more than 350 sites throughout Alaska. We use a subset of these sites to study permanent deformation of the overriding North American plate, in particular the motion on the strike-slip Denali and Fairweather faults and the deformation of interior Alaska. Velocities from almost 100 GPS sites help us to determine how the Pacific-North American plate boundary deformation is distributed and which structures other than the Alaska-Aleutian megathrust are important in accommodating the relative motion of the plates. Based on the GPS velocities, we have constructed new quantitative tectonic models for Alaska. Our models are based on, and a considerable improvement to the model of Lahr and Plafker [1980]. The fundamental difference between our proposed models and theirs is that we use measured slip rates rather than assumed rates or guesses. We thus present the first truly quantitative tectonic models for the deformation of the overriding plate in Alaska, although several important parts of the models need additional data to constrain them. Using dislocation modeling techniques, we estimate slip rates for the McKinley segment of the Denali fault and the Fairweather fault to be approximately 9 mm/yr and 46 mm/yr, respectively. We present three models, all of which involve the Yakutat block, Fairweather block (called the St. Elias block by Lahr and Plafker [1980]), and the southern Alaska block (called the Wrangell block by Lahr and Plafker [1980]). The western boundary to the Southern Alaska block is the most speculative, and the nature and location of this boundary are the only differences between our three proposed models. For each crustal block we determine an Euler pole and angular rotation rate and calculate the slip rates across the boundaries between the blocks. The models provide a first step

  1. Statistical Aspects of Effect Size Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    When the results of a series of independent studies are combined, it is useful to quantitatively estimate the magnitude of the effects. Several methods for estimating effect size are compared in this paper. Glass' estimator and the uniformly minimum variance unbiased estimator are based on the ratio of the sample mean difference and the pooled…

  2. Demographic Aspects of the Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiser, Clyde V.

    1970-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Conference on "Demographic Aspects of the Black Community," held in 1969, and organized by the Milbank Memorial Fund. The Conference was held with the belief that knowledge of demographic characteristics and trends of the black community is essential to better understanding of various problems of the…

  3. Nuclear aspects of few-baryon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.F.

    1993-10-01

    Recent progress in understanding the bound state properties of the trinucleons and the alpha particle in terms of a hadron picture of the nucleus is reviewed. The role of three-body forces and meson exchange currents is examined. novel aspects of few-body hypernuclei as well as unresolved issues in this S {ne} O sector are summarized.

  4. An Underdiscussed Aspect of Chomsky (1959)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Barry Eshkol

    2007-01-01

    Chomsky's (1959) review of Skinner's (1957) "Verbal Behavior" has been influential and attributed with a role in the cognitive revolution. However, while counter reviews from within behavior analysis have noted that Chomsky misunderstood the subject matter, certain aspects of his scholarship have been underdiscussed. This includes several…

  5. Economic Aspects of a Resource Discovery Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Leah; Oppenheim, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Explores economic aspects of a resource discovery network (RDN) in the United Kingdom consisting of a center and eight sub-based hubs using Ithink Analyst, a modeling software package. Results suggest that with a combination of sponsorship and subscription income a RDN could succeed without grant funding within 10 years of its launch. (Author/LRW)

  6. Aspects of Tutor and Writing Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidin, M. Arifin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between aspects of tutor and the students' basic writing outcomes of the Elementary School Teacher Education at the Distance Learning Program Unit, Open University of Palu. This is ex post facto correlation with the population research of 387 people and the total sample of 100 people. This…

  7. Education for All Aspects of the Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Thomas; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Education for all aspects of the industry (AAI) is a strategy that is being advocated by education reformers to combine learning and experience, integrate vocational and academic education, develop more interdisciplinary instruction, and forge more links between schools, business, and the community. A study examined AAI from the perspective of the…

  8. Aspects of the Syntax of Indonesian Teochew

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Anne Elise

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to provide a description of some aspects of the syntax of Indonesian Teochew, a Southern Min Chinese language spoken in Indonesian. This dissertation examines two dialects of Indonesian Teochew: Jambi Teochew, which is spoken in Jambi City, Sumatra, and Pontianak Teochew, which is spoken in Pontianak, West…

  9. Aspects of Teacher Accountability in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Carroll L.

    The term "accountability" involves more than the recent demand by the public that schools justify the academic levels achieved by their students. Such aspects of accountability as teacher certification, school accreditation, educational evaluation, and student testing have existed for years. The New Mexico State Department of Education…

  10. Economic Aspects of a Resource Discovery Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Leah; Oppenheim, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Explores economic aspects of a resource discovery network (RDN) in the United Kingdom consisting of a center and eight sub-based hubs using Ithink Analyst, a modeling software package. Results suggest that with a combination of sponsorship and subscription income a RDN could succeed without grant funding within 10 years of its launch. (Author/LRW)

  11. Interdisciplinary Aspects of Learning: Physics and Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleg, Yavoruk

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with interdisciplinary aspects of learning in the case of physics and psychology. It describes the lab-based academic course focused on: observation and experimentation; discovery of new scientific facts; measurement; identification of errors; the study of psychological characteristics of people (time perception, the reaction…

  12. Social Aspects of Bioenergy Sustainability Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Luchner, Sarah; Johnson, Kristen; Lindauer, Alicia; McKinnon, Taryn; Broad, Max

    2013-05-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office held a workshop on “Social Aspects of Bioenergy” on April 24, 2012, in Washington, D.C., and convened a webinar on this topic on May 8, 2012. The findings and recommendations from the workshop and webinar are compiled in this report.

  13. Legal Aspects of Organizing a Library Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlile, Huntington; Burkley, John H.

    1980-01-01

    Three aspects of a library network are discussed: (1) legal structure, (2) membership, and (3) governance. An ideal network organization, from a legal viewpoint, is outlined. Also discussed are these types of network organizational structures: government networks, quasi-government networks, nonprofit membership corporations, and unincorporated…

  14. Developmental Aspects of Scientific Reasoning: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Harold J.; Cox, William F., Jr.

    Two experiments investigated developmental aspects of the two components of scientific reasoning: induction and deduction. In the first experiment, 98 subjects, ages 5 through 11, inductively identified four silhouetted pictures by removing, one at a time and in any sequence, as few covering pieces as possible. Results indicated that: (a) the…

  15. On virial analysis at low aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Bongard, Michael W.; Barr, Jayson L.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Reusch, Joshua A.; Thome, Kathreen E.

