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Sample records for lysimeter investigations low-level

  1. Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program for fiscal year 1994. Annual report, Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Jastrow, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1995-05-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Compressive test results of 11-year-old cement and vinyl ester-styrene solidified waste forms are presented, which show effects of aging and self-irradiation. Results of the ninth year of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  2. Field lysimeter investigations: Low-level waste data base development program for fiscal year 1993. Annual report: Volume 6

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Jastrow, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1994-05-01

    The March 28, 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 released approximately 560,000 gal of contaminated water to the auxiliary and fuel handling buildings. The water was decontaminated using a three-stage demineralization system called EPICOR-II containing organic and inorganic ion-exchange media. The first stage of the system was designated the prefilter, and the second and third stages were called demineralizers. Research is being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory on materials from four of those EPICOR-II prefilters. The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the eighth year of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both Portland type I--II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environment conditions, over a 20-year period. 24 references, 43 figures, 12 tables.

  3. Field lysimeter investigations: Low-level waste data base development program for fiscal year 1996. Annual report; Volume 9

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Larsen, I.L.; Jastrow, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Sullivan, T.M.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1997-08-01

    A data base development program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is (a) studying the degradation effects in organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified ion-exchange resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of liners used to dispose the ion-exchange resins. During the field testing experiments, both portland type 1--2 cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste form samples were tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The study was designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over an extended period. Those experiments have been shut down and are to be exhumed. This report discusses the plans for removal, sampling, and analysis of waste form and soil cores from the lysimeters. Results of partition coefficient determinations are presented, as well as application of a source term computer code using those coefficients to predict the lysimeter results. A study of radionuclide-containing colloids associated with the leachate waters removed from these lysimeters is described. An update of upward migration of radionuclides in the sand-filled lysimeter at ORNL is included.

  4. Field lysimeter investigations: Low-level waste data base development program for fiscal year 1995. Volume 8, Annual report, October 1994-- September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Larsen, I.L.; Jastrow, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1996-06-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is (a) studying the degradation effects in organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified ion-exchange resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified ion- exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of liners used to dispose the ion-exchange resins. Compressive test results of 12-year-old cement and vinyl ester- styrene solidified waste form samples are presented, which show effects of aging and self-irradiation. Results of the tenth year of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste form samples are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  5. Field Lysimeter Investigations -- Test results. Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Brey, R.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D.; Jastrow, J.D.; Wickliff Hicks, D.S.; Sanford, W.E.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1995-12-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the second 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type 1--2 cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  6. Field Lysimeter Investigations - test results: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1994-1995

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rodgers, R.D.; Hilton, L.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (1) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (2) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (3) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (4) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the final 2 (10 total) years of data acquisition from operation of the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period. At the end of the tenth year, the experiment was closed down. Examination of soil and waste forms is planned to be conducted next and will be reported later.

  7. Experiment close out of lysimeter field testing of low-level radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Jastrow, J.D.

    1998-03-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining information on the performance of radioactive waste forms. These experiments were recently shut down and the contents of the lysimeters have been examined in accordance with a detailed waste form and soil sampling plan. Ion-exchange resins from a commercial nuclear power station were solidified into waste forms using portland cement and vinyl ester-styrene. These waste forms were tested to (a) obtain information on performance of waste forms in typical disposal environments, (b) compare field results with bench leach studies, (c) develop a low-level waste data base for use in performance assessment source term calculations, and (d) apply the DUST computer code to compare predicted cumulative release to actual field data. The program, funded by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), includes observed radio nuclide releases from waste forms in field lysimeters at two test sites over 10 years of successful operation. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the examination of waste forms and soils of the two lysimeter arrays after shut down. During this examination, the waste forms were characterized after removal from the lysimeters and the results compared to the findings of the original characterizations. Vertical soil cores were taken from the soil columns and analyzed with radiochemistry to define movement of radionuclides in the soils after release from the waste forms. A comparison is made of the DUST and BLT code predictions of releases and movement, using recently developed partition coefficients and leachate measurements, to actual radio nuclide movement through the soil columns as determined from these core analyses.

  8. Radiocolloids in leachate from the NRC field lysimeter investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Brey, R.R.; Butikofer, T.; McConnell, J.W.; Rogers, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    An investigation of colloidal particles has been completed on leachate samples collected from sand and soil-filled lysimeters (of the Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program) in which low-level radioactive waste forms were buried. An array of analytical techniques including: gamma spectroscopy, liquid scintillation spectrometry, gross alpha and beta particle proportional counting, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), neutron activation analysis (NAA), X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), proton induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE), gravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were performed on samples thought to contain colloidal particles to determine particle composition and the nature of their association with radioactive material. Several different types of particles ranging in size from 0.02 to 20 {micro}m were identified within the leachate including crystalline calcium hydroxide particles, rounded siliceous grains, angular weathered soil, and spherical particles apparently composed of an organic polymer. The primary radioactive material associated with these particles was Sr-90. About 2% of the total Sr-90 activity in the leachate is associated with colloidal particles. This information indicates that colloidal particles play a role in radioactive material transport through lysimeter soils.

  9. Field lysimeter facility for evaluating the performance of commercial solidified low-level waste. [Shallow land burial

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.B.; Graham, M.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-11-01

    Analyzing the potential migration of radionuclides from sites containing solid low-level wastes requires knowledge of contaminant concentrations in the soil solution surrounding the waste. This soil solution concentration is generally referred to as the source term and is determined by such factors as the concentration of radionuclides in the solid waste, the rate of leachate formation, the concentration of dissolved species in the leachate, any solubility reactions occurring when the leachate contacts the soil, and the rate of water flow in the soil surrounding the waste. A field lysimeter facility established at the Hanford site is being used to determine typical source terms in arid climates for commercial low-level wastes solidifed with cement, Dow polymer (vinyl ester-styrene), and bitumen. The field lysimeter facility consists of 10, 3-m-deep by 1.8-m-dia closed-bottom lysimeters situated around a 4-m-deep by 4-m-dia central instrument caisson. Commercial cement and Dow polymer waste samples were removed from 210-L drums and placed in 8 of the lysimeters. Two bitumen samples are planned to be emplaced in the facility's remaining 2 lysimeters during 1984. The central caisson provides access to the instrumentation in the individual lysimeters and allows selective sampling of the soil and waste. Suction candles (ceramic cups) placed around the waste forms will be used to periodically collect soil-water samples for chemical analysis. Meteorological data, soil moisture content, and soil temperature are automatically monitored at the facility. Characterization of the soils and waste forms have been partially completed. These data consist of moisture release characteristics, particle-size distribution, and distributions and concentrations of radionuclides in the waste forms. 11 references, 12 figures, 5 tables.

  10. An arid zone lysimeter facility for performance assessment and closure investigations at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, D.G.; Lohrstorfer, C.F.; Sully, M.J.; Ginanni, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    Two precision weighing lysimeters were installed near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site to provide support for investigations of water, solute, and heat fluxes in the near-surface of the soil. The lysimeters consist of soil tanks with a volume of 16 cubic meters mounted on a sensitive scale. One lysimeter was revegetated with native shrubs whereas the other was kept bare to stimulate a non-vegetated waste cover. Data consisting of physical and hydrological properties of the lysimeter soils, thermal and moisture conditions in the lysimeters, and atmospheric boundary conditions are being collected for calibrating and verifying computer models for simulating the flow of water and heat in the near surface alluvium at the Area 5 RWMS. This effort will provide site- specific models for demonstration of ``no migration`` of constituents to the water table. Moisture and thermal conditions in the lysimeters are monitored daily using time domain reflectometry probes and thermocouple psychrometers. Daily evaporation and evapotranspiration are calculated from the lysimeter scales. Meteorological variables are monitored by sensors mounted on a 3 meter tower adjacent to the lysimeters. An array of soil-solution samplers to be installed through the side of the soil tank will allow studies of waste mobility under natural conditions. Conceptual designs for closure at the RWMS are focused on using an upper layer of repacked native alluvium, which can be tested with the lysimeters. In addition, performance of other components such as a capillary barrier can be tested by installing a scaled version in one of the lysimeter tanks.

  11. Investigation of the low-level modulated light action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, Sergei N.; Sotnikov, V. N.; Koreneva, L. G.

    1994-07-01

    Now there exists no clear complete knowledge about mechanisms and pathways by which low level laser bioactivation works. Modulated laser light action has been investigated two new ways: dynamical infrared thermography and computing image of living brain. These ways permit observation in real time laser action on peripheral blood flow, reflex reactions to functional probes, thermoregulation mechanisms as well as brain electrical activity changes of humans. We have designed a universal apparatus which produced all regimes of the output laser light. It has a built-in He-Ne laser with an acousto-optic modulator and an infrared GaAs laser. The device provided spatial combination of both the light beams and permitted us to irradiate an object both separately and simultaneously. This research shows that the most effective frequencies range from several to dozens of hertz. The duty factor and frequency scanning are also important. On the basis of these results in Russian clinics new treatment methods using modulated light are applied in practical neurology, gynecology, etc.

  12. Soil Lysimeter Excavation for Coupled Hydrological, Geochemical, and Microbiological Investigations.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Aditi; Wang, Yadi; Meira Neto, Antonio A; Matos, Katarena A; Dontsova, Katerina; Root, Rob; Neilson, Julie W; Maier, Raina M; Chorover, Jon; Troch, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Studying co-evolution of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in the subsurface of natural landscapes can enhance the understanding of coupled Earth-system processes. Such knowledge is imperative in improving predictions of hydro-biogeochemical cycles, especially under climate change scenarios. We present an experimental method, designed to capture sub-surface heterogeneity of an initially homogeneous soil system. This method is based on destructive sampling of a soil lysimeter designed to simulate a small-scale hillslope. A weighing lysimeter of one cubic meter capacity was divided into sections (voxels) and was excavated layer-by-layer, with sub samples being collected from each voxel. The excavation procedure was aimed at detecting the incipient heterogeneity of the system by focusing on the spatial assessment of hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological properties of the soil. Representative results of a few physicochemical variables tested show the development of heterogeneity. Additional work to test interactions between hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological signatures is planned to interpret the observed patterns. Our study also demonstrates the possibility of carrying out similar excavations in order to observe and quantify different aspects of soil-development under varying environmental conditions and scale. PMID:27684738

  13. Lysimeter Soil Retriever (LSR) - A tool for investigation on heterogeneity of the migration and structural changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reth, S.; Gierig, M.; Winkler, J. B.; Mueller, C. W.; Nitsche, C.; Seyfarth, M.

    2009-04-01

    Generally research fields of lysimeter studies scheduled as long term experiments. In the course of the studies, the lysimeters act more or less as a "black box". Usually the soil material is identified and analysed at the beginning of the experiments. But there is also a strong need to analyze the soil without disturbance of the soil structure after the experiments in order to obtain information about spatial and structural changes within the soil profile. The new technique of the Lysimeter Soil Retriever for the first time enables studies on the heterogeneous migration of percolating water, and changes of soil structure as well as soil organic matter (SOM) and biomass distribution, as well as the distribution of mycorrhiza and microbes in different depths on intact soil profiles. The main target by using the LSR is the preparation of an intact soil monolith from the field lysimeter and the immediate dissection into slices to enable a direct sampling of its soil environment at several depths. Distribution and composition of SOM, pF-values, soil porosity, as well as degradation of PAH were only a few parameters, which are determined at the different soil depths. In this presentation we give some examples for the different application of the LSR and the advantage for the experiments: - The soil of 8 lysimeters, planted with young beeches was retrieved after several years of fumigation with doubled atmospheric ozone concentrations and application of fungi. Due to the accurate sectioning of the soil monoliths a very dense and intensive soil sampling was possible. As the whole soil space of 8 lysimeters could be sampled, precise spatial information were obtained about the rapid formation of SOM depth gradients within the experiment duration. - After the investigation on the mobilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) by the seepage water, the lysimeter soil was retrieved. Investigations on the microbiological degradation of the PAH were possible in the whole

  14. Compound specific isotope analysis to investigate pesticide degradation in lysimeter experiments at field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabenko, Evgenia; Elsner, Martin; Bakkour, Rani; Hofstetter, Thomas; Torrento, Clara; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    mixtures and c) transformation of pesticides in lysimeters during the year 2014. 1 Elsner, M. Stable isotope fractionation to investigate natural transformation mechanisms of organic contaminants: principles, prospects and limitations. J. Environ. Monit. 12, 2005-2031 (2010). 2 Hofstetter, T. B. & Berg, M. Assessing transformation processes of organic contaminants by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30, 618-627 (2011). 3 Elsner, M. et al. Current challenges in compound-specific stable isotope analysis of environmental organic contaminants. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 403, 2471-2491, doi:10.1007/s00216-011-5683-y (2012).

  15. Deep Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  16. Lysimeter data as input to performance assessment models.

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1998-01-14

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining information on the performance of radioactive waste forms in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-117 prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. The program includes reviewing radionuclide releases from those waste forms in the first 7 years of sampling and examining the relationship between code input parameters and lysimeter data. Also, lysimeter data are applied to performance assessment source term models, and initial results from use of data in two models are presented.

  17. Lysimeter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Don T.; Erickson, Eugene E.; Casper, William L.; Everett, David M.; Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2005-09-06

    A suction lysimeter for sampling subsurface liquids includes a lysimeter casing having a drive portion, a reservoir portion, and a tip portion, the tip portion including a membrane through which subsurface liquids may be sampled; a fluid conduit coupled in fluid flowing relation relative to the membrane, and which in operation facilitates the delivery of the sampled subsurface liquids from the membrane to the reservoir portion; and a plurality of tubes coupled in fluid flowing relation relative to the reservoir portion, the tubes in operation facilitating delivery of the sampled subsurface liquids from the reservoir portion for testing. A method of sampling subsurface liquids comprises using this lysimeter.

  18. Investigations of soil cracking and preferential flow in a weighing lysimeter filled with cracking clay soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, A.; Andersen, M. S.; Acworth, R. I.

    2010-10-01

    SummaryAn improved understanding of deep drainage processes in irrigated cracking soils is needed for sustainable irrigation management. To investigate the effect of crack dynamics and macropore flow on drainage in cracking soils, a series of irrigation experiments was carried out in a weighing lysimeter. Subsurface soil cracks of the initially very dry soil were investigated with a videoscope and changes in the surface expression of cracks in response to irrigation events were monitored by time-lapse photography. A bromide tracer was applied to one irrigation event. Variations in the combined soil and moisture mass and the volume of drainage out of the soil column was logged and the drainage EC and bromide content were determined. No drainage occurred out of the soil column during the first 3 out of 6 irrigation events, even though substantial surface runoff into the cracks occurred and, at least initially, soil cracks provided an uninterrupted flow path through the profile. The breakthrough of the bromide tracer, as well as an initially low EC of the drainage water indicate that preferential flow accounted for a substantial part of the first of the two drainage events, even though the soil cracks were sealed on the surface at the onset of the irrigation causing the drainage. The results show that lateral infiltration of macropore flow into the soil matrix can be substantial and should not be neglected while simulating macropore flow and deep drainage in cracking soils. The results also indicate that soil cracks can remain pathways for preferential flow even after they are closed at the soil surface. The type of water application appears to have an impact on the location of crack formation, with flood irrigation favouring reappearance of cracks at previous crack locations and simulated rainfall resulting in shifting crack locations.

  19. An Investigation of Topography Modulated Low Level Moisture Convergence Patterns in the Southern Appalachians Using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. M.; Duan, Y.; Barros, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Appalachian Mountains (SAM) region is a biodiversity hot-spot that is vulnerable to land use/land cover changes due to its proximity to the rapidly growing population in the Southeast U.S. Persistent near surface moisture and associated microclimates observed in this region have been documented since the colonization of the area. The landform in this area, in particular in the inner mountain region, is highly complex with nested valleys and ridges. The geometry of the terrain causes distinct diurnal and seasonal local flow patterns that result in highly complex interactions of this low level moisture with meso- and synoptic-scale cyclones passing through the region. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) was used to conduct high resolution simulations of several case studies of warm season precipitation in the SAM with different synoptic-scale conditions to investigate this interaction between local and larger-scale flow patterns. The aim is to elucidate the microphysical interactions among these shallow orographic clouds and preexisting precipitating cloud systems and identify uncertainties in the model microphysics using in situ measurements. Findings show that ridge-valley precipitation gradients, in particular the "reverse" to the classical orographic effect observed in inner mountain valleys, is linked to horizontal heterogeneity in the vertical structure of low level cloud and precipitation promoted through landform controls on local flow. Moisture convergence patterns follow the peaks and valleys as represented by WRF terrain, and the topography effectively controls their timing and spatial structure. The simulations support the hypothesis that ridge-valley precipitation gradients, and in particular the reverse orographic enhancement effect in inner mountain valleys, is linked to horizontal heterogeneity in the vertical structure of low level clouds and precipitation promoted through landform controls on moisture convergence.

  20. The Bushland weighing lysimeters: A quarter century of crop ET investigations to advance sustainable irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1987-1989, the first irrigated crops were grown on the four large, precision weighing lysimeters at the USDA-ARS Laboratory at Bushland, Texas, on the Southern High Plains (SHP). Thus began >25-years of full- and deficit-irrigated crop growth, energy and water balance, evapotranspiration (ET), yi...

  1. The Bushland weighing lysimeters: A quarter century of crop ET investigations to advance sustainable irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1987-1989, the first irrigated crops were grown on the four large, precision weighing lysimeters at the USDA-ARS Conservation & Production Laboratory on the Southern High Plains (SHP) at Bushland, Texas. Thus began >25-years of full- and deficit-irrigated crop growth, energy and water balance, ev...

  2. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Remote Handled Low Level Waste Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda R. Pace; Hollie Gilbert; Julie Braun Williams; Clayton Marler; Dino Lowrey; Cameron Brizzee

    2010-06-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a facility for disposal of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) generated remote-handled low-level waste. Initial screening has resulted in the identification of two recommended alternative locations for this new facility: one near the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex and one near the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility (ICDF). In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, intensive archaeological field surveys, and initial coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by new construction within either one of these candidate locations. This investigation showed that construction within the location near the ATR Complex may impact one historic homestead and several historic canals and ditches that are potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No resources judged to be of National Register significance were identified in the candidate location near the ICDF. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both locations. This report outlines recommendations for protective measures to help ensure that the impacts of construction on the identified resources are not adverse.

  3. Investigation of {sup 14}C release in an engineered low-level waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, M.S.; Simonson, S.A.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1996-05-01

    Atmospheric releases of {sup 14}C from a generic engineered low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility and its radiological impacts are investigated. A computer model that describes microbial gas generation and the transport has been developed and used to analyze the generation of {sup 14}C contaminated gases and subsequent migration in a facility. Models are based on a chemical kinetic description of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition of organic materials coupled with attending models of oxygen transport and consumption within waste containers in a facility. Effects of radiolysis on gas generation are addressed based on the estimated dose rate for class B and C wastes. Estimates predict that annual atmospheric release of {sup 14}C due to atmospheric pressure variations could range between {approximately}2.6 {times} 10{sup 8} and 5.5 {times} 10{sup 11} Bq as a result of microbial gas generation based on a volume of 48 000 m{sup 3} LLW disposed in a facility. The associated dose to a maximally exposed individual is estimated to be dominated by ingestion pathway and strongly depends on the fraction of the food imported from an uncontaminated outside area. Dose rates are expected to be <0.04 mSv/yr, considering a reasonable distance between the facility and the exposed population. The depletion through airborne releases of {sup 14}C inventory that is available for transport through other pathways is not expected to be a significant issue.

  4. The Precision Field Lysimeter Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, J.

    2009-04-01

    The understanding and interpretation of leaching processes have improved significantly during the past decades. Unlike laboratory experiments, which are mostly performed under very controlled conditions (e.g. homogeneous, uniform packing of pre-treated test material, saturated steady-state flow conditions, and controlled uniform hydraulic conditions), lysimeter experiments generally simulate actual field conditions. Lysimeters may be classified according to different criteria such as type of soil block used (monolithic or reconstructed), drainage (drainage by gravity or vacuum or a water table may be maintained), or weighing or non-weighing lysimeters. In 2004 experimental investigations have been set up to assess the impact of different farming systems on groundwater quality of the shallow floodplain aquifer of the river Mur in Wagna (Styria, Austria). The sediment is characterized by a thin layer (30 - 100 cm) of sandy Dystric Cambisol and underlying gravel and sand. Three precisely weighing equilibrium tension block lysimeters have been installed in agricultural test fields to compare water flow and solute transport under (i) organic farming, (ii) conventional low input farming and (iii) extensification by mulching grass. Specific monitoring equipment is used to reduce the well known shortcomings of lysimeter investigations: The lysimeter core is excavated as an undisturbed monolithic block (circular, 1 m2 surface area, 2 m depth) to prevent destruction of the natural soil structure, and pore system. Tracing experiments have been achieved to investigate the occurrence of artificial preferential flow and transport along the walls of the lysimeters. The results show that such effects can be neglected. Precisely weighing load cells are used to constantly determine the weight loss of the lysimeter due to evaporation and transpiration and to measure different forms of precipitation. The accuracy of the weighing apparatus is 0.05 kg, or 0.05 mm water equivalent

  5. Lysimeter study of vegetative uptake from saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1990-06-08

    At the Savannah River Site, liquid, low-level nuclear waste will be disposed of by incorporating the waste in concrete, a wasteform called saltstone. Saltstone monoliths will then be buried in the earth. To study the potential uptake of radionuclides by trees and other plants growing in the soil in the area containing buried saltstone, a lysimeter study has been in progress since 1984. Thirty two lysimeters were designed, constructed, and filled with soil. Saltstone samples, containing the liquid, low-level supernate from the tank 50 in-tank precipitation demonstration, were buried in some of the lysimeters. Other lysimeters, not containing saltstone, were used as controls. Crops, grass, and trees were planted in the lysimeters and sampled periodically to determine radionuclide concentrations. Water samples were also collected from the lysimeter sumps and analyzed for radionuclide content. This report documents the results of vegetative and lysimeter sump water measurements from the beginning of the project in November of 1984 through September of 1989. 6 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Epidemiological investigations of aircrew: an occupational group with low-level cosmic radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Hajo; Hammer, Gaël P; Blettner, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Aircrew and passengers are exposed to low-level cosmic ionising radiation. Annual effective doses for flight crew have been estimated to be in the order of 2-5 mSv and can attain 75 mSv at career end. Epidemiological studies in this occupational group have been conducted over the last 15-20 years, usually with a focus on radiation-associated cancer. These studies are summarised in this note. Overall cancer risk was not elevated in most studies and subpopulations analysed, while malignant melanoma, other skin cancers and breast cancer in female aircrew have shown elevated incidence, with lesser risk elevations in terms of mortality. In some studies, including the large German cohort, brain cancer risk appears elevated. Cardiovascular mortality risks were generally very low. Dose information for pilots was usually derived from calculation procedures based on routine licence information, types of aircraft and routes/hours flown, but not on direct measurements. However, dose estimates have shown high validity when compared with measured values. No clear-cut dose-response patterns pointing to a higher risk for those with higher cumulative doses were found. Studies on other health outcomes have shown mixed results. Overall, aircrew are a highly selected group with many specific characteristics and exposures that might also influence cancers or other health outcomes. Radiation-associated health effects have not been clearly established in the studies available so far.

  7. Epidemiological investigations of aircrew: an occupational group with low-level cosmic radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Hajo; Hammer, Gaël P; Blettner, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Aircrew and passengers are exposed to low-level cosmic ionising radiation. Annual effective doses for flight crew have been estimated to be in the order of 2-5 mSv and can attain 75 mSv at career end. Epidemiological studies in this occupational group have been conducted over the last 15-20 years, usually with a focus on radiation-associated cancer. These studies are summarised in this note. Overall cancer risk was not elevated in most studies and subpopulations analysed, while malignant melanoma, other skin cancers and breast cancer in female aircrew have shown elevated incidence, with lesser risk elevations in terms of mortality. In some studies, including the large German cohort, brain cancer risk appears elevated. Cardiovascular mortality risks were generally very low. Dose information for pilots was usually derived from calculation procedures based on routine licence information, types of aircraft and routes/hours flown, but not on direct measurements. However, dose estimates have shown high validity when compared with measured values. No clear-cut dose-response patterns pointing to a higher risk for those with higher cumulative doses were found. Studies on other health outcomes have shown mixed results. Overall, aircrew are a highly selected group with many specific characteristics and exposures that might also influence cancers or other health outcomes. Radiation-associated health effects have not been clearly established in the studies available so far. PMID:22395103

  8. Investigation of the liquid low-level waste evaporator steam coil failure and supporting laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, S.J.; Keiser, J.R.; Longmire, H.F.

    1995-05-01

    Using a remote video camera, the internals of a low-level waste evaporator tank (termed 2A2, type 304L stainless steel construction, known to have failed steam coils) were inspected. This inspection revealed at least three rather substantial holes as opposed to crack- or pit-like leak sites near the nominal solution level position on one particular steam coil. This section was removed from the evaporator vessel, and subsequent hot cell examination revealed extensive general corrosion on the process side of the coil with little or no attack on the steam side. Hot cell metallography confirmed intense general corrosion on the process side and, in addition, revealed shallow intergranular attack at the leading edge of corrosion. No pits or cracks were detected in this section of the steam coil. Laboratory corrosion tests with coupons of 304L (and other high-alloy materials) isothermally exposed in a range of solutions similar to those expected in the evaporator reveal only very low corrosion rates below 40% sodium hydroxide and the solution boiling point. However, {open_quotes}dried film{close_quotes} experiments revealed that much more dilute solutions became aggressive to stainless steel due to concentrating effects (evaporation and periodic wetting) at the air/solution interface. The high general corrosion rates observed on the failed coil section occurred at or near the air/solution interface and were attributed to such {open_quotes}splash zone{close_quotes} activity.

  9. Effect of low-level laser therapy after rapid maxillary expansion: a clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Valentin Javier; Arnabat, J; Comesaña, Rafael; Kasem, Khaled; Ustrell, Josep Maria; Pasetto, Stefano; Segura, Oscar Pozuelo; ManzanaresCéspedes, Maria Cristina; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the repair of the mid palatal suture, after rapid maxillary expansion (RME). A single-operator, randomized single-blind placebo-controlled study was performed at the Orthodontic Department at the Dental Hospital of Bellvitge. Barcelona University, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain. Thirty-nine children (range 6-12 years old), completed RME and were randomized to receive active LLLT (n = 20) or placebo (n = 19). The laser parameters and dose were 660 nm, 100 mW, CW, InGaAlP laser, illuminated area 0.26 cm(2), 332 mW/cm(2), 60 s to four points along midpalatal suture, and 30 s to a point each side of the suture. A total of seven applications were made on days 1, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70 of the retention phase RME. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan was carried out on the day of the first laser treatment, and at day 75, a second CBCT scan was performed. Two radiologists synchronized the slices of two scans to be assessed. P = 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. At day 75 of the suture, the irradiated patients presented a greater percentage of approximate zones in the anterior (p = 0.008) and posterior (p = 0.001) superior suture-and less approximation in the posterior superior suture (p = 0.040)-than the placebo group. LLLT appears to stimulate the repair process during retention phase after RME. PMID:27236292

  10. Is the diagnosis of mass hysteria an excuse for incomplete investigation of low-level environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, H.S.; Brilliant, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    Mass hysteria is an epidemic diagnostic term used to characterize unexplained outbreaks of syncope among women. A syncope outbreak among women in a meeting in a rural area of Michigan prompted an intense investigation to etiology. Low levels of ozone, carbon monoxide, and pentane were found associated with the outbreak. These levels were too low by themselves to explain the symptoms. A sociometric scale of intensity of illness was devised and found to be highly correlated (r = -.094) with the weight of those who fainted. It is argued that mass hysteria may be the result of interactions of low levels of toxicants and may not be a result of the hysterical behavior in women at all.

  11. Is the diagnosis of mass hysteria an excuse for incomplete investigation of low-level environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, H.S.; Brilliant, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    Mass hysteria is an epidemic diagnostic term used to characterize unexplained outbreaks of syncope among women. A syncope outbreak among women in a meeting in a rural area of Michigan prompted an intense investigation for etiology. Low levels of ozone, carbon monoxide, and pentane were found associated with the outbreak. These levels were too low by themselves to explain the symptoms. A sociometric scale of intensity of illness was devised and found to be highly correlated (r = -0.94) with the weight of those who fainted. It is argued that mass hysteria may be the result of interactions of low levels of toxicants and may not be a result of the hysterical behavior in women at all.

  12. Cytomorphometric and clinical investigation of the gingiva before and after low-level laser therapy of gingivitis in children.

    PubMed

    Igic, Marija; Mihailovic, Dragan; Kesic, Ljiljana; Milasin, Jelena; Apostolovic, Mirjana; Kostadinovic, Ljiljana; Janjic, Olivera Trickovic

    2012-07-01

    Gingival epithelial cells are the first physical barrier against periodontal pathogenic microorganisms. Bacterial products may penetrate the epithelium and directly disturb its integrity. We investigated the clinical and cytomorphological status of the gingiva in children with gingivitis before and after low-level laser therapy. The study enrolled 130 children divided into three groups: group 1 comprised 50 children with chronic catarrhal gingivitis who received basic treatment, group 2 comprised 50 children with chronic catarrhal gingivitis who received low-level laser treatment in addition to basic treatment, and group 3 comprised 30 children with healthy gingiva as controls. Oral hygiene and the status of the gingiva were assessed using the appropriate indexes before and after treatment. Inflammation of the gingiva was monitored by cytomorphometric evaluation. Cytomorphometric analysis revealed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) in the size of the nuclei of the stratified squamous epithelial cells of the gingiva before and after treatment in chronic catarrhal gingivitis. Evaluation using clinical parameters showed that treatment of gingivitis with basic treatment was successful. Cytomorphometric analysis showed that after basic treatment the nuclei of the stratified squamous epithelial cells of the gingiva were reduced in size, although not to the size found in healthy gingiva. However, after adjuvant low-level laser therapy, the size of the nuclei of the stratified squamous epithelial cells in the gingiva matched the size of the nuclei in the cells in healthy gingiva.

  13. Lysimeter methods and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Don T.; Erickson, Eugene E.; Casper, William L.; Everett, David M.; Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-12-07

    A suction lysimeter for sampling subsurface liquids includes a lysimeter casing having a drive portion, a reservoir portion, and a tip portion, the tip portion including a membrane through which subsurface liquids may be sampled; a fluid conduit coupled in fluid flowing relation relative to the membrane, and which in operation facilitates the delivery of the sampled subsurface liquids from the membrane to the reservoir portion; and a plurality of tubes coupled in fluid flowing relation relative to the reservoir portion, the tubes in operation facilitating delivery of the sampled subsurface liquids from the reservoir portion for testing. A method of sampling subsurface liquids comprises using this lysimeter.

  14. The Site Investigation Of Low-Level Radioactive Waste For Sub-Surface Disposal Facility In Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, S.; Sasaki, T.

    2006-12-01

    [1.Concept of the sub-surface disposal facility] In Japan, the facilities of Low-Level Radioactive West (LLW) for near-surface disposal have already been in operation. Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) has a plan of a new facility of LLW for sub-surface disposal with engineered barrier, for short "the sub-surface disposal facility".This facility can accept the relatively higher low-level waste from unclear power plant operation and in core materials from the decommissioning, estimated about 20 thousands cubic meter in total.In addition, this will accept transuranim (TRU) slightly contaminated waste from reprocessing plant operation and decommissioning. It shall be located at a sufficient depth enough to avoid normal human activities in future. [2.Site investigation] From 2001 to 2006,the site investigation on geology and hydrogeology has been performed in order to acquire the basic data for the design and the safety assessment for the sub-surface disposal facility.The candidate area is located at the site of JNFL, where Rokkasho-mura, Aomori Prefecture in the northern area of the Mainland of Japan.To confirm geology hydraulic conditions and geo-chemistry, 22 boring survey including 6 holes in swamp and marsh have been performed. The 1km long access tunnel (the entrance level EL 8.0m, incline of 1/10) to the altitude of EL -86m underground, around 100m depth from surface, has excavated. During excavating the tunnel, observation of geology, permeability tests, pore water pressure measurements and so on has been performed in situ.And the large size test cavern of 18m diameters was constructed at the end of the tunnel to demonstrate stability of the tunnel. Prior to the excavation, 3 measuring tunnels were excavated surrounding the test cavern to examine the excavation. [3.Geological features] The sedimentary rock called Takahoko formation at the Neogene period is distributed upper than EL-500m in the candidate area.The quaternary stratum about 10m in thickness is

  15. Lysimeter literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, R.D.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1993-08-01

    Many reports have been published concerning the use of lysimeters to obtain data on the performance of buried radioactive waste. This document presents a review of some of those reports. This review includes lysimeter studies using radioactive waste forms at Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory; radionuclide tracer studies at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment and Los Alamos National Laboratory; and water movement studies at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Beltsville, Maryland site, at the Hanford Site, and at New Mexico State University. The tests, results, and conclusions of each report are summarized, and conclusions concerning lysimeter technology are presented from an overall analysis of the literature. 38 refs., 44 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Investigation of pulmonary function among employees exposed to low levels of monomeric isocyanates and solvents at an automobile finishings plant.

    PubMed

    Schweigert, Michael; Sax, Sol; House, Ron; Henderson, Bruce

    2002-11-01

    There have been reports in the literature of decrements in pulmonary function associated with long-term, low-level monomeric isocyanate exposure combined with solvent exposure. This cross-sectional study examines the relationship between these exposures and pulmonary function in an automobile paint and coating (finishes) plant. A job exposure matrix was developed for isocyanate and solvent exposure; years in a work task were used as a surrogate for exposure. Recent pulmonary function tests were used as the outcome variables; specifically the difference between predicted and actual FEV1 and FVC. The results of the analysis demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between combined isocyanate and solvent exposure and decline in pulmonary function. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between solvent exposure and FEV1 and FVC.

  17. An investigation into the depth of penetration of low level laser therapy through the equine tendon in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is frequently used in the treatment of wounds, soft tissue injury and in pain management. The exact penetration depth of LLLT in human tissue remains unspecified. Similar uncertainty regarding penetration depth arises in treating animals. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that transmission of LLLT in horses is increased by clipping the hair and/or by cleaning the area to be treated with alcohol, but is unaffected by coat colour. A LLLT probe (810 nm, 500 mW) was applied to the medial aspect of the superficial flexor tendon of seventeen equine forelimbs in vivo. A light sensor was applied to the lateral aspect, directly opposite the laser probe to measure the amount of light transmitted. Light transmission was not affected by individual horse, coat colour or leg. However, it was associated with leg condition (F = 4.42, p = 0.0032). Tendons clipped dry and clipped and cleaned with alcohol, were both associated with greater transmission of light than the unprepared state. Use of alcohol without clipping was not associated with an increase in light transmission. These results suggest that, when applying laser to a subcutaneous structure in the horse, the area should be clipped and cleaned beforehand. PMID:21851694

  18. Paramecium tetraurelia growth stimulation under low-level chronic irradiation: investigations on a possible mechanism. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H.

    1982-12-01

    Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the effects of low-level chronic irradiation on Paramecium tetraurelia proliferation. Biological effects were strongly dependent on the bacterial density of culture medium and more exactly on the catalase content of the medium. Significant growth stimulation was found under /sup 60/Co chronic irradiation at a dose rate of 2 rad/year when paramecia were grown in a medium containing a high bacterial concentration (2.5 x 10/sup 2/ cells/m) or supplemented with catalase (300 U/ml). In a medium with a low bacterial density (1 x 10/sup 6/ cell/ml) or supplemented with a catalase activity inhibitor, growth simulation was preceded by a transitory inhibiting effect which could be correlated with extracellularly radioproduced H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ addition appeared to be able to simulate the biological effects of chronic irradiation. A possible mechanism is discussed.We proposed that the stimulating effects were the result of intracellular enzymatic scavenging of radioproduced H/sub 2/O/sub 2/.

  19. Portable Suction Lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-07-13

    A portable lysimeter including a collection vessel having an inflatable bladder and a semi-permeable member assembly at least partially movable in response to inflation of the bladder, a sample conduit in fluid communication with the semi-permeable member and a reservoir in fluid communication with the sample conduit.

  20. Investigations of Possible Low-Level Temperature and Moisture Anomalies During the AMIE Field Campaign on Manus Island

    SciTech Connect

    Long, CN; Holdridge, DJ

    2012-11-19

    This document discusses results stemming from the investigation of near-surface temperature and moisture “oddities” that were brought to light as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE), Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO), and Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011) campaigns.

  1. Application of low-level counting techniques for the investigation of low-level radioactive wastes and the impact of uranium mining as well as remediation on the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Niese, S.

    1995-12-31

    In the undergoing laboratory ``Felsenkeller`` in Dresden a new iron shielded counting room is installed. In the paper the laboratory will be described and examples of application of low-level counting techniques are presented. Long-lived radionuclides in low-level wastes from a power station are corrosion products, fission products and actinides. They have been radiochemical separated and measured by alpha, beta and gamma spectrometry. Natural radionuclides in soil samples, water and plants from the vicinity of an uranium mining plant are measured by gamma and by alpha spectrometry. Geochemical and technological processes cause important changes of the radioactive equilibrium, for example in the activity ratio of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 226}Ra.

  2. Method of retrieving a liquid sample, a suction lysimeter, a portable suction lysimeter, a lysimeter system, and a deep lysimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A method of retrieving a liquid sample comprises providing a portable lysimeter including a semi-permeable membrane and a chamber in fluid communication with the semi-permeable membrane; making a hole at a site from which a liquid sample is desired; evacuating the chamber by applying a vacuum to the chamber; lowering the portable lysimeter into the hole; obtaining a sample in the chamber; and retrieving the lysimeter from the bore; wherein it is not necessary to backfill the bore. A portable lysimeter includes a semi-permeable member and a chamber in fluid communication with the semi-permeable membrane.

  3. A piloted simulation investigation of yaw dynamics requirements for turreted gun use in low-level helicopter air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Morris, Patrick M.; Williams, Jeffrey N.

    1988-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation study was conducted to investigate the handling qualities requirements for helicopter air-to-air combat using turreted guns in the near-terrain environment. The study used a version of the helicopter air combat system developed at NASA Ames Research Center for one-on-one air combat. The study focused on the potential trade-off between gun angular movement capability and required yaw axis response. Experimental variables included yaw axis response frequency and damping and the size of the gun-movement envelope. A helmet position and sighting system was used for pilot control of gun aim. Approximately 340 simulated air combat engagements were evaluated by pilots from the Army and industry. Results from the experiment indicate that a highly-damped, high frequency yaw response was desired for Level I handling qualities. Pilot preference for those characteristics became more pronounced as gun turret movement was restricted; however, a stable, slow-reacting platform could be used with a large turret envelope. Most pilots preferred to engage with the opponent near the own-ship centerline. Turret elevation restriction affected the engagement more than azimuth restrictions.

  4. Low-level liquid waste disposal at the Savannah River Site: A large scale demonstration of saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.B.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1990-12-31

    Lysimeters are large-scale, field experiments used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to measure the effect of percolating rainfall on the release of contaminants from wasteforms. The saltstone lysimeters described are demonstrations of a disposal concept for a low-level radioactive waste resulting from the processing of high-level defense waste for vitrification. Results from the lysimeters confirm the efficacy of the slag formulation in retaining chromium and technetium. Lysimeter results were also useful in validating mathematical models used in predicting environmental effects of saltstone disposal in engineered vaults. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Low-level liquid waste disposal at the Savannah River Site: A large scale demonstration of saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.B.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    Lysimeters are large-scale, field experiments used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to measure the effect of percolating rainfall on the release of contaminants from wasteforms. The saltstone lysimeters described are demonstrations of a disposal concept for a low-level radioactive waste resulting from the processing of high-level defense waste for vitrification. Results from the lysimeters confirm the efficacy of the slag formulation in retaining chromium and technetium. Lysimeter results were also useful in validating mathematical models used in predicting environmental effects of saltstone disposal in engineered vaults. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Atomic force microscopy investigation of the interaction of low-level laser irradiation of collagen thin films in correlation with fibroblast response.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Andreas; Yova, Dido

    2015-12-01

    Low-level red laser (LLRL)-tissue interactions have a wide range of medical applications and are garnering increased attention. Although the positive effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) have frequently been reported and enhanced collagen accumulation has been identified as one of the most important mechanisms involved, little is known about LLRL-collagen interactions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of LLRL irradiation on collagen, in correlation with fibroblast response. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to characterize surfaces and identify conformational changes in collagen before and after LLRL irradiation. Irradiated and non-irradiated collagen thin films were used as culturing substrates to investigate fibroblast response with fluorescence microscopy. The results demonstrated that LLRL induced small alterations in fluorescence emission and had a negligible effect on the topography of collagen thin films. However, fibroblasts cultured on LLRL-irradiated collagen thin films responded to LRLL. The results of this study show for the first time the effect of LLRL irradiation on pure collagen. Although irradiation did not affect the nanotopography of collagen, it influenced cell behavior. The role of collagen appears to be crucial in the LLLT mechanism, and our results demonstrated that LLRL directly affects collagen and indirectly affects cell behavior.

  7. Atomic force microscopy investigation of the interaction of low-level laser irradiation of collagen thin films in correlation with fibroblast response.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Andreas; Yova, Dido

    2015-12-01

    Low-level red laser (LLRL)-tissue interactions have a wide range of medical applications and are garnering increased attention. Although the positive effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) have frequently been reported and enhanced collagen accumulation has been identified as one of the most important mechanisms involved, little is known about LLRL-collagen interactions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of LLRL irradiation on collagen, in correlation with fibroblast response. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to characterize surfaces and identify conformational changes in collagen before and after LLRL irradiation. Irradiated and non-irradiated collagen thin films were used as culturing substrates to investigate fibroblast response with fluorescence microscopy. The results demonstrated that LLRL induced small alterations in fluorescence emission and had a negligible effect on the topography of collagen thin films. However, fibroblasts cultured on LLRL-irradiated collagen thin films responded to LRLL. The results of this study show for the first time the effect of LLRL irradiation on pure collagen. Although irradiation did not affect the nanotopography of collagen, it influenced cell behavior. The role of collagen appears to be crucial in the LLLT mechanism, and our results demonstrated that LLRL directly affects collagen and indirectly affects cell behavior. PMID:26498450

  8. Investigation of the Relationship Between Turbulence and Drizzle Onset and Development in Continental and Marine Stratiform Low-level Clouds Using ARM Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, E. P.; Borque, P.; Chiu, J. Y. C.; Kollias, P.

    2014-12-01

    The response of shallow cloud systems to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols is a major source of uncertainty limiting the accuracy of predictions of future climate. Factors contributing to this uncertainty are drizzle formation and intensity. Drizzle is ubiquitous in low-level clouds, and the two primary parameters that control the production (autoconversion) and development (accretion) of drizzle are liquid water path (LWP) and aerosol loading. While LWP is the dominant parameter controlling the production and development of drizzle, several numerical studies and field observations have provided evidence of an aerosol role in drizzle suppression. However, it remains unclear to what extent small-scale turbulence influences the production and development of drizzle in low-level stratiform clouds. Here, we use observations from the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) deployments in the Black Forest, Germany, from April to December 2007 and at the Azores from June 2009 to December 2010. Several days of continental and maritime stratocumulus clouds are identified. Using synergy between ground-based aerosol observing systems and active and passive remote-sensing instruments, time series of LWP, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration (NCCN), and cloud base drizzle rate (RCB) are derived (Mann et al., 2014). This dataset is conditionally sampled with respect to LWP and NCCN, and for each subset within a specific range of LWP and NCCN values, several additional parameters are estimated to provide information on drizzle onset, drizzle growth and in-cloud turbulence. In particular, the profiling cloud radar Doppler spectra dataset is used to estimate the radar Doppler spectrum skewness, a particularly sensitive parameter in the detection of drizzle onset (Kollias et al., 2011). The rate of drizzle growth is determined using average profiles of radar reflectivity and mean Doppler velocity. In

  9. Control of water infiltration into near surface low-level waste disposal units. Final report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O`Donnell, E.

    1997-09-01

    This study`s objective was to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work was carried out in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (70 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration were investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management.

  10. Use of Long-Term Lysimeter Data in Support of Shallow Land Waste Disposal Cover Design

    SciTech Connect

    Desotell, L.T.; Hudson, D.B.; Yucel, V.; Carilli, J.T.

    2006-07-01

    Water balance studies using two precision weighing lysimeters have been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in support of low-level radioactive waste disposal since 1994. The lysimeters are located in northern Frenchman Flat approximately 400 meters (m) from the southwest corner of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. Frenchman Flat is in the northern Mojave Desert and has an average annual precipitation of 125 millimeters (mm). Each lysimeter consists of a 2 m by 4 m by 2 m deep steel tank filled with native alluvium, supported on a sensitive scale. The scale is instrumented with an electronic load-cell and data-logger for continuous measurement of total soil water storage with a precision of approximately {+-}800 grams or {+-}0.1 mm of soil water storage. Data-loggers are linked to cell phone modems for remote data acquisition. One lysimeter is vegetated with native creosote bush, four wing salt bush, and annual grass at the approximate density of the surrounding landscape while the other is maintained as bare soil. Since no drainage has been observed from the bottom of the lysimeters and run-on/run-off is precluded, the change in soil-water storage is equal to precipitation minus evaporation/evapotranspiration. After equilibration, the bare lysimeter contains approximately 20.2 centimeters (cm) of water (10.1 % volumetric water content) and the vegetated lysimeter contains approximately 11.6 cm of water (5.8 % volumetric water content). The finite difference code UNSAT-H was used to simulate the continuous water balance of the lysimeters. Calibrated one-dimensional model simulations were generally in agreement with field data. 30-year model simulations were conducted to evaluate long-term potential transport of radionuclides via the soil water migration pathway. A 30-year climate record was generated by repeating the existing data record. Simulations indicate a 2 m thick closure cover, in conjunction with native vegetation, will essentially eliminate

  11. Teaching the Low Level Achiever.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for teachers of the English language arts, the articles in this issue offer suggestions and techniques for teaching the low level achiever. Titles and authors of the articles are as follows: (1) "A Point to Ponder" (Rachel Martin); (2) "Tracking: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Failure for the Low Level Achiever" (James Christopher Davis);…

  12. Investigation of low-level laser therapy potentiality on proliferation and differentiation of human osteoblast-like cells in the absence/presence of osteogenic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloise, Nora; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Minzioni, Paolo; Vercellino, Marco; Benedetti, Laura; De Angelis, Maria Gabriella Cusella; Imbriani, Marcello; Visai, Livia

    2013-12-01

    Several studies have shown that low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) has beneficial effects on bone regeneration. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro effects of LLLI on proliferation and differentiation of a human osteoblast-like cell line (Saos-2 cell line). Cultured cells were exposed to different doses of LLLI with a semiconductor diode laser (659 nm 10 mW power output). The effects of laser on proliferation were assessed daily up to seven days of culture in cells irradiated once or for three consecutive days with laser doses of 1 or 3 J/cm2. The obtained results showed that laser stimulation enhances the proliferation potential of Saos-2 cells without changing their telomerase pattern or morphological characteristics. The effects on cell differentiation were assessed after three consecutive laser irradiation treatments in the presence or absence of osteo-inductive factors on day 14. Enhanced secretion of proteins specific for differentiation toward bone as well as calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity were observed in irradiated cells cultured in a medium not supplemented with osteogenic factors. Taken together these findings indicate that laser treatment enhances the in vitro proliferation of Saos-2 cells, and also influences their osteogenic maturation, which suggest it is a helpful application for bone tissue regeneration.

  13. Field lysimeter studies for performance evaluation of grouted Hanford defense wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Serne, R.J.; LeGore, V.L.

    1995-02-01

    The Grout Waste Test Facility (GWTF) consisted of four large field lysimeters designed to test the leaching and migration rates of grout-solidified low-level radioactive wastes generated by Hanford Site operations. Each lysimeter was an 8-m-deep by 2-media closed-bottom caisson that was placed in the ground such that the uppermost rim remained just above grade. Two of these lysimeters were used; the other two remained empty. The two lysimeters that were used (A-1 and B-1) were backfilled with a two-layer soil profile representative of the proposed grout disposal site. The proposed grout disposal site (termed the Grout Treatment Facility Landfill) is located immediately east of the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area. This soil profile consisted of a coarse sand into which the grout waste forms were placed and covered by 4 m of a very fine sand. The A-1 lysimeter was backfilled in March 1985, with a grout-solidified phosphate/sulfate liquid waste from N Reactor decontamination and ion exchange resin regeneration. The B-1 lysimeter was backfilled in September 1985 and received a grout-solidified simulated cladding removal waste representative of waste generated from fuel reprocessing operations at the head end of the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) plant. Routine monitoring and leachate collection activities were conducted for over three years, terminating in January 1989. Drainage was collected sporadically between January 1989 and December 1992. Decontamination and decommissioning of these lysimeters during the summer of 1994, confirmed the presence of a 15 to 20-cm-long hairline crack in one of the bottom plate welds. This report discusses the design and construction of the GWTF, presents the routine data collected from this facility through January 1989 and subsequent data collected sporadically between 1989 and 1993, and provides a brief discussion concerning preliminary interpretation of the results.

  14. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF BOUNDARY-LAYER EVOLUTION AND NOCTURNAL LOW-LEVEL JETS: LOCAL VERSUS NON-LOCAL PBL SCHEMES. (R826373)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Investigation of Novel Electrode Materials for Electrochemically-Based Remediation of High- and Low-Level Mixed Wastes in the DOE Complex - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N.S.; Anderson, M.

    2000-12-01

    New materials are investigated, based on degenerately-doped titanias, for use in the electrochemical degradation of organics and nitrogen-containing compounds in sites of concern to the DOE remediation effort. The data collected in this project appear to provide a rational approach for design of more efficient nanoporous electrodes. Also, osmium complexes appear to be promising candidates for further optimization in operating photo electrochemical cells for solar energy conversion applications.

  16. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    DeFalco, S.; Kaiser, L. L.; May, L. E.

    1991-09-01

    The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project.

  17. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project.

  18. Lysimeter Kleče Sanitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracic Zeleznik, Branka; Cencur Curk, Barbara

    2010-05-01

    Ljubljana field aquifer is the main source of drinking water for Ljubljana. About 35% of the recharge area is used for agriculture, predominantly for intensive vegetable production therefore two lysimeters were built in 1991 at the area of the water pumping station Klece in order to study natural nitrate percolation through the unsaturated zone. The lysimeters consist of two concrete pipes (radius: 0,9 m, depth: 2,0 m), filled with autochthon soil, sandy (pebbles of 2-4 cm diameter) gravel and drainage material, each 50 cm thick. Both lysimeters are connected with control shaft. The mean porosity of the lysimeter is 22 %. At the bottom of the lysimeter outflow a drain pipe leads into adjacent control shaft where outflow is measured with tipping bucket. The measurements of percolating water indicated that the southern lysimeter is damaged, because the part of the percolating water is lost through the bottom of the container. This was the reason for the removal of the southern lysimeter and replacing it with hydro-lysimeter. The monolith of 2 m height and 1,1m diameter will be cut from sandy gravel sediments on the area of the water pumping station. Inside the monolith tensiometers, TDR probes and suction cups will be installed in three levels in depths of 50 cm, 100 cm and 150 cm. Additionally 2 tensiometers for temperature and tension in the depths 190 cm to transfer field matrix potential into the lysimeter will be installed. Long term observations of water balance and nitrate percolation are very important in order to assess trends in groundwater recharge and nitrate content. Measurements and monitoring of NO3-N in percolated water from non-fertilised area give information about nitrate natural background, which helps to determine the correct use of plant fertilizers and enables prompt reactions to negative trends on the groundwater quality.

  19. Can low-level ethanol exposure during pregnancy influence maternal care? An investigation using two strains of rat across two generations.

    PubMed

    Popoola, Daniel O; Borrow, Amanda P; Sanders, Julia E; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Cameron, Nicole M

    2015-09-01

    Gestational alcohol use is well documented as detrimental to both maternal and fetal health, producing an increase in offspring's tendency for alcoholism, as well as in behavioral and neuropsychological disorders. In both rodents and in humans, parental care can influence the development of offspring physiology and behavior. Animal studies that have investigated gestational alcohol use on parental care and/or their interaction mostly employ heavy alcohol use and single strains. This study aimed at investigating the effects of low gestational ethanol dose on parental behavior and its transgenerational transmission, with comparison between two rat strains. Pregnant Sprague Dawley (SD) and Long Evans (LE) progenitor dams (F0) received 1g/kg ethanol or water through gestational days 17-20 via gavage, or remained untreated in their home cages. At maturity, F1 female offspring were mated with males of the same strain and treatment and were left undisturbed through gestation. Maternal behavior was scored in both generations during the first six postnatal days. Arch-back nursing (ABN) was categorized as: 1, when the dam demonstrated minimal kyphosis; 2, when the dam demonstrated moderate kyphosis; and 3, when the dam displayed maximal kyphosis. Overall, SD showed greater amounts of ABN than LE dams and spent more time in contact with their pups. In the F0 generation, water and ethanol gavage increased ABN1 and contact with pups in SD, behaviors which decreased in treated LE. For ABN2, ethanol-treated SD dams showed more ABN2 than water-treated dams, with no effect of treatment on LE animals. In the F1 generation, prenatal exposure affected retrieval. Transgenerational transmission of LG was observed only in the untreated LE group. Strain-specific differences in maternal behavior were also observed. This study provides evidence that gestational gavage can influence maternal behavior in a strain-specific manner. Our results also suggest that the experimental procedure during

  20. Investigation of novel electrode materials for electrochemically based remediation of high and low-level mixed wastes in the DOE complex. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.A.; Lewis, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    'This work is focused on the preparation of novel electrode materials for the degradation of toxic wastes in the DOE complex. One of the goals of this work is to characterize whether it is possible to use controlled doping of TiO{sub 2} with species such as Nb in order to create new electrode materials that will facilitate the destruction of undesirable organics and inorganics, without light and instead only with an applied potential, in the waste tanks at the DOE sites. In the first part of this project, the authors have therefore spent an extensive amount of effort characterizing, as a baseline, the chemical and electrochemical behavior of TiO{sub 2} itself, so that they can make robust comparisons to the behavior of the Nb-doped systems in subsequent work on this project. The preparation of these electrode films is being performed by Marc Anderson at Wisconsin, who is preparing a number of different stoichiometries, grain sizes, etc. for investigation of their electrochemical properties by the Lewis group at Caltech. First they report on the progress of the electrode preparation work, and then they describe progress on the electrochemical work.'

  1. Determining water and nitrogen balances for beneficial management practices using lysimeters at Wagna test site (Austria).

    PubMed

    Klammler, Gernot; Fank, Johann

    2014-11-15

    The shallow Murtal aquifer south of Graz, Austria, provides easily withdrawable groundwater, which is supplied as drinking water without any chemical treatment. The aquifer is also used intensively by agriculture. Common agricultural management practices are the main source for diffuse nitrogen leaching and high groundwater nitrate concentrations. To safeguard the coexisting use of these two important resources, lysimeters are operated at the agricultural test site Wagna, Austria, and the influence of two beneficial management practices--low nitrogen input and organic farming--on nitrogen leaching towards groundwater is investigated. The technical lysimeter design as presented here consists of: (1) high-resolution weighing cells, (2) a suction controlled lower boundary condition for sucking off seepage water, thus emulating undisturbed field conditions, (3) comparative soil temperature, water content and matrix potential measurements inside and outside the lysimeter at different depths, (4) an installation of the lysimeters directly into test plots and (5) a removable upper lysimeter ring enabling machinery soil tillage. Our results indicate that oasis effects or fringe effects of the lysimeter cylinder on unsaturated water flow did not occur. Another lysimeter cultivated with lawn is operated for observing grass-reference evapotranspiration, which resulted in good agreement with calculated grass-reference evapotranspiration according to the FAO-Penman-Monteith method. We conclude that lysimeters installed at Wagna test site did not show any fringe effects and, thus, are appropriate tools for measuring water balance elements and nitrogen leaching of arable and grass land at point scale. Furthermore, our results for the period of 2005 to 2011 show that beneficial management practices reduced nitrate leaching and, hence, may allow for a sustainable coexistence of drinking water supply and agriculture in the Murtal aquifer.

  2. Determining water and nitrogen balances for beneficial management practices using lysimeters at Wagna test site (Austria).

    PubMed

    Klammler, Gernot; Fank, Johann

    2014-11-15

    The shallow Murtal aquifer south of Graz, Austria, provides easily withdrawable groundwater, which is supplied as drinking water without any chemical treatment. The aquifer is also used intensively by agriculture. Common agricultural management practices are the main source for diffuse nitrogen leaching and high groundwater nitrate concentrations. To safeguard the coexisting use of these two important resources, lysimeters are operated at the agricultural test site Wagna, Austria, and the influence of two beneficial management practices--low nitrogen input and organic farming--on nitrogen leaching towards groundwater is investigated. The technical lysimeter design as presented here consists of: (1) high-resolution weighing cells, (2) a suction controlled lower boundary condition for sucking off seepage water, thus emulating undisturbed field conditions, (3) comparative soil temperature, water content and matrix potential measurements inside and outside the lysimeter at different depths, (4) an installation of the lysimeters directly into test plots and (5) a removable upper lysimeter ring enabling machinery soil tillage. Our results indicate that oasis effects or fringe effects of the lysimeter cylinder on unsaturated water flow did not occur. Another lysimeter cultivated with lawn is operated for observing grass-reference evapotranspiration, which resulted in good agreement with calculated grass-reference evapotranspiration according to the FAO-Penman-Monteith method. We conclude that lysimeters installed at Wagna test site did not show any fringe effects and, thus, are appropriate tools for measuring water balance elements and nitrogen leaching of arable and grass land at point scale. Furthermore, our results for the period of 2005 to 2011 show that beneficial management practices reduced nitrate leaching and, hence, may allow for a sustainable coexistence of drinking water supply and agriculture in the Murtal aquifer. PMID:24982000

  3. An overview of the geochemical code MINTEQ: Applications to performance assessment for low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.R.; Opitz, B.E.; Graham, M.J.; Eary, L.E.