    2016-07-28

    The validity of virial analysis to infer global MHD equilibrium poloidal beta βp and internal inductance ℓi from external magnetics measurements is examined for low aspect ratio configurations with A < 2. Numerical equilibrium studies at varied aspect ratio are utilized to validate the technique at finite aspect ratio. The effect of applying high-A approximations to low-A experimental data is quantified and demonstrates significant over-estimation of stored energy (factors of 2–10) in spherical tokamak geometry. Experimental approximations to equilibrium-dependent volume integral terms in the analysis are evaluated at low-A. Highly paramagnetic configurations are found to be inadequately represented through the virial mean radius parameter RT. Alternate formulations for inferring βp and ℓi that are independent of RT to avoid this difficulty are presented for the static isotropic limit. Lastly, these formulations are suitable for fast estimation of tokamak stored energy components at low aspect ratio using virial analysis.

  16. Objective reality, causality and the aspect experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegg, D. T.

    1980-08-01

    It is argued that, in the framework of Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics objective reality and causality in the strict sense are consistent with the outcome of atomic cascade photon correlation experiments, provided this outcome is not altered by the Aspect experimental modification.

  17. On virial analysis at low aspect ratio

    DOE PAGES

    Bongard, Michael W.; Barr, Jayson L.; Fonck, Raymond J.; ...

    2016-07-28

    The validity of virial analysis to infer global MHD equilibrium poloidal beta βp and internal inductance ℓi from external magnetics measurements is examined for low aspect ratio configurations with A < 2. Numerical equilibrium studies at varied aspect ratio are utilized to validate the technique at finite aspect ratio. The effect of applying high-A approximations to low-A experimental data is quantified and demonstrates significant over-estimation of stored energy (factors of 2–10) in spherical tokamak geometry. Experimental approximations to equilibrium-dependent volume integral terms in the analysis are evaluated at low-A. Highly paramagnetic configurations are found to be inadequately represented through themore » virial mean radius parameter RT. Alternate formulations for inferring βp and ℓi that are independent of RT to avoid this difficulty are presented for the static isotropic limit. Lastly, these formulations are suitable for fast estimation of tokamak stored energy components at low aspect ratio using virial analysis.« less

  18. On virial analysis at low aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Bongard, Michael W.; Barr, Jayson L.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Reusch, Joshua A.; Thome, Kathreen E.

    2016-07-28

    The validity of virial analysis to infer global MHD equilibrium poloidal beta βp and internal inductance ℓi from external magnetics measurements is examined for low aspect ratio configurations with A < 2. Numerical equilibrium studies at varied aspect ratio are utilized to validate the technique at finite aspect ratio. The effect of applying high-A approximations to low-A experimental data is quantified and demonstrates significant over-estimation of stored energy (factors of 2–10) in spherical tokamak geometry. Experimental approximations to equilibrium-dependent volume integral terms in the analysis are evaluated at low-A. Highly paramagnetic configurations are found to be inadequately represented through the virial mean radius parameter RT. Alternate formulations for inferring βp and ℓi that are independent of RT to avoid this difficulty are presented for the static isotropic limit. Lastly, these formulations are suitable for fast estimation of tokamak stored energy components at low aspect ratio using virial analysis.

  19. An Underdiscussed Aspect of Chomsky (1959)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Barry Eshkol

    2007-01-01

    Chomsky's (1959) review of Skinner's (1957) "Verbal Behavior" has been influential and attributed with a role in the cognitive revolution. However, while counter reviews from within behavior analysis have noted that Chomsky misunderstood the subject matter, certain aspects of his scholarship have been underdiscussed. This includes several…

  20. Clustering aspects of nuclear structure and reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.; Rae, W.D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Some aspects of clustering phenomena in nuclear structure and reactions are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the relationship between cluster-like states and shape-isomeric states which arise as a result of shell effects in deformed potentials. Some recent evidence in favor of this connection is presented and discussed. 50 refs., 17 figs.

  1. Aspects of a Modern Business Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Business Education.

    A collection of six papers by New York business educators deals with criteria for judging the completeness and effectiveness of a business education program. The curriculum, recruitment, program promotion, image, and other aspects of a comprehensive high school program are outlined by C. Irene Schindler. Karen R. Gillespie of New York University…

  2. Oedipus in Gethsemane: archetypal aspects of homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Frey-Wehrlin, C T

    1992-04-01

    In the history of depth psychology, we often come upon the theme of 'father-son' relationships, which, although initially positive, ultimately become destructive. I submit that repressed homosexual aspects may be responsible for this turn of events and illustrate this hypothesis with archetypal motifs found in Greek and Judaeo-Christian culture.

  3. Psychosomatic Aspects of Cancer: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, John B.

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested in this literature review on the psychosomatic aspects of cancer that psychoanalytic interpretations which focused on intrapsychic elements have given way to considerations of rehabilitation and assistance with the complex emotional reactions of patients and their families to terminal illness and death. (Author/DB)

  4. Aspects of Vocabulary Knowledge in German Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary-Sundquist, Colleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on second language vocabulary acquisition has shown that learning to use a new word is not a simple matter of making a form-meaning connection. Knowing a word instead requires mastery of as many as nine different aspects of vocabulary knowledge (Nation, 2001). The current study uses data from five beginning-level textbooks of…

  5. Teaching the Legal Aspects of Business Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harcourt, Jules

    1990-01-01

    Maintains that the basic business communication course is the ideal course in which to discuss the legal aspects of business communication. Reviews some of the most important legal considerations: contract communications, credit and collections communication, employment communication, and other interpersonal communication. (SR)

  6. Aspects of Bangime Phonology, Morphology, and Morphosyntax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantgan, Abbie

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation provides a description of aspects of the phonology, morphology, and morphosyntax of Bangime. Bangime is a language isolate spoken in the Dogon language speaking area of Central Eastern Mali. Although the Bangande, the speakers of Bangime, self-identify with the Dogon, their language bears practically no resemblance to the…

  7. Psychological Aspects of Female College Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcoxon, Barbara R.

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the psychological aspects (femininity, masculinity, and androgyny), attitudes, self-esteem, and social competence exhibited by female college athletes participating in elected individual and team sports. For the purpose of this research the following hypotheses were tested: The social costs of…

  8. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SCHOOL BUILDING DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KEITH, PAT M.; SMITH, LOUIS M.