    1987-03-01

    The MINTEQ geochemical computer code, developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), integrates many of the capabilities of its two immediate predecessors, MINEQL and WATEQ3. The MINTEQ code will be used in the Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid program to perform the calculations necessary to simulate (model) the contact of low-level waste solutions with heterogeneous sediments of the interaction of ground water with solidified low-level wastes. The code can calculate ion speciation/solubilitya, adsorption, oxidation-reduction, gas phase equilibria, and precipitation/dissolution of solid phases. Under the Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid program, the composition of effluents (leachates) from column and batch experiments, using laboratory-scale waste forms, will be used to develop a geochemical model of the interaction of ground water with commercial, solidified low-level wastes. The wastes being evaluated include power-reactor waste streams that have been solidified in cement, vinyl ester-styrene, and bitumen. The thermodynamic database for the code was upgraded preparatory to performing the geochemical modeling. Thermodynamic data for solid phases and aqueous species containing Sb, Ce, Cs, or Co were added to the MINTEQ database. The need to add these data was identified from the characterization of the waste streams. The geochemical model developed from the laboratory data will then be applied to predict the release from a field-lysimeter facility that contains full-scale waste samples. The contaminant concentrations migrating from the waste forms predicted using MINTEQ will be compared to the long-term lysimeter data. This comparison will constitute a partial field validation of the geochemical model.

  4. Geochemical analysis of leachates from cement/low-level radioactive waste/soil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Criscenti, L.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1988-09-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted as part of the Special Waste Form Lysimeters/endash/Arid Program. These experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical arid, near-surface disposal site, and to evaluate the ability of laboratory tests to predict leaching in actual field conditions. Batch leaching, soil adsorption column, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted using Portland III cement waste forms containing boiling-water reactor evaporator concentrate and ion-exchange resin waste. In order to understand the reaction chemistry of the cement waste form/soil/ground-water system, the compositions of the leachates from the laboratory experiments were studied with the aid of the MINTEQ ion speciation/solubility and mass transfer computer code. The purpose of this report is to describe the changes in leachate composition that occur during the course of the experiments, to discuss the geochemical modeling results, and to explore the factors controlling the major element chemistry of these leachates. 18 refs., 84 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. Lysimeter tests of SRP waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, R.L.; Root, R.W. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    A field study, estimated to last 10 years, has been started to define leaching and migration rates of radionuclides from typical SRP buried wastes. The study utilizes 42 lysimeters (6-ft or 10-ft diameter by 10-ft deep) which have been charged with soil and waste to simulate burial ground conditions. Eight waste forms were selected for the study, which represent the bulk of the wastes generated at SRP. This report describes the lysimeter design, the physical and radiological characteristics of the wastes, and the experimental approach. Calculations have also been made which predict the migration of various radionuclides in the lysimeter soil. The calculations should provide guidance during the course of the study, and are the basis of recommendations made for collecting and interpreting data so that important parameters of migration can be evaluated.

  6. Leaching studies of low-level radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Dayal, R.; Arora, H.; Milian, L.; Clinton, J.

    1985-01-01

    A research program has been underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory to investigate the release of radionuclides from low-level waste forms under laboratory conditions. This paper describes the leaching behavior of Cs-137 from two major low-level waste streams, that is, ion exchange bead resin and boric acid concentrate, solidified in Portland cement. The resultant leach data are employed to evaluate and predict the release behavior of Cs-137 from low-level waste forms under field burial conditions.

  7. Long-term lysimeter experiment to analyze the influence of the climate change on matter fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütz, Thomas; Groh, Jannis; Wollschläger, Ute; Gerke, Horst; Priesack, Eckart; Kiese, Ralf; Borg, Erik; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Based on the TERENO SoilCan infrastructure, a long-term large-scale experiment was designed to study the effects of climate change on terrestrial systems. The water and matter fluxes in soil are the main focuses of SoilCan. In the frame of SoilCan, fully automated lysimeter systems were installed on several highly equipped experimental field sites of the TERENO-observatories and the relevant status variables of each ecosystem were monitored (e.g. climate, hydrology, biosphere-atmosphere exchange, biodiversity, etc.). In total, 90 lysimeters (1.5 m depth, 1m2 surface) were filled with soil monoliths at the four TERENO-observatories and were instrumented with TDRs, tensiometers, temperature sensors, soil heat flux plates, and CO2 sensors. For the controlling of the lower boundary condition, suction candle rakes were installed into the lysimeter bottoms. In combination with bi-directional pumps and tanks, the water content of the lysimeters was adjusted to the surrounded original field sites. To simulate the expected climate change, 48 lysimeters were transferred along temperature and rainfall gradients within the respective observatories and between the observatories, based on the principle 'Space for Time'. In case of the "Rur" observatory, three intensively instrumented field sites ("Wüstebach", "Rollesbroich" und "Selhausen") were equipped with lysimeter stations. These three field sites include different land uses, "Wüstebach" as a forest site, "Rollesbroich" as a grassland and "Selhausen" as an arable site. In order to standardize the agronomic management, the crop rotation at the arable lysimeters comprised winter wheat - winter rye - winter barley - oats. For investigation of the matter flux, soil solutions and leachates were regularly sampled. The water balances and the dynamics of the carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the first two years of the experiment will be presented.

  8. Using long-term lysimeter data to analyze hydrological trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puetz, Thomas; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Roesseler, Anne-Kathrin; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    actual evapotranspiration derived from lysimeter measurements at specific locations. Observed water storage changes, and evaporative and drainage fluxes in lysimeter systems combined with mathematical modeling of the soil water balance may help to separate climate forcing from management. Evett, S.R., et al., 2012. Can weighing lysimeter et represent surrounding field et well enough to test flux station measurements of daily and sub-daily et? Adv. Water Resour. 50:79-90. Jung, M., et al., 2010. Recent decline in the global land evapotranspiration trend due to limited moisture supply. Nature 467:951-954. Seneviratne, S.I., et al., 2010: Investigating soil moisture-climate interactions in a changing climate: A review. Earth-Science Reviews, 99, 3-4, 125-161, doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2010.02.004. Sheffield, J., et al., 2012. Little change in global drought over the past 60 years. Nature, 491, 435-438. Teuling, A.J., et al., 2009: A regional perspective on trends in continental evaporation. Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L02404, doi:10.1029/2008GL036584.

  9. Long-term lysimeter data on evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term crop evapotranspiration (ET) data measured using large weighing lysimeters have only been gathered in a few places in the world, yet are of great importance for ground truthing of many models of plant water use, mesoscale climate, remote sensing estimation of ET, climate change and climate...

  10. Behavior of water balance components at sites with shallow groundwater tables: Possibilities and limitations of their simulation using different types of groundwater lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Ottfried; Fahle, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater lysimeters are a special type of lysimeter that can provide valuable insights into processes occurring at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Typically, water balance simulations for such sites using hydrological models are complicated by the permanently changing directions of the water fluxes due to percolation and capillary rise and the complex hydrological conditions. Problems also arise when trying to imitate such conditions correctly in a lysimeter. The biggest challenge is to realistically simulate the lower boundary condition, which has a pronounced impact on most of the hydrological variables, especially when considering time scales shorter than one day. Historically, groundwater levels in soil monoliths of groundwater lysimeters were controlled by so-called Mariotte bottles (type 1). Even nowadays, most groundwater lysimeters use such systems. From a technical standpoint, the solution is reliable and simple to operate and maintain. Nevertheless, the accuracy of Mariotte bottles (type 1) is limited when simulatingnatural shallow groundwater table conditions which are characterized by fluctuations on a short time scale. Today's lysimeters are able to simulate measured groundwater levels with higher accuracy, even for short time steps (type 2). However, conditions in the lysimeter and the place where the reference groundwater level is measured have to be consistent in order to get reliable results. Problems also arise if the behavior of the groundwater level itself is the aim of the investigation as the groundwater level has to be pre-defined, i.e. it is the control value. A new approach regulates the lower boundary condition by controlling the in- and outflows of the lysimeter (type 3). This enlarges the field of possible applications of groundwater lysimeters, especially with respect to simulations of natural site conditions and short time scales. The presentation compares the performance of different types of groundwater lysimeters with

  11. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    SciTech Connect

    Tuite, K.; Winberg, M.R.; McIsaac, C.V.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy through the National Low-Level Waste Management Program and WMG Inc. have entered into a joint development effort to design, build, and demonstrate the Packaged Low-Level Waste Verification System. Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste disposal site operators have no method to independently verify the radionuclide content of packaged low-level waste that arrives at disposal sites for disposition. At this time, the disposal site relies on the low-level waste generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to ensure that low-level waste received meets the site`s waste acceptance criteria. The subject invention provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of low-level waste shipping records to ensure that the site`s waste acceptance criteria are being met. The objective of the prototype system is to demonstrate a mobile system capable of independently verifying the content of packaged low-level waste.

  12. Low level tank waste disposal study

    SciTech Connect

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-09-29

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

  13. Effect of rice husk gasification residue application on herbicide behavior in micro paddy lysimeter.

    PubMed

    Ok, Junghun; Pisith, Sok; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc; Boulange, Julien; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Effects of rice husk gasification residues (RHGR) application on the fate of herbicides, butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, in paddy water were investigated using micro paddy lysimeters (MPLs). The dissipation of both herbicides in paddy water was faster in the RHGR treated MPL than in the control MPL. The average concentrations of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water in the lysimeter treated with RHGR during 21 days were significantly reduced by 51% and 48%, respectively, as compared to those in the lysimeter without RHGR application. The half-lives (DT50) of butachlor in paddy water for control and treatment were 3.1 and 2.3 days respectively, and these values of pyrazosulfuron-ethyl were 3.0 and 2.2 days, respectively. Based on this study, RHGR application in rice paddy environment is an alternative method to reduce the concentration of herbicide in paddy field water and consequently to reduce potential pollution to aquatic environment.

  14. Upscaling of lysimeter measurements to regional groundwater nitrate distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Gernot; Fank, Johann; Kupfersberger, Hans; Rock, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    For many European countries nitrate leaching from the soil zone into the aquifer due to surplus application of mineral fertilizer and animal manure by farmers constitutes the most important threat to groundwater quality. This is a diffuse pollution situation and measures to change agricultural production have to be investigated at the aquifer scale to safeguard drinking water supply from shallow groundwater resources Lysimeters are state-of-the-art measurements for water and solute fluxes through the unsaturated zone towards groundwater at the point scale, but due to regional heterogeneities (especially concerning soil conditions) lysimeters cannot provide aquifer-wide groundwater recharge and solute leaching. Thus, in this work the numerical simulation model SIMWASER/STOTRASIM (Stenitzer, 1988; Feichtinger, 1998) for quantifying groundwater recharge and nitrate leaching at aquifer scale is applied. Nevertheless, according to Groenendijk et al. (2014) a model calibration by means of lysimeter measurements is essential, since uncalibrated models are generally far from acceptable. Thus, a lysimeter provides the basis for the parameterization of numerical simulation models. To quantify also the impact on regional nitrate distribution in the groundwater, we couple the unsaturated zone model SIMWASER/STOTRASIM with the saturated groundwater flow and solute transport model FELOW (Diersch, 2009) sequentially. In principal, the problem could be solved by the 3 dimensional equation describing variable saturated groundwater flow and solute transport. However, this is computationally prohibitive due to the temporal and spatial scope of the task, particularly in the framework of running numerous simulations to compromise between conflicting interests (i.e. good groundwater status and high agricultural yield). To account for the unknown regional distribution of crops grown and amount, timing and kind of fertilizers used a stochastic tool (Klammler et al, 2011) is developed that

  15. Low level moisture from VAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    Previous research and current opinion are too pessimistic concerning the capability of defining moisture fields from satellite measurements. The TIROS-N sounder is a close analogue to what will fly on GEOS-D and can be used to investigate the probable capability of VAS. Basically, there are three frequencies applied to sensing moisture in the troposphere. The ability of these three measurements to define the moisture pattern is assessed. It is certainly true that one cannot achieve the detail available with a radiosonde hygristor. Sharp discontinuities cannot be sensed by a passive sounder, especially since the measurement tends to "saturate" with the first moisture layer encountered. However, the satellite measurements demonstrate a high degree of skill in defining the horizontal gradient. Moisture "tongues" and "dry lines" are readily delineated with some, perhaps two layers, of vertical definition. These attributes allow both the calculation of important advective quantities as well as (in concert with the temperature sounding) a gross definition of the vertical stability. The skill is demonstrably commensurate with subsynoptic forecast models and perhaps even to regional scale models.

  16. Chemical characterization, leach, and adsorption studies of solidified low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.B.; Serne, R.J.; Jones, T.L.; McLaurine, S.B.

    1986-12-01

    Laboratory and field leaching experiments are beig conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical, arid, near-surface disposal site. Under PNL's Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid Program, a field test facility was constructed to monitor the leaching of commercial solidified waste. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the leaching and adsorption characteristics of the waste forms in contact with soil. Liquid radioactive wastes solidified in cement, vinyl ester-styrene, and bitumen were obtained from commercial boiling water and pressurized water reactors, and buried in a field leaching facility on the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. Batch leaching, soil column adsorption, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted in the laboratory, using small-scale cement waste forms and Hanford site ground water. The purpose of these experiments is to evaluate the ability of laboratory leaching tests to predict leaching under actual field conditions and to determine which mechanisms (i.e., diffusion, solubility, adsorption) actually control the concentration of radionuclides in the soil surrounding the waste form. Chemical and radionuclide analyses performed on samples collected from the field and laboratory experiments indicate strong adsorption of /sup 134,137/Cs and /sup 85/Sr onto the Hanford site sediment. Small amounts of /sup 60/Co are leached from the waste forms as very mobile species. Some /sup 60/Co migrated through the soil at the same rate as water. Chemical constituents present in the reactor waste streams also found at elevated levels in the field and laboratory leachates include sodium, sulfate, magnesium, and nitrate. Plausible solid phases that could be controlling some of the chemical and radionuclide concentrations in the leachate were identified using the MINTEQ geochemical computer code.

  17. Polyethylene solidification of low-level wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalb, P. D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-02-01

    The results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive waste in polyethylene are discussed. Waste streams included those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Four types of commercially available low-density polyethylenes were employed which encompass a range of processing and property characteristics. Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste and polyethylene type. Property evaluation testing was performed on laboratory-scale specimens to assess the potential behavior of actual waste forms in a disposal environment.

  18. Low-level waste program technical strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Bledsoe, K.W.

    1994-10-01

    The Low-Level Waste Technical Strategy document describes the mechanisms which the Low-Level Waste Program Office plans to implement to achieve its mission. The mission is to manage the receipt, immobilization, packaging, storage/disposal and RCRA closure (of the site) of the low-level Hanford waste (pretreated tank wastes) in an environmentally sound, safe and cost-effective manner. The primary objective of the TWRS Low-level waste Program office is to vitrify the LLW fraction of the tank waste and dispose of it onsite.

  19. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  20. Impact of agricultural management practices on DOC leaching - results of a long-term lysimeter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Ollesch, G.; Seeger, J.; Meißner, R.; Rode, M.

    2009-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes are recently increasing in surface waters of humid climate regions. Due to its substantial importance for leaching processes, aquatic foodwebs, and drinking water purification a better understanding of sources and pathways of DOC is needed. Therefore this study aims to analyse and simulate DOC fluxes in agricultural ecosystems with selected crop rotations. A data set of 24 lysimeters of the UFZ Lysimeter station at Falkenberg (Saxony-Anhalt) covering nine years of DOC investigation has been selected and examined. The data set covers a wide range of climatic conditions with deviating management practices for grasslands and agricultural crop rotations. The monthly DOC concentrations assessed in the leached water range from 2.4 to 34.1 mg /l. DOC concentrations depend on temperature, precipitation and discharge. The type of crop grown on the lysimeter is an important trigger for DOC leaching - especially lysimeters used as pasture, or planted with rape and carrots exhibit high DOC concentrations. Management practices and fertilizer application modify the leaching of DOC and offer potentials to reduce DOC losses. The results form the basis of further process simulation studies and upscaling of the results to the small catchment scale.

  1. Characterizing soil water dynamics on steep hillslopes from long-term lysimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augenstein, Michael; Goeppert, Nadine; Goldscheider, Nico

    2015-10-01

    Understanding soil water dynamics on hillslopes is of crucial importance to the prediction of floods and other hydrological events in mountainous catchments, to the identification of natural vegetation patterns, and to the optimization of agricultural land use. In principle, such information can be obtained from lysimeters, but most experimental lysimeter facilities have been installed on flat terrain. This study presents a long-term and high-resolution investigation of soil moisture, surface and subsurface flow using three large-scale lysimeters on a slope with 23.5° inclination on a landfill site in Karlsruhe, Germany. Data from a 10-year observation period were evaluated for this study, including weekly soil moisture data obtained by neutron probes, continuous discharge data from the land surface and several layers within the soil zone, and hydrometeorological data from a climate station. The results reveal (i) clear temporal and spatial patterns of soil moisture variations down to a depth of 250 cm, (ii) substantially higher discharge and faster percolation rates in the lower part of the lysimeter field, indicating significant downhill flow at various depths within the soil profile, (iii) characteristic threshold values for flow processes in the soil, associated with a hysteresis effect between soil moisture and flow processes. These results can be used as a basis of improved numerical models for the simulation of floods, soil moisture distributions, and vegetation patterns.

  2. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Protective barrier test results (FY 1990, the third year)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.

    1990-11-01

    The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) was constructed to test protective barriers for isolating low-level radioactive and hazardous wastes from the biosphere. Protective barriers are specially configured earth materials placed over near-surface wastes to prevent intrusion of water, plants, and animals. Low-level radioactive waste is stored in near-surface repositories at the Hanford Site and can be transported into the biosphere by water, plants, and animals. The purpose of the FLTF is to measure water balance within barriers as precipitation is partitioned to evaporation (including transpiration), storage, and drainage. Runoff was prevented by raised edges on the lysimeters. Water balance in protective barriers depends on the water-holding capacity of the soil, the gradient of a potential, and the conductivity of the underlying capillary barrier. Current barrier design uses soil with a high water storage capacity and a capillary barrier underlying the soil to increase its water storage capacity. This increased storage capacity is to hold water, which would normally drain, near the the surface where evaporation can cycle it back to the atmosphere. 7 refs., 23 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect

    Sternwheeler, W.D.E.

    1992-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage.

  4. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    This report provides highlights from the 1992 fall meeting of the Low LEvel Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: disposal options after 1992; interregional agreements; management alternatives; policy; and storage.

  5. Improving the performance of lysimeters with thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voortman, Bernard; Bartholomeus, Ruud; Witte, Jan-Philip

    2014-05-01

    Precision weighing lysimeters generate data of evapotranspiration (ET) at a high resolution in the order of 0.01 to 0.05 mm. Though this resolution is often reported as the accuracy of the lysimeter, it is in fact the precision of the weighing device. The accuracy of a lysimeter is heavily dependent on its ability to duplicate environmental conditions of its surroundings. In general, measurement errors will decrease with increasing lysimeter dimension, primarily because a larger part of the lysimeter is unaffected by its boundaries and because heterogeneities in soil hydraulic properties and micro-climate are more averaged out. However, the cost of large lysimeters make them unattractive and scientists often choose for more economical solutions, optimizing between lysimeter dimensions and costs. Instead of investing in large lysimeters or putting effort in duplicating environmental conditions, we invested in monitoring the surface temperature of zero tension lysimeters with a thermal infrared camera to detect deviations in ET. In such a system, measurement errors caused by deviations in moisture content can be compensated, without the struggle of controlling the lysimeter moisture content with pressure plates and vacuum pumps or preventing wall flow. Other advantages of using thermal imaging are that (i) measurements of ET can be extrapolated to much larger areas than the surface area of most conventional lysimeters, and (ii) ET can be split into soil evaporation and transpiration, which allows us to study the effects of the vegetation structure on the water balance. Several experiments were performed to estimate differences in ET between lysimeters based on the radiometric surface temperature. Two simple methods, 1) linear scaling and 2) a comparison of the surface energy balance were applied to translate differences in surface temperature to differences in ET. We examined the application of both methods on bare sand, moss and grass. We show that the performance

  6. Variably-saturated flow in large weighing lysimeters under dry conditions: inverse and predictive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, Sascha; Reineke, Daniela; Koonce, Jeremy; Berli, Markus; Durner, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    A reliable quantification of the soil water balance in semi-arid regions requires an accurate determination of bare soil evaporation. Modeling of soil water movement in relatively dry soils and the quantitative prediction of evaporation rates and groundwater recharge pose considerable challenges in these regions. Actual evaporation from dry soil cannot be predicted without detailed knowledge of the complex interplay between liquid, vapor and heat flow and soil hydraulic properties exert a strong influence on evaporation rates during stage-two evaporation. We have analyzed data from the SEPHAS lysimeter facility in Boulder City (NV) which was installed to investigate the near-surface processes of water and energy exchange in desert environments. The scientific instrumentation consists of 152 sensors per Lysimeter which measured soil temperature, soil water content, and soil water potential. Data from three weighing lysimeters (3 m long, surface area 4 m2) were used to identifiy effective soil hydraulic properties of the disturbed soil monoliths by inverse modeling with the Richards equation assuming isothermal flow conditions. Results indicate that the observed soil water content in 8 different soil depths can be well matched for all three lysimeters and that the effective soil hydraulic properties of the three lysimeters agree well. These results could only be obtained with a flexible model of the soil hydraulic properties which guaranteed physical plausibility of water retention towards complete dryness and accounted for capillary, film and isothermal vapor flow. Conversely, flow models using traditional parameterizations of the soil hydraulic properties were not able to match the observed evaporation fluxes and water contents. After identifying the system properties by inverse modeling, we checked the possibility to forecast evaporation rates by running a fully coupled water, heat and vapor flow model which solved the energy balance of the soil surface. In these

  7. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    SciTech Connect

    Tuite, K.T.; Winberg, M.; Flores, A.Y.; Killian, E.W.; McIsaac, C.V.

    1996-08-01

    Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site operators have no method of independently verifying the radionuclide content of packaged LLW that arrive at disposal sites for disposal. At this time, disposal sites rely on LLW generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to insure that LLW received meets the waste acceptance criteria. An independent verification system would provide a method of checking generator LLW characterization methods and help ensure that LLW disposed of at disposal facilities meets requirements. The Mobile Low-Level Waste Verification System (MLLWVS) provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of LLW shipping records to insure that disposal site waste acceptance criteria are being met. The MLLWVS system was developed under a cost share subcontract between WMG, Inc., and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies through the Department of Energy`s National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  8. Using lysimeters to test the Penman Monteith actual evapotranspiration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Asher, Jiftah; Volinski, Roman; Zilberman, Arkadi; Bar Yosef, Beni; Silber, Avner

    2015-04-01

    Differences in actual transpiration (ETa) of banana plants were quantified in a lysimeter experiment. ETA was computed using instantaneous data from two weighing lysimeters and compared to PM (Penman-Monteith) model for ETa. Two critical problems were faced in this test. A) Estimating canopy and aerodynamic resistances ("rc" and "ra" respectively ) and B) converting the lysimeter changes in water volume ( LYv cm3 ) to ETa length units ( cm ). The two unknowns " rc" and "ra" were obtained from continuous measurements of the differences between canopy and air temperature (Tc - Ta). This difference was established by means of the infrared thermometry which was followed by numerical and analytical calculation of ETa using the modification suggested by R. Jackson to the PM model. The conversion of lysimeter volumetric units (LYv) to ETa length units was derived from the slope of cumulative LYv/ETa. This relationship was significantly linear (r2=0.97and 0.98.). Its slope was interpreted as "evaporating leaf area" which accounted for 1.8E4 cm2 in lysimeter 1 and 2.3E4 cm2.in lysimeter 2 . The comparison between LYv and PM model was acceptable even under very low ETa. The average of two lysimeters was 1.1mm/day (1.4 mm/day , LYv 1 and 0.8 LYv 2) while ETa calculated on the basis of PM model was 1.2 mm/day. It was concluded that although lysimeters are most accurate systems to measure ETa one of its disadvantages ( beside the high cost) is the volumetric output that in many cases should be supported by a one dimensional energy balance system. The PM model was found to be a reliable complementary tool to convert lysimeters volumetric output into conventional length units of ETa.

  9. A lysimeter-based approach to quantify the impact of climate change on soil hydrological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slawitsch, Veronika; Steffen, Birk; Herndl, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The predicted climate change involving increasing CO2 concentrations and increasing temperatures will have effects on both vegetation and soil properties and thus on the soil water balance. The aim of this work is to quantify the effects of changes in these climatic factors on soil hydrological processes and parameters. For this purpose data of six high precision weighable lysimeters will be used. The lysimeters are part of a Lysi-T-FACE concept, where free-air will be enriched with CO2 (FACE-Technique) and infrared heaters heat the plots for investigation on effects of increasing temperatures (T-FACE-Technique). The Lysi-T-FACE concept was developed on the „Clim Grass Site" at the HBLFA Raumberg-Gumpenstein (Styria, Austria) in 2011 and 2012 with a total of 54 experimental plots. These include six plots with lysimeters where the two climatic factors are varied in different combinations. On the basis of these grass land lysimeters the soil hydraulic parameters under different experimental conditions will be investigated. The lysimeters are equipped with TDR-Trime sensors and temperature sensors combined with tensiometers in different depths. In addition, a mechanical separation snow cover system is implemented to obtain a correct water balance in winter. To be able to infer differences between the lysimeters reliably a verification of functionalities and a plausibility check of the data from the lysimeters as well as adequate data corrections are needed. Both an automatic and a user-defined control including the recently developed filter method AWAT (Adaptive Window and Adaptive Threshold Filter) are combined with a visualisation tool using the software NI DIAdem. For each lysimeter the raw data is classified in groups of matric potentials, soil water contents and lysimeter weights. Values exceeding technical thresholds are eliminated and marked automatically. The manual data control is employed every day to obtain high precision seepage water weights. The

  10. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues.

  11. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the October 1990 meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: a special session on liability and financial assurance needs; proposal to dispose of mixed waste at federal facilities; state plans for interim storage; and hazardous materials legislation.

  12. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    This report contains highlights from the 1991 fall meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included legal updates; US NRC updates; US EPA updates; mixed waste issues; financial assistance for waste disposal facilities; and a legislative and policy report.

  13. Disposal of low-level radioactive wastes.

    PubMed

    Hendee, W R

    1986-07-01

    The generation of low-level radioactive waste is a natural consequence of the societal uses of radioactive materials. These uses include the application of radioactive materials to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease and to research into the causes of human disease and their prevention. Currently, low level radioactive wastes are disposed of in one of three shallow land-burial disposal sites located in Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina. With the passage in December 1980 of Public Law 96-573, "The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act," the disposal of low-level wastes generated in each state was identified as a responsibility of the state. To fulfill this responsibility, states were encouraged to form interstate compacts for radioactive waste disposal. At the present time, only 37 states have entered into compact agreements, in spite of the clause in Public Law 96-573 that established January 1, 1986, as a target date for implementation of state responsibility for radioactive wastes. Recent action by Congress has resulted in postponement of the implementation date to January 1, 1993.

  14. Natural Artificial Languages: Low-Level Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Gary

    This paper explores languages for communicating precise ideas within limited domains, which include mathematical notation and general purpose and high level computer programming languages. Low-level properties of such natural artificial languages are discussed, with emphasis on those in which names are chosen for concepts and symbols are chosen…

  15. Infrared low-level wind shear work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, Pat

    1988-01-01

    Results of field experiments for the detection of clear air disturbance and low level wind shear utilizing an infrared airborne system are given in vugraph form. The hits, misses and nuisance alarms scores are given. Information is given on the infrared spatial resolution technique. The popular index of aircraft hazard (F= WX over g - VN over AS) is developed for a remote temperature sensor.

  16. Low-level waste vitrification contact maintenance viability study

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, C.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-12

    This study investigates the economic viability of contact maintenance in the Low-Level Waste Vitrification Facility, which is part of the Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System. This document was prepared by Flour Daniel, Inc., and transmitted to Westinghouse Hanford Company in September 1995.

  17. Atmospheric loading effects on free-draining lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, J.; Schnabel, W. E.; Barnes, D.; Lee, W.

    2011-05-01

    Temporal atmospheric pressure variations introduce an artifact into percolation measurements in free-draining lysimeters. This anomaly is associated with transient pressure gradients that occur as fluid and gas pressures within the lysimeter equilibrate with atmospheric pressure changes at the drain. On the basis of harmonic (Fourier) analysis of a large (20 m × 10 m × 1.8 m) free-draining lysimeter, hourly percolation was maximally affected by pressure variations of ˜2 cycles per day, with the effect decreasing with decreasing frequency. Compared to the calculated pressure differences at the drain, the measured phase delay between percolation and the atmospheric pressure was less by ˜45°, which we attribute to an additional phase lag existing between the percolation and pressure difference at the drain. These pressure-induced changes in percolation rate can influence the outcome of water balances conducted via free-draining lysimeters.

  18. Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2014-12-22

    Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network

  19. Effects of dietary protein concentration on ammonia volatilization, nitrate leaching, and plant nitrogen uptake from dairy manure applied to lysimeters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This lysimeter experiment was designed to investigate the effects of dietary crude protein (CP) concentration on nitrate-N (NO3-N) and ammonia (NH3) losses from dairy manure applied to soil and manure N use for plant growth. Lactating dairy cows were fed diets with 16.7 (HighCP) or 14.8% (LowCP) cru...

  20. Effects of soil type, irrigation volume and plant species on treatment of log yard run-off in lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Maria; Dimitriou, Ioannis; Aronsson, Pär; Elowson, Torbjörn

    2004-09-01

    Wet storage of timber and pulpwood produces large quantities of run-off water. A study was conducted to determine the purification efficiency of soil-plant systems for log yard run-off. Sixteen 1200-l lysimeters (1.2 m deep soil columns) with clay or sand soil were planted with willow (Salix sp.) or alder (Alnus glutinosa), and irrigated with run-off from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) log yard. Drainage water was analysed for total organic carbon (TOC), phenols, total P and total N in order to determine concentrations and levels of retention. High retention of TOC, phenols and P occurred in the lysimeters, but no clear differences between willows and alder or clay and sand were identified. Lysimeters with high levels of irrigation showed greater retention than those with low levels. Soil-plant systems using willow and alder could provide an alternative for log yard run-off purification: the key requirement is to optimise irrigation rather than manipulate the plants or soils. PMID:15325190

  1. Liquid low level waste management expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, J.J.; Abraham, T.J. ); Jackson, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    An expert system has been developed as part of a new initiative for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) systems analysis program. This expert system will aid in prioritizing radioactive waste streams for treatment and disposal by evaluating the severity and treatability of the problem, as well as the final waste form. The objectives of the expert system development included: (1) collecting information on process treatment technologies for liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that can be incorporated in the knowledge base of the expert system, and (2) producing a prototype that suggests processes and disposal technologies for the ORNL LLLW system. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOEpatents

    Holbrook, Richard H.; Keener, Wendell E.

    1995-01-01

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame.

  3. Low-level structural recognition of documents

    SciTech Connect

    Chenevoy, Y.; Belaied, A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper focuses on the qualitative approach of the low-level structured document analysis. The system identifies the different logical fields within the document and produces as output a structured flow with confidence scores. The strategy is driven by a generic model and by an OCR flow. Logical labels are attached to research areas after hypothesizing and testing typographical, lexical and contextual properties. A qualitative recognition is performed, which allows to amphasize ambiguities and unrecognized fields. Library references are treated to illustrate this method.

  4. Low level vapor verification of monomethyl hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Narinder

    1990-01-01

    The vapor scrubbing system and the coulometric test procedure for the low level vapor verification of monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) are evaluated. Experimental data on precision, efficiency of the scrubbing liquid, instrument response, detection and reliable quantitation limits, stability of the vapor scrubbed solution, and interference were obtained to assess the applicability of the method for the low ppb level detection of the analyte vapor in air. The results indicated that the analyte vapor scrubbing system and the coulometric test procedure can be utilized for the quantitative detection of low ppb level vapor of MMH in air.

  5. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOEpatents

    Holbrook, R.H.; Keener, W.E.

    1995-02-28

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame. 6 figs.

  6. Solid low-level waste certification strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.A.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Solid Low-Level Waste (SLLW) Certification Program is to provide assurance that SLLW generated at the ORNL meets the applicable waste acceptance criteria for those facilities to which the waste is sent for treatment, handling, storage, or disposal. This document describes the strategy to be used for certification of SLLW or ORNL. The SLLW Certification Program applies to all ORNL operations involving the generation, shipment, handling, treatment, storage and disposal of SLLW. Mixed wastes, containing both hazardous and radioactive constituents, and transuranic wastes are not included in the scope of this document. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Effect of rice husk gasification residue application on herbicide behavior in micro paddy lysimeter.

    PubMed

    Ok, Junghun; Pisith, Sok; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc; Boulange, Julien; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Effects of rice husk gasification residues (RHGR) application on the fate of herbicides, butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, in paddy water were investigated using micro paddy lysimeters (MPLs). The dissipation of both herbicides in paddy water was faster in the RHGR treated MPL than in the control MPL. The average concentrations of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water in the lysimeter treated with RHGR during 21 days were significantly reduced by 51% and 48%, respectively, as compared to those in the lysimeter without RHGR application. The half-lives (DT50) of butachlor in paddy water for control and treatment were 3.1 and 2.3 days respectively, and these values of pyrazosulfuron-ethyl were 3.0 and 2.2 days, respectively. Based on this study, RHGR application in rice paddy environment is an alternative method to reduce the concentration of herbicide in paddy field water and consequently to reduce potential pollution to aquatic environment. PMID:25763539

  8. Russian low-level waste disposal program

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, L.

    1993-03-01

    The strategy for disposal of low-level radioactive waste in Russia differs from that employed in the US. In Russia, there are separate authorities and facilities for wastes generated by nuclear power plants, defense wastes, and hospital/small generator/research wastes. The reactor wastes and the defense wastes are generally processed onsite and disposed of either onsite, or nearby. Treating these waste streams utilizes such volume reduction techniques as compaction and incineration. The Russians also employ methods such as bitumenization, cementation, and vitrification for waste treatment before burial. Shallow land trench burial is the most commonly used technique. Hospital and research waste is centrally regulated by the Moscow Council of Deputies. Plans are made in cooperation with the Ministry of Atomic Energy. Currently the former Soviet Union has a network of low-level disposal sites located near large cities. Fifteen disposal sites are located in the Federal Republic of Russia, six are in the Ukraine, and one is located in each of the remaining 13 republics. Like the US, each republic is in charge of management of the facilities within their borders. The sites are all similarly designed, being modeled after the RADON site near Moscow.

  9. 48-Pack low level waste storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bilik, T.J.

    1995-11-01

    ComEd has completed a design for a low level radioactive waste (LLW) storage facility, dubbed the {open_quotes}48-Pack{close_quotes}. The 48-Pack, so named because of its ability to hold 48 high integrity containers (HICs), is a modular, heavily shielded, concrete bunker. The facility was designed to serve as an effective means of augmenting the Company`s existing process waste storage capacity if and when the need arose. This paper identifies how ComEd addressed the potential need to supplement the storage capacity at its six nuclear stations through the development of the 48-Pack. Based on the criteria of meeting safety and regulatory requirements, low cost, short lead time for construction, universal design, and modularity, the 48-Pack concept was anticipated to meet and exceed the Company`s storage needs which were anticipated to end with the availability of a Central Midwest Compact (CMC) disposal facility.

  10. Low level counting from meteorites to neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Heusser, Gerd

    2005-09-08

    The development in low level counting at Heidelberg with NaI(Tl) crystals, proportional counters and Germanium detectors is reviewed throughout the course of almost 40 years of experience. Research subjects changed from cosmogenic radionuclides in meteorites to solar neutrinos and double beta decay. Driven by screening measurements for these rare event experiments, the sensitivity in single gamma counting has gained almost 3 orders of magnitude. With Ge spectrometry the {mu}Bq/kg range is now accessible. It is discussed how further improvements can be realized. There is potential to reach a sensitivity at the level of 10 to 100 nBq/kg for cryogenic liquid type Gespectroscopy, a technique which the next generation 76Ge double beta decay experiment GERDA is based on.

  11. Detecting low levels of radionuclides in fluids

    DOEpatents

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting low levels of one or more radionuclides in a fluid sample uses a substrate that includes an ion exchange resin or other sorbent material to collect the radionuclides. A collecting apparatus includes a collecting chamber that exposes the substrate to a measured amount of the fluid sample such that radionuclides in the fluid sample are collected by the ion exchange resin. A drying apparatus, which can include a drying chamber, then dries the substrate. A measuring apparatus measures emissions from radionuclides collected on the substrate. The substrate is positioned in a measuring chamber proximate to a detector, which provides a signal in response to emissions from the radionuclides. Other analysis methods can be used to detect non-radioactive analytes, which can be collected with other types of sorbent materials.

  12. R&D ERL: Low level RF

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    2010-01-15

    A superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is currently under development at the Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The major components from an RF perspective are (a) a 5-cell SRF ERL cavity, (b) an SRF photocathode electron gun, and (c) a drive laser for the photocathode gun. Each of these RF subsystems has its own set of RF performance requirements, as well as common requirements for ensuring correct synchronism between them. A low level RF (LLRF) control system is currently under development, which seeks to leverage both technology and experience gained from the recently commissioned RHIC LLRF system upgrade. This note will review the LLRF system requirements and describe the system to be installed at the ERL.

  13. Draft low level waste technical summary

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, W.J.; Benar, C.J.; Certa, P.J.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Kruger, A.A.; Norman, E.C.; Mitchell, D.E.; Penwell, D.E.; Reidel, S.P.; Shade, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an outline of the Hanford Site Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal program, what it has accomplished, what is being done, and where the program is headed. This document may be used to provide background information to personnel new to the LLW management/disposal field and to those individuals needing more information or background on an area in LLW for which they are not familiar. This document should be appropriate for outside groups that may want to learn about the program without immediately becoming immersed in the details. This document is not a program or systems engineering baseline report, and personnel should refer to more current baseline documentation for critical information.

  14. Low-level therapy in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankov, O. P.

    1999-07-01

    Extremely slow introduction of low-level laser therapy into the practice of ophthalmologists is restricted by the lack of good methodological recommendation and modern equipment adopted to the needs of ophthalmology. The most perspective is considered to be further improvement of the methods and the elaboration of the medical equipment, working in several wave bands, combined with magnetotherapy and working with the use of various modes of the modulation of the intensity of the luminous flux. It may be asserted that unlike the mode of continuous radiation, in some cases, the effectiveness of the treatment increases when the modulated light with the frequency of one to a few tens HZ is used. Moreover, the methods are being elaborated, when the modulation frequency of laser light and the biorhythms of man physiologic parameters are synchronized. Very perspective seems the computerization of the treatment process with the simultaneous electrophysiological control of the condition of visual functions.

  15. Statistical analysis of low level atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tieleman, H. W.; Chen, W. W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The statistical properties of low-level wind-turbulence data were obtained with the model 1080 total vector anemometer and the model 1296 dual split-film anemometer, both manufactured by Thermo Systems Incorporated. The data obtained from the above fast-response probes were compared with the results obtained from a pair of Gill propeller anemometers. The digitized time series representing the three velocity components and the temperature were each divided into a number of blocks, the length of which depended on the lowest frequency of interest and also on the storage capacity of the available computer. A moving-average and differencing high-pass filter was used to remove the trend and the low frequency components in the time series. The calculated results for each of the anemometers used are represented in graphical or tabulated form.

  16. Mechanisms of low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova, Tatiana N.

    2006-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Originally thought to be a peculiar property of laser light (soft or cold lasers), the subject has now broadened to include photobiomodulation and photobiostimulation using non-coherent light. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. This likely is due to two main reasons; firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. In particular a biphasic dose response has been frequently observed where low levels of light have a much better effect than higher levels. This introductory review will cover some of the proposed cellular chromophores responsible for the effect of visible light on mammalian cells, including cytochrome c oxidase (with absorption peaks in the near infrared) and photoactive porphyrins. Mitochondria are thought to be a likely site for the initial effects of light, leading to increased ATP production, modulation of reactive oxygen species and induction of transcription factors. These effects in turn lead to increased cell proliferation and migration (particularly by fibroblasts), modulation in levels of cytokines, growth factors and inflammatory mediators, and increased tissue oxygenation. The results of these biochemical and cellular changes in animals and patients include such benefits as increased healing in chronic wounds, improvements in sports injuries and

  17. Concepts and data-collection techniques used in a study of the unsaturated zone at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; DeVries, M.P.; Striegl, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    A study of water and radionuclide movement through the unsaturated zone is being conducted at the low level radioactive waste disposal site near Sheffield, Illinois. Included in the study are detailed investigations of evapotranspiration, movement of water through waste trench covers, and movement of water and radionuclides (dissolved and gaseous) from the trenches. An energy balance/Bowen ratio approach is used to determine evapotranspiration. Precipitation, net radiation, soil-heat flux, air temperature and water vapor content gradients, wind speed, and wind direction are measured. Soil water tension is measured with tensiometers which are connected to pressure transducers. Meteorological sensors and tensiometers which are connected to pressure transducers. Meteorological sensors and tensiometers are monitored with automatic data loggers. Soil moisture contents are measured through small-diameter access tubes with neutron and gamma-ray attenuation gages. Data beneath the trenches are obtained through a 130-meter-long tunnel which extends under four of the trenches. Water samples are obtained with suction lysimeters, and samples of the geologic material are obtained with core tubes. These samples are analyzed for radiometric and inorganic chemistry. Gas samples are obtained from gas piezometers and analyzed for partial pressures of major constituents, Radon-222, tritiated water vapor, and carbon-14 dioxide. (USGS)

  18. Disposal of low-level and low-level mixed waste: audit report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-03

    The Department of Energy (Department) is faced with the legacy of thousands of contaminated areas and buildings and large volumes of `backlog` waste requiring disposal. Waste management and environmental restoration activities have become central to the Department`s mission. One of the Department`s priorities is to clean up former nuclear weapons sites and find more effective and timely methods for disposing of nuclear waste. This audit focused on determining if the Department was disposing of low-level and low-level mixed waste in the most cost-effective manner.

  19. Status of SRNL radiological field lysimeter experiment-Year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.; Roberts, K.; Bagwell, L.

    2013-10-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radiological Field Lysimeter Experiment is a one-of-a-kind field facility designed to study radionuclide geochemical processes at a larger spatial scale (from grams to tens of kilograms sediment) and temporal scale (from months to 10 years) than is readily afforded through laboratory studies. The lysimeter facility is intended to capture the natural heterogeneity of moisture and temperature regimes in the vadose zone, the unsaturated subsurface region between the surface soil and the underlying aquifer. The 48 lysimeter columns, which contain various radionuclides (and stable iodine), were opened to rainfall infiltration on July 5, 2012. The objective of this report is to provide a status of the lysimeter facility operations and to compile data collected during FY13, including leachate volume, rainfall, and soil moisture and temperature in situ probe data. Radiological leachate data are not presented in this document but will be the subject of a separate document.1 Leachate samples were collected quarterly and shipped to Clemson University for radiological analyses. Rainfall, leachate volume, moisture and temperature probe data were collected continuously. During operations of the facility this year, there were four safety or technical concerns that required additional maintenance: 1) radioactivity was detected in one of the overflow bottles (captured water collected from the secondary containment that does not come in contact with the radiological source material); 2) rainwater accumulated within the sample-bottle storage sheds; 3) overflow containers collected more liquid than anticipated; and 4) significant spider infestation occurred in the sample-bottle storage sheds. To address the first three concerns, each of the lysimeter columns was re-plumbed to improve and to minimize the number of joint unions. To address the fourth concern regarding spiders, new sample-bottle water sheds were purchased and a pest control

  20. A method for installing zero-tension pan and wick lysimeters in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zero-tension pan lysimeters and passive capillary fiberglass wick lysimeters are useful in determining water quality and volumetric aspects of subsurface water flow. Installation of pan and wick lysimeters beneath undisturbed soil may be complicated by the tendency for the soil to cave-in as the lys...

  1. Health-promoting low level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jian-Qin; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Li, Jiang-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Xu, Xiao-Yang; Liu, Song-Hao

    2008-12-01

    Homeostasis is a classical concept of physiology, and will be developed into function-specific homeostasis (FSH) in this paper. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific conditions inside the biosystem. Let Q be the quality of a FSH. A person might simultaneously have many kinds of FSH, {FSHi, i = 1, 2,... n}, and then has {Qi, i = 1, 2,...,n}. Let Qmax=max{Qi, i = 1, 2,...n}. Qmax represents the health level, and might be enhanced by training. An individual system might be classified as FSH-essential subsystems (FESs) and FSH-non-essential subsystems (FNSs) which homeostasis can be written as FESHs and FNSHs for short, respectively. The training to establish a new FSH can also be classified as extraordinary training (ET) and ordinary training (OT). ET disrupts the present FSH and establishes FESHs. OT maintains FESHs and establishes FNSHs and then a new FSH, and then maintains the new FSH. The cellular rehabilitation of low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light might promote the establishment of FESHs, FNSHs and then FSH, shorten ET or OT period and then promote health.

  2. Language abstractions for low level optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dévai, Gergely; Gera, Zoltán; Kelemen, Zoltán

    2012-09-01

    In case of performance critical applications programmers are often forced to write code at a low abstraction level. This leads to programs that are hard to develop and maintain because the program text is mixed up by low level optimization tricks and is far from the algorithm it implements. Even if compilers are smart nowadays and provide the user with many automatically applied optimizations, practice shows that in some cases it is hopeless to optimize the program automatically without the programmer's knowledge. A complementary approach is to allow the programmer to fine tune the program but provide him with language features that make the optimization easier. These are language abstractions that make optimization techniques explicit without adding too much syntactic noise to the program text. This paper presents such language abstractions for two well-known optimizations: bitvectors and SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data). The language features are implemented in the embedded domain specific language Feldspar which is specifically tailored for digital signal processing applications. While we present these language elements as part of Feldspar, the ideas behind them are general enough to be applied in other language definition projects as well.

  3. Low-level efficacy of cosmetic preservatives.

    PubMed

    Lundov, M D; Johansen, J D; Zachariae, C; Moesby, L

    2011-04-01

    Preservation using combinations of preservatives has several advantages. This study shows that the concentration of some of the most frequently used allergenic preservatives can be markedly lowered when they are combined with phenoxyethanol. The antimicrobial efficacy of cosmetic preservatives and known allergens of various potency [diazolidinyl urea, methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI), methylisothiazolinone (MI) and phenoxyethanol] was tested alone and in various combinations of two or three preservatives together. The preservatives were tested for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and possible synergy using fractional inhibitory concentration. MCI/MI was the only preservative showing low-level MIC against all four tested microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. Different combinations of the preservatives indicated additive effects against the microorganisms. No combination of preservatives showed any inhibitory action on each other. Challenge tests with different concentrations and combinations were performed in a cosmetic cream. Diazolidinyl urea and MCI/MI alone were ineffective against C. albicans in a challenge test at concentrations up to 16 times higher than the observed MIC values. When combining phenoxyethanol with either one of the allergenic preservatives diazolidinyl urea, MCI/MI or MI, the cosmetic cream was adequately preserved at concentrations well below the preservatives' MIC values as well as 10-20 times below the maximum permitted concentrations. By using combinations of preservatives, effective preservation can be achieved with lower concentrations of allergenic preservatives.

  4. MESERAN Calibration for Low Level Organic Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovich, M.G.

    2004-04-08

    Precision cleaning studies done at Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T), the Kansas City Plant (KCP), and at other locations within the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons complex over the last 30 years have depended upon results from MESERAN Evaporative Rate Analysis for detecting low levels of organic contamination. The characterization of the surface being analyzed is carried out by depositing a Carbon-14 tagged radiochemical onto the test surface and monitoring the rate at which the radiochemical disappears from the surface with a Geiger-Mueller counter. In the past, the total number of counts over a 2-minute span have been used to judge whether a surface is contaminated or not and semi-quantitatively to what extent. This technique is very sensitive but has not enjoyed the broad acceptance of a purely quantitative analysis. The work on this project developed calibrations of various organic contaminants typically encountered in KCP operations. In addition, a new analysis method was developed to enhance the ability of MESERAN Analyzers to detect organic contamination and yield quantitative data in the microgram and nanogram levels.

  5. Simulating Roll Clouds associated with Low-Level Convergence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A. A.; Sherwood, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Convective initiation often takes place when features such as fronts and/or rolls collide, merge or otherwise meet. Rolls indicate boundary layer convergence and may initiate thunderstorms. These are often seen in satellite and radar imagery prior to the onset of deep convection. However, links between convergence driven rolls and convection are poor in global models. The poor representation of convection is the source of many model biases, especially over the Maritime Continent in the Tropics. We simulate low-level convergence lines over north-eastern Australia using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model (version 3.7). The simulations are events from September-October 2002 driven by sea breeze circulations. Cloud lines associated with bore-waves that form along the low-level convergence lines are thoroughly investigated in this study with comparisons from satellite and surface observations. Initial simulations for a series of cloud lines observed on 4th October, 2002 over the Gulf of Carpentaria showed greater agreement in the timing and propagation of the disturbance and the low-level convergence, however the cloud lines or streets of roll clouds were not properly captured by the model. Results from a number of WRF simulations with different microphysics, cumulus and planetary boundary layer schemes, resolution and boundary conditions will also be discussed.

  6. The effects of radiative transfer on low-level cyclogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1995-04-01

    Many investigators have documented the role that thermodynamic forcing due to radiative flux divergence plays in the enhancement or generation of circulation. Most of these studies involve large-scale systems, small-scale systems such as thunderstorms, and squall lines. The generation of circulation on large scales results from the creation of divergence in the upper troposphere and the maintenance of low-level potentially unstable air, and the maintenance of baroclinicity throughout the atmosphere. On smaller scales, radiative flux divergence acts similarly. In the thunderstorms and squall lines, the radiative forcing acts as a pump, increasing the divergence at the top of the storm systems and increasing the updraft velocity and the intensity of inflow at mid-levels in the storm systems. Other researchers have examined the role of surface processes and low-level baroclinicity in east coast cyclogenesis. In this paper, we examine the interactive role that radiative flux divergence, clouds, and surface processes play in low-level cyclogenesis and the creation or maintenance of the boundary layer baroclinicity.

  7. Forearm muscle oxygenation decreases with low levels of voluntary contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.; Rempel, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to determine if the near infrared spectroscopy technique was sensitive to changes in tissue oxygenation at low levels of isometric contraction in the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle. Nine subjects were seated with the right arm abducted to 45 degrees, elbow flexed to 85 degrees, forearm pronated 45 degrees, and wrist and forearm supported on an armrest throughout the protocol. Altered tissue oxygenation was measured noninvasively with near infrared spectroscopy. The near infrared spectroscopy probe was placed over the extensor carpi radialis brevis of the subject's right forearm and secured with an elastic wrap. After 1 minute of baseline measurements taken with the muscle relaxed, four different loads were applied just proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joint such that the subjects isometrically contracted the extensor carpi radialis brevis at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction for 1 minute each. A 3-minute recovery period followed each level of contraction. At the end of the protocol, with the probe still in place, a value for ischemic tissue oxygenation was obtained for each subject. This value was considered the physiological zero and hence 0% tissue oxygenation. Mean tissue oxygenation (+/-SE) decreased from resting baseline (100% tissue oxygenation) to 89 +/- 4, 81 +/- 8, 78 +/- 8, and 47 +/- 8% at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction, respectively. Tissue oxygenation levels at 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the baseline value. Our results indicate that tissue oxygenation significantly decreases during brief, low levels of static muscle contraction and that near infrared spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting deoxygenation noninvasively at low levels of forearm muscle contraction. Our findings have important implications in occupational medicine because oxygen depletion induced by low levels of muscle

  8. A comprehensive filtering scheme for high-resolution estimation of the water balance components from high-precision lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannes, M.; Wollschlager, U.; Schrader, F.; Durner, W.; Gebler, S.; Putz, T.; Fank, J.; von Unold, G.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2015-08-01

    Large weighing lysimeters are currently the most precise method to directly measure all components of the terrestrial water balance in parallel via the built-in weighing system. As lysimeters are exposed to several external forces such as management practices or wind influencing the weighing data, the calculated fluxes of precipitation and evapotranspiration can be altered considerably without having applied appropriate corrections to the raw data. Therefore, adequate filtering schemes for obtaining most accurate estimates of the water balance components are required. In this study, we use data from the TERENO (TERrestrial ENvironmental Observatories) SoilCan research site in Bad Lauchstadt to develop a comprehensive filtering procedure for high-precision lysimeter data, which is designed to deal with various kinds of possible errors starting from the elimination of large disturbances in the raw data resulting e.g., from management practices all the way to the reduction of noise caused e.g., by moderate wind. Furthermore, we analyze the influence of averaging times and thresholds required by some of the filtering steps on the calculated water balance and investigate the ability of two adaptive filtering methods (the adaptive window and adaptive threshold filter (AWAT filter; Peters et al., 2014), and a new synchro filter applicable to the data from a set of several lysimeters) to further reduce the filtering error. Finally, we take advantage of the data sets of all 18 lysimeters running in parallel at the Bad Lauchstadt site to evaluate the performance and accuracy of the proposed filtering scheme. For the tested time interval of 2 months, we show that the estimation of the water balance with high temporal resolution and good accuracy is possible. The filtering code can be downloaded from the journal website as Supplement to this publication.

  9. Investigation of Low-Level Cascadia Tremor Between Major Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C.; Wech, A. G.; Creager, K. C.

    2006-12-01

    Major episodes of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) located under the Olympic peninsula, Washington, and further north occur every 14 months and have been well-studied using both seismic and geodetic data. The next major episode is expected in November 2006. We look at the interval between major events using seismic data and find that there are still tremor episodes, although of smaller duration and magnitude. We examined vertical component data from 22 Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network seismometers broadly distributed across western Washington and Oregon. The data were band-pass filtered at 1 to 6 Hz. An envelope function calculated from these waveforms was then low-pass filtered at 0.03 Hz. We classify tremor as an emergent increase in seismic activity across multiple stations lasting anywhere from 10 minutes to many hours and exhibiting similarly shaped waveforms for nearby stations. Crude estimates of tremor location are based on the geographic variability of tremor amplitude. Typical smaller tremor bursts occur over 2 to 3 days, containing periods of up to 8 continuous hours exhibiting similar waveforms, and appear in 2 to 8 stations at a time. The longest period without any tremor was 10 days. Preliminary analysis shows that more tremor occurs under Washington than Oregon and occurs with a possible two-week periodicity, suggesting a potential effect of tidal forcing.

  10. Low level laser therapy on experimental myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dávila, Soledad; Vignola, María Belén; Cremonezzi, David; Simes, Juan C.; Soriano, Fernando; Campana, Vilma R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present work was to study the effect of Helium-Neon (HeNe) and Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) laser upon nitric oxide (NO) plasma levels, an inflammatory biomarker associated with oxidative stress, in rats with experimental myopathy. These were evaluated through histological assessment. Materials and Methods: The groups studied were: (A) control (intact rats that received LLLT sham exposures), (B) rats with myopathy and sacrificed at 24 h later, (C) rats with myopathy and sacrificed 8 days later, (D) rats with myopathy and treated with HeNe laser, (E) rats with myopathy and treated with GaAs laser, (F) intact rats treated with HeNe laser and (G) intact rats treated with GaAs laser. Myopathy was induced by injecting 50μl of 1% carrageenan λ (type IV) in the left gastrocnemius muscle. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) was applied with 9.5 J.cm−2 daily for 10 consecutive days with each laser. The determination of the NO was made by spectrophotometry. The muscles were stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin and examined by optic microscopy. Quantitative variables were statistically analyzed by the Fisher test, and categorical by applying Pearson's Chi Squared test at p <0.05 for all cases. Results: In groups B and C, NO was significantly increased compared to groups A, D, E, F and G (p<0.05). In group C, the percentage of area with inflammatory infiltration was significantly increased compared to the other groups (p<0.001). Conclusions: LLLT decreased plasma levels of NO in rats with experimental myopathies and significant muscle recovery. PMID:24155539

  11. Large Plate Lysimeter Efficiency for Collecting Water Transported from Soil to Ground Water

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T

    2004-04-14

    A large, zero-tension, plate lysimeter (3.05 x 2.13 m) was installed to intercept percolating soil water at Bikini Atoll (11 35'N, 165 25'E), a former nuclear test-site. In two experiments controlled amounts of irrigation water were applied over the lysimeter and leachate water was collected. Evapotranspiration (ET) calculations were made using the Penman-Monteith equation and climate data collected at the atoll. The efficiency of the lysimeter was essentially 100% in contrast to low efficiencies reported for smaller plate lysimeters. Lysimeter design, installation, and water balance results are discussed.

  12. A Protocol for Collecting and Constructing Soil Core Lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Saporito, Louis S; Bryant, Ray B; Kleinman, Peter J A

    2016-06-06

    Leaching of nutrients from land applied fertilizers and manure used in agriculture can lead to accelerated eutrophication of surface water. Because the landscape has complex and varied soil morphology, an accompanying disparity in flow paths for leachate through the soil macropore and matrix structure is present. The rate of flow through these paths is further affected by antecedent soil moisture. Lysimeters are used to quantify flow rate, volume of water and concentration of nutrients leaching downward through soils. While many lysimeter designs exist, accurately determining the volume of water and mass balance of nutrients is best accomplished with bounded lysimeters that leave the natural soil structure intact. Here we present a detailed method for the extraction and construction of soil core lysimeters equipped with soil moisture sensors at 5 cm and 25 cm depths. Lysimeters from four different Coastal Plain soils (Bojac, Evesboro, Quindocqua and Sassafras) were collected on the Delmarva Peninsula and moved to an indoor climate controlled facility. Soils were irrigated once weekly with the equivalent of 2 cm of rainfall to draw down soil nitrate-N concentrations. At the end of the draw down period, poultry litter was applied (162 kg TN ha(-1)) and leaching was resumed for an additional five weeks. Total recovery of applied irrigation water varied from 71% to 85%. Nitrate-N concentration varied over the course of the study from an average of 27.1 mg L(-1) before litter application to 40.3 mg L(-1) following litter application. While greatest flux of nutrients was measured in soils dominated by coarse sand (Sassafras) the greatest immediate flux occurred from the finest textured soil with pronounced macropore development (Quindocqua).