    THE DEVELOPMENT AND INTEGRATION OF SOCIOPSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SCHOOL DESIGN WERE INVESTIGATED BY FOCUSING ON THE IMPACT OF A UNIQUELY DESIGNED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING, THE KENSINGTON SCHOOL. AN ATTEMPT WAS MADE TO SYNTHESIZE ROLE THEORY, DECISION MAKING THEORY, SOCIAL SYSTEM THEORY, AND SUCH PROBLEM AREAS AS STAFF PEER GROUPS, EDUCATIONAL…

  9. Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Edema agudo del pulmon [Acute mountain sickness: Acute edema of the lungs]. An Fac Med (Lima). 1955;38:244. 9. Hurtado A. Pathological aspects of life...recommendations for career dose lim- its, based on lifetime excess risk of cancer mortality, take into account age at first exposure and gender. The ca- reer

  10. Instructional Aspects of Intelligent Tutoring Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieters, Jules M., Ed.

    This collection contains three papers addressing the instructional aspects of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS): (1) "Some Experiences with Two Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teaching Computer Programming: Proust and the LISP-Tutor" (van den Berg, Merrienboer, and Maaswinkel); (2) "Some Issues on the Construction of Cooperative…

  11. Verb Aspect, Event Structure, and Coreferential Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferretti, Todd R.; Rohde, Hannah; Kehler, Andrew; Crutchley, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    We used an off-line story continuation task and an online ERP reading task to investigate coreferential processing following sentences that portrayed transfer-of-possession events as either ongoing or completed, using imperfective and perfective verb aspect (e.g., Amanda was shifting/shifted some poker chips to Scott). The story continuation task…

  12. Selected aspects of the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Marco; O'Toole, Paul W; de Vos, Willem M; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2017-10-06

    The gut microbiota represents a highly complex assembly of microbes, which interact with each other and with their host. These interactions have various implications in terms of health and disease, and this multi-author review issue will address a number of selected aspects pertaining to gut microbiota research.

  13. Aspects of Teacher Accountability in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Carroll L.

    The term "accountability" involves more than the recent demand by the public that schools justify the academic levels achieved by their students. Such aspects of accountability as teacher certification, school accreditation, educational evaluation, and student testing have existed for years. The New Mexico State Department of Education…

  14. Instructional Aspects of Intelligent Tutoring Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieters, Jules M., Ed.

    This collection contains three papers addressing the instructional aspects of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS): (1) "Some Experiences with Two Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teaching Computer Programming: Proust and the LISP-Tutor" (van den Berg, Merrienboer, and Maaswinkel); (2) "Some Issues on the Construction of Cooperative…

  15. Aspects of Vocabulary Knowledge in German Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary-Sundquist, Colleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on second language vocabulary acquisition has shown that learning to use a new word is not a simple matter of making a form-meaning connection. Knowing a word instead requires mastery of as many as nine different aspects of vocabulary knowledge (Nation, 2001). The current study uses data from five beginning-level textbooks of…

  16. Psychological Aspects of Female College Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcoxon, Barbara R.

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the psychological aspects (femininity, masculinity, and androgyny), attitudes, self-esteem, and social competence exhibited by female college athletes participating in elected individual and team sports. For the purpose of this research the following hypotheses were tested: The social costs of…

  17. Students' perceptions of aspects affecting seminar learning.

    PubMed

    Spruijt, A; Jaarsma, A D C; Wolfhagen, H A P; van Beukelen, P; Scherpbier, A J J A

    2012-01-01

    Many medical and veterinary schools have curricula in which they use seminars of approximately 25 students to achieve their learning goals. There is not much research on seminar learning. To explore students' views regarding aspects that affect seminar learning. Twenty-four second-year students of a 3-year bachelor curriculum participated in semi-structured focus group interviews. The sessions were audio-taped and transcribed. Two researchers independently coded the data using qualitative methods. An iterative process of data reduction resulted in emerging aspects. The participating students were asked to comment on the preliminary results. Course schedule, coherence and alignment of the different educational methods, the amount and type of seminar questions and the amount and clarity of the preparation materials affected seminar learning. Also, the didactic approach and facilitating methods used by the teachers, the group composition, size and atmosphere, the amount of active student participation and interaction and assessment influenced seminar learning according to students. Most aspects that affect seminar learning are consistent with aspects affecting small group learning. Course schedule and alignment seem to have a stronger impact on seminar learning.

  18. Emphasize the Nontechnical Aspects of Office Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Walter A.

    1979-01-01

    Stating that employers consider the nontechnical aspects of office work to be as important as work competence, the author lists 12 nontechnical qualities that business teachers should place greater emphasis on, such as new terminology, new devices, communication skills, decision making, personal and professional characteristics, responsibility,…

  19. Aspects of Bangime Phonology, Morphology, and Morphosyntax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantgan, Abbie

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation provides a description of aspects of the phonology, morphology, and morphosyntax of Bangime. Bangime is a language isolate spoken in the Dogon language speaking area of Central Eastern Mali. Although the Bangande, the speakers of Bangime, self-identify with the Dogon, their language bears practically no resemblance to the…

  20. Various aspects of sustainability analysis in Georgia

    Treesearch

    C. J. Cieszewski; M. Zasada; B. E. Borders; R. Lowe; M. L. Clutter; R. F. Daniels; R. Izlar

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 the Georgia Traditional Industries Program (TIP) sponsored a cooperative study at the D.B. Warnell School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia, to analyze the long-term sustainability of the fiber supply in Georgia. The subject of this study is relevant to a diverse array of disciplines, and it offers the opportunity to explore various aspects of...

  1. The biopsychosocial aspects of unwanted teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Suzanne J

    Unwanted teenage pregnancy is a major health problem in Wales and perioperative nurses are frequently involved in caring for teenagers undergoing surgical termination of pregnancy. By providing such adolescents with holistic care--by taking into account both biological and psychological aspects of health--nurses can help reduce an adolescent's anxiety and pain.

  2. Verbal Aspects in Germanic, Slavic, and Baltic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senn, Alfred

    1949-01-01

    This study examines the theory of Prokosch concerning the Germanic-Slavic-Baltic tense and aspect systems. The interrelatedness and influence of languages and dialects in Slavic (Russian and Old Church Slavic), Baltic (Lithuanian), and Germanic (Old High German and Gothic) are demonstrated. Examples illustrating the use of the perfective present…

  3. Satellite sound broadcast research aspect in CRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hase, Yoshihiro; Kondo, Kimio; Ohmori, Shingo

    1990-01-01

    Researches on Satellite Sound Broadcasting Services (SSBS) have become active in the past few years. Activities of the Consultative Committee for International Radio (CCIR) and the World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC), especially about digital systems proposed in the CCIR report, are briefly reviewed. The Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) future plan of SSBS research, stressing propagation rather than communications aspects, is described.

  4. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    LANL

    2008-05-12

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane

  5. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    ScienceCinema

    LANL

    2016-07-12

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane

  6. The NIST quantitative infrared database

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.M.; Guenther, F.R.; Rhoderick, G.C.; Lafferty, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    With the recent developments in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers it is becoming more feasible to place these instruments in field environments. As a result, there has been enormous increase in the use of FTIR techniques for a variety of qualitative and quantitative chemical measurements. These methods offer the possibility of fully automated real-time quantitation of many analytes; therefore FTIR has great potential as an analytical tool. Recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has developed protocol methods for emissions monitoring using both extractive and open-path FTIR measurements. Depending upon the analyte, the experimental conditions and the analyte matrix, approximately 100 of the hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) listed in the 1990 USEPA Clean Air Act amendment (CAAA) can be measured. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has initiated a program to provide quality-assured infrared absorption coefficient data based on NIST prepared primary gas standards. Currently, absorption coefficient data has been acquired for approximately 20 of the HAPs. For each compound, the absorption coefficient spectrum was calculated using nine transmittance spectra at 0.12 cm{sup {minus}1} resolution and the Beer`s law relationship. The uncertainties in the absorption coefficient data were estimated from the linear regressions of the transmittance data and considerations of other error sources such as the nonlinear detector response. For absorption coefficient values greater than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} {mu}mol/mol{sup {minus}1} m{sup {minus}1} the average relative expanded uncertainty is 2.2%. This quantitative infrared database is currently an ongoing project at NIST. Additional spectra will be added to the database as they are acquired. The current plans include continued data acquisition of the compounds listed in the CAAA, as well as the compounds that contribute to global warming and ozone depletion.

  7. The NIST Quantitative Infrared Database

    PubMed Central

    Chu, P. M.; Guenther, F. R.; Rhoderick, G. C.; Lafferty, W. J.

    1999-01-01

    With the recent developments in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers it is becoming more feasible to place these instruments in field environments. As a result, there has been enormous increase in the use of FTIR techniques for a variety of qualitative and quantitative chemical measurements. These methods offer the possibility of fully automated real-time quantitation of many analytes; therefore FTIR has great potential as an analytical tool. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S.EPA) has developed protocol methods for emissions monitoring using both extractive and open-path FTIR measurements. Depending upon the analyte, the experimental conditions and the analyte matrix, approximately 100 of the hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) listed in the 1990 U.S.EPA Clean Air Act amendment (CAAA) can be measured. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has initiated a program to provide quality-assured infrared absorption coefficient data based on NIST prepared primary gas standards. Currently, absorption coefficient data has been acquired for approximately 20 of the HAPs. For each compound, the absorption coefficient spectrum was calculated using nine transmittance spectra at 0.12 cm−1 resolution and the Beer’s law relationship. The uncertainties in the absorption coefficient data were estimated from the linear regressions of the transmittance data and considerations of other error sources such as the nonlinear detector response. For absorption coefficient values greater than 1 × 10−4 μmol/mol)−1 m−1 the average relative expanded uncertainty is 2.2 %. This quantitative infrared database is currently an ongoing project at NIST. Additional spectra will be added to the database as they are acquired. Our current plans include continued data acquisition of the compounds listed in the CAAA, as well as the compounds that contribute to global warming and ozone depletion.

  8. Automated Quantitative Nuclear Cardiology Methods

    PubMed Central

    Motwani, Manish; Berman, Daniel S.; Germano, Guido; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of SPECT and PET has become a major part of nuclear cardiology practice. Current software tools can automatically segment the left ventricle, quantify function, establish myocardial perfusion maps and estimate global and local measures of stress/rest perfusion – all with minimal user input. State-of-the-art automated techniques have been shown to offer high diagnostic accuracy for detecting coronary artery disease, as well as predict prognostic outcomes. This chapter briefly reviews these techniques, highlights several challenges and discusses the latest developments. PMID:26590779

  9. Quantitative indices in paternity cases.

    PubMed

    Lenhartová, E; Lenhart, K; Bártová, A

    1992-01-01

    The study discusses the basic quantitative indices used as a standard method in foreign professional literature dealing with paternity cases. They are as follows: 1. mean probability of exclusion (PE) which characterizes the informative value of the experts opinions and is the same in all the disputes evaluated by this expert. 2. relative frequency of men chosen at random from the population and excluded at given phenotype of mother and child (RME). 3. probability of paternity (PP) for particular trio: mother-child-the accused man. Hereinafter the results of our studies in the HLA laboratory in Olomouc from 1976-1991 are introduced.

  10. Non-manipulation quantitative designs.

    PubMed

    Rumrill, Phillip D

    2004-01-01

    The article describes non-manipulation quantitative designs of two types, correlational and causal comparative studies. Both of these designs are characterized by the absence of random assignment of research participants to conditions or groups and non-manipulation of the independent variable. Without random selection or manipulation of the independent variable, no attempt is made to draw causal inferences regarding relationships between independent and dependent variables. Nonetheless, non-manipulation studies play an important role in rehabilitation research, as described in this article. Examples from the contemporary rehabilitation literature are included. Copyright 2004 IOS Press

  11. Quantitative Neuroproteomics of the Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Ortolaza, Dinah Lee; Bushlin, Ittai; Abul-Husn, Noura; Annagudi, Suresh P.; Sweedler, Jonathan; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2011-01-01

    An emerging way to study neuropsychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases is by performing proteomic analyses of brain tissues. Here, we describe methods used to isolate and identify the proteins associated with a sample of interest, such as the synapse, as well as to compare the levels of proteins in the sample under different conditions. These techniques, involving subcellular fractionation and modern quantitative proteomics using isotopic labels, can be used to understand the organization of neuronal compartments and the regulation of synaptic function under various conditions. PMID:20013213

  12. High speed quantitative digital microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Price, K. H.; Eskenazi, R.; Ovadya, M. M.; Navon, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Modern digital image processing hardware makes possible quantitative analysis of microscope images at high speed. This paper describes an application to automatic screening for cervical cancer. The system uses twelve MC6809 microprocessors arranged in a pipeline multiprocessor configuration. Each processor executes one part of the algorithm on each cell image as it passes through the pipeline. Each processor communicates with its upstream and downstream neighbors via shared two-port memory. Thus no time is devoted to input-output operations as such. This configuration is expected to be at least ten times faster than previous systems.