  13. A Protocol for Collecting and Constructing Soil Core Lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Saporito, Louis S; Bryant, Ray B; Kleinman, Peter J A

    2016-01-01

    Leaching of nutrients from land applied fertilizers and manure used in agriculture can lead to accelerated eutrophication of surface water. Because the landscape has complex and varied soil morphology, an accompanying disparity in flow paths for leachate through the soil macropore and matrix structure is present. The rate of flow through these paths is further affected by antecedent soil moisture. Lysimeters are used to quantify flow rate, volume of water and concentration of nutrients leaching downward through soils. While many lysimeter designs exist, accurately determining the volume of water and mass balance of nutrients is best accomplished with bounded lysimeters that leave the natural soil structure intact. Here we present a detailed method for the extraction and construction of soil core lysimeters equipped with soil moisture sensors at 5 cm and 25 cm depths. Lysimeters from four different Coastal Plain soils (Bojac, Evesboro, Quindocqua and Sassafras) were collected on the Delmarva Peninsula and moved to an indoor climate controlled facility. Soils were irrigated once weekly with the equivalent of 2 cm of rainfall to draw down soil nitrate-N concentrations. At the end of the draw down period, poultry litter was applied (162 kg TN ha(-1)) and leaching was resumed for an additional five weeks. Total recovery of applied irrigation water varied from 71% to 85%. Nitrate-N concentration varied over the course of the study from an average of 27.1 mg L(-1) before litter application to 40.3 mg L(-1) following litter application. While greatest flux of nutrients was measured in soils dominated by coarse sand (Sassafras) the greatest immediate flux occurred from the finest textured soil with pronounced macropore development (Quindocqua). PMID:27341654

  14. Influence of the lower boundary in lysimeter observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Ulrich; Richter, Katja; Gubis, Jozef; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Lysimeters are a valuable tool to study the water household in soils under close to natural conditions. One major drawback is that they are cut off at the lower boundary. This influences strongly the percolation of water. As long as water is leaching down in the soil, it is stagnating at the lower boundary until saturated conditions are reached and the water can percolate through the gravel filter, and under unsaturated conditions there is no flow at all at the lower boundary. In natural soils the water potential at the same depth differs considerably from the regime in a lysimeter. If the depth of the soil or the soil forming substrate is deep enough, the lower boundary is at the potential that allows the percolation of the long term mean of percolation. In other situations, a water table may influence the matric potential in the natural soil, or a less permeable layer may impede free drainage. In all these situations the matric potential at the depth of the lower boundary of the lysimeter will differ substantially in the natural soil. The latest generation of lysimeter therefore has a controlled lower boundary. The matric potential can be actively adjusted to a desired value over a broad range. Most applications connect the suction in the lysimeter to a reference value obtained in the field at the same depth in order to mimic the correct distribution of the soil water. In this presentation we demonstrate the long term influence of the different lower boundary regimes on percolation and evaporation of water based on soil physical models, and we show first field data on the practical implementations with several months of observations.

  15. Issue briefs on low-level radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This report contains 4 Issue Briefs on low-level radioactive wastes. They are entitled: Handling, Packaging, and Transportation, Economics of LLW Management, Public Participation and Siting, and Low Level Waste Management.

  16. Investigating effects of different evapotranspiration (ET) schemes on soil water dynamics and ET partitioning: a large lysimeter case of summer maize in a semi-arid environment northwest of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Zeng, Y.; Su, Z.; Cai, H.; Zheng, Z.

    2015-09-01

    Different evapotranspiration (ET) schemes can affect significantly the performance of land surface models in capturing the soil water dynamics and ET partitioning over various land cover and climates, the accurate understanding of which is crucial to determine the effective irrigation. In this study, a land model considering the coupled transfer of water, vapor and heat in the soil, with two alternative ET schemes, was used to investigate how the coupled mechanism can affect the soil water dynamics in a crop field and how the ET partitioning was influenced. There are two different evapotranspiration (ET) schemes, one is based on reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) and use LAI to partition into soil evaporation and transpiration, denoted as the ETind scheme; the other is one-step calculation of actual soil evaporation and potential transpiration by incorporating canopy minimum resistance and actual soil resistance into Penman-Monteith model, denoted as the ETdir scheme. Results indicated that the coupled model with the two different ET schemes differed in simulating soil water content and crop evapotranspiration components while agreed well for the simulation of soil temperature. Considering the aerodynamic and surface resistance terms made the ETdir scheme better in simulating soil evaporation especially after irrigations. Furthermore, the results of different crop growth scenarios indicated that the uncertainty in LAI played an important role in estimating the relative transpiration and evaporation fraction. The soil drying seemed to intensify the disturbance of maximum rooting depth and root growth rate in calculating ET components. The former was more important at the late growing season while the latter dominated at the early growing season.

  17. 4D GPR Experiments--Towards the Virtual Lysimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasmueck, M.; Viggiano, D. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Drasdis, J. B.; Kruse, S. E.; Or, D.

    2006-05-01

    In-situ monitoring of infiltration, water flow and retention in the vadose zone currently rely primarily on invasive methods, which irreversibly disturb original soil structure and alter its hydrologic behavior in the vicinity of the measurement. For example, use of lysimeters requires extraction and repacking of soil samples, and time- domain reflectometry (TDR) requires insertion of probes into the soil profile. This study investigates the use of repeated high-density 3D ground penetrating radar surveys (also known as 4D GPR) as a non-invasive alternative for detailed visualization and quantification of water flow in the vadose zone. Evaluation of the 4D GPR method was based on a series of controlled point-source water injection experiments into undisturbed beach sand deposits at Crandon Park in Miami, Florida. The goal of the GPR surveys was to image the shape and evolution of a wet-bulb as it propagates from the injection points (~0.5 m) towards the water table at 2.2 m depth. The experimental design was guided by predictive modeling using Hydrus 2D and finite-difference GPR waveform codes. Input parameters for the modeling were derived from hydrologic and electromagnetic characterization of representative sand samples. Guided by modeling results, we injected 30 to 40 liters of tap water through plastic-cased boreholes with slotted bottom sections (0.1 m) located 0.4 to 0.6 m below the surface. During and after injection, an area of 25 m2 was surveyed every 20 minutes using 250 and 500 MHz antennas with a grid spacing of 0.05 x 0.025 m. A total of 20 3D GPR surveys were completed over 3 infiltration sites. To confirm wet-bulb shapes measured by GPR, we injected 2 liters of "brilliant blue" dye (~100 mg/l) along with a saline water tracer towards the end of one experiment. After completion of GPR scanning, a trench was excavated to examine the distribution of the saltwater and dye using TDR and visual inspection, respectively. Preliminary analysis of the 4D GPR

  18. Monitoring the performance of an alternative cover using caisson lysimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.; Smith, G.M.; Mushovic, P.S.

    2004-02-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8, collaborated on a series of field lysimeter studies to design and monitor the performance of an alternative cover for a uranium mill tailings disposal cell at the Monticello, Utah, Superfund Site. Because groundwater recharge is naturally limited at Monticello in areas with thick loess soils, DOE and EPA chose to design a cover for Monticello using local soils and a native plant community to mimic this natural soilwater balance. Two large drainage lysimeters fabricated of corrugated steel culvert lined with high-density polyethylene were installed to evaluate the hydrological and ecological performance of an alternative cover design constructed in 2000 on the disposal cell. Unlike conventional, lowpermeability designs, this cover relies on (1) the water storage capacity of a 163-cm soil “sponge” layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to retain precipitation while plants are dormant and (2) native vegetation to remove precipitation during the growing season. The sponge layer consists of a clay loam subsoil compacted to 1.65 g/cm2 in one lysimeter and a loam topsoil compacted to 1.45 g/cm2 in the other lysimeter, representing the range of as-built conditions constructed in the nearby disposal cell cover. About 0.1 mm of drainage occurred in both lysimeters during an average precipitation year and before they were planted, an amount well below the EPA target of <3.0 mm/yr. However, the cover with less compacted loam topsoil sponge had a 40% greater water storage capacity than the cover with overly compacted clay loam subsoil sponge. The difference is attributable in part to higher green leaf area and water extraction by plants in the loam topsoil. The lesson learned is that seemingly subtle differences in soil types, sources, and compaction can result in salient differences in performance. Diverse, seeded communities of

  19. Seasonal groundwater contribution to crop-water use assessed with lysimeter observations and model simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Sophocleous, M.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater evaporation can play an important role in crop-water use where the water table is shallow. Lysimeters are often used to quantify the groundwater evaporation contribution influenced by a broad range of environmental factors. However, it is difficult for such field facilities, which are operated under limited conditions within limited time, to capture the whole spectrum of capillary upflow with regard to the inter-seasonal variability of climate, especially rainfall. Therefore, in this work, the method of combining lysimeter and numerical experiments was implemented to investigate seasonal groundwater contribution to crop-water use. Groundwater evaporation experiments were conducted through a weighing lysimeter at an agricultural experiment station located within an irrigation district in the lower Yellow River Basin for two winter wheat growth seasons. A HYDRUS-1D model was first calibrated and validated with weighing lysimeter data, and then was employed to perform scenario simulations of groundwater evaporation under different depths to water table (DTW) and water input (rainfall plus irrigation) driven by long term meteorological data. The scenario simulations revealed that the seasonally averaged groundwater evaporation amount was linearly correlated to water input for different values of DTW. The linear regression could explain more than 70% of the variability. The seasonally averaged ratio of the groundwater contribution to crop-water use varied with the seasonal water input and DTW. The ratio reached as high as 75% in the case of DTW=1.0. m and no irrigation, and as low as 3% in the case of DTW=3.0. m and three irrigation applications. The results also revealed that the ratio of seasonal groundwater evaporation to potential evapotranspiration could be fitted to an exponential function of the DTW that may be applied to estimate seasonal groundwater evaporation. In this case study of multilayered soil profile, the depth at which groundwater may

  20. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended.

  1. Groundwater recharge measurements in gravel sandy sediments with monolith lysimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracic Zeleznik, Branka; Souvent, Petra; Cencur Curk, Barbara; Zupanc, Vesna

    2013-04-01

    Ljubljana field aquifer is recharging through precipitation and the river Sava, which has the snow-rain flow regime. The sediments of the aquifer have high permeability and create fast flow as well as high regeneration of the dynamic reserves of the Ljubljana field groundwater resource. Groundwater recharge is vulnerable to climate change and it is very important for drinking water supply management. Water stored in the soil and less permeable layers is important for water availability under extreme weather conditions. Measurements of water percolation through the vadose zone provide important input for groundwater recharge assessment and estimation of contaminant migration from land surface to the groundwater. Knowledge of the processes governing groundwater recharge in the vadose zone is critical to understanding the overall hydrological cycle and quantifying the links between land uses and groundwater quantity and quality. To improve the knowledge on water balance for Ljubljana field aquifer we establish a lysimeter for measurements of processes in unsaturated zone in well field Kleče. The type of lysimeter is a scientific lysimeter designed to solve the water balance equation by measuring the mass of the lysimeter monolith as well as that of outflow tank with high accuracy and high temporal resolution. We evaluated short period data, however the chosen month demonstrates weather extremes of the local climate - relatively dry periods, followed by high precipitation amount. In time of high water usage of vegetation only subsequent substantial precipitation events directly results in water flow towards lower layers. At the same time, gravely layers of the deeper parts of the unsaturated zone have little or no capacity for water retention, and in the event that water line leaves top soil, water flow moves downwards fairly quickly. On one hand this confirms high recharge capacity of Ljubljana field aquifer from precipitation on green areas; on the other hand it

  2. Disposal of low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste during 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Isotopic inventories and other data are presented for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed LLW disposed (and occasionally stored) during calendar year 1990 at commercial disposal facilities and Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Detailed isotopic information is presented for the three commercial disposal facilities located near Barnwell, SC, Richland, WA, and Beatty, NV. Less information is presented for the Envirocare disposal facility located near Clive, UT, and for LLW stored during 1990 at the West Valley site. DOE disposal information is included for the Savannah River Site (including the saltstone facility), Nevada Test Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, Y-12 Site, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Summary information is presented about stored DOE LLW. Suggestions are made about improving LLW disposal data.

  3. Electrolytic decontamination of metal low level waste (LLW) and mixed low level waste (MLLW)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    Metal objects resulting from ER activities were decontaminated using electrolytic methods. The project involved about 500 kg of ballistic test projectiles, 23 augers and drill heads, and 50 pieces of shrapnel containing lead. All objects were free-released and either reclaimed as scrap metal or reused. Electrolytic decontamination was proven to be an effective method to decontaminate metal waste objects to free-release standards. A cost analysis showed the process to be economical, especially when applied to decontamination of mixed waste, TRU waste, or when the recovered materials could be reused or recycled. The cost of decontamination of scrap iron is approximately equal to the cost of its land disposal as low level waste.

  4. Construction and evaluation of simulated pilot scale landfill lysimeter in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rafizul, Islam M; Howlader, Milon Kanti; Alamgir, Muhammed

    2012-11-01

    This research concentrates the design, construction and evaluation of simulated pilot scale landfill lysimeter at KUET campus, Khulna, Bangladesh. Both the aerobic and anaerobic conditions having a base liner and two different types of cap liner were simulated. After the design of a reference cell, the construction of landfill lysimeter was started in January 2008 and completed in July 2008. In all construction process locally available civil construction materials were used. The municipal solid waste (MSW) of 2800-2985 kg having the total volume of 2.80 m(3) (height 1.6 m) and moisture content of 65% was deposited in each lysimeter by applying required compaction energy. In contrast, both the composition in terms of methane (CH(4)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and oxygen (O(2)) as well as the flow rate of landfill gas (LFG) generated from MSW in landfill lysimeter were measured and varied significantly in relation to the variation of lysimeter operational condition. Moreover, anaerobic lysimeter-C shows the highest composition of LFG in compare to the anaerobic lysimeter-B due to the providing of lower compaction of cap liner in anaerobic lysimeter-C. Here, it is interesting to note that in absence of compacted clay liner (CCL) and hence percolation of rainwater that facilitates rapid degradation of MSW in aerobic lysimeter-A has resulted in the highest settlement than that of anaerobic landfill lysimeter-B and C. Moreover, in case of anaerobic lysimeter-B and C, the leachate generation was lower than that of aerobic lysimeter-A due to the providing of cap liner in anaerobic lysimeter-B and C, played an important role to reduce the percolation of rainwater. The study also reveals that the leachate pollution index (LPI) has decreased in relation to the increasing of elapsed period as well as the LPI for collection system of aerobic lysimeter-A was higher than that of the collection system of anaerobic lysimeter-B and C. Finally, it can be depicted that LPI for lysimeter

  5. Design of top covers supporting aerobic in situ stabilization of old landfills - An experimental simulation in lysimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion; Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas G.

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tested engineered covers as surrogate to gas extraction during and after in situ aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined how covers influence gas emissions, water balance and leachate generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated effect of top covers on air-distribution in waste mass during aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We suggest criteria and cover design to meet the demands during and after aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such cover systems may offer greenhouse gas emission reduction also after active aeration. - Abstract: Landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection is a promising tool to reduce long term emissions from organic waste fractions through accelerated biological stabilization. Top covers that enhance methane oxidation could provide a simple and economic way to mitigate residual greenhouse gas emissions from in situ aerated landfills, and may replace off-gas extraction and treatment, particularly at smaller and older sites. In this respect the installation of a landfill cover system adjusted to the forced-aerated landfill body is of great significance. Investigations into large scale lysimeters (2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Multiplication-Sign 3 m) under field conditions have been carried out using different top covers including compost materials and natural soils as a surrogate to gas extraction during active low pressure aeration. In the present study, the emission behaviour as well as the water balance performance of the lysimeters has been investigated, both prior to and during the first months of in situ aeration. Results reveal that mature sewage sludge compost (SSC) placed in one lysimeter exhibits in principle optimal ambient conditions for methanotrophic bacteria to enhance methane oxidation. Under laboratory conditions the mature compost mitigated CH{sub 4} loadings up to 300 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d. In addition, the compost material provided high air permeability

  6. Simulating the dissipation of two herbicides using micro paddy lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Nhung, Dang Thi Tuyet; Phong, Thai Khanh; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Iwafune, Takashi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc

    2009-11-01

    A set of packed micro paddy lysimeters, placed in a greenhouse, was used to simulate the dissipation of two herbicides, simetryn and thiobencarb, in a controlled environment. Data from a field monitoring study in 2003, including the soil condition and water balances, were used in the simulation. The herbicides were applied and monitored over a period of 21 d. The water balances under two water management scenarios, intermittent irrigation management (AI) and continuous irrigation management (CI), were simulated. In the AI scenario, the pattern of herbicide dissipation in the surface water of the field were simulated, following the first-order kinetics. In the CI scenario, similarity was observed in most lysimeter and field concentrations, but there were differences in some data points. Dissipation curves of both herbicides in the surface water of the two simulated scenarios were not significantly different (P>0.05) from the field data except for intercept of the thiobencarb curve in the CI scenario. The distribution of simetryn and thiobencarb in the soil profile after simulation were also similar to the field data. The highest concentrations of both herbicides were found on the topsoil layer at 0-2.5 cm depth. Only a small amount of herbicides moved down to the deeper soil layers. Micro paddy lysimeters are thus a good alternative for the dissipation study of pesticides in the paddy environment. PMID:19811801

  7. Design of top covers supporting aerobic in situ stabilization of old landfills--an experimental simulation in lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion; Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas G

    2012-12-01

    Landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection is a promising tool to reduce long term emissions from organic waste fractions through accelerated biological stabilization. Top covers that enhance methane oxidation could provide a simple and economic way to mitigate residual greenhouse gas emissions from in situ aerated landfills, and may replace off-gas extraction and treatment, particularly at smaller and older sites. In this respect the installation of a landfill cover system adjusted to the forced-aerated landfill body is of great significance. Investigations into large scale lysimeters (2 × 2 × 3m) under field conditions have been carried out using different top covers including compost materials and natural soils as a surrogate to gas extraction during active low pressure aeration. In the present study, the emission behaviour as well as the water balance performance of the lysimeters has been investigated, both prior to and during the first months of in situ aeration. Results reveal that mature sewage sludge compost (SSC) placed in one lysimeter exhibits in principle optimal ambient conditions for methanotrophic bacteria to enhance methane oxidation. Under laboratory conditions the mature compost mitigated CH(4) loadings up to 300 lCH(4)/m(2)d. In addition, the compost material provided high air permeability even at 100% water holding capacity (WHC). In contrast, the more cohesive, mineral soil cover was expected to cause a notably uniform distribution of the injected air within the waste layer. Laboratory results also revealed sufficient air permeability of the soil materials (TS-F and SS-Z) placed in lysimeter C. However, at higher compaction density SS-Z became impermeable at 100% WHC. Methane emissions from the reference lysimeter with the smaller substrate cover (12-52 g CH(4)/m(2)d) were significantly higher than fluxes from the other lysimeters (0-19 g CH(4)/m(2)d) during in situ aeration. Regarding water balance, lysimeters covered with

  8. Screening Experiments for Removal of Low-Level Tritiated Water

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yun Mi; Baney, Ronald; Powers, Kevin; Koopman, Ben; Tulenko, James

    2005-03-15

    Screening experiments for low levels of tritiated water (HTO) remediation based upon selective adsorption/desorption mechanisms utilizing equilibrium isotope effects have been carried out. Several organic and inorganic high surface area materials were investigated to assess their ability to selectively adsorb low concentrations of HTO. Ion-exchange resins with cation functionalities, chitosan, sodium alginate, and several inorganic media modified with metal cations exhibited promising results. Biomaterials, for example, chitosan and modified alginate, demonstrated positive results. Based on the literature and our preliminary testing, we postulate four possible mechanisms for selected tritium adsorption: hydrogen ion exchange, HTO coordination with surface cation sites, hydrogen bonding to surface basic sites, and secondary hydrogen bonding (structural water) in fine pores.

  9. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) for cosmetics and dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Mossum K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Over the last few years, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be beneficial to the field of aesthetic medicine, specifically aesthetic dermatology. LLLT encompasses a broad spectrum of procedures, primarily cosmetic, which provide treatment options for a myriad of dermatological conditions. Dermatological disorders involving inflammation, acne, scars, aging and pigmentation have been investigated with the assistance of animal models and clinical trials. The most commercially successful use of LLLT is for managing alopecia (hair loss) in both men and women. LLLT also seems to play an influential role in procedures such as lipoplasty and liposuction, allowing for noninvasive and nonthermal methods of subcutaneous fat reduction. LLLT offers a means to address such conditions with improved efficacy versatility and no known side-effects; however comprehensive literature reports covering the utility of LLLT are scarce and thus the need for coverage arises.

  10. Luminous fabric devices for wearable low-level light therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jing; Chui, Chunghin; Tao, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a flexible luminous fabric device was developed and investigated for wearable three-dimensionally fitted low-level light therapy. The fabric device exhibited excellent optical and thermal properties. Its optical power density and operating temperature were stable during usage for 10 hours. In vitro experiments demonstrated a significant increase in collagen production in human fibroblast irradiated by the fabric device, compared with the fibroblast without light irradiation. A series of tests were conducted for the safety of the fabric for human skin contact according to ISO standard ISO 10993-1:2003. The results showed that there was no potential hazard when the luminous fabrics were in direct contact with human skin. PMID:24409391

  11. Revisiting hydraulic hysteresis based on long-term monitoring of hydraulic states in lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannes, M.; Wollschläger, U.; Wöhling, T.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2016-05-01

    Hysteretic processes have been recognized for decades as an important characteristic of soil hydraulic behavior. Several studies confirmed that wetting and drying periods cannot be described by a simple functional relationship, and that some nonequilibrium of the water retention characteristics has to be taken into account. A large number of models describing the hysteresis of the soil water retention characteristic were successfully tested on soil cores under controlled laboratory conditions. However, its relevance under field conditions under natural forcings has rarely been investigated. In practice, the modeling of field soils usually neglects the hysteretic nature of soil hydraulic properties. In this study, long-term observations of water content and matric potential in lysimeters of the lysimeter network TERENO-SoilCan are presented, clearly demonstrating the hysteretic behavior of field soils. We propose a classification into three categories related to different time scales. Based on synthetic and long-term monitoring data, three different models of hysteresis were applied to data sets showing different degrees of hysteresis. We found no single model to be superior to the others. The model ranking depended on the degree of hysteresis. All models were able to reflect the general structure of hysteresis in most cases but failed to reproduce the detailed trajectories of state variables especially under highly transient conditions. As an important result we found that the temporal dynamics of wetting and drying significantly affects these trajectories which should be accounted for in future model concepts.

  12. Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990.

  13. Low-Level Waste (LLW) forum meeting report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  14. Annual Report for Gravity Collection Lysimeter Monitoring Plan - ERDF Cells 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Remsen

    2006-12-21

    The objectives of the Annual Report are to: 1) describe changes in the volume of liquid seen in each lysimeter, 2) describe concentrations and changes or trends in the concentrations of leachate-indicator constituents in any liquids accumulated in each lysimeter, 3) summarize the finding in regard to the presence or absence of leachate in each lysimeter, 4) make recommendations, if any, limited to vadose-zone study-related variables. The data and analyses contained in this report reflect the initial characterization of construction and consolidation water in Cells 5 and 6 lysimeters.

  15. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the last decade to ensure the safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of comprehensive State and Federal regulations governing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste, and the enactment of Federal laws making States responsible for the disposal of such waste generated within their borders.

  16. Responses to the low-level-radiation controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1981-10-07

    Some data sets dealing with the hazards of low-level radiation are discussed. It is concluded that none of these reports, individually or collectively, changes appreciably or even significantly the evaluations of possible low-level radiation effects that have been made by several authoritative national and international groups. (ACR)

  17. Formation of secondary minerals in a lysimeter approach - A mineral-microbe interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffner, F.; Merten, D.; De Giudici, G.; Beyer, A.; Akob, D. M.; Ricci, P. C.; Küsel, K.; Büchel, G.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy metal contamination of large areas due to uranium mining operations poses a serious long-term environmental problem. In the Ronneburg district (eastern Thuringia, Germany), leaching of low grade uranium bearing ores (uranium content < 300 g/t) occurred from 1972 to 1990 using acid mine drainage (AMD; pH 2.7-2.8) and diluted sulphuric acid (10 g/l). Secondary mineral phases like birnessite, todorokite and goethite occur within a natural attenuation process associated with enrichment of heavy metals, especially Cd, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn due to a residual contamination even after remediation efforts. To reveal the processes of secondary mineral precipitation in the field a laboratory lysimeter approach was set up under in situ-like conditions. Homogenized soil from the field site and pure quartz sand were used as substrates. In general, in situ measurements of redox potentials in the substrates showed highly oxidizing conditions (200-750 mV). Water was supplied to the lysimeter from below via a mariottés bottle containing contaminated groundwater from the field. Evaporation processes were allowed, providing a continuous flow of water. This led to precipitation of epsomite and probably aplowite on the top layer of substrate, similar to what is observed in field investigations. After 4 weeks, the first iron and manganese bearing secondary minerals became visible. Soil water samples were used to monitor the behaviour of metals within the lysimeter. Saturation indices (SI) for different secondary minerals were calculated with PHREEQC. The SI of goethite showed oversaturation with respect to the soil solution. SEM-EDX analyses and IR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of goethite. Geochemical data revealed that goethite formation was mainly dominated by Eh/pH processes and that heavy metals, e.g. Zn and U, could be enriched in this phase. Although Eh/pH data does not support formation of manganese minerals, Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) could be isolated from field

  18. Application of Low level Lasers in Dentistry (Endodontic)

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Safavi, Nassimeh

    2013-01-01

    Low level lasers, cold or soft lasers: These lasers do not produce thermal effects on tissues and induce photoreactions in cells through light stimulation which is called photobiostimulation. Power of these lasers is usually under 250mW. The main point differentiating low level lasers and high power ones is the activation of photochemical reactions without heat formation. The most important factor to achieve this light characteristic in lasers is not their power, but their power density for each surfa ceunit (i.e cm2). Density lower than 670mW/cm2, can induce the stimulatory effects of low level lasers without thermal effects. Low level lasers (therapeutic) used today as treatment adjunctive devices in medicine and dentistry. Numerous studies have been performed on the applications of low level lasers in patient pain reduction. Mechanisms of pain reduction with therapeutic lasers and their application are expressed, and the studies realized in this field are presented. PMID:25606308

  19. The Role of Low-Level Laser in Periodontal Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sobouti, Farhad; Khatami, Maziar; Heydari, Mohaddase; Barati, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Treatment protocols with low-level Laser (also called ‘soft laser therapy) have been used in health care systems for more than three decades. Bearing in mind the suitable sub-cellular absorption and the cellular-vascular impacts, low-level laser may be a treatment of choice for soft tissues. Low-level lasers have played crucial and colorful roles in performing periodontal surgeries. Their anti-inflammatory and painless effects have been variously reported in in-vitro studies. In this present review article, searches have been made in Pub Med, Google Scholar, and Science Direct, focusing on the studies which included low-level lasers, flap-periodontal surgeries, gingivectomy, and periodontal graft. The present study has sought to review the cellular impacts of low-level lasers and its role on reducing pain and inflammation following soft tissue surgical treatments. PMID:25987968

  20. Field Lysimeter Test Facility status report IV: FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Felmy, D.G.; Ritter, J.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Downs, J.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kirkham, R.R.; Link, S.O.

    1993-10-01

    At the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, a unique facility, the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is used to measure drainage from and water storage in soil covers. Drainage has ranged from near zero amounts to more than 50% of the applied water, with the amount depending on vegetative cover and soil type. Drainage occurred from lysimeters with coarse soils and gravel covers, but did not occur from capillary barrier-type lysimeters (1.5 m silt loam soil over coarse sands and gravels) except under the most extreme condition tested. For capillary barriers that were irrigated and kept vegetation-free (bare surface), no drainage occurred in 5 of the past 6 years. However, this past year (1992--1993) a record snowfall of 1,425 mm occurred and water storage in the irrigated, bare-surfaced capillary barriers exceeded 500 mm resulting in drainage of more than 30 mm from these barriers. In contrast, capillary barriers, covered with native vegetation (i.e., shrubs and grasses) did not drain under any climatic condition (with or without irrigation). In FY 1994, the FLTF treatments will be increased from 11 to 17 with the addition of materials that will simulate portions of a prototype barrier planned for construction in 1994 at the Hanford Site. The 17 FLTF treatments are designed to test the expected range of surface soil, vegetation, and climatic conditions encountered at the Hanford Site and will assist in evaluating final surface barrier designs for a waste disposal facility.

  1. Annual Report for Gravity Collection Lysimeter Monitoring in ERDF Cells 5, 6, 7, an 8, CY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Weiss, B.L. Lawrence

    2010-07-08

    The purpose of this annual report is to evaluate the conditions and identify trends to develop Hanford Site specific data on the performance of the lysimeter systems related to the vadose zone monitoring and potential future use of lysimeter systems.

  2. Water balance measurements and simulations of maize plants on lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinlein, Florian; Biernath, Christian; Klein, Christian; Thieme, Christoph; Priesack, Eckart

    2016-04-01

    In Central Europe expected major aspects of climate change are a shift of precipitation events and amounts towards winter months, and the general increase of extreme weather events like heat waves or summer droughts. This will lead to strongly changing regional water availability and will have an impact on future crop growth, water use efficiency and yields. Therefore, to estimate future crop yields by growth models accurate descriptions of transpiration as part of the water balance is important. In this study, maize was grown on weighing lysimeters (sowdate: 24 April 2013). Transpiration was determined by sap flow measurement devices (ICT International Pty Ltd, Australia) using the Heat-Ratio-Method: two temperature probes, 0.5 cm above and below a heater, detect a heat pulse and its speed which allows the calculation of sap flow. Water balance simulations were executed with different applications of the model framework Expert-N. The same pedotransfer and hydraulic functions and the same modules to simulate soil water flow, soil heat and nitrogen transport, nitrification, denitrification and mineralization were used. Differences occur in the chosen potential evapotranspiration ETpot (Penman-Monteith ASCE, Penman-Monteith FAO, Haude) and plant modules (SPASS, CERES). In all simulations ETpot is separated into a soil and a plant part using the leaf are index (LAI). In a next step, these parts are reduced by soil water availability. The sum of these parts is the actual evapotranspiration ETact which is compared to the lysimeter measurements. The results were analyzed from Mid-August to Mid-September 2013. The measured sap flow rates show clear diurnal cycles except on rainy days. The SPASS model is able to simulate these diurnal cycles, overestimates the measurements on rainy days and at the beginning of the analyzed period, and underestimates transpiration on the other days. The main reason is an overestimation of potential transpiration Tpot due to too high

  3. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Low-level microwave irradiation and central cholinergic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1989-05-01

    Our previous research showed that 45 min of exposure to low-level, pulsed microwaves (2450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps, whole-body average specific absorption rate 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. The effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems were further investigated in this study. Increases in choline uptake activity in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus were observed after 20 min of acute microwave exposure, and tolerance to the effect of microwaves developed in the hypothalamus, but not in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, of rats subjected to ten daily 20-min exposure sessions. Furthermore, the effects of acute microwave irradiation on central choline uptake could be blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone. In another series of experiments, rats were exposed to microwaves in ten daily sessions of either 20 or 45 min, and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in different regions of the brain were studied by 3H-QNB binding assay. Decreases in concentration of receptors occurred in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 20-min microwave exposure sessions, whereas increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of animals exposed to ten 45-min sessions. This study also investigated the effects of microwave exposure on learning in the radial-arm maze. Rats were trained in the maze to obtain food reinforcements immediately after 20 or 45 min of microwave exposure.

  5. Annual Report for Gravity Collection Lysimeter Monitoring Plan- ERDF Cells 5 and 6, CY 2008

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Weiss; D. W. Woolery

    2009-08-25

    The purpose of this annual report is to evaluate the conditions and identify trends to develop Hanford site-specific data on the performance of the lysimeter systems related to the vadose zone monitoring and potential future use of lysimeter systems.

  6. Pilot uranium lysimeter studies at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C.W.; Hyder, L.K.; Howard, S.C.; Cline, J.E.; Clapp, R.B.

    1993-08-01

    A field lysimeter test facility has been constructed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant to evaluate land burial of wastes containing depleted uranium. The principal objective in the construction of such a facility is to provide a means for monitoring waste leachate characteristics over time, in particular uranium concentrations in leachate. The design of the field lysimeter test facility allows, via the portals along the side walls of the lysimeter, the collection of leachate as a function of depth in the lysimeter. The methodology to collect leachate from within the field lysimeter has not been clearly defined. Thus, before wastes were loaded into the field lysimeter facility, a pilot lysimeter study was initiated to test several design concepts for the collection of in situ leachate. The primary objective of this pilot study was to demonstrate the feasibility and quality assurance of proposed instrumentation used to monitor leachate generation and characteristics in the full-scale field lysimeter. Secondary objectives included gaining experience in the handling/packing of wastes, installation/operation of the leachate collection devices, and waste leachate characterization

  7. Hydraulic considerations in sampling the unsaturated zone with inclined gravity lysimeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oaksford, E.T.

    1983-01-01

    Inclined gravity lysimeters as deep as 5.39 meters below land surface designed for sampling soil water in coarse sand under continuous ponding conditions, were shown to be capable of collecting 10 liters per hour at an infiltration rate of 0.5 meter per hour. This represents a capture efficiency of approximately 50%, a value observed in two similar but shallower lysimeters. When lysimeters are installed from a trench or observation manhole, soil-water samples can be taken under virtually undisturbed conditions, avoiding the soil disturbance and filtration associated with porous-cup vacuum lysimeters. Successful operation requires that the sampler be designed for the hydraulic characteristics of the soil from which the water sample is to be extracted. Criteria for lysimeter dimensions can be established on the basis of pressure heads experienced during sampling, can be induced to flow into the lysimeter by gradient manipulation. Observed head gradients outside the lysimeter ranged between 1.7 and 2.2 times those across the lysimeter, which would seem to explain the observed capture efficiency. (USGS)

  8. Control of environmental conditions at the lower boundary of field lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwärzel, Kai; Podlasly, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Lysimeters are vessels containing disturbed or undisturbed soil, embedded completely in soil with its top even to the soil surface. At the bottom of lysimeters, the soil is cut off from the parent soil, and the lower boundary of lysimeters is usually exposed to atmospheric pressure. For this reason, soil water conditions may be different than of the surrounding soil. This may affect the soil-water conditions throughout the soil profile in comparison to the surrounding soil. To avoid this problem, lysimeters with a construction depth much more than the expected rooting depth should be used or a suction-controlled drainage system needs to be installed at the bottom of lysimeters. Not only the water flow but also the heat flow in the lysimeter is affected by the isolation of the soil and by the fact that the soil at the bottom of the lysimeter is cut off from the surrounding area. However, since now only a few studies have dealt with this issue. This is surprising because the soil thermal regime controls both growth and function of roots and shoots. Therefore, a new design for an automatic control of soil temperature at the lower boundary of large, undisturbed field lysimeters was developed. The objective of the intended talk is to present and evaluate the design and functionality of this new setup.

  9. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, F.M.

    1996-09-16

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single- and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and its performance as early as possible in the project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

  10. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, F.M.

    1997-09-12

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

  11. Do the Low Levels of Reading Course Material Continue? An Examination in a Forensic Psychology Graduate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clump, Michael A.; Doll, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Clump, Bauer, and Bradley (2004) and Burchfield and Sappington (2000) previously found extremely low levels of reading in undergraduate psychology courses. The current study investigated whether these low levels of reading are also found with graduate students, or if this value is altered by only investigating individuals who show continued…

  12. Managing low-level radioactive wastes: a proposed approach

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    This document is a consensus report of the Low-Level Waste Strategy Task Force. It covers system-wide issues; generation, treatment, and packaging; transportation; and disposal. Recommendations are made. (DLC)

  13. Bibliographic Data on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Documents

    1995-11-10

    The purpose of the system is to allow users (researchers, policy makers, etc) to identify existing documents on a range of subjects related to low-level radioactive waste management. The software is menu driven.

  14. Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste (MLLW) Primer

    SciTech Connect

    W. E. Schwinkendorf

    1999-04-01

    This document presents a general overview of mixed low-level waste, including the regulatory definitions and drivers, the manner in which the various kinds of mixed waste are regulated, and a discussion of the waste treatment options.

  15. Dielectric Properties of Low-Level Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    L. E. Lagos; M. A. Ebadian

    1998-10-20

    The purpose of this study was to develop a data collection containing values for the dielectric properties of various low-level liquid waste (LLLW) simulants measured as a function of frequency, temperature, and composition. The investigation was motivated by current interest in the use of microwave processing for the treatment of radioactive waste. A large volume of transuranic liquid and sludge produced by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) during the production of nuclear fiel bars is stored at several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites around the United States. Waste storage and disposal space is scarce, expensive, and must be minimized. Thus, several DOE sites are pursuing the use of microwave heating as a means of achieving volume reduction and solidification of low-level liquid wastes. It is important to know which microwave frequencies should be employed tc achieve the most efficient processing at a range of different temperatures. The dielectric properties of the LLLW simulants can be utilized to determine the optimum frequencies for use with a particular LLLW or with other LLLWS of similar composition. Furthermore, nonlinear thermal processes, such as thermal runaway, which occur in the material being treated cannot be modeled without a knowledge of the temperature dependence of the dielectric properties. Often, this data does not exist; however, when it does, only very limited data near room temperature are available. The data collection generated in this study can be used to predict the behavior of a variety of microwave thermal treatment technologies, which have the potential of substantially reducing the volume of the LLLWS that are currently stored at many DOE sites. This information should help the users of the microwave reduction and solidification technology to optimize microwave processes used in the treatment of LLLW. The microwave reduction and solidification technology has clear advantages over other methods of reducing LLLWS. These

  16. Technical issues in licensing low-level radioactive waste facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Junkert, R.

    1993-03-01

    The California Department of Health Service spent two years in the review of an application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in California. During this review period a variety of technical issues had to be evaluated and resolved. One of the first issues was the applicability and use of NRC guidance documents for the development of LLW disposal facilities. Other technical issues that required intensive evaluations included surface water hydrology, seismic investigation, field and numerical analysis of the unsaturated zone, including a water infiltration test. Source term verification became an issue because of one specific isotope that comprised more than 90% of the curies projected for disposal during the operational period. The use of trench liners and the proposed monitoring of the unsaturated zone were reviewed by a highly select panel of experts to provide guidance on the need for liners and to ensure that the monitoring system was capable of monitoring sufficient representative areas for radionuclides in the soil, soil gas, and soil moisture. Finally, concerns about the quality of the preoperational environmental monitoring program, including data, sample collection procedures, laboratory analysis, data review and interpretation and duration of monitoring caused a significant delay in completing the licensing review.

  17. Aerobic Denitrifying Bacteria That Produce Low Levels of Nitrous Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Naoki; Catalan-Sakairi, Maria Antonina B.; Sakaguchi, Yasushi; Kato, Isao; Zhou, Zhemin; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2003-01-01

    Most denitrifiers produce nitrous oxide (N2O) instead of dinitrogen (N2) under aerobic conditions. We isolated and characterized novel aerobic denitrifiers that produce low levels of N2O under aerobic conditions. We monitored the denitrification activities of two of the isolates, strains TR2 and K50, in batch and continuous cultures. Both strains reduced nitrate (NO3−) to N2 at rates of 0.9 and 0.03 μmol min−1 unit of optical density at 540 nm−1 at dissolved oxygen (O2) (DO) concentrations of 39 and 38 μmol liter−1, respectively. At the same DO level, the typical denitrifier Pseudomonas stutzeri and the previously described aerobic denitrifier Paracoccus denitrificans did not produce N2 but evolved more than 10-fold more N2O than strains TR2 and K50 evolved. The isolates denitrified NO3− with concomitant consumption of O2. These results indicated that strains TR2 and K50 are aerobic denitrifiers. These two isolates were taxonomically placed in the β subclass of the class Proteobacteria and were identified as P. stutzeri TR2 and Pseudomonas sp. strain K50. These strains should be useful for future investigations of the mechanisms of denitrifying bacteria that regulate N2O emission, the single-stage process for nitrogen removal, and microbial N2O emission into the ecosystem. PMID:12788710

  18. Evaluation of Low-Level Laser Therapy in TMD Patients.

    PubMed

    Ayyildiz, Simel; Emir, Faruk; Sahin, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) is one of the most recent treatment modalities in dentistry. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is suggested to have biostimulating and analgesic effects through direct irradiation without causing thermal response. There are few studies that have investigated the efficacy of laser therapy in temporomandibular disorders (TMD), especially in reduced mouth opening. The case report here evaluates performance of LLLT with a diode laser for temporomandibular clicking and postoperative findings were evaluated in two cases of TMD patients. First patient had a history of limited mouth opening and pain in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region since nine months. Second patient's main complaint was his restricted mouth opening, which was progressed in one year. LLLT was performed with a 685 nm red probed diode laser that has an energy density of 6.2 J/cm(2), three times a week for one month, and application time was 30 seconds (685 nm, 25 mW, 30 s, 0.02 Hz, and 6.2 J/cm(2)) (BTL-2000, Portative Laser Therapy Device). The treatment protocol was decided according to the literature. One year later patients were evaluated and there were no changes. This application suggested that LLLT is an appropriate treatment for TMD related pain and limited mouth opening and should be considered as an alternative to other methods. PMID:26587294

  19. Engineered sorbent barriers for low-level waste disposal.

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Mitchell, S.J.; Buelt, J.L.

    1986-12-01

    The Engineered Sorbent Barriers Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating sorbent materials to prevent the migration of soluble radio nuclides from low-level waste sites. These materials would allow water to pass, preventing the bathtub effect at humid sites. Laboratory studies identifield promising sorbent materials for three key radionuclides: for cesium, greensand; for cobalt, activated charcoal; and for strontium, synthetic zeolite or clinoptilolite. Mixtures of these sorbent materials were tested in 0.6-m-diameter columns using radioactive leachates. To simulate expected worst-case conditions, the leachate solution contained the radionuclides, competing cations, and a chelating agent and was adjusted to a pH of 5. A sorbent barrier comprised of greensand (1 wt%), activated charcoal (6 wt%), synthetic zeolite (20 wt%), and local soil (73 wt%) achieved the decontamination factors necessary to meet the regulatory performance requirements established for this study. Sorbent barriers can be applied to shallow-land burial, as backfill around the waste or engineered structures, or as backup to other liner systems. 7 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Evaluation of Low-Level Laser Therapy in TMD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ayyildiz, Simel; Emir, Faruk; Sahin, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) is one of the most recent treatment modalities in dentistry. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is suggested to have biostimulating and analgesic effects through direct irradiation without causing thermal response. There are few studies that have investigated the efficacy of laser therapy in temporomandibular disorders (TMD), especially in reduced mouth opening. The case report here evaluates performance of LLLT with a diode laser for temporomandibular clicking and postoperative findings were evaluated in two cases of TMD patients. First patient had a history of limited mouth opening and pain in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region since nine months. Second patient's main complaint was his restricted mouth opening, which was progressed in one year. LLLT was performed with a 685 nm red probed diode laser that has an energy density of 6.2 J/cm2, three times a week for one month, and application time was 30 seconds (685 nm, 25 mW, 30 s, 0.02 Hz, and 6.2 J/cm2) (BTL-2000, Portative Laser Therapy Device). The treatment protocol was decided according to the literature. One year later patients were evaluated and there were no changes. This application suggested that LLLT is an appropriate treatment for TMD related pain and limited mouth opening and should be considered as an alternative to other methods. PMID:26587294

  1. Low Level Waste Conceptual Design Adaption to Poor Geological Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.; Drimmer, D.; Giovannini, A.; Manfroy, P.; Maquet, F.; Schittekat, J.; Van Cotthem, A.; Van Echelpoel, E.

    2002-02-26

    Since the early eighties, several studies have been carried out in Belgium with respect to a repository for the final disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). In 1998, the Belgian Government decided to restrict future investigations to the four existing nuclear sites in Belgium or sites that might show interest. So far, only two existing nuclear sites have been thoroughly investigated from a geological and hydrogeological point of view. These sites are located in the North-East (Mol-Dessel) and in the mid part (Fleurus-Farciennes) of the country. Both sites have the disadvantage of presenting poor geological and hydrogeological conditions, which are rather unfavorable to accommodate a surface disposal facility for LLW. The underground of the Mol-Dessel site consists of neogene sand layers of about 180 m thick which cover a 100 meters thick clay layer. These neogene sands contain, at 20 m depth, a thin clayey layer. The groundwater level is quite close to the surface (0-2m) and finally, the topography is almost totally flat. The upper layer of the Fleurus-Farciennes site consists of 10 m silt with poor geomechanical characteristics, overlying sands (only a few meters thick) and Westphalian shales between 15 and 20 m depth. The Westphalian shales are tectonized and strongly weathered. In the past, coal seams were mined out. This activity induced locally important surface subsidence. For both nuclear sites that were investigated, a conceptual design was made that could allow any unfavorable geological or hydrogeological conditions of the site to be overcome. In Fleurus-Farciennes, for instance, the proposed conceptual design of the repository is quite original. It is composed of a shallow, buried concrete cylinder, surrounded by an accessible concrete ring, which allows permanent inspection and control during the whole lifetime of the repository. Stability and drainage systems should be independent of potential differential settlements an d subsidences

  2. Low-Level Radioactive Waste temporary storage issues

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 gave responsibility for the disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste to the States. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 attached additional requirements for specific State milestones. Compact regions were formed and host States selected to establish disposal facilities for the waste generated within their borders. As a result of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, the existing low-level radioactive waste disposal sites will close at the end of 1992; the only exception is the Richland, Washington, site, which will remain open to the Northwest Compact region only. All host States are required to provide for disposal of low-level radioactive waste by January 1, 1996. States also have the option of taking title to the waste after January 1, 1993, or taking title by default on January 1, 1996. Low-level radioactive waste disposal will not be available to most States on January 1, 1993. The most viable option between that date and the time disposal is available is storage. Several options for storage can be considered. In some cases, a finite storage time will be permitted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the generator site, not to exceed five years. If disposal is not available within that time frame, other options must be considered. There are several options that include some form of extension for storage at the generator site, moving the waste to an existing storage site, or establishing a new storage facility. Each of these options will include differing issues specific to the type of storage sought.

  3. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Campbell, M.D.

    1989-02-01

    The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance.

  4. Hydrological and geochemical factors controlling the leaching of cemented MSWI air pollution control residues: A lysimeter field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Christian; Johnson, C. Annette; Käppeli, Michael; Ulrich, Andrea; Riediker, Sonja

    2000-03-01

    A pilot landfill (area, 16 m 2; depth 1.5 m) containing cement-stabilized air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) was investigated in order to determine the hydrological and geochemical factors that control the leaching process. Between May and August 1996, 3 rain events were investigated. Rainfall and discharge were monitored and leachate samples taken for the analysis of major components. It was found that water from the rain events took 2-3 days to pass through the lysimeter. Leachate dilution at the beginning of rain events indicated that rainwater passed through the lysimeter as preferential flow. The change in the concentration of leachate components with time was found to be almost identical for most components. Conductivity, dominated by Na + and OH -, also positively correlated with the concentrations of Al, Cs, K, Si, sulfate, chloride, carbonate and organic substances in the drainage discharge. The Ca concentrations were not influenced by the rain events, indicating that this component was leached by rainwater from the lysimeter cover layer. This was also found to apply to observed changes in Sr concentrations. Both conductivity and Sr were used as tracers for rainwater in the leachate and results agreed well. The solubility of the main constituents, Ca, Si, and Al could be explained by thermodynamic equilibrium with the solids calcium silicate hydrate, ettringite and possibly K-feldspar. The results indicate that the leaching process (within the first 5 years) is dominated by pore waters between the cement blocks that are in equilibrium with the cement-stabilized APC residues (thus explaining the constant composition of the leachate) and is flushed out by rain events.

  5. Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    David Duncan

    2010-10-01

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  6. Commission operation. National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-09-01

    Since Congress enacted the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, the states have prepared to meet their responsibilities for management of low-level radioactive waste by entering into regional compacts. This option document is intended to provide a framework for the operation of a compact commission formed as the governing body of a low-level radioactive waste compact. The document is designed to be easily modified to meet the needs of various regional compacts. The ideas and format presented were taken in general from the Federal Administrative procedures Act, various state administrative procedures, and the state regulatory agencies' rules of procedure. Requirements of filing, time frames, and standard language are written from a legal perspective.

  7. Low-level radioactive waste: Gamma rays in the garbage

    SciTech Connect

    Saleska, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Of the four categories of radioactive waste (uranium mill tailings, high-level waste, transuranic, and low-level), the last term, low-level, proves to be the most misleading. The author suggests that a better term for this category would be miscellaneous radioactive junk, since it is by definition everything not included in the other three categories. Ted Taylor, a New York State resident and physicist and former nuclear weapons designer, points out that this category includes such intensely radioactive materials as reactor components that would deliver in a few minutes a lethal dose of gamma rays to anyone standing nearby. It is pointed out that of the original 6 low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, only 3 are still operating and two of those are slated to be closed in 1993 when they will be full. Unquestionably, new standards and policies are needed to deal sensibly with the problem; these are discussed briefly. 9 refs.

  8. Low Level Laser Therapy: A Panacea for oral maladies

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Vartika; Kalra, Gauri

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To review the applications of low level laser therapy on various soft and hard oral tissues. A variety of therapeutic effects of Low Level Laser Therapy have been reported on a broad range of disorders. It has been found amenably practical in dental applications including soft as well as hard tissues of the oral cavity. LLLT has been found to be efficient in acceleration of wound healing, enhanced remodelling and bone repair, regeneration of neural cells following injury, pain attenuation, endorphin release stimulation and modulation of immune system. The aforementioned biological processes induced by Low level lasers have been effectively applied in treating various pathological conditions in the oral cavity. With is article, we attempt to review the possible application of Low Laser Therapy in the field of dentistry. PMID:26557737

  9. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  10. SRNL RADIONUCLIDE FIELD LYSIMETER EXPERIMENT: BASELINE CONSTRUCTION AND IMPLEMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Bagwell, L.; Powell, B.; Almond, P.; Emerson, H.; Hixon, A.; Jablonski, J.; Buchanan, C.; Waterhouse, T.

    2012-10-17

    The purpose of this document is to compile information regarding experimental design, facility design, construction, radionuclide source preparation, and path forward for the ten year Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radionuclide Field Lysimeter Experiment at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This is a collaborative effort by researchers at SRNL and Clemson University. The scientific objectives of this study are to: Study long-term radionuclide transport under conditions more representative of vadose zone conditions than laboratory experiments; Provide more realistic quantification of radionuclide transport and geochemistry in the vadose zone, providing better information pertinent to radioactive waste storage solutions than presently exists; Reduce uncertainty and improve justification for geochemical models such as those used in performance assessments and composite analyses.

  11. Effect of exposure on the water balance of two identical lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenau, J.; Meissner, R.; Borg, H.

    2015-01-01

    This study looks at the water balance of two identical weighable lysimeters located right next to each other. They contain the same soil and are managed in the same way. Both were planted with maize. The area around them was planted with maize, too, to ensure that the lysimeters were located inside a crop. The only difference between them was that one side of lysimeter 2 was exposed due to a footpath. At first both yielded similar results. However, as the maize became taller lysimeter 2 began to show consistently more precipitation and drainage. After harvest the differences disappeared again. Since precipitation often falls at an angle, a crop with an exposed side receives more than a crop without one, if the precipitation falls towards the exposed side. The additional precipitation a crop with an exposed side may capture increases with the height of the crop. After harvest this exposure effect therefore disappears completely. Compared to lysimeter 1, lysimeter 2 accumulated >100 mm of additional precipitation during the growth of the maize. After the maize was removed, both crops recorded the same amount of precipitation again. Lysimeter 2 showed more drainage, too, because the additional precipitation led to higher water contents, which in turn caused the water holding capacity of the soil to be exceeded on more days than in the case of lysimeter 1. The difference in actual evapotranspiration was small, because lysimeter 2 was exposed towards west-northwest and therefore received only little more radiation, and because the distribution of the rainfall pattern was such that the additional precipitation led to a similar amount of additional drainage rather than to an increase in the volume of stored water, which could have been consumed by evapotranspiration later. The data clearly illustrate that exposure can significantly alter the water balance of a lysimeter, which makes it inadvisable to extrapolate data obtained under such circumstances to the field. This

  12. Actual evapotranspiration and precipitation measured by lysimeters: a comparison with eddy covariance and tipping bucket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebler, S.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Pütz, T.; Post, H.; Schmidt, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-05-01

    This study compares actual evapotranspiration (ETa) measurements by a set of six weighable lysimeters, ETa estimates obtained with the eddy covariance (EC) method, and evapotranspiration calculated with the full-form Penman-Monteith equation (ETPM) for the Rollesbroich site in the Eifel (western Germany). The comparison of ETa measured by EC (including correction of the energy balance deficit) and by lysimeters is rarely reported in the literature and allows more insight into the performance of both methods. An evaluation of ETa for the two methods for the year 2012 shows a good agreement with a total difference of 3.8% (19 mm) between the ETa estimates. The highest agreement and smallest relative differences (< 8%) on a monthly basis between both methods are found in summer. ETa was close to ETPM, indicating that ET was energy limited and not limited by water availability. ETa differences between lysimeter and EC were mainly related to differences in grass height caused by harvest and the EC footprint. The lysimeter data were also used to estimate precipitation amounts in combination with a filter algorithm for the high-precision lysimeters recently introduced by Peters et al. (2014). The estimated precipitation amounts from the lysimeter data differ significantly from precipitation amounts recorded with a standard rain gauge at the Rollesbroich test site. For the complete year 2012 the lysimeter records show a 16 % higher precipitation amount than the tipping bucket. After a correction of the tipping bucket measurements by the method of Richter (1995) this amount was reduced to 3%. With the help of an on-site camera the precipitation measurements of the lysimeters were analyzed in more detail. It was found that the lysimeters record more precipitation than the tipping bucket, in part related to the detection of rime and dew, which contribute 17% to the yearly difference between both methods. In addition, fog and drizzle explain an additional 5.5% of the total

  13. Actual evapotranspiration and precipitation measured by lysimeters: a comparison with eddy covariance and tipping bucket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebler, S.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Pütz, T.; Post, H.; Schmidt, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    This study compares actual evapotranspiration (ETa) measurements by a set of six weighable lysimeters, ETa estimates obtained with the eddy covariance (EC) method, and potential crop evapotranspiration according to FAO (ETc-FAO) for the Rollesbroich site in the Eifel (Western Germany). The comparison of ETa measured by EC (including correction of the energy balance deficit) and by lysimeters is rarely reported in literature and allows more insight into the performance of both methods. An evaluation of ETa for the two methods for the year 2012 shows a good agreement with a total difference of 3.8% (19 mm) between the ETa estimates. The highest agreement and smallest relative differences (<8%) on monthly basis between both methods are found in summer. ETa was close to ETc-FAO, indicating that ET was energy limited and not limited by water availability. ETa differences between lysimeter, ETc-FAO, and EC were mainly related to differences in grass height caused by harvesting management and the EC footprint. The lysimeter data were also used to estimate precipitation amounts in combination with a filter algorithm for high precision lysimeters recently introduced by Peters et al. (2014). The estimated precipitation amounts from the lysimeter data show significant differences compared to the precipitation amounts recorded with a standard rain gauge at the Rollesbroich test site. For the complete year 2012 the lysimeter records show a 16% higher precipitation amount than the tipping bucket. With the help of an on-site camera the precipitation measurements of the lysimeters were analyzed in more detail. It was found that the lysimeters record more precipitation than the tipping bucket in part related to the detection of rime and dew, which contributes 17% to the yearly difference between both methods. In addition, fog and drizzle explain an additional 5.5% of the total difference. Larger differences are also recorded for snow and sleet situations. During snowfall, the

  14. GRABGAM Analysis of Ultra-Low-Level HPGe Gamma Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1999-07-28

    The GRABGAM code has been used successfully for ultra-low level HPGe gamma spectrometry analysis since its development in 1985 at Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Although numerous gamma analysis codes existed at that time, reviews of institutional and commercial codes indicated that none addressed all features that were desired by SRTC. Furthermore, it was recognized that development of an in-house code would better facilitate future evolution of the code to address SRTC needs based on experience with low-level spectra. GRABGAM derives its name from Gamma Ray Analysis BASIC Generated At MCA/PC.

  15. A case study of a low level jet during OPALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallée, H.; Barral, H.; Vignon, E.; Genthon, C.

    2014-12-01

    A case study of a low level jet during the OPALE (Oxidant Production over Antarctic Land and its Export) summer campaign is presented. It has been observed at Dome C (East Antarctica) and is simulated accurately by the three-dimensional version of the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR). It is found that this low level jet is not related to an episode of thermal wind, conforting that Dome C may be a~place where turbulence on flat terrain can be studied.

  16. A robotic inspector for low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.; Pettus, R.O.

    1996-06-01

    The Department of Energy has low-level radioactive waste stored in warehouses at several facilities. Weekly visual inspections are required. A mobile robot inspection system, ARIES (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), has been developed to survey and inspect the stored drums. The robot will travel through the three- foot wide aisles of drums stacked four high and perform a visual inspection, normally performed by a human operator, making decisions about the condition of the drums and maintaining a database of pertinent information about each drum. This mobile robot system will improve the quality of inspection, generate required reports, and relieve human operators from low-level radioactive exposure.