  13. Quantitative biology of single neurons

    PubMed Central

    Eberwine, James; Lovatt, Ditte; Buckley, Peter; Dueck, Hannah; Francis, Chantal; Kim, Tae Kyung; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Miler; Miyashiro, Kevin; Morris, Jacqueline; Peritz, Tiina; Schochet, Terri; Spaethling, Jennifer; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Kim, Junhyong

    2012-01-01

    The building blocks of complex biological systems are single cells. Fundamental insights gained from single-cell analysis promise to provide the framework for understanding normal biological systems development as well as the limits on systems/cellular ability to respond to disease. The interplay of cells to create functional systems is not well understood. Until recently, the study of single cells has concentrated primarily on morphological and physiological characterization. With the application of new highly sensitive molecular and genomic technologies, the quantitative biochemistry of single cells is now accessible. PMID:22915636

  14. High speed quantitative digital microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Price, K. H.; Eskenazi, R.; Ovadya, M. M.; Navon, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Modern digital image processing hardware makes possible quantitative analysis of microscope images at high speed. This paper describes an application to automatic screening for cervical cancer. The system uses twelve MC6809 microprocessors arranged in a pipeline multiprocessor configuration. Each processor executes one part of the algorithm on each cell image as it passes through the pipeline. Each processor communicates with its upstream and downstream neighbors via shared two-port memory. Thus no time is devoted to input-output operations as such. This configuration is expected to be at least ten times faster than previous systems.

  15. Quantitative assessment of increasing complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csernai, L. P.; Spinnangr, S. F.; Velle, S.

    2017-05-01

    We study the build up of complexity on the example of 1 kg matter in different forms. We start with the simplest example of ideal gases, and then continue with more complex chemical, biological, life, social and technical structures. We assess the complexity of these systems quantitatively, based on their entropy. We present a method to attribute the same entropy to known physical systems and to complex organic molecules, up to a DNA molecule. The important steps in this program and the basic obstacles are discussed.

  16. Product Aspect Clustering by Incorporating Background Knowledge for Opinion Mining.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiheng; Zhao, Yanyan; Qin, Bing; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Product aspect recognition is a key task in fine-grained opinion mining. Current methods primarily focus on the extraction of aspects from the product reviews. However, it is also important to cluster synonymous extracted aspects into the same category. In this paper, we focus on the problem of product aspect clustering. The primary challenge is to properly cluster and generalize aspects that have similar meanings but different representations. To address this problem, we learn two types of background knowledge for each extracted aspect based on two types of effective aspect relations: relevant aspect relations and irrelevant aspect relations, which describe two different types of relationships between two aspects. Based on these two types of relationships, we can assign many relevant and irrelevant aspects into two different sets as the background knowledge to describe each product aspect. To obtain abundant background knowledge for each product aspect, we can enrich the available information with background knowledge from the Web. Then, we design a hierarchical clustering algorithm to cluster these aspects into different groups, in which aspect similarity is computed using the relevant and irrelevant aspect sets for each product aspect. Experimental results obtained in both camera and mobile phone domains demonstrate that the proposed product aspect clustering method based on two types of background knowledge performs better than the baseline approach without the use of background knowledge. Moreover, the experimental results also indicate that expanding the available background knowledge using the Web is feasible.

  17. Product Aspect Clustering by Incorporating Background Knowledge for Opinion Mining

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiheng; Zhao, Yanyan; Qin, Bing; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Product aspect recognition is a key task in fine-grained opinion mining. Current methods primarily focus on the extraction of aspects from the product reviews. However, it is also important to cluster synonymous extracted aspects into the same category. In this paper, we focus on the problem of product aspect clustering. The primary challenge is to properly cluster and generalize aspects that have similar meanings but different representations. To address this problem, we learn two types of background knowledge for each extracted aspect based on two types of effective aspect relations: relevant aspect relations and irrelevant aspect relations, which describe two different types of relationships between two aspects. Based on these two types of relationships, we can assign many relevant and irrelevant aspects into two different sets as the background knowledge to describe each product aspect. To obtain abundant background knowledge for each product aspect, we can enrich the available information with background knowledge from the Web. Then, we design a hierarchical clustering algorithm to cluster these aspects into different groups, in which aspect similarity is computed using the relevant and irrelevant aspect sets for each product aspect. Experimental results obtained in both camera and mobile phone domains demonstrate that the proposed product aspect clustering method based on two types of background knowledge performs better than the baseline approach without the use of background knowledge. Moreover, the experimental results also indicate that expanding the available background knowledge using the Web is feasible. PMID:27561001

  18. A Quantitative Theory of Human Color Choices

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Natalia L.; Jameson, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    The system for colorimetry adopted by the Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) in 1931, along with its subsequent improvements, represents a family of light mixture models that has served well for many decades for stimulus specification and reproduction when highly controlled color standards are important. Still, with regard to color appearance many perceptual and cognitive factors are known to contribute to color similarity, and, in general, to all cognitive judgments of color. Using experimentally obtained odd-one-out triad similarity judgments from 52 observers, we demonstrate that CIE-based models can explain a good portion (but not all) of the color similarity data. Color difference quantified by CIELAB ΔE explained behavior at levels of 81% (across all colors), 79% (across red colors), and 66% (across blue colors). We show that the unexplained variation cannot be ascribed to inter- or intra-individual variations among the observers, and points to the presence of additional factors shared by the majority of responders. Based on this, we create a quantitative model of a lexicographic semiorder type, which shows how different perceptual and cognitive influences can trade-off when making color similarity judgments. We show that by incorporating additional influences related to categorical and lightness and saturation factors, the model explains more of the triad similarity behavior, namely, 91% (all colors), 90% (reds), and 87% (blues). We conclude that distance in a CIE model is but the first of several layers in a hierarchy of higher-order cognitive influences that shape color triad choices. We further discuss additional mitigating influences outside the scope of CIE modeling, which can be incorporated in this framework, including well-known influences from language, stimulus set effects, and color preference bias. We also discuss universal and cultural aspects of the model as well as non-uniformity of the color space with respect to different

  19. A quantitative theory of human color choices.

    PubMed

    Komarova, Natalia L; Jameson, Kimberly A

    2013-01-01

    The system for colorimetry adopted by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) in 1931, along with its subsequent improvements, represents a family of light mixture models that has served well for many decades for stimulus specification and reproduction when highly controlled color standards are important. Still, with regard to color appearance many perceptual and cognitive factors are known to contribute to color similarity, and, in general, to all cognitive judgments of color. Using experimentally obtained odd-one-out triad similarity judgments from 52 observers, we demonstrate that CIE-based models can explain a good portion (but not all) of the color similarity data. Color difference quantified by CIELAB ΔE explained behavior at levels of 81% (across all colors), 79% (across red colors), and 66% (across blue colors). We show that the unexplained variation cannot be ascribed to inter- or intra-individual variations among the observers, and points to the presence of additional factors shared by the majority of responders. Based on this, we create a quantitative model of a lexicographic semiorder type, which shows how different perceptual and cognitive influences can trade-off when making color similarity judgments. We show that by incorporating additional influences related to categorical and lightness and saturation factors, the model explains more of the triad similarity behavior, namely, 91% (all colors), 90% (reds), and 87% (blues). We conclude that distance in a CIE model is but the first of several layers in a hierarchy of higher-order cognitive influences that shape color triad choices. We further discuss additional mitigating influences outside the scope of CIE modeling, which can be incorporated in this framework, including well-known influences from language, stimulus set effects, and color preference bias. We also discuss universal and cultural aspects of the model as well as non-uniformity of the color space with respect to different

  20. Understanding and critiquing quantitative research papers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Polly

    This article, the second in a three-part series on research, explores quantitative research. Quantitative research aims to focus on objectivity, and therefore searches for answers that can be generalised to other situations. Quantitative researchers believe that it is possible to focus on objective reality within the world.

  1. Quantitative magnetic resonance micro-imaging methods for pharmaceutical research.

    PubMed

    Mantle, M D

    2011-09-30

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool in pharmaceutical research is now well established and the current literature covers a multitude of different pharmaceutically relevant research areas. This review focuses on the use of quantitative magnetic resonance micro-imaging techniques and how they have been exploited to extract information that is of direct relevance to the pharmaceutical industry. The article is divided into two main areas. The first half outlines the theoretical aspects of magnetic resonance and deals with basic magnetic resonance theory, the effects of nuclear spin-lattice (T(1)), spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation and molecular diffusion upon image quantitation, and discusses the applications of rapid magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition to the theory, the review aims to provide some practical guidelines for the pharmaceutical researcher with an interest in MRI as to which MRI pulse sequences/protocols should be used and when. The second half of the article reviews the recent advances and developments that have appeared in the literature concerning the use of quantitative micro-imaging methods to pharmaceutically relevant research. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  3. Pungency Quantitation of Hot Pepper Sauces Using HPLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Thomas A.

    1999-02-01

    A class of compounds known as capsaicinoids are responsible for the "heat" of hot peppers. To determine the pungency of a particular pepper or pepper product, one may quantify the capsaicinoids and relate those concentrations to the perceived heat. The format of the laboratory described here allows students to collectively develop an HPLC method for the quantitation of the two predominant capsaicinoids (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin) in hot-pepper products. Each small group of students investigated one of the following aspects of the method: detector wavelength, mobile-phase composition, extraction of capsaicinoids, calibration, and quantitation. The format of the lab forced students to communicate and cooperate to develop this method. The resulting HPLC method involves extraction with acetonitrile followed by solid-phase extraction clean-up, an isocratic 80:20 methanol-water mobile phase, a 4.6 mm by 25 cm C-18 column, and UV absorbance detection at 284 nm. The method developed by the students was then applied to the quantitation of capsaicinoids in a variety of hot pepper sauces. Editor's Note on Hazards in our April 2000 issue addresses the above.

  4. A quantitative method for optimized placement of continuous air monitors.

    PubMed

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Rodgers, John C; Moxley, John S

    2003-11-01

    Alarming continuous air monitors (CAMs) are a critical component for worker protection in facilities that handle large amounts of hazardous materials. In nuclear facilities, continuous air monitors alarm when levels of airborne radioactive materials exceed alarm thresholds, thus prompting workers to exit the room to reduce inhalation exposures. To maintain a high level of worker protection, continuous air monitors are required to detect radioactive aerosol clouds quickly and with good sensitivity. This requires that there are sufficient numbers of continuous air monitors in a room and that they are well positioned. Yet there are no published methodologies to quantitatively determine the optimal number and placement of continuous air monitors in a room. The goal of this study was to develop and test an approach to quantitatively determine optimal number and placement of continuous air monitors in a room. The method we have developed uses tracer aerosol releases (to simulate accidental releases) and the measurement of the temporal and spatial aspects of the dispersion of the tracer aerosol through the room. The aerosol dispersion data is then analyzed to optimize continuous air monitor utilization based on simulated worker exposure. This method was tested in a room within a Department of Energy operated plutonium facility at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, U.S. Results from this study show that the value of quantitative airflow and aerosol dispersion studies is significant and that worker protection can be significantly improved while balancing the costs associated with CAM programs.

  5. Quantitative ultrasonic phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    When imaging with ultrasonic phased arrays, what do we actually image? What quantitative information is contained in the image? Ad-hoc delay-and-sum methods such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and the total focusing method (TFM) fail to answer these questions. We have shown that a new quantitative approach allows the formation of flaw images by explicitly inverting the Thompson-Gray measurement model. To examine the above questions, we have set up a software simulation test bed that considers a 2-D scalar scattering problem of a cylindrical inclusion with the method of separation of variables. It is shown that in SAFT types of imaging the only part of the flaw properly imaged is the front surface specular response of the flaw. Other responses (back surface reflections, creeping waves, etc.) are improperly imaged and form artifacts in the image. In the case of TFM-like imaging the quantity being properly imaged is an angular integration of the front surface reflectivity. The other, improperly imaged responses are also averaged, leading to a reduction in some of the artifacts present. Our results have strong implications for flaw sizing and flaw characterization with delay-and-sum images.

  6. Quantitative imaging with fluorescent biosensors.

    PubMed

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Jones, Alexander; Frommer, Wolf B

    2012-01-01

    Molecular activities are highly dynamic and can occur locally in subcellular domains or compartments. Neighboring cells in the same tissue can exist in different states. Therefore, quantitative information on the cellular and subcellular dynamics of ions, signaling molecules, and metabolites is critical for functional understanding of organisms. Mass spectrometry is generally used for monitoring ions and metabolites; however, its temporal and spatial resolution are limited. Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology-e.g., fluorescent proteins can report on gene expression or protein localization in real time-yet promoter-based reporters are often slow to report physiologically relevant changes such as calcium oscillations. Therefore, novel tools are required that can be deployed in specific cells and targeted to subcellular compartments in order to quantify target molecule dynamics directly. We require tools that can measure enzyme activities, protein dynamics, and biophysical processes (e.g., membrane potential or molecular tension) with subcellular resolution. Today, we have an extensive suite of tools at our disposal to address these challenges, including translocation sensors, fluorescence-intensity sensors, and Förster resonance energy transfer sensors. This review summarizes sensor design principles, provides a database of sensors for more than 70 different analytes/processes, and gives examples of applications in quantitative live cell imaging.