  17. Modeling and low-level waste management: an interagency workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.A.; Stratton, L.E.

    1980-01-01

    The interagency workshop on Modeling and Low-Level Waste Management was held on December 1-4, 1980 in Denver, Colorado. Twenty papers were presented at this meeting which consisted of three sessions. First, each agency presented its point of view concerning modeling and the need for models in low-level radioactive waste applications. Second, a larger group of more technical papers was presented by persons actively involved in model development or applications. Last of all, four workshops were held to attempt to reach a consensus among participants regarding numerous waste modeling topics. Abstracts are provided for the papers presented at this workshop.

  18. Immobilized low-level waste disposal options configuration study

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    This report compiles information that supports the eventual conceptual and definitive design of a disposal facility for immobilized low-level waste. The report includes the results of a joint Westinghouse/Fluor Daniel Inc. evaluation of trade-offs for glass manufacturing and product (waste form) disposal. Though recommendations for the preferred manufacturing and disposal option for low-level waste are outside the scope of this document, relative ranking as applied to facility complexity, safety, remote operation concepts and ease of retrieval are addressed.

  19. Development of a low-level (37)Ar calibration standard.

    PubMed

    Williams, R M; Aalseth, C E; Bowyer, T W; Day, A R; Fuller, E S; Haas, D A; Hayes, J C; Hoppe, E W; Humble, P H; Keillor, M E; LaFerriere, B D; Mace, E K; McIntyre, J I; Miley, H S; Myers, A W; Orrell, J L; Overman, C T; Panisko, M E; Seifert, A

    2016-03-01

    Argon-37 is an environmental signature of an underground nuclear explosion. Producing and quantifying low-level (37)Ar standards is an important step in the development of sensitive field measurement instruments. This paper describes progress at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in developing a process to generate and quantify low-level (37)Ar standards, which can be used to calibrate sensitive field systems at activities consistent with soil background levels. This paper presents a discussion of the measurement analysis, along with assumptions and uncertainty estimates. PMID:26701655

  20. A preliminary evaluation of alternatives for disposal of INEL low-level waste and low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.H.; Roesener, W.S.; Jorgenson-Waters, M.J.

    1993-07-01

    The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility (MLLWDF) project was established in 1992 by the US Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to provide enhanced disposal capabilities for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level mixed waste and low-level waste. This Preliminary Evaluation of Alternatives for Disposal of INEL Low-Level Waste and Low-Level Mixed Waste identifies and evaluates-on a preliminary, overview basis-the alternatives for disposal of that waste. Five disposal alternatives, ranging from of no-action`` to constructing and operating the MLLWDF, are identified and evaluated. Several subalternatives are formulated within the MLLWDF alternative. The subalternatives involve various disposal technologies as well as various scenarios related to the waste volumes and waste forms to be received for disposal. The evaluations include qualitative comparisons of the projected isolation performance for each alternative, and facility, health and safety, environmental, institutional, schedule, and rough order-of-magnitude life-cycle cost comparisons. The performance of each alternative is evaluated against lists of ``musts`` and ``wants.`` Also included is a discussion of other key considerations for decisionmaking. The analysis of results indicated further study is necessary to obtain the best estimate of long-term future waste volume and characteristics from the INEL Environmental Restoration activities and the expanded INEL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program.

  1. Transportation and disposal configuration for DOE-managed low-level and mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, T.

    1993-06-01

    This report briefly examines the current U.S. Department of Energy complex-wide configuration for transportation and disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and also retraces the historical sequence of events and rationale that has guided its development. The study determined that Nevada Test Site and the Hanford Site are the only two sites that currently provide substantial disposal services for offsite low-level waste generators. It was also determined that mixed low-level waste shipments are infrequent and are generally limited to shipments to offsite commercial treatment facilities or other Department of Energy sites for storage. The current alignment of generator to disposal site for low-level waste shipments is generally consistent with the programmatic mission of the generator; that is, defense-generated waste is shipped to the Nevada Test Site and research-generated waste is transported to the Hanford Site. The historical development of the current configuration was resurrected by retrieving Department of Energy documentation and interviewing both current and former department and contractor personnel. According to several accounts, the basic framework of the system was developed during the late 1970s, and was reportedly based on the ability of the disposal site to manage a given waste form. Documented evidence to support this reasoning, however, could not be uncovered.

  2. Migration and leaching risk of extraneous antimony in three representative soils of China: lysimeter and batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Hou, H; Yao, N; Li, J N; Wei, Y; Zhao, L; Zhang, J; Li, F S

    2013-11-01

    Antimony (Sb) distribution, solubility and mobility onto natural soils of China were studied in lysimeter and batch experiments as a function of physicochemical properties of the soil. An outdoor lysimeter experiment investigated the leaching and migration of Sb in the soils with Sb-polluted topsoil and unpolluted subsoil over a 5month period. Soil solutions were collected by suction cups installed at different depth of lysimeters, and leachates were regularly collected and analyzed for Sb concentrations. The majority of the added Sb was retained in the topsoil layers, but small portions were moved to the sub-layers. Sb concentrations in the soil solutions and leachates ranged from 0-755.5 (6.38±54 on average) μg l(-1) and 0-0.45 (smaller than the detection limit) μg l(-1) respectively, indicating the low solubility of Sb in the soils. Batch experiments were performed in order to determine the sorption capacity and the partition coefficient (Kd). Freundlich isotherm described properly the equilibrium experimental data and results show that the Kd values for Primosol, Isohumosol, Ferrosol equal to 22.5, 87.8, 704 L kg(-1), respectively. These results showed the strong capacity of the soils to retain Sb, and prevent it being leached down the profile. The mobilizable Sb was in the order: Primosol>Isohumosol>Ferrosol. Sb migration in the soils was mainly associated with the exchangeable, carbonate-bound, and metal-organic complex-bound fractions. Health risk assessment indicates that Sb leaching from Ferrosol will not harm to human health through groundwater under the test conditions, while it has certain health risks from the Isohumosol and Primosol.

  3. Phytotoxicity testing of lysimeter leachates from aided phytostabilized Cu-contaminated soils using duckweed (Lemna minor L.).

    PubMed

    Marchand, Lilian; Mench, Michel; Marchand, Charlotte; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Kolbas, Aliaksandr; Maalouf, Jean-Paul

    2011-12-01

    Aided phytostabilization of a Cu-contaminated soil was conducted at a wood preservation site located in southwest France using outdoor lysimeters to study leaching from the root zone and leachate ecotoxicity. The effects of Cu-tolerant plants (Agrostis gigantea L. and Populus trichocarpa x deltoides cv. Beaupré) and four amendments were investigated with seven treatments: untreated soil without plants (UNT) and with plants (PHYTO), and planted soils amended with compost (OM, 5% per air-dried soil weight), dolomitic limestone (DL, 0.2%), Linz-Donawitz slag (LDS, 1%), OM with DL (OMDL), and OM with 2% of zerovalent iron grit (OMZ). Total Cu concentrations (mgkg(-1)) in lysimeter topsoil and subsoil were 1110 and 111-153, respectively. Lysimeter leachates collected in year 3 were characterized for Al, B, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, P, K and Zn concentrations, free Cu ions, and pH. Total Cu concentration in leachates (mgL(-1)) ranged from 0.15±0.08 (LDS) to 1.95±0.47 (PHYTO). Plants grown without soil amendment did not reduce total Cu and free Cu ions in leachates. Lemna minor L. was used to assess the leachate phytotoxicity, and based on its growth, the DL, LDS, OM and OMDL leachates were less phytotoxic than the OMZ, PHYTO and UNT ones. The LDS leachates had the lowest Cu, Cu(2+), Fe, and Zn concentrations, but L. minor developed less in these leachates than in a mineral water and a river freshwater. Leachate Mg concentrations were in decreasing order OMDL>DL>PHYTO=OM=LDS>UNT=OMZ and influenced the duckweed growth.

  4. Application of flow field-flow fractionation and laser sizing to characterize soil colloids in drained and undrained lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Gimbert, Laura J; Haygarth, Philip M; Worsfold, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the use of a new technique, flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF), for the characterization of soil sampled under grassland. FlFFF can be used to determine the fine colloidal material in the <1 microm fraction obtained by gravitational settling of 1% m/v soil suspensions. The aim of this work was to determine the potential of FIFFF to characterize soil colloids in drained and undrained field lysimeters from soil cores sampled at different depths. Two different grassland lysimeter plots of 1 ha, one drained and one undrained, were investigated, and the soil was sampled at 20-m intervals along a single diagonal transect at three different depths (0-2, 10-12, and 30-32 cm). The results showed that there was a statistically significant (P = 0.05) increase in colloidal material at 30- to 32-cm depth along the transect under the drained lysimeter, which correlates with disturbance of the soil at this depth due to the installation of tile drains at 85-cm depth backfilled to 30-cm depth with gravel. Laser sizing was also used to determine the particles in the size range 1 to 2000 microm and complement the data obtained using FlFFF because laser sizing lacks resolution for the finer colloidal material (0.1-1.0 microm). The laser sizing data showed increased heterogeneity at 30- to 32-cm depth, particularly in the 50 to 250 microm size fraction. Therefore FIFFF characterized the finer material and laser sizing the coarser soil fraction (<2000 microm) at depth in drained and undrained grassland. This is of importance as colloidal material is more mobile than the larger material and consequently an important vector for contaminant transport from agricultural land to catchments.

  5. Construction and demolition waste: Comparison of standard up-flow column and down-flow lysimeter leaching tests.

    PubMed

    Butera, Stefania; Hyks, Jiri; Christensen, Thomas H; Astrup, Thomas F

    2015-09-01

    Five samples of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) were investigated in order to quantify leaching of inorganic elements under percolation conditions according to two different experimental setups: standardised up-flow saturated columns (<4mm particle size) and unsaturated, intermittent down-flow lysimeters (<40mm particle size). While standardised column tests are meant primarily to provide basic information on characteristic leaching properties and mechanisms and not to reproduce field conditions, the lysimeters were intended to mimic the actual leaching conditions when C&DW is used in unbound geotechnical layers. In practice, results from standardised percolation tests are often interpreted as estimations of actual release from solid materials in percolation scenarios. In general, the two tests yielded fairly similar results in terms of cumulative release at liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S) 10l·kgTS; however, significant differences were observed for P, Pb, Ba, Mg and Zn. Further differences emerged in terms of concentration in the early eluates (L/S<5l·kg(-1)TS) for Al, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, DOC, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Si, Zn. Observed differences between tests are likely to be due to differences in pH related to crushing and exposure of fresh particle surfaces, as well as in equilibrium conditions. In the case of C&DW, the standardised column tests, which are more practical, are considered to acceptably describe cumulative releases at L/S 10l·kg(-1)TS in percolation scenarios. However, when the focus is on estimation of initial concentrations for (for example) risk assessment, data from standardised column tests may not be fully applicable, and data from lysimeters may be used for validation purposes. Se, Cr and, to a lesser extent, SO4 and Sb were leaching from C&DW in critical amounts compared with existing limit values. PMID:26031330

  6. 60. VIEW OF LOW LEVEL CHECK STATION ON THE ARIZONA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. VIEW OF LOW LEVEL CHECK STATION ON THE ARIZONA CANAL, NEAR THE DEER VALLEY TREATMENT PLANT, LOOKING WEST. THE ARIZONA CANAL DIVERSION CHANNEL IS VISIBLE ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE PHOTOGRAPH Photographer: James Eastwood, July 1990 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. The engineering studies, initiated in July 1991, identified 37 mixed waste streams, and 55 low-level waste streams. This report documents the waste stream information and potential treatment strategies, as well as the regulatory requirements for the Department of Energy-owned treatment facility option. The total report comprises three volumes and two appendices. This report consists of Volume 1, which explains the overall program mission, the guiding assumptions for the engineering studies, and summarizes the waste stream and regulatory information, and Volume 2, the Waste Stream Technical Summary which, encompasses the studies conducted to identify the INEL's waste streams and their potential treatment strategies.

  8. Effects of low levels of radiation on humans

    SciTech Connect

    Auxier, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed. (ACR)

  9. Low Level Lead Toxicity: The Hidden Challenge for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Patrick P.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the widespread problem of low level lead toxicity and how it affects young children's behavior and learning ability. Discusses what medical and environmental measures can be taken to remedy the problem. Briefly notes what role states have taken. Also suggests actions early childhood teachers can take to remedy the problem. (BB)

  10. Advanced Academic Skills in the Low-Level ESL Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Christine R.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests and gives examples of how a few advanced skills and concepts are related to successful reading and writing and can be introduced in low-level ESL classes. Examples include generality-specificity distinction, relevance-irrelevance distinction, underlining and making notes, paraphrasing, and summarizing. This conceptually integrated…

  11. Low-Level Violence: A Neglected Aspect of School Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupper, David R.; Meyer-Adams, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Examines the extent of low-level violence in public schools and its impact on school performance, asserting that the way to reduce such violence is to create a more positive school culture and climate. Guidelines for preventing or minimizing such violence at school are presented. (SM)

  12. Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure

    SciTech Connect

    White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  13. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, low level aerial view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, low level aerial view of Test Stand "D," looking due west, after completion of Dd station installation in 1961. Note Test Stand "D" "neutralization pond" to immediate southeast of tower. (JPL negative no. 384-2997-B, 12 December 1961) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Low-Level Waste Disposal Alternatives Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Carlson; Kay Adler-Flitton; Roy Grant; Joan Connolly; Peggy Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz

    2006-09-01

    This report identifies and compares on-site and off-site disposal options for the disposal of contract-handled and remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Potential disposal options are screened for viability by waste type resulting in a short list of options for further consideration. The most crediable option are selected after systematic consideration of cost, schedule constraints, and risk. In order to holistically address the approach for low-level waste disposal, options are compiled into comprehensive disposal schemes, that is, alternative scenarios. Each alternative scenario addresses the disposal path for all low-level waste types over the period of interest. The alternative scenarios are compared and ranked using cost, risk and complexity to arrive at the recommended approach. Schedule alignment with disposal needs is addressed to ensure that all waste types are managed appropriately. The recommended alternative scenario for the disposal of low-level waste based on this analysis is to build a disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  15. Environmentalism and low-level waste-the aftermath

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorelle, P.J.

    1995-05-01

    Radical Environmentalists, anxious to shut down nuclear power, are directing efforts against the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (contaminated coveralls, tools, paper, plastic, glass, etc.). The rationals is that if nuclear power facilities cannot dispose of their waste streams, eventually they may have to stop operating. This article discusses the political and practical issues surrounding this approach.

  16. Central nervous system transplantation benefited by low-level laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochkind, S.; Lubart, Rachel; Wollman, Yoram; Simantov, Rabi; Nissan, Moshe; Barr-Nea, Lilian

    1990-06-01

    Effect of low-level laser irradiation on the central nervous system transplantation is reported. Ernbryonal brain allografts were transplanted into the brain of 20 adult rats and peripheral nerve graft transplanted into the severely injured spinal cord of 16 dogs. The operated wound of 10 rats and 8 dogs were exposed daily for 21 days to lowpower laser irradiation CW HeNe laser (35 mW, 632.8 run, energy density of 30 J/cm2 at each point for rats and 70 J/cm2 at each point for dogs). This study shows that (i) the low-level laser irradiation prevents extensive glial scar formation (a limiting factor in CNS regeneration) between embryonal transplants and host brain; (ii) Dogs made paraplegic by spinal cord injury were able to walk 3-6 months later. Recovery of these dogs was effected by the implantation of a fragment of autologous sciatic nerve at the site of injury and subsequently exposing the dogs to low-level laser irradiation. The effect of laser irradiation on the embryonal nerve cells grown in tissue culture was also observed. We found that low-level laser irradiation induced intensive migration of neurites outward of the aggregates 15-22 The results of the present study and our previous investigations suggest that low-level laser irradiation is a novel tool for treatment of peripheral and central nervous system injuries.

  17. Forearm Muscle Oxygenation Decreases During Low Levels of Brief, Isometric Contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy Gita; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, Alan R.; Rempel, D. M.; Hargens, Murthy G. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Regional muscle pain syndromes can be caused by repeated and sustained exertion of a specific muscle. Such exertion may elevate local tissue fluid pressure, reduce blood flow and tissue oxygenation (TO2), and cause fatigue, pain and functional deficits of the Involved muscle. Low levels (less than 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)) of prolonged static contraction of the upper extremity are common In many occupational settings and May cause fatigue. The purpose of our Investigation was to determine whether TO2 decreases significantly at low levels of static contraction of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB).

  18. Effect of photon energy in collagen generation by interstitial low level laser stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Eunkwon; Ha, Myungjin; Lee, Sangyeob; Radfar, Edalat; Park, Jihoon; Jung, Byungjo

    2015-03-01

    Although the mechanism of low level laser therapy (LLLT) is unclear, many studies demonstrated the positive clinical performance of LLLT for skin rejuvenation. An increase in dermal collagen plays an important role in skin rejuvenation and wound healing. This study aimed to investigate collagen generation after interstitial low level laser stimulation (ILLS). Rabbits were divided into two groups: surfacing irradiation and minimally invasive irradiation. 660nm diode laser of 20mW with 10J, 13J and 15J was applied to the backside of rabbits. Collagen formation was evaluated with ultrasound skin scanner every 12 hours. Results shows that ILLS groups have denser collagen density than surfacing groups.

  19. Utilization of critical periods during development to study the effects of low levels of environmental agents

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L. B.

    1980-01-01

    Careful definition of critical periods in the development of selected characters can result in experimental systems that may be highly useful in studying risk at low levels of exposure. Three examples are presented. Epidemiological investigations can lose much of their value unless critical periods are known for the end points being studied.

  20. Laboratory And Lysimeter Experimentation And Transport Modeling Of Neptunium And Strontium In Savannah River Site Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Powell, B. A.; Miller, Todd J.

    2012-09-24

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) conducts performance assessment (PA) calculations to determine the appropriate amount of low-level radiological waste that can be safely disposed on site. Parameters are included in these calculations that account for the interaction between the immobile solid phase and the mobile aqueous phase. These parameters are either the distribution coefficient (K{sub d} value) or the apparent solubility value (K{sub sp}). These parameters are readily found in the literature and are used throughout the DOE complex. One shortcoming of K{sub d} values is that they are only applicable to a given set of solid and aqueous phase conditions. Therefore, a given radionuclide may have several K{sub d} values as it moves between formations and comes into contact with different solids and different aqueous phases. It is expected that the K{sub d} construct will be appropriate to use for a majority of the PA and for a majority of the radionuclides. However, semi-mechanistic models would be more representative in isolated cases where the chemistry is especially transitory or the radionuclide chemistry is especially complex, bringing to bear multiple species of varying sorption tendencies to the sediment. Semi-mechanistic models explicitly accommodate the dependency of K{sub d} values, or other sorption parameters, on contaminant concentration, competing ion concentrations, pH-dependent surface charge on the adsorbent, and solute species distribution. Incorporating semi-mechanistic concepts into geochemical models is desirable to make the models more robust and technically defensible. Furthermore, these alternative models could be used to augment or validate a Kd?based DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment. The objectives of this study were to: 1) develop a quantitative thermodynamically-based model for neptunium sorption to SRS sediments, and 2) determine a sorption constant from an SRS 11-year lysimeter study. The modeling studies were conducted with

  1. Modelling of a Tracer experiment (Bromide) at the lysimeter Wagna/Austria with MIKE-SHE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reszler, Christian; Fank, Johann

    2015-04-01

    Data of a tracer experiment with Bromide at one of the three lysimeters in Wagna/Austria are used to test the unsaturated zone solute transport model in MIKE-SHE. On April 4th, 2005 50 mg/l of Bromide were applied on the lysimeter operated with conventional farming. At this time the lysimeter was covered with bare soil until the start of the cultivation of pumpkin one month later. Concentrations at the lysimeter bottom (180 cm depth) were measured and, after break-through, plant uptake was measured to quantify mass recovery. The model using the Richards-Van Genuchten-Mualem approach is setup by comprehensive data of vegetation and soil hydraulic properties available at the lysimeter. Water movement simulation in the unsaturated zone is tested against measured seepage rates at the lysimeter bottom and soil water contents in different soil depths in a period of five years. A sensitivity study shows that, particularly in the quaternary gravel zone two different parameter sets are necessary to represent the different dynamics of water content and seepage. With both two sets the general dynamics of the tracer experiment are simulated well. However, the early rapid rise of the measured concentrations could not be represented by either parameter set, which indicates a complex pore system consisting of different flow paths in the gravel zone, e.g., a system of matrix flow and macro-pore flow.

  2. Automatic Measurement of Low Level Contamination on Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, M.; Itoh, H.; Shimada, T.; Yanagihara, S.

    2002-02-28

    Automatic measurement of radioactivity is necessary for considering cost effectiveness in final radiological survey of building structures in decommissioning nuclear facilities. The RAPID (radiation measuring pilot device for surface contamination) was developed to be applied to automatic measurement of low level contamination on concrete surfaces. The RAPID has a capability to measure contamination with detection limit of 0.14 Bq/cm2 for 60Co in 30 seconds of measurement time and its efficiency is evaluated to be 5 m2/h in a normal measurement option. It was confirmed that low level contamination on concrete surfaces could be surveyed by the RAPID efficiently compared with direct measurement by workers through its actual application.

  3. Controlling low-level image properties: the SHINE toolbox.

    PubMed

    Willenbockel, Verena; Sadr, Javid; Fiset, Daniel; Horne, Greg O; Gosselin, Frédéric; Tanaka, James W

    2010-08-01

    Visual perception can be influenced by top-down processes related to the observer's goals and expectations, as well as by bottom-up processes related to low-level stimulus attributes, such as luminance, contrast, and spatial frequency. When using different physical stimuli across psychological conditions, one faces the problem of disentangling the contributions of low- and high-level factors. Here, we make available the SHINE (spectrum, histogram, and intensity normalization and equalization) toolbox for MATLAB, which we have found useful for controlling a number of image properties separately or simultaneously. The toolbox features functions for specifying the (rotational average of the) Fourier amplitude spectra, for normalizing and scaling mean luminance and contrast, and for exact histogram specification optimized for perceptual visual quality. SHINE can thus be employed for parametrically modifying a number of image properties or for equating them across stimuli to minimize potential low-level confounds in studies on higher level processes.

  4. Ocean dumping of low-level radioactive wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, W. L.

    1982-10-01

    Scientific bases, developed internationally over the last 20 years, to control and restrict to acceptable levels the resultant radiation doses that potentially could occur from the dumping of low-level radioactive wastes in the deep oceans were presented. It is concluded that present evaluations of the disposal of radioactive wastes into the oceans, coastal and deep ocean, indicate that these are being conducted within the ICRP recommended dose limits. However, there are presently no international institutions or mechanisms to deal with the long-term radiation exposure at low-levels to large numbers of people on a regional basis if not a global level. Recommendations were made to deal with these aspects through the established mechanisms of NEA/OECD and the London Dumping Convention, in cooperation with ICRP, UNSCEAR and the IAEA.

  5. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  6. Immobilization of low level hazardous organics using recycled materials

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.R.; Smith, F.G.

    1996-12-31

    Rust Remedial Services, Inc. (RRS) recently conducted a major study on the effectiveness of additives, both virgin and recycled, in the immobilization of low-level organics in soils. Using a clean soil spiked with a mixture of hazardous organic chemicals, twelve different stabilization formulations were comparatively tested using leaching (TCLP) and total analysis (TCA) methods. TCLP reduction levels illustrated the effectiveness of the stabilization treatment on a wide variety of low level organics in contaminated soil, with the proper selection of stabilization admixtures. A specially prepared, comminuted, rubber particulate was especially effective in reducing the apparent presence of certain semi-volatile organic compounds in soil, as measured by TCA methods. Most semi-volatile organic compounds were so strongly held by the rubber particles that they were not recovered in the analytical procedure.

  7. Low level laser therapy in the treatment of aphthous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Anand, Vishal; Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Bhargavi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common and painful ulcerative lesions of the oral cavity, but until now no cure has been recognized for it. Two patients diagnosed with minor RAS were treated in a single sitting with low level laser therapy using 940-nm diode laser. The lesions healed completely within 3-4 days and a follow-up for 1 showed no recurrence in these patients. According to the results of this study, low level laser therapy can decrease the healing time, pain intensity, size, and recurrence of the lesion in patients with minor RAS, and hence can be considered the most appropriate treatment modality for minor RAS, with greatest clinical effectiveness.

  8. Low-level flow conditions hazardous to aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. B.; Camp, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Low level flow conditions known to be hazardous to aircraft during takeoff/climbout and approach/landing operations are turbulence, wind shear, and vertical motion. These conditions can and frequently do occur separately and in combinations. The identification and selection were completed of representative data cases to determine magnitude, frequency, duration, and simultaneity of occurrence of turbulence (gustiness and gust factor), wind shear (speed and direction), and vertical motion (updraft and downdraft), along with temperature inversions. New representations of temporal and spatial variations in the atmospheric boundary layer were developed. Efforts continued relative to low level flow conditions where published results imply strong vertical shear with virtually no horizontal shear and where order of magnitude analyses of the equations of motion for an aircraft illustrates that low values of horizontal shear (along the flight path) are much more hazardous than larger values of vertical wind shear (altitude).

  9. A model for a national low level waste program

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenhorn, James A

    2009-01-01

    A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site

  10. Low-level waste disposal in highly populated areas

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, E.; McCombie, C.; Issler, H.

    1989-11-01

    Nuclear-generated electricity supplies almost 40% of the demand in Switzerland (the rest being hydro-power). Allowing for a certain reserve and assuming an operational life-time of 40 years for each reactor, and taking into account wastes from decommissioning and from medicine, industry and research, the total amount of low-level radioactive waste to be disposed of is about 175,000 m{sup 3}. Since there are no unpopulated areas in Switzerland, and since Swiss Federal Law specifies that the safety of disposal may not depend upon supervision of the repository, no shallow-land burial has been foreseen, even for short-lived low-level waste. Instead, geological disposal in a mined cavern system with access through a horizontal tunnel was selected as the best way of meeting the requirements and ensuring the necessary public acceptance.

  11. Commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.

    1995-10-01

    Why are 11 states attempting to develop new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities? Why is only on disposal facility accepting waste nationally? What is the future of waste disposal? These questions are representative of those being asked throughout the country. This paper attempts to answer these questions in terms of where we are, how we got there, and where we might be going.

  12. Chemical digestion of low level nuclear solid waste material

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, Carl R.; Lerch, Ronald E.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical digestion for treatment of low level combustible nuclear solid waste material is provided and comprises reacting the solid waste material with concentrated sulfuric acid at a temperature within the range of 230.degree.-300.degree.C and simultaneously and/or thereafter contacting the reacting mixture with concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide. In a special embodiment spent ion exchange resins are converted by this chemical digestion to noncombustible gases and a low volume noncombustible residue.

  13. Department of Energy low-level radioactive waste disposal concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, C.; Page, L.; Morreale, B.; Owens, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) manages its low-level waste (LLW), regulated by DOE Order 5820.2A by using an overall systems approach. This systems approach provides an improved and consistent management system for all DOE LLW waste, from generation to disposal. This paper outlines six basic disposal concepts used in the systems approach, discusses issues associated with each of the concepts, and outlines both present and future disposal concepts used at six DOE sites. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Waste Management Facilities cost information for low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  15. The Argonne low level /sup 14/C counting system

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.; Rymas, S.J.; Studebaker, L.D.; Yule, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    A low level /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ counting system is described. This system was used to process several thousand CO/sub 2/ samples derived from atmospheric collections at various altitudes. Special features include counter construction utilizing electrolytic copper and shielding with neutron moderating and absorbing paraffin containing sodium metaborate. The effect of steel shielding thickness is shown, and the anticoincidence counters are described. Purification of the CO/sub 2/ for proportional counting is discussed. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report documents those studies so the project can continue with an evaluation of programmatic options, system tradeoff studies, and the conceptual design phase of the project. This report, appendix B, comprises the engineering design files for this project study. The engineering design files document each waste steam, its characteristics, and identified treatment strategies.

  17. Low-level radioactive waste technology: a selected, annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Fore, C.S.; Vaughan, N.D.; Hyder, L.K.

    1980-10-01

    This annotated bibliography of 447 references contains scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information relevant to low-level radioactive waste technology. The bibliography focuses on environmental transport, disposal site, and waste treatment studies. The publication covers both domestic and foreign literature for the period 1952 to 1979. Major chapters selected are Chemical and Physical Aspects; Container Design and Performance; Disposal Site; Environmental Transport; General Studies and Reviews; Geology, Hydrology and Site Resources; Regulatory and Economic Aspects; Transportation Technology; Waste Production; and Waste Treatment. Specialized data fields have been incorporated into the data file to improve the ease and accuracy of locating pertinent references. Specific radionuclides for which data are presented are listed in the Measured Radionuclides field, and specific parameters which affect the migration of these radionuclides are presented in the Measured Parameters field. In addition, each document referenced in this bibliography has been assigned a relevance number to facilitate sorting the documents according to their pertinence to low-level radioactive waste technology. The documents are rated 1, 2, 3, or 4, with 1 indicating direct applicability to low-level radioactive waste technology and 4 indicating that a considerable amount of interpretation is required for the information presented to be applied. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author, corporate affiliation, or title of the document. Indexes are provide for (1) author(s), (2) keywords, (3) subject category, (4) title, (5) geographic location, (6) measured parameters, (7) measured radionuclides, and (8) publication description.

  18. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report, Appendix A, Environmental Regulatory Planning Documentation, identifies the regulatory requirements that would be imposed on the operation or construction of a facility designed to process the INEL's waste streams. These requirements are contained in five reports that discuss the following topics: (1) an environmental compliance plan and schedule, (2) National Environmental Policy Act requirements, (3) preliminary siting requirements, (4) regulatory justification for the project, and (5) health and safety criteria.

  19. Management of low-level radioactive wastes around the world

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, L.T.; Harmon, K.M.; Colombo, P.

    1985-04-01

    This paper reviews the status of various practices used throughout the world for managing low-level radioactive wastes. Most of the information in this review was obtained through the DOE-sponsored International Program Support Office (IPSO) activities at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) at Richland, Washington. The objective of IPSO is to collect, evaluate, and disseminate information on international waste management and nuclear fuel cycle activities. The center's sources of information vary widely and include the proceedings of international symposia, papers presented at technical society meetings, published topical reports, foreign trip reports, and the news media. Periodically, the information is published in topical reports. Much of the information contained in this report was presented at the Fifth Annual Participants' Information Meeting sponsored by DOE's Low-Level Waste Management Program Office at Denver, Colorado, in September of 1983. Subsequent to that presentation, the information has been updated, particularly with information provided by Dr. P. Colombo of Brookhaven National Laboratory who corresponded with low-level waste management specialists in many countries. The practices reviewed in this paper generally represent actual operations. However, major R and D activities, along with future plans, are also discussed. 98 refs., 6 tabls.

  20. A digital retina-like low-level vision processor.

    PubMed

    Mertoguno, S; Bourbakis, N G

    2003-01-01

    This correspondence presents the basic design and the simulation of a low level multilayer vision processor that emulates to some degree the functional behavior of a human retina. This retina-like multilayer processor is the lower part of an autonomous self-organized vision system, called Kydon, that could be used on visually impaired people with a damaged visual cerebral cortex. The Kydon vision system, however, is not presented in this paper. The retina-like processor consists of four major layers, where each of them is an array processor based on hexagonal, autonomous processing elements that perform a certain set of low level vision tasks, such as smoothing and light adaptation, edge detection, segmentation, line recognition and region-graph generation. At each layer, the array processor is a 2D array of k/spl times/m hexagonal identical autonomous cells that simultaneously execute certain low level vision tasks. Thus, the hardware design and the simulation at the transistor level of the processing elements (PEs) of the retina-like processor and its simulated functionality with illustrative examples are provided in this paper.

  1. Low-level measurements of tritium in water.

    PubMed

    Villa, M; Manjón, G

    2004-01-01

    Using a liquid scintillation counter, an experimental procedure for measuring low-level activity concentrations of tritium in environmental water has been developed by our laboratory, using the electrolytic tritium enrichment. Additionally, some quality tests were applied in order to assure the goodness of the method. Well-known water samples collected in the Tagus River (West of Spain) and the Danube River (Bulgaria), both affected by nuclear plant releases, were analysed and results were compared to previous data. The analytical procedure was applied to drinking water samples from the public water supply of Seville and mineral waters from different springs in Spain in order to characterize its origin. Due to the very low levels of tritium in the analysed samples, some results were reported as lower than the minimum detectable activity concentration (MDA). However, the count rate of these measurements was over the background count rate of LS counter in all the cases. For that reason, an exhaustive discussion about the meaning of the MDA, using an experimental essay, was made in order to establish a rigorous criterion that leads to a reliable value in the case of low-level measurements. PMID:15177365

  2. Modeling of pilot's visual behavior for low-level flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Axel; Onken, Reiner

    1995-06-01

    Developers of synthetic vision systems for low-level flight simulators deal with the problem to decide which features to incorporate in order to achieve most realistic training conditions. This paper supports an approach to this problem on the basis of modeling the pilot's visual behavior. This approach is founded upon the basic requirement that the pilot's mechanisms of visual perception should be identical in simulated and real low-level flight. Flight simulator experiments with pilots were conducted for knowledge acquisition. During the experiments video material of a real low-level flight mission containing different situations was displayed to the pilot who was acting under a realistic mission assignment in a laboratory environment. Pilot's eye movements could be measured during the replay. The visual mechanisms were divided into rule based strategies for visual navigation, based on the preflight planning process, as opposed to skill based processes. The paper results in a model of the pilot's planning strategy of a visual fixing routine as part of the navigation task. The model is a knowledge based system based upon the fuzzy evaluation of terrain features in order to determine the landmarks used by pilots. It can be shown that a computer implementation of the model selects those features, which were preferred by trained pilots, too.

  3. Greater-confinement disposal of low-level radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Gilbert, T.L.; Luner, C.; Merry-Libby, P.A.; Meshkov, N.K.; Yu, C.

    1985-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes include a broad spectrum of wastes that have different radionuclide concentrations, half-lives, and physical and chemical properties. Standard shallow-land burial practice can provide adequate protection of public health and safety for most low-level wastes, but a small volume fraction (about 1%) containing most of the activity inventory (approx.90%) requires specific measures known as ''greater-confinement disposal'' (GCD). Different site characteristics and different waste characteristics - such as high radionuclide concentrations, long radionuclide half-lives, high radionuclide mobility, and physical or chemical characteristics that present exceptional hazards - lead to different GCD facility design requirements. Facility design alternatives considered for GCD include the augered shaft, deep trench, engineered structure, hydrofracture, improved waste form, and high-integrity container. Selection of an appropriate design must also consider the interplay between basic risk limits for protection of public health and safety, performance characteristics and objectives, costs, waste-acceptance criteria, waste characteristics, and site characteristics. This paper presents an overview of the factors that must be considered in planning the application of methods proposed for providing greater confinement of low-level wastes. 27 refs.

  4. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1990-04-01

    The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

  5. A preliminary evaluation of alternatives for treatment of INEL Low-Level Waste and low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.H.; Roesener, W.S.; Jorgensen-Waters, M.J.; Edinborough, C.R.

    1992-06-01

    The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility (MLLWTF) project was established in 1991 by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office to provide treatment capabilities for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level mixed waste and low-level waste. This report identifies and evaluates the alternatives for treating that waste. Twelve treatment alternatives, ranging from ``no-action`` to constructing and operating the MLLWTF, are identified and evaluated. Evaluations include facility performance, environmental, safety, institutional, schedule, and rough order-of-magnitude cost comparisons. The performance of each alternative is evaluated against lists of ``musts`` and ``wants.`` Also included is a discussion of other key considerations for decision making. Analysis of results indicated further study is necessary to obtain the best estimate of future waste volumes and characteristics from the expanded INEL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. It is also recommended that conceptual design begin as scheduled on the MLLWTF, maximum treatment alternative while re-evaluating the waste volume projections.

  6. Lysimeter experiments to determine the ability of soil to reduce concentrations of BOD, available P and inorganic N in dirty water.

    PubMed

    Brookman, S K E; Chadwick; Retter, A R

    2005-11-01

    Lysimeter experiments were conducted to determine the ability of different soils to reduce levels of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and concentrations of molybdate reactive phosphorus (MRP) and ammonium-N (NH4(+)-N) in dirty water and the impact of applications on nitrate leaching. An additional experiment investigated the effect of dirty water components on leaching quality. This information is required to assess the potential risk of dirty water applications on polluting groundwater and to assess the use of such soils in the development of treatment systems for dirty water. Intact and disturbed soil lysimeters, 0.5 and 1m deep were constructed from four soils; a coarse free-draining sandy loam, a sandy loam over soft sandstone, a calcareous silty clay over chalk and a sandy loam over granite. For the coarse free-draining sandy loam, lysimeters were also constructed from disturbed soil with and without the addition of lime, to assess if this could increase phosphorus immobilisation. Levels of BOD and concentrations of MRP, NH4(+)-N and nitrate (NO3(-)-N) of leachates were measured following dirty water applications at 2 and 8 mm day(-1) under laboratory conditions. Under the daily 2mm application, all soils were effective at treating dirty water, reducing concentrations of BOD, MRP and NH4(+)- N by > or = 98% but NO3(-)-N concentrations increased up to 80 mg l(-1) from the 0.5 m deep lysimeters of the sandy loam over granite. Soils were less effective at reducing levels of BOD, MRP and NH4(+)- N at the 8 mm daily rate of application, with maximum NO3(-)-N concentrations of leachates of 200 mg l(-1) from disturbed soils.

  7. Seventh annual DOE LLWMP participants' information meeting. DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The following sessions were held: International Low-Level Waste Management Activities; Low-Level Waste Disposal; Characteristics and Treatment of Low-Level Waste; Environmental Monitoring and Performance; Greater Confinement and Alternative Disposal Methods; Low-Level Waste Management; Corrective Measures; Performance Prediction and Assessment; and Siting New Defense and Commercial Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities.

  8. How much can be learned from populations exposed to low levels of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-05-01

    The assessment of health effects from low-level exposure to radiation is a matter of considerable controversy. Many of the problems in analyzing and interpreting data on populations exposed to low levels of radiation are well illustrated by a current study of the effects on mortality of occupational exposure to radiation at the Hanford plant. The conclusion drawn is that the amount that can be learned from the Hanford population, and other populations exposed to low levels of radiation, is extremely limited. The data are not adequate to determine reliable estimates of risks, or to investigate the appropriateness of various models. Although there are problems in using data from populations exposed at high levels to estimate risks of low level exposure to radiation, the problems in obtaining such estimates directly are even more severe. Thus data from populations such as the Japanese A-bomb survivors and the British ankylosing spondylitis patients must continue to serve as our primary source of information on radiation effects. 27 references, 3 tables. (ACR)

  9. Status of low-level radioactive waste management in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.J.

    1993-03-01

    The Republic of Korea has accomplished dramatic economic growth over the past three decades; demand for electricity has rapidly grown more than 15% per year. Since the first nuclear power plant, Kori-1 [587 MWe, pressurized water reactor (PWR)], went into commercial operation in 1978, the nuclear power program has continuously expanded and played a key role in meeting the national electricity demand. Nowadays, Korea has nine nuclear power plants [eight PWRs and one Canadian natural uranium reactor (CANDU)] in operation with total generating capacity of 7,616 MWe. The nuclear share of total electrical capacity is about 36%; however, about 50% of actual electricity production is provided by these nine nuclear power plants. In addition, two PWRs are under construction, five units (three CANDUs and two PWRs) are under design, and three more CANDUs and eight more PWRs are planned to be completed by 2006. With this ambitious nuclear program, the total nuclear generating capacity will reach about 23,000 MWe and the nuclear share will be about 40% of the total generating capacity in the year 2006. In order to expand the nuclear power program this ambitiously, enormous amounts of work still have to be done. One major area is radioactive waste management. This paper reviews the status of low-level radioactive waste management in Korea. First, the current and future generation of low-level radioactive wastes are estimated. Also included are the status and plan for the construction of a repository for low-level radioactive wastes, which is one of the hot issues in Korea. Then, the nuclear regulatory system is briefly mentioned. Finally, the research and development activities for LLW management are briefly discussed.

  10. Cadmium leaching from micro-lysimeters planted with the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens: experimental findings and modeling.

    PubMed

    Ingwersen, Joachim; Bücherl, Barbara; Neumann, Günter; Streck, Thilo

    2006-01-01

    The use of heavy metal hyperaccumulating plants has the potential to become a promising new technique to remediate contaminated sites. We investigated the role of metal mobilization in the Cd hyperaccumulation of Thlaspi caerulescens (J. & C. Presl, 'Ganges'). In a micro-lysimeter experiment we investigated the dynamics of Cd concentration of leachate as well as Cd removal by plant uptake in four treatments: (i) Control (bare soil), (ii) T. caerulescens, (iii) nonhyperaccumulator Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. ('PI 426308'), and (iv) co-cropping of the hyperaccumulator and nonhyperaccumulator. The experimental findings were analyzed using one- and two-site rate-limited desorption models. Co-cropping of T. caerulescens and B. juncea did not enhance metal uptake by B. juncea. Although Cd uptake of T. caerulescens was 10 times higher than that of B. juncea, the Cd concentration of leachate of the T. caerulescens treatment did not decrease below that of the B. juncea treatment. The Cd depletion in leachate was well reproduced by the two-site rate-limited desorption model. The optimized desorption coefficient was three orders of magnitude higher in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil. Our results indicate that T. caerulescens accelerates the resupply of Cd from soil pointing to an important role of kinetic desorption in the hyperaccumulation by T. caerulescens. PMID:17071874

  11. Low level atmospheric sulfur dioxide pollution and childhood asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, R.Y.; Li, C.K. )

    1990-11-01

    Quarterly analysis (1983-1987) of childhood asthma in Hong Kong from 13,620 hospitalization episodes in relation to levels of pollutants (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, NO, O{sub 3}, TSP, and RSP) revealed a seasonal pattern of attack rates that correlates inversely with exposure to sulfur dioxide (r = -.52, P less than .05). The same cannot be found with other pollutants. Many factors may contribute to the seasonal variation of asthma attacks. We speculate that prolonged exposure (in terms of months) to low level SO{sub 2} is one factor that might induce airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity and predispose to episodes of asthma.

  12. Nuclear reactor with low-level core coolant intake

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    A natural-circulation boiling-water reactor has skirts extending downward from control rod guide tubes to about 10 centimeters from the reactor vessel bottom. The skirts define annular channels about control rod drive housings that extend through the reactor vessel bottom. Recirculating water is forced in through the low-level entrances to these channels, sweeping bottom water into the channels in the process. The sweeping action prevents cooler water from accumulating at the bottom. This in turn minimizes thermal shock to bottom-dwelling components as would occur when accumulated cool water is swept away and suddenly replaced by warmer water.

  13. Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B.; Quapp, W.J.

    1992-08-01

    The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT&E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

  14. Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B. . Environmental Services Div.); Quapp, W.J. )

    1992-08-01

    The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

  15. Low level communication management for e-health systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Guillermo; Zerbini, Carlos; Voos, Javier; Centeno, Carlos; González, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    The heterogeneity of e-health systems encourages the use of standards such as Health Level 7 (HL7v3) to ensure interoperability. Many actual implementations address this problem by unoptimized high level programming of top-range portable computing platforms. However, this approach could pose excessive demands on battery-powered mid-range terminals. In this work, we propose low-level support for portable HL7v3-compatible embedded systems in order to better exploit their limited processing and communications capabilities. In particular, we present our experience in mobile communication management through two different approaches, which proves the feasibility of this proposal.

  16. Effectiveness of low-level laser on carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Hua-Feng; Ma, Xin-Long; Tian, Peng; Huang, Yuting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been applied in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) for an extended period of time without definitive consensus on its effectiveness. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser in the treatment of mild to moderate CTS using a Cochrane systematic review. Methods: We conducted electronic searches of PubMed (1966–2015.10), Medline (1966–2015.10), Embase (1980–2015.10), and ScienceDirect (1985–2015.10), using the terms “carpal tunnel syndrome” and “laser” according to the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Relevant journals or conference proceedings were searched manually to identify studies that might have been missed in the database search. Only randomized clinical trials were included, and the quality assessments were performed according to the Cochrane systematic review method. The data extraction and analyses from the included studies were conducted independently by 2 reviewers. The results were expressed as the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the continuous outcomes. Results: Seven randomized clinical trials met the inclusion criteria; there were 270 wrists in the laser group and 261 wrists in the control group. High heterogeneity existed when the analysis was conducted. Hand grip (at 12 weeks) was stronger in the LLLT group than in the control group (MD = 2.04; 95% CI: 0.08–3.99; P = 0.04; I2 = 62%), and there was better improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) (at 12 weeks) in the LLLT group (MD = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.84–1.11; P < 0.01; I2 = 0%). The sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) (at 12 weeks) was better in the LLLT group (MD = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.44–1.73; P = 0.001; I2 = 0%). However, 1 included study was weighted at >95% in the calculation of these 3 parameters. There were no statistically significant differences in the other parameters between the 2 groups. Conclusion

  17. System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Richard G.; Blasewitz, Albert G.

    1982-01-01

    An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

  18. Geologic setting of the low-level burial grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, K.A.; Jaeger, G.K.; Slate, J.L.; Swett, K.J.; Mercer, R.B.

    1994-10-13

    This report describes the regional and site specific geology of the Hanford Sites low-level burial grounds in the 200 East and West Areas. The report incorporates data from boreholes across the entire 200 Areas, integrating the geology of this area into a single framework. Geologic cross-sections, isopach maps, and structure contour maps of all major geological units from the top of the Columbia River Basalt Group to the surface are included. The physical properties and characteristics of the major suprabasalt sedimentary units also are discussed.

  19. Estimating sap flux densities in date palm trees using the heat dissipation method and weighing lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Or; Shapira, Or; Cohen, Shabtai; Tripler, Effi; Schwartz, Amnon; Lazarovitch, Naftali

    2012-09-01

    In a world of diminishing water reservoirs and a rising demand for food, the practice and development of water stress indicators and sensors are in rapid progress. The heat dissipation method, originally established by Granier, is herein applied and modified to enable sap flow measurements in date palm trees in the southern Arava desert of Israel. A long and tough sensor was constructed to withstand insertion into the date palm's hard exterior stem. This stem is wide and fibrous, surrounded by an even tougher external non-conducting layer of dead leaf bases. Furthermore, being a monocot species, water flow does not necessarily occur through the outer part of the palm's stem, as in most trees. Therefore, it is highly important to investigate the variations of the sap flux densities and determine the preferable location for sap flow sensing within the stem. Once installed into fully grown date palm trees stationed on weighing lysimeters, sap flow as measured by the modified sensors was compared with the actual transpiration. Sap flow was found to be well correlated with transpiration, especially when using a recent calibration equation rather than the original Granier equation. Furthermore, inducing the axial variability of the sap flux densities was found to be highly important for accurate assessments of transpiration by sap flow measurements. The sensors indicated no transpiration at night, a high increase of transpiration from 06:00 to 09:00, maximum transpiration at 12:00, followed by a moderate reduction until 08:00; when transpiration ceased. These results were reinforced by the lysimeters' output. Reduced sap flux densities were detected at the stem's mantle when compared with its center. These results were reinforced by mechanistic measurements of the stem's specific hydraulic conductivity. Variance on the vertical axis was also observed, indicating an accelerated flow towards the upper parts of the tree and raising a hypothesis concerning dehydrating

  20. Treatment options for low-level radiologically contaminated ORNL filtercake

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hom-Ti; Bostick, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    Water softening sludge (>4000 stored low level contaminated drums; 600 drums per year) generated by the ORNL Process Waste Treatment Plant must be treated, stabilized, and placed in safe storage/disposal. The sludge is primarily CaCO{sub 3} and is contaminated by low levels of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs. In this study, microwave sintering and calcination were evaluated for treating the sludge. The microwave melting experiments showed promise: volume reductions were significant (3-5X), and the waste form was durable with glass additives (LiOH, fly ash). A commercial vendor using surrogate has demonstrated a melt mineralization process that yields a dense monolithic waste form with a volume reduction factor (VR) of 7.7. Calcination of the sludge at 850-900 C yielded a VR of 2.5. Compaction at 4500 psi increased the VR to 4.2, but the compressed form is not dimensionally stable. Addition of paraffin helped consolidate fines and yielded a VR of 3.5. In conclusion, microwave melting or another form of vitrification is likely to be the best method; however for immediate implementation, the calculation/compaction/waxing process is viable.

  1. Low level lead inhibits the human brain cation pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, J.M.; Sprenkle, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The impact of low level lead exposure on human central nervous system function is a major public health concern. This study addresses the inhibition of the cation pump enzyme Na,K-ATPase by low level lead. Human brain tissue was obtained at autopsy and frozen until use. Brain homogenates were preincubated with PbCl{sub 2} for 20 min at 0{degree}C. Inhibition of K-paranitrophenylphosphatase (pNPPase), a measure of the dephosphorylation step of Na,K-ATPase, reached steady state within 10 min. K-pNPPase activity, expressed as a percentage of control, fell to 96.3 {plus minus} 0.9% at 0.25 uM (PbCl{sub 2}) to 82.0 {plus minus} 1.6% at 2.5 uM (PbCl{sub 2}) in homogenates prepared from normal brain. Similar results were obtained with homogenates prepared from brains of patients with a history of alcohol abuse and of those with other miscellaneous conditions. Since the mean blood level of lead in the US has ranged recently from m9.2 to 16.0 ug/dl, these results indicate that current in vivo levels of lead exposure may impair important human brain function.

  2. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1991-12-31

    In 1985, Public Law 99-240 (Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985) made the Department of Energy (DOE) responsible for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW). DOE strategies for storage and disposal of GTCC LLW required characterization of volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate characteristics, project volumes, and determine radionuclide activities to the years 2035 and 2055. Twenty-year life extensions for 70% of the operating nuclear reactors were assumed to calculate the GTCC LLW available in 2055. The following categories of GTCC LLW were addressed: Nuclear Utilities Waste; Potential Sealed Sources GTCC LLW; DOE-Held Potential GTCC LLW; and Other Generator Waste. It was determined that the largest volume of these wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear utilities. The Other Generator Waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. DOE-Held Potential GTCC LLW accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035. Potential Sealed Sources GTCC LLW is less than 0.2% of the total projected volume. The base case total projected volume of GTCC LLW for all categories was 3,250 cubic meters. This was substantially less than previous estimates.

  3. IGRIS for characterizing low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, C.W.; Swanson, P.J.

    1993-03-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to noninvasively characterize low-level radioactive waste in bulk soil samples, containers such as 55-gallon barrels, and in pipes, valves, etc. The probe interrogates the target with a low-intensity beam of 14-MeV neutrons produced from the deuterium-tritium reaction in a specially designed sealed-tube neutron-generator (STNG) that incorporates an alpha detector to detect the alpha particle associated with each neutron. These neutrons interact with the nuclei in the target to produce inelastic-, capture-, and decay-gamma rays that are detected by gamma-ray detectors. Time-of-flight methods are used to separate the inelastic-gamma rays from other gamma rays and to determine the origin of each inelastic-gamma ray in three dimensions through Inelastic-Gamma Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy (IGRIS). The capture-gamma ray spectrum is measured simultaneously with the IGRIS measurements. The decay-gamma ray spectrum is measured with the STNG turned off. Laboratory proof-of-concept measurements were used to design prototype systems for Bulk Soil Assay, Barrel Inspection, and Decontamination and Decommissioning and to predict their minimum detectable levels for heavy toxic metals (As, Hg, Cr, Zn, Pb, Ni, and Cd), uranium and transuranics, gamma-ray emitters, and elements such as chlorine, which is found in PCBs and other pollutants. These systems are expected to be complementary and synergistic with other technologies used to characterize low-level radioactive waste.

  4. Secondary Low-Level Waste Treatment Strategy Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. LaRue

    1999-05-25

    The objective of this analysis is to identify and review potential options for processing and disposing of the secondary low-level waste (LLW) that will be generated through operation of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). An estimate of annual secondary LLW is generated utilizing the mechanism established in ''Secondary Waste Treatment Analysis'' (Reference 8.1) and ''Secondary Low-Level Waste Generation Rate Analysis'' (Reference 8.5). The secondary LLW quantities are based on the spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) arrival schedule as defined in the ''Controlled Design Assumptions Document'' (CDA) (Reference 8.6). This analysis presents estimates of the quantities of LLW in its various forms. A review of applicable laws, codes, and standards is discussed, and a synopsis of those applicable laws, codes, and standards and their impacts on potential processing and disposal options is presented. The analysis identifies viable processing/disposal options in light of the existing laws, codes, and standards, and then evaluates these options in regard to: (1) Process and equipment requirements; (2) LLW disposal volumes; and (3) Facility requirements.

  5. Biphasic Dose Response in Low Level Light Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing cell death and tissue damage has been known for over forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial in mainstream medicine. The biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. A biphasic dose response has been frequently observed where low levels of light have a much better effect on stimulating and repairing tissues than higher levels of light. The so-called Arndt-Schulz curve is frequently used to describe this biphasic dose response. This review will cover the molecular and cellular mechanisms in LLLT, and describe some of our recent results in vitro and in vivo that provide scientific explanations for this biphasic dose response. PMID:20011653

  6. Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    Under DOE Contract No. DE-AR21-95MC32091, Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste, ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 500- lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area published April 1997.1 The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfidly tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium- contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (>99.9999oA) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radlonuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Cost studies have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  7. Biological intrusion of low-level-waste trench covers

    SciTech Connect

    Hakonson, T.E.; Gladney, E.S.

    1981-01-01

    The long-term integrity of low-level waste shallow land burial sites is dependent on the interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that modify the waste containment system. Past research on low-level waste shallow land burial methods has emphasized physical (i.e., water infiltration, soil erosion) and chemical (radionuclide leaching) processes that can cause waste site failure and subsequent radionuclide transport. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the need to consider biological processes as being potentially important in reducing the integrity of waste burial site cover treatments. Plants and animals not only can transport radionuclides to the ground surface via root systems and soil excavated from the cover profile by animal burrowing activities, but they modify physical and chemical processes within the cover profile by changing the water infiltration rates, soil erosion rates and chemical composition of the soil. One approach to limiting biological intrusion through the waste cover is to apply a barrier within the profile to limit root and animal penetration with depth. Experiments in the Los Alamos Experimental Engineered Test Facility were initiated to develop and evaluate biological barriers that are effective in minimizing intrusion into waste trenches. The experiments that are described employ four different candidate barrier materials of geologic origin. Experimental variables that will be evaluated, in addition to barrier type, are barrier depth and soil overburden depth. The rate of biological intrusion through the various barrier materials is being evaluated through the use of activatable stable tracers.

  8. Soil-atmosphere and vadose zone water fluxes at the Wagna - lysimeter: Workflow, models, and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, Johann

    2014-05-01

    A precise knowledge of the water fluxes between the soil-plant system and the atmosphere is of great importance for understanding and modeling water, solute and energy transfer in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Weighing lysimeters are precise tools to allow the determination of the hydrological cycle components in very short time intervals. Lysimeters with controlled suction at the lower boundary allow estimation of capillary rise and deep water percolation on short time scales. Evapotranspiration, rainfall, and irrigation can be computed from weight changes. In the last decades resolution and precision of the weighing systems have been substantially improved, so that modern lysimeters, resting on weighing cells can reach resolutions of up to 0.01 mm. Nevertheless, a lot of external effects (e.g. from maintenance, surface treatment) and small mechanical disturbances (e.g. caused by wind) became visible in the data. Seepage mass data are affected by water sampling and the emptying process of the seepage water container. Increasing parts of corrected seepage mass data show deep water percolation, decreasing parts in dry weather periods can be interpreted as capillary rise. In the evaluation process of corrected lysimeter mass data every increase in system weight (lysimeter mass + cumulative seepage mass) might be interpreted as rainfall or irrigation, whereas every decrease in system weight is interpreted as evapotranspiration. To apply this concept correctly, the noise in both data sets has to be separated from signals using a filtering routine (e.g. Peters et al., 2013) which is appropriate for any event, including events with low disturbances as well as strong wind and heavy precipitation in small time intervals. Based on the data set from the "Wagna" lysimeter in Austria with a high resolution of the scale (~ 0,015 mm) and very low noise due to low wind velocities for the year 2010 a lysimeter data preparation workflow will be executed: (a) correction of the

  9. Long-term, high precision lysimeter network an important tool to validate soil models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puetz, T.; Wollschläger, U.; Groh, J.; Gerke, H. H.; Priesack, E.; Kiese, R.; Borg, E.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term highly resolved time series of soil water fluxes and soil moisture are essential for the validation of soil and hydrological models and to understand the impact of climate change and land use change on the water cycle. Within the scope of TERENO (TERrestrial ENvironmental Observatories), four observatories for long-term monitoring of climate change parameters have been established. The observatories are located in areas of Germany that are affected by climate change. SoilCan, a lysimeter-network is part of the TERENO infrastructure which comprises 132 lysimeters of possibly identical technical specification and located at 13 different sites. Primary objectives of SoilCan are: Collection of comprehensive long-term data to monitor Global Change on the regional scale. Generation of high-quality data to develop and improve the prognosis of regional climate models with the aim to develop and implement options for management strategies. In the frame of SoilCan, fully automated lysimeter systems were installed on highly equipped experimental field sites within the TERENO-observatories and the relevant status variables of each ecosystem are monitored (e.g. climate, hydrology, biosphere-atmosphere exchange, biodiversity, etc.). The TERENO-observatories are placed in the following four regions of Germany with differing climate conditions. The lysimeters (1.5 m depth, 1m2 surface) were filled with soil monoliths taken at the four TERENO-observatories. In order to capture the expected climate change, 48 lysimeters were transferred along temperature and precipitation gradients within the observatories and/or between the observatories according to the principle „space for time". The lysimeters are instrumented with high-resolution scales and with TDR, tensiometer, temperature, soil heat flux and CO2 sensors. Suction rakes were installed at the bottom of the lysimeters controlling the lower boundary condition. To observe matter fluxes, soil solution and percolate were

  10. Chemical equilibria model analysis of Hope Creek eastern oil shale lysimeter leachate data

    SciTech Connect

    Essington, M.E.