  7. Temperature dependency of quantitative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pocock, N A; Babichev, A; Culton, N; Graney, K; Rooney, J; Bell, D; Chu, J

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters are temperature dependent. We examined the effect of temperature on QUS using Lunar Achilles+ and Hologic Sahara units. In vivo studies were performed in a cadaveric foot and in 5 volunteers. QUS scans were performed in the cadaveric foot, using both machines, at temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 degrees C. To assess the effect of change in water bath temperature in the Achilles+, independently of foot temperature, 5 volunteers were studied at water temperatures ranging from 10 to 42 degrees C. In the cadaveric foot there were strong negative correlations between temperature and speed of sound (SOS) but a moderately positive correlation between temperature and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA). Stiffness and the Quantitative Ultrasound Index (QUI) in the cadaveric foot showed strong negative correlations with temperature, reflecting their high dependence on SOS. In the 5 volunteers, in whom foot temperature was assumed to be constant, there was a small change in Stiffness in the Achilles+, with variation in water temperature. In conclusion, while there are opposite effects of temperature on SOS and BUA in vivo, there is still a significant effect of temperature variation on Stiffness and the QUI. This may have clinical significance in particular subjects. The precision of QUS may be affected by temperature variation of the environment or of the patient's limb. Instruments utilizing a water bath may be able partly to compensate for changes in environmental temperature, but standardization of water bath temperature is crucial to maximize precision.

  8. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Frank Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  9. Clinical Utility of Quantitative Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Abramson, Richard G.; Burton, Kirsteen R.; Yu, John-Paul J.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Subramaniam, Rathan M.; Lenchik, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative imaging (QI) is increasingly applied in modern radiology practice, assisting in the clinical assessment of many patients and providing a source of biomarkers for a spectrum of diseases. QI is commonly used to inform patient diagnosis or prognosis, determine the choice of therapy, or monitor therapy response. Because most radiologists will likely implement some QI tools to meet the patient care needs of their referring clinicians, it is important for all radiologists to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of QI. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Quantitative Imaging Task Force has explored the clinical application of QI and summarizes its work in this review. We provide an overview of the clinical use of QI by discussing QI tools that are currently employed in clinical practice, clinical applications of these tools, approaches to reporting of QI, and challenges to implementing QI. It is hoped that these insights will help radiologists recognize the tangible benefits of QI to their patients, their referring clinicians, and their own radiology practice. PMID:25442800

  10. Quantitative risk assessment system (QRAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, Robert M (Inventor); Smidts, Carol S (Inventor); Mosleh, Ali (Inventor); Chang, Yung-Hsien (Inventor); Swaminathan, Sankaran (Inventor); Groen, Francisco J (Inventor); Tan, Zhibin (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative risk assessment system (QRAS) builds a risk model of a system for which risk of failure is being assessed, then analyzes the risk of the system corresponding to the risk model. The QRAS performs sensitivity analysis of the risk model by altering fundamental components and quantifications built into the risk model, then re-analyzes the risk of the system using the modifications. More particularly, the risk model is built by building a hierarchy, creating a mission timeline, quantifying failure modes, and building/editing event sequence diagrams. Multiplicities, dependencies, and redundancies of the system are included in the risk model. For analysis runs, a fixed baseline is first constructed and stored. This baseline contains the lowest level scenarios, preserved in event tree structure. The analysis runs, at any level of the hierarchy and below, access this baseline for risk quantitative computation as well as ranking of particular risks. A standalone Tool Box capability exists, allowing the user to store application programs within QRAS.

  11. Quantitative criticism of literary relationships

    PubMed Central

    Dexter, Joseph P.; Katz, Theodore; Tripuraneni, Nilesh; Dasgupta, Tathagata; Kannan, Ajay; Brofos, James A.; Bonilla Lopez, Jorge A.; Schroeder, Lea A.; Casarez, Adriana; Rabinovich, Maxim; Haimson Lushkov, Ayelet; Chaudhuri, Pramit

    2017-01-01

    Authors often convey meaning by referring to or imitating prior works of literature, a process that creates complex networks of literary relationships (“intertextuality”) and contributes to cultural evolution. In this paper, we use techniques from stylometry and machine learning to address subjective literary critical questions about Latin literature, a corpus marked by an extraordinary concentration of intertextuality. Our work, which we term “quantitative criticism,” focuses on case studies involving two influential Roman authors, the playwright Seneca and the historian Livy. We find that four plays related to but distinct from Seneca’s main writings are differentiated from the rest of the corpus by subtle but important stylistic features. We offer literary interpretations of the significance of these anomalies, providing quantitative data in support of hypotheses about the use of unusual formal features and the interplay between sound and meaning. The second part of the paper describes a machine-learning approach to the identification and analysis of citational material that Livy loosely appropriated from earlier sources. We extend our approach to map the stylistic topography of Latin prose, identifying the writings of Caesar and his near-contemporary Livy as an inflection point in the development of Latin prose style. In total, our results reflect the integration of computational and humanistic methods to investigate a diverse range of literary questions. PMID:28373557

  12. Quantitative evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesne, S.; Frisoni, G. B.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a single, quantitative metric called the disease evaluation factor (DEF) and assess its efficiency at estimating disease burden in normal, control subjects (CTRL) and probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The study group consisted in 75 patients with a diagnosis of probable AD and 75 age-matched normal CTRL without neurological or neuropsychological deficit. We calculated a reference eigenspace of MRI appearance from reference data, in which our CTRL and probable AD subjects were projected. We then calculated the multi-dimensional hyperplane separating the CTRL and probable AD groups. The DEF was estimated via a multidimensional weighted distance of eigencoordinates for a given subject and the CTRL group mean, along salient principal components forming the separating hyperplane. We used quantile plots, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and χ2 tests to compare the DEF values and test that their distribution was normal. We used a linear discriminant test to separate CTRL from probable AD based on the DEF factor, and reached an accuracy of 87%. A quantitative biomarker in AD would act as an important surrogate marker of disease status and progression.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Face Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Abraham

    2015-06-01

    The major objective of this article was to report quantitatively the degree of human face symmetry for reported images taken from the Internet. From the original image of a certain person that appears in the center of each triplet, 2 symmetric combinations were constructed that are based on the left part of the image and its mirror image (left-left) and on the right part of the image and its mirror image (right-right). By applying a computer software that enables to determine length, surface area, and perimeter of any geometric shape, the following measurements were obtained for each triplet: face perimeter and area; distance between the pupils; mouth length; its perimeter and area; nose length and face length, usually below the ears; as well as the area and perimeter of the pupils. Then, for each of the above measurements, the value C, which characterizes the degree of symmetry of the real image with respect to the combinations right-right and left-left, was calculated. C appears on the right-hand side below each image. A high value of C indicates a low symmetry, and as the value is decreasing, the symmetry is increasing. The magnitude on the left relates to the pupils and compares the difference between the area and perimeter of the 2 pupils. The major conclusion arrived at here is that the human face is asymmetric to some degree; the degree of asymmetry is reported quantitatively under each portrait.

  14. Quantitative criticism of literary relationships.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Joseph P; Katz, Theodore; Tripuraneni, Nilesh; Dasgupta, Tathagata; Kannan, Ajay; Brofos, James A; Bonilla Lopez, Jorge A; Schroeder, Lea A; Casarez, Adriana; Rabinovich, Maxim; Haimson Lushkov, Ayelet; Chaudhuri, Pramit

    2017-04-03

    Authors often convey meaning by referring to or imitating prior works of literature, a process that creates complex networks of literary relationships ("intertextuality") and contributes to cultural evolution. In this paper, we use techniques from stylometry and machine learning to address subjective literary critical questions about Latin literature, a corpus marked by an extraordinary concentration of intertextuality. Our work, which we term "quantitative criticism," focuses on case studies involving two influential Roman authors, the playwright Seneca and the historian Livy. We find that four plays related to but distinct from Seneca's main writings are differentiated from the rest of the corpus by subtle but important stylistic features. We offer literary interpretations of the significance of these anomalies, providing quantitative data in support of hypotheses about the use of unusual formal features and the interplay between sound and meaning. The second part of the paper describes a machine-learning approach to the identification and analysis of citational material that Livy loosely appropriated from earlier sources. We extend our approach to map the stylistic topography of Latin prose, identifying the writings of Caesar and his near-contemporary Livy as an inflection point in the development of Latin prose style. In total, our results reflect the integration of computational and humanistic methods to investigate a diverse range of literary questions.

  15. Applications of microfluidics in quantitative biology.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Gao, Meng; Wen, Lingling; He, Caiyun; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Chenli; Fu, Xiongfei; Huang, Shuqiang

    2017-10-04

    Quantitative biology is dedicated to taking advantage of quantitative reasoning and advanced engineering technologies to make biology more predictable. Microfluidics, as an emerging technique, provides new approaches to precisely control fluidic conditions on small scales and collect data in high-throughput and quantitative manners. In this review, we present the relevant applications of microfluidics to quantitative biology based on two major categories (channel-based microfluidics and droplet-based microfluidics), and their typical features. We also envision some other microfluidic techniques that may not be employed in quantitative biology right now, but have great potential in the near future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Simulation of Five-Frequency Quasiperiodic and Related States For Convecting Flows In Moderate-Aspect-Ratio Box Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Lai, Ming-Chih; Cross, M. C.; Greenside, Henry

    2000-11-01

    We have developed a finite-difference code to integrate the three-dimensional Boussinesq equations for Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a box geometry with insulating or conducting side walls and no-slip boundary conditions. Motivated by the experimental observations of Walden et al [Phys. Rev. Lett., 53, 242 (1984)], we used this code to study the dynamics of moderate-aspect-ratio convecting flows as a function of Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, and aspect ratio. Our simulations were able to reproduce the occurrence of quasiperiodic states with up to five incommensurate frequencies, although the values of the frequencies differ quantitatively. We find that the five-frequency state is sensitive to small perturbations to the system, breaking down to mode-locking, intermittent, and chaotic states on small changes in the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers and aspect ratio. In particular, small changes in the aspect ratio lead to a surprisingly large multiplicity of distinct planforms yielding vastly different dynamics.

  17. Radiological and microscopic aspects of the denticles.

    PubMed

    Deva, V; Mogoantă, L; Manolea, H; Pancă, Oana Adina; Vătu, Mihaela; Vătăman, Maria

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we have realized a study on 43 patients on which the retro-alveolar radiological exam has shown the existence of a calcareous structure within the pulp chamber having in view a better knowledge of this structure and its etiology, way of forming and pathological implications. For 16 of the patients the radiological exam was supplemented by a microscopic examination. Radiologically, the denticles were noticed more often in the pulp chamber of the molars. The examination of the histological samples has evidenced aspects such as the size, shape and structure of the denticles. The concentric disposition of the tissue elements shows that in the formation of a denticle there is a "center" around which a conjunctive substance avid of calcium salts is deposited. The microscopic aspects noticed on large denticles allowed us to sustain the hypothesis that in a large pulp chamber many denticles form simultaneously and grow up and merge generating a large-sized unique calcareous structure.

  18. Environmental aspects of solar energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, C.L.

    1980-09-01

    Solar energy technologies have environmental effects, and these may be positive or negative compared with current ways of producing energy. In this respect, solar energy technologies are no different from other energy systems. Where solar energy technologies differ is that no unresolvable technological problems (e.g., CO/sub 2/ emissions) or sociopolitical barriers (e.g., waste disposal, catastrophic accidents) have been identified. This report reviews some of the environmental aspects of solar energy technologies and ongoing research designed to identify and resolve potential environmental concerns. It is important to continue research and assessment of environmental aspects of solar energy to ensure that unanticipated problems do not arise. It is also important that the knowledge gained through such environmental research be incorporated into technology development programs and policy initiatives.

  19. Aspect-Oriented Monitoring of C Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; VanWyk, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents current work on extending ASPECTC with state machines, resulting in a framework for aspect-oriented monitoring of C programs. Such a framework can be used for testing purposes, or it can be part of a fault protection strategy. The long term goal is to explore the synergy between the fields of runtime verification, focused on program monitoring, and aspect-oriented programming, focused on more general program development issues. The work is inspired by the observation that most work in this direction has been done for JAVA, partly due to the lack of easily accessible extensible compiler frameworks for C. The work is performed using the SILVER extensible attribute grammar compiler framework, in which C has been defined as a host language. Our work consists of extending C with ASPECTC, and subsequently to extend ASPECTC with state machines.

  20. Materials aspects of world energy needs

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Plenary session papers presented by participants from both developed and developing countries contributed to the information base on materials and energy outlook, international cooperation, economic aspects, and environmental considerations and established the theme for the subsequent workshop sessions. Workshops on ten major aspects of materials-energy interrelationships provided the opportunity of open and informal discussion of critical issues in each area and the development of reasonable consensus on problems and potential solutions. A separate abstract for each of the 10 plenary-session papers, the 10 workshop reports, and the 4 selected papers will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). The brief issue summaries (preprints) will appear individually (total of 75) only in the DOE Energy Data Base.