    1989-09-01

    Leachates from field lysimeters containing an eastern oil shale, a retorted eastern oil shale, and an oil shale fines/retorted oil shale mixture were subjected to chemical equilibria analysis by the GEOCHEM model. Results of the chemical equilibria model analysis provided a more detailed characterization of the chemistry of oil shale materials. The aqueous chemistry of the lysimeter leachates is dominated by free ionic metal species and metal sulfate ion pairs. Activity diagrams shows that free metal ion activities (with the exception of Ca{sup 2+}) are directly related to SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} activities. This suggests that the aqueous activities of the metals examined are not supported by metal sulfate solid phases. However, an examination of metal sulfate ion activity products (IAPs) as a function of time shows that the IAPs approach constant values after approximately 800 days of the field study. For the great majority of the metals examined, the IAP values suggest leachate undersaturation with respect to even the most stable metal sulfate phases. Leachates from all three materials are predicted by GEOCHEM to approach equilibrium with respect to gypsum and goethite. In addition, leachates from the oil shale lysimeter are predicted by GEOCHEM to approach equilibrium with respect to melanterite, Fe-jurbanite, franklinite, molybdite, and molybdic acid. Aluminum activities in all three lysimeter leachates fall within the stability region of several basic aluminum sulfates. However, Al{sup 3+} activities in the lysimeter leachates are not supported by sulfate phases. 34 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. A comparison of simulation models for predicting soil water dynamics in bare and vegetated lysimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Kickert, R.N.; Fayer, M.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes the results of simulation models used to predict soil water storage dynamics at the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) weighing lysimeters. The objectives of this research is to develop the capability to predict soil water storage dynamics with plants in support of water infiltration control studies for the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program. It is important to gain confidence in one`s ability to simulate soil water dynamics over long time periods to assess the barrier`s ability to prevent drainage. Two models were compared for their ability to simulate soil water storage dynamics with and without plants in weighing lysimeters, the soil water infiltration and movement (SWIM) and the simulation of production and utilization of rangelands (SPUR-91) models. These models adequately simulated soil water storage dynamics for the weighing lysimeters. The range of root mean square error values for the two models was 7.0 to 19.8. This compares well with the range reported by Fayer et al. (1992) for the bare soil data sets of 8.1 to 22.1. Future research will test the predictive capability of these models for longer term lysimeter data sets and for historical data sets collected in various plant community types.

  12. Managing commercial low-level radioactive waste beyond 1992: Transportation planning for a LLW disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This technical bulletin presents information on the many activities and issues related to transportation of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) to allow interested States to investigate further those subjects for which proactive preparation will facilitate the development and operation of a LLW disposal facility. The activities related to transportation for a LLW disposal facility are discussed under the following headings: safety; legislation, regulations, and implementation guidance; operations-related transport (LLW and non-LLW traffic); construction traffic; economics; and public involvement.

  13. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project. Appendix B, Waste stream engineering files, Part 1, Mixed waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  14. Oestrogen, ocular function and low-level vision: a review.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Claire V; Walker, James A; Davidson, Colin

    2014-11-01

    Over the past 10 years, a literature has emerged concerning the sex steroid hormone oestrogen and its role in human vision. Herein, we review evidence that oestrogen (oestradiol) levels may significantly affect ocular function and low-level vision, particularly in older females. In doing so, we have examined a number of vision-related disorders including dry eye, cataract, increased intraocular pressure, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In each case, we have found oestrogen, or lack thereof, to have a role. We have also included discussion of how oestrogen-related pharmacological treatments for menopause and breast cancer can impact the pathology of the eye and a number of psychophysical aspects of vision. Finally, we have reviewed oestrogen's pharmacology and suggest potential mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects, with particular emphasis on anti-apoptotic and vascular effects.

  15. Effects of high vs low-level radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to appreciate adequately the various possible effects of radiation, particularly from high-level vs low-level radiation exposure (HLRE, vs LLRE), it is necessary to understand the substantial differences between (a) exposure as used in exposure-incidence curves, which are always initially linear and without threshold, and (b) dose as used in dose-response curves, which always have a threshold, above which the function is curvilinear with increasing slope. The differences are discussed first in terms of generally familiar nonradiation situations involving dose vs exposure, and then specifically in terms of exposure to radiation, vs a dose of radiation. Examples are given of relevant biomedical findings illustrating that, while dose can be used with HLRE, it is inappropriate and misleading the LLRE where exposure is the conceptually correct measure of the amount of radiation involved.

  16. Summertime Low-Level Jets over the Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Stensrud, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The sky over the southern Great Plains Cloud and Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program during the predawn and early morning hours often is partially obstructed by stratocumulus, stratus fractus, or cumulus fractus that are moving rapidly to the north, even through the surface winds are weak. This cloud movement is evidence of the low-level jet (LLJ), a wind speed maximum that occurs in the lowest few kilometers of the atmosphere. Owing to the wide spacing between upper-air sounding sites and the relatively infrequent sounding launches, LLJ evolution has been difficult to observe adequately, even though the effects of LLJs on moisture flux into North America are large. Model simulation of the LLJ is described.

  17. Low-level stored waste inspection using mobile robots

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.; Pettus, R.O.

    1996-06-01

    A mobile robot inspection system, ARIES (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy to replace human inspectors in the routine, regulated inspection of radioactive waste stored in drums. The robot will roam the three-foot aisles of drums, stacked four high, making decisions about the surface condition of the drums and maintaining a database of information about each drum. A distributed system of onboard and offboard computers will provide versatile, friendly control of the inspection process. This mobile robot system, based on a commercial mobile platform, will improve the quality of inspection, generate required reports, and relieve human operators from low-level radioactive exposure. This paper describes and discusses primarily the computer and control processes for the system.

  18. Overview of resuspension model: application to low level waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Resuspension is one of the potential pathways to man for radioactive or chemical contaminants that are in the biosphere. In waste management, spills or other surface contamination can serve as a source for resuspension during the operational phase. After the low-level waste disposal area is closed, radioactive materials can be brought to the surface by animals or insects or, in the long term, the surface can be removed by erosion. Any of these methods expose the material to resuspension in the atmosphere. Intrusion into the waste mass can produce resuspension of potential hazard to the intruder. Removal of items from the waste mass by scavengers or archeologists can result in potential resuspension exposure to others handling or working with the object. The ways in which resuspension can occur are wind resuspension, mechanical resuspension and local resuspension. While methods of predicting exposure are not accurate, they include the use of the resuspension factor, the resuspension rate and mass loading of the air.

  19. Effect of interstitial low level laser stimulation in skin density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seulki; Ha, Myungjin; Lee, Sangyeob; Yu, Sungkon; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Hwang, Dong Hyun; Lee, Han A.; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    As the interest in skin was increased, number of studies on skin care also have been increased. The reduction of skin density is one of the symptoms of skin aging. It reduces elasticity of skin and becomes the reason of wrinkle formation. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as one of the effective therapeutic methods for skin aging as in hasten to change skin density. This study presents the effect of a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) (wavelength: 660nm, power: 20mW) in skin density. Rabbits were divided into three groups. Group 1 didn't receive any laser stimulation as a control group. Group 2 and 3 as test groups were exposed to MILNS with energy of 8J and 6J on rabbits' dorsal side once a week, respectively. Skin density of rabbits was measured every 12 hours by using an ultrasound skin scanner.

  20. Low Level Laser Therapy: laser radiation absorption in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Paola; Orlando, Stefano; Dell'Ariccia, Marco; Brandimarte, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we report the results of an experimental study in which we have measured the transmitted laser radiation through dead biological tissues of various animals (chicken, adult and young bovine, pig) in order to evaluate the maximum thickness through which the power density could still produce a reparative cellular effect. In our experiments we have utilized a pulsed laser IRL1 ISO model (based on an infrared diode GaAs, λ=904 nm) produced by BIOMEDICA s.r.l. commonly used in Low Level Laser Therapy. Some of the laser characteristics have been accurately studied and reported in this paper. The transmission results suggest that even with tissue thicknesses of several centimeters the power density is still sufficient to produce a cell reparative effect.

  1. Low level laser therapy on injured rat muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, M.; Pinheiro, J. P.; Morgado, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    Although studies show the clinical effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in facilitating the muscle healing process, scientific evidence is still required to prove the effectiveness of LLLT and to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms triggered by irradiation. Here we evaluate the effect of different LLLT doses, using continuous illumination (830 nm), in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats, through the quantification of cytokines in systemic blood and histological analysis of muscle tissue. We verified that all applied doses produce an effect on reducing the number of inflammatory cells and the concentration of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines. The best results were obtained for 40 mW. The results may suggest a biphasic dose response curve.

  2. Characteristics of low-level radioactive decontamination waste

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Morcos, N. )

    1993-02-01

    This document addresses the work performed during fiscal year 1992 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste -- Decontamination Waste Program (FIN A6359), which is funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The program evaluates the physical stability and leachability of solidified waste streams generated in the decontamination process of primary coolant systems in operating nuclear power stations. The data in this document include the chemical composition and characterization of waste streams from Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Unit 3 and from Nine Mile Point Nuclear Plant Unit 1. The results of compressive strength testing on immersed and unimmersed solidified waste-form specimens from peach Bottom, and the results of leachate analysis are addressed. Cumulative fractional release rates and leachability indexes of those specimens were calculated and are included in this report.

  3. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  4. Decontamination processes for low level radioactive waste metal objects

    SciTech Connect

    Longnecker, E.F.; Ichikawa, Sekigo; Kanamori, Osamu

    1996-12-31

    Disposal and safe storage of contaminated nuclear waste is a problem of international scope. Although the greatest volume of such waste is concentrated in the USA and former Soviet Union, Western Europe and Japan have contaminated nuclear waste requiring attention. Japan`s radioactive nuclear waste is principally generated at nuclear power plants since it has no nuclear weapons production. However, their waste reduction, storage and disposal problems may be comparable to that of the USA on an inhabited area basis when consideration is given to population density where Japan`s population, half that of the USA, lives in an area slightly smaller than that of California`s. If everyone`s backyard was in California, the USA might have insoluble radioactive waste reduction, storage and disposal problems. Viewing Japan`s contaminated nuclear waste as a national problem requiring solutions, as well as an economic opportunity, Morikawa began research and development for decontaminating low level radioactive nuclear waste seven years ago. As engineers and manufacturers of special machinery for many years Morikawa brings special electro/mechanical/pneumatic Skills and knowledge to solving these unique problems. Genden Engineering Services and Construction Company (GESC), an affiliate of Japan Atomic Power Company, recently joined with Morikawa in this R&D effort to decontaminate low level radioactive nuclear waste (LLW) and to substantially reduce the volume of such nuclear waste requiring long term storage. This paper will present equipment with both mechanical and chemical processes developed over these several years by Morikawa and most recently in cooperation with GESC.

  5. Costs of mixed low-level waste stabilization options

    SciTech Connect

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Cooley, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    Selection of final waste forms to be used for disposal of DOE`s mixed low-level waste (MLLW) depends on the waste form characteristics and total life cycle cost. In this paper the various cost factors associated with production and disposal of the final waste form are discussed and combined to develop life-cycle costs associated with several waste stabilization options. Cost factors used in this paper are based on a series of treatment system studies in which cost and mass balance analyses were performed for several mixed low-level waste treatment systems and various waste stabilization methods including vitrification, grout, phosphate bonded ceramic and polymer. Major cost elements include waste form production, final waste form volume, unit disposal cost, and system availability. Production of grout costs less than the production of a vitrified waste form if each treatment process has equal operating time (availability) each year; however, because of the lower volume of a high temperature slag, certification and handling costs and disposal costs of the final waste form are less. Both the total treatment cost and life cycle costs are higher for a system producing grout than for a system producing high temperature slag, assuming equal system availability. The treatment costs decrease with increasing availability regardless of the waste form produced. If the availability of a system producing grout is sufficiently greater than a system producing slag, then the cost of treatment for the grout system will be less than the cost for the slag system, and the life cycle cost (including disposal) may be less depending on the unit disposal cost. Treatment and disposal costs will determine the return on investment in improved system availability.

  6. Shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, J.B.; Jacobs, D.G.; Lee, D.W.; Gilmore, C.C.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kornegay, F.C.; Roop, R.D.; Staub, W.P.; Stratton, L.E.; Thoma, R.E.

    1986-02-01

    The performance objectives included in regulations for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (10 CFR 61 for commercial waste and DOE Order 5820.2 for defense waste) are generic principles that generate technical requirements which must be factored into each phase of the development and operation of a shallow land burial facility. These phases include a determination of the quantity and characteristics of the waste, selection of a site and appropriate facility design, use of sound operating practices, and closure of the facility. The collective experience concerning shallow land burial operations has shown that achievement of the performance objectives (specifically, waste isolation and radionuclide containment) requires a systems approach, factoring into consideration the interrelationships of the phases of facility development and operation and their overall impact on performance. This report presents the technical requirements and procedures for the development and operation of a shallow land burial facility for low-level radioactive waste. The systems approach is embodied in the presentation. The report is not intended to be an instruction manual; rather, emphasis is placed on understanding the technical requirements and knowing what information and analysis are needed for making informed choices to meet them. A framework is developed for using the desired site characteristics to locate potentially suitable sites. The scope of efforts necessary for characterizing a site is then described and the range of techniques available for site characterization is identified. Given the natural features of a site, design options for achieving the performance objectives are discussed, as are the operating practices, which must be compatible with the design. Site closure is presented as functioning to preserve the containment and isolation provided at earlier stages of the development and operation of the facility.

  7. Incineration of Low Level Radioactive Vegetation for Waste Volume Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, N.P.S.; Rucker, G.G.; Looper, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The DOE changing mission at Savannah River Site (SRS) are to increase activities for Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. There are a number of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) locations that are contaminated with radioactivity and support dense vegetation, and are targeted for remediation. Two such locations have been studied for non-time critical removal actions under the National Contingency Plan (NCP). Both of these sites support about 23 plant species. Surveys of the vegetation show that radiation emanates mainly from vines, shrubs, and trees and range from 20,000 to 200,000 d/m beta gamma. Planning for removal and disposal of low-level radioactive vegetation was done with two principal goals: to process contaminated vegetation for optimum volume reduction and waste minimization, and for the protection of human health and environment. Four alternatives were identified as candidates for vegetation removal and disposal: chipping the vegetation and packing in carbon steel boxes (lined with synthetic commercial liners) and disposal at the Solid Waste Disposal Facility at SRS; composting the vegetation; burning the vegetation in the field; and incinerating the vegetation. One alternative `incineration` was considered viable choice for waste minimization, safe handling, and the protection of the environment and human health. Advantages and disadvantages of all four alternatives considered have been evaluated. For waste minimization and ultimate disposal of radioactive vegetation incineration is the preferred option. Advantages of incineration are that volume reduction is achieved and low-level radioactive waste are stabilized. For incineration and final disposal vegetation will be chipped and packed in card board boxes and discharged to the rotary kiln of the incinerator. The slow rotation and longer resident time in the kiln will ensure complete combustion of the vegetative material.

  8. Impact of Low-level Jet on Regional Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.

    2011-12-01

    During spring and summer seasons, the frequent occurrences of nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) over Great Plains region of the United States are widely recognized. As an important element of the low-level atmospheric circulation this LLJ effectively transports water vapor from the Gulf of Mexico, which in turn affects the development of server weather over the central United States. The LLJ has long been known to be conducive to summer rainfall and widespread flooding over the Great Plains of North America. The LLJ transports more than just moisture. Ozone episodes occur mainly during summer and are influenced by regional transport. Little is known, however,about the interrelation between the Great Plains LLJ and regional ozone transport. In this study, analysis of observational data during 1993-2006 has shown strong influence of the Great Plains LLJ on local and regional ozone distributions. Hourly ozone measurements from Air Quality System (AQS) are compared with wind fields at 850 hPa from the NCEP North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). It is demonstrated that the low ozone concentrations over Texas in late spring and summer are identified with large LLJ transport of clean marine air mass from the Gulf of Mexico. Significant negative correlations exist between daily ozone concentration and LLJ index (Figure 1), suggesting that lower ozone over Texas is associated with stronger LLJ. On the other hand, positive correlations occur in the Midwest and Northeast, indicating the important role of regional transport of ozone and precursors along the pathway by the wind circulation accompanying the LLJ. In addition, the LLJ is significantly correlated with northerly flows in the eastern Pacific Ocean and the adjacent coast. This relationship explains the coexistence of low ozone concentrations in Texas and southwestern U.S during summer, both attributed to the inland transport of clean marine air. These observed ozone-LLJ patterns are well simulated by the regional CMM5

  9. Quantifying soil evaporation and transpiration at the scale of a remote sensing pixel by extrapolating mini-lysimeter results with the aid of remote sensed surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voortman, B.; Bartholomeus, R.; Witte, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Lysimeters are often used to measure evapotranspiration (Et) by changes in mass of a volume of soil. Precision lysimeters generate data of Et at a high resolution in the order of 0.02 to 0.05 mm. This resolution is often reported as the accuracy of the lysimeter, which is in fact the accuracy of the weighing device. Improper installation or design of lysimeters is often not accounted for when assessing their accuracy. In general, measurement errors due to improper environmental conditions will decrease with increasing surface area and depth of the lysimeter. This is primarily because a larger part of the lysimeter is unaffected by its boundaries and because heterogeneities in soil hydraulic properties and micro-climate are more averaged out. However, the cost of large systems make them unattractive and scientists often choose for more economical solutions, optimizing between lysimeter dimensions and costs. One of the difficulties when designing a lysimeter is controlling the boundary condition at the base of the lysimeter. In case of a freely draining lysimeter (atmospheric pressure at the bottom), the lower portion of the lysimeter must saturate to generate a hydraulic gradient in downward direction, after which the lysimeter starts to drain. In groundwater independent sites this will lead to a higher soil moisture content in the lysimeter in comparison with the surrounding soil. One could overcome this problem by using suction plates and vacuum pumps to set a suction level at the base of the lysimeter equal to the surrounding soil., In dry soils, however, suction plates may dry out beyond the air entry value of the ceramic material, which neutralizes the suction pressure. Furthermore, a sophisticated drainage system will increase the maintenance and construction cost of the lysimeter. Moisture conditions in lysimeters are difficult to control and whenever this affects the available water for rooting plants this will lead to erroneous measurements of Et. We

  10. A rainfall loading response recorded at 300 meters depth: Implications for geological weighing lysimeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.; Bardsley, E.; Healey, J.

    2006-01-01

    Static pore water pressures in confined aquifers vary in response to ground surface loading changes, including precipitation and evaporation. Under certain hydrogeological conditions such aquifers can function as giant natural weighing lysimeters, referenced here as 'geological weighing lysimeters'. The extent of the land area 'weighed' increases with aquifer depth and it is of interest to establish at what depth it is still possible to monitor surface water budgets. An 86 mm rainfall event produced a clear loading signal in a well in western Kansas at 300 m depth. The loading effect is quantitatively consistent with elastic deformation induced by the rainfall mass and suggests that geological weighing lysimeters could operate at considerably greater depths, thereby monitoring water budgets over a significant land area. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  11. The role of lysimeters in the development of our understanding of processes in the vadose zone relevant to contamination of groundwater aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Michael J.; Ehlers, Wilfried; Unc, Adrian

    further highlighted the importance of preferential flow. Lysimeters have permitted investigation of the mechanisms by which these chemical and biological materials, which can be hazardous to human health, reach our sources of drinking water. They have also provided the means of identifying soil management practices that could be used to reduce the movement contaminants in the leachate from agricultural fields.

  12. Low-level visible light (LLVL) irradiation promotes proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lipovsky, Anat; Oron, Uri; Gedanken, Aharon; Lubart, Rachel

    2013-07-01

    Low-level visible light irradiation was found to stimulate proliferation potential of various types of cells in vitro. Stem cells in general are of significance for implantation in regenerative medicine. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of low-level light irradiation on the proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs were isolated from the bone marrow, and light irradiation was applied at energy densities of 2.4, 4.8, and 7.2 J/cm(2). Illumination of the MSCs resulted in almost twofold increase in cell number as compared to controls. Elevated reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production was also observed in MSCs cultures following illumination with broadband visible light. The present study clearly demonstrates the ability of broadband visible light illumination to promote proliferation of MSCs in vitro. These results may have an important impact on wound healing.

  13. Comparison of Bowen-ratio, eddy-correlation, and weighing-lysimeter evapotranspiration for two sparse-canopy sites in eastern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomlinson, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    This report compares evapotranspiration estimated with the Bowen-ratio and eddy-correlation methods with evapotranspiration measured by weighing lysimeters for two sparse-canopy sites in eastern Washington. The sites are located in a grassland area (grass lysimeter site) and a sagbrush- covered area (sage lysimeter site) on the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve in Benton County, Washington. Lysimeter data were collected at the sites from August 1990 to November 1994. Bowen-ratio data were collected for varying periods from May 1993 to November 1994. Additional Bowen-ratio data without interchanging air- temperature and vapor-pressure sensors to remove sensor bias (fixed-sensor system) were collected from October 1993 to June 1994. Eddy-correlation data were collected at the grass lysimeter site from March to April 1994, and at the sage lysimeter site from April to May 1994. The comparisons of evapotranspiration determined by the various methods differed considerably, depending on the periods of record being compared and the sites being analyzed. The year 1993 was very wet, with about 50 percent more precipitation than average; 1994 was a very dry year, with only about half the average precipitation. The study showed that on an annual basis, at least in 1994, Bowen-ratio evapotranspiration closely matched lysimeter evapotranspiration. In 1993, Bowen-ratio and lysimeter evapotranspiration comparisons were variable. Evapotranspiration estimated with the Bowen-ratio method averaged 5 percent more than evapotranspiration measured by lysimeters at the grass lysimeter site from October 1993 to November 1994, and 3 percent less than lysimeters at the sage lysimeter site from November 1993 to October 1994. From March 24 to April 5, 1994, at the grass lysimeter site, the Bowen-ratio method estimated 11 percent less, the Bowen-ratio method utilizing the fixed sensor system about 7 percent more, and the eddy-correlation method about 28 percent less evapotranspiration than the

  14. The representativeness of pore water samples collected from the unsaturated zone using pressure-vacuum lysimeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, C.A.; Healy, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the chemistry of water samples may be altered by the collection technique, creating concern about the representativeness of the pore water samples obtained. A study using soil water pressure-vacuum lysimeters in outwash sand and glacial till deposits demonstrates that for non-dilute-solution samples the effect of pH of sampling with lysimeters is minimal, and that measured major cation and anion concentrations are representative of the natural pore water; trace-metal concentrations can be significantly altered by collection procedures at low concentrations. -from Authors

  15. The influence of the lysimeter filling on the soil monolith inside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puetz, T.; Schilling, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-04-01

    In general, lysimeters are vessels containing disturbed or undisturbed soil blocks, for the most realistic scenario with regard to real outdoor conditions an undisturbed soil block so called soil monolith is preferable. The lower boundary condition was realized in two different ways: as a zero-tension lysimeter with a perforated bottom plate or as controlled lower boundary condition with a suction plate. The optimal surface area and the lysimeter length depend mainly on the scientific question. For cropped lysimeter experiments the lysimeter length has to reflect to a maximum root length. The base area is strongly connected to the scale of observation, whereby small-scale heterogeneity will be averaged using large base areas. For our experiments lysimeters with 2.5 m length, 2 m2 base area and with a wall thickness of the round vessel of 10 mm were used. A base frame weighted down by 120 t of concrete weights is necessary to press a lysimeter cylinder into the ground by the aid of a hydraulic press. The hydraulic press is connected with the base frame via chains. Because of the control of the four hydraulic cylinders a very precise vertical pressing process is guaranteed. To visualize the impact of the lysimeter filling on the intactness of the soil monolith a finite element computation was conducted. The finite element package ANSYS Release 11 was used to execute a nonlinear static analysis on a 2D-axisymmetric finite element model, to simulate the pressing process starting from a soil initial stress state and ending with the full length of the vessel driven into the soil, after which the hydraulic press and the concrete weights are deactivated and the vessel-surrounding soil is excavated. The numerical model of the pressing process considers among other things, a cap non-associative plasticity model with shear and volumetric hardening, soil to soil contact with cohesive zone modelling, soil to vessel contact with high friction, soil excavation using element birth

  16. Modelling the water balance of a precise weighable lysimeter for short time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot; Rock, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Precise knowledge of the water fluxes between the atmosphere and the soil-plant system and the percolation to the groundwater system is of great importance for understanding and modeling water, solute and energy transfer in the atmosphere-plant-soil-groundwater system. Weighable lysimeters yield the most precise and realistic measures for the change of stored water volume (ΔS), Precipitation (P) which can be rain, irrigation, snow and dewfall and evapotranspiration (ET) as the sum of soil evaporation, evaporation of intercepted water and transpiration. They avoid systematic errors of standard gauges and class-A pans. Lysimeters with controlled suction at the lower boundary allow estimation of capillary rise (C) and leachate (L) on short time scales. Precise weighable large scale (surface >= 1 m2) monolithic lysimeters avoiding oasis effects allow to solve the water balance equation (P - ET - L + C ± ΔS = 0) for a 3D-section of a natural atmosphere-plant-soil-system for a certain time period. Precision and accuracy of the lysimeter measurements depend not only on the precision of the weighing device but also on external conditions, which cannot be controlled or turned off. To separate the noise in measured data sets from signals the adaptive window and adaptive threshold (AWAT) filter (Peters et al., 2014) is used. The data set for the years 2010 and 2011 from the HYDRO-lysimeter (surface = 1 m2, depth = 1 m) in Wagna, Austria (Klammler and Fank, 2014) with a resolution of 0,01 mm for the lysimeter scale and of 0,001 mm for the leachate tank scale is used to evaluate the water balance. The mass of the lysimeter and the mass of the leachate tank is measured every two seconds. The measurements are stored as one minute arithmetic means. Based on calculations in a calibration period from January to May 2010 with different widths of moving window the wmax - Parameter for the AWAT filter was set to 41 minutes. A time series for the system mass ('upper boundary') of the

  17. Alternatives generation and analysis report for immobilized low-level waste interim storage architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-01

    The Immobilized Low-Level Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-level waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This report describes alternative Immobilized Low-Level Waste storage system architectures, evaluation criteria, and evaluation results to support the Immobilized Low-Level Waste storage system architecture selection decision process.

  18. Modelling approaches to compare sorption and degradation of metsulfuron-methyl in laboratory micro-lysimeter and batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Heistermann, Maik; Jene, Bernhard; Fent, Gunnar; Feyerabend, Martin; Seppelt, Ralf; Richter, Otto; Kubiak, Roland

    2003-12-01

    Results of laboratory batch studies often differ from those of outdoor lysimeter or field plot experiments--with respect to degradation as well as sorption. Laboratory micro-lysimeters are a useful device for closing the gap between laboratory and field by both including relevant transport processes in undisturbed soil columns and allowing controlled boundary conditions. In this study, sorption and degradation of the herbicide metsulfuron-methyl in a loamy silt soil were investigated by applying inverse modelling techniques to data sets from different experimental approaches under laboratory conditions at a temperature of 10 degrees C: first, batch-degradation studies and, second, column experiments with undisturbed soil cores (28 cm length x 21 cm diameter). The column experiments included leachate and soil profile analysis at two different run times. A sequential extraction method was applied in both study parts in order to determine different binding states of the test item within the soil. Data were modelled using ModelMaker and Hydrus-1D/2D. Metsulfuron-methyl half-life in the batch-experiments (t1/2 = 66 days) was shown to be about four times higher than in the micro-lysimeter studies (t1/2 about 17 days). Kinetic sorption was found to be a significant process both in batch and column experiments. Applying the one-rate-two-site kinetic sorption model to the sequential extraction data, it was possible to associate the stronger bonded fraction of metsulfuron-methyl with its kinetically sorbed fraction in the model. Although the columns exhibited strong significance of multi-domain flow (soil heterogeneity), the comparison between bromide and metsulfuron-methyl leaching and profile data showed clear evidence for kinetic sorption effects. The use of soil profile data had significant impact on parameter estimates concerning sorption and degradation. The simulated leaching of metsulfuron-methyl as it resulted from parameter estimation was shown to decrease when

  19. Low-level radioactive waste from nuclear power generating stations: Characterization, classification and assessment of activated metals and waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.W.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.

    1993-02-01

    Since the enactment of 10 CFR Part 61, additional difficult-to-measure long-lived radionuclides, not specified in Tables 1 2 of Part 61, have been identified (e.g., [sup 108m]Ag, [sup 93]Mo, [sup 36]Cl, [sup 10]Be, [sup 113m]Cd, [sup 121m]Sn, [sup 126]Sn, [sup 93m]Nb) that may be of concern in certain types of waste. These nuclides are primarily associated with activated metal and perhaps other nuclear power low-level waste (LLW) being sent to disposal facilities. The concentration of a radionuclide in waste materials is normally determined by direct measurement or by indirect calculational methods, such as using a scaling factor to relate inferred concentration of a difficult-to-measure radionuclide to another that is easily measured. The total disposal site inventory of certain difficult-to-measure radionuclides (e.g., [sup 14]C, [sup 129]I, and [sup 99]Tc) often control the total quantities of radioactive waste permitted in LLW burial facilities. Overly conservative scaling factors based on lower limits of detection (LLD), often used in the nuclear power industry to estimate these controlling nuclides, could lead to premature closure of a disposal facility. Samples of LLW (Class B and C activated metals [AM] and other waste streams) are being collected from operating nuclear power stations and analyzed for radionuclides covered in 10 CFR Part 61 and the additional difficult-to-measure radionuclides. This analysis will enhance the NRC's understanding of the distribution and projected quantities of radionuclides within AM and LLW streams from commercial nuclear power stations. This research will also provide radiological characterization of AM specimens for others to use in leach-rate and lysimeter experiments to determine nuclide releases and subsequent movement in natural soil environments.

  20. Low-level radioactive waste from nuclear power generating stations: Characterization, classification and assessment of activated metals and waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.W.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.

    1993-02-01

    Since the enactment of 10 CFR Part 61, additional difficult-to-measure long-lived radionuclides, not specified in Tables 1 2 of Part 61, have been identified (e.g., {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 93}Mo, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 10}Be, {sup 113m}Cd, {sup 121m}Sn, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 93m}Nb) that may be of concern in certain types of waste. These nuclides are primarily associated with activated metal and perhaps other nuclear power low-level waste (LLW) being sent to disposal facilities. The concentration of a radionuclide in waste materials is normally determined by direct measurement or by indirect calculational methods, such as using a scaling factor to relate inferred concentration of a difficult-to-measure radionuclide to another that is easily measured. The total disposal site inventory of certain difficult-to-measure radionuclides (e.g., {sup 14}C, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc) often control the total quantities of radioactive waste permitted in LLW burial facilities. Overly conservative scaling factors based on lower limits of detection (LLD), often used in the nuclear power industry to estimate these controlling nuclides, could lead to premature closure of a disposal facility. Samples of LLW (Class B and C activated metals [AM] and other waste streams) are being collected from operating nuclear power stations and analyzed for radionuclides covered in 10 CFR Part 61 and the additional difficult-to-measure radionuclides. This analysis will enhance the NRC`s understanding of the distribution and projected quantities of radionuclides within AM and LLW streams from commercial nuclear power stations. This research will also provide radiological characterization of AM specimens for others to use in leach-rate and lysimeter experiments to determine nuclide releases and subsequent movement in natural soil environments.

  1. Role of Low-Level Laser Therapy in Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Javad T.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Osmani, Bushra Z.; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Naeser, Margaret A.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the laser. The development of lasers for medical use, which became known as low-level laser therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation, followed in 1967. In recent years, LLLT has become an increasingly mainstream modality, especially in the areas of physical medicine and rehabilitation. At first used mainly for wound healing and pain relief, the medical applications of LLLT have broadened to include diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and degenerative or traumatic brain disorders. This review will cover the mechanisms of LLLT that operate both on a cellular and a tissue level. Mitochondria are thought to be the principal photoreceptors, and increased adenosine triphosphate, reactive oxygen species, intracellular calcium, and release of nitric oxide are the initial events. Activation of transcription factors then leads to expression of many protective, anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, and pro-proliferation gene products. Animal studies and human clinical trials of LLLT for indications with relevance to neurology, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, degenerative brain disease, spinal cord injury, and peripheral nerve regeneration, will be covered. PMID:21172691

  2. Recent international developments in low-level waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Harmon, K.M.

    1986-11-01

    Recent international developments in low-level waste (LLW) disposal have included a move away from ocean dumping and a trend towards engineered and deeper dispoosal. Siting efforts have accelerated as interim storage facilities and existing sites reach capacity. The suspension of ocean dumping by the London Dumping Conventions of 1983 and 1985 has affected the LLW disposal practices of several countries, including the United Kingdom, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Japan. Their plans now include disposal in trenches, shallow concrete pits, deep mines, sub-seabed caverns, horizontal mountain tunnels, and long-term storage facilities. Other recent developments include selection of the semi-desert Vaalputs site in South Africa, licensing activities for the Konrad mine site in the Federal Republic of Germany, design of at-reactor sites in Finland, and construction of a Baltic Sea site in Sweden. Also, the French have recently selected the Aube site for engineered disposal in monoliths and tumuli, now used at the La Manche site.

  3. Molten salt oxidation for treating low-level mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M G; Ford, T D; Foster, K G; Hipple, D L; Hopper, R W; Hsu, P C

    1998-12-10

    MS0 is a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared a facility (please see the photo attached) in which an integrated pilot-scale MS0 treatment system is being tested and demonstrated. The system consists of a MS0 vessel with a dedicated off-gas treatment system, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and a ceramic final waste forms immobilization system. The MSO/off-gas system has been operational since December 1997. The salt recycle system and the ceramic final forms immobilization became operational in May and August 1998, respectively. We have tested the MS0 facility with various organic feeds, including chlorinated solvents; tributyl phosphate/kerosene, PCB-contaminated waste oils & solvents, booties, plastic pellets, ion exchange resins, activated carbon, radioactive-spiked organics, and well-characterized low- level liquid mixed wastes. MS0 is a versatile technology for hazardous waste treatment and may be a solution to many waste disposal problems. In this paper we will present our operational experience with MS0 and also discuss its process capabilities as well as performance data with different feeds.

  4. Effect of Pulsing in Low-Level Light Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Javad T.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kurup, Divya Balachandran; De Taboada, Luis; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective Low level light (or laser) therapy (LLLT) is a rapidly growing modality used in physical therapy, chiropractic, sports medicine and increasingly in mainstream medicine. LLLT is used to increase wound healing and tissue regeneration, to relieve pain and inflammation, to prevent tissue death, to mitigate degeneration in many neurological indications. While some agreement has emerged on the best wavelengths of light and a range of acceptable dosages to be used (irradiance and fluence), there is no agreement on whether continuous wave or pulsed light is best and on what factors govern the pulse parameters to be chosen. Study Design/Materials and Methods The published peer-reviewed literature was reviewed between 1970 and 2010. Results The basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of LLLT are discussed. The type of pulsed light sources available and the parameters that govern their pulse structure are outlined. Studies that have compared continuous wave and pulsed light in both animals and patients are reviewed. Frequencies used in other pulsed modalities used in physical therapy and biomedicine are compared to those used in LLLT. Conclusion There is some evidence that pulsed light does have effects that are different from those of continuous wave light. However further work is needed to define these effects for different disease conditions and pulse structures. PMID:20662021

  5. Steam reforming of low-level mixed waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design, construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 300-lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area and published in April 1997. The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfully tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium-contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (> 99.9999%) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radionuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Economic evaluations have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  6. Low-level waste minimization at the Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Koger, J.

    1993-03-01

    The Y-12 Development Waste Minimization Program is used as a basis for defining new technologies and processes that produce minimum low-level wastes (hazardous, mixed, radioactive, and industrial) for the Y-12 Plant in the future and for Complex-21 and that aid in decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) efforts throughout the complex. In the past, the strategy at the Y-12 Plant was to treat the residues from the production processes using chemical treatment, incineration, compaction, and other technologies, which often generated copious quantities of additional wastes and, with the exception of highly valuable materials such as enriched uranium, incorporated very little recycle in the process. Recycle, in this context, is defined as material that is put back into the process before it enters a waste stream. Additionally, there are several new technology drivers that have recently emerged with the changing climate in the Nuclear Weapons Complex such as Complex 21 and D and D technologies and an increasing number of disassemblies. The hierarchies of concern in the waste minimization effort are source reduction, recycle capability, treatment simplicity, and final disposal difficulty with regard to Complex 21, disassembly efforts, D and D, and, to a lesser extent, weapons production. Source reduction can be achieved through substitution of hazardous substances for nonhazardous materials, and process changes that result in less generated waste.

  7. Body contouring using 635-nm low level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Mark S; Newburger, Jessica; Zarraga, Matthew B

    2013-03-01

    Noninvasive body contouring has become one of the fastest-growing areas of esthetic medicine. Many patients appear to prefer nonsurgical less-invasive procedures owing to the benefits of fewer side effects and shorter recovery times. Increasingly, 635-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions and has been shown to improve wound healing, reduce edema, and relieve acute pain. Within the past decade, LLLT has also emerged as a new modality for noninvasive body contouring. Research has shown that LLLT is effective in reducing overall body circumference measurements of specifically treated regions, including the hips, waist, thighs, and upper arms, with recent studies demonstrating the long-term effectiveness of results. The treatment is painless, and there appears to be no adverse events associated with LLLT. The mechanism of action of LLLT in body contouring is believed to stem from photoactivation of cytochrome c oxidase within hypertrophic adipocytes, which, in turn, affects intracellular secondary cascades, resulting in the formation of transitory pores within the adipocytes' membrane. The secondary cascades involved may include, but are not limited to, activation of cytosolic lipase and nitric oxide. Newly formed pores release intracellular lipids, which are further metabolized. Future studies need to fully outline the cellular and systemic effects of LLLT as well as determine optimal treatment protocols.

  8. Remediation alternatives for low-level herbicide contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Conger, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    In early 1995, an evaluation of alternatives for remediation of a shallow groundwater plume containing low-levels of an organic herbicide was conducted at BASF Corporation, a petrochemical facility located in Ascension Parish, Louisiana. The contaminated site is located on an undeveloped portion of property within 1/4 mile of the east bank of the Mississippi River near the community of Geismar. Environmental assessment data indicated that about two acres of the thirty acre site had been contaminated from past waste management practices with the herbicide bentazon. Shallow soils and groundwater between 5 to 15 feet in depth were affected. Maximum concentrations of bentazon in groundwater were less than seven parts per million. To identify potentially feasible remediation alternatives, the environmental assessment data, available research, and cost effectiveness were reviewed. After consideration of a preliminary list of alternatives, only two potentially feasible alternatives could be identified. Groundwater pumping, the most commonly used remediation alternative, followed by carbon adsorption treatment was identified as was a new innovative alternative known as vegetative transpiration. This alternative relies on the natural transpiration processes of vegetation to bioremediate organic contaminants. Advantages identified during screening suggest that the transpiration method could be the best remediation alternative to address both economic and environmental factors. An experiment to test critical factors of the vegetatived transpiration alternative with bentazon was recommended before a final decision on feasibility can be made.

  9. Low level CO2 effects on pulmonary function in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, J.; Mueller, K.; Elliott, A.; Gerzer, D.; Strohl, K. P.; West, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether chamber exposure to low levels of CO2 results in functional alterations in gas mixing and closing volume in humans. Four healthy volunteer subjects were exposed to 0.7% CO2 and to 1.2% CO2. Spirometry, lung volumes, single breath nitrogen washout, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) by two methods, and cardiac output were measured in triplicate. Values were obtained over two non-consecutive days during the training period (control) and on days 2 or 3, 4, 6, 10, 13, and 23 of exposure to each CO2 level. Measurements were made during the same time of day. There was one day of testing after exposure, while still in the chamber but off carbon dioxide. The order of testing, up until measurements of DLCO and cardiac output, were randomized to avoid presentation effects. The consistent findings were a reduction in diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide and a fall in cardiac output, occurring to a similar degree with both exposures. For the group as a whole, there was no indication of major effects on spirometry, lung volumes, gas mixing or dead space. We conclude that small changes may occur in the function of distal gas exchanging units; however, these effects were not associated with any adverse health effects. The likelihood of pathophysiologic changes in lung function or structure with 0.7 or 1.2% CO2 exposure for this period of time, is therefore, low.

  10. Feedback Configuration Tools for LHC Low Level RF

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, D.; Fox, J.; Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; /CERN

    2009-12-16

    The LHC Low Level RF System (LLRF) is a complex multi-VME crate system which is used to regulate the superconductive cavity gap voltage as well as to lower the impedance as seen by the beam through low latency feedback. This system contains multiple loops with several parameters to be set before the loops can be closed. In this paper, we present a suite of MATLAB based tools developed to perform the preliminary alignment of the RF stations and the beginnings of a closed loop model based alignment routine. We briefly introduce the RF system and in particular the base band (time domain noise based) network analyzer system built into the LHC LLRF. The main focus of this paper is the methodology of the algorithms used by the routines within the context of the overall system. Measured results are presented that validate the technique. Because the RF systems are located in a cavern 120 m underground in a location which is relatively un-accessible without beam and completely un-accessible with beam present or magnets are energized, these remotely operated tools are a necessity for the CERN LLRF team to maintain and tune their LLRF systems in a similar fashion as to what was done very successfully in PEP-II at SLAC.

  11. Reproductive toxicity of low-level lead exposure in men

    SciTech Connect

    Telisman, Spomenka Colak, Bozo; Pizent, Alica; Jurasovic, Jasna; Cvitkovic, Petar

    2007-10-15

    Parameters of semen quality, seminal plasma indicators of secretory function of the prostate and seminal vesicles, sex hormones in serum, and biomarkers of lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and selenium body burden were measured in 240 Croatian men 19-52 years of age. The subjects had no occupational exposure to metals and no known other reasons suspected of influencing male reproductive function or metal metabolism. After adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, blood cadmium, and serum copper, zinc, and selenium by multiple regression, significant (P<0.05) associations of blood lead (BPb), {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), and/or erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) with reproductive parameters indicated a lead-related increase in immature sperm concentration, in percentages of pathologic sperm, wide sperm, round sperm, and short sperm, in serum levels of testosterone and estradiol, and a decrease in seminal plasma zinc and in serum prolactin. These reproductive effects were observed at low-level lead exposure (BPb median 49 {mu}g/L, range 11-149 {mu}g/L in the 240 subjects) common for general populations worldwide. The observed significant synergistic effect of BPb and blood cadmium on increasing serum testosterone, and additive effect of a decrease in serum selenium on increasing serum testosterone, may have implications on the initiation and development of prostate cancer because testosterone augments the progress of prostate cancer in its early stages.

  12. Oxidation Kinetics of Spent Low-Level Radioactive Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-J.; Wang, H. Paul; Chao, Chih C.; Liu, H.H.; Hsiao, M.C.; Liu, S.H.

    2005-11-15

    Experimentally, two-stage oxidation of spent low-level radioactive resin was found by thermo- gravimetric analysis (TGA). About 24% of the spent resins was oxidized at 600 to 900 K. Online Fourier transform infrared spectra showed that the decomposition of the -SO{sub 3}H species in the resin to SO{sub 2} occurred at 670 and 1020 K. The numerical calculation from TGA weight loss data at different heating rates showed that the global activation energies for oxidation of the spent resins were 108 to 138 kJ.mol{sup -1}. The reaction orders for resin and oxygen were about 1.0 and 3.5, respectively. The global rate equations for oxidation of the resin in the first and second stages can be expressed as dx{sub 1}/dt (s{sup -1}) = 2.3 x 10{sup 7} (s{sup -1})exp[-117 900(J.mol{sup -1})/T(K)][1 - x (%)]{sup 0.82} [O{sub 2} (vt%)]{sup 3.5} (x denotes the reaction conversion) and dx{sub 2}/dt = 8.4 x 10{sup 17} exp(-239 500/RT) (1 - x){sup 0.9}[O{sub 2}]{sup 4.5}, respectively.

  13. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-02-19

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution`s (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  14. Towards Smart Homes Using Low Level Sensory Data

    PubMed Central

    Khattak, Asad Masood; Truc, Phan Tran Ho; Hung, Le Xuan; Vinh, La The; Dang, Viet-Hung; Guan, Donghai; Pervez, Zeeshan; Han, Manhyung; Lee, Sungyoung; Lee, Young-Koo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitous Life Care (u-Life care) is receiving attention because it provides high quality and low cost care services. To provide spontaneous and robust healthcare services, knowledge of a patient’s real-time daily life activities is required. Context information with real-time daily life activities can help to provide better services and to improve healthcare delivery. The performance and accuracy of existing life care systems is not reliable, even with a limited number of services. This paper presents a Human Activity Recognition Engine (HARE) that monitors human health as well as activities using heterogeneous sensor technology and processes these activities intelligently on a Cloud platform for providing improved care at low cost. We focus on activity recognition using video-based, wearable sensor-based, and location-based activity recognition engines and then use intelligent processing to analyze the context of the activities performed. The experimental results of all the components showed good accuracy against existing techniques. The system is deployed on Cloud for Alzheimer’s disease patients (as a case study) with four activity recognition engines to identify low level activity from the raw data captured by sensors. These are then manipulated using ontology to infer higher level activities and make decisions about a patient’s activity using patient profile information and customized rules. PMID:22247682

  15. Engineered sorbent barriers for improved low-level waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Engineered Sorbent Barriers Program at Pacific Northwest Lab., supported by the US Dept. of Energy's Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Program, is developing sorbent materials to prevent the migration of radionuclides from LLW sites. Unlike impermeable barriers, sorbent barriers allow moisture to pass while selectively sorbing contaminants. This would prevent filling the waste site with water at humid sites, referred to as the bathtub effect. The sorptive behavior of these barriers is similar to the ion-exchange properties that many soils possess for certain radionuclides. However, the degree of sorption of radionuclides is dependent on the type of soil, the specific radionuclide, and the presence of competing ions and organic complexants. Therefore, the use of sorptive additives as radionuclide barriers is recommended to prevent radionuclide migration from the waste site. The experimental work discussed in this paper was directed toward identifying and evaluating sorbent materials for three radionuclides of major concern in defense LLW: /sup 137/Cs, /sup 60/Co, and /sup 90/Sr. No single material was found to be effective for sorbing all three radionuclides of interest. Therefore, formulations were developed containing A-51 zeolite or clinoptilolite for sorbing strontium, greensand or red pottery clay for sorbing cesium, and activated charcoal for sorbing cobalt.

  16. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, low level aerial view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, low level aerial view of Test Stand "D," looking due south, after completion of Dd station installation in 1961. Note Test Stand "D" "neutralization pond" to immediate southeast of tower. A steel barrier north of and parallel to the Dd station separates fuel run tanks (on south side obscured from view) from oxidizer run tanks (on north side). Small Dj injector test stand is visible to the immediate left of oxidizer run tanks; it is oriented on a northeast/southwest diagonal to the Dd test station. The large tank to the north of the oxidizer run tanks (near center bottom of view) is an oxidizer storage tank for nitrogen tetroxide. Slender tanks to the northwest of the tower (lower right of view) contain high pressure nitrogen gas. A large vertical tank at the base of the tower contains distilled water for flushing propellant lines. (JPL negative no. 384-2997-B, 12 December 1961) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Soil characterization methods for unsaturated low-level waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H. . Dept. of Soil and Water Science); Gee, G.W.; Kincaid, C.T. ); Hills, R.G. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Nicholson, T.J.; Cady, R.E. )

    1993-01-01

    To support a license application for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), applicants must characterize the unsaturated zone and demonstrate that waste will not migrate from the facility boundary. This document provides a strategy for developing this characterization plan. It describes principles of contaminant flow and transport, site characterization and monitoring strategies, and data management. It also discusses methods and practices that are currently used to monitor properties and conditions in the soil profile, how these properties influence water and waste migration, and why they are important to the license application. The methods part of the document is divided into sections on laboratory and field-based properties, then further subdivided into the description of methods for determining 18 physical, flow, and transport properties. Because of the availability of detailed procedures in many texts and journal articles, the reader is often directed for details to the available literature. References are made to experiments performed at the Las Cruces Trench site, New Mexico, that support LLW site characterization activities. A major contribution from the Las Cruces study is the experience gained in handling data sets for site characterization and the subsequent use of these data sets in modeling studies.

  18. Honeybees as monitors of low levels of radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.A. ); Bromenshenk, J.J.; Gudatis, J.L. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-07-01

    Large-scale environmental monitoring programs rely on sampling many media -- air, water, food, et cetera -- from a large network of sampling stations. For describing the total region possibly impacted by contaminants, the most efficient sampler would be one that covered a large region and simultaneously sampled many different media, such as water, air, soil, and vegetation. Honeybees have been shown to be useful monitors of the environment in this context for detecting both radionuclides and heavy metals. This study sought to determine the effectiveness of honeybees as monitors of low levels of radioactivity in the form of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. For the study, approximately 50 honeybee colonies were placed on the Hanford Site and along the Columbia River in areas downwind of the site. The mini-hive colonies were sampled after 1 month and tested for tritium and for gamma-emitting radionuclides. From this and other studies, it is known that honeybees can be used to detect radionuclides present in the environment. Their mobility and their ability to integrate all exposure pathways could expand and add another level of confidence to the present monitoring program. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Advances in low-level jet research and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongbo; He, Mingyang; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Qinghong

    2014-02-01

    The low-level jet (LLJ) is closely related to severe rainfall events, air pollution, wind energy utilization, aviation safety, sandstorms, forest fire, and other weather and climate phenomena. Therefore, it has attracted considerable attention since its discovery. Scientists have carried out many studies on LLJs and made significant achievements during the past five or six decades. This article summarizes and assesses the current knowledge on this subject, and focuses in particular on three aspects: 1) LLJ classification, definition, distribution, and structure; 2) LLJ formation and evolutionary mechanisms; and 3) relationships between LLJ and rainfall, as well as other interdisciplinary fields. After comparing the status of LLJ research at home (China) and abroad, we then discuss the shortcomings of LLJ research in China. We suggest that this includes: coarse definitions of the LLJ, lack of observations and inadequate quality control, few thorough explorations of LLJ characteristics and formation mechanisms, and limited studies in interdisciplinary fields. The future prospects for several LLJ research avenues are also speculated.

  20. Versatile Low Level RF System For Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The Low Level RF (LLRF) system is the source of all of the rf signals required for an rf linear accelerator. These signals are amplified to drive accelerator and buncher cavities. It can even provide the synchronizing signal for the rf power for a synchrotron. The use of Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) techniques results in a versatile system that can provide multiple coherent signals at the same or different frequencies with adjustable amplitudes and phase relations. Pulsing the DDS allows rf switching with an essentially infinite on/off ratio. The LLRF system includes a versatile phase detector that allows phase-locking the rf frequency to a cavity at any phase angle over the full 360 deg. range. With the use of stepper motor driven slug tuners multiple cavity resonant frequencies can be phase locked to the rf source frequency. No external phase shifters are required and there is no feedback loop phase setup required. All that is needed is to turn the frequency feedback on. The use of Digital Signal Processing (DSP) allows amplitude and phase control over the entire rf pulse. This paper describes the basic principles of a LLRF system that has been used for both proton accelerators and electron accelerators, including multiple tank accelerators, sub-harmonic and fundamental bunchers, and synchrotrons.

  1. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

  2. Versatile Low Level RF System For Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The Low Level RF (LLRF) system is the source of all of the rf signals required for an rf linear accelerator. These signals are amplified to drive accelerator and buncher cavities. It can even provide the synchronizing signal for the rf power for a synchrotron. The use of Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) techniques results in a versatile system that can provide multiple coherent signals at the same or different frequencies with adjustable amplitudes and phase relations. Pulsing the DDS allows rf switching with an essentially infinite on/off ratio. The LLRF system includes a versatile phase detector that allows phase-locking the rf frequency to a cavity at any phase angle over the full 360° range. With the use of stepper motor driven slug tuners multiple cavity resonant frequencies can be phase locked to the rf source frequency. No external phase shifters are required and there is no feedback loop phase setup required. All that is needed is to turn the frequency feedback on. The use of Digital Signal Processing (DSP) allows amplitude and phase control over the entire rf pulse. This paper describes the basic principles of a LLRF system that has been used for both proton accelerators and electron accelerators, including multiple tank accelerators, sub-harmonic and fundamental bunchers, and synchrotrons.

  3. Low-level radioactive wastes. AMA Council on Scientific Affairs.

    PubMed

    1990-02-01

    Under a federal law, each state by January 1, 1993, must provide for safe disposal of its low-level radioactive wastes. Most of the wastes are from using nuclear power to produce electricity, but 25% to 30% are from medical diagnosis, therapy, and research. Exposures to radioactivity from the wastes are much smaller than those from natural sources, and federal standards limit public exposure. Currently operating disposal facilities are in Beatty, Nev, Barnwell, SC, and Richland, Wash. National policy encourages the development of regional facilities. Planning a regional facility, selecting a site, and building, monitoring, and closing the facility will be a complex project lasting decades that involves legislation, public participation, local and state governments, financing, quality control, and surveillance. The facilities will utilize geological factors, structural designs, packaging, and other approaches to isolate the wastes. Those providing medical care can reduce wastes by storing them until they are less radioactive, substituting nonradioactive compounds, reducing volumes, and incinerating. Physicians have an important role in informing and advising the public and public officials about risks involved with the wastes and about effective methods of dealing with them.

  4. Low-level radioactive wastes. Council on Scientific Affairs.

    PubMed

    1989-08-01

    Under a federal law, each state by January 1, 1993, must provide for safe disposal of its low-level radioactive wastes. Most of the wastes are from using nuclear power to produce electricity, but 25% to 30% are from medical diagnosis, therapy, and research. Exposures to radioactivity from the wastes are much smaller than those from natural sources, and federal standards limit public exposure. Currently operating disposal facilities are in Beatty, Nev, Barnwell, SC, and Richland, Wash. National policy encourages the development of regional facilities. Planning a regional facility, selecting a site, and building, monitoring, and closing the facility will be a complex project lasting decades that involves legislation, public participation, local and state governments, financing, quality control, and surveillance. The facilities will utilize geological factors, structural designs, packaging, and other approaches to isolate the wastes. Those providing medical care can reduce wastes by storing them until they are less radioactive, substituting nonradioactive compounds, reducing volumes, and incinerating. Physicians have an important role in informing and advising the public and public officials about risks involved with the wastes and about effective methods of dealing with them.

  5. Hanford low-level waste process chemistry testing data package

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.; Tracey, E.M.; Darab, J.G.; Smith, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    Recently, the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) among the State of Washington Department of Ecology, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the cleanup of the Hanford Site was renegotiated. The revised agreement specifies vitrification as the encapsulation technology for low level waste (LLW). A demonstration, testing, and evaluation program underway at Westinghouse Hanford Company to identify the best overall melter-system technology available for vitrification of Hanford Site LLW to meet the TPA milestones. Phase I is a {open_quotes}proof of principle{close_quotes} test to demonstrate that a melter system can process a simulated highly alkaline, high nitrate/nitrite content aqueous LLW feed into a glass product of consistent quality. Seven melter vendors were selected for the Phase I evaluation: joule-heated melters from GTS Duratek, Incorporated (GDI); Envitco, Incorporated (EVI); Penberthy Electomelt, Incorporated (PEI); and Vectra Technologies, Incorporated (VTI); a gas-fired cyclone burner from Babcock & Wilcox (BCW); a plasma torch-fired, cupola furnace from Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (WSTC); and an electric arc furnace with top-entering vertical carbon electrodes from the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM).

  6. Factors associated with low levels of aerobic fitness among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Eliane Cristina de Andrade; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of low aerobic fitness levels and to analyze the association with sociodemographic factors, lifestyle and excess body fatness among adolescents of southern Brazil. Methods: The study included 879 adolescents aged 14-19 years the city of São José/SC, Brazil. The aerobic fitness was assessed by Canadian modified test of aerobic fitness. Sociodemographic variables (skin color, age, sex, study turn, economic level), sexual maturation and lifestyle (eating habits, screen time, physical activity, consumption of alcohol and tobacco) were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Excess body fatness was evaluated by sum of skinfolds triceps and subscapular. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results: Prevalence of low aerobic fitness level was 87.5%. The girls who spent two hours or more in front screen, consumed less than one glass of milk by day, did not smoke and had an excess of body fatness had a higher chance of having lower levels of aerobic fitness. White boys with low physical activity had had a higher chance of having lower levels of aerobic fitness. Conclusions: Eight out of ten adolescents were with low fitness levels aerobic. Modifiable lifestyle factors were associated with low levels of aerobic fitness. Interventions that emphasize behavior change are needed. PMID:26743851

  7. Observation of cloud formation caused by low-level jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; McCormick, M. P.; Lei, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of analyses performed on high-resolution remotely-sensed and in situ atmospheric measurements of the boundary layer and lower atmosphere centered over the northeast coast of the Hampton Roads body of water in southeast Virginia. This region is adjacent to the confluence of the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean where often times, low-level jets (LLJs) are found in the boundary layer during summer months. An East Hampton Roads Aerosol Flux (EHRAF) campaign, was conducted from the campus of Hampton University (HU) to examine small-scale aerosol transport using aerosol, Raman, and Doppler lidars, as well as rawindsondes over a one-week period in May 2014 . LLJs were observed from evening of 20 May to the morning of 21 May, and were found to lead to cloud formation. In this paper, the cloud formation caused by LLJs is analyzed using data that includes high-resolution profiles of: aerosol backscatter, turbulence structure, temperature, wind speed and direction, and water vapor. It is found that enhanced nighttime turbulence triggered by LLJs causes the aerosol and water vapor content of boundary layer to be lifted up forming a well-mixed region. We show that this region contains the cloud condensation nuclei that are very important for the formation of clouds.

  8. Effect of interstitial low level laser therapy on tibial defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyeob; Ha, Myungjin; Hwang, Donghyun; Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    Tibial defect is very common musculoskeletal disorder which makes patient painful and uncomfortable. Many studies about bone regeneration tried to figure out fast bone healing on early phase. It is already known that low level laser therapy (LLLT) is very convenient and good for beginning of bone disorder. However, light scattering and absorption obstruct musculoskeletal therapy which need optimal photon energy delivery. This study has used an interstitial laser probe (ILP) to overcome the limitations of light penetration depth and scattering. Animals (mouse, C57BL/6) were divided into three groups: laser treated test group 1 (660 nm; power 10 mW; total energy 5 J) and test group 2 (660 nm; power 20 mW; total energy 10 J); and untreated control group. All animals were taken surgical operation to make tibial defect on right crest of tibia. The test groups were treated every 48 hours with ILP. Bone volume and X-ray attenuation coefficient were measured on 0, 14th and 28th day with u-CT after treatment and were used to evaluate effect of LLLT. Results show that bone volume of test groups has been improved more than control group. X-ray attenuation coefficients of each groups have slightly different. The results suggest that LLLT combined with ILP may affect on early phase of bone regeneration and may be used in various musculoskeletal disease in deep tissue layer.

  9. Low-level laser therapy for Peyronie's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Douglas E.; Bertini, John E. J.; Harris, James M.; Hawkins, Janet H.

    1995-05-01

    We are reporting the preliminary results of a nonrandomized trial using a low-level gallium- aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) laser at a wavelength of 830 nm (Microlight 830, Lasermedics, Inc., Stafford, TX) to treat patients with symptomatic Peyronie's disease. All patients entered into the study had disease consisting of a well-defined fibrous plaque causing pain and/or curvature of the penile shaft on erection that interfered with satisfactory sexual intercourse. Treatment has consisted of 30 mW administered over a duty cycle of 100 seconds (3 J) beginning at the base of the penis and extending to the coronal sulcus over the dorsum of the penis at 0.5 cm intervals. An additional duty cycle of 100 seconds was delivered to each 0.5 cm of palpable plaque. The ability of the therapy to reduce the size of the fibrous plaque, the severity of the penile curvature, and the severity of pain associated with penile erection and the treatment's effect on the patient's quality of life were assessed for each patient at completion of therapy and 6 weeks later.

  10. Ultra-low level radon assays in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin Ran

    2015-08-17

    The SuperNEMO experiment aims to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νβ β) to T{sub 1{sub /{sub 2}}}(0ν) > 10{sup 26} years, this corresponds to an effective neutrino mass of 50-100 meV. The extremely rare event rate means the minimisation of background is of critical concern. The stringent strategy instigated to ensure detector radiopurity is outlined here for all construction materials. In particular the large R&D programme undertaken to reach the challengingly low level of radon, < 0.15 mBq/m{sup 3}, required inside the SuperNEMO gaseous tracker will be detailed. This includes an experiment designed to measure radon diffusion through various materials. A “Radon Concentration Line” (RnCL) was developed to be used in conjunction with a state-of-the-art radon detector in order to achieve world leading sensitivity to {sup 222}Rn content in large gas volumes at the level of a few µBq/m{sup 3}. A radon purification system was developed and installed which has demonstrated radon suppression by several orders of magnitude depending on the carrier gas. This apparatus has now been commissioned and measurements of cylindered gas have been made to confirm radon suppression by a factor 20 when using nitrogen as the carrier gas. The results from measurements of radon content in various gases, used inside SuperNEMO, using the RnCL will be presented.

  11. Low level laser therapy for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiuhe; Huang, Ying-Ying; Dhital, Saphala; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Whalen, Michael J.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    Low level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) has been clinically applied for many indications in medicine that require the following processes: protection from cell and tissue death, stimulation of healing and repair of injuries, and reduction of pain, swelling and inflammation. One area that is attracting growing interest is the use of transcranial LLLT to treat stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The fact that near-infrared light can penetrate into the brain would allow non-invasive treatment to be carried out with a low likelihood of treatment-related adverse events. LLLT may have beneficial effects in the acute treatment of brain damage injury by increasing respiration in the mitochondria, causing activation of transcription factors, reducing key inflammatory mediators, and inhibiting apoptosis. We tested LLLT in a mouse model of TBI produced by a controlled weight drop onto the skull. Mice received a single treatment with 660-nm, 810-nm or 980-nm laser (36 J/cm2) four hours post-injury and were followed up by neurological performance testing for 4 weeks. Mice with moderate to severe TBI treated with 660- nm and 810-nm laser had a significant improvement in neurological score over the course of the follow-up and histological examination of the brains at sacrifice revealed less lesion area compared to untreated controls. Further studies are underway.

  12. Noninvasive low-level laser therapy for thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Dong, Tingting; Li, Peiyu; Wu, Mei X

    2016-07-27

    Thrombocytopenia is a common hematologic disorder that is managed primarily by platelet transfusions. We report here that noninvasive whole-body illumination with a special near-infrared laser cures acute thrombocytopenia triggered by γ-irradiation within 2 weeks in mice, as opposed to a 5-week recovery time required in controls. The low-level laser (LLL) also greatly accelerated platelet regeneration in the presence of anti-CD41 antibody that binds and depletes platelets, and prevented a severe drop in platelet count caused by a common chemotherapeutic drug. Mechanistically, LLL stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis specifically in megakaryocytes owing to polyploidy of the cells. LLL also protected megakaryocytes from mitochondrial injury and apoptosis under stress. The multifaceted effects of LLL on mitochondria bolstered megakaryocyte maturation; facilitated elongation, branching, and formation of proplatelets; and doubled the number of platelets generated from individual megakaryocytes in mice. LLL-mediated platelet biogenesis depended on megakaryopoiesis and was inversely correlated with platelet counts, which kept platelet biogenesis in check and effectively averted thrombosis even after repeated uses, in sharp contrast to all current agents that stimulate the differentiation of megakaryocyte progenitors from hematopoietic stem cells independently of platelet counts. This safe, drug-free, donor-independent modality represents a paradigm shift in the prophylaxis and treatment of thrombocytopenia. PMID:27464749

  13. Mixed low-level waste minimization at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, T.P.

    1998-12-01

    During the first six months of University of California 98 Fiscal Year (July--December) Los Alamos National Laboratory has achieved a 57% reduction in mixed low-level waste generation. This has been accomplished through a systems approach that identified and minimized the largest MLLW streams. These included surface-contaminated lead, lead-lined gloveboxes, printed circuit boards, and activated fluorescent lamps. Specific waste minimization projects have been initiated to address these streams. In addition, several chemical processing equipment upgrades are being implemented. Use of contaminated lead is planned for several high energy proton beam stop applications and stainless steel encapsulated lead is being evaluated for other radiological control area applications. INEEL is assisting Los Alamos with a complete systems analysis of analytical chemistry derived mixed wastes at the CMR building and with a minimum life-cycle cost standard glovebox design. Funding for waste minimization upgrades has come from several sources: generator programs, waste management, the generator set-aside program, and Defense Programs funding to INEEL.

  14. Low-level laser therapy and invisible removal aligners.

    PubMed

    Caccianiga, G; Crestale, C; Cozzani, M; Piras, A; Mutinelli, S; Lo Giudice, A; Cordasco, G

    2016-01-01

    It seems that Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) stimulates orthodontic tooth movements, increasing the alveolar bone turnover. The aim of this study is to evaluate how LLLT can influence the orthodontic treatment with invisible removal aligner. A sample of 21 subjects was divided into two groups, a laser group (10 patients) and a control group (11 patients). All subjects were instructed to wear each aligner 12 hours a day for 2 weeks. Laser external bio-stimulation was given in the laser group every second week. The laser group successfully finished the treatment, while at 3rd – 5th aligner the control group did not finish the treatment. Laser treatment seemed to be better than treatment without laser. LLLT combined with aligners is able to favour, in 12 hours, the same tooth movement obtained by wearing the aligner 22 hours a day, according to the traditional protocol. This aspect could be useful for those patients who prefer not to use the aligners during the day. LLLT makes invisible removal aligner treatment more comfortable also because during the day the patients have to wear the aligners less hours than the treatment without laser. PMID:27469556

  15. Integrated software system for low level waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Worku, G.

    1995-12-31

    In the continually changing and uncertain world of low level waste management, many generators in the US are faced with the prospect of having to store their waste on site for the indefinite future. This consequently increases the set of tasks performed by the generators in the areas of packaging, characterizing, classifying, screening (if a set of acceptance criteria applies), and managing the inventory for the duration of onsite storage. When disposal sites become available, it is expected that the work will require re-evaluating the waste packages, including possible re-processing, re-packaging, or re-classifying in preparation for shipment for disposal under the regulatory requirements of the time. In this day and age, when there is wide use of computers and computer literacy is at high levels, an important waste management tool would be an integrated software system that aids waste management personnel in conducting these tasks quickly and accurately. It has become evident that such an integrated radwaste management software system offers great benefits to radwaste generators both in the US and other countries. This paper discusses one such approach to integrated radwaste management utilizing some globally accepted radiological assessment software applications.

  16. Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, R.

    1992-06-30

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

  17. Low-level luminescence as a method of detecting the UV influence on biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Wei-Ping; Popp, Fritz A.

    1995-02-01

    It is well known that low-level luminescence is correlated to many physiological and biological parameters, e.g. cell cycle, temperature, oxidation- and UV-stress. We report some new approaches on low-level luminescence measurements and UV influence on different biological systems. One example concerns yeast cultures, which show an increasing intensity of luminescence after UV-treatment with a maximum after 1.5 h. Investigations on normal human fibroblasts and keratinocytes display different longtime kinetics: The former show no changes of the luminescence in time, the latter an increase that reaches the maximum after 9 h. The time-dependent spectral measurement on xeroderma pigmentosum after UV-treatment displays a time-shift of the action-spectra shifting the maximum from 400 nm to 420 nm in 12 h. Some results on neutrophils reveals spectral UV influence on respiratory burst and the cellular repair system. The results on human skin display spectral changes of low-level luminescence after UV-treatment. These results provide a useful tool of analyzing UV influence on human skin.

  18. Expression of fas protein on CD4+T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on the Expression of Fas protein on CD4+ T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne laser in the cases of psoriasis. Methods:the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was determined in the casee of psoriasis(n=5) pre and post-low level laser irradiation(30 min、60min and 120min)by flow cytometry as compared withthe control(n=5). Results:In the cases of psoriasis,the expression of CD4+T FAS protein 21.4+/-3.1% was increased significantly than that of control group 16.8+/-2.1% pre-irradiation, p<0.05in the control,there is no difference between pre and post- irradiation,p>0.05in the cases , the expression of CD4+T Fas protein wae positively corelated to the irradiation times, when the energy density arrived to 22.92J/cm2(60 minutes)and 45.84J/cm2(120minutes), the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was increased significantly as compared with pre-irradiation,p<0.05.Conclusion: The expression of CD4+T Fas protein may be increased by low level He-Ne laser irradiation ,the uncontrolled status of apoptosis could be corrected.

  19. Low-level awareness accompanies "unconscious" high-level processing during continuous flash suppression.

    PubMed

    Gelbard-Sagiv, Hagar; Faivre, Nathan; Mudrik, Liad; Koch, Christof

    2016-01-01

    The scope and limits of unconscious processing are a matter of ongoing debate. Lately, continuous flash suppression (CFS), a technique for suppressing visual stimuli, has been widely used to demonstrate surprisingly high-level processing of invisible stimuli. Yet, recent studies showed that CFS might actually allow low-level features of the stimulus to escape suppression and be consciously perceived. The influence of such low-level awareness on high-level processing might easily go unnoticed, as studies usually only probe the visibility of the feature of interest, and not that of lower-level features. For instance, face identity is held to be processed unconsciously since subjects who fail to judge the identity of suppressed faces still show identity priming effects. Here we challenge these results, showing that such high-level priming effects are indeed induced by faces whose identity is invisible, but critically, only when a lower-level feature, such as color or location, is visible. No evidence for identity processing was found when subjects had no conscious access to any feature of the suppressed face. These results suggest that high-level processing of an image might be enabled by-or co-occur with-conscious access to some of its low-level features, even when these features are not relevant to the processed dimension. Accordingly, they call for further investigation of lower-level awareness during CFS, and reevaluation of other unconscious high-level processing findings. PMID:26756173

  20. ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

  1. Fat liquefaction: effect of low-level laser energy on adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, José; Ramirez, Hugo; Ortiz, Clara Lucía; Solarte, Efrain; Sequeda, Federico; Gutierrez, Maria Isabel

    2002-09-01

    Low-level laser energy has been increasingly used in the treatment of a broad range of conditions and has improved wound healing, reduced edema, and relieved pain of various etiologies. This study examined whether 635-nm low-level lasers had an effect on adipose tissue in vivo and the procedural implementation of lipoplasty/liposuction techniques. The experiment investigated the effect of 635-nm, 10-mW diode laser radiation with exclusive energy dispersing optics. Total energy values of 1.2 J/cm(2), 2.4 J/cm(2), and 3.6 J/cm(2) were applied on human adipose tissue taken from lipectomy samples of 12 healthy women. The tissue samples were irradiated for 0, 2, 4, and 6 minutes with and without tumescent solution and were studied using the protocols of transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Nonirradiated tissue samples were taken for reference. More than 180 images were recorded and professionally evaluated. All microscopic results showed that without laser exposure the normal adipose tissue appeared as a grape-shaped node. After 4 minutes of laser exposure, 80 percent of the fat was released from the adipose cells; at 6 minutes of laser exposure, 99 percent of the fat was released from the adipocyte. The released fat was collected in the interstitial space. Transmission electron microscopic images of the adipose tissue taken at x60,000 showed a transitory pore and complete deflation of the adipocytes. The low-level laser energy affected the adipose cell by causing a transitory pore in the cell membrane to open, which permitted the fat content to go from inside to outside the cell. The cells in the interstitial space and the capillaries remained intact. Low-level laser-assisted lipoplasty has a significant impact on the procedural implementation of lipoplasty techniques. PMID:12172159

  2. The impact of multiple low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations on response to ponatinib

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, David T. O.; Yeoman, Alexandra L.; Altamura, Haley K.; Jamison, Bronte A.; Field, Chani R.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Rivera, Victor M.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Branford, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) ponatinib shows activity against all common BCR-ABL1 single mutants, including the highly resistant BCR-ABL1-T315I mutant, improving outcome for patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, responses are variable, and causal baseline factors have not been well-studied. The type and number of low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations present after imatinib resistance has prognostic significance for subsequent treatment with nilotinib or dasatinib as second-line therapy. We therefore investigated the impact of low-level mutations detected by sensitive mass-spectrometry before ponatinib initiation (baseline) on treatment response in 363 TKI-resistant patients enrolled in the PONATINIB for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Evaluation and Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia trial, including 231 patients in chronic phase (CP-CML). Low-level mutations were detected in 53 patients (15%, including low-level T315I in 14 patients); most, however, did not undergo clonal expansion during ponatinib treatment and, moreover, no specific individual mutations were associated with inferior outcome. We demonstrate however, that the number of mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance is associated with response to ponatinib treatment and could be used to refine the therapeutic approach. Although CP-CML patients with T315I (63/231, 27%) had superior responses overall, those with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry (20, 32%) had substantially inferior responses compared with those with T315I as the sole mutation detected (43, 68%). In contrast, for CP-CML patients without T315I, the inferior responses previously observed with nilotinib/dasatinib therapy for imatinib-resistant patients with multiple mutations were not seen with ponatinib treatment, suggesting that ponatinib may prove to be particularly advantageous for patients with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance

  3. Low-Level Environmental Phthalate Exposure Associates with Urine Metabolome Alteration in a Chinese Male Cohort.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Liangpo; Wang, Xiaofei; Huang, Qingyu; Tian, Meiping; Shen, Heqing

    2016-06-01

    The general population is exposed to phthalates through various sources and routes. Integration of omics data and epidemiological data is a key step toward directly linking phthalate biomonitoring data with biological response. Urine metabolomics is a powerful tool to identify exposure biomarkers and delineate the modes of action of environmental stressors. The objectives of this study are to investigate the association between low-level environmental phthalate exposure and urine metabolome alteration in male population, and to unveil the metabolic pathways involved in the mechanisms of phthalate toxicity. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, we studied the urine metabolomic profiles of 364 male subjects exposed to low-level environmental phthalates. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) are the most widely used phthalates. ∑DEHP and MBP (the major metabolite of DBP) were associated with significant alteration of global urine metabolome in the male population. We observed significant increase in the levels of acetylneuraminic acid, carnitine C8:1, carnitine C18:0, cystine, phenylglycine, phenylpyruvic acid and glutamylphenylalanine; and meanwhile, decrease in the levels of carnitine C16:2, diacetylspermine, alanine, taurine, tryptophan, ornithine, methylglutaconic acid, hydroxyl-PEG2 and keto-PGE2 in high exposure group. The observations indicated that low-level environmental phthalate exposure associated with increased oxidative stress and fatty acid oxidation and decreased prostaglandin metabolism. Urea cycle, tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism disruption was also observed. The urine metabolome disruption effects associated with ∑DEHP and MBP were similar, but not identical. The multibiomarker models presented AUC values of 0.845 and 0.834 for ∑DEHP and MBP, respectively. The predictive accuracy rates of established models were 81% for ΣDEHP and 73% for MBP. Our results suggest that low-level environmental phthalate

  4. Hydrogeologic factors in the selection of shallow land burial sites for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, John N.

    1986-01-01

    In the United States, low-level radioactive waste is disposed of by shallow land burial. Commercial low-level radioactive waste has been buried at six sites, and low-level radioactive waste generated by the Federal Government has been buried at nine major and several minor sites. Several existing low-level radioactive waste sites have not provided expected protection of the environment. These shortcomings are related, at least in part, to an inadequate understanding of site hydrogeology at the time the sites were selected. To better understand the natural systems and the effect of hydrogeologic factors on long-term site performance, the U.S. Geological Survey has conducted investigations at five of the six commercial low-level radioactive waste sites and at three Federal sites. These studies, combined with those of other Federal and State agencies, have identified and confirmed important hydrogeologic factors in the effective disposal of low-level radioactive waste by shallow land burial. These factors include precipitation, surface drainage, topography, site stability, geology, thickness of the host soil-rock horizon, soil and sediment permeability, soil and water chemistry, and depth to the water table.

  5. Annual Report for Gravity Collection Lysimeter Monitoring Plan – ERDF Cells 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Proctor

    2006-04-04

    The data and analyses contained in this report reflect the initial characterization of construction and consolidation water in Cells 5 and 6 lysimeters. Therefore, the scope of this report will be to establish constituent levels and document dewatering activities completed to date.

  6. Simulating Water Flow and Heat Transfer in Arid Soil Using Weighing Lysimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkema, Jelle; Koonce, Jeremy; Ghezzehei, Teamrat; Berli, Markus; van der Ploeg, Martine; (Rien) van Genuchten, Martinus

    2015-04-01

    Deserts cover about one third of the Earth's land surface. Rather little though is known about the physics of desert soils and their implications for the ecology and hydrology of arid environments. The recently constructed weighing lysimeters located in Boulder City, Nevada, were designed to improve our understanding of the physical processes and properties of arid soils at the meter scale. In this study, we developed a HYDRUS-1D model to simulate water infiltration, hydraulic redistribution, and heat transfer for one of the lysimeters. HYDRUS-1D solves the coupled equations for water flow and heat transfer in variably saturated soil. Soil hydraulic and thermal properties were initialized based on prior knowledge and characterizations of the lysimeter soil. Soil hydraulic and thermal parameters were further refined by inverse simulation using a subset of the soil water content, water potential and temperature measurements at various depths. The model was validated using a separate portion of the soil moisture and temperature data set that was not used for calibration. The calibrated model provides a tool to virtually test future experiments in the lysimeters such as changes in the irrigation regime or the incorporation of plants. The model will also help to assess the impact of the placement of physical structures (such as solar panels) on the water and heat balance of desert soils.

  7. In situ sensors, weighing lysimeters and COSMOS under vegetated and bare conditions with subsurface drip irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term weighing lysimeter records may have utility for assessment of climate changes occurring during the period of record. They typically enclose a depth of soil that exceeds the root zone of vegetation normally grown on them and have drainagy systems so that more or less natural hydrologic flux...

  8. Annual Report for Gravity Collection Lysimeter Monitoring Plan - ERDF Cells 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    W. E. Remsen

    2006-12-19

    The data and analyses contained in this report reflect the initial characterization of construction and consolidation water in Cells 5 and 6 lysimeters. Therefore, the scope of this report will be to establish constituent levels and document dewatering activities completed to date.

  9. Effects of biochar addition to soil on nitrogen fluxes in a winter wheat lysimeter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüppi, Roman; Leifeld, Jens; Neftel, Albrecht; Conen, Franz; Six, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich, porous residue from pyrolysis of biomass that potentially increases crop yields by reducing losses of nitrogen from soils and/or enhancing the uptake of applied fertiliser by the crops. Previous research is scarce about biochar's ability to increase wheat yields in temperate soils or how it changes nitrogen dynamics in the field. In a lysimeter system with two different soils (sandy/silt loam) nitrogen fluxes were traced by isotopic 15N enriched fertiliser to identify changes in nitrous oxide emissions, leaching and plant uptake after biochar addition. 20t/ha woodchip-waste biochar (pH=13) was applied to these soils in four lysimeters per soil type; the same number of lysimeters served as a control. The soils were cropped with winter wheat during the season 2012/2013. 170 kg-N/ha ammonium nitrate fertiliser with 10% 15N was applied in 3 events during the growing season and 15N concentrations where measured at different points in time in plant, soil, leachate and emitted nitrous oxide. After one year the lysimeter system showed no difference between biochar and control treatment in grain- and straw yield or nitrogen uptake. However biochar did reduce nitrous oxide emissions in the silt loam and losses of nitrate leaching in sandy loam. This study indicates potential reduction of nitrogen loss from cropland soil by biochar application but could not confirm increased yields in an intensive wheat production system.

  10. An Integrated Lysimeter and Satellite Imagery Approach for Estimating Crop Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorahoo, D.; Cassel-Sharma, F.; Johnson, L.; Melton, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate estimation of crop water requirement (CWR) is essential for the implementation efficient irrigation schedules in an effort to optimize water use efficiency. This is particularly important in the central San Joaquin Valley (SJV), California, USA, where severe droughts have accentuated the need to conserve water and improve on-farm water management. In the current study, we adopt an integrated approach for estimation of crop evapotranspiration (ETc) involving the use of weighing lysimeters and satellite imagery. In the first phase of the study with the crop lysimeter, conducted on a clay loam soil with processing tomatoes grown under sub-surface drip irrigation, observations of crop ground cover were conducted weekly and evapotranspiration (ET) data were collected daily to derive relationships between crop coefficients and fractional cover. Data collected during the first year of the study, indicted that the crop coefficients (Kc) obtained at peak season were relatively higher than those generally reported for tomatoes commonly grown in the central SJV. Overall, there was a good correlation between fractional cover and crop coefficients (r2 = 0.91), with the average peak ET and Kc values ranging from 6 to 7 mm per day and from 0.8 to 0.9, respectively. Data obtained from satellite imagery, representing relatively larger spatial measurements than the lysimeters, are being compared with the surface observations from the lysimeters and will also be discussed in our presentation.

  11. Wound healing stimulation in mice by low-level light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidova, Tatiana N.; Herman, Ira M.; Salomatina, Elena V.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2006-02-01

    It has been known for many years that low levels of laser or non-coherent light (LLLT) accelerate some phases of wound healing. LLLT can stimulate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and migration. It is thought to work via light absorption by mitochondrial chromophores leading to an increase in ATP, reactive oxygen species and consequent gene transcription. However, despite many reports about the positive effects of LLLT on wound healing, its use remains controversial. Our laboratory has developed a model of a full thickness excisional wound in mice that allows quantitative and reproducible light dose healing response curves to be generated. We have found a biphasic dose response curve with a maximum positive effect at 2 J/cm2 of 635-nm light and successively lower beneficial effects from 3-25 J/cm2, the effect is diminished at doses below 2J/cm2 and gradually reaches control healing levels. At light doses above 25 J/cm2 healing is actually worse than controls. The two most effective wavelengths of light were found to be 635 and 820-nm. We found no difference between filtered 635+/-15-nm light from a lamp and 633-nm light from a HeNe laser. The strain and age of the mouse affected the magnitude of the effect. Light treated wounds start to contract after illumination while control wounds initially expand for the first 24 hours. Our hypothesis is that a single brief light exposure soon after wounding affects fibroblast cells in the margins of the wound. Cells may be induced to proliferate, migrate and assume a myofibroblast phenotype. Our future work will be focused on understanding the mechanisms underlying effects of light on wound healing processes.

  12. Melatonin protection from chronic, low-level ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Russel J; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Ma, Shuran; Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun-Xian

    2011-12-15

    In the current survey, we summarize the published literature which supports the use of melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, as a protective agent against chronic, low-level ionizing radiation. Under in vitro conditions, melatonin uniformly was found to protect cellular DNA and plasmid super coiled DNA from ionizing radiation damage due to Cs(137) or X-radiation exposure. Likewise, in an in vivo/in vitro study in which humans were given melatonin orally and then their blood lymphocytes were collected and exposed to Cs(137) ionizing radiation, nuclear DNA from the cells of those individuals who consumed melatonin (and had elevated blood levels) was less damaged than that from control individuals. In in vivo studies as well, melatonin given to animals prevented DNA and lipid damage (including limiting membrane rigidity) and reduced the percentage of animals that died when they had been exposed to Cs(137) or Co(60) radiation. Melatonin's ability to protect macromolecules from the damage inflicted by ionizing radiation likely stems from its high efficacy as a direct free radical scavenger and possibly also due to its ability to stimulate antioxidative enzymes. Melatonin is readily absorbed when taken orally or via any other route. Melatonin's ease of self administration and its virtual absence of toxicity or side effects, even when consumed over very long periods of time, are essential when large populations are exposed to lingering radioactive contamination such as occurs as a result of an inadvertent nuclear accident, an intentional nuclear explosion or the detonation of a radiological dispersion device, i.e., a "dirty" bomb. PMID:22185900

  13. Asthma and low level air pollution in Helsinki

    SciTech Connect

    Poenkae A5 )

    1991-09-01

    The effects of relatively low levels of air pollution and weather conditions on the number of patients who had asthma attacks and who were admitted to a hospital were studied in Helsinki during a 3-y period. The number of admissions increased during cold weather (n = 4,209), especially among persons who were of working age but not among children. Even after standardization for temperature, all admissions, including emergency ward admissions, were significantly correlated with ambient air concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and total suspended particulates (TSP). Regression analysis revealed that NO and O3 were most strongly associated with asthma problems. Effects of air pollutants and cold were maximal if they occurred on the same day, except for O3, which had a more pronounced effect after a 1-d lag. The associations between pollutants, low temperature, and admissions were most significant among adults of working age, followed by the elderly. Among children, only O3 and NO were significantly correlated with admissions. Levels of pollutants were fairly low, the long-term mean being 19.2 micrograms/m3 for SO2, 38.6 micrograms/m3 for NO2, 22.0 micrograms/m3 or O3, and 1.3 mg/m3 for CO. In contrast, the mean concentration of TSP was high (76.3 micrograms/m3), and the mean temperature was low (+ 4.7 degrees C). These results suggest that concentrations of pollutants lower than those given as guidelines in many countries may increase the incidence of asthma attacks.

  14. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr

    1996-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates in 10 CFR 61 that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. To provide guidance to disposal vendors and nuclear station waste generators for implementing those requirements, the NRC developed the Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1. That document details a specified set of recommended testing procedures and criteria, including several tests for determining the biodegradation properties of waste forms. Information has been presented by a number of researchers, which indicated that those tests may be inappropriate for examining microbial degradation of cement-solidified LLW. Cement has been widely used to solidify LLW; however, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. The purpose of this research program was to develop modified microbial degradation test procedures that would be more appropriate than the existing procedures for evaluation of the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. The procedures that have been developed in this work are presented and discussed. Groups of microorganisms indigenous to LLW disposal sites were employed that can metabolically convert organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this final report. Data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW and subsequent release of radionuclides developed during this study are presented.

  15. The Dose That Works: Low Level Laser Treatment of Tendinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; McDonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.; David Baxter, G.

    2010-05-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is used in the treatment of tendon injuries. However, the clinical effectiveness of this modality remains controversial with limited agreement on the most efficacious dosage and parameter choices. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy and the validity of current dosage recommendations for treatment. Method: Medical databases were searched from inception to 1st August 2008. Controlled clinical trials evaluating LLLT as a primary intervention for any tendinopathy were included in the review. Methodological quality was classified using the PEDro scale. Appropriateness of treatment parameters were assessed using established guidelines. Results: Twenty five trials met the inclusion criteria. There was conflicting findings from multiple trials: 12 showed positive effects and 13 were inconclusive or showed no effect. Dosages used in the 12 positive studies support the existence of an effective dosage window that closely resembled current guidelines. Where pooling of data was possible, LLLT showed a positive effect size; in high quality studies of lateral epicondylitis, participants' grip strength was 9.59 Kg higher than the control group; for participants with Achilles tendinopathy, the effect was 13.6 mm less pain on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Conclusion: This study found conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy. However, an effective dosage window emerged showing benefit in the treatment of tendinopathy. Strong evidence exists from the 12 positive studies that positive outcomes are associated with the use of current dosage recommendations for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  16. In vitro transdentinal effect of low-level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C. F.; Basso, F. G.; dos Reis, R. I.; Parreiras-e-Silva, L. T.; Lins, E. C.; Kurachi, C.; Hebling, J.; Bagnato, V. S.; de Souza Costa, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used for the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity. However, the specific LLL dose and the response mechanisms of these cells to transdentinal irradiation have not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, this study evaluated the transdentinal effects of different LLL doses on stressed odontoblast-like pulp cells MDPC-23 seeded onto the pulpal side of dentin discs obtained from human third molars. The discs were placed in devices simulating in vitro pulp chambers and the whole set was placed in 24-well plates containing plain culture medium (DMEM). After 24 h incubation, the culture medium was replaced by fresh DMEM supplemented with either 5% (simulating a nutritional stress condition) or 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). The cells were irradiated with doses of 15 and 25 J cm-2 every 24 h, totaling three applications over three consecutive days. The cells in the control groups were removed from the incubator for the same times as used in their respective experimental groups for irradiation, though without activating the laser source (sham irradiation). After 72 h of the last active or sham irradiation, the cells were evaluated with respect to succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme production (MTT assay), total protein (TP) expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) synthesis, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for collagen type 1 (Col-I) and ALP, and morphology (SEM). For both tests, significantly higher values were obtained for the 25 J cm-2 dose. Regarding SDH production, supplementation of the culture medium with 5% FBS provided better results. For TP and ALP expression, the 25 J cm-2 presented higher values, especially for the 5% FBS concentration (Mann-Whitney p < 0.05). Under the tested conditions, near infrared laser irradiation at 25 J cm-2 caused transdentinal biostimulation of odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells.

  17. The effect of low level laser on anaplastic thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Moon, Jeon-Hwan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2015-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-thermal phototherapy used in several medical applications, including wound healing, reduction of pain and amelioration of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, the effects of LLLT upon cancer or dysplastic cells have been so far poorly studied. Here we report that the effects of laser irradiation on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells leads to hyperplasia. 650nm of laser diode was performed with a different time interval (0, 15, 30, 60J/cm2 , 25mW) on anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line FRO in vivo. FRO was orthotopically injected into the thyroid gland of nude mice and the irradiation was performed with the same method described previously. After irradiation, the xenograft evaluation was followed for one month. The thyroid tissues from sacrificed mice were undergone to H&E staining and immunohistochemical staining with HIF-1α, Akt, TGF-β1. We found the aggressive proliferation of FRO on thyroid gland with dose dependent. In case of 60 J/ cm2 of energy density, the necrotic bodies were found in a center of the thyroid. The phosphorylation of HIF-1α and Akt was detected in the thyroid gland, which explained the survival signaling of anaplastic cancer cell was turned on the thyroid gland. Furthermore, TGF-β1 expression was decreased after irradiation. In this study, we demonstrated that insufficient energy density irradiation occurred the decreasing of TGF-β1 which corresponding to the phosphorylation of Akt/ HIF-1α. This aggressive proliferation resulted to the hypoxic condition of tissue for angiogenesis. We suggest that LLLT may influence to cancer aggressiveness associated with a decrease in TGF-β1 and increase in Akt/HIF-1α.

  18. The low-level radioactivity ocean sediment standard reference material

    SciTech Connect

    Inn, K.G.W.; Lin, Z.; Liggett, W.S.; Krey, P.W.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past decades, on the order of 10{sup 15} Becquerel nuclear waste have been stored in the oceans. Potential contamination of the oceans from leaking nuclear waste has caused world wide concern. Currently, early warning of ocean contamination near the waste dumping sites rely on monitoring systems being set up by different countries and agencies. Because the determination of low-level radioactivity in ocean sediment is a difficult technical task, a basis for measurement quality assurance, methods verification, and data comparability is needed. The recently certified NIST ocean sediment Standard Reference Material (SRM-4355) is a composite of 1% contaminated Irish Sea sediment and 99% of Chesapeake Bay sediment by weight. The sediments were blended, pulverized to a median particle size of 8 {mu}m, and reblended to achieve acceptable sample homogeneity. A statistical assessment of the intercomparison results from 19 laboratories has shown the material to be homogeneous down to 10 grams. The certified radionuclide concentration range from 0.4 to 230 mBq/g. A variety of radiochemical procedures and detection techniques have been used in the measurements to minimize possible systematic bias. Twelve radionuclides including {sup 40}K, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 232}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup (239+240)}Pu were certified. The mean values were reported for an additional 10 uncertified radionuclides: {sup 129}I, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 210}Po, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 212}Pb, {sup 214}Pb, {sup 214}Bi, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 241}Am. The standard reference material in unit quantities of about 100 gram each will be available by the end of 1995.

  19. Low-Level Waste Drum Assay Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Greutzmacher, K.; Kuzminski, J.; Myers, S. C.

    2003-02-26

    Nuclear waste assay is an integral element of programs such as safeguards, waste management, and waste disposal. The majority of nuclear waste is packaged in drums and analyzed by various nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques to identify and quantify the radioactive content. Due to various regulations and the public interest in nuclear issues, the analytical results are required to be of high quality and supported by a rigorous Quality Assurance (QA) program. A valuable QA tool is an intercomparison program in which a known sample is analyzed by a number of different facilities. While transuranic waste (TRU) certified NDA teams are evaluated through the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP), low-level waste (LLW) assay specialists have not been afforded a similar opportunity. NDA specialists from throughout the DOE complex were invited to participate in this voluntary drum assay intercomparison study that was organized and facilitated by the Solid Waste Operations and the Safeguards Science and Technology groups at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and by Eberline Services. Each participating NDA team performed six replicate blind measurements of two 55-gallon drums with relatively low-density matrices (a 19.1 kg shredded paper matrix and a 54.4 kg mixed metal, rubber, paper and plastic matrix). This paper presents the results from this study, with an emphasis on discussing the lessons learned as well as desirable follow up programs for the future. The results will discuss the accuracy and precision of the replicate measurements for each NDA team as well as any issues that arose during the effort.

  20. The role of nitric oxide in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    2008-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. Firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. This review will focus on the role of nitric oxide in the cellular and tissue effects of LLLT. Red and near-IR light is primarily absorbed by cytochrome c oxidase (unit four in the mitochondrial respiratory chain). Nitric oxide produced in the mitochondria can inhibit respiration by binding to cytochrome c oxidase and competitively displacing oxygen, especially in stressed or hypoxic cells. If light absorption displaced the nitric oxide and thus allowed the cytochrome c oxidase to recover and cellular respiration to resume, this would explain many of the observations made in LLLT. Why the effect is only seen in hypoxic, stressed or damaged cells or tissues? How the effects can keep working for some time (hours or days) postillumination? Why increased NO concentrations are sometimes measured in cell culture or in animals? How blood flow can be increased? Why angiogenesis is sometimes increased after LLLT in vivo?

  1. The Dose That Works: Low Level Laser Treatment of Tendinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; David Baxter, G.; McDonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.

    2010-05-31

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is used in the treatment of tendon injuries. However, the clinical effectiveness of this modality remains controversial with limited agreement on the most efficacious dosage and parameter choices. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy and the validity of current dosage recommendations for treatment. Method: Medical databases were searched from inception to 1st August 2008. Controlled clinical trials evaluating LLLT as a primary intervention for any tendinopathy were included in the review. Methodological quality was classified using the PEDro scale. Appropriateness of treatment parameters were assessed using established guidelines. Results: Twenty five trials met the inclusion criteria. There was conflicting findings from multiple trials: 12 showed positive effects and 13 were inconclusive or showed no effect. Dosages used in the 12 positive studies support the existence of an effective dosage window that closely resembled current guidelines. Where pooling of data was possible, LLLT showed a positive effect size; in high quality studies of lateral epicondylitis, participants' grip strength was 9.59 Kg higher than the control group; for participants with Achilles tendinopathy, the effect was 13.6 mm less pain on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Conclusion: This study found conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy. However, an effective dosage window emerged showing benefit in the treatment of tendinopathy. Strong evidence exists from the 12 positive studies that positive outcomes are associated with the use of current dosage recommendations for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  2. Conditions necessary for low-level measurements of reactive oxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Nakareseisoon, S.

    1988-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide and ozone are considered to be the alternatives to chlorine for the disinfection of drinking water supplies and also for the treatment of wastewaters prior to discharge. Chlorine dioxide, under normal circumstances, is reduced to chlorite ion which is toxic. The recommended seven-day suggested no-adverse-response levels (SNARL's) of chlorite ion is 0.007 mg/l (7 ppb). Chlorite ion at these low levels cannot be satisfactorily determined by existing methods, and so, it became necessary to develop an analytical method for determining ppb levels of chlorite ion. Such a method can be developed using differential pulse polarography (DPP). The electrochemical reduction of chlorite ion has been studied between pH 3.7-14 and in an ionic strength range of 0.05-3.0 M. The optimum conditions are pH 4.1-4.4 and an ionic strength of 0.45 M. The current under these conditions is a linear function of chlorite ion concentration ranging from 2.77 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} to 2.80 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M (19 ppb to 19 ppm). The imprecision is better than {plus minus} 1.0% and {plus minus} 3.4% at concentrations of 2.87 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M and 1.74 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M, respectively, with a detection limit of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M (7 ppb). The rate of ozone decomposition has been studied in highly basic solutions (8-15 NaOH), where ozone becomes stable. The mechanism of ozone regeneration was proposed to explain the observed kinetic and to clarify the contradiction concerning the very slow observed rate of ozone decomposition in basic solution.

  3. Behavior of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water using micro paddy lysimeters under different temperature conditions in spring and summer.

    PubMed

    Ok, Junghun; Doan, Nguyen Hai; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc; Boulange, Julien

    2012-08-01

    The behavior of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water was investigated using micro paddy lysimeters with prescribed hydrological conditions under ambient temperature in spring and summer for simulating two rice crop seasons. Although they were not significantly different, the dissipation of both herbicides in paddy water in the summer experiment was faster than in the spring experiment. The half-lives (DT(50)) in paddy water for spring and summer experiments were 3.2 and 2.5 days for butachlor, and 3.1 and 1.6 days for pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, respectively.

  4. Behavior of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water using micro paddy lysimeters under different temperature conditions in spring and summer.

    PubMed

    Ok, Junghun; Doan, Nguyen Hai; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc; Boulange, Julien

    2012-08-01

    The behavior of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water was investigated using micro paddy lysimeters with prescribed hydrological conditions under ambient temperature in spring and summer for simulating two rice crop seasons. Although they were not significantly different, the dissipation of both herbicides in paddy water in the summer experiment was faster than in the spring experiment. The half-lives (DT(50)) in paddy water for spring and summer experiments were 3.2 and 2.5 days for butachlor, and 3.1 and 1.6 days for pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, respectively. PMID:22696099

  5. Tracer breakthrough curves in a complex lysimeter system: evidence of non-stationary transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queloz, P.; Bertuzzo, E.; Botter, G.; Rao, P.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the outcomes of a lysimeter experiment aimed at the measurement of travel time distributions of water and certain nonreactive solutes under non-stationary conditions to examine the kinematics of age mixing. In order to simulate the release of a compound in a receiving water body, it is common in hydrology to attribute a travel time probability distribution to each particle, which reflects the response of a catchment unit to a solute input. Hence, the concentration measured at a control section becomes the convolution between the travel time distribution and the concentration of the inputs throughout the past. This study aims at experimentally demonstrating that the tracer travel time probability distribution is, in fact, strongly dependent on the antecedent conditions at the time of tracer injection and the subsequent states experienced in the system. It is therefore a function of numerous transient processes such as hydrologic filtering in soils, climatic forcing or evapotranspiration patterns. A 2-meter deep weighing lysimeter was equipped with a discharge measurement system coupled with a sample collector, an array of water content sensors and an array of porous cups for soil water sampling at three different depths. Controlled random rainfall following a Poisson process was generated, and evapotranspiration losses from two willow trees planted in the lysimeter created an important soil-water storage deficit. Five species of fluorobenzoic acids were used as tracers, and sequentially injected through rainfall at different times. The measurement system installed allowed a precise and accurate monitoring of every input and output flux and water storage, which is crucial to determine the conditions influencing the travel time distribution and to calculate the mass loads and recovery rates. Breakthrough curves for multiple tracers measured at several depths within the lysimeter and at the lysimeter outlet provide support for non-stationary tracer travel

  6. Special waste-form lysimeters - arid: 1984--1992 data summary and preliminary interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.L.; Serne, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    A lysimeter facility constructed at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State has been used since 1984 to monitor the leaching of buried waste forms under natural conditions. The facility is generating data that are useful in evaluating source-term models used in radioactive waste transport analyses. The facility includes ten bare-soil lysimeters (183 cm diameter by 305 cm depth) containing buried waste forms generated at nuclear reactors in the United States and solidified with Portland M cement, masonry cement, bitumen, and vinyl-ester styrene. The waste forms contained in the lysimeters have been leached under natural, semiarid conditions. In spite of the semiarid conditions, from 1984 through 1992, an average of 45 cm of water leached through the lysimeters, representing 27% of area precipitation. Leachate samples have been routinely collected and analyzed for radionuclide and chemical content. To date, tritium, cobalt-60, and cesium-137 have been identified in the lysimeter leachate samples. From 1984 through 1992, over 4000 {mu}Ci of tritium, representing 76 and 71 % of inventory (not decay corrected), have been leached from the two waste forms containing tritium. Cobalt-60 has been found in the leachate from all six of the waste forms that originally contained > 1 mCi of inventory. The leached amounts of cobalt-60 represent < 0.1 % of original cobalt inventories. Mobile cobalt is believed to be chelated with organic compounds, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), that are present in the waste. Trace amounts of cesium-137 have occasionally been identified in leachate from two waste forms since 1991. Qualitatively, the field leaching results confirm laboratory studies suggesting that tritium is readily leached from cement, and that cobalt-60 is generally leached more easily from cement than from vinyl-ester styrene.

  7. Model Evaluation for Low-Level Cloud Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, S.-H.

    2012-04-01

    , we give a courteous answer to the question of whether low-level clouds act as a positive or negative feedback to climate change.

  8. Cellular chromophores and signaling in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.

    2007-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light (LLLT) for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Originally thought to be a peculiar property of laser light (soft or cold lasers), the subject has now broadened to include photobiomodulation and photobiostimulation using non-coherent light. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. This likely is due to two main reasons; firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. In recent years major advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms that operate at the cellular and tissue levels during LLLT. Mitochondria are thought to be the main site for the initial effects of light and specifically cytochrome c oxidase that has absorption peaks in the red and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum matches the action spectra of LLLT effects. The discovery that cells employ nitric oxide (NO) synthesized in the mitochondria by neuronal nitric oxide synthase, to regulate respiration by competitive binding to the oxygen binding of cytochrome c oxidase, now suggests how LLLT can affect cell metabolism. If LLLT photodissociates inhibitory NO from cytochrome c oxidase, this would explain increased ATP production, modulation of reactive oxygen species, reduction and prevention of apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, increase of blood flow and induction of transcription factors. In

  9. SECONDARY LOW-LEVEL WASTE GENERATION RATE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D. LaRue

    1999-05-10

    The objective of this design analysis is -to update the assessment of estimated annual secondary low-level waste (LLW) generation rates resulting from the repackaging of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) for disposal at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis supports the preparation of documentation necessary for license application (LA) for the MGR. For the purposes of this analysis, secondary LLW is defined, in brief terms, as LLW generated as a direct result of processing SNF/HLW through the receiving and repackaging operations. The current Waste Handling Building (WHB) design is based on the predominant movement of fuel assemblies through the wet handling lines within the WHB. Dry handling lines are also included in the current WHB design to accommodate canistered waste (i.e., SNF and/or HLW packages). Major input changes to this analysis in comparison to previous analyses include: (1) changes in the SNF/HLW arrival schedules; (2) changes to the WHB and the Waste Treatment Building (WTB) dimensions; and (3) changes in operational staff sizes within the WHB and WTB. The rates generated in this analysis can be utilized to define necessary waste processes, waste flow rates, and equipment sizes for the processing of secondary LLW for proper disposal. This analysis is based on the present reference design, i.e., Viability Assessment (VA) design, and present projections on spent fuel delivery and processing. LLW generation rates, for both liquids and solids, are a direct function of square footages in radiological areas, and a direct function of spent fuel throughput. Future changes in the approved reference design or spent fuel throughput will directly impact the LLW generation rates defined in this analysis. Small amounts of wastes other than LLW may be generated on a non-routine basis. These wastes may include transuranic (TRU), hazardous, and mixed wastes. Although the objective of this analysis is to define LLW waste generation

  10. Peat: a natural repository for low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1985-12-01

    A study has been initiated to evaluate the possibility of using peat as a natural repository for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste. One aspect of this study was to determine the retentive properties of the peat through measurements of the distribution coefficients (K/sub d/) for Am-241, Ru-106, Cs-137, Co-57, and Sr-85 in two layers of mountain top peat bogs from Lefgren's, NY, and Spruce Flats, PA. These K/sub d/ values were then compared to literature values of various sediment/water systems at similar environmental conditions. Am-241, Ru-106, Co-57, and Sr-85 attained distribution coefficients in the organic rich layers of the bogs two orders of magnitude greater than those obtained previously at pH 4.0. Although, the Cs-137 sorbed strongly to the inorganic rich layer of the Spruce Flats, PA, bog, the K/sub d/ values obtained for this isotope were, again, comparable or higher than those reported previously at pH 4.0, indicating the greater retentive properties of the peat. A chromatographic ''theoretical plate'' model was used to describe the field migration of Cs-137. The advection and diffusion coefficients were higher in the Lefgren's Bog, NY, than those obtained for the Spruce Flats Bog, PA. These field data were substantiated by the lower Cs-137 K/sub d/ values determined in the laboratory for the Lefgren's Bog, NY, compared to the Spruce Flats Bog. Although this model gave a good indication of the field migration, it neglected the process of sorption as defined by the sorption isotherm. Based on the time series data on distribution ratio measurements, a Cameron-Klute type of sorption isotherm was indicated, with rapid equilibrium initially superimposed onto a slower first order linear reversible equilibrium. This sorption isotherm can then be used in the final form of a model to describe the migration of radionuclides in a peat bog. 19 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Dynamics of the Iberian Peninsula Coastal Low-Level Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semedo, Alvaro; Rijo, Nádia; Miranda, Pedro; Lima, Daniela C. A.; Cardoso, Rita; Soares, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Coastal low-level jets (CLLJ) are important mesoscale phenomena of some regional coastal climates. They are characterized by a coast-parallel flow which has a wind speed maxima within the first few hundred meters above sea level (usually below 1000 m, and most of the times around 500 m), encapsulated within the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). Coastal jets have a larger scale synoptic forcing behind them: a high pressure system over the ocean and a thermal low inland. The regions where CLLJ occur coincide with cold equator-ward eastern boundary currents in the mid-latitudes (with an exception of the coast of Oman in the Arabian Sea), where the contrast between the cold ocean and the warm land in the summer is highest. As a response of CLLJ occurrences a positive feedback mechanism is triggered: the coast-parallel wind induces upwelling currents at the coast, reducing the sea surface temperature, which in turn increase the thermal (pressure) gradient at the coast, leading to higher wind speeds. The Iberian Peninsula Coastal Jet (IPCJ) is an example of a CLLJ, developed mostly during the summer season due to the effect of the semi-present Azores high-pressure system in the North Atlantic and of a thermal low pressure system inland. This synoptic pattern drives a seasonal (western) coast parallel wind, often called the Nortada (northerly wind), where the IPCJ develops. A detailed analysis of the IPCJ structure and dynamics will be presented, trough the analysis of two case studies off the west coast of Portugal. The case studies are simulated using the WRF mesoscale model, at 9 and 3 km horizontal resolution, forced by the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ERA-Interim reanalysis. The MABL structure off the west coast of Iberia, the interaction of the flow with the two main west Iberia capes (Finisterre and Roca), and the consequences on the cloud cover and wind speed up- and down-wind of the capes will be analysed.

  12. Closure Plan for Active Low Level Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    2000-11-16

    This plan has been prepared in response to direction from the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of the plan is to define approaches that will be implemented to ensure protection of the public and the environment when active Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) at the Hanford Site are closed. Performance assessments for active burial grounds in the 200 East and West 200 Areas provide current estimates of potential environmental contamination and doses to the ''maximum exposed individual'' from burial ground operation and closure and compare dose estimates to performance objective dose limits for the facilities. This is an Operational Closure Plan. The intent of the guidance in DOE Order 435.1 is that this plan will be a living document, like the facility performance assessments, and will be revised periodically through the operational life of the LLBGs to reflect updated information on waste inventory. management practices, facility transition planning, schedule dates, assessments of post-closure performance, and environmental consequences. Out year dates identified in this plan are tentative. A Final Closure Plan will be prepared in the future when the timing and extent of closure-related activities for LLBGs can be established with greater certainty. After current operations at the LLBGs are concluded, this plan proposes transitioning of these facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program. This action will enable the Environmental Restoration Program to design and implement consistent and coordinated final remedial actions for active and inactive LLBGs. Active and inactive burial grounds in the 200 West and 200 East Areas are commingled. This plan describes approaches that will be implemented during Interim Closure, Final Closure, and Institutional Control Periods to prepare LLBGs for surface barriers, and the construction of barriers, as well as the scope of inspection, monitoring and maintenance practices that will be performed during and after closure

  13. State of the art review of alternatives to shallow land burial of low level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    A review of alternatives to shallow land burial for disposal of low level radioactive waste was conducted to assist ORNL in developing a program for the evaluation, selection, and demonstration of the most acceptable alternatives. The alternatives were categorized as follows: (1) near term isolation concepts, (2) far term isolation concepts, (3) dispersion concepts, and (4) conversion concepts. Detailed descriptions of near term isolation concepts are provided. The descriptions include: (1) method of isolation, (2) waste forms that can be accommodated, (3) advantages and disadvantages, (4) facility and equipment requirements, (5) unusual operational or maintenance requirements, (6) information/technology development requirements, and (7) related investigations of the concept.

  14. Improvement of Leaching Resistance of Low-level Waste Form in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.Y.; Lee, B.C.; Kim, C.L.

    2006-07-01

    Low-level liquid concentrate wastes including boric acid have been immobilized with paraffin wax using concentrate waste drying system in Korean nuclear power plants since 1995. Small amount of low density polyethylene (LDPE) was added to increase the leaching resistance of the existing paraffin waste form and the influence of LDPE on the leaching behavior of waste form was investigated. It was observed that the leaching of nuclides immobilized within paraffin waste form remarkably reduced as the content of LDPE increased. The acceptance criteria of paraffin waste form associated with leachability index and compressive strength after the leaching test were successfully satisfied with the help of LDPE. (authors)

  15. Numerical study on the potential impact of different bottom boundary conditions on the water balance of lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Jannis; Vanderborght, Jan; Pütz, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    The SOILCan lysimeter network is a large scale climate feedback experiment and is embedded in the four long term observatories of TERENO (TERestrial ENvironmental Observatories). The focus of the SOILCan-project is to observe the impact of climate change on water and matter budgets in different grass- and arable-land lysimeters. The monitoring infrastructure was established across a rainfall and temperature transect along which lysimeters were transported from wetter to drier conditions. The lysimeters in SOILCan have a controlled bottom boundary condition using a rack of suction candles that enables upward and downward flow of water. This pressure head at the bottom is controlled by measured soil water potentials in undisturbed soil in the close vicinity of the bottom of the lysimeter. For transported lysimeters this controlling approach no longer works as the surrounding soil profile and both its upper climatic boundary conditions and lower boundary conditions related to its hydrogeological setting differ from the place where the lysimeter was taken from. In order to evaluate these artefacts and to derive a suited approach to control the lower boundary of transported lysimeters, water balance simulations were run. We analyzed three different approaches to impose bottom boundary conditions for transported lysimeters. A 'zeroth-order' approach is to define the bottom boundary at the bottom of the lysimeter and use the pressure heads measured at the location from which the soil lysimeter was taken. However, this approach is prone to artefacts since these bottom boundary conditions are determined by the climate at the site where the lysimeter was taken from. A 'first-order' approach is to define a bottom boundary condition at a certain hydrogeological boundary that can be defined deeper in the soil profile such as a seepage face or a groundwater table. However, for shallow groundwater tables, this approach may also lead to artefacts since the depth of the groundwater

  16. Environmental assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of commercial low level nuclear waste across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This environmental assessment investigates the potential environmental and safety effects which could result from the land transport of low level radioactive wastes across the Savannah River Plant. Chem-Nuclear Systems operates a low level radioactive waste burial facility adjacent to the Savannah River Plant and is seeking permission from the DOE to transport the waste across Savannah River Plant.

  17. Environmental radiation monitoring of low-level wastes by the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, A.W.; Mooney, R.R.; Erickson, J.L.

    1989-11-01

    The Washington State Department of Health, as the state`s regulatory agency for radiation, monitors several forms of low-level radioactive wastes. The monitoring is done to assess the potential impact on the environment and on public health. The emphasis of the monitoring program is placed on the solid and liquid wastes from defense activities on the Hanford Reservation, commercial wastes at the site located on leased land at Hanford and uranium mill tailings in Northeastern Washington. Although not classified as low-level waste, monitoring is also periodically conducted at selected landfills and sewage treatment facilities and other licensees, where radioactive wastes are known or suspected to be present. Environmental pathways associated with waste disposal are monitored independently, and/or in conjunction with the waste site operators to verify their results and evaluate their programs. The Department also participates in many site investigations conducted by site operators and other agencies, and conducts it`s own special investigations when deemed necessary. Past investigations and special projects have included allegations of adverse environmental impact of I-129, uranium in ground water, impacts of wastes on the agricultural industry, radioactivity in seeps into the Columbia River from waste sites, identifying lost waste sites at Hanford, differentiating groundwater contamination from defense versus commercial sources, and radioactivity in municipal landfills and sewers. The state`s environmental radiation monitoring program has identified and verified a number of environmental problems associated with radioactive waste disposal, but has, to date, identified no adverse offsite impacts to public health.

  18. Alternatives To The Burial Of Low-Level Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J. Mark

    2008-01-15

    have been fully dismantled. Proven techniques and equipment are available to dismantle nuclear facilities safely. Most parts of a nuclear power plants do not become radioactive or are contaminated at very low levels and most metal can be recycled. There are obvious environmental benefits to the decontamination, recycle and reuse of materials. The benefits come primarily from the reduction of waste and eliminating the need to obtain fresh materials for the new product. The benefits of recycling in other industries are well recognized. Not having a waste management option can sometimes delay decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Therefore, the availability of a recycling route for the waste may accelerate decommissioning progress. With improving prospects for building new nuclear power plants, the industry would likely use the option if significant amounts of waste materials could be recycled economically. There is little consistency in national approaches to recycling radioactive waste. Many options for recycling allow for the release of materials into the public domain (after decontamination to allowable levels). There is not uniform endorsement of this practice from country to country and some stakeholders do not agree with this type of material release (often reduced to as unconditional release). There is a large amount of material that can have conditional release within the industry that assures consistent endorsement by stakeholders. This material includes: concrete, lead, carbon and stainless steel, and graphite. More work needs to be done to ensure consistency in regulation from country to country. The IAEA is working to this end.

  19. 1989 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress during 1989 of states and compacts in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level waste received for disposal in 1989 by commercially operated low-level waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99--240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Commercial low-level radioactive waste transportation liability and radiological risk

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, G.J.; Brown, O.F. II; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-08-01

    This report was prepared for States, compact regions, and other interested parties to address two subjects related to transporting low-level radioactive waste to disposal facilities. One is the potential liabilities associated with low-level radioactive waste transportation from the perspective of States as hosts to low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The other is the radiological risks of low-level radioactive waste transportation for drivers, the public, and disposal facility workers.

  1. Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter; R. D. Baird

    1999-08-01

    This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

  2. Evaluating non-incinerative treatment of organically contaminated low level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shuck, D.L.; Skriba, M.C.; Wade, J.F.

    1993-03-01

    This investigation examines the feasibility of using non-incinerator technologies effectively to treat organically contaminated mixed waste. If such a system is feasible now, it would be easier to license because it would avoid the stigma that incineration has in the publics` perception. As other DOE facilities face similar problems, this evaluation is expected to be of interest to both DOE and the attendees of WM`93. This investigation considered treatment to land disposal restriction (LDR) standards of 21 different low level mixed (LLM) waste streams covered by the Rocky Flats Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Typically the hazardous components consists of organic solvent wastes and the radioactive component consists of uranic/transuranic wastes. Limited amounts of cyanide and lead wastes are also involved. The primary objective of this investigation was to identify the minimum number of non-thermal unit processes needed to effectively treat this collection of mixed waste streams.

  3. Evaluating non-incinerative treatment of organically contaminated low level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shuck, D.L. . Denver Environmental Services); Skriba, M.C. ); Wade, J.F. )

    1993-01-01

    This investigation examines the feasibility of using non-incinerator technologies effectively to treat organically contaminated mixed waste. If such a system is feasible now, it would be easier to license because it would avoid the stigma that incineration has in the publics' perception. As other DOE facilities face similar problems, this evaluation is expected to be of interest to both DOE and the attendees of WM'93. This investigation considered treatment to land disposal restriction (LDR) standards of 21 different low level mixed (LLM) waste streams covered by the Rocky Flats Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Typically the hazardous components consists of organic solvent wastes and the radioactive component consists of uranic/transuranic wastes. Limited amounts of cyanide and lead wastes are also involved. The primary objective of this investigation was to identify the minimum number of non-thermal unit processes needed to effectively treat this collection of mixed waste streams.

  4. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T. H.; Chen, C. C.; Liu, S. L.; Lu, Y. C.; Kao, C. T.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm-2 or 10 J cm-2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p < 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The low-level laser treatment of periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p < 0.05). In periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators.

  5. Importance of geologic characterization of potential low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weibel, C.P.; Berg, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Using the example of the Geff Alternative Site in Wayne County, Illinois, for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste, this paper demonstrates, from a policy and public opinion perspective, the importance of accurately determining site stratigraphy. Complete and accurate characterization of geologic materials and determination of site stratigraphy at potential low-level waste disposal sites provides the frame-work for subsequent hydrologic and geochemical investigations. Proper geologic characterization is critical to determine the long-term site stability and the extent of interactions of groundwater between the site and its surroundings. Failure to adequately characterize site stratigraphy can lead to the incorrect evaluation of the geology of a site, which in turn may result in a lack of public confidence. A potential problem of lack of public confidence was alleviated as a result of the resolution and proper definition of the Geff Alternative Site stratigraphy. The integrity of the investigation was not questioned and public perception was not compromised. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  6. Fate of two herbicides in zero-tension lysimeters and in field soil.

    PubMed

    Kasteel, R; Pütz, T; Vanderborght, J; Vereecken, H

    2010-01-01

    In Germany, zero-tension lysimeters are used as part of the registration requirements in case pesticides pose a potential threat to contaminate the groundwater. However, the water regime and the method of pesticide sampling differ between the lysimeters and the field. We monitored the transport of the two herbicides ethidimuron [1-(5- ethylsulfonyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-1,3-dimethylurea] (ETD) and methabenzthiazuron [1-benzothiazol-2-yl-1,3-dimethyl-urea] (MBT) and their main metabolite, accompanied with bromide as conservative tracer, in zero-tension lysimeters filled with undisturbed soil and in the field. The herbicides were applied as a short pulse to the bare soil surface. Herbicide concentrations were analyzed in the drainage water of the 1.2-m-deep lysimeters and from soil cores taken from the field during six campaigns. Soil coring in the field emphasized matrix flow and allowed us to estimate the field-based dissipation and sorption parameters. Based on mass recovery calculations, the field fate half-life was 870 d for ETD compared with 389 d for its main metabolite. The initially fast field-based dissipation of MBT with a half-life value of approximately 1 mo was followed by a much slower dissipation. The retardation factor was estimated from the concentration profiles by inversely solving the convection-dispersion equation and yielded 18.2 +/- 1.3 for ETD and 36.9 +/- 17.5 for MBT. For the lysimeters, a leaching period of 2 1/2 yr was too short to monitor bulk herbicide mass through the soil matrix. Only 1.7% of the applied EDT and 1.4% of the applied MBT were sampled in the drainage water at 1.2 m depth. Despite contrasting sorption and dissipation properties, both herbicides appeared fast and at the same time in the drainage water, hinting at preferential flow phenomena. Compared with field fate of herbicides measured by soil coring, zero-potential lysimeters emphasize the transport of small amounts of herbicides triggered by preferential flow events

  7. Modulation of neurological related allergic reaction in mice exposed to low-level toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Tin-Tin-Win-Shwe; Yamamoto, Shoji; Nakajima, Daisuke; Furuyama, Akiko; Fukushima, Atsushi; Ahmed, Sohel; Goto, Sumio; Fujimaki, Hidekazu . E-mail: fujimaki@nies.go.jp

    2007-07-01

    The contributing role of indoor air pollution to the development of allergic disease has become increasingly evident in public health problems. It has been reported that extensive communication exists between neurons and immune cells, and neurotrophins are molecules potentially responsible for regulating and controlling this neuroimmune crosstalk. The adverse effects of volatile organic compounds which are main indoor pollutants on induction or augmentation of neuroimmune interaction have not been fully characterized yet. To investigate the effects of low-level toluene inhalation on the airway inflammatory responses, male C3H mice were exposed to filtered air (control), 9 ppm, and 90 ppm toluene for 30 min by nose-only inhalation on Days 0, 1, 2, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Some groups of mice were injected with ovalbumin intraperitoneally before starting exposure schedule and these mice were then challenged with aerosolized ovalbumin as booster dose. For analysis of airway inflammation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected to determine inflammatory cell influx and lung tissue and blood samples were collected to determine cytokine and neurotrophin mRNA and protein expressions and plasma antibody titers using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA methods respectively. Exposure of the ovalbumin-immunized mice to low-level toluene resulted in (1) increased inflammatory cells infiltration in BAL fluid; (2) increased IL-5 mRNA, decreased nerve growth factor receptor tropomyosin-related kinase A and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNAs in lung; and (3) increased IgE and IgG{sub 1} antibodies and nerve growth factor content in the plasma. These findings suggest that low-level toluene exposure aggravates the airway inflammatory responses in ovalbumin-immunized mice by modulating neuroimmune crosstalk.

  8. Low-Level Laser Irradiation Stimulates Tenocyte Migration with Up-Regulation of Dynamin II Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Lin, Miao-Sui; Chen, Ying-Hsun; Liang, Fang-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to treat sports-related tendinopathy or tendon injury. Tendon healing requires tenocyte migration to the repair site, followed by proliferation and synthesis of the extracellular matrix. This study was designed to determine the effect of laser on tenocyte migration. Furthermore, the correlation between this effect and expression of dynamin 2, a positive regulator of cell motility, was also investigated. Tenocytes intrinsic to rat Achilles tendon were treated with low-level laser (660 nm with energy density at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 J/cm2). Tenocyte migration was evaluated by an in vitro wound healing model and by transwell filter migration assay. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were determined by reverse transcription/real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and Western blot analysis respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was used to evaluate the dynamin 2 expression in tenocytes. Tenocytes with or without laser irradiation was treated with dynasore, a dynamin competitor and then underwent transwell filter migration assay. In vitro wound model revealed that more tenocytes with laser irradiation migrated across the wound border to the cell-free zone. Transwell filter migration assay confirmed that tenocyte migration was enhanced dose-dependently by laser. Real-time PCR and Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were up-regulated by laser irradiation dose-dependently. Confocal microscopy showed that laser enhanced the expression of dynamin 2 in cytoplasm of tenocytes. The stimulation effect of laser on tenocytes migration was suppressed by dynasore. In conclusion, low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration in a process that is mediated by up-regulation of dynamin 2, which can be suppressed by dynasore. PMID:22666495

  9. Influence of nutrients on oxidation of low level methane by mixed methanotrophic consortia.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Obulisamy Parthiba; Chidambarampadmavathy, Karthigeyan; Nadarajan, Saravanan; Heimann, Kirsten

    2016-03-01

    Low-level methane emissions from coal mine ventilation air (CMV-CH4; i.e., 1 % CH4) can significantly contribute to global climate change, and therefore, treatment is important to reduce impacts. To investigate CMV-CH4 abatement potential, five different mixed methanotrohic consortia (MMCs) were established from soil/sediment sources, i.e., landfill top cover soil, bio-solid compost, vegetated humus soil, estuarine and marine sediments. Enrichment conditions for MMCs were as follows: nitrate mineral salt (NMS) medium, pH ~ 6.8; 25 °C; 20-25 % CH4; agitation 200 rpm; and culture period 20 days, in mini-bench-top bioreactors. The enriched cultures were supplemented with extra carbon (methanol 0.5-1.5 %, formate 5-15 mM, and acetate 5-15 mM), nitrogen (nitrate 0.5-1.5 g L(-1), ammonium 0.1-0.5 g L(-1), or urea: 0.1-0.5 g L(-1)), and trace elements (copper 1-5 μM, iron 1-5 μM, and zinc 1-5 μM) in different batch experiments to improve low-level CH4 abatement. Average CH4 oxidation capacities (MOCs) of MMCs varied between 1.712 ± 0.032 and 1.963 ± 0.057 mg g(-1)DWbiomass h(-1). Addition of formate improved the MOCs of MMCs, but the dose-response varied for different MMCs. Acetate, nitrate and copper had no significant effect on MOCs, while addition of methanol, ammonium, urea, iron and zinc impacted negatively. Overall, MMCs enriched from marine sediments and landfill top cover soil showed high MOCs which were largely resilient to nutrient supplementation, suggesting a strong potential for biofilter development for industrial low-level CH4 abatement, such as those present in CMV.

  10. Effect of low-level laser therapy on tooth sensitivity induced by in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Horieh; Arjmand, Nooshin; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Zakeri, Majid; Maleknejad, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on tooth sensitivity induced by in-office bleaching. Sixty-six patients enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. Following the in-office procedure with 40% hydrogen peroxide, the participants were randomly divided into three groups. The patients in group 1 received irradiation from a low-level red laser (LLRL; 660 nm, 200 mW, 15 s, 12 J/cm(2)), whereas participants in group 2 were subjected to a low-level infrared laser (LLIL; 810 nm) under similar conditions as in group 1. In group 3 (placebo), the laser treatment was the same as that in groups 1 and 2, but without energy output. The degree of tooth sensitivity was recorded at 1, 24, and 48 h after bleaching using a visual analog scale (VAS). The change in tooth shade was measured 30 days after tooth whitening. The intensity of tooth sensitivity was not significantly different between groups at 1 h after bleaching (p > 0.05). At 24 h after therapy, pain level was significantly lower in the LLIL group compared to the LLRL and placebo groups (p < 0.05). At 48 h after bleaching, VAS scores in the LLIL and LLRL groups were comparable to each other (p > 0.05) and both were significantly lower than that of the placebo group (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the efficacy of tooth whitening among groups (p > 0.05). LLLT with an infrared diode laser could be recommended as a suitable strategy to reduce the intensity of tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching. PMID:26964798

  11. Effect of low-level laser therapy on tooth sensitivity induced by in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Horieh; Arjmand, Nooshin; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Zakeri, Majid; Maleknejad, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on tooth sensitivity induced by in-office bleaching. Sixty-six patients enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. Following the in-office procedure with 40% hydrogen peroxide, the participants were randomly divided into three groups. The patients in group 1 received irradiation from a low-level red laser (LLRL; 660 nm, 200 mW, 15 s, 12 J/cm(2)), whereas participants in group 2 were subjected to a low-level infrared laser (LLIL; 810 nm) under similar conditions as in group 1. In group 3 (placebo), the laser treatment was the same as that in groups 1 and 2, but without energy output. The degree of tooth sensitivity was recorded at 1, 24, and 48 h after bleaching using a visual analog scale (VAS). The change in tooth shade was measured 30 days after tooth whitening. The intensity of tooth sensitivity was not significantly different between groups at 1 h after bleaching (p > 0.05). At 24 h after therapy, pain level was significantly lower in the LLIL group compared to the LLRL and placebo groups (p < 0.05). At 48 h after bleaching, VAS scores in the LLIL and LLRL groups were comparable to each other (p > 0.05) and both were significantly lower than that of the placebo group (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the efficacy of tooth whitening among groups (p > 0.05). LLLT with an infrared diode laser could be recommended as a suitable strategy to reduce the intensity of tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching.

  12. Low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration with up-regulation of dynamin II expression.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Miao-Sui; Chen, Ying-Hsun; Liang, Fang-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to treat sports-related tendinopathy or tendon injury. Tendon healing requires tenocyte migration to the repair site, followed by proliferation and synthesis of the extracellular matrix. This study was designed to determine the effect of laser on tenocyte migration. Furthermore, the correlation between this effect and expression of dynamin 2, a positive regulator of cell motility, was also investigated. Tenocytes intrinsic to rat Achilles tendon were treated with low-level laser (660 nm with energy density at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 J/cm(2)). Tenocyte migration was evaluated by an in vitro wound healing model and by transwell filter migration assay. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were determined by reverse transcription/real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and Western blot analysis respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was used to evaluate the dynamin 2 expression in tenocytes. Tenocytes with or without laser irradiation was treated with dynasore, a dynamin competitor and then underwent transwell filter migration assay. In vitro wound model revealed that more tenocytes with laser irradiation migrated across the wound border to the cell-free zone. Transwell filter migration assay confirmed that tenocyte migration was enhanced dose-dependently by laser. Real-time PCR and Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were up-regulated by laser irradiation dose-dependently. Confocal microscopy showed that laser enhanced the expression of dynamin 2 in cytoplasm of tenocytes. The stimulation effect of laser on tenocytes migration was suppressed by dynasore. In conclusion, low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration in a process that is mediated by up-regulation of dynamin 2, which can be suppressed by dynasore.

  13. Application of Low-Level Laser Therapy Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Babazadeh, Kamran; Lajevardi, Marjan; Dabaghian, Fataneh Hashem; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: An attack of acute myocardial infarction (MI) poses the threat of great damage to cardiac tissue. Operative therapeutic modalities such as coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) may enhance myocardial perfusion in high-grade coronary vasculature occlusions. It has been shown previously that Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) significantly reduces infarct size following induction of myocardial infarction in rats and dogs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of LLLT on cardiac tissue healing markers following grafting operations for coronary vessel occlusion. Methods: Thirty-two cases having each two or three coronary vessel occlusions (2VD/3VD) underwent low-level laser therapy post-CABG, and 28 patients who did not undergo laser therapy were studied as a control group. Diode laser (810 nm, 500 mW) was used as LLLT protocol for 3 successive days post-CABG. Repeated measurements of blood cell count (CBC) and cardiac damage markers (CPK, CPK-MB, LDH) attained before CABG and during the 5 days of LLLT post-operatively, taken at one and 12 hours after daily laser irradiation. Results: In a comparison of the mean levels of the control and laser group, the variables were statistically different on 5th day after intervention for WBC, Neutrophil and Lymphocyte counts and WBC and lymphocyte changes. A statistically significant difference was seen in changes of CPK, CPK-mb and LDH over time P<0.001. Conclusion: It is concluded that low-level laser irradiation after CABG surgery could decrease cardiac cellular damage and help accelerate the repair of cardiac tissue post-operatively. This may lower post-operative disability as well as bed rest period in these patients. PMID:25653805

  14. Modulation of neurological related allergic reaction in mice exposed to low-level toluene.

    PubMed

    Tin-Tin-Win-Shwe; Yamamoto, Shoji; Nakajima, Daisuke; Furuyama, Akiko; Fukushima, Atsushi; Ahmed, Sohel; Goto, Sumio; Fujimaki, Hidekazu

    2007-07-01

    The contributing role of indoor air pollution to the development of allergic disease has become increasingly evident in public health problems. It has been reported that extensive communication exists between neurons and immune cells, and neurotrophins are molecules potentially responsible for regulating and controlling this neuroimmune crosstalk. The adverse effects of volatile organic compounds which are main indoor pollutants on induction or augmentation of neuroimmune interaction have not been fully characterized yet. To investigate the effects of low-level toluene inhalation on the airway inflammatory responses, male C3H mice were exposed to filtered air (control), 9 ppm, and 90 ppm toluene for 30 min by nose-only inhalation on Days 0, 1, 2, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Some groups of mice were injected with ovalbumin intraperitoneally before starting exposure schedule and these mice were then challenged with aerosolized ovalbumin as booster dose. For analysis of airway inflammation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected to determine inflammatory cell influx and lung tissue and blood samples were collected to determine cytokine and neurotrophin mRNA and protein expressions and plasma antibody titers using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA methods respectively. Exposure of the ovalbumin-immunized mice to low-level toluene resulted in (1) increased inflammatory cells infiltration in BAL fluid; (2) increased IL-5 mRNA, decreased nerve growth factor receptor tropomyosin-related kinase A and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNAs in lung; and (3) increased IgE and IgG(1) antibodies and nerve growth factor content in the plasma. These findings suggest that low-level toluene exposure aggravates the airway inflammatory responses in ovalbumin-immunized mice by modulating neuroimmune crosstalk. PMID:17481687

  15. Low Level and Transuranic Waste Segregation and Low Level Waste Characterization at the 200 Area of the Hanford Site - 12424

    SciTech Connect

    Donohoue, Tom; Martin, E. Ray; Mason, John A.; Blackford, Ty; Estes, Michael; Jasen, William; Cahill, Michael

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the waste measurement and waste characterization activities carried out by ANTECH Corporation (ANTECH) and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) at the 200 Area of the Hanford Site under Contracts No. 22394 and No. 40245 for the US Department of Energy (DOE). These include Low Level Waste (LLW) and Transuranic (TRU) Waste segregation and LLW characterization for both 55-gallon (200-litre) drums with gross weight up to 454 kg and 85-gallon over-pack drums. In order to achieve efficient and effective waste drum segregation and assay, ANTECH deployed an automated Gamma Mobile Assay Laboratory (G-MAL) at the trench face in both 200 Area West and East. The unit consists of a modified 40 foot ISO shipping container with an automatic flow through roller conveyor system with internal drum weigh scale, four measurement and drum rotation positions, and four high efficiency high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors with both detector and shadow shields. The unit performs multiple far-field measurements and is able to segregate drums at levels well below 100 nCi/g. The system is sufficiently sensitive that drums, which are classified as LLW, are characterized at measurement levels that meet the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). With measurement times of between 20 and 30 minutes the unit can classify and characterize over 40 drums in an 8-hour shift. The system is well characterized with documented calibrations, lower limits of detection (LLD) and total measurement uncertainty. The calibrations are confirmed and verified using nationally traceable standards in keeping with the CHPRC measurement requirements. The performance of the system has been confirmed and validated throughout the measurement process by independent CHPRC personnel using traceable standards. All of the measurement and maintenance work has been conducted during the period under a Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) compliant with the

  16. Laboratory-lysimeter studies of dry FGD wastes from tests of the Coolside technology

    SciTech Connect

    Taulbee, D.N.; Schram, W.H.; Thomas, G.A.; Rathbone, R.F.; Robl, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    Twenty two laboratory lysimeters were monitored for 12 months in an effort to characterize the leaching behavior of dry flue-gas desulfurization wastes generated during tests of the Coolside duct-injection Technology. Included were samples from Ohio Edison`s 1990 demonstration runs conducted at its Edgewater power plant and materials derived from runs conducted in CONSOL`s Coolside pilot plant. The primary objective of the study was to generate predictive information on leaching behavior of Coolside wastes. In addition, the test matrix was designed to examine the impact of various parameters including (1)lysimeter packing density, (2) use of a constant vs rain simulation method of water addition, (3) variation in the extent of prehydration of the wastes prior to loading, and (4) exposure to elevated levels of CO{sub 2} during the study. The relationships between these latter parameters and leachate characteristics are discussed.

  17. Psilocybin impairs high-level but not low-level motion perception.

    PubMed

    Carter, Olivia L; Pettigrew, John D; Burr, David C; Alais, David; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2004-08-26

    The hallucinogenic serotonin(1A&2A) agonist psilocybin is known for its ability to induce illusions of motion in otherwise stationary objects or textured surfaces. This study investigated the effect of psilocybin on local and global motion processing in nine human volunteers. Using a forced choice direction of motion discrimination task we show that psilocybin selectively impairs coherence sensitivity for random dot patterns, likely mediated by high-level global motion detectors, but not contrast sensitivity for drifting gratings, believed to be mediated by low-level detectors. These results are in line with those observed within schizophrenic populations and are discussed in respect to the proposition that psilocybin may provide a model to investigate clinical psychosis and the pharmacological underpinnings of visual perception in normal populations.

  18. Quantification of low levels of amorphous content in crystalline celecoxib using dynamic vapor sorption (DVS).

    PubMed

    Sheokand, Sneha; Modi, Sameer R; Bansal, Arvind K

    2016-05-01

    A minor amount of amorphous phase, especially present on the surface of crystalline pharmaceutical actives, can have a significant impact on their processing and performance. Despite the presence of sophisticated analytical tools, detection and quantification of low levels of amorphous content pose significant challenges owing to issues of sensitivity, suitability, limit of detection and limit of quantitation. Current study encompasses the quantification of amorphous content in the crystalline form of celecoxib (CLB) using a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) based method. Water, used as the solvent probe, achieved equilibration within a very short period of time (i.e. 6h) due to hydrophobic nature of CLB, thus allowing development of a rapid quantification method. The study included optimization of instrument and sample related parameters for the development of an analytical method. The calibration curve for amorphous CLB in crystalline CLB was prepared in the concentration range of 0-10% w/w. The analytical method was validated for linearity, range, accuracy and precision. The method for quantification was found to be linear with R(2) value of 0.999, rapid and sensitive for quantification of low levels of amorphous CLB content. It was able to detect the presence of amorphous phase in a predominantly crystalline phase at concentrations as low as 0.3% w/w. The limit of quantitation was found to be 0.9% w/w. Moreover, the influence of mechanical processing on the amorphous content in crystalline CLB was also investigated. PMID:26948976

  19. Transport code for radiocolloid migration: with an assessment of an actual low-level waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1984-12-31

    Recently, there is increased concern that radiocolloids may act as a rapid transport mechanism for the release of radionuclides from high-level waste repositories. The role of colloids is, however, controversial because the necessary data and assessment methodology have been limited. Evidence is accumulating to indicate that colloids are an important consideration in the geological disposal of nuclear waste. To quantitatively assess the role of colloids, the TRACR3D transport code has been enhanced by the addition of the population balance equations. This new version of the code can simulate the migration of colloids through combinations of porous/fractured, unsaturated, geologic media. The code was tested against the experimental laboratory column data of Avogadro et al. in order to compare the code results to both experimental data and an analytical solution. Next, a low-level radioactive waste site was investigated to explore whether colloid migration could account for the unusually rapid and long transport of plutonium and americium observed at a low-level waste site. Both plutonium and americium migrated 30 meters through unsaturated volcanic tuff. The nature and modeling of radiocolloids are discussed along with site simulation results from the TRACR3D code. 20 references.

  20. Low-level jet characteristics over the Arctic Ocean in spring and summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobson, L.; Vihma, T.; Jakobson, E.; Palo, T.; Männik, A.; Jaagus, J.

    2013-11-01

    Low-level jets (LLJ) are important for turbulence in the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, but their occurrence, properties, and generation mechanisms in the Arctic are not well known. We analysed LLJs over the central Arctic Ocean in spring and summer 2007 on the basis of data collected in the drifting ice station Tara. Instead of traditional radiosonde soundings, data from tethersonde soundings with a high vertical resolution were used. The Tara results showed a lower occurrence of LLJs (46 ± 8%) than many previous studies over polar sea ice. Strong jet core winds contributed to growth of the turbulent layer. Complex relationships between the jet core height and the temperature inversion top height were detected: substantial correlation (r = 0.72; p < 0.01) occurred when the jet core was above the turbulent layer, but when inside the turbulent layer there was no correlation. The most important forcing mechanism for LLJs was baroclinicity, which was responsible for the generation of strong and warm LLJs, which on average occurred at lower altitudes than other jets. Baroclinic jets were mostly associated with transient cyclones instead of the climatological air temperature gradients. Besides baroclinicity, cases related to inertial oscillations and gusts were detected. As many as 49% of the LLJs observed were associated with a frontal passage, which provides favourable conditions for baroclinicity, inertial oscillations, and gusts. Further research needs on LLJs in the Arctic include investigation of low-level jet streams and their effects on the sea ice drift and atmospheric moisture transport.

  1. Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste treatment technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, T W; Fischer, D K

    1993-01-01

    This report was developed to provide the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program with criteria and a methodology to select candidate treatment technologies for Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) destined for dedicated storage and ultimately disposal. The technology selection criteria are provided in a Lotus spreadsheet format to allow the methodology to evolve as the GTCC LLW Program evolves. It is recognized that the final disposal facility is not yet defined; thus, the waste acceptance criteria and other facility-specific features are subject to change. The spreadsheet format will allow for these changes a they occur. As additional treatment information becomes available, it can be factored into the analysis. The technology selection criteria were established from program goals, draft waste acceptance criteria for dedicated storage (including applicable regulations), and accepted remedial investigation methods utilized under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Kepner-Tregoe decisionmaking techniques are used to compare and rank technologies against the criteria.

  2. Southern hemisphere low level wind circulation statistics from the Seasat scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Gad

    1994-01-01

    Analyses of remotely sensed low-level wind vector data over the Southern Ocean are performed. Five-day averages and monthly means are created and the month-to-month variability during the winter (July-September) of 1978 is investigated. The remotely sensed winds are compared to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (ABM) and the National Meteorological Center (NMC) surface analyses. In southern latitudes the remotely sensed winds are stronger than what the weather services' analyses suggest, indicating under-estimation by ABM and NMC in these regions. The evolution of the low-level jet and the major stormtracks during the season are studied and different flow regimes are identified. The large-scale variability of the meridional flow is studied with the aid of empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. The dominance of quasi-stationary wave numbers 3,4, and 5 in the winter flows is evident in both the EOF analysis and the mean flow. The signature of an exceptionally strong blocking situation is evident in July and the special conditions leading to it are discussed. A very large intraseasonal variability with different flow regimes at different months is documented.

  3. Expression of DNA repair genes in burned skin exposed to low-level red laser.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Pôrto, Luís Cristóvão; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-11-01

    Although red laser lights lie in the region of non-ionizing radiations in the electromagnetic spectrum, there are doubts whether absorption of these radiations causes lesions in the DNA molecule. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the genes involved with base excision and nucleotide excision repair pathways in skin tissue submitted to burn injury and exposed to low-level red laser. Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group-rats burned and not irradiated, laser group-rats burned and irradiated 1 day after injury for five consecutive days, and later laser group-rats injured and treated 4 days after injury for five consecutive days. Irradiation was performed according to a clinical protocol (20 J/cm(2), 100 mW, continuous wave emission mode). The animals were sacrificed on day 10, and scarred tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, and evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Low-level red laser exposure (1) reduces the expression of APE1 messenger (mRNA), (2) increases the expression of OGG1 mRNA, (3) reduces the expression of XPC mRNA, and (4) increases the expression of XPA mRNA both in laser and later laser groups. Red laser exposure at therapeutic fluences alters the expression of genes related to base excision and nucleotide excision pathways of DNA repair during wound healing of burned skin.

  4. How low-level laser therapy can change mechanical properties of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Martinez, Diana; Ferreira, Marcia Z. J.; Yoshimura, Ellisabeth M.; Alencar, Adriano M.; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    2013-03-01

    Low level laser therapy is used as a treatment of several conditions, including inflammatory processes and wound healing. Possible changes in mechanical properties of cells, caused by illumination, are investigated with optical magnetic twisting cytometry (OMTC), which is a technique used to evaluate mechanical properties in cell culture. Ferromagnetic micro beads are bound to cell cytoskeleton, the beads are magnetized vertically and a horizontal twisting magnetic field is applied causing a torque that moves the beads and deforms the cell, the beads rotate and displace. Based on the lateral displacement of the beads, elastic shear and loss moduli are obtained. Samples of human bronchial epithelial cell culture were divided in two groups: one was illuminated with a 660 nm red laser, 30 mW power, 0.75 W/cm2 irradiance, during different time intervals, and the other one, the control group, was not illuminated. The values of the mechanical constants of the cells of the control group showed a tendency of increasing with the time out of the incubator. On the other hand, the illuminated group showed constancy on the behavior of both moduli, keeping the normal conditions of the cell culture. Those results indicate that illumination can induce cells to homeostasis, and OMTC is sensitive to observe departures from the steady conditions. Hence, OMTC is an important technique which can be used to aggregate knowledge on the light effect in cell cytoskeleton and even on the low level laser therapy mechanisms in inflammatory processes and/or wound healing.

  5. Pre-Conditioning with Low-Level Laser (Light) Therapy: Light Before the Storm

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Tanupriya; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Rai, Vikrant; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-conditioning by ischemia, hyperthermia, hypothermia, hyperbaric oxygen (and numerous other modalities) is a rapidly growing area of investigation that is used in pathological conditions where tissue damage may be expected. The damage caused by surgery, heart attack, or stroke can be mitigated by pre-treating the local or distant tissue with low levels of a stress-inducing stimulus, that can induce a protective response against subsequent major damage. Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been used for nearly 50 years to enhance tissue healing and to relieve pain, inflammation and swelling. The photons are absorbed in cytochrome(c) oxidase (unit four in the mitochondrial respiratory chain), and this enzyme activation increases electron transport, respiration, oxygen consumption and ATP production. A complex signaling cascade is initiated leading to activation of transcription factors and up- and down-regulation of numerous genes. Recently it has become apparent that LLLT can also be effective if delivered to normal cells or tissue before the actual insult or trauma, in a pre-conditioning mode. Muscles are protected, nerves feel less pain, and LLLT can protect against a subsequent heart attack. These examples point the way to wider use of LLLT as a pre-conditioning modality to prevent pain and increase healing after surgical/medical procedures and possibly to increase athletic performance. PMID:25552961

  6. US Army facility for the consolidation of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, S.L.; Tanner, J.E.; Murphy, B.L.; Gillings, J.C.; Hadley, R.T.; Lyso, O.M.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Murphy, D.W.

    1983-12-01

    A preliminary study of a waste consolidation facility for the Department of the Army's low-level radioactive waste was carried out to determine a possible site and perform a cost-benefit analysis. Four sites were assessed as possible locations for such a facility, using predetermined site selection criteria. To assist in the selection of a site, an evaluation of environmental issues was included as part of each site review. In addition, a preliminary design for a waste consolidation facility was developed, and facilities at each site were reviewed for their availability and suitability for this purpose. Currently available processes for volume reduction, as well as processes still under development, were then investigated, and the support and handling equipment and the staff needed for the safe operation of a waste consolidation facility were studied. Using current costs for the transportation and burial of low-level waste, a cost comparison was then made between waste disposal with and without the utilization of volume reduction. Finally, regulations that could affect the operation of a waste consolidation facility were identified and their impact was assessed. 11 references, 5 figures, 16 tables.

  7. Marine plankton as an indicator of low-level radionuclide contamination in the Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1984-07-01

    We have initiated an investigation of the utility of marine plankton as bioconcentrating samplers of low-level marine radioactivity in the southern hemisphere. A literature review shows that both freshwater and marine plankton have trace element and radionuclide concentration factors (relative to water) of up to 10/sup 4/. In the years 1956-1958, considerable work was done on the accumulation and distribution of a variety of fission and activation products produced by the nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands. Since then, studies have largely been confined to a few selected radionuclides, and by far most of this work has been done in the northern hemisphere. We participated in Operation Deepfreeze 1981, collecting 32 plankton samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Glacier on its Antarctic cruise, while Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories concurrently sampled air, water, rain and fallout. We were able to measure concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides /sup 7/Be, /sup 40/K and the U and th series, and we believe that we have detected low levels of /sup 144/Ce and /sup 95/Nb in seven samples ranging as far south as 68/sup 0/. There is a definite association between the radionuclide content of plankton and air filters, suggesting that aerosol resuspension of marine radioactivity may be occurring. Biological identification of the plankton suggests a possible correlation between radionuclide concentration and foraminifera content of the samples. 38 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces inflammatory infiltrate and enhances skeletal muscle repair: Histomorphometric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva-Oliveira, E. L.; Lima, N. C.; Silva, P. H.; Sousa, N. T. A.; Barbosa, F. S.; Orsini, M.; Silva, J. G.

    2012-09-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as an effective therapeutics in inflammatory processes modulation and tissue repairing. However, there is a lack of studies that analyze the anti-inflammatory effects of the infrared lasers in muscular skeletal injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy 904 nm in the repair process of skeletal muscle tissue. Swiss mice were submitted to cryoinjury and divided in test (LLLT-treated) and control groups. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin to assess general morphology and inflammatory influx, and Picrossirus to quantify collagen fibers deposition. Our results showed significant reduction in inflammatory infiltrated in irradiated mice after 4 days of treatment compared to control ( p = 0.01). After 8 days, the irradiated group showed high levels at regenerating myofibers with significant statistically differences in relation at control group ( p < 0.01). Collagen deposition was significantly increased in the final stages of regeneration at test group, when compared with control group ( p = 0.05). Our data suggests that LLLT reduces the inflammatory response in the initial stages of injury and accelerates the process of muscular tissue repair.

  9. Visual cues to geographical orientation during low-level flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battiste, Vernol; Delzell, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    A field study of an operational Emergency Medical Service (EMS) unit was conducted to investigate the relationships among geographical orientation, pilot decision making, and workload in EMS flights. The map data collected during this study were compared to protocols gathered in the laboratory, where pilots viewed a simulated flight over different types of unfamiliar terrain and verbally identified the features utilized to maintain geographical orientation. The EMS pilot's questionnaire data were compared with data from non-EMS helicopter pilots with comparable flight experience.

  10. Low level constraints on dynamic contour path integration.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sophie; Bourke, Patrick; Guo, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Contour integration is a fundamental visual process. The constraints on integrating discrete contour elements and the associated neural mechanisms have typically been investigated using static contour paths. However, in our dynamic natural environment objects and scenes vary over space and time. With the aim of investigating the parameters affecting spatiotemporal contour path integration, we measured human contrast detection performance of a briefly presented foveal target embedded in dynamic collinear stimulus sequences (comprising five short 'predictor' bars appearing consecutively towards the fovea, followed by the 'target' bar) in four experiments. The data showed that participants' target detection performance was relatively unchanged when individual contour elements were separated by up to 2° spatial gap or 200 ms temporal gap. Randomising the luminance contrast or colour of the predictors, on the other hand, had similar detrimental effect on grouping dynamic contour path and subsequent target detection performance. Randomising the orientation of the predictors reduced target detection performance greater than introducing misalignment relative to the contour path. The results suggest that the visual system integrates dynamic path elements to bias target detection even when the continuity of path is disrupted in terms of spatial (2°), temporal (200 ms), colour (over 10 colours) and luminance (-25% to 25%) information. We discuss how the findings can be largely reconciled within the functioning of V1 horizontal connections.

  11. High-frequency low-level diode laser irradiation promotes proliferation and migration of primary cultured human gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ejiri, Kenichiro; Aoki, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Izumi, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    In periodontal therapy, the use of low-level diode lasers has recently been considered to improve wound healing of the gingival tissue. However, its effects on human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs) remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to examine whether high-frequency low-level diode laser irradiation stimulates key cell responses in wound healing, proliferation and migration, in primary cultured HGECs in vitro. HGECs were derived from seven independent gingival tissue specimens. Cultured HGECs were exposed to a single session of high-frequency (30 kHz) low-level diode laser irradiation with various irradiation time periods (fluence 5.7-56.7 J/cm(2)). After 20-24 h, cell proliferation was evaluated by WST-8 assay and [(3)H]thymidine incorporation assay, and cell migration was monitored by in vitro wound healing assay. Further, phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways after irradiation was investigated by Western blotting. The high-frequency low-level irradiation significantly increased cell proliferation and [(3)H]thymidine incorporation at various irradiation time periods. Migration of the irradiated cells was significantly accelerated compared with the nonirradiated control. Further, the low-level diode laser irradiation induced phosphorylation of MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) at 5, 15, 60, and 120 min after irradiation. Stress-activated protein kinases/c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK remained un-phosphorylated. The results show that high-frequency low-level diode laser irradiation promotes HGEC proliferation and migration in association with the activation of MAPK/ERK, suggesting that laser irradiation may accelerate gingival wound healing.

  12. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization. Appendix F: Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste light water reactor projections

    SciTech Connect

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; Levin, A.; O`Kelley, M.

    1991-08-01

    This study characterizes potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste streams, estimates the amounts of waste generated, and estimates their radionuclide content and distribution. Several types of low-level radioactive wastes produced by light water reactors were identified in an earlier study as being potential greater-than-Class C low-level waste, including specific activated metal components and certain process wastes in the form of cartridge filters and decontamination resins. Light water reactor operating parameters and current management practices at operating plants were reviewed and used to estimate the amounts of potential greater-than-Class C low-level waste generated per fuel cycle. The amounts of routinely generated activated metal components and process waste were estimated as a function of fuel cycle. Component-specific radionuclide content and distribution was calculated for activated metals components. Empirical data from actual low-level radioactive waste streams were used to estimate radionuclide content and distribution for process wastes. The greater-than-Class C low-level waste volumes that could be generated through plant closure were also estimated, along with volumes and activities for potential greater-than-Class C activated metals generated at decommissioning.

  13. Low Level Primary Blast Injury in Rodent Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela B. L.; Kan, Enci Mary; Salim, Agus; Li, Zhaohui; Ng, Kian Chye; Moochhala, Shabbir M.; Ling, Eng-Ang; Tan, Mui Hong; Lu, Jia

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of blast attacks and resulting traumatic brain injuries has been on the rise in recent years. Primary blast is one of the mechanisms in which the blast wave can cause injury to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single sub-lethal blast over pressure (BOP) exposure of either 48.9 kPa (7.1 psi) or 77.3 kPa (11.3 psi) to rodents in an open-field setting. Brain tissue from these rats was harvested for microarray and histopathological analyses. Gross histopathology of the brains showed that cortical neurons were “darkened” and shrunken with narrowed vasculature in the cerebral cortex day 1 after blast with signs of recovery at day 4 and day 7 after blast. TUNEL-positive cells were predominant in the white matter of the brain at day 1 after blast and double-labeling of brain tissue showed that these DNA-damaged cells were both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes but were mainly not apoptotic due to the low caspase-3 immunopositivity. There was also an increase in amyloid precursor protein immunoreactive cells in the white matter which suggests acute axonal damage. In contrast, Iba-1 staining for macrophages or microglia was not different from control post-blast. Blast exposure altered the expression of over 5786 genes in the brain which occurred mostly at day 1 and day 4 post-blast. These genes were narrowed down to 10 overlapping genes after time-course evaluation and functional analyses. These genes pointed toward signs of repair at day 4 and day 7 post-blast. Our findings suggest that the BOP levels in the study resulted in mild cellular injury to the brain as evidenced by acute neuronal, cerebrovascular, and white matter perturbations that showed signs of resolution. It is unclear whether these perturbations exist at a milder level or normalize completely and will need more investigation. Specific changes in gene expression may be further evaluated to understand the mechanism of blast-induced neurotrauma. PMID

  14. Application of infrared radiometers for airborne detection of clear air turbulence and low level wind shear, airborne infrared low level wind shear detection test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of infrared optical techniques for the advance detection and avoidance of low level wind shear (LLWS) or low altitude wind shear hazardous to aircraft operations was investigated. A primary feasibility research effort was conducted with infrared detectors and instrumentation aboard the NASA Ames Research Center Learjet. The main field effort was flown on the NASA-Ames Dryden B57B aircraft. The original approach visualized a forward-looking, infrared transmitting (KRS-5) window through which signals would reach the detector. The present concept of a one inch diameter light pipe with a 45 deg angled mirror enables a much simpler installation virtually anywhere on the aircraft coupled with the possibility of horizontal scanning via rotation of the forward directed mirror. Present infrared detectors and filters would certainly permit ranging and horizontal scanning in a variety of methods. CRT display technology could provide a contoured picture with possible shear intensity levels from the infrared detection system on the weather radar or a small adjunct display. This procedure shoud be further developed and pilot evaluated in a light aircraft such as a Cessna 207 or equivalent.

  15. Determination of Iodine-129 in Low Level Radioactive Wastes - 13334

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K.C.; Ahn, J.H.; Park, Y.J.; Song, K.S.

    2013-07-01

    For the radioactivity determination of {sup 129}I in the radioactive wastes, alkali fusion and anion-exchange resin separation methods, which are sample pretreatment methods, have been investigated in this study. To separate and quantify the {sup 129}I radionuclide in an evaporator bottom and spent resin, the radionuclide was chemically leached from the wastes and adsorbed on an anion exchange resin at pH 4, 7, 9. In the case of dry active waste and another solid type, the alkali fusion method was applied. KNO{sub 3} was added as a KOH and oxidizer to the wastes. It was then fused at 450 deg. C for 1 hour. The radioactivity of the separated iodine was measured with a low energy gamma spectrometer after the sample pretreatment. Finally, it was confirmed that the recovery rate of the iodine for the alkali fusion method was 83.6±3.8%, and 86.4±1.6% for the anionic exchange separation method. (authors)

  16. Low-level atmospheric flows studied by pulsed Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banta, Robert M.; Olivier, Lisa D.; Hardesty, R. Michael

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed Doppler radar gains a tremendous advantage in studying atmospheric flows when it has the ability to scan. The Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) has been operating a scanning, 10.59 micron CO2 system for over 10 years. Recently, the WPL lidar has been a featured instrument in several investigations of mesoscale wind fields in the lowest 3-4 km of the atmosphere. These include four experiments: a study of the initiation and growth of the sea breeze off the coast of California, a study of the snake column of a prescribed forest fire, a study of the nighttime flow over the complex terrain near Rocky Flats, Colorado as it affects the dispersion of atmospheric contaminants, and a study of the wind flow in the Grand Canyon. We have analyzed much data from these experiments, and we have found that the lidar provides new insight into the structure of these flows. Many of these studies took place in rugged or mountainous terrain, thus using one of the major benefits of the lidar: the narrow, 90 microrad beam of the lidar makes it an ideal instrument for studying flow close to topography.

  17. Bistability and chaos at low levels of quanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, T. V.; Shahinyan, A. R.; Chew, Lock Yue; Kryuchkyan, G. Yu.

    2013-08-01

    We study nonlinear phenomena of bistability and chaos at a level of few quanta. For this purpose, we consider a single-mode dissipative oscillator with strong Kerr nonlinearity with respect to the dissipation rate driven by a monochromatic force as well as by a train of Gaussian pulses. The quantum effects and decoherence in the oscillatory mode are investigated in the framework of the purity of states and the Wigner functions calculated from the master equation. We demonstrate the quantum chaotic regime by means of a comparison between the contour plots of the Wigner functions and the strange attractors on the classical Poincaré section. Considering bistability at a low limit of quanta, we analyze the minimal level of excitation numbers at which the bistable regime of the system is displayed. We also discuss the formation of an oscillatory chaotic regime by varying oscillatory excitation numbers at ranges of a few quanta. We demonstrate quantum-interference phenomena that are assisted hysteresis-cycle behavior and quantum chaos for the oscillator driven by a train of Gaussian pulses. We establish the border of quantum-classical correspondence for chaotic regimes in the case of strong nonlinearities.

  18. Novel Codon Insert in HIV Type 1 Clade B Reverse Transcriptase Associated with Low-Level Viremia During Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gianella, Sara; Vazquez, Homero; Ignacio, Caroline; Zweig, Adam C.; Richman, Douglas D.; Smith, Davey M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the pol genotype in two phylogenetically and epidemiologically linked partners, who were both experiencing persistent low-level viremia during antiretroviral therapy. In one partner we identified a new residue insertion between codon 248 and 249 of the HIV-1 RNA reverse transcriptase (RT) coding region (HXB2 numbering). We then investigated the potential impact of identified mutations in RT and antiretroviral binding affinity using a novel computational approach. PMID:24020934

  19. Fluxes of N2O and CH4 from forest and grassland lysimeter soils in response to simulated climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Daniel; Brueggemann, Nicolas; Puetz, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Central Europe is expected to be exposed to altered temperature and hydrological conditions, which will affect the vulnerability of nitrogen and carbon cycling in soils and thus production and fluxes of climate relevant trace gases. However, knowledge of the response of greenhouse gas fluxes to climate change is limited so far, but will be an important basis for future climate projections. Here we present preliminary results of an ongoing lysimeter field study which aims to assess the impact of simulated climate change on N2O and CH4 fluxes from a forest and a fertilized grassland soil. The lysimeters are part of the Germany-wide research infrastructure TERENO, which investigates feedbacks of climate change to the pedosphere on a long-term scale. Lysimeters (A = 1m2) were established in 2010 at high elevated sites (HE, 500 and 600 m.a.s.l.) and subsequently transferred along an altitudinal gradient to a low elevated site (LE, 100 m.a.s.l.) within the Eifel / Lower Rhine Valley Observatory in Western Germany, thereby resulting in a temperature increase of 2.3 K whereas precipitation decreased by 160 mm during the present study period. Systematic monitoring of soil-atmosphere exchange of N2O and CH4 based on weekly manual closed chamber measurements at HE and LE sites has started in August 2013. Furthermore, we routinely determine dissolved N2O and CH4 concentrations in the seepage water using a headspace equilibration technique and record water discharge in order to quantify leaching losses of both greenhouse gases. Cumulative N2O fluxes clearly responded to simulated climate change conditions and increased by 250 % and 600 % for the forest and the grassland soil, respectively. This difference between the HE and LE sites was mainly caused by an exceptionally heavy precipitation event in July 2014 which turned the LE site sustainably to a consistently higher emission level. Nonetheless, emissions remained rather small and ranged between 20 and 40 μg m-2 h-1. In

  20. Electrokinetics for removal of low-level radioactivity from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Pamukcu, S.; Wittle, J.K.

    1993-03-01

    The electrokinetic process is an emerging technology for in situ soil decontamination in which chemical species, both ionic and nonionic, are transported to an electrode site in soil. These products are subsequently removed from the ground via collection systems engineered for each specific application. The work presented here describes part of the effort undertaken to investigate electrokinetically enhanced transport of soil contaminants in synthetic systems. These systems consisted of clay or clay-sand mixtures containing known concentrations of a selected heavy-metal salt solution. These metals included surrogate radionuclides such as Sr, Cs and U, and an anionic species of Cr. Degree of removal of these metals from soil by the electrokinetic treatment process was assessed through the metal concentration profiles generated across the soil between the electrodes. Removals of some metal species up to 99% were achieved at the anode or cathode end of the soil upon 24 to 48 hours of treatment or a maximum of 1 pore volume of water displacement toward the cathode compartment. Transient pH change through the soil had an effect on the metal movement, as evidenced by accumulation of the metals at the discharge ends of the soil specimens. This accumulation was attributed to the precipitation of the metal and increased cation retention capacity of the clay in high pH environment at the cathode end. In general, the reduced mobility and dissociation of the ionic species as they encounter areas of higher ionic concentration in their path of migration resulted in the accumulation of the metals at the discharge ends of the soil specimens.

  1. Low Levels of Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate in Younger Burnout Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lennartsson, Anna-Karin; Theorell, Töres; Kushnir, Mark M.; Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-s) is an anabolic protective hormone of importance for maintenance of health. DHEA-s levels peak in young adults and decline thereafter with age. DHEA-s has previously been shown to be lower in individuals reporting prolonged stress. This study investigates DHEA-s levels in patients with clinical burnout, a disorder caused by long-term psychosocial stress. Methods 122 patients (51% men) and 47 controls (51% men) in the age 25–54 years were included in the study. DHEA-s levels were compared between patients and controls in the whole sample and within each of the three 10-year-interval age groups. Results In the youngest age group (25–34 years), DHEA-s levels were on average 25% lower in the patients (p = 0.006). The differences in DHEA-s levels between patients and controls were more pronounced among female than male participants (on average 32% and 13% lower, respectively). There were no differences in DHEA-s levels between patients and controls in the age group 35–44 years (p = 0.927) or 45–54 years (p = 0.897) or when analyzing all age groups together (p = 0.187). Conclusion The study indicates that levels of the health promoting “youth” hormone DHEA-s are low in younger burnout patients. The fact that younger adults have much higher DHEA-s levels and more pronounced inter-subject variability in DHEA-s levels than older individuals might explain why burnout status differentiates patients from controls only among the youngest patients included in this study. PMID:26441131

  2. Low-level aeromagnetic surveying for petroleum in arctic Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, T.J.; Hendricks, J.D.; Roberts, A.A.; Eliason, P.T.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic anomalies of high wave number measured over oil fields have been interpreted as reflecting abundant near-surface magnetic minerals formed as a direct result of petroleum seepage. The investigation reported here, undertaken during the summer of 1979, demonstrates that these kinds of anomalies are associated with known occurrences of petroleum in northern Alaska. Because routine geological and geophysical information is especially difficult and expensive to acquire in northern Alaska, rapidly gathered and relatively inexpensive aeromagnetic data that might conceivably serve as an indirect indicator of hydrocarbons could have an impact on exploration activities there. Additionally, documentation of microseepage-related phenomena is an important step toward understanding petroleum microseepage in a permafrost environment. Rocks above and adjacent to the Barrow arch, a buried regional feature along the north coast of Alaska, are a primary habitat for oil and gas, but the geologic framework and the geology of petroleum occurrence are complex. Upper Devonian to lowermost Cretaceous carbonate and clastic rocks derived from northern sources were deposited in a basin that deepened southward. These rocks contain four of the five major reservoirs in the Prudhoe Bay field, which is located on the arch 330 km southeast of Barrow. Formation of the ancestral Brooks Range and the opening of the Arctic Ocean in the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous caused southern sediment sources to replace the northern landmass. Subsequent subsidence and tilting of the continental margin toward the opening Arctic Ocean resulted in the formation of the Barrow arch. The Barrow arch was onlapped and overlapped in Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times by a series of clastic wedges that filled northeastward-migrating foredeeps.

  3. Long-term, low-level microwave irradiation of rats.

    PubMed

    Chou, C K; Guy, A W; Kunz, L L; Johnson, R B; Crowley, J J; Krupp, J H

    1992-01-01

    Our goal was to investigate effects of long-term exposure to pulsed microwave radiation. The major emphasis was to expose a large sample of experimental animals throughout their lifetimes and to monitor them for effects on general health and longevity. An exposure facility was developed that enabled 200 rats to be maintained under specific-pathogen-free (SPF) conditions while housed individually in circularly-polarized waveguides. The exposure facility consisted of two rooms, each containing 50 active waveguides and 50 waveguides for sham (control) exposures. The experimental rats were exposed to 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves at 800 pps with a 10-microseconds pulse width. The pulsed microwaves were square-wave modulated at 8-Hz. Whole body calorimetry, thermographic analysis, and power-meter analysis indicated that microwaves delivered at 0.144 W to each exposure waveguide resulted in an average specific absorption rate (SAR) that ranged from 0.4 W/kg for a 200-g rat to 0.15 W/kg for an 800-g rat. Two hundred male, Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned in equal numbers to radiation-exposure and sham-exposure conditions. Exposure began at 8 weeks of age and continued daily, 21.5 h/day, for 25 months. Animals were bled at regular intervals and blood samples were analyzed for serum chemistries, hematological values, protein electrophoretic patterns, thyroxine, and plasma corticosterone levels. In addition to daily measures of body mass, food and water consumption by all animals, O2 consumption and CO2 production were periodically measured in a sub-sample (N = 18) of each group. Activity was assessed in an open-field apparatus at regular intervals throughout the study. After 13 months, 10 rats from each group were euthanatized to test for immunological competence and to permit whole-body analysis, as well as gross and histopathological examinations. At the end of 25 months, the survivors (11 sham-exposed and 12 radiation-exposed rats) were euthanatized for similar analyses

  4. Neuropsychological Effects of Low-Level Manganese Exposure in Welders

    PubMed Central

    Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Lin, Xihong; Herrick, Robert F.; Fang, Shona C.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Shrairman, Ruth; Landau, Alexander; Christiani, David C.; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    While the neuropsychological effects of high manganese (Mn) exposure in occupational settings are well known, the effects of lower levels of exposure are less understood. In this study, we investigated the neuropsychological effects of lower level occupational Mn exposure in 46 male welders (mean age = 37.4, sd = 11.7 years). Each welders’ cumulative Mn exposure indices (Mn-CEI) for the past 12 months and total work history Mn exposure were constructed based on air Mn measurements and work histories. The association between these exposure indices and performance on cognitive, motor control, and psychological tests was examined. In addition, among a subset of welders (n=24) who completed the tests both before and after a work shift, we examined the association between cross-shift Mn exposure assessed from personal monitoring and acute changes in test scores. Mn exposures in this study (median = 12.9 μg/m3) were much lower, as compared to those observed in other similar studies. Increasing total Mn-CEI was significantly associated with slower reaction time on the continuous performance test (CPT; p<0.01), as well as worse mood for several scales on the Profile of Mood States (POMS; confused, tired, and a composite of tired and energetic, all p≤0.03). Increasing Mn-CEI over the previous 12 months was significantly associated with worse mood on the sad, tense, and confused POMS scales (all p≤0.03) and the association with worse CPT performance approached significance (p=0.10). Higher Mn exposure over the course of a workday was associated with worse performance on the CPT test across the day (p=0.06) as well as declines in fine motor control over the work-shift (p=0.04), adjusting for age and time between the 2 tests. Our study suggests that even at relatively low Mn exposure levels neuropsychological effects may manifest particularly with respect to attention, mood, and fine motor control. PMID:21192973

  5. Effects of Low-level Laser in the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Dysfunction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Arash; Sahebjamee, Mahnaz; Lawaf, Shirin; Jamalee, Fereydoon; Maroofi, Nader

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims Muscular pain in the facial region is the most common cause of facial pains. Myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPDS) is one of the most important facial muscle disorders comprising of signs and symptoms including pain during function, tenderness in the muscles of mastication and restricted jaw movement. Due to the lack of an accepted therapeutic approach, the purpose of this paper was to find an effective treatment to decrease the pain of such patients. Considering the analgesic and anti-inflammatory action of laser therapy, the effects of low level laser (Ga-Al-As) in the treatment of MPDS patients referred to Tehran University of Medical Sciences Faculty of Dentistry, were investigated in the present study. Materials and methods This study was a quasi-experimental research. Twenty-two MPDS patients were selected from those referred to Department of Oral Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences Faculty of Dentistry. Clinical examination was performed at six stages in the following order: prior to the treatment, at 2 and 4 weeks after treatment, and monthly thereafter for a 3-months follow-up. All patients underwent low-level laser therapy for 4 weeks (12 sessions). Variables such as pain severity, pain of cheek region, pain frequency, tenderness of masticatory muscles, click, and mouth opening were evaluated at each stage. Numerical variables were investigated using Analysis of Variance test for repeated measures whereas ranking variables were studied by non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Results At the end of treatment period, pain severity, pain of cheek region, pain frequency, tenderness of masseter, temporalis, medial pterygoid, and lateral pterygoid muscles showed significant improvement as compared with the commencement of any treatment which continued during the 3-months post-treatment (p<0.05). Conclusion It was shown that low-level laser (Ga-Al-As) therapy had the efficacy to alleviate pain and decrease the tenderness of

  6. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Winter meeting, January 26--28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  7. Low-Level Waste Forum meeting report. Quarterly meeting, April 25--27, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  8. Low-Level Waste Forum meeting report. Quarterly meeting, July 23--24, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  9. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Quarterly meeting, July 25--26, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  10. Investigating Negotiation of Meaning in EFL Children with Very Low Levels of Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lázaro, Amparo; Azpilicueta-Martinez, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies hold that interaction has beneficial effects on second language acquisition among adults and children in second language contexts. However, data from children learning English as a foreign language are still unavailable. In order to fill this research niche, this study examines the conversational interactions of 8 pairs of young…

  11. Gold Nanoparticle Based Activatable Probe for Sensing Ultra-Low Levels of Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dingbin; Huang, Xinglu; Wang, Zhantong; Jin, Albert; Sun, Xiaolian; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Fu; Ma, Ying; Niu, Gang; HightWalker, Angela R.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    It is still in high demand to develop extremely sensitive and accurate clinical tools for biomarkers of interest for early diagnosis and monitoring of diseases. In this report, we present a highly sensitive and compatible gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based fluorescence activatable probe for sensing ultra-low levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patient serum samples. The limit of detection of the newly-developed probe for PSA was pushed down to 0.032 pg/mL, which is more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of the conventional fluorescence probe. The ultrahigh sensitivity of this probe was attributed to the high loading efficiency of the dyes on AuNP surfaces and high fluorescence quenching unquenching abilities of the dye-AuNP pairs. The efficiency and robustness of this probe was investigated in patient serum samples, demonstrating the great potential of this probe in real-world applications. PMID:23683064

  12. Abnormal liver function in workers exposed to low levels of ethylene dichloride and vinyl chloride monomer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T J; Huang, M L; You, N C; Du, C L; Chau, T T

    1999-12-01

    We investigated whether exposure to ethylene dichloride (EDC) and vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) resulted in increased risk of liver damage. Epidemiological information, including occupational, medical, smoking, and drinking history, was obtained by interview from 251 male workers. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) were used as indicators of liver damage. Exposure to moderate or low levels of ECD and VCM resulted in a higher risk of developing abnormal ALT levels than did exposure to lower levels of the chemicals. Results were similar for AST. GGT was not associated with EDC or VCM exposure. Combined exposure to EDC and VCM showed a dose-response relationship in association with abnormal ALT levels. We concluded that relatively low concentrations of VCM and EDC cause liver damage.

  13. Controllable release from high-transition temperature magnetoliposomes by low-level magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Spera, Romina; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela; Paffi, Alessandra; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Petralito, Stefania

    2015-07-01

    High-transition temperature liposomes with embedded coated magnetite nanoparticles were prepared using the thin lipid film hydration method in order to obtain magnetoliposomes not sensitive to temperature increase (at least up to 50°C). Accordingly, drug can be released from such magnetoliposomes using a low-level electromagnetic field as triggering agent, while no delivery would be obtained with temperature increase within the physiological acceptable range. The hypothesized release mechanism involves mechanical stress of the liposome membrane due to nanoparticles oscillations and it is investigated by means of a numerical model evaluated using multiphysics simulations. The carrier content was repetitively released by switching on and off a 20kHz, 60A/m magnetic field. The results indicated high reproducibility of cycle-to-cycle release induced by the magnetic-impelled motions driving to the destabilization of the bilayer rather than the liposome phase transition or the destruction of the liposome structure.

  14. Controllable release from high-transition temperature magnetoliposomes by low-level magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Spera, Romina; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela; Paffi, Alessandra; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Petralito, Stefania

    2015-07-01

    High-transition temperature liposomes with embedded coated magnetite nanoparticles were prepared using the thin lipid film hydration method in order to obtain magnetoliposomes not sensitive to temperature increase (at least up to 50°C). Accordingly, drug can be released from such magnetoliposomes using a low-level electromagnetic field as triggering agent, while no delivery would be obtained with temperature increase within the physiological acceptable range. The hypothesized release mechanism involves mechanical stress of the liposome membrane due to nanoparticles oscillations and it is investigated by means of a numerical model evaluated using multiphysics simulations. The carrier content was repetitively released by switching on and off a 20kHz, 60A/m magnetic field. The results indicated high reproducibility of cycle-to-cycle release induced by the magnetic-impelled motions driving to the destabilization of the bilayer rather than the liposome phase transition or the destruction of the liposome structure. PMID:26042528

  15. An experimental survey of the factors that affect leaching from low-level radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, D.R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1988-09-01

    This report represents the results of an experimental survey of the factors that affect leaching from several types of solidified low-level radioactive waste forms. The goal of these investigations was to determine those factors that accelerate leaching without changing its mechanism(s). Typically, although not in every case,the accelerating factors include: increased temperature, increased waste loading (i.e., increased waste to binder ratio), and decreased size (i.e., decreased waste form volume to surface area ratio). Additional factors that were studied were: increased leachant volume to waste form surface area ratio, pH, leachant composition (groundwaters, natural and synthetic chelating agents), leachant flow rate or replacement frequency and waste form porosity and surface condition. Other potential factors, including the radiation environment and pressure, were omitted based on a survey of the literature. 82 refs., 236 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Commercial disposal options for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C.L.; Widmayer, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-operated site. Significant quantities of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) have been generated and disposed of onsite at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The INEL expects to continue generating LLW while performing its mission and as aging facilities are decommissioned. An on-going Performance Assessment process for the RWMC underscores the potential for reduced or limited LLW disposal capacity at the existing onsite facility. In order to properly manage the anticipated amount of LLW, the INEL is investigating various disposal options. These options include building a new facility, disposing the LLW at other DOE sites, using commercial disposal facilities, or seeking a combination of options. This evaluation reports on the feasibility of using commercial disposal facilities.

  17. Comparative approaches to siting low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Newberry, W.F.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes activities in nine States to select site locations for new disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. These nine States have completed processes leading to identification of specific site locations for onsite investigations. For each State, the status, legal and regulatory framework, site criteria, and site selection process are described. In most cases, States and compact regions decided to assign responsibility for site selection to agencies of government and to use top-down mapping methods for site selection. The report discusses quantitative and qualitative techniques used in applying top-down screenings, various approaches for delineating units of land for comparison, issues involved in excluding land from further consideration, and different positions taken by the siting organizations in considering public acceptance, land use, and land availability as factors in site selection.

  18. Groundwater monitoring in the Savannah River Plant Low Level Waste Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.

    1983-12-31

    This document describes chemical mechanisms that may affect trace-level radionuclide migration through acidic sandy clay soils in a humid environment, and summarizes the extensive chemical and radiochemical analyses of the groundwater directly below the SRP Low-Level Waste (LLW) Burial Ground (643-G). Anomalies were identified in the chemistry of individual wells which appear to be related to small amounts of fission product activity that have reached the water table. The chemical properties which were statistically related to trace level transport of Cs-137 and Sr-90 were iron, potassium, sodium and calcium. Concentrations on the order of 100 ppM appear sufficient to affect nuclide migration. Several complexation mechanisms for plutonium migration were investigated.

  19. Leaching of brominated flame retardants from mixed wastes in lysimeters under conditions simulating landfills in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Natsuko; Hirata, Osamu; Takigami, Hidetaka; Noma, Yukio; Tachifuji, Ayako; Matsufuji, Yasushi

    2014-12-01

    In developing countries, wastes are usually not separated before being disposed of in solid-waste landfills, most of which are open dumps without adequate measures to prevent environmental pollution. To understand the leaching behavior of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) from waste consumer products in landfills, we have been conducting a long-term landfill lysimeter experiment since 2006 under conditions designed to mimic three types of landfill conditions in developing countries: aerobic, semi-aerobic, and anaerobic. Pilot-scale lysimeters (60-cm i.d.) were filled with a 400-cm layer of mixed wastes consisting of 35 wt% food, 20 wt% paper, 20 wt% paper pulp, 13 wt% plastic, 10 wt% wood chips, 1 wt% glass, and 1 wt% metals, proportions that are typical of unsorted municipal solid waste in Asian developing countries. In the present study, we determined the concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, tetrabromobisphenol A, tribromophenols, and hexabromocyclododecanes in leachate samples collected from the lysimeters during the first 3.5 years of the experiment, to evaluate BFR elution behavior in early-stage landfills. Under all three conditions, BFR elution started at the beginning of the experiment. The BFR concentrations in the leachates from the aerobic lysimeter tended to be lower than those from the anaerobic lysimeter, suggesting that the presence of air inside landfills considerably reduces BFR elution to the surrounding environment. During the 3.5-year experiment, BFR outflow from the lysimeters was only 0.001-0.58% of the total BFRs in the loaded waste; that is, most of the BFRs in the waste remained in the lysimeters. PMID:24560282

  20. Leaching of brominated flame retardants from mixed wastes in lysimeters under conditions simulating landfills in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Natsuko; Hirata, Osamu; Takigami, Hidetaka; Noma, Yukio; Tachifuji, Ayako; Matsufuji, Yasushi

    2014-12-01

    In developing countries, wastes are usually not separated before being disposed of in solid-waste landfills, most of which are open dumps without adequate measures to prevent environmental pollution. To understand the leaching behavior of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) from waste consumer products in landfills, we have been conducting a long-term landfill lysimeter experiment since 2006 under conditions designed to mimic three types of landfill conditions in developing countries: aerobic, semi-aerobic, and anaerobic. Pilot-scale lysimeters (60-cm i.d.) were filled with a 400-cm layer of mixed wastes consisting of 35 wt% food, 20 wt% paper, 20 wt% paper pulp, 13 wt% plastic, 10 wt% wood chips, 1 wt% glass, and 1 wt% metals, proportions that are typical of unsorted municipal solid waste in Asian developing countries. In the present study, we determined the concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, tetrabromobisphenol A, tribromophenols, and hexabromocyclododecanes in leachate samples collected from the lysimeters during the first 3.5 years of the experiment, to evaluate BFR elution behavior in early-stage landfills. Under all three conditions, BFR elution started at the beginning of the experiment. The BFR concentrations in the leachates from the aerobic lysimeter tended to be lower than those from the anaerobic lysimeter, suggesting that the presence of air inside landfills considerably reduces BFR elution to the surrounding environment. During the 3.5-year experiment, BFR outflow from the lysimeters was only 0.001-0.58% of the total BFRs in the loaded waste; that is, most of the BFRs in the waste remained in the lysimeters.

  1. Effects of low-level radioactive-waste disposal on water chemistry in the unsaturated zone at a site near Sheffield, Illinois, 1982-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, C.A.; Striegl, R.G.; Mills, P.C.; Healy, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    A 1982-84 field study defined the chemistry of water collected from the unsaturated zone at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Bureau County, Illinois. Chemical data were evaluated to determine the principal naturally occurring geochemical reactions in the unsaturated zone and to evaluate waste-induced effects on pore-water chemistry. Samples of precipitation, unsaturated-zone pore water, and saturated-zone water were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, major cations and anions, dissolved organic carbon, gross alpha and beta radiation, and tritium. Little change in concentration of most major constituents in the unsaturated-zone water was observed with respect to depth or distance from disposal trenches. Tritium and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were, however, dependent on proximity to trenches. The primary reactions, both on- site and off-site, were carbonate and clay dissolution, cation exchange, and the oxidation of pyrite. The major difference between on-site and off-site inorganic water chemistry resulted from the removal of the Roxana Silt and the Radnor Till Member of the Glasford Formation from on-site. Off-site, the Roxana Silt contributed substantial quantities of sodium to solution from montmorillonite dissolution and associated cation-exchange reactions. The Radnor Till Member provided exchange surfaces for magnesium. Precipitation at the site had an ionic composition of calcium zinc sulfate and an average pH of 4.6. Within 0.3 meter of the land surface, infiltrating rain water or snowmelt changed to an ionic canposition of calcium sulfate off-site and calcium bicarbonate on-site and had an average pH of 7.9; below that depth, pH averaged 7.5 and the ionic composition generally was calcium magnesium bicarbonate. Alkalinity and specific conductance differed primarily according to composition of geologic materials. Tritium concentrations ranged from 0.2 (detection limit) to 1,380 nanocuries per liter. The

  2. Effects of low-level radioactive-waste disposal on water chemistry in the unsaturated zone at a site near Sheffield, Illinois, 1982-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, C.A.; Striegl, R.G.; Mills, P.C.; Healy, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    A 1982-84 field study defined the chemistry of water collected from the unsaturated zone at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Bureau County, Ill. Chemical data were evaluated to determine the principal, naturally occurring geochemical reactions in the unsaturated zone and to evaluate waste-induced effects on pore-water chemistry. Samples of precipitation, unsaturated-zone pore water, and saturated-zone water were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, major cations and anions, dissolved organic carbon, gross alpha and beta radiation, and tritium. Little change in concentration of most major constituents in the unsaturated-zone water was observed with respect to depth or distance from disposal trenches. Tritium and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were, however, dependent on proximity to trenches. The primary reactions, both on-site and off-site, were carbonate and clay dissolution, cation exchange, and the oxidation of pyrite. The major difference between on-site and off-site inorganic water chemistry resulted from the removal of the Roxana Silt and the Radnor Till Member of the Glasford Formation from on-site. Off-site, the Roxana Silt contributed substantial quantities of sodium to solution from montmorillonite dissolution and associated cation-exchange reactions. The Radnor Till Member provided exchange surfaces for magnesium. Precipitation at the site had an ionic composition of calcium zinc sulfate and an average pH of 4.6. Within 0.3 meter of the land surface, infiltrating rainwater or snowmelt changed to an ionic composition of calcium sulfate off-site and calcium bicarbonate on-site and had an average pH of 7.9; below that depth, pH averaged 7.5 and the ionic composition generally was calcium magnesium bicarbonate. Alkalinity and specific conductance differed primarily according to composition of geologic materials. Tritium concentrations ranged from 0.2 (detection limit) to 1,380 nanocuries per liter. The

  3. Report to Congress: 1995 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This report is prepared in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, Public Law 96-573, 1980, as amended by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes the progress of states and compact regions during calendar year 1995 in establishing new disposal facilities for commercially-generated low-level radioactive waste. The report emphasizes significant issues and events that have affected progress, and also includes an introduction that provides background information and perspective on United States policy for low-level radioactive waste disposal.

  4. Approximate Co-Location of Precipitation and Low-Level Westerlies in Tropical Monthly Means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choa, Winston C.; Chen, Baode

    1999-01-01

    In summer monsoon regions the monthly mean precipitation regions coincide approximately well with regions of westerlies at low-levels. An included chart shows a 15-year (1979-1993) mean August 850 hPa zonal wind from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset and Xie-Arkin precipitation. It shows a region of westerlies covering most of Northern Indian Ocean and extending to northwestern Pacific. This region coincides well with the region with precipitation greater than 6 mm/day. Obviously the coincidence is not exact; the region of larges; zonal wind in the Arabian Sea is in a region of relatively low precipitation and is far from the region of maximum precipitation in Bay of Bengal. Also, in a zonally averaged sense between 40E and 140E, the latitude of maximum precipitation is slightly higher than that of the maximum zonal wind. Low-level westerlies are also found in regions west of Central America and in western Africa north of the equator. These regions are also closely associated with precipitation centers. Across equator from these westerlies regions there are regions of strong easterlies. Also, on their poleward side the westerly regions are flanked by weaker easterly regions. In February, similar observation can be found in the Australian monsoon area and in South America monsoon region; again the regions of westerlies coincide well with regions of maximum precipitation. As in the northern hemisphere, the maximum precipitation is found to the cast of the maximum zonal wind. The two maxima lie almost at the same latitude with that of the westerlies slightly closer to the equator. In the non-monsoon seasons the low- level westerlies can also be found in the tropical precipitation regions, the longitudinal range of the westerlies is undiminished and the speed of the westerlies is not much weaker than that found in February. The interpretation of these observational facts is the goal of this investigation. The approach taken is numerical simulation with the Goddard Earth

  5. Global Climatology of the Coastal Low-Level Wind Jets using different Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Daniela C. A.; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Semedo, Alvaro; Cardoso, Rita M.

    2016-04-01

    System Reanalysis (NCEP CFSR). The CLLJ detection method proposed by Ranjha et al. (2013) was used for the reanalysis data. The criteria was applied sequentially to wind-speed and temperature vertical profiles to detect the location and frequency of CLLJ. The CLLJs spatio-temporal features and the seasonal synoptic configuration associated with the presence of coastal jets are studied for the period (1979-2008) using the ensemble. The present study will allow us to investigate thoroughly the global coastal low-level jets occurrence and main properties, following a new perspective and to assess the uncertainties in the representation of this jets by the available reanalysis. ublication supported by project FCT UID/GEO/50019/2013 - Instituto Dom Luiz.

  6. Low level laser therapy and hair regrowth: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mina; Wikramanayake, Tongyu C; Falto-Aizpurua, Leyre; Schachner, Lawrence A; Jimenez, Joaquin J

    2016-02-01

    Despite the current treatment options for different types of alopecia, there is a need for more effective management options. Recently, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) was evaluated for stimulating hair growth. Here, we reviewed the current evidence on the LLLT effects with an evidence-based approach, focusing more on randomized controlled studies by critically evaluating them. In order to investigate whether in individuals presenting with hair loss (male pattern hair loss (MPHL), female pattern hair loss (FPHL), alopecia areata (AA), and chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA)) LLLT is effective for hair regrowth, several databases including PubMed, Google Scholar, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Database were searched using the following keywords: Alopecia, Hair loss, Hair growth, Low level laser therapy, Low level light therapy, Low energy laser irradiation, and Photobiomodulation. From the searches, 21 relevant studies were summarized in this review including 2 in vitro, 7 animal, and 12 clinical studies. Among clinical studies, only five were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which evaluated LLLT effect on male and female pattern hair loss. The RCTs were critically appraised using the created checklist according to the Critical Appraisal for Therapy Articles Worksheet created by the Center of Evidence-Based Medicine, Oxford. The results demonstrated that all the performed RCTs have moderate to high quality of evidence. However, only one out of five studies performed intention-to-treat analysis, and only another study reported the method of randomization and subsequent concealment of allocation clearly; all other studies did not include this very important information in their reports. None of these studies reported the treatment effect of factors such as number needed to treat. Based on this review on all the available evidence about effect of LLLT in alopecia, we found that the FDA-cleared LLLT devices are both safe and effective in patients with MPHL and FPHL

  7. Low-level jet characteristics over the Arctic Ocean in spring and summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobson, L.; Vihma, T.; Jakobson, E.; Palo, T.; Männik, A.; Jaagus, J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-level jets (LLJ) are important for turbulence in the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, but their occurrence, properties, and generation mechanisms in the Arctic are not well known. We analysed LLJs over the central Arctic Ocean in spring and summer 2007 on the bases of data collected in the drifting ice station Tara. Instead of traditional radiosonde soundings, data from tethersonde soundings with a high vertical resolution were used. The Tara results showed a lower occurrence of LLJs (46%) than many previous studies over polar sea ice. Strong jet core winds contributed to growth of the turbulent layer. Complex relationship between the jet core height and the temperature inversion top height were detected: substantial correlation (r = 0.72; p < 0.01) occurred when the jet core was above the turbulent layer, but inside the turbulent layer there was no correlation. The most important forcing mechanism for LLJs was baroclinicity, which was responsible for generation of strong and warm LLJs, which on average occurred at lower altitudes than other jets. Baroclinic jets were mostly associated to transient cyclones instead of the climatological air temperature gradients. Besides baroclinicity, cases related to inertial oscillations, gusts, and fronts were detected. In approximately 50% of the observed LLJs the generation mechanism remained unclear, but in most of these cases the wind speed was strong in the whole vertical profile, the jet core representing only a weak maximum. Further research needs on LLJs in the Arctic include investigation of low-level jet streams and their effects on the sea ice drift and atmospheric moisture transport.

  8. Evaluation of the Effect of Low Level Laser Therapy Toothbrush in Treatment of Dentin Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Jaber; Mogharehabed, Ahmad; Safavi, Nassimeh; Mohamadi, Mehrnush; Ashtiju, Fahime

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dentin hypersensitivity is one of the most common complications that affect patients after periodontal therapy. Recently low level laser therapy has been introduced as a new treatment modality and has produced beneficial results. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of low level laser therapy toothbrushes in reduction of dentin hypersensitivity. Methods: In this pilot interventional controlled clinical trial, 40 patients suffering from dentin hypersensitivity were selected using simple randomization. Half of the patients were given laser toothbrushes and the other half was given non-laser sensodyne toothbrushes. Primary dentin hypersensitivity was recorded by visual analogue scale (VAS) score and ice spray. Then dentin hypersensitivity was measured right after the treatment as well az in the intervals of 1 month and 2 months after initiation of the study. Data were compared using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software and Analysis of variance (ANOVA) paired T test. Results: The results of this study showed that there was a significant difference in each of the two kinds of tooth brushes separately for all time intervals (P < 0.001). Also the effect of the type of toothbrush was investigated using before treatment VAS with covariance analyses. P values for immediately, 1 month and 2 months after treatment were calculated to be 0.078, 0.02, 0.01 respectfully. Also the effect of the toothbrush type was significant in the manner that laser toothbrushes reduce dentin hypersensitivity more than ordinary toothbrushes (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Both sensodyne and laser tooth brushes improve dentin hypersensitivity, although the laser toothbrush led to better results in short. PMID:25987974

  9. Poleward shift in Indian summer monsoon low level jetstream under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, S.; Ajayamohan R., S.

    2015-04-01

    The low level jetstream (LLJ) transports moisture from the surrounding Oceans to Indian land mass and hence an important component of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM). Widening of tropical belt and poleward shifts in mid-latitude jetstreams have been identified as major impacts of global warming on large-scale atmospheric dynamics. A general northward shift in ISM circulation has been suggested recently, based on the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) simulations. Here, we investigate the current and projected future changes in LLJ in observations as well as the coupled model (CMIP3/CMIP5) simulations. A poleward shift in the monsoon LLJ has been detected both in the observations and coupled model simulations. The poleward shift is also reflected in the future projections in a warming scenario, with the magnitude of shift depending on the degree of warming. Consistent with the LLJ shift, a drying (wet) trend in the southern (northern) part of the western coast of India is also observed in the last three decades. Further analysis reveals that enhanced land-sea contrast resulted in a strengthening of the cross-equatorial sea level pressure gradient over Indian Ocean, which in turn resulted in the northward shift of the zero absolute vorticity contour from its climatological position. The poleward shift in zero absolute vorticity contour is consistent with that of LLJ core (location of maximum low-level zonal winds). Possible uncertainties in the results are discussed in the context of known model biases and ensemble sample sizes. These results assume significance in the context of the concerns over ecologically fragile Western Ghats region in a warming scenario.

  10. Poleward shift in Indian summer monsoon low level jetstream under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, S.; Ajayamohan, R. S.

    2015-07-01

    The low level jetstream (LLJ) transports moisture from the surrounding Oceans to Indian land mass and hence an important component of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM). Widening of tropical belt and poleward shifts in mid-latitude jetstreams have been identified as major impacts of global warming on large-scale atmospheric dynamics. A general northward shift in ISM circulation has been suggested recently, based on the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) simulations. Here, we investigate the current and projected future changes in LLJ in observations as well as the coupled model (CMIP3/CMIP5) simulations. A poleward shift in the monsoon LLJ has been detected both in the observations and coupled model simulations. The poleward shift is also reflected in the future projections in a warming scenario, with the magnitude of shift depending on the degree of warming. Consistent with the LLJ shift, a drying (wet) trend in the southern (northern) part of the western coast of India is also observed in the last three decades. Further analysis reveals that enhanced land-sea contrast resulted in a strengthening of the cross-equatorial sea level pressure gradient over Indian Ocean, which in turn resulted in the northward shift of the zero absolute vorticity contour from its climatological position. The poleward shift in zero absolute vorticity contour is consistent with that of LLJ core (location of maximum low-level zonal winds). Possible uncertainties in the results are discussed in the context of known model biases and ensemble sample sizes. These results assume significance in the context of the concerns over ecologically fragile Western Ghats region in a warming scenario.

  11. No enhancement in bioconcentration of organic contaminants by low levels of DOM

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haitzer, M.; Akkanen, J.; Steinberg, C.; Kukkonen, J.V.K.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to systematically study the effect of low concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the bioconcentration of organic contaminants, in order to show whether the phenomenon of enhanced bioconcentration factors (BCFs), that has been reported in the literature, is generally found at low levels of DOM or if BCF enhancements are more likely due to a random scatter in the experimental data. The first part of the study tested the hypothesis that low levels of DOM affect the uptake kinetics of organic contaminants, leading to transient enhancements of BCFs, relative to DOM-free controls, which could have been reported as BCF enhancements in short-term studies. We found that the presence of low concentrations of two different types of DOM consistently decreased the bioconcentration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in the water flea Daphnia magna at all exposure times (1-24 h), and that no transient BCF enhancements occurred. The second part of the study systematically investigated if low concentrations of DOM from a wide range of different aquatic systems can cause enhancements in the bioconcentration of organic contaminants. Water fleas were exposed to combinations of four different organic contaminants (BaP, tetrachlorobiphenyl, pentachlorophenol and naphthalene) with low concentrations of 12 different types of DOM that had been collected from various regions throughout Europe. In several of the DOM treatments, we found mean BCFs being higher than mean BCFs in the controls (especially for naphthalene). This shows that the experimental setup used in this study (and similarly in previous studies) can produce seeming BCF enhancements at low concentrations of DOM. However, statistical analyses showed that treatment means were not significantly different from control means. Thus, this systematic study suggests that the BCF enhancements that have been reported in the literature are more likely the result of random, experimental variations than the

  12. Controversial effects of low level laser irradiation on the proliferation of human osteoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bölükbaşı Ateş, Gamze; Ak, Ayşe.; Garipcan, Bora; Yüksel, Šahru; Gülsoy, Murat

    2015-03-01

    Low level laser irradiation (LLLI) is the application of red or near infrared lasers irradiating between 600-1100 nm with an output power of 1-500 mW. Several researches indicate that LLLI modulates cellular mechanisms and leads to enhance proliferation. Although the biological mechanisms are not fully understood, it is known that the effects depend on several parameters such as wavelength, irradiation duration, energy level, beam type and energy density. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of low level laser irradiation at varying energy densities with two different wavelengths (635 nm and 809 nm) on the proliferation of human osteoblasts in vitro. The cells are seeded on 96 well plates (105cells/well) and after 24 h incubation cells are irradiated at energy densities 0.5 J/cm2, 1 J/cm2 and 2 J/cm2. Cell viability test is applied after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h in order to examine effects of laser irradiation on osteoblast proliferation. 635 nm light irradiation did not appear to have significant effect on the proliferation of osteoblasts as compared to the control. On the other hand, 809 nm laser irradiation caused significant (p ≤ 0.01) biostimulation effect on the osteoblast cell cultures at 48 h and 72 h. In conclusion, irradiation of both wavelengths did not cause any cytotoxic effects. 809 nm light irradiation can promote proliferation of human osteoblasts in vitro. On the other hand, 635 nm light irradiation has no positive effect on osteoblast proliferation. As a result, LLLI applied using different wavelengths on the same cell type may lead to different biological effects.

  13. Is there a stimulation of blood microcirculation at low level laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogatkin, Dmitry; Dunaev, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    In 1980-2000 besides the laser surgery an intensive evolution of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) had started in medicine, especially in Russia as well as in several other East-European countries. At the same time the biophysical mechanisms of LLLT are still the subject of disputes. One of the most popular clinical effects at Low Level Laser Irradiation (LLLI) being mentioned in medical publications for justification of the LLLT healing outcome is a stimulation of blood microcirculation in irradiated area. It was declared a priori at a dawn of LLLT and is now a basis of medical interpretation of healing mechanisms of LLLT at least in Russia. But in past 20 years a lot of investigation was carried out on optical registration of microhaemodynamic parameters in vivo as well as a number of noninvasive diagnostic tools was created for that. So, today it is possible to experimentally check the blood microcirculation stimulation hypothesis. Our study was aimed on that during the past 10 years. The most precision and accurate experiments we have carried out recently using simultaneously three different noninvasive diagnostic techniques: Laser Doppler Flowmetry, Tissue Reflectance Oximetry and Infrared Thermography. All these methods didn't confirm the effect on the blood microcirculation stimulation in skin or mucosa at irradiation with the power density below 50 mW/cm2 and irradiation time up to 5-6 minutes. Above this threshold the heating on 0,8…1 °C of tissue in the field of irradiation and the corresponding synchronous increase of all parameters of microhemodynamics were observed.

  14. Mild neurotrauma indicates a range-specific pressure response to low level shock wave exposure.

    PubMed

    Vandevord, Pamela J; Bolander, Richard; Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Hay, Kathryn; Bir, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the level of overpressure required to create physiological deficits is vital to advance prevention, diagnostic, and treatment strategies for individuals exposed to blasts. In this study, a rodent model of primary blast neurotrauma was employed to determine the pressure at which acute neurological alterations occurred. Rats were exposed to a single low intensity shock wave at a pressure of 0, 97, 117, or 153 kPa. Following exposure, rats were assessed for acute cognitive alterations using the Morris water maze and motor dysfunction using the horizontal ladder test. Subsequently, histological analyses of three brain regions (primary motor cortex, the hippocampal dentate gyrus region, and the posteromedial cortical amygdala) were conducted. Histological parameters included measuring the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to identify astrocyte activation, cleaved caspase-3 for early apoptosis identification and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) which labels degenerating neurons within the brain tissue. The results demonstrated that an exposure to a single 117 kPa shock wave revealed a significant change in overall neurological deficits when compared to controls and the other pressures. The animals showed significant alterations in water maze parameters and a histological increase in the number of GFAP, caspase-3, and FJB-positive cells. It is suggested that when exposed to a low level shock wave, there may be a biomechanical response elicited by a specific pressure range which can cause low level neurological deficits within the rat. These data indicate that neurotrauma induced from a shock wave may lead to cognitive deficits in short-term learning and memory of rats. Additional histological evidence supports significant and diffuse glial activation and cellular damage. Further investigation into the biomechanical aspects of shock wave exposure is required to elucidate this pressure range-specific phenomenon. PMID:21994066

  15. Pulmonary biochemical and histological alterations after repeated low-level blast overpressure exposures.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Nabil M; Gorbunov, Nikolai V

    2007-01-01

    Blast overpressure (BOP), also known as high energy impulse noise, is a damaging outcome of explosive detonations and firing of weapons. Exposure to BOP shock waves alone results in injury predominantly to the hollow organ systems such as auditory, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. In recent years, the hazards of BOP that once were confined to military and professional settings have become a global societal problem as terrorist bombings and armed conflicts involving both military and civilian populations increased significantly. We have previously investigated the effects of single BOP exposures at different peak pressures. In this study, we examined the effects of repeated exposure to a low-level BOP and whether the number of exposures or time after exposure would alter the injury outcome. We exposed deeply anesthetized rats to simulated BOP at 62 +/- 2 kPa peak pressure. The lungs were examined immediately after one exposure (1 + 0), or 1 h after one (1 + 1), two (2 + 1), or three (3 + 1) consecutive exposures at 3-min interval. In one group of animals, we examined the effects of repeated exposure on lung weight, methemoglobin, transferrin, antioxidants, and lipid peroxidation. In a second group, the lungs were fixed inflated at 25 cm water, sectioned, and examined histologically after one to three repeated exposures, or after one exposure at 1, 6, and 24 h. We found that single BOP exposure causes notable changes after 1 h, and that repeating BOP exposure did not add markedly to the effect of the first one. However, the effects increased significantly with time from 1 to 24 h. These observations have biological and occupational implications, and emphasize the need for protection from low-level BOP, and for prompt treatment within the first hour following BOP exposure. PMID:17060374

  16. 77 FR 58416 - Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Spent Ion Exchange Resins From Commercial Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste Spent Ion Exchange Resins from... Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste Spent...

  17. 18th U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference. Program

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-20

    This conference explored the latest developments in low-level radioactive waste management through presentations from professionals in both the public and the private sectors and special guests. The conference included two continuing education seminars, a workshop, exhibits, and a tour of Envirocare of Utah, Inc., one of America's three commercial low-level radioactive waste depositories.

  18. 77 FR 25760 - Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management and Volume Reduction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... COMMISSION Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management and Volume Reduction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Commission) is revising its 1981 Policy Statement on Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) Volume Reduction... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In 1981, the NRC published a Policy Statement (46 FR 51100; October...

  19. 76 FR 20840 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of the Low Level Laser...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... Devices; Classification of the Low Level Laser System for Aesthetic Use AGENCY: Food and Drug... level laser system for aesthetic use into class II (special controls). The special control(s) that will apply to the device is entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Low Level Laser...

  20. Nobody Wants It So Why Is It There? Towards an Understanding of Low-Level Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Geoff

    2004-01-01

    This article looks in some detail at the transcript of a mathematics lesson in exploring the nature of low-level disruption in schools. This is preceded by a brief theoretical overview of behavioural issues, aimed at giving a context for the consideration of low-level disruption. The discussion of the issues arising from the analysis of the…

  1. Simulation of the great plains low-level jet and associated clouds by general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, S.J.; Bian, X.; Corsetti, L.

    1996-07-01

    The low-level jet frequently observed in the Great Plains of the United States forms preferentially at night and apparently influences the timing of the thunderstorms in the region. The authors have found that both the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts general circulation model and the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model simulate the low-level jet rather well, although the spatial distribution of the jet frequency simulated by the two GCM`s differ considerably. Sensitivity experiments have demonstrated that the simulated low-level jet is surprisingly robust, with similar simulations at much coarser horizontal and vertical resolutions. However, both GCM`s fail to simulate the observed relationship between clouds and the low-level jet. The pronounced nocturnal maximum in thunderstorm frequency associated with the low-level jet is not simulated well by either GCM, with only weak evidence of a nocturnal maximum in the Great Plains. 36 refs., 20 figs.

  2. Preferential flow and solute transport in a large lysimeter, under controlled boundary conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, R.; Gaudet, J. P.; Bariac, T.

    1999-02-01

    Laboratory studies of solute transport in soils (soil columns) are not totally representative of field conditions (spatial variability, soil structure etc.). Field studies hardly allow quantification of fluxes and mechanisms. In this article, and intermediate approach is suggested, using a lysimeter (1.7 m 3) of an almost undisturbed soil, with controlled boundary conditions, the aim being to be able to quantify fluxes and mechanisms at a scale closer to field conditions, thus yielding results that better depict reality. Two experiments, with constant water fluxes of 1.05 and 1.48 mm h -1 were conducted. Solutes were introduced as concentration pulses. Species 2H 2O, C1 - and Br - were used as tracers, and K +, NH 4+, NO 3-, atrazine as interactive and/or reactive solutes. Elution curves were analyzed by the method of moments. Results show that about 20% of the water are immobile. As a consequence of anion exclusion, anion tracers appear at the outlet with an advance of about 10% in time as compared to isotopic tracers. The added NH 4+is mostly nitrified, and K + undergoes cation exchange with Ca 2+ and Mg 2+. Under our experimental conditions, leaching of atrazine is significant with low degradation. A third experiment was conducted, in which the flow was interrupted while the solute peak was within the lysimeter, and 400 soil samples were extracted from the lysimeter. Soil-water content distributions exhibit coefficients of variation within layers between 5% and 27%. Concentration distributions exhibit coefficients of variation within layers between 22% and 59%. There is no correlation between concentration and water content. The observed spatial variability suggests the occurrence of preferential flow. Concentrations in suction cups were 55%-136% of those measured in corresponding soil samples.

  3. Design, manufacture and evaluation of a hydraulically installed, multi-sampling lysimeter. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scroppo, J.A.; Scroppo, G.L.; Carty, R.H.; Chaimberg, M.; Timmons, R.D.; O`Donnell, M.

    1992-06-01

    There is a need for a quick, simple, reliable, and inexpensive on-site method for sampling soil pollutants before they reach the groundwater. Vadose zone monitoring is an important aspect of sound groundwater management. In the vadose zone, where water moves via percolation, this water medium possesses the ability to transfer hazardous wastes to the nation`s groundwater system. Obtaining samples of moisture and contaminants from the vadose zone is necessary if potential problems are to be identified before they reach the water table. Accurate determination of spatial distribution, movement, and concentrations of contaminants is essential to the selection of remediation technologies. There is a need for three-dimentional subsurface characterization technologies to identify the location of hazardous plumes and their migration. Current subsurface characterization methods for dispersed contaminants primarily involve a time consuming, expensive process for drilling wells and taking samples. With no major water flow in the vadose zone, conventional monitoring wells will not function as designed. The multi-sampling lysimeter can be readily linked with physical and chemical sensors for on-site screening. The hydraulically-installed suction lysimeter was capable of extracting soil pore liquid samples from unsaturated test soils without the need to predrill a well. Test results verified that the lysimeters installed with a hydraulic or mechanical ram were able to collect soil pore liquid samples in excess of the amount typically required for monitoring and analysis on a daily basis. Modifications to the prototype design eliminated moving parts and the need for inflatable packers. The elimination of the packer system and the use of porous nickel contributed to increased system ruggedness.

  4. Evaluation of the Transport of Natural Radioactive Materials in Large Lysimeters Using Hydrus-1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontedeiro, E.; Cipriani, M.; van Genuchten, M.; Simunek, J.

    2007-12-01

    The mining industry in Brazil often uses raw materials that contain relatively high concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive materials (referred to as NORM). Ores of relatively low grade typically are used to produce refined metals of high purity (e.g., Nb, Ta, Sn, and Au) using pyrometallurgic processes. The final waste is a slag rich in natural radioactive contaminants (the U and Th decay series), which are then usually deposited in industrial landfills. To study the long-term fate and transport of radionuclides leached from the NORM wastes, several large (3 m deep) lysimeters were constructed at the Pocos de Caldas Laboratory of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commision (CNEN). The lysimeters were packed with surface soils and slags from one of the mining sites in South East Brazil. Main purpose of our lysimeter experiments was to follow the dissolution and transport of radionuclides from the slags under natural climatic conditions. Leaching rates and radionuclide concentrations of the effluent were observed during a three-year time period. A variety of physical and chemical properties of the soils and slags (including laboratory batch equilibrium sorption values) were also determined. The data were analyzed using several computer software packages, including the STANMOD code for analytical modeling of decay chain transport during steady flow, the HYDRUS-1D code for variably-saturated flow and the transport of multiple solutes, and the HP1 code for a more comprehensive analysis of the geochemistry involved. In this presentation we describe the experimental setup and provide preliminary results of the theoretical analyses, especially those using HYDRUS-1D.

  5. Non-invasive methods to study flow and transport at the soil core and lysimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, H.

    2004-12-01

    Non-invasive methods offer a great potential to study flow and transport processes at the core to the field and regional scale. In this contribution we will focus on the application of selected techniques such as MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), X-Ray-Tomography (X-RT), MERIT (Magnetic Electrical Resistivity Imaging Technique), GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) and Spectral Induced Polarisation (SIP) at the core to lysimeter scale. MRI is a powerful tool to derive local scale transport parameters. Based on the imaging of the 3-D temporal evolution of the spatial moments of a solute transport in a soil core, the local scale dispersivity of the soil can be derived. We also use MRI to image the root distribution inside a packed soil column. We employ the effect that the transverse relaxation time of water in the porous medium is considerably smaller than in the root tissue of rizinus communis. Different MRI pulse sequences were tested showing that the best contrast is obtainable by the strongly T2* weighted method CISS. X-RT provides information on the structure of the porous media. By parametrizing this structural information we may obtain an improved description of solute transport in undisturbed soil cores. GPR allows to map the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture in large undisturbed lysimeters. Combined with outflow data, this provides unique information to evaluate and improve mathematical models. New developments like MERIT are on their way which additionally exploits the magnetic information inherent in Electrical Resistivity Tomography-experiments to improve the spatial distribution of solute concentrations at lysimeter scale. SIP methods may be used to derive local scale pore size distribution and hydraulic conductivity. The single relaxation times, deduced from a measured phase spectrum either via multi-Cole-Cole-fits or as a whole relaxation time distribution, are a function of the relaxation length, which is connected to pore space

  6. [The modulation of low-level laser on polarization of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages].

    PubMed

    Dai, Chen; Song, Jiwei; Liang, Zhuowen; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Zhe; Hu, Xueyu

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of 810 nm low-level laser of different energy on the polarization of macrophages. Methods The macrophages were isolated from the bone borrow of BALB/c mice and cultured in macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) conditioned cultural medium. The expression of F4/80 was examined by flow cytometry for identification. After lipopolysaccharide-γ interferon (LPS-IFN-γ) induced polarization status in the macrophages, the mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), arginase 1 (Arg1) and CD86 were detected by reverse transcription PCR, and the protein expressions of iNOS and Arg1 were tested by Western blotting. Thereafter, the M1 macrophages were exposed to 810 nm low-level laser of (1, 2, 3, 4) J/cm(2), and then the cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay; the expressions of iNOS and Arg1 were observed by immunofluorescent cytochemical staining; the mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and Arg1 were studied by reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting. Results Flow cytometry showed that the percentage of F4/80 positive cells cultured with M-CSF conditioned medium was 99.9%. The mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and CD86 in macrophages were both significantly raised after induction by LPS-IFN-γ. Compared with the control cells, the viability of M1 cells significantly decreased when the energy of the low-level laser exposure was 4 J/cm(2), while the viability remained unchanged when the energy was 1, 2 or 3 J/cm(2). Immunocytochemistry revealed that the percentage of Arg1 positive cells that represent M2 macrophages was not significantly different from the control group when the irradiation dose was 1 or 2 J/cm(2), however, the Arg1 positive cells significantly increased and the iNOS positive cells that represent M1 macrophages significantly decreased when the irradiation dose was 3 or 4 J/cm(2). When the irradiation dose was 1 or 2 J/cm(2), the mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and Arg1 remained unchanged

  7. Flow through in situ reactors with suction lysimeter sampling capability and methods of using

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Corey W [Idaho Falls, ID; Blackwelder, D Brad [Blackfoot, ID; Hubbell, Joel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-11-17

    An in situ reactor for use in a geological strata includes a liner defining a centrally disposed passageway and a sampling conduit received within the passageway. The sampling conduit may be used to receive a geological speciment derived from geological strata therein and a lysimeter is disposed within the sampling conduit in communication with the geological specimen. Fluid may be added to the geological specimen through the passageway defined by the liner, between an inside surface of the liner and an outside surface of the sampling conduit. A distal portion of the sampling conduit may be in fluid communication with the passageway.

  8. Testing data evaluation strategies for estimating precipitation and actual evaporation from precision lysimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Frederik; Durner, Wolfgang; Fank, Johann; Pütz, Thomas; Wollschläger, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Weighing lysimeters have long been recognized as valuable tools not only for monitoring of groundwater recharge and solute transport, but also for the determination of the soil water balance and quantification of water exchange processes at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. If well embedded into an equally-vegetated environment, they reach a hitherto unprecedented accuracy in estimating precipitation (P) by rain, dew, fog, rime and snow, as well as actual evapotranspiration (ET). At the same time, they largely avoid errors made by traditional micrometeorological instruments, such as the wind error of Hellman rain samplers or the influence of subsurface heterogeneity on readings from in situ instrumentation of soil water state variables. Beginning in 2008, the Helmholtz Association established a network of terrestrial environmental observatories (TERENO) that aim at long-term monitoring of climate and land-use change consequences. A total of 126 identically designed large weighing lysimeters, operating at a sampling frequency of 1 min-1, were installed for this purpose, which raises the demand for standardized data processing methods. In theory, estimating P and ET from these measurements is straightforward: An increase in the combined mass of the soil monolith and the collected seepage water indicates P, while a decrease indicates ET. However, in practice, lysimeter data are prone to numerous sources of error, including, but not limited to, outliers, systematic errors due to plant growth and removal, data gaps, and stochastic fluctuations. The latter pose a particularly challenging problem - if we would directly calculate P and ET from a time-series that is affected by random noise, every positive fluctuation would be interpreted as P and every negative one as ET. Consequently, we would overestimate both quantities by far. The aim of this study was to evaluate algorithms that focus on eliminating the effect of these fluctuations and to estimate actual fluxes

  9. Leaching of soil calcium, magnesium, and potassium in irrigated orchard lysimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, G.H.; Stevenson, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of N fertilizer and grass cover vs. clean cultivation on Ca, Mg, and K leaching were measured and the changes in concentrations of these cations in soil and leaf and fruit tissue of McIntosh apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh were determined. Twelve lysimeters, each containing an Osoyoos sandy loam soil and a single McIntosh apple tree, have been monitored for Ca, Mg, and K concentration of soil, drainage water, and tree leaves and fruit from 1976 to 1980. Lysimeter treatments included factorial combinations of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) and clean cultivation and two N fertilization rates (162 (N1) and 324 kg N ha/sup -1/ year/sup -1/ (N2) as NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/). Clean cultivation had the greatest effect on cation leaching with significantly higher Ca and Mg concentrations and higher Ca, Mg, and K losses frequently measured in drainage from these plots. By 1981, exchangeable Ca, Mg, and soil pH at the 0- to 0.10-m soil depth in the cultivated plots had declined by 4.3 mmol kg/sup -1/, 2.2 mmol kg/sup -1/, and 0.3 units, respectively, relative to the grass plots. Drainage from N2 relative to N1 lysimeters had a significantly higher Mg concentration for 4 years but significantly higher Ca and Mg loss rates in only 1 year because of lack of differences in drainage volumes between N2 and N1 plots. For all lysimeters Ca and Mg leached more rapidly than K. Annual losses over all treatments, 1976 through 1980, average 387 kg Ca ha/sup -1/, 118 kg Mg ha/sup -1/, and 44 kg K ha/sup -1/. Such leaching would eventually lead to enrichment of local soils with K relative to Mg and Ca. This is undesirable since McIntosh trees are susceptible to Mg deficiency and K:Ca antagonism. Therefore, periodic additions of Ca and Mg as through dolomitic liming should be considered for these orchards. Also, K fertilization accelerates existing trends to relative enrichment of these soils with K. 21 references, 5 tables.

  10. Factors associated with low levels of lumbar strength in adolescents in Southern Brazil☆

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Diego Augusto Santos; Gonçalves, Eliane Cristina de Andrade; Grigollo, Leoberto Ricardo; Petroski, Edio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and factors associated with low levels of lumbar strength in adolescents. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study involving 601 adolescents, aged 14 to 17 years, enrolled in public schools in the western region of Santa Catarina State - Southern Brazil. Lumbar strength was analyzed by the lumbar extension test developed by the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology, which proposes different cutoffs for boys and girls. Independent variables were sex, age, socioeconomic status, dietary habits, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and aerobic fitness. For data analysis, univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used, with significance level of 5%. RESULTS: The prevalence of low levels of lumbar strength was 27.3%. The population subgroups most likely to present low levels of lumbar strength were females (OR: 1.54, 95% CI : 1.06 to 2.23), adolescents with low levels of aerobic fitness (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.41 to 3.11) and the overweight (OR: 2.28, 95% CI: 1.35 to 3.81). CONCLUSION: Almost one-third of the studied students have low levels of lumbar strength. Interventions in the school population should be taken with special attention to female adolescents, those with low levels of aerobic fitness, and those with overweight, as these population subgroups were most likely to demostrate low levels of lumbar strength. PMID:25511000

  11. In vivo and in vitro analysis of low level light therapy: a useful therapeutic approach for sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Choi, M; Kim, J E; Cho, K H; Lee, J H

    2013-11-01

    Sensitive skin is a relatively common dermatologic condition and no optimal treatments have been established so far. Low-level laser/light therapy (LLLT) has been used for its biostimulative effect in various clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether low-level laser/light therapy can improve sensitive skin clinically and to evaluate the effects of LLLT on skin in vitro. Twenty-eight patients complaining of sensitive skin were treated with low-level polarized light, and clinical results were evaluated using subjective and objective method. To investigate possible working mechanism of LLLT on skin, cultured human keratinocytes pretreated with nontoxic concentration of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) were used. Cytokines released from irritated keratinocytes after LLLT were analyzed. All patients showed subjective and objective improvement after treatment. No adverse effects were reported. The average number of LLLT sessions required to achieve clinical improvement was 9.9, and cumulative dose of LLLT was 71.3 J/cm(2) on the average. Erythema index decreased significantly after LLLT treatment (p = 0.017). In vitro assay showed that LLLT significantly reduced the release of VEGF from SLS-pretreated keratinocytes (p = 0.021). Our results suggest that LLLT could be a useful and safe treatment modality for sensitive skin, and modification of inflammatory cytokines released from irritated keratinocytes may be considered as one of plausible mechanisms in sensitive skin treated with LLLT.

  12. Geographic factors related to site suitability of low-level waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zittel, H. E.

    Factors related to the site suitability of low level waste disposal sites are discussed including those which might be considered environmental and those dealing with site criteria. Possible population criteria, alternative site selection, transportation criteria, and community involvement are considered. All these factors are based on the premise that the technology exists to carry out low level waste disposal in a manner such that public health and safety can be insured. It is concluded that problems encountered in siting low level waste facilities are largely societal and political in nature.

  13. Environmental Assessment Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, low-level and mixed waste processing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0843, for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level and mixed waste processing. The original proposed action, as reviewed in this EA, was (1) to incinerate INEL`s mixed low-level waste (MLLW) at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF); (2) reduce the volume of INEL generated low-level waste (LLW) through sizing, compaction, and stabilization at the WERF; and (3) to ship INEL LLW to a commercial incinerator for supplemental LLW volume reduction.

  14. Alternative concepts for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal: Conceptual design report. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This conceptual design report is provided by the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Low-Level Waste Management Program to assist states and compact regions in developing new low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities in accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendment Act of 1985. The report provides conceptual designs and evaluations of six widely considered concepts for LLW disposal. These are shallow land disposal (SLD), intermediate depth disposal (IDD), below-ground vaults (BGV), above-ground vaults (AGV), modular concrete canister disposal (MCCD), earth-mounded concrete bunker (EMCB). 40 refs., 45 figs., 77 tabs.

  15. Assessment of neurobehavioral response in humans to low-level volatile organic compound (VOC) sources

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, D.A.

    1991-06-01

    Occupants of sick buildings often complain of CNS symptoms including headache and memory loss, but little objective evidence of neurobehavioral effects exists. Available evidence of neurobehavioral effects of low level VOC exposure representative of new buildings is reviewed. Methods suitable for studying the neurobehavioral effects of low-level VOC exposure--including computerized behavioral tests, balance tests and sensory evoked potentials--are reviewed. The use of computerized behavioral tests in conjunction with symptom questionnaires is recommended for low-level VOC studies.

  16. Thirteenth annual U.S. DOE low-level radioactive waste management conference: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    The 40 papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy`s Thirteenth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference that was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on November 19--21, 1991. General subjects addressed during the conference included: disposal facility design; greater-than-class C low-level waste; public acceptance considerations; waste certification; site characterization; performance assessment; licensing and documentation; emerging low-level waste technologies; waste minimization; mixed waste; tracking and transportation; storage; and regulatory changes. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  17. National low-level waste management program radionuclide report series, Volume 15: Uranium-238

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    This report, Volume 15 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U). The purpose of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the waste disposal facility environment. This report also includes discussions about waste types and forms in which {sup 238}U can be found, and {sup 238}U behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  18. Background information on sources of low-level radionuclide emissions to air

    SciTech Connect

    Corbit, C.D.; Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Stout, L.A.; Corley, J.P.

    1983-09-01

    This report provides a general description and reported emissions for eight low-level radioactive source categories, including facilties that are licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Agreement States, and non-Department of Energy (DOE) federal facilities. The eight categories of low-level radioactive source facilities covered by this report are: research and test reactors, accelerators, the radiopharmaceutical industry, source manufacturers, medical facilities, laboratories, naval shipyards, and low-level commercial waste disposal sites. Under each category five elements are addressed: a general description, a facility and process description, the emission control systems, a site description, and the radionuclides released to air (from routine operations).

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Dissolved Organic Matter Export Under Natural Conditions - A Lysimeter Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaesche, P.; Totsche, K. U.; Koegel-Knabner, I.

    The fate of dissolved and colloidal phase organic matter (DOM) within soils is con- trolled by the release from and the interactions with the immobile solid phase and by the flow regime. While release rate and interaction parameters can well be deter- mined in the laboratory, the effect of the flow regime as a function of the climatological boundary conditions has to be studied in the field. The natural soil hydrological regime shows strong temporal variations, ranging from fast downward flow events to stagna- tion or even reversal of flow direction, according to the amount and distribution of precipitation and evapotranspiration. To assess the risk of DOM-facilitated transport of contaminants through soils, field lysimeter studies offer an appropriate approach to the determination of DOM export rates from soils. As precipitation and thus infiltra- tion show a strong spatial variability, our field experimental site was equipped with 18 natural gradient lysimeters, each of these mounted with a rain collector. Sampling was performed after individual rain events. Analytical procedures comprised measure- ment of turbidity, pH, DOM, EC, UV absorption, temperature, and two low molecular weight organic solutes as reactive tracers. Our results indicate the strong spatial and temporal variability of DOM release and seepage, which are closely related to the meteorological boundary conditions

  20. Transport of Europium Colloids in Vadose Zone Lysimeters at the Semiarid Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ziru; Flury, Markus; Zhang, Z. Fred; Harsh, James B.; Gee, Glendon W.; Strickland, Chris E.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2013-03-05

    The objective of this study was to quantify transport of Eu colloids in the vadose zone at the semiarid Hanford site. Eu-hydroxy-carbonate colloids, Eu(OH)-(CO3), were applied to the surface of field lysimeters, and migration of the colloids through the sediments was monitored using wick samplers. The lysimeters were exposed to natural precipitation (145-231 mm/year) or artificial irrigation (124-348 mm/year). Wick outflow was analyzed for Eu concentrations, supplemented by electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Small amounts of Eu colloids (<1%) were detected in the deepest wick sampler (2.14 m depth) 2.5 months after application and cumulative precipitation of only 20 mm. We observed rapid transport of Eu colloids under both natural precipitation and artificial irrigation; that is, the leading edge of the Eu colloids moved at a velocity of 3 cm/day within the first 2 months after application. Episodic infiltration (e.g., Chinook snowmelt events) caused peaks of Eu in the wick outflow. While a fraction of Eu moved consistent with long-term recharge estimates at the site, the main mass of Eu remained in the top 30 cm of the sediments. This study illustrates that, under field conditions, near-surface colloid mobilization and transport occurred in Hanford sediments.

  1. Transport of europium colloids in vadose zone lysimeters at the semiarid Hanford site.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziru; Flury, Markus; Zhang, Z Fred; Harsh, James B; Gee, Glendon W; Strickland, Chris E; Clayton, Ray E

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify transport of Eu colloids in the vadose zone at the semiarid Hanford site. Eu-hydroxy-carbonate colloids, Eu(OH)(CO3), were applied to the surface of field lysimeters, and migration of the colloids through the sediments was monitored using wick samplers. The lysimeters were exposed to natural precipitation (145-231 mm/year) or artificial irrigation (124-348 mm/year). Wick outflow was analyzed for Eu concentrations, supplemented by electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Small amounts of Eu colloids (<1%) were detected in the deepest wick sampler (2.14 m depth) 2.5 months after application and cumulative precipitation of only 20 mm. We observed rapid transport of Eu colloids under both natural precipitation and artificial irrigation; that is, the leading edge of the Eu colloids moved at a velocity of 3 cm/day within the first 2 months after application. Episodic infiltration (e.g., Chinook snowmelt events) caused peaks of Eu in the wick outflow. While a fraction of Eu moved consistent with long-term recharge estimates at the site, the main mass of Eu remained in the top 30 cm of the sediments. This study illustrates that, under field conditions, near-surface colloid mobilization and transport occurred in Hanford sediments.

  2. Impact of climate change on GHG emissions of (pre-) alpine grassland ecosystems under intensive and extensive management - a climate sequence lysimeter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiese, Ralf; Lu, Haiyan; Fu, Jin; Diaz-Pines, Eugenio; Gasche, Rainer; Dannenmann, Michael; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Due to cool and moist climatic conditions alpine grassland soils of moderate elevation are rich in soil organic carbon and associated nitrogen. In the framework of an in-situ climate change experiment we test the hypothesis that soil organic carbon and nitrogen are either volatilized (GHG emissions) or leached with seepage water due to increase in temperature. Field investigations are carried out in the (Pre-) Alpine TERENO Observatory covering several research sites (including ICOS sites) in South-Bavaria, Germany. IMK-IFU has installed 36 weighable lysimeters with undisturbed intact grassland soil cores (diameter 1m, depth 1.4m) and is operating them at three sites differing in altitude and thus climatic conditions (850m, 750m, 600m) since 2011. Lysimeters were partly translocated from higher elevation to sites at lower elevation and other soil cores still staying at the sites as controls. In addition to the space for time in-situ climate change approach the total of 36 lysimeters are split into treatments of intensive and extensive grassland management. GHG exchange was measured by manual (850m site) but also with two novel automatic robot chamber systems (750m, 600m) connected to QCLs for simultaneous detection of CO2, N2O, and CH4 concentration changes in chamber headspace. GHG flux monitoring was supplemented by NEE measurements with transparent chambers since 2014. Climate change, generally stimulated plant growth (according to biomass sampling after cutting events) and soil C and N turnover leading to increased soil CO2 emissions and an increased uptake of atmospheric CH4. N2O emission were generally low and slightly increased in spring, summer and autumn but significantly decreased during the winter period under global change conditions, the latter due to lower intensity and frequency of frost-thaw events. The main gaseous nitrogen component emitted from the grassland ecosystems was N2 which also showed a much stronger increase with climate change than N2O

  3. Puerto Rico State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The Puerto Rico State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Puerto Rico. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Puerto Rico. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Puerto Rico.

  4. Wisconsin State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The Wisconsin State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Wisconsin. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Wisconsin. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Wisconsin.

  5. Application Of The Thermoluminescent Dosemeters For The Measurement Of Low Level Background

    SciTech Connect

    Stochioiu, Ana I.; Sahagia, Maria C.; Mihai, Felicia S.; Tudor, Ion L.; Lupescu, Henrieta I.

    2007-04-23

    The results obtained in the measurement of the low level radiation background by using a thermoluminescent (TL) system, in a former salt mine, designed to be used as an underground laboratory , are presented.

  6. South Carolina State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The South Carolina State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in South Carolina. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in South Carolina. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as definied by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in South Carolina.

  7. 1994 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This report for calendar year 1994 summarizes the progress that states and compact regions made during the year in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Although events that have occurred in 1995 greatly alter the perspective in terms of storage versus disposal, the purpose of this report is to convey the concerns as evidenced during calendar year 1994. Significant developments occurring in 1995 are briefly outlined in the transmittal letter and will be detailed in the report for calendar year 1995. The report also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1994 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, and is prepared is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985.

  8. New Jersey State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The New Jersey state Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in New Jersey. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in New Jersey. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in New Jersey.

  9. Texas State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The Texas State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactivee waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Texas. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Texas. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Texas.

  10. Proposed low-level radioactive waste handling building at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), evaluating the impacts associated with the proposed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Building at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois. As a result of the high energy physics program at Fermilab, small quantities of low-level radioactive wastes are generated. These wastes are collected, sorted and packaged for shipment to an off-site disposal facility in Hanford, Washington. The proposed project includes the construction of a new building to house, all low-level radioactive waste handling operations. The building would provide workspace for five full-time workers. The proposed project would improve the efficiency and safety of the low-level radioactive waste handling at Fermilab by upgrading equipment and consolidating operations into one facility.

  11. Connecticut State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management

    SciTech Connect

    1981-06-01

    The Connecticut State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Connecticut. The profile is the result of a survey of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees in Connecticut. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Connecticut.

  12. Utah State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The Utah State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Utah. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Utah. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Utah.

  13. North Carolina State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The North Carolina State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in North Carolina. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in North Carolina. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in North Carolina.

  14. Florida State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management

    SciTech Connect

    1981-06-01

    The Florida State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Florida. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Florida. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Florida.

  15. Maine State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The Maine State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and Federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Maine. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Maine. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested partices including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant goverment agencies and activities, all of which may impact management practices in Maine.

  16. Indiana State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Mitter, E.L.; Hume, R.D.; Briggs, H.R.; Feigenbaum, E.D.

    1981-12-24

    The Indiana State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Indiana. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Indiana. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Indiana.

  17. North Dakota State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    The North Dakota State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in North Dakota. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in North Dakota. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in North Dakota.

  18. Massachusetts State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-12

    The Massachusetts State Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist State and Federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Massachusetts. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Massachusetts. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Massachusetts.

  19. South Dakota State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The South Dakota State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in South Dakota. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in South Dakota. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in South Dakota.

  20. Kentucky State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The Kentucky State Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist State and Federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Kentucky. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Kentucky. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Kentucky